WorldWideScience

Sample records for surveys select samples

  1. Understanding Sample Surveys: Selective Learning about Social Science Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin-Percival, Mary; Johnson, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate differences in what students learn about survey methodology in a class on public opinion presented in two critically different ways: with the inclusion or exclusion of an original research project using a random-digit-dial telephone survey. Using a quasi-experimental design and data obtained from pretests and posttests in two public…

  2. The Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey parent population : I. Sample selection and number counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKean, J. P.; Browne, I. W. A.; Jackson, N. J.; Fassnacht, C. D.; Helbig, P.

    We present the selection of the Jodrell Bank Flat-spectrum (JBF) radio source sample, which is designed to reduce the uncertainties in the Cosmic Lens All-Sky Survey (CLASS) gravitational lensing statistics arising from the lack of knowledge about the parent population luminosity function. From

  3. Sample selection, recruitment and participation rates in health examination surveys in Europe--experience from seven national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jennifer S; Giampaoli, Simona; Goesswald, Antje; Kamtsiuris, Panagiotis; Mann, Charlotte; Männistö, Satu; Morgan, Karen; Shelton, Nicola J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Tolonen, Hanna

    2015-10-05

    Health examination surveys (HESs), carried out in Europe since the 1950's, provide valuable information about the general population's health for health monitoring, policy making, and research. Survey participation rates, important for representativeness, have been falling. International comparisons are hampered by differing exclusion criteria and definitions for non-response. Information was collected about seven national HESs in Europe conducted in 2007-2012. These surveys can be classified into household and individual-based surveys, depending on the sampling frames used. Participation rates of randomly selected adult samples were calculated for four survey modules using standardised definitions and compared by sex, age-group, geographical areas within countries, and over time, where possible. All surveys covered residents not just citizens; three countries excluded those in institutions. In two surveys, physical examinations and blood sample collection were conducted at the participants' home; the others occurred at examination clinics. Recruitment processes varied considerably between surveys. Monetary incentives were used in four surveys. Initial participation rates aged 35-64 were 45% in the Netherlands (phase II), 54% in Germany (new and previous participants combined), 55% in Italy, and 65% in Finland. In Ireland, England and Scotland, household participation rates were 66%, 66% and 63% respectively. Participation rates were generally higher in women and increased with age. Almost all participants attending an examination centre agreed to all modules but surveys conducted in the participants' home had falling responses to each stage. Participation rates in most primate cities were substantially lower than the national average. Age-standardized response rates to blood pressure measurement among those aged 35-64 in Finland, Germany and England fell by 0.7-1.5 percentage points p.a. between 1998-2002 and 2010-2012. Longer trends in some countries show a more

  4. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Schulze, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Hjorth, J.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chary, R.; Cucchiara, A.; Ellis, R.; Fong, W.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gorosabel, J.; Greiner, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kim, S.; Laskar, T.; Levan, A. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Tanvir, N. R.; Thöne, C. C.; Wiersema, K.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (“SHOALS”), a multi-observatory high-redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly deep, multicolor optical/near-IR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without preexisting redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust obscured, and at most 2% originate from z\\gt 5.5. Using this sample, we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z∼ 2.5 and fall by at least an order of magnitude toward low (z = 0) redshift, while declining more gradually toward high (z∼ 7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.

  5. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey. I. Sample Selection and Redshift Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, D. A.; Kruhler, T.; Schulze, S.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Hjorth, J.; Berger, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Chary, R.; Cucchiara, A.; Ellis, R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy Legacy Survey (SHOALS), a multi-observatory high redshift galaxy survey targeting the largest unbiased sample of long-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) hosts yet assembled (119 in total). We describe the motivations of the survey and the development of our selection criteria, including an assessment of the impact of various observability metrics on the success rate of afterglow-based redshift measurement. We briefly outline our host galaxy observational program, consisting of deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging of every field supplemented by similarly deep, multicolor optical/near-IR photometry, plus spectroscopy of events without preexisting redshifts. Our optimized selection cuts combined with host galaxy follow-up have so far enabled redshift measurements for 110 targets (92%) and placed upper limits on all but one of the remainder. About 20% of GRBs in the sample are heavily dust obscured, and at most 2% originate from z > 5.5. Using this sample, we estimate the redshift-dependent GRB rate density, showing it to peak at z approx. 2.5 and fall by at least an order of magnitude toward low (z = 0) redshift, while declining more gradually toward high (z approx. 7) redshift. This behavior is consistent with a progenitor whose formation efficiency varies modestly over cosmic history. Our survey will permit the most detailed examination to date of the connection between the GRB host population and general star-forming galaxies, directly measure evolution in the host population over cosmic time and discern its causes, and provide new constraints on the fraction of cosmic star formation occurring in undetectable galaxies at all redshifts.

  6. Does self-selection affect samples' representativeness in online surveys? An investigation in online video game research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaal, Yasser; van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne; Achab, Sophia; Zullino, Daniele; Rothen, Stephane; Khan, Riaz; Billieux, Joel; Thorens, Gabriel

    2014-07-07

    The number of medical studies performed through online surveys has increased dramatically in recent years. Despite their numerous advantages (eg, sample size, facilitated access to individuals presenting stigmatizing issues), selection bias may exist in online surveys. However, evidence on the representativeness of self-selected samples in online studies is patchy. Our objective was to explore the representativeness of a self-selected sample of online gamers using online players' virtual characters (avatars). All avatars belonged to individuals playing World of Warcraft (WoW), currently the most widely used online game. Avatars' characteristics were defined using various games' scores, reported on the WoW's official website, and two self-selected samples from previous studies were compared with a randomly selected sample of avatars. We used scores linked to 1240 avatars (762 from the self-selected samples and 478 from the random sample). The two self-selected samples of avatars had higher scores on most of the assessed variables (except for guild membership and exploration). Furthermore, some guilds were overrepresented in the self-selected samples. Our results suggest that more proficient players or players more involved in the game may be more likely to participate in online surveys. Caution is needed in the interpretation of studies based on online surveys that used a self-selection recruitment procedure. Epidemiological evidence on the reduced representativeness of sample of online surveys is warranted.

  7. Sampling methodology and site selection in the National Eye Health Survey: an Australian population-based prevalence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Joshua; Keel, Stuart; Dunn, Ross; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Taylor, Hugh R; Dirani, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents the sampling methodology of the National Eye Health Survey that aimed to determine the prevalence of vision impairment and blindness in Australia. The National Eye Health Survey is a cross-sectional population-based survey. Indigenous Australians aged 40 years and older and non-Indigenous Australians aged 50 years and older residing in all levels of geographic remoteness in Australia. Using multistage, random-cluster sampling, 30 geographic areas were selected to provide samples of 3000 non-Indigenous Australians and 1400 Indigenous Australians. Sampling involved (i) selecting Statistical Area- Level 2 sites, stratified by remoteness; (ii) selecting Statistical Area- Level 1 sites within Statistical Area- Level 2 sites to provide targeted samples; and (iii) grouping of contiguous Statistical Area- Level 1 sites or replacing Statistical Area- Level 1 sites to provide sufficient samples. The main outcome measures involved Sites sites selected and participants sampled in the survey. Thirty sites were generated, including 12 Major City sites, 6 Inner Regional sites, 6 Outer Regional sites, 4 Remote sites and 2 Very Remote sites. Three thousand ninety-eight non-Indigenous participants and 1738 Indigenous participants were recruited. Selection of Statistical Area- Level 1 site overestimated the number of eligible residents in all sites. About 20% (6/30) of Statistical Area- Level 1 sites were situated in non-residential bushland, and 26.67% (8/30) of Statistical Area- Level 1 populations had low eligibility or accessibility, requiring replacement. Representative samples of Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians were selected, recruited and tested, providing the first national data on the prevalence of vision impairment and blindness in Australia. © 2016 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  8. Keck DEIMOS Spectroscopy of a GALEX UV-Selected Sample from the Medium Imaging Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Ryan P.; Rich, R. Michael; Salim, Samir; Small, Todd; Charlot, Stephane; Seibert, Mark; Wyder, Ted; Barlow, Tom A.; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Martin, D. Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, José; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alex S.; Welsh, Barry Y.; Yi, Sukyoung

    2007-12-01

    We report results from a pilot program to obtain spectroscopy for objects detected in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Medium Imaging Survey (MIS). Our study examines the properties of galaxies detected by GALEX fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic survey. This is the first study to extend the techniques of Salim and coworkers to estimate stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and the b (star formation history) parameter for star-forming galaxies out to z~0.7. We obtain redshifts for 50 GALEX MIS sources reaching NUV=23.9 (AB mag) having counterparts in the SDSS Data Release 4 (DR4). Of our sample, 43 are star-forming galaxies with z1 are QSOs, 3 of which are not previously cataloged. We compare our sample to a much larger sample of ~50,000 matched GALEX/SDSS galaxies with SDSS spectroscopy; while our survey is shallow, the optical counterparts to our sources reach ~3 mag fainter in SDSS r than the SDSS spectroscopic sample. We use emission-line diagnostics for the galaxies to determine that the sample contains mostly star-forming galaxies. The galaxies in the sample populate the blue sequence in the NUV-r versus Mr color-magnitude diagram. The derived stellar masses of the galaxies range from 108 to 1011 Msolar, and derived SFRs are between 10-1 and 102 Msolar yr-1. Our sample has SFRs, luminosities, and velocity dispersions that are similar to the samples of faint compact blue galaxies studied previously in the same redshift range by Koo and collaborators, Guzmán and collaborators, and Phillips and collaborators. However, our sample is ~2 mag fainter in surface brightness than the compact blue galaxies. We find that the star formation histories for a majority of the galaxies are consistent with a recent starburst within the last 100 Myr. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of

  9. Collecting Genetic Samples in Population Wide (Panel) Surveys: Feasibility, Nonresponse and Selectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Schonlau; Martin Reuter; Juergen Schupp; Christian Montag; Bernd Weber; Thomas Dohmen; Nico A. Siegel; Uwe Sunde; Wagner, Gert G.; Armin Falk

    2010-01-01

    "Collecting biomarkers as part of general purpose surveys offers scientists - and social scientists in particular - the ability to study biosocial phenomena, e.g. the relation between genes and human behavior. The authors explore the feasibility of collecting buccal cells for genetic analyses with normal interviewers as part of a pretest for the German Socio-economic Panel Study (SOEP) using a probability sample. They introduce a new non-invasive technique for collecting cell material for gen...

  10. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. I. A Large Spectroscopically Selected Sample of Massive Early-Type Lens Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    The Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey is an efficient Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Snapshot imaging survey for new galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses. The targeted lens candidates are selected spectroscopically from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database of galaxy spectra for having multiple nebular emission lines at a redshift significantly higher than that of the SDSS target galaxy. The SLACS survey is optimized to detect bright early-type lens galaxies with faint lensed sources in order to increase the sample of known gravitational lenses suitable for detailed lensing, photometric, and dynamical modeling. In this paper, the first in a series on the current results of our HST Cycle 13 imaging survey, we present a catalog of 19 newly discovered gravitational lenses, along with nine other observed candidate systems that are either possible lenses, nonlenses, or nondetections. The survey efficiency is thus >=68%. We also present Gemini 8 m and Magellan 6.5 m integral-field spectroscopic data for nine of the SLACS targets, which further support the lensing interpretation. A new method for the effective subtraction of foreground galaxy images to reveal faint background features is presented. We show that the SLACS lens galaxies have colors and ellipticities typical of the spectroscopic parent sample from which they are drawn (SDSS luminous red galaxies and quiescent MAIN sample galaxies), but are somewhat brighter and more centrally concentrated. Several explanations for the latter bias are suggested. The SLACS survey provides the first statistically significant and homogeneously selected sample of bright early-type lens galaxies, furnishing a powerful probe of the structure of early-type galaxies within the half-light radius. The high confirmation rate of lenses in the SLACS survey suggests consideration of spectroscopic lens discovery as an explicit science goal of future spectroscopic galaxy surveys.

  11. A nonparametric approach to the sample selection problem in survey data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vazquez-Alvarez, R.

    2001-01-01

    Responses to economic surveys are usually noisy. Item non-response, as a particular type of censored data, is a common problem for key economic variables such as income and earnings, consumption or accumulated assets. If such non-response is non-random, the consequence can be a bias in the results

  12. Strategic Sample Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Tillio, Alfredo; Ottaviani, Marco; Sørensen, Peter Norman

    2017-01-01

    is double logconvex, as with normal noise. The results are applied to the analysis of strategic sample selection by a biased researcher and extended to the case of uncertain and unanticipated selection. Our theoretical analysis offers applied research a new angle on the problem of selection in empirical......What is the impact of sample selection on the inference payoff of an evaluator testing a simple hypothesis based on the outcome of a location experiment? We show that anticipated selection locally reduces noise dispersion and thus increases informativeness if and only if the noise distribution...

  13. The NuSTAR  Extragalactic Surveys: X-Ray Spectroscopic Analysis of the Bright Hard-band Selected Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappacosta, L.; Comastri, A.; Civano, F.; Puccetti, S.; Fiore, F.; Aird, J.; Del Moro, A.; Lansbury, G. B.; Lanzuisi, G.; Goulding, A.; Mullaney, J. R.; Stern, D.; Ajello, M.; Alexander, D. M.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Chen, C.-T. J.; Farrah, D.; Harrison, F. A.; Gandhi, P.; Lanz, L.; Masini, A.; Marchesi, S.; Ricci, C.; Treister, E.

    2018-02-01

    We discuss the spectral analysis of a sample of 63 active galactic nuclei (AGN) detected above a limiting flux of S(8{--}24 {keV})=7× {10}-14 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 {{cm}}-2 in the multi-tiered NuSTAR extragalactic survey program. The sources span a redshift range z=0{--}2.1 (median =0.58). The spectral analysis is performed over the broad 0.5–24 keV energy range, combining NuSTAR with Chandra and/or XMM-Newton data and employing empirical and physically motivated models. This constitutes the largest sample of AGN selected at > 10 {keV} to be homogeneously spectrally analyzed at these flux levels. We study the distribution of spectral parameters such as photon index, column density ({N}{{H}}), reflection parameter ({\\boldsymbol{R}}), and 10–40 keV luminosity ({L}{{X}}). Heavily obscured ({log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]≥slant 23) and Compton-thick (CT; {log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]≥slant 24) AGN constitute ∼25% (15–17 sources) and ∼2–3% (1–2 sources) of the sample, respectively. The observed {N}{{H}} distribution agrees fairly well with predictions of cosmic X-ray background population-synthesis models (CXBPSM). We estimate the intrinsic fraction of AGN as a function of {N}{{H}}, accounting for the bias against obscured AGN in a flux-selected sample. The fraction of CT AGN relative to {log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]=20{--}24 AGN is poorly constrained, formally in the range 2–56% (90% upper limit of 66%). We derived a fraction (f abs) of obscured AGN ({log}[{N}{{H}}/{{cm}}-2]=22{--}24) as a function of {L}{{X}} in agreement with CXBPSM and previous z< 1 X-ray determinations. Furthermore, f abs at z=0.1{--}0.5 and {log}({L}{{x}}/{erg} {{{s}}}-1)≈ 43.6{--}44.3 agrees with observational measurements/trends obtained over larger redshift intervals. We report a significant anti-correlation of R with {L}{{X}} (confirmed by our companion paper on stacked spectra) with considerable scatter around the median R values.

  14. Modern survey sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, Arijit

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to SamplingAbstract Introduction Concepts of Population, Sample, and SamplingInitial RamificationsAbstract Introduction Sampling Design, Sampling SchemeRandom Numbers and Their Uses in Simple RandomSampling (SRS)Drawing Simple Random Samples with and withoutReplacementEstimation of Mean, Total, Ratio of Totals/Means:Variance and Variance EstimationDetermination of Sample SizesA.2 Appendix to Chapter 2 A.More on Equal Probability Sampling A.Horvitz-Thompson EstimatorA.SufficiencyA.LikelihoodA.Non-Existence Theorem More Intricacies Abstract Introduction Unequal Probability Sampling StrategiesPPS Sampling Exploring Improved WaysAbstract Introduction Stratified Sampling Cluster SamplingMulti-Stage SamplingMulti-Phase Sampling: Ratio and RegressionEstimationviiviii ContentsControlled SamplingModeling Introduction Super-Population ModelingPrediction Approach Model-Assisted Approach Bayesian Methods Spatial SmoothingSampling on Successive Occasions: Panel Rotation Non-Response and Not-at-Homes Weighting Adj...

  15. The Quality and Selectivity of Linking Federal Administrative Records to Respondents and Nonrespondents in a General Population Sample Survey of Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Sakshaug

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Various forms of auxiliary information are being sought to augment survey samples and adjust for possible nonresponse bias in key survey estimates. Auxiliary data options are typically limited in most general population surveys and there are questions concerning their utility for nonresponse bias evaluation and adjustment. Federal administrative databases provide a potentially rich source of auxiliary information for nonresponse purposes, but linking them to general population samples is usually restricted to surveys which draw their samples from population registers containing unique personal identity numbers which can be directly linked to federal databases containing more detailed substantive information. In this article, we examine the quality and selectivity of augmenting a federal administrative database to a general population survey when such a unique personal identifier is not available. We employ a series of standard linkage procedures that rely instead on non-unique and error-prone identifiers collected from the sampling frame to link a federal employment database to a general population survey in Germany. The quality and selectivity of the established links are evaluated using household- and person-level interview data in accordance with German data protection laws. We report a linkage rate of 60 percent for the entire sample under a strict linkage criterion, and 80 percent under a more relaxed criterion. We find that linkage rates vary across some household- and person-level characteristics that are likely specific to the particular administrative database used in this case study. We conclude with a general discussion of the practical implications of this work for survey organizations considering performing similar linkages and highlight some opportunities for future research.

  16. The rise of survey sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlehem, J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is about the history of survey sampling. It describes how sampling became an accepted scientific method. From the first ideas in 1895 it took some 50 years before the principles of probability sampling were widely accepted. This papers has a focus on developments in official statistics in

  17. Improving the sampling strategy of the Joint Danube Survey 3 (2013) by means of multivariate statistical techniques applied on selected physico-chemical and biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamchevici, Carmen; Udrea, Ion

    2013-11-01

    The concept of basin-wide Joint Danube Survey (JDS) was launched by the International Commission for the Protection of the Danube River (ICPDR) as a tool for investigative monitoring under the Water Framework Directive (WFD), with a frequency of 6 years. The first JDS was carried out in 2001 and its success in providing key information for characterisation of the Danube River Basin District as required by WFD lead to the organisation of the second JDS in 2007, which was the world's biggest river research expedition in that year. The present paper presents an approach for improving the survey strategy for the next planned survey JDS3 (2013) by means of several multivariate statistical techniques. In order to design the optimum structure in terms of parameters and sampling sites, principal component analysis (PCA), factor analysis (FA) and cluster analysis were applied on JDS2 data for 13 selected physico-chemical and one biological element measured in 78 sampling sites located on the main course of the Danube. Results from PCA/FA showed that most of the dataset variance (above 75%) was explained by five varifactors loaded with 8 out of 14 variables: physical (transparency and total suspended solids), relevant nutrients (N-nitrates and P-orthophosphates), feedback effects of primary production (pH, alkalinity and dissolved oxygen) and algal biomass. Taking into account the representation of the factor scores given by FA versus sampling sites and the major groups generated by the clustering procedure, the spatial network of the next survey could be carefully tailored, leading to a decreasing of sampling sites by more than 30%. The approach of target oriented sampling strategy based on the selected multivariate statistics can provide a strong reduction in dimensionality of the original data and corresponding costs as well, without any loss of information.

  18. A sample of ultra steep spectrum sources selected from the Westerbork In the Southern Hemisphere (WISH) survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breuck, C de; Tang, Y.; Bruyn, A. G. de; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Breugel, W.van

    2002-01-01

    The 352 MHz Westerbork In the Southern Hemisphere (WISH) survey is the southern extension of the WENSS, covering 1.60 sr between -9degrees <δ <-26degrees to a limiting flux density of similar to18 mJy (5sigma). Due to the very low elevation of the observations, the survey has a much lower resolution

  19. Mahalanobis' Contributions to Sample Surveys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    has more than 60 research publications in various journals and is a Member of the International. Statistical Institute. Rao is on the Governing Council of the National Sample. Survey Organisation and is the Managing Editor of. Sankhya, Series B as well as a coeditor. ______ LAA~AA< ______ __. RESONANCE I June 1999.

  20. National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) Download makes data from the survey readily available to users in a one-stop download. The Survey has been...

  1. Household sampling in slums in surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Maria Cecilia Goi Porto; Morais, Maria de Lima Salum E; Escuder, Maria Mercedes Loureiro; Goldbaum, Moisés; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo; Cesar, Chester Luiz Galvão; Carandina, Luana

    2011-12-01

    To identify the advantages and disadvantages of using segments compared to a complete address list, for the selection of households in a multistage cluster sampling in slums. A qualitative study was performed in four slums selected by the São Paulo Municipal Health Survey of 2008, and the two selection techniques were applied. Focal groups were performed with field researchers, including the persons making the list of addresses and the interviewers. The content of the conversations were analyzed, grouped in categories and organized in themes. Use of household segments was associated with several advantages and few disadvantages. The advantages included: speed and facility in developing the sampling frame and in locating and identifying households when performing interviews, increased safety for interviewers and the population, greater access to interviewees, greater stability and coverage of the frame, and fewer errors in the identification of selected households. The construction of a household registry by creation of segments is advantageous compared to the complete listing of addresses, when undertaken in slums. Due to its economy and ease, the technique is an option for simplifying the sampling process in areas characterized by high density and disorganized housing.

  2. Statistical Literacy and Sample Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In…

  3. Stratified random sampling plan for an irrigation customer telephone survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, J.W.; Davis, L.J.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the procedures used to design and select a sample for a telephone survey of individuals who use electricity in irrigating agricultural cropland in the Pacific Northwest. The survey is intended to gather information on the irrigated agricultural sector that will be useful for conservation assessment, load forecasting, rate design, and other regional power planning activities.

  4. Statistical literacy and sample survey results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In general, they fare no better than managers who have never studied statistics. There are implications for teaching, especially in business schools, as well as for consulting.

  5. Variable selection and estimation for longitudinal survey data

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Li

    2014-09-01

    There is wide interest in studying longitudinal surveys where sample subjects are observed successively over time. Longitudinal surveys have been used in many areas today, for example, in the health and social sciences, to explore relationships or to identify significant variables in regression settings. This paper develops a general strategy for the model selection problem in longitudinal sample surveys. A survey weighted penalized estimating equation approach is proposed to select significant variables and estimate the coefficients simultaneously. The proposed estimators are design consistent and perform as well as the oracle procedure when the correct submodel was known. The estimating function bootstrap is applied to obtain the standard errors of the estimated parameters with good accuracy. A fast and efficient variable selection algorithm is developed to identify significant variables for complex longitudinal survey data. Simulated examples are illustrated to show the usefulness of the proposed methodology under various model settings and sampling designs. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  6. Research Note Pilot survey to assess sample size for herbaceous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot survey to determine sub-sample size (number of point observations per plot) for herbaceous species composition assessments, using a wheel-point apparatus applying the nearest-plant method, was conducted. Three plots differing in species composition on the Zululand coastal plain were selected, and on each plot ...

  7. The quality of sample surveys in a developing nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Bourne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Paul A Bourne1, Christopher AD Charles2,3, Neva South-Bourne4, Chloe Morris1, Denise Eldemire-Shearer1, Maureen D Kerr-Campbell51Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica; 2King Graduate School, Monroe College, Bronx, New York, USA; 3Center for Victim Support, Harlem Hospital Center, New York, USA; 4Research assistant for Paul A Bourne; 5Systems Development Unit, Main Library, Faculty of Humanities and Education, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, JamaicaBackground: In Jamaica, population census began in 1844, and many intercensal ratios obtained from the census data showed that there is a general high degree of accuracy of the data. However, statistics from the Jamaican Ministry of Health showed that there are inaccuracies in health data collected from males using sample surveys.Objectives: The objectives of the present research are to 1 investigate the accuracy of a national sample survey, 2 explore the feasibility and quality of using a subnational sample survey to represent a national survey, 3 aid other scholars in understanding the probability of using national sample surveys and subnational sample surveys, 4 assess older men’s ­evaluation of their health status, and 5 determine whether dichotomization changes self-evaluated health status.Methods: For the current study, the data used in the analysis were originally collected from 2 different sources: 1 the Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (JSLC and 2 Survey of Older Men (SOM. Cross validation of self-evaluated data of men in Jamaica was done with comparable samples of the complete JSLC data and the SOM data, where men older than 55 years were selected from each sample.Results: In study 1, 50.2% of respondents indicated at least good self-evaluated health status compared with 74.0% in study 2. Statistical associations were found between health status and survey sample (Χ2 [df = 5

  8. Selective Survey of MARC Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockard, Joan

    1971-01-01

    Significant nonduplicative literature on MARC and BNB-MARC is surveyed and characterized. Time lag in publication and the proliferation of ephemera are noted. Two categories of the literature are identified: reports in many formats by individuals and groups associated officially with MARC, and publications of MARC users or observers. (61…

  9. Sampling approaches for extensive surveys in nematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prot, J C; Ferris, H

    1992-12-01

    Extensive surveys of the frequency and abundance of plant-parasitic nematodes over large geographic areas provide useful data of unknown reliability. Time, cost, and logistical constraints may limit the sampling intensity that can be invested at any survey site. We developed a computer program to evaluate the probability of detection and the reliability of population estimates obtained by different strategies for collecting one sample of 10 cores from a field. We used data from two fields that had been sampled systematically and extensively as the basis for our analyses. Our analyses indicate that, at least for those two fields, it is possible to have a high probability of detecting the presence of nematode species and to reliably estimate abundance, with a single 10-core soil sample from a field. When species were rare or not uniformly distributed in a field, the probability of detection and reliability of the population estimate were correlated with the distance between core removal sites. Increasing the prescribed distance between cores resulted in the composite sample representing a wider range of microenvironments in the field.

  10. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    OpenAIRE

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect ...

  11. Relativistic effects on galaxy redshift samples due to target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Ho, Shirley; Zhu, Hongyu; Giusarma, Elena

    2017-10-01

    In a galaxy redshift survey, the objects to be targeted for spectra are selected from a photometrically observed sample. The observed magnitudes and colours of galaxies in this parent sample will be affected by their peculiar velocities, through relativistic Doppler and relativistic beaming effects. In this paper, we compute the resulting expected changes in galaxy photometry. The magnitudes of the relativistic effects are a function of redshift, stellar mass, galaxy velocity and velocity direction. We focus on the CMASS sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), which is selected on the basis of colour and magnitude. We find that 0.10 per cent of the sample (∼585 galaxies) has been scattered into the targeted region of colour-magnitude space by relativistic effects, and conversely 0.09 per cent of the sample (∼532 galaxies) has been scattered out. Observational consequences of these effects include an asymmetry in clustering statistics, which we explore in a companion paper. Here, we compute a set of weights that can be used to remove the effect of modulations introduced into the density field inferred from a galaxy sample. We conclude by investigating the possible effects of these relativistic modulation on large-scale clustering of the galaxy sample.

  12. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  13. Robust inference in sample selection models

    KAUST Repository

    Zhelonkin, Mikhail

    2015-11-20

    The problem of non-random sample selectivity often occurs in practice in many fields. The classical estimators introduced by Heckman are the backbone of the standard statistical analysis of these models. However, these estimators are very sensitive to small deviations from the distributional assumptions which are often not satisfied in practice. We develop a general framework to study the robustness properties of estimators and tests in sample selection models. We derive the influence function and the change-of-variance function of Heckman\\'s two-stage estimator, and we demonstrate the non-robustness of this estimator and its estimated variance to small deviations from the model assumed. We propose a procedure for robustifying the estimator, prove its asymptotic normality and give its asymptotic variance. Both cases with and without an exclusion restriction are covered. This allows us to construct a simple robust alternative to the sample selection bias test. We illustrate the use of our new methodology in an analysis of ambulatory expenditures and we compare the performance of the classical and robust methods in a Monte Carlo simulation study.

  14. Multiwavelength studies of X-ray selected extragalactic sample

    OpenAIRE

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Paronyan, G. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Abrahamyan, H. V.; Gyulzadyan, M. V.

    2015-01-01

    The joint catalogue of Active Galactic Nuclei selected from optical identifications of X-ray sources was created as a combination of two samples: Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (HRC) and Byurakan-Hamburg-ROSAT Catalogue (BHRC). Both are based on optical identifications of X-ray sources from ROSAT catalogues using low-dispersion spectra of Hamburg Quasar Survey (HQS). However, HRC and BHRC contain a number of misidentifications and using the recent optical and multiwavelength (MW) catalogues we have ...

  15. Sample size reduction in groundwater surveys via sparse data assimilation

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Z.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we focus on sparse signal recovery methods for data assimilation in groundwater models. The objective of this work is to exploit the commonly understood spatial sparsity in hydrodynamic models and thereby reduce the number of measurements to image a dynamic groundwater profile. To achieve this we employ a Bayesian compressive sensing framework that lets us adaptively select the next measurement to reduce the estimation error. An extension to the Bayesian compressive sensing framework is also proposed which incorporates the additional model information to estimate system states from even lesser measurements. Instead of using cumulative imaging-like measurements, such as those used in standard compressive sensing, we use sparse binary matrices. This choice of measurements can be interpreted as randomly sampling only a small subset of dug wells at each time step, instead of sampling the entire grid. Therefore, this framework offers groundwater surveyors a significant reduction in surveying effort without compromising the quality of the survey. © 2013 IEEE.

  16. Privacy problems in the small sample selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Cerbara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The side of social research that uses small samples for the production of micro data, today finds some operating difficulties due to the privacy law. The privacy code is a really important and necessary law because it guarantees the Italian citizen’s rights, as already happens in other Countries of the world. However it does not seem appropriate to limit once more the possibilities of the data production of the national centres of research. That possibilities are already moreover compromised due to insufficient founds is a common problem becoming more and more frequent in the research field. It would be necessary, therefore, to include in the law the possibility to use telephonic lists to select samples useful for activities directly of interest and importance to the citizen, such as the collection of the data carried out on the basis of opinion polls by the centres of research of the Italian CNR and some universities.

  17. Sample size estimation and sampling techniques for selecting a representative sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Omair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this article is to provide a general understanding of the concepts of sampling as applied to health-related research. Sample Size Estimation: It is important to select a representative sample in quantitative research in order to be able to generalize the results to the target population. The sample should be of the required sample size and must be selected using an appropriate probability sampling technique. There are many hidden biases which can adversely affect the outcome of the study. Important factors to consider for estimating the sample size include the size of the study population, confidence level, expected proportion of the outcome variable (for categorical variables/standard deviation of the outcome variable (for numerical variables, and the required precision (margin of accuracy from the study. The more the precision required, the greater is the required sample size. Sampling Techniques: The probability sampling techniques applied for health related research include simple random sampling, systematic random sampling, stratified random sampling, cluster sampling, and multistage sampling. These are more recommended than the nonprobability sampling techniques, because the results of the study can be generalized to the target population.

  18. Mineral Composition of Selected Serbian Propolis Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tosic Snezana

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the content of 22 macro- and microelements in ten raw Serbian propolis samples which differ in geographical and botanical origin as well as in polluted agent contents by atomic emission spectrometry with inductively coupled plasma (ICP-OES. The macroelements were more common and present Ca content was the highest while Na content the lowest. Among the studied essential trace elements Fe was the most common element. The levels of toxic elements (Pb, Cd, As and Hg were also analyzed, since they were possible environmental contaminants that could be transferred into propolis products for human consumption. As and Hg were not detected in any of the analyzed samples but a high level of Pb (2.0-9.7 mg/kg was detected and only selected portions of raw propolis could be used to produce natural medicines and dietary supplements for humans. Obtained results were statistically analyzed, and the examined samples showed a wide range of element content.

  19. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison...

  20. Sample frame and related sample design issues for surveys of physicians and physician practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digaetano, Ralph

    2013-09-01

    A sample frame is the listing of the units from which a sample is to be selected. When deciding upon a file to serve as a source for a sample frame for a survey, perhaps the most important consideration is the extent to which the target population will be covered by the frame. However, other issues also come into play such as the accuracy of contact and other information appearing on the file as well as its cost. The American Medical Association Masterfile has long been considered the preferred choice for surveys of physicians, although it does have drawbacks. Here we consider two alternative files, discussing their relative advantages and disadvantages. For surveys of physician practices (or other organizations that employ physicians), there have been no files that are obvious choices to serve as the basis for a sample frame. Here we discuss data collection on physician practices from an analytic perspective and consider how sampling physicians to obtain practice level data may be a desirable approach.

  1. An Introduction to Sample Surveys for Government Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Carol H.; Hatry, Harry P.

    This report is intended to provide government managers with some perspective on the nature and implications of sample surveys, their likely costs, and what can be expected from them. The authors discuss sample surveys less from the technical side than from the perspective of the officials who will make management decisions about an overall survey.…

  2. The selection function of the RAVE survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojno, Jennifer; Kordopatis, Georges; Piffl, Tilmann; Binney, James; Steinmetz, Matthias; Matijevič, Gal; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Sharma, Sanjib; McMillan, Paul; Watson, Fred; Reid, Warren; Kunder, Andrea; Enke, Harry; Grebel, Eva K.; Seabroke, George; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Zwitter, Tomaž; Bienaymé, Olivier; Freeman, Kenneth C.; Gibson, Brad K.; Gilmore, Gerry; Helmi, Amina; Munari, Ulisse; Navarro, Julio F.; Parker, Quentin A.; Siebert, Arnaud

    2017-07-01

    We characterize the selection function of RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) using 2 Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) as our underlying population, which we assume represents all stars that could have potentially been observed. We evaluate the completeness fraction as a function of position, magnitude and colour in two ways: first, on a field-by-field basis, and second, in equal-size areas on the sky. Then, we consider the effect of the RAVE stellar parameter pipeline on the final resulting catalogue, which in principle limits the parameter space over which our selection function is valid. Our final selection function is the product of the completeness fraction and the selection function of the pipeline. We then test if the application of the selection function introduces biases in the derived parameters. To do this, we compare a parent mock catalogue generated using galaxia with a mock-RAVE catalogue where the selection function of RAVE has been applied. We conclude that for stars brighter than I = 12, between 4000 expectations from galaxia.

  3. An Optically Selected Sample of BL Lac Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londish, D. M.; Croom, S. M.; Boyle, B. J.; Sadler, E. M.

    2004-08-01

    BL Lac objects are thought to be the beamed counterparts of FRI/FRII radio galaxies (cf. review by Urry & Padovani 1995, PASP, 107,803); at optical wavelengths these objects are dominated by Doppler boosted, synchrotron radiation, the resultant featureless continuum making BL Lacs all but impossible to target in optical surveys. To date, therefore, all BL Lac samples have been initially identified in radio and/or X-ray surveys, thus these objects are naturally found to be emitters at these frequencies. The first optically selected sample of BL Lac objects was identified from scrutiny of spectra in two redshift surveys (2QZ and 6QZ) using the 2dF and 6dF instruments at Siding Spring, NSW, Australia (Croom et al. 2001, MNRAS, 325, 483; MNRAS, 2004, 349, 1397). Of 52 featureless continuum objects identified, only 14 objects have radio flux densitites > 0.15mJy. Five of these 14 also have detectable X-ray emission. With optical b J magnitudes in the range 16.4 Rector et al. 2000, ApJ, 120, 1626) and the radio-selected 1Jy BL Lac Sample (z=0.6, Stickel et al. 1991, ApJ, 374, 431; Rector & Stocke 2001, AJ, 122,565). This raises the question as to why such X-ray-quiet, radio-quiet BL Lacs (lineless QSOs?) have not been found at lower redshifts, and what mechanisms are responsible for the lack of such detectable X-ray and radio emission in these optically selected BL Lacs. DL acknowledges support from the Science Foundation, University of Sydney.

  4. An efficient sampling strategy for selection of biobank samples using risk scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Jonas; Malmqvist, Ebba; Rylander, Lars; Rignell-Hydbom, Anna

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to suggest a new sample-selection strategy based on risk scores in case-control studies with biobank data. An ongoing Swedish case-control study on fetal exposure to endocrine disruptors and overweight in early childhood was used as the empirical example. Cases were defined as children with a body mass index (BMI) ⩾18 kg/m(2) ( n=545) at four years of age, and controls as children with a BMI of ⩽17 kg/m(2) ( n=4472 available). The risk of being overweight was modelled using logistic regression based on available covariates from the health examination and prior to selecting samples from the biobank. A risk score was estimated for each child and categorised as low (0-5%), medium (6-13%) or high (⩾14%) risk of being overweight. The final risk-score model, with smoking during pregnancy ( p=0.001), birth weight ( poperating characteristic curve of 67% ( n=3945 with complete data). The case group ( n=416) had the following risk-score profile: low (12%), medium (46%) and high risk (43%). Twice as many controls were selected from each risk group, with further matching on sex. Computer simulations showed that the proposed selection strategy with stratification on risk scores yielded consistent improvements in statistical precision. Using risk scores based on available survey or register data as a basis for sample selection may improve possibilities to study heterogeneity of exposure effects in biobank-based studies.

  5. Acceptance sampling using judgmental and randomly selected samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sego, Landon H.; Shulman, Stanley A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Wilson, John E.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Sieber, W. Karl

    2010-09-01

    We present a Bayesian model for acceptance sampling where the population consists of two groups, each with different levels of risk of containing unacceptable items. Expert opinion, or judgment, may be required to distinguish between the high and low-risk groups. Hence, high-risk items are likely to be identifed (and sampled) using expert judgment, while the remaining low-risk items are sampled randomly. We focus on the situation where all observed samples must be acceptable. Consequently, the objective of the statistical inference is to quantify the probability that a large percentage of the unsampled items in the population are also acceptable. We demonstrate that traditional (frequentist) acceptance sampling and simpler Bayesian formulations of the problem are essentially special cases of the proposed model. We explore the properties of the model in detail, and discuss the conditions necessary to ensure that required samples sizes are non-decreasing function of the population size. The method is applicable to a variety of acceptance sampling problems, and, in particular, to environmental sampling where the objective is to demonstrate the safety of reoccupying a remediated facility that has been contaminated with a lethal agent.

  6. Heterogeneous Causal Effects and Sample Selection Bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breen, Richard; Choi, Seongsoo; Holm, Anders

    2015-01-01

    causal effects might vary over individuals or groups. In this paper we point out one of the under-appreciated hazards of seeking to estimate heterogeneous causal effects: conventional selection bias (that is, selection on baseline differences) can easily be mistaken for heterogeneity of causal effects....... This might lead us to find heterogeneous effects when the true effect is homogenous, or to wrongly estimate not only the magnitude but also the sign of heterogeneous effects. We apply a test for the robustness of heterogeneous causal effects in the face of varying degrees and patterns of selection bias...

  7. Determining sample size for tree utilization surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley J. Zarnoch; James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service has conducted many studies to determine what proportion of the timber harvested in the South is actually utilized. This paper describes the statistical methods used to determine required sample sizes for estimating utilization ratios for a required level of precision. The data used are those for 515 hardwood and 1,557...

  8. Sampling Methods for Web and E-mail Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Fricker, RD

    2012-01-01

    London: SAGE Publications. Reprinted from The SAGE Handbook of Online Research Methods, N. Fielding, R.M. Lee and G. Blank, eds., chapter 11, London: SAGE Publications, 195-216. This chapter is a comprehensive overview of sampling methods for web and e-mail (‘Internetbased’) surveys. It reviews the various types of sampling method – both probability and nonprobability – and examines their applicability to Internet-based surveys. Issues related to Internetbased survey samp...

  9. The ATLASGAL survey: The sample of young massive cluster progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csengeri, T.; Bontemps, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Megeath, S. T.; Motte, F.; Sanna, A.; Wienen, M.; Menten, K. M.

    2017-05-01

    Context. The progenitors of high-mass stars and clusters are still challenging to recognise. Only unbiased surveys, sensitive to compact regions of high dust column density, can unambiguously reveal such a small population of particularly massive and cold clumps. Aims: Here we use the ATLASGAL survey to identify a sample of candidate progenitors of massive clusters in the inner Galaxy. Methods: We characterise a flux limited sample of compact sources selected from the ATLASGAL survey. Sensitive mid-infrared data at 21-24μm from the WISE and MIPSGAL surveys were explored to search for embedded objects, and complementary spectroscopic data were used to investigate their stability and their star formation activity. Results: We identify an unbiased sample of infrared-quiet massive clumps in the Galaxy that potentially represent the earliest stages of massive cluster formation. An important fraction of this sample consists of sources that have not been studied in detail before. We first find that clumps hosting more evolved embedded objects and infrared-quiet clumps exhibit similar physical properties in terms of mass and size, suggesting that the sources are not only capable of forming high-mass stars, but likely also follow a single evolutionary track leading to the formation of massive clusters. The majority of the clumps are likely not in virial-equilibrium, suggesting collapse on the clump scale. Conclusions: We identify the precursors of the most massive clusters in the Galaxy within our completeness limit, and argue that these objects are undergoing large-scale collapse. This is in line with the low number of infrared-quiet massive clumps and earlier findings that star formation, in particular for high-mass objects is a fast, dynamic process. We propose a scenario in which massive clumps start to fragment and collapse before their final mass is accumulated indicating that strong self-gravity and global collapse is needed to build up rich clusters and the most

  10. Attitudes towards preconception sex selection: a representative survey from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, E; Hinsch, K-D; Brosig, B; Beutel, M

    2004-12-01

    Within the next parliamentary term, the German government is expected to replace the current Embryo Protection Act with a new Human Reproductive Technology Act. Before introducing new legislation, policy makers may want to survey public attitudes towards novel applications of reproductive technology. In order to assess opinions and concerns about preconception sex selection for non-medical reasons, a social survey has been conducted in Germany. As a representative sample of the German population, 1005 men and women 18 years and older were asked whether or not preconception sex selection should be made available. Of the respondents, 32% held that sex selection should be strictly prohibited, be it for medical or non-medical reasons, and 54% accepted the use of preconception sex selection for medical purposes. Only a minority of 11% approved of the use of preconception sex selection for non-medical reasons. The widespread opposition to a freely available service for non-medical sex selection is based on several claims: 87% of respondents hold that 'children are a gift and deserve to be loved regardless of any characteristics such as beauty, intelligence or sex'; 79% argue that choosing the sex of children is 'playing God'; 76% are opposed because it is seen as 'unnatural'; 49% are afraid that it is 'skewing the natural sex ratio'; and 40% consider it to be 'sexist'.

  11. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. V. The full ACS strong-lens sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Treu, Tommaso; Gavazzi, Raphael; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Wayth, Randall; Schlegel, David J.

    2008-01-01

    We present the definitive data for the full sample of 131 strong gravitational lens candidates observed with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope by the Sloan Lens ACS (SLACS) Survey. All targets were selected for higher redshift emission lines and lower redshift

  12. Raman spectroscopy of selected carbonaceous samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiecinska, Barbara [University of Science and Technology-AGH, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, Krakow (Poland); Suarez-Ruiz, Isabel [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain); Paluszkiewicz, Czeslawa [University of Science and Technology-AGH, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Krakow (Poland); Rodriques, Sandra [Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Dept. de Geologia (Portugal)

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the results of Raman spectra measured on carbonaceous materials ranging from greenschist facies to granulite-facies graphite (Anchimetamorphism and Epimetamorphism zones). Raman spectroscopy has come to be regarded as a more appropriate tool than X-ray diffraction for study of highly ordered carbon materials, including chondritic matter, soot, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and evolved coal samples. This work demonstrates the usefulness of the Raman spectroscopy analysis in determining internal crystallographic structure (disordered lattice, heterogeneity). Moreover, this methodology permits the detection of differences within the meta-anthracite rank, semi-graphite and graphite stages for the samples included in this study. In the first order Raman spectra, the bands located near to c.a. 1350 cm{sup -1} (defects and disorder mode A{sub 1g}) and 1580 cm{sup -1} (in plane E{sub 2g} zone - centre mode) contribute to the characterization and determination of the degree of structural evolution and graphitization of the carbonaceous samples. The data from Raman spectroscopy were compared with parameters obtained by means of structural, chemical and optical microscopic analysis carried out on the same carbonaceous samples. The results revealed some positive and significant relationships, although the use of reflectance as a parameter for following the increase in structural order in natural graphitized samples was subject to limitations. (author)

  13. A two-phase sampling survey for nonresponse and its paradata to correct nonresponse bias in a health surveillance survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, G; Bénézet, L; Geoffroy-Perez, B; Bouyer, J; Guéguen, A

    2017-02-01

    The decline in participation rates in surveys, including epidemiological surveillance surveys, has become a real concern since it may increase nonresponse bias. The aim of this study is to estimate the contribution of a complementary survey among a subsample of nonrespondents, and the additional contribution of paradata in correcting for nonresponse bias in an occupational health surveillance survey. In 2010, 10,000 workers were randomly selected and sent a postal questionnaire. Sociodemographic data were available for the whole sample. After data collection of the questionnaires, a complementary survey among a random subsample of 500 nonrespondents was performed using a questionnaire administered by an interviewer. Paradata were collected for the complete subsample of the complementary survey. Nonresponse bias in the initial sample and in the combined samples were assessed using variables from administrative databases available for the whole sample, not subject to differential measurement errors. Corrected prevalences by reweighting technique were estimated by first using the initial survey alone and then the initial and complementary surveys combined, under several assumptions regarding the missing data process. Results were compared by computing relative errors. The response rates of the initial and complementary surveys were 23.6% and 62.6%, respectively. For the initial and the combined surveys, the relative errors decreased after correction for nonresponse on sociodemographic variables. For the combined surveys without paradata, relative errors decreased compared with the initial survey. The contribution of the paradata was weak. When a complex descriptive survey has a low response rate, a short complementary survey among nonrespondents with a protocol which aims to maximize the response rates, is useful. The contribution of sociodemographic variables in correcting for nonresponse bias is important whereas the additional contribution of paradata in

  14. Sample design for the residential energy consumption survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide detailed information about the multistage area-probability sample design used for the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). It is intended as a technical report, for use by statisticians, to better understand the theory and procedures followed in the creation of the RECS sample frame. For a more cursory overview of the RECS sample design, refer to the appendix entitled ``How the Survey was Conducted,`` which is included in the statistical reports produced for each RECS survey year.

  15. 40 CFR 205.171-3 - Test motorcycle sample selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test motorcycle sample selection. 205... ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Motorcycle Exhaust Systems § 205.171-3 Test motorcycle sample selection. A test motorcycle to be used for selective enforcement audit testing...

  16. A Survey of Archaeological Samples Dated in 1984

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Vagn

    A survey is given of archaeological samples dated in 1984 at the Nordic Laboratory for Thermoluminescence Dating. A total of 79 samples were dated, 49 of which were burnt stones. All results were corrected for fading as measured for samples stored for four weeks at room temperature. The alpha dose...

  17. A Survey of Archaeological Samples Dated in 1985

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, Vagn

    1986-01-01

    A survey is given of archaeological samples received for dating in 1985 at the Nordic Laboratory for Thermoluminescence Dating. A total of 66 samples were dated, 42 of which were burnt stones. All results were corrected for short-term fading as measured for samples stored at room temperature...

  18. Thermal properties of selected cheeses samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika BOŽIKOVÁ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The thermophysical parameters of selected cheeses (processed cheese and half hard cheese are presented in the article. Cheese is a generic term for a diverse group of milk-based food products. Cheese is produced throughout the world in wide-ranging flavors, textures, and forms. Cheese goes during processing through the thermal and mechanical manipulation, so thermal properties are one of the most important. Knowledge about thermal parameters of cheeses could be used in the process of quality evaluation. Based on the presented facts thermal properties of selected cheeses which are produced by Slovak producers were measured. Theoretical part of article contains description of cheese and description of plane source method which was used for thermal parameters detection. Thermophysical parameters as thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity and volume specific heat were measured during the temperature stabilisation. The results are presented as relations of thermophysical parameters to the temperature in temperature range from 13.5°C to 24°C. Every point of graphic relation was obtained as arithmetic average from measured values for the same temperature. Obtained results were statistically processed. Presented graphical relations were chosen according to the results of statistical evaluation and also according to the coefficients of determination for every relation. The results of thermal parameters are in good agreement with values measured by other authors for similar types of cheeses.

  19. The design effect and cluster samples: optimising tuberculosis prevalence surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, B.; Gopi, P. G.; Borgdorff, M. W.; Yamada, N.; Dye, C.

    2008-01-01

    Cross-sectional surveys of disease prevalence, including for tuberculosis (TB), often use a two (or more) stage sampling procedure. By choosing clusters of people randomly from all possible clusters, the logistic costs of doing the survey can be reduced. However, this increases the statistical

  20. A Survey of Blue-Noise Sampling and Its Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Dongming

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we survey recent approaches to blue-noise sampling and discuss their beneficial applications. We discuss the sampling algorithms that use points as sampling primitives and classify the sampling algorithms based on various aspects, e.g., the sampling domain and the type of algorithm. We demonstrate several well-known applications that can be improved by recent blue-noise sampling techniques, as well as some new applications such as dynamic sampling and blue-noise remeshing. © 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  1. Determining the sample size required for a community radon survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Tracy, Bliss L; Zielinski, Jan M; Moir, Deborah

    2008-04-01

    Radon measurements in homes and other buildings have been included in various community health surveys often dealing with only a few hundred randomly sampled households. It would be interesting to know whether such a small sample size can adequately represent the radon distribution in a large community. An analysis of radon measurement data obtained from the Winnipeg case-control study with randomly sampled subsets of different sizes has showed that a sample size of one to several hundred can serve the survey purpose well.

  2. UNLABELED SELECTED SAMPLES IN FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR CLASSIFICATION OF HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES WITH LIMITED TRAINING SAMPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kianisarkaleh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Feature extraction plays a key role in hyperspectral images classification. Using unlabeled samples, often unlimitedly available, unsupervised and semisupervised feature extraction methods show better performance when limited number of training samples exists. This paper illustrates the importance of selecting appropriate unlabeled samples that used in feature extraction methods. Also proposes a new method for unlabeled samples selection using spectral and spatial information. The proposed method has four parts including: PCA, prior classification, posterior classification and sample selection. As hyperspectral image passes these parts, selected unlabeled samples can be used in arbitrary feature extraction methods. The effectiveness of the proposed unlabeled selected samples in unsupervised and semisupervised feature extraction is demonstrated using two real hyperspectral datasets. Results show that through selecting appropriate unlabeled samples, the proposed method can improve the performance of feature extraction methods and increase classification accuracy.

  3. Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: sampling and analysis summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Eagle, R.J.; Stuart, M.L.

    1981-07-23

    A radiological survey was conducted in the Northern Marshall Islands to document reamining external gamma exposures from nuclear tests conducted at Enewetak and Bikini Atolls. An additional program was later included to obtain terrestrial and marine samples for radiological dose assessment for current or potential atoll inhabitants. This report is the first of a series summarizing the results from the terrestrial and marine surveys. The sample collection and processing procedures and the general survey methodology are discussed; a summary of the collected samples and radionuclide analyses is presented. Over 5400 samples were collected from the 12 atolls and 2 islands and prepared for analysis including 3093 soil, 961 vegetation, 153 animal, 965 fish composite samples (average of 30 fish per sample), 101 clam, 50 lagoon water, 15 cistern water, 17 groundwater, and 85 lagoon sediment samples. A complete breakdown by sample type, atoll, and island is given here. The total number of analyses by radionuclide are 8840 for /sup 241/Am, 6569 for /sup 137/Cs, 4535 for /sup 239 +240/Pu, 4431 for /sup 90/Sr, 1146 for /sup 238/Pu, 269 for /sup 241/Pu, and 114 each for /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. A complete breakdown by sample category, atoll or island, and radionuclide is also included.

  4. EFFICIENCY OF RANKED SET SAMPLING IN HORTICULTURAL SURVEYS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Iqbal Jeelani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.12957/cadest.2015.19114 Abstract In this paper, we explore the feasibility of using RSS (Ranked Set Sampling in improving the estimates of the population mean in comparison  to SRS (Simple Random Sampling in Horticultural research. We use an experience developed with a survey of apples in India. The numerical results suggest that RSS procedure results in a substantial reduction of standard errors, and  thus provides more efficient estimates than SRS, in the  specific Horticultural Survey studied, using the same sample size. Then it is recommended as an easy-to-use accurate method to management of this Horticulture problem. Key-words: Ranked Set Sampling, Simple Random Sampling, Standard Error, Accuracy.  

  5. Cosmology and astrophysics from relaxed galaxy clusters - I. Sample selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, Adam B.; Allen, Steven W.; Morris, R. Glenn; Schmidt, Robert W.; von der Linden, Anja; Urban, Ondrej

    2015-05-01

    This is the first in a series of papers studying the astrophysics and cosmology of massive, dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters. Here we present a new, automated method for identifying relaxed clusters based on their morphologies in X-ray imaging data. While broadly similar to others in the literature, the morphological quantities that we measure are specifically designed to provide a fair basis for comparison across a range of data quality and cluster redshifts, to be robust against missing data due to point source masks and gaps between detectors, and to avoid strong assumptions about the cosmological background and cluster masses. Based on three morphological indicators - symmetry, peakiness, and alignment - we develop the symmetry-peakiness-alignment (SPA) criterion for relaxation. This analysis was applied to a large sample of cluster observations from the Chandra and ROSAT archives. Of the 361 clusters which received the SPA treatment, 57 (16 per cent) were subsequently found to be relaxed according to our criterion. We compare our measurements to similar estimators in the literature, as well as projected ellipticity and other image measures, and comment on trends in the relaxed cluster fraction with redshift, temperature, and survey selection method. Code implementing our morphological analysis will be made available on the web (http://www.slac.stanford.edu/amantz/work/morph14/).

  6. Spatial density fluctuations and selection effects in galaxy redshift surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labini, Francesco Sylos [Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Via Panisperna 89 A, Compendio del Viminale, 00184 Rome (Italy); Tekhanovich, Daniil [Faculty of Mathematics and Mechanics, Saint Petersburg State University, Staryj Peterhoff, 198504, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Baryshev, Yurij V., E-mail: Francesco.SylosLabini@roma1.infn.it, E-mail: d.tekhanovich@spbu.ru, E-mail: y.baryshev@spbu.ru [Institute of Astronomy, St.Petersburg State University, Staryj Peterhoff, 198504, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    One of the main problems of observational cosmology is to determine the range in which a reliable measurement of galaxy correlations is possible. This corresponds to determining the shape of the correlation function, its possible evolution with redshift and the size and amplitude of large scale structures. Different selection effects, inevitably entering in any observation, introduce important constraints in the measurement of correlations. In the context of galaxy redshift surveys selection effects can be caused by observational techniques and strategies and by implicit assumptions used in the data analysis. Generally all these effects are taken into account by using pair-counting algorithms to measure two-point correlations. We review these methods stressing that they are based on the a-priori assumption that galaxy distribution is spatially homogeneous inside a given sample. We show that, when this assumption is not satisfied by the data, results of the correlation analysis are affected by finite size effects. In order to quantify these effects, we introduce a new method based on the computation of the gradient of galaxy counts along tiny cylinders. We show, by using artificial homogeneous and inhomogeneous point distributions, that this method identifies redshift dependent selection effects and disentangles them from the presence of large scale density fluctuations. We then apply this new method to several redshift catalogs and we find evidence that galaxy distribution, in those samples where selection effects are small enough, is characterized by power-law correlations with exponent γ=0.9 up to 20 Mpc/h followed by a change of slope that, in the range 20–100 Mpc/h, corresponds to a power-law exponent γ=0.25. Whether a crossover to spatial uniformity occurs at ∼ 100 Mpc/h or larger scales cannot be clarified by the present data.

  7. Incorporating Complex Sample Design Effects When Only Final Survey Weights are Available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Brady T; McCabe, Sean Esteban

    2012-10-01

    This article considers the situation that arises when a survey data producer has collected data from a sample with a complex design (possibly featuring stratification of the population, cluster sampling, and / or unequal probabilities of selection), and for various reasons only provides secondary analysts of those survey data with a final survey weight for each respondent and "average" design effects for survey estimates computed from the data. In general, these "average" design effects, presumably computed by the data producer in a way that fully accounts for all of the complex sampling features, already incorporate possible increases in sampling variance due to the use of the survey weights in estimation. The secondary analyst of the survey data who then 1) uses the provided information to compute weighted estimates, 2) computes design-based standard errors reflecting variance in the weights (using Taylor Series Linearization, for example), and 3) inflates the estimated variances using the "average" design effects provided is applying a "double" adjustment to the standard errors for the effect of weighting on the variance estimates, leading to overly conservative inferences. We propose a simple method for preventing this problem, and provide a Stata program for applying appropriate adjustments to variance estimates in this situation. We illustrate two applications of the method to survey data from the Monitoring the Future (MTF) study, and conclude with suggested directions for future research in this area.

  8. Testing exclusion restrictions and additive separability in sample selection models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Martin; Mellace, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Standard sample selection models with non-randomly censored outcomes assume (i) an exclusion restriction (i.e., a variable affecting selection, but not the outcome) and (ii) additive separability of the errors in the selection process. This paper proposes tests for the joint satisfaction of these......Standard sample selection models with non-randomly censored outcomes assume (i) an exclusion restriction (i.e., a variable affecting selection, but not the outcome) and (ii) additive separability of the errors in the selection process. This paper proposes tests for the joint satisfaction...... of these assumptions by applying the approach of Huber and Mellace (Testing instrument validity for LATE identification based on inequality moment constraints, 2011) (for testing instrument validity under treatment endogeneity) to the sample selection framework. We show that the exclusion restriction and additive...... separability imply two testable inequality constraints that come from both point identifying and bounding the outcome distribution of the subpopulation that is always selected/observed. We apply the tests to two variables for which the exclusion restriction is frequently invoked in female wage regressions: non...

  9. The genealogy of samples in models with selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, C; Krone, S M

    1997-02-01

    We introduce the genealogy of a random sample of genes taken from a large haploid population that evolves according to random reproduction with selection and mutation. Without selection, the genealogy is described by Kingman's well-known coalescent process. In the selective case, the genealogy of the sample is embedded in a graph with a coalescing and branching structure. We describe this graph, called the ancestral selection graph, and point out differences and similarities with Kingman's coalescent. We present simulations for a two-allele model with symmetric mutation in which one of the alleles has a selective advantage over the other. We find that when the allele frequencies in the population are already in equilibrium, then the genealogy does not differ much from the neutral case. This is supported by rigorous results. Furthermore, we describe the ancestral selection graph for other selective models with finitely many selection classes, such as the K-allele models, infinitely-many-alleles models. DNA sequence models, and infinitely-many-sites models, and briefly discuss the diploid case.

  10. Selection of sampling rate for digital control of aircrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, P.; Powell, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    The considerations in selecting the sample rates for digital control of aircrafts are identified and evaluated using the optimal discrete method. A high performance aircraft model which includes a bending mode and wind gusts was studied. The following factors which influence the selection of the sampling rates were identified: (1) the time and roughness response to control inputs; (2) the response to external disturbances; and (3) the sensitivity to variations of parameters. It was found that the time response to a control input and the response to external disturbances limit the selection of the sampling rate. The optimal discrete regulator, the steady state Kalman filter, and the mean response to external disturbances are calculated.

  11. How accurate are self-selection web surveys?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlehem, J.

    2008-01-01

    Due to methodological problems, the quality of the outcomes of web surveys may be seriously affected. This paper addresses one of these problems: self-selection of respondents. Self-selection leads to a lack of representativity and thus to biased estimates. It is shown that the bias of estimators in

  12. A Survey of Job Loss in Selected Communities around ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. This paper reported on a survey of job loss in selected communities around Johannesburg, South Africa. Six communities were purposively selected to participate in this study on the basis of a perceived high incidence of job losses among them as a result of ... They experienced a feeling of lowered self-esteem.

  13. Samples and data accessibility in research biobanks: an explorative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Capocasa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biobanks, which contain human biological samples and/or data, provide a crucial contribution to the progress of biomedical research. However, the effective and efficient use of biobank resources depends on their accessibility. In fact, making bio-resources promptly accessible to everybody may increase the benefits for society. Furthermore, optimizing their use and ensuring their quality will promote scientific creativity and, in general, contribute to the progress of bio-medical research. Although this has become a rather common belief, several laboratories are still secretive and continue to withhold samples and data. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire-based survey in order to investigate sample and data accessibility in research biobanks operating all over the world. The survey involved a total of 46 biobanks. Most of them gave permission to access their samples (95.7% and data (85.4%, but free and unconditioned accessibility seemed not to be common practice. The analysis of the guidelines regarding the accessibility to resources of the biobanks that responded to the survey highlights three issues: (i the request for applicants to explain what they would like to do with the resources requested; (ii the role of funding, public or private, in the establishment of fruitful collaborations between biobanks and research labs; (iii the request of co-authorship in order to give access to their data. These results suggest that economic and academic aspects are involved in determining the extent of sample and data sharing stored in biobanks. As a second step of this study, we investigated the reasons behind the high diversity of requirements to access biobank resources. The analysis of informative answers suggested that the different modalities of resource accessibility seem to be largely influenced by both social context and legislation of the countries where the biobanks operate.

  14. Autonomous site selection and instrument positioning for sample acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A.; Barnes, D.; Pugh, S.

    The European Space Agency Aurora Exploration Program aims to establish a European long-term programme for the exploration of Space, culminating in a human mission to space in the 2030 timeframe. Two flagship missions, namely Mars Sample Return and ExoMars, have been proposed as recognised steps along the way. The Exomars Rover is the first of these flagship missions and includes a rover carrying the Pasteur Payload, a mobile exobiology instrumentation package, and the Beagle 2 arm. The primary objective is the search for evidence of past or present life on mars, but the payload will also study the evolution of the planet and the atmosphere, look for evidence of seismological activity and survey the environment in preparation for future missions. The operation of rovers in unknown environments is complicated, and requires large resources not only on the planet but also in ground based operations. Currently, this can be very labour intensive, and costly, if large teams of scientists and engineers are required to assess mission progress, plan mission scenarios, and construct a sequence of events or goals for uplink. Furthermore, the constraints in communication imposed by the time delay involved over such large distances, and line-of-sight required, make autonomy paramount to mission success, affording the ability to operate in the event of communications outages and be opportunistic with respect to scientific discovery. As part of this drive to reduce mission costs and increase autonomy the Space Robotics group at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth is researching methods of autonomous site selection and instrument positioning, directly applicable to the ExoMars mission. The site selection technique used builds on the geometric reasoning algorithms used previously for localisation and navigation [Shaw 03]. It is proposed that a digital elevation model (DEM) of the local surface, generated during traverse and without interaction from ground based operators, can be

  15. Trivariate Probit with Double Sample Selection: Theory and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Víctor Gerardo Carreón Rodríguez; Jorge L. García García-Menéndez

    2011-01-01

    We develop the trivariate probit model in which the sample incidentally truncates twice —i.e. in the first and in the second equations—, which is not solved in the literature. The model is analogue to the so called Bivariate Probit with Sample Selection (also referred as Bivariate Probit with Partial Partial Observabilty, Censored Probit or Heckman Probit) but in this case there are three equations and two truncations. We also present an application that shows the estimation biases when the i...

  16. XMM-Newton Observations of the DLS Shear-Selected Cluster Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellAntonio, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project continues to be to test the selection effects in cluster surveys by investigating the X-ray properties of the first shear-selected sample of galaxy clusters, the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Because lensing signal is only sensitive to mass (albeit with projection effects), lensing signal can be used to select a sample that is independent of its X-ray properties. If a lensing-selected sample has very different X-ray properties from an X-ray selected sample, it would have important consequences for evolutionary studies based on existing cluster samples was aimed at refining the lensing-selected sample as part of this continuing study The grant supported a KPNO run to obtain data on another region of the sky to extend the cluster sample, and also the purchase of a disk array for archiving the optical mosaic data (Two terabytes worth) from which the lensing maps are derived As a result of the grant, we have extended the lensing cluster sample to another 4-square degree patch of the sky, adding another three clusters to our sample to be observed While the sample of X-ray observed clusters is too small to derive a firm conclusion yet, our preliminary finding is that the X-ray properties of the observed sample do not differ from those of X-ray selected surveys A paper discussing the first results has been published, and a second paper on the mass differences is still in preparation (with J Hughes as first author)

  17. Target Selection for the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; De Lee, Nathan; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Mack, Claude E., III; Dhital, Saurav; Hebb, Leslie; Ge, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We present the target selection process for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. MARVELS is a medium-resolution (R ∼ 11,000) multi-fiber spectrograph capable of obtaining radial velocities for 60 objects at a time in order to find brown dwarfs and giant planets. The survey was configured to target dwarf stars with effective temperatures approximately between 4500 and 6250 K. For the first 2 years MARVELS relied on low-resolution spectroscopic pre-observations to estimate the effective temperature and log (g) for candidate stars and then selected suitable dwarf stars from this pool. Ultimately, the pre-observation spectra proved ineffective at filtering out giant stars; many giants were incorrectly classified as dwarfs, resulting in a giant contamination rate of ∼30% for the first phase of the MARVELS survey. Thereafter, the survey instead applied a reduced proper motion cut to eliminate giants and used the Infrared Flux Method to estimate effective temperatures, using only extant photmetric and proper-motion catalog information. The target selection method introduced here may be useful for other surveys that need to rely on extant catalog data for selection of specific stellar populations.

  18. Sharp Bounds on Causal Effects under Sample Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Martin; Mellace, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    In many empirical problems, the evaluation of treatment effects is complicated by sample selection so that the outcome is only observed for a non-random subpopulation. In the absence of instruments and/or tight parametric assumptions, treatment effects are not point identified, but can be bounded...

  19. 40 CFR 205.57-2 - Test vehicle sample selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test vehicle sample selection. 205.57-2 Section 205.57-2 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT NOISE EMISSION CONTROLS Medium and Heavy Trucks § 205.57-2 Test...

  20. The effect of curriculum sample selection for medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Marieke; Fluit, Cornelia; Fransen, Jaap; Latijnhouwers, Mieke; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Laan, Roland

    2017-03-01

    In the Netherlands, students are admitted to medical school through (1) selection, (2) direct access by high pre-university Grade Point Average (pu-GPA), (3) lottery after being rejected in the selection procedure, or (4) lottery. At Radboud University Medical Center, 2010 was the first year we selected applicants. We designed a procedure based on tasks mimicking the reality of early medical school. Applicants took an online course followed by an on-site exam, resembling courses and exams in early medical school. Based on the exam scores, applicants were selected or rejected. The aim of our study is to determine whether curriculum sample selection explains performance in medical school and is preferable compared to selection based on performance in secondary school. We gathered data on the performance of students of three consecutive cohorts (2010-2012, N = 954). We compared medical school performance (course credits and grade points) of selected students to the three groups admitted in other ways, especially lottery admissions. In regression analyses, we controlled for out of context cognitive performance by adjusting for pu-GPA. Selection-admitted students outperformed lottery-admitted students on most outcome measures, unadjusted as well as adjusted for pu-GPA (p ≤ 0.05). They had higher grade points than non-selected lottery students, both unadjusted and adjusted for pu-GPA (p ≤ 0.025). Adjusted for pu-GPA, selection-admitted students and high-pu-GPA students performed equally. We recommend this selection procedure as it adds to secondary school cognitive performance for the general population of students, is efficient for large numbers of applicants and not labour-intensive.

  1. Improvements in Sample Selection Methods for Image Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Sehn Körting

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditional image classification algorithms are mainly divided into unsupervised and supervised paradigms. In the first paradigm, algorithms are designed to automatically estimate the classes’ distributions in the feature space. The second paradigm depends on the knowledge of a domain expert to identify representative examples from the image to be used for estimating the classification model. Recent improvements in human-computer interaction (HCI enable the construction of more intuitive graphic user interfaces (GUIs to help users obtain desired results. In remote sensing image classification, GUIs still need advancements. In this work, we describe our efforts to develop an improved GUI for selecting the representative samples needed to estimate the classification model. The idea is to identify changes in the common strategies for sample selection to create a user-driven sample selection, which focuses on different views of each sample, and to help domain experts identify explicit classification rules, which is a well-established technique in geographic object-based image analysis (GEOBIA. We also propose the use of the well-known nearest neighbor algorithm to identify similar samples and accelerate the classification.

  2. Using maximum entropy modeling for optimal selection of sampling sites for monitoring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, Thomas J.; Kumar, Sunil; Barnett, David T.; Evangelista, Paul H.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental monitoring programs must efficiently describe state shifts. We propose using maximum entropy modeling to select dissimilar sampling sites to capture environmental variability at low cost, and demonstrate a specific application: sample site selection for the Central Plains domain (453,490 km2) of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON). We relied on four environmental factors: mean annual temperature and precipitation, elevation, and vegetation type. A “sample site” was defined as a 20 km × 20 km area (equal to NEON’s airborne observation platform [AOP] footprint), within which each 1 km2 cell was evaluated for each environmental factor. After each model run, the most environmentally dissimilar site was selected from all potential sample sites. The iterative selection of eight sites captured approximately 80% of the environmental envelope of the domain, an improvement over stratified random sampling and simple random designs for sample site selection. This approach can be widely used for cost-efficient selection of survey and monitoring sites.

  3. Using Maximum Entropy Modeling for Optimal Selection of Sampling Sites for Monitoring Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Evangelista

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Environmental monitoring programs must efficiently describe state shifts. We propose using maximum entropy modeling to select dissimilar sampling sites to capture environmental variability at low cost, and demonstrate a specific application: sample site selection for the Central Plains domain (453,490 km2 of the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON. We relied on four environmental factors: mean annual temperature and precipitation, elevation, and vegetation type. A “sample site” was defined as a 20 km × 20 km area (equal to NEON’s airborne observation platform [AOP] footprint, within which each 1 km2 cell was evaluated for each environmental factor. After each model run, the most environmentally dissimilar site was selected from all potential sample sites. The iterative selection of eight sites captured approximately 80% of the environmental envelope of the domain, an improvement over stratified random sampling and simple random designs for sample site selection. This approach can be widely used for cost-efficient selection of survey and monitoring sites.

  4. Assessing usual dietary intake in complex sample design surveys: the National Dietary Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia dos Santos Barbosa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The National Cancer Institute (NCI method allows the distributions of usual intake of nutrients and foods to be estimated. This method can be used in complex surveys. However, the user must perform additional calculations, such as balanced repeated replication (BRR, in order to obtain standard errors and confidence intervals for the percentiles and mean from the distribution of usual intake. The objective is to highlight adaptations of the NCI method using data from the National Dietary Survey. The application of the NCI method was exemplified analyzing the total energy (kcal and fruit (g intake, comparing estimations of mean and standard deviation that were based on the complex design of the Brazilian survey with those assuming simple random sample. Although means point estimates were similar, estimates of standard error using the complex design increased by up to 60% compared to simple random sample. Thus, for valid estimates of food and energy intake for the population, all of the sampling characteristics of the surveys should be taken into account because when these characteristics are neglected, statistical analysis may produce underestimated standard errors that would compromise the results and the conclusions of the survey.

  5. Stratified sampling using cluster analysis: a sample selection strategy for improved generalizations from experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Elizabeth

    2013-04-01

    An important question in the design of experiments is how to ensure that the findings from the experiment are generalizable to a larger population. This concern with generalizability is particularly important when treatment effects are heterogeneous and when selecting units into the experiment using random sampling is not possible-two conditions commonly met in large-scale educational experiments. This article introduces a model-based balanced-sampling framework for improving generalizations, with a focus on developing methods that are robust to model misspecification. Additionally, the article provides a new method for sample selection within this framework: First units in an inference population are divided into relatively homogenous strata using cluster analysis, and then the sample is selected using distance rankings. In order to demonstrate and evaluate the method, a reanalysis of a completed experiment is conducted. This example compares samples selected using the new method with the actual sample used in the experiment. Results indicate that even under high nonresponse, balance is better on most covariates and that fewer coverage errors result. The article concludes with a discussion of additional benefits and limitations of the method.

  6. Patch-based visual tracking with online representative sample selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Weihua; Yuan, Di; Li, Donghao; Liu, Bin; Xia, Daoxun; Zeng, Wu

    2017-05-01

    Occlusion is one of the most challenging problems in visual object tracking. Recently, a lot of discriminative methods have been proposed to deal with this problem. For the discriminative methods, it is difficult to select the representative samples for the target template updating. In general, the holistic bounding boxes that contain tracked results are selected as the positive samples. However, when the objects are occluded, this simple strategy easily introduces the noises into the training data set and the target template and then leads the tracker to drift away from the target seriously. To address this problem, we propose a robust patch-based visual tracker with online representative sample selection. Different from previous works, we divide the object and the candidates into several patches uniformly and propose a score function to calculate the score of each patch independently. Then, the average score is adopted to determine the optimal candidate. Finally, we utilize the non-negative least square method to find the representative samples, which are used to update the target template. The experimental results on the object tracking benchmark 2013 and on the 13 challenging sequences show that the proposed method is robust to the occlusion and achieves promising results.

  7. Biochemical and nutritional components of selected honey samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Lee Suan; Adnan, Nur Ardawati

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of biochemical (enzymes) and nutritional components in the selected honey samples from Malaysia. The relationship is important to estimate the quality of honey based on the concentration of these nutritious components. Such a study is limited for honey samples from tropical countries with heavy rainfall throughout the year. A number of six honey samples that commonly consumed by local people were collected for the study. Both the biochemical and nutritional components were analysed by using standard methods from Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). Individual monosaccharides, disaccharides and 17 amino acids in honey were determined by using liquid chromatographic method. The results showed that the peroxide activity was positively correlated with moisture content (r = 0.8264), but negatively correlated with carbohydrate content (r = 0.7755) in honey. The chromatographic sugar and free amino acid profiles showed that the honey samples could be clustered based on the type and maturity of honey. Proline explained for 64.9% of the total variance in principle component analysis (PCA). The correlation between honey components and honey quality has been established for the selected honey samples based on their biochemical and nutritional concentrations. PCA results revealed that the ratio of sucrose to maltose could be used to measure honey maturity, whereas proline was the marker compound used to distinguish honey either as floral or honeydew.

  8. Sample selection and taste correlation in discrete choice transport modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mabit, Stefan Lindhard

    2008-01-01

    many issues that deserve attention. This thesis investigates how sample selection can affect estimation of discrete choice models and how taste correlation should be incorporated into applied mixed logit estimation. Sampling in transport modelling is often based on an observed trip. This may cause...... explain counterintuitive results in value of travel time estimation. However, the results also point at the difficulty of finding suitable instruments for the selection mechanism. Taste heterogeneity is another important aspect of discrete choice modelling. Mixed logit models are designed to capture...... observed as well as unobserved heterogeneity in tastes. But just as there are many reasons to expect unobserved heterogeneity, there is no reason to expect these tastes for different things to be independent. This is rarely accounted for in transportation research. Here three separate investigations...

  9. Selecting samples for Mars sample return: Triage by pyrolysis-FTIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Court, Richard W.; Lewis, James M.; Wright, Miriam C.; Gordon, Peter R.

    2013-04-01

    A future Mars Sample Return mission will deliver samples of the red planet to Earth laboratories for detailed analysis. A successful mission will require selection of the best samples that can be used to address the highest priority science objectives including assessment of past habitability and evidence of life. Pyrolysis is a commonly used method for extracting organic information from rocks but is most often coupled with complex analytical steps such as gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is a less resource demanding method that still allows sample characterisation. Here we demonstrate how pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy could be used to triage samples destined to return to Earth, thereby maximising the scientific return from future sample return missions.

  10. What Are Probability Surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) use probability-survey designs to assess the condition of the nation’s waters. In probability surveys (also known as sample-surveys or statistical surveys), sampling sites are selected randomly.

  11. A survey of drug abuse problems among students of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to survey drug abuse problems among students of selected secondary schools in Ile-Ife in Osun State. Specifically, the study was to find out the reasons for drug abuse among students. The major instrument used to collect needed information was the questionnaire which was distributed to ...

  12. The TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS) : Design, Current Status, and Selected Findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Johan; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Sijtsema, Jelle; van Oort, Floor; Raven, Dennis; Veenstra, Rene; Vollebergh, Wilma A M; Verhulst, Frank C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of this study were as follows: to present a concise overview of the sample, outcomes, determinants, non-response and attrition of the ongoing TRacking Adolescents' Individual Lives Survey (TRAILS), which started in 2001; to summarize a selection of recent findings on

  13. Sample Selection in Randomized Experiments: A New Method Using Propensity Score Stratified Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Elizabeth; Hedges, Larry; Vaden-Kiernan, Michael; Borman, Geoffrey; Sullivan, Kate; Caverly, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Randomized experiments are often seen as the "gold standard" for causal research. Despite the fact that experiments use random assignment to treatment conditions, units are seldom selected into the experiment using probability sampling. Very little research on experimental design has focused on how to make generalizations to well-defined…

  14. Selection of patient samples and genes for outcome prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiqing; Li, Jinyan; Wong, Limsoon

    2004-01-01

    Gene expression profiles with clinical outcome data enable monitoring of disease progression and prediction of patient survival at the molecular level. We present a new computational method for outcome prediction. Our idea is to use an informative subset of original training samples. This subset consists of only short-term survivors who died within a short period and long-term survivors who were still alive after a long follow-up time. These extreme training samples yield a clear platform to identify genes whose expression is related to survival. To find relevant genes, we combine two feature selection methods -- entropy measure and Wilcoxon rank sum test -- so that a set of sharp discriminating features are identified. The selected training samples and genes are then integrated by a support vector machine to build a prediction model, by which each validation sample is assigned a survival/relapse risk score for drawing Kaplan-Meier survival curves. We apply this method to two data sets: diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and primary lung adenocarcinoma. In both cases, patients in high and low risk groups stratified by our risk scores are clearly distinguishable. We also compare our risk scores to some clinical factors, such as International Prognostic Index score for DLBCL analysis and tumor stage information for lung adenocarcinoma. Our results indicate that gene expression profiles combined with carefully chosen learning algorithms can predict patient survival for certain diseases.

  15. Effects of the selection function on metallicity trends in spectroscopic surveys of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, G.; Schultheis, M.; Hayden, M.; Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Haywood, M.

    2017-10-01

    Context. Large spectroscopic Galactic surveys imply a selection function in the way they performed their target selection. Aims: We investigate here the effect of the selection function on the metallicity distribution function (MDF) and on the vertical metallicity gradient by studying similar lines of sight using four different spectroscopic surveys (APOGEE, LAMOST, RAVE, and Gaia-ESO), which have different targeting strategies and therefore different selection functions. Methods: We use common fields between the spectroscopic surveys of APOGEE, LAMOST, RAVE (ALR) and APOGEE, RAVE, Gaia-ESO (AGR) and use two stellar population synthesis models, GALAXIA and TRILEGAL, to create mock fields for each survey. We apply the selection function in the form of colour and magnitude cuts of the respective survey to the mock fields to replicate the observed source sample. We make a basic comparison between the models to check which best reproduces the observed sample distribution. We carry out a quantitative comparison between the synthetic MDF from the mock catalogues using both models to understand the effect of the selection function on the MDF and on the vertical metallicity gradient. Results: Using both models, we find a negligible effect of the selection function on the MDF for APOGEE, LAMOST, and RAVE. We find a negligible selection function effect on the vertical metallicity gradients as well, though GALAXIA and TRILEGAL have steeper and shallower slopes, respectively, than the observed gradient. After applying correction terms on the metallicities of RAVE and LAMOST with respect to our reference APOGEE sample, our observed vertical metallicity gradients between the four surveys are consistent within 1σ. We also find consistent gradient for the combined sample of all surveys in ALR and AGR. We estimated a mean vertical metallicity gradient of - 0.241 ± 0.028 dex kpc-1. There is a significant scatter in the estimated gradients in the literature, but our estimates are

  16. Error patterns in children's age reports in retrospective sample surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, S; Becker, S

    1984-12-01

    Age misreporting distorts age distributions as well as affects fertility and mortality estimates in a population. Reported ages in Bangladesh are often inaccurate because respondents do not know their exact ages; ages must be estimated by the interviewer. This paper attempts to validate reports of children's ages in retrospective sample surveys by comparing them to the actual ages recorded in a vital registration system in Matlab Thana, Bangladesh. In 1 of 2 field surveys in 1980, 2076 women aged 15-50 reported on their 3859 living children. 19% of the children's ages were reported within 1 month of their true age. The ages of 34% were overreported, and the ages of 46% were underreported. Incorrect ages were, on average, off by 14 months. Women less than 30 years old correctly reported the ages of 28% of their living children, twice the percentage of women over30 years old. Women with 3 or fewer live births were more likely to report their children's ages correctly than women with more than 3 live births. In general, as a woman grew older and had more children, not only did she report incorrect ages for a higher proportion of her living children, but the errors were largerin magnitude and mostly negative in sign. Correct ages were reported equally often for male and female children. Overstatement of age was more common for children under 5 years old. It was also found that the quality of age data deteriorated significantly with the progress of field work.

  17. Communication problems in Turner syndrome: a sample survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, J; Dhooge, I; Verhoye, K; Derde, K; Curfs, L

    1999-01-01

    Turner syndrome is a condition first recognized in 1938 with an incidence estimated at 1/2500 female births. It is known to result from a missing X chromosome and has as its main features a short stature, ovarian dysgenesis, neck webbing, congenital peripheral lymphedema, coarctation of the aorta, cubitus valgus, dysplastic nails, and pigmented nevi. In addition, psychosocial difficulties including communication disorders may occur. While the physical characteristics of Turner syndrome have been well documented, information on the communication problems in Turner syndrome is scarce. This study reports the results of a sample survey in 128 girls with Turner syndrome ranging in age from 2.4 to 58.8 years. Results are presented on the occurrence and nature of speech and language problems (voice disorders, articulation problems, stuttering, and delayed language development), on the presence of learning disabilities, and on educational history.

  18. Choosing a Cluster Sampling Design for Lot Quality Assurance Sampling Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hund, Lauren; Bedrick, Edward J; Pagano, Marcello

    2015-01-01

    Lot quality assurance sampling (LQAS) surveys are commonly used for monitoring and evaluation in resource-limited settings. Recently several methods have been proposed to combine LQAS with cluster sampling for more timely and cost-effective data collection. For some of these methods, the standard binomial model can be used for constructing decision rules as the clustering can be ignored. For other designs, considered here, clustering is accommodated in the design phase. In this paper, we compare these latter cluster LQAS methodologies and provide recommendations for choosing a cluster LQAS design. We compare technical differences in the three methods and determine situations in which the choice of method results in a substantively different design. We consider two different aspects of the methods: the distributional assumptions and the clustering parameterization. Further, we provide software tools for implementing each method and clarify misconceptions about these designs in the literature. We illustrate the differences in these methods using vaccination and nutrition cluster LQAS surveys as example designs. The cluster methods are not sensitive to the distributional assumptions but can result in substantially different designs (sample sizes) depending on the clustering parameterization. However, none of the clustering parameterizations used in the existing methods appears to be consistent with the observed data, and, consequently, choice between the cluster LQAS methods is not straightforward. Further research should attempt to characterize clustering patterns in specific applications and provide suggestions for best-practice cluster LQAS designs on a setting-specific basis.

  19. [Methodological Aspects of the Sampling Design for the 2015 National Mental Health Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Nelcy; Rodríguez, Viviana Alejandra; Ramírez, Eugenia; Cediel, Sandra; Gil, Fabián; Rondón, Martín Alonso

    2016-12-01

    The WHO has encouraged the development, implementation and evaluation of policies related to mental health all over the world. In Colombia, within this framework and promoted by the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, as well as being supported by Colciencias, the fourth National Mental Health Survey (NMHST) was conducted using a observational cross sectional study. According to the context and following the guidelines and sampling design, a summary of the methodology used for this sampling process is presented. The fourth NMHST used the Homes Master Sample for Studies in Health from the National System of Studies and Population Surveys for Health to calculate its sample. This Master Sample was developed and implemented in the year 2013 by the Ministry of Social Protection. This study included non-institutionalised civilian population divided into four age groups: children 7-11 years, adolescent 12-17 years, 18-44 years and 44 years old or older. The sample size calculation was based on the reported prevalences in other studies for the outcomes of mental disorders, depression, suicide, associated morbidity, and alcohol use. A probabilistic, cluster, stratified and multistage selection process was used. Expansions factors to the total population were calculated. A total of 15,351 completed surveys were collected and were distributed according to the age groups: 2727, 7-11 years, 1754, 12-17 years, 5889, 18-44 years, and 4981, ≥45 years. All the surveys were distributed in five regions: Atlantic, Oriental, Bogotá, Central and Pacific. A sufficient number of surveys were collected in this study to obtain a more precise approximation of the mental problems and disorders at the regional and national level. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of handheld computers with global positioning systems for probability sampling and data entry in household surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Eng, Jodi L; Wolkon, Adam; Frolov, Anatoly S; Terlouw, Dianne J; Eliades, M James; Morgah, Kodjo; Takpa, Vincent; Dare, Aboudou; Sodahlon, Yao K; Doumanou, Yao; Hawley, William A; Hightower, Allen W

    2007-08-01

    We introduce an innovative method that uses personal digital assistants (PDAs) equipped with global positioning system (GPS) units in household surveys to select a probability-based sample and perform PDA-based interviews. Our approach uses PDAs with GPS to rapidly map all households in selected areas, choose a random sample, and navigate back to the sampled households to conduct an interview. We present recent field experience in two large-scale nationally representative household surveys to assess insecticide-treated bed net coverage as part of malaria control efforts in Africa. The successful application of this method resulted in statistically valid samples; quality-controlled data entry; and rapid aggregation, analyses, and availability of preliminary results within days of completing the field work. We propose this method as an alternative to the Expanded Program on Immunization cluster sample method when a fast, statistically valid survey is required in an environment with little census information at the enumeration area level.

  1. Sampling in health geography: reconciling geographical objectives and probabilistic methods. An example of a health survey in Vientiane (Lao PDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bochaton Audrey

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographical objectives and probabilistic methods are difficult to reconcile in a unique health survey. Probabilistic methods focus on individuals to provide estimates of a variable's prevalence with a certain precision, while geographical approaches emphasise the selection of specific areas to study interactions between spatial characteristics and health outcomes. A sample selected from a small number of specific areas creates statistical challenges: the observations are not independent at the local level, and this results in poor statistical validity at the global level. Therefore, it is difficult to construct a sample that is appropriate for both geographical and probability methods. Methods We used a two-stage selection procedure with a first non-random stage of selection of clusters. Instead of randomly selecting clusters, we deliberately chose a group of clusters, which as a whole would contain all the variation in health measures in the population. As there was no health information available before the survey, we selected a priori determinants that can influence the spatial homogeneity of the health characteristics. This method yields a distribution of variables in the sample that closely resembles that in the overall population, something that cannot be guaranteed with randomly-selected clusters, especially if the number of selected clusters is small. In this way, we were able to survey specific areas while minimising design effects and maximising statistical precision. Application We applied this strategy in a health survey carried out in Vientiane, Lao People's Democratic Republic. We selected well-known health determinants with unequal spatial distribution within the city: nationality and literacy. We deliberately selected a combination of clusters whose distribution of nationality and literacy is similar to the distribution in the general population. Conclusion This paper describes the conceptual reasoning behind

  2. Parasitological survey on birds at some selected brazilian zoos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Gonzalez Hofstatter

    Full Text Available A parasitological survey was conducted at some zoos in the states of São Paulo and Paraná, Brazil, from 2009 to 2011. Several groups of birds were surveyed for fecal samples, but the most important was Psittacidae. Among the parasites, Eimeria (coccidian and Capillaria, Ascaridia and Heterakis (nematodes were observed in almost one third of the samples. Presence of a rich parasite fauna associated with captive birds seems to be an effect of captivity, since data on free-ranging birds indicate few or virtually no parasites at all. The discovery of new coccidian species during this survey reveals the need of more research on the subject as even well-known bird species have unknown parasites, but caution must be exercised in order to avoid descriptions of pseudoparasites.

  3. Parasitological survey on birds at some selected brazilian zoos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstatter, Paulo Gonzalez; Guaraldo, Ana Maria Aparecida

    2015-01-01

    A parasitological survey was conducted at some zoos in the states of São Paulo and Paraná, Brazil, from 2009 to 2011. Several groups of birds were surveyed for fecal samples, but the most important was Psittacidae. Among the parasites, Eimeria (coccidian) and Capillaria, Ascaridia and Heterakis (nematodes) were observed in almost one third of the samples. Presence of a rich parasite fauna associated with captive birds seems to be an effect of captivity, since data on free-ranging birds indicate few or virtually no parasites at all. The discovery of new coccidian species during this survey reveals the need of more research on the subject as even well-known bird species have unknown parasites, but caution must be exercised in order to avoid descriptions of pseudoparasites.

  4. CT dose survey in adults: what sample size for what precision?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Stephen [Hopital Ambroise Pare, Department of Radiology, Mons (Belgium); Muylem, Alain van [Hopital Erasme, Department of Pneumology, Brussels (Belgium); Howarth, Nigel [Clinique des Grangettes, Department of Radiology, Chene-Bougeries (Switzerland); Gevenois, Pierre Alain [Hopital Erasme, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Tack, Denis [EpiCURA, Clinique Louis Caty, Department of Radiology, Baudour (Belgium)

    2017-01-15

    To determine variability of volume computed tomographic dose index (CTDIvol) and dose-length product (DLP) data, and propose a minimum sample size to achieve an expected precision. CTDIvol and DLP values of 19,875 consecutive CT acquisitions of abdomen (7268), thorax (3805), lumbar spine (3161), cervical spine (1515) and head (4106) were collected in two centers. Their variabilities were investigated according to sample size (10 to 1000 acquisitions) and patient body weight categories (no weight selection, 67-73 kg and 60-80 kg). The 95 % confidence interval in percentage of their median (CI95/med) value was calculated for increasing sample sizes. We deduced the sample size that set a 95 % CI lower than 10 % of the median (CI95/med ≤ 10 %). Sample size ensuring CI95/med ≤ 10 %, ranged from 15 to 900 depending on the body region and the dose descriptor considered. In sample sizes recommended by regulatory authorities (i.e., from 10-20 patients), mean CTDIvol and DLP of one sample ranged from 0.50 to 2.00 times its actual value extracted from 2000 samples. The sampling error in CTDIvol and DLP means is high in dose surveys based on small samples of patients. Sample size should be increased at least tenfold to decrease this variability. (orig.)

  5. Mate selection preferences: gender differences examined in a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprecher, S; Sullivan, Q; Hatfield, E

    1994-06-01

    Social psychologists have devoted considerable theoretical and empirical attention to studying gender differences in traits desired in a mate. Most of the studies on mate preferences, however, have been conducted with small, nonrepresentative samples. In this study, we analyzed data collected from single adults in a national probability sample, the National Survey of Families and Households. Respondents were asked to consider 12 possible assets or liabilities in a marriage partner and to indicate their willingness to marry someone possessing each of these traits. These data extended previous research by comparing men's and women's mate preferences in a heterogeneous sample of the national population and by comparing gender differences in different sociodemographic groups. The gender differences found in this study were consistent with those secured in previous research (e.g., youth and physical attractiveness were found to be more important for men than for women; earning potential was found to be less important for men than for women) and were quite consistent across age groups and races. However, the various sociodemographic groups differed slightly in the magnitude of gender differences for some of the mate preferences.

  6. Sample selection and preservation techniques for the Mars sample return mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Fun-Dow

    1988-01-01

    It is proposed that a miniaturized electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer be developed as an effective, nondestructivew sample selection and characterization instrument for the Mars Rover Sample Return mission. The ESR instrument can meet rover science payload requirements and yet has the capability and versatility to perform the following in situ Martian sample analyses: (1) detection of active oxygen species, and characterization of Martian surface chemistry and photocatalytic oxidation processes; (2) determination of paramagnetic Fe(3+) in clay silicate minerals, Mn(2+) in carbonates, and ferromagnetic centers of magnetite, maghemite and hematite; (3) search for organic compounds in the form of free radicals in subsoil, and detection of Martian fossil organic matter likely to be associated with carbonate and other sedimentary deposits. The proposed instrument is further detailed.

  7. Important considerations when analyzing health survey data collected using a complex sample design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakshaug, Joseph W; West, Brady T

    2014-01-01

    Researchers often use survey data to answer important public health policy questions. Examples of common data sources used in public health research include the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the National Health Interview Survey, the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, and the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. All these surveys employ a complex sample design to recruit participants into the survey. When performing secondary analyses of complex sample survey data, it is necessary to remind ourselves of the key features of these designs that must be taken into account to produce valid statistical estimates.

  8. A CO survey on a sample of Herschel cold clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, O.; Juvela, M.; Lunttila, T.; Montillaud, J.; Ristorcelli, I.; Zahorecz, S.; Tóth, L. V.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The physical state of cold cloud clumps has a great impact on the process and efficiency of star formation and the masses of the forming stars inside these objects. The sub-millimetre survey of the Planck space observatory and the far-infrared follow-up mapping of the Herschel space telescope provide an unbiased, large sample of these cold objects. Aims: We have observed 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) emission in 35 high-density clumps in 26 Herschel fields sampling different environments in the Galaxy. Here, we aim to derive the physical properties of the objects and estimate their gravitational stability. Methods: The densities and temperatures of the clumps were calculated from both the dust continuum and the molecular line data. Kinematic distances were derived using 13CO(1-0) line velocities to verify previous distance estimates and the sizes and masses of the objects were calculated by fitting 2D Gaussian functions to their optical depth distribution maps on 250 μm. The masses and virial masses were estimated assuming an upper and lower limit on the kinetic temperatures and considering uncertainties due to distance limitations. Results: The derived excitation temperatures are between 8.5-19.5 K, and for most clumps between 10-15 K, while the Herschel-derived dust colour temperatures are more uniform, between 12-16 K. The sizes (0.1-3 pc), 13CO column densities (0.5-44 × 1015 cm-2) and masses (from less than 0.1 M⊙ to more than 1500 M⊙) of the objects all span broad ranges. We provide new kinematic distance estimates, identify gravitationally bound or unbound structures and discuss their nature. Conclusions: The sample contains objects on a wide scale of temperatures, densities and sizes. Eleven gravitationally unbound clumps were found, many of them smaller than 0.3 pc, but large, parsec-scale clouds with a few hundred solar masses appear as well. Colder clumps have generally high column densities but warmer objects appear at both low and higher

  9. THE zCOSMOS-SINFONI PROJECT. I. SAMPLE SELECTION AND NATURAL-SEEING OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, C.; Renzini, A. [INAF-OAPD, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Foerster Schreiber, N. M.; Hicks, E. K. S.; Genzel, R.; Tacconi, L.; Davies, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Cresci, G. [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (OAF), INAF-Firenze, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Peng, Y.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, M.; Oesch, P. [Institute of Astronomy, Department of Physics, Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule, ETH Zurich CH-8093 (Switzerland); Vergani, D.; Pozzetti, L.; Zamorani, G. [INAF-Bologna, Via Ranzani, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Daddi, E. [CEA-Saclay, DSM/DAPNIA/Service d' Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-Sur Yvette Cedex (France); Maraston, C. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, PO1 3HE Portsmouth (United Kingdom); McCracken, H. J. [IAP, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Bouche, N. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Shapiro, K. [Aerospace Research Laboratories, Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, CA 90278 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10

    The zCOSMOS-SINFONI project is aimed at studying the physical and kinematical properties of a sample of massive z {approx} 1.4-2.5 star-forming galaxies, through SINFONI near-infrared integral field spectroscopy (IFS), combined with the multiwavelength information from the zCOSMOS (COSMOS) survey. The project is based on one hour of natural-seeing observations per target, and adaptive optics (AO) follow-up for a major part of the sample, which includes 30 galaxies selected from the zCOSMOS/VIMOS spectroscopic survey. This first paper presents the sample selection, and the global physical characterization of the target galaxies from multicolor photometry, i.e., star formation rate (SFR), stellar mass, age, etc. The H{alpha} integrated properties, such as, flux, velocity dispersion, and size, are derived from the natural-seeing observations, while the follow-up AO observations will be presented in the next paper of this series. Our sample appears to be well representative of star-forming galaxies at z {approx} 2, covering a wide range in mass and SFR. The H{alpha} integrated properties of the 25 H{alpha} detected galaxies are similar to those of other IFS samples at the same redshifts. Good agreement is found among the SFRs derived from H{alpha} luminosity and other diagnostic methods, provided the extinction affecting the H{alpha} luminosity is about twice that affecting the continuum. A preliminary kinematic analysis, based on the maximum observed velocity difference across the source and on the integrated velocity dispersion, indicates that the sample splits nearly 50-50 into rotation-dominated and velocity-dispersion-dominated galaxies, in good agreement with previous surveys.

  10. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: final emission line galaxy target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichoor, A.; Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, Ch; Dawson, K. S.; Percival, W. J.; Dey, A.; Lang, D.; Schlegel, D. J.; Gorgoni, C.; Bautista, J.; Brownstein, J. R.; Mariappan, V.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J. L.; Ross, A. J.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.-B.; Moustakas, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Jullo, E.; Newmann, J. A.; Prada, F.; Zhu, G. B.

    2017-11-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the emission line galaxy (ELG) sample at z ˜ 0.85 for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the g - r versus r - z colour-colour space and a cut on the g-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [O II] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg-2 on the North Galactic Cap and of 240 deg-2 on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50 000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict σ _{D_V}/D_V = 0.023, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at z ˜ 0.85, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.

  11. Sampling dynamics: an alternative to payoff-monotone selection dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berkemer, Rainer

    payoff-monotone nor payoff-positive which has interesting consequences. This can be demonstrated by application to the travelers dilemma, a deliberately constructed social dilemma. The game has just one symmetric Nash equilibrium which is Pareto inefficient. Especially when the travelers have many...... derive a threshold k(m) such that above k(m) the Jacobean of the dynamical system, evaluated for the Nash equilibrium, can only have eigenvalues with negative real parts. One might well argue that for biological systems payoff-monotonicity of selection dynamics should be better preserved. For social......'' of the standard game theory result. Both, analytical tools and agent based simulation are used to investigate the dynamic stability of sampling equilibria in a generalized travelers dilemma. Two parameters are of interest: the number of strategy options (m) available to each traveler and an experience parameter...

  12. Simulating future uncertainty to guide the selection of survey designs for long-term monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Steven L.; Schweiger, E. William; Manier, Daniel J.; Gitzen, Robert A.; Millspaugh, Joshua J.; Cooper, Andrew B.; Licht, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    A goal of environmental monitoring is to provide sound information on the status and trends of natural resources (Messer et al. 1991, Theobald et al. 2007, Fancy et al. 2009). When monitoring observations are acquired by measuring a subset of the population of interest, probability sampling as part of a well-constructed survey design provides the most reliable and legally defensible approach to achieve this goal (Cochran 1977, Olsen et al. 1999, Schreuder et al. 2004; see Chapters 2, 5, 6, 7). Previous works have described the fundamentals of sample surveys (e.g. Hansen et al. 1953, Kish 1965). Interest in survey designs and monitoring over the past 15 years has led to extensive evaluations and new developments of sample selection methods (Stevens and Olsen 2004), of strategies for allocating sample units in space and time (Urquhart et al. 1993, Overton and Stehman 1996, Urquhart and Kincaid 1999), and of estimation (Lesser and Overton 1994, Overton and Stehman 1995) and variance properties (Larsen et al. 1995, Stevens and Olsen 2003) of survey designs. Carefully planned, “scientific” (Chapter 5) survey designs have become a standard in contemporary monitoring of natural resources. Based on our experience with the long-term monitoring program of the US National Park Service (NPS; Fancy et al. 2009; Chapters 16, 22), operational survey designs tend to be selected using the following procedures. For a monitoring indicator (i.e. variable or response), a minimum detectable trend requirement is specified, based on the minimum level of change that would result in meaningful change (e.g. degradation). A probability of detecting this trend (statistical power) and an acceptable level of uncertainty (Type I error; see Chapter 2) within a specified time frame (e.g. 10 years) are specified to ensure timely detection. Explicit statements of the minimum detectable trend, the time frame for detecting the minimum trend, power, and acceptable probability of Type I error (

  13. Hand Surgery Fellowship Selection Criteria: A National Fellowship Director Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco M. Egro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Candidate characteristics for hand surgery fellowship training remains unknown, as very little data is available in the literature. This study aims to provide information on the criteria that are employed to select candidates for the hand surgery fellowship match. Methods A 38-question survey was sent in April 2015 to all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recognized hand surgery fellowship program directors (n=81 involved in the U.S. match. The survey investigated factors used for the selection of applicants, including medical school, residency training, research experience, fellowship interview, and candidate characteristics. A 5-point Likert scale was used to grade 33 factors from “not at all important” (1 to “essential in making my decision” (5; or for five controversial factors from “very negative impact” (1 to “very positive impact in making my decision” (5. Results A total of 52% (42 out of 81 of responses were received from hand surgery fellowship program directors. The most important influential factors were interactions with faculty during interview and visit (4.6±0.6, interpersonal skills (4.6±0.5, overall interview performance in the selection process (4.6±0.6, professionalism and ethics (4.6±0.7, and letters of recommendation from hand surgeons (4.5±0.7. Factors that have a negative impact on the selection process include visa requirement (2.1±1.2, graduate of non-plastic surgery residency program (2.4±1.3, and graduate of a foreign medical school (2.4±1.1. Conclusions This study provides data on hand surgery fellowship directors’ perception on the criteria important for fellowship applicant selection, and showed that interview-related criteria and letters of recommendation are the important factors.

  14. Active Learning to Overcome Sample Selection Bias: Application to Photometric Variable Star Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Joseph W.; Starr, Dan L.; Brink, Henrik; Miller, Adam A.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; James, J. Berian; Long, James P.; Rice, John

    2012-01-01

    Despite the great promise of machine-learning algorithms to classify and predict astrophysical parameters for the vast numbers of astrophysical sources and transients observed in large-scale surveys, the peculiarities of the training data often manifest as strongly biased predictions on the data of interest. Typically, training sets are derived from historical surveys of brighter, more nearby objects than those from more extensive, deeper surveys (testing data). This sample selection bias can cause catastrophic errors in predictions on the testing data because (1) standard assumptions for machine-learned model selection procedures break down and (2) dense regions of testing space might be completely devoid of training data. We explore possible remedies to sample selection bias, including importance weighting, co-training, and active learning (AL). We argue that AL—where the data whose inclusion in the training set would most improve predictions on the testing set are queried for manual follow-up—is an effective approach and is appropriate for many astronomical applications. For a variable star classification problem on a well-studied set of stars from Hipparcos and Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment, AL is the optimal method in terms of error rate on the testing data, beating the off-the-shelf classifier by 3.4% and the other proposed methods by at least 3.0%. To aid with manual labeling of variable stars, we developed a Web interface which allows for easy light curve visualization and querying of external databases. Finally, we apply AL to classify variable stars in the All Sky Automated Survey, finding dramatic improvement in our agreement with the ASAS Catalog of Variable Stars, from 65.5% to 79.5%, and a significant increase in the classifier's average confidence for the testing set, from 14.6% to 42.9%, after a few AL iterations.

  15. Target Selection for the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasowski, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Cohen, R. E.; Carlberg, J. K.; Fleming, Scott W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chojnowski, S. D.; Holtzman, J. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88001 (United States); Santana, F. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Oelkers, R. J.; Bird, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Andrews, B. [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Beaton, R. L. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bender, C.; Cunha, K. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bovy, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Covey, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Dell’Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, and Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Harding, P. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Johnson, J. A., E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2017-11-01

    APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing ∼3 × 10{sup 5} stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding on APOGEE’s goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch and red clump stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.

  16. Target Selection for the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasowski, G.; Cohen, R. E.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Santana, F.; Oelkers, R. J.; Andrews, B.; Beaton, R. L.; Bender, C.; Bird, J. C.; Bovy, J.; Carlberg, J. K.; Covey, K.; Cunha, K.; Dell’Agli, F.; Fleming, Scott W.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Harding, P.; Holtzman, J.; Johnson, J. A.; Kollmeier, J. A.; Majewski, S. R.; Mészáros, Sz.; Munn, J.; Muñoz, R. R.; Ness, M. K.; Nidever, D. L.; Poleski, R.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Shetrone, M.; Simon, J. D.; Smith, V. V.; Sobeck, J. S.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Szigetiáros, L.; Tayar, J.; Troup, N.

    2017-11-01

    APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing ∼3 × 105 stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding on APOGEE’s goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch and red clump stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.

  17. Factors affecting orthopedic residency selection: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelzow, Jason; Petretta, Robert; Broekhuyse, Henry M

    2017-06-01

    Annually, orthopedic residency programs rank and recruit the best possible candidates. Little evidence exists identifying factors that potential candidates use to select their career paths. Recent literature from nonsurgical programs suggests hospital, social and program-based factors influence program selection. We sought to determine what factors influence the choice of an orthopedic career and a candidate's choice of orthopedic residency program. We surveyed medical student applicants to orthopedic programs and current Canadian orthopedic surgery residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-5). The confidential online survey focused on 3 broad categories of program selection: educational, program cohesion and noneducation factors. Questions were graded on a Likert Scale and tailed for mean scores. In total, 139 residents from 11 of 17 Canadian orthopedic programs (49% response rate) and 23 medical student applicants (88% response rate) completed our survey. Orthopedic electives and mandatory rotations were reported by 71% of participants as somewhat or very important to their career choice. Collegiality among residents (4.70 ± 0.6), program being the "right fit" (4.65 ± 0.53) and current resident satisfaction with their chosen program (4.63 ±0.66) were ranked with the highest mean scores on a 5-point Likert scale. There are several modifiable factors that residency programs may use to attract applicants, including early availability of clerkship rotations and a strong mentorship environment emphasizing both resident-resident and resident-staff cohesion. Desirable residency programs should develop early access to surgical and operative skills. These must be balanced with a continued emphasis on top-level orthopedic training.

  18. Using public participation to sample trace metals in lake surface sediments: the OPAL Metals Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S D; Rose, N L; Goldsmith, B; Bearcock, J M; Scheib, C; Yang, H

    2017-05-01

    Members of the public in England were invited in 2010 to take part in a national metals survey, by collecting samples of littoral sediment from a standing water body for geochemical analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first national sediment metals survey using public participation and reveals a snapshot of the extent of metals contamination in ponds and lakes across England. Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb concentrations exceeding sediment quality guidelines for the health of aquatic biota are ubiquitous in ponds and lakes, not just in areas with a legacy of industrial activity. To validate the public sampling approach, a calibration exercise was conducted at ten water bodies selected to represent a range of lakes found across England. Sediment concentrations of Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were measured in samples of soil, stream and littoral and deep water sediment to assess inputs. Significant differences between littoral sediment metal concentrations occur due to local variability, but also organic content, especially in upland, peat soil catchments. Variability of metal concentrations between littoral samples is shown to be low in small (complex inputs and variation in organic content of littoral samples have a greater variability. Collection of littoral sediments in small lakes and ponds, with or without voluntary participation, can provide a reliable sampling technique for the preliminary assessment of metal contamination in standing waters. However, the heterogeneity of geology, soils and history/extent of metal contamination in the English landscape, combined with the random nature of sample collection, shows that systematic sampling for evaluating the full extent of metal contamination in lakes is still required.

  19. Selection Component Analysis of Natural Polymorphisms using Population Samples Including Mother-Offspring Combinations, II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarmer, Hanne Østergaard; Christiansen, Freddy Bugge

    1981-01-01

    Population samples including mother-offspring combinations provide information on the selection components: zygotic selection, sexual selection, gametic seletion and fecundity selection, on the mating pattern, and on the deviation from linkage equilibrium among the loci studied. The theory...

  20. Progressive sample processing of band selection for hyperspectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Keng-Hao; Chien, Hung-Chang; Chen, Shih-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Band selection (BS) is one of the most important topics in hyperspectral image (HSI) processing. The objective of BS is to find a set of representative bands that can represent the whole image with lower inter-band redundancy. Many types of BS algorithms were proposed in the past. However, most of them can be carried on in an off-line manner. It means that they can only be implemented on the pre-collected data. Those off-line based methods are sometime useless for those applications that are timeliness, particular in disaster prevention and target detection. To tackle this issue, a new concept, called progressive sample processing (PSP), was proposed recently. The PSP is an "on-line" framework where the specific type of algorithm can process the currently collected data during the data transmission under band-interleavedby-sample/pixel (BIS/BIP) protocol. This paper proposes an online BS method that integrates a sparse-based BS into PSP framework, called PSP-BS. In PSP-BS, the BS can be carried out by updating BS result recursively pixel by pixel in the same way that a Kalman filter does for updating data information in a recursive fashion. The sparse regression is solved by orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm, and the recursive equations of PSP-BS are derived by using matrix decomposition. The experiments conducted on a real hyperspectral image show that the PSP-BS can progressively output the BS status with very low computing time. The convergence of BS results during the transmission can be quickly achieved by using a rearranged pixel transmission sequence. This significant advantage allows BS to be implemented in a real time manner when the HSI data is transmitted pixel by pixel.

  1. Men who have sex with men in Great Britain: comparison of a self‐selected internet sample with a national probability sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alison Ruth; Wiggins, Richard D; Mercer, Catherine H; Bolding, Graham J; Elford, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To compare the characteristics of a self‐selected, convenience sample of men who have sex with men (MSM) recruited through the internet with MSM drawn from a national probability survey in Great Britain. Methods The internet sample (n = 2065) was recruited through two popular websites for homosexual men in Great Britain in May and June 2003. This sample was compared with MSM (n = 117) from the National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal), a probability sample survey of adults resident in Great Britain conducted between May 1999 and February 2001. Results No significant differences were observed between the samples on a range of sociodemographic and behavioural variables (p>0.05). However, men from the internet sample were younger (p<0.001) and more likely to be students (p = 0.001), but less likely to live in London (p = 0.001) or report good health (p = 0.014). Although both samples were equally likely to report testing for HIV, men from the internet sample were more likely to report a sexually transmitted infection in the past year (16.9% v 4.8%, adjusted odds ratio 4.14, 95% CI 1.76 to 9.74; p = 0.001), anal intercourse (76.9% v 63.3%; p = 0.001) and unprotected anal intercourse in the past 3 months (45% v 36.6%; p = 0.064). Conclusions The internet provides a means of recruiting a self‐selected, convenience sample of MSM whose social and demographic characteristics are broadly similar to those of MSM drawn from a national probability survey. However, estimates of high‐risk sexual behaviour based on internet convenience samples are likely to overestimate levels of sexual risk behaviour in the wider MSM population. PMID:17135330

  2. Parameter Estimation in Stratified Cluster Sampling under Randomized Response Models for Sensitive Question Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Xiangke; Gao, Ge; Fan, Yubo; Wang, Mian

    2016-01-01

    Randomized response is a research method to get accurate answers to sensitive questions in structured sample survey. Simple random sampling is widely used in surveys of sensitive questions but hard to apply on large targeted populations. On the other side, more sophisticated sampling regimes and corresponding formulas are seldom employed to sensitive question surveys. In this work, we developed a series of formulas for parameter estimation in cluster sampling and stratified cluster sampling under two kinds of randomized response models by using classic sampling theories and total probability formulas. The performances of the sampling methods and formulas in the survey of premarital sex and cheating on exams at Soochow University were also provided. The reliability of the survey methods and formulas for sensitive question survey was found to be high.

  3. Parameter Estimation in Stratified Cluster Sampling under Randomized Response Models for Sensitive Question Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangke Pu

    Full Text Available Randomized response is a research method to get accurate answers to sensitive questions in structured sample survey. Simple random sampling is widely used in surveys of sensitive questions but hard to apply on large targeted populations. On the other side, more sophisticated sampling regimes and corresponding formulas are seldom employed to sensitive question surveys. In this work, we developed a series of formulas for parameter estimation in cluster sampling and stratified cluster sampling under two kinds of randomized response models by using classic sampling theories and total probability formulas. The performances of the sampling methods and formulas in the survey of premarital sex and cheating on exams at Soochow University were also provided. The reliability of the survey methods and formulas for sensitive question survey was found to be high.

  4. A Manual for Selecting Sampling Techniques in Research

    OpenAIRE

    Alvi, Mohsin

    2016-01-01

    The Manual for Sampling Techniques used in Social Sciences is an effort to describe various types of sampling methodologies that are used in researches of social sciences in an easy and understandable way. Characteristics, benefits, crucial issues/ draw backs, and examples of each sampling type are provided separately. The manual begins by describing What is Sampling and its Purposes then it moves forward discussing the two broader types: probability sampling and non-probability sampling. Lat...

  5. Survey research with a random digit dial national mobile phone sample in Ghana: Methods and sample quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefa, Eunice; Adimazoya, Edward Akolgo; Yartey, Emmanuel; Lenzi, Rachel; Tarpo, Cindy; Heward-Mills, Nii Lante; Lew, Katherine; Ampeh, Yvonne

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Generating a nationally representative sample in low and middle income countries typically requires resource-intensive household level sampling with door-to-door data collection. High mobile phone penetration rates in developing countries provide new opportunities for alternative sampling and data collection methods, but there is limited information about response rates and sample biases in coverage and nonresponse using these methods. We utilized data from an interactive voice response, random-digit dial, national mobile phone survey in Ghana to calculate standardized response rates and assess representativeness of the obtained sample. Materials and methods The survey methodology was piloted in two rounds of data collection. The final survey included 18 demographic, media exposure, and health behavior questions. Call outcomes and response rates were calculated according to the American Association of Public Opinion Research guidelines. Sample characteristics, productivity, and costs per interview were calculated. Representativeness was assessed by comparing data to the Ghana Demographic and Health Survey and the National Population and Housing Census. Results The survey was fielded during a 27-day period in February-March 2017. There were 9,469 completed interviews and 3,547 partial interviews. Response, cooperation, refusal, and contact rates were 31%, 81%, 7%, and 39% respectively. Twenty-three calls were dialed to produce an eligible contact: nonresponse was substantial due to the automated calling system and dialing of many unassigned or non-working numbers. Younger, urban, better educated, and male respondents were overrepresented in the sample. Conclusions The innovative mobile phone data collection methodology yielded a large sample in a relatively short period. Response rates were comparable to other surveys, although substantial coverage bias resulted from fewer women, rural, and older residents completing the mobile phone survey in

  6. The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations project: the spectrally selected sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, Anna; Bonavera, Laura; Massardi, Marcella; De Zotti, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    The Planck Australia Telescope Compact Array (Planck-ATCA) Co-eval Observations (PACO) have provided multi-frequency (5-40 GHz) flux density measurements of complete samples of Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) radio sources at frequencies below and overlapping with Planck frequency bands, almost simultaneously with Planck observations. In this work we analyse the data in total intensity for the spectrally selected PACO sample, a complete sample of 69 sources brighter than S20 GHz = 200 mJy selected from the AT20G survey catalogue to be inverted or upturning between 5 and 20 GHz. We study the spectral behaviour and variability of the sample. We use the variability between AT20G (2004-2007) and PACO (2009-2010) epochs to discriminate between candidate High-Frequency Peakers (HFPs) and candidate blazars. The HFPs picked up by our selection criteria have spectral peaks >10 GHz in the observer frame and turn out to be rare ( = 2.1 ± 0.5 yr (median: τmedian = 1.3 yr). The 5-20 GHz spectral indices show a systematic decrease from AT20G to PACO. At higher frequencies spectral indices steepen: the median α4030 is steeper than the median α205 by δα = 0.6. Taking further into account the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer data we find that the Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs), νS(ν), of most of our blazars peak at νSEDp 105 GHz.

  7. The Effect of Curriculum Sample Selection for Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Visser, Marieke; Fluit, Cornelia; Fransen, Jaap; Latijnhouwers, Mieke; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Laan, Roland

    2017-01-01

    In the Netherlands, students are admitted to medical school through (1) selection, (2) direct access by high pre-university Grade Point Average (pu-GPA), (3) lottery after being rejected in the selection procedure, or (4) lottery. At Radboud University Medical Center, 2010 was the first year we selected applicants. We designed a procedure based on…

  8. Non-response weighting adjustment approach in survey sampling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-response problem is an issue of great concern to all the researchers because it pervades almost all survey research. This ultimately creates potential for bias. The higher the non-response rate the greater the bias if the characteristic under study in respondents differs markedly from non-respondents. This paper reviews ...

  9. Sample Size Calculations for Population Size Estimation Studies Using Multiplier Methods With Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearon, Elizabeth; Chabata, Sungai T; Thompson, Jennifer A; Cowan, Frances M; Hargreaves, James R

    2017-09-14

    While guidance exists for obtaining population size estimates using multiplier methods with respondent-driven sampling surveys, we lack specific guidance for making sample size decisions. To guide the design of multiplier method population size estimation studies using respondent-driven sampling surveys to reduce the random error around the estimate obtained. The population size estimate is obtained by dividing the number of individuals receiving a service or the number of unique objects distributed (M) by the proportion of individuals in a representative survey who report receipt of the service or object (P). We have developed an approach to sample size calculation, interpreting methods to estimate the variance around estimates obtained using multiplier methods in conjunction with research into design effects and respondent-driven sampling. We describe an application to estimate the number of female sex workers in Harare, Zimbabwe. There is high variance in estimates. Random error around the size estimate reflects uncertainty from M and P, particularly when the estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey is low. As expected, sample size requirements are higher when the design effect of the survey is assumed to be greater. We suggest a method for investigating the effects of sample size on the precision of a population size estimate obtained using multipler methods and respondent-driven sampling. Uncertainty in the size estimate is high, particularly when P is small, so balancing against other potential sources of bias, we advise researchers to consider longer service attendance reference periods and to distribute more unique objects, which is likely to result in a higher estimate of P in the respondent-driven sampling survey.

  10. Complex sample survey estimation in static state-space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond L. Czaplewski

    2010-01-01

    Increased use of remotely sensed data is a key strategy adopted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program. However, multiple sensor technologies require complex sampling units and sampling designs. The Recursive Restriction Estimator (RRE) accommodates this complexity. It is a design-consistent Empirical Best Linear Unbiased Prediction for the state-vector, which...

  11. Pilot studies for the North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project - Site selection, sampling protocols, analytical methods, and quality control protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.B.; Woodruff, L.G.; O'Leary, R. M.; Cannon, W.F.; Garrett, R.G.; Kilburn, J.E.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, the US Geological Survey (USGS) and the Geological Survey of Canada sampled and chemically analyzed soils along two transects across Canada and the USA in preparation for a planned soil geochemical survey of North America. This effort was a pilot study to test and refine sampling protocols, analytical methods, quality control protocols, and field logistics for the continental survey. A total of 220 sample sites were selected at approximately 40-km intervals along the two transects. The ideal sampling protocol at each site called for a sample from a depth of 0-5 cm and a composite of each of the O, A, and C horizons. The analysis, the USGS QC officer, and the principal investigator for the study. This level of review resulted in an average of one QC sample for every 20 field samples, which proved to be minimally adequate for such a large-scale survey. Additional QC samples should be added to monitor within-batch quality to the extent that no more than 10 samples are analyzed between a QC sample. Only Cr (77%), Y (82%), and Sb (80%) fell outside the acceptable limits of accuracy (% recovery between 85 and 115%) because of likely residence in mineral phases resistant to the acid digestion. A separate sample of 0-5-cm material was collected at each site for determination of organic compounds. A subset of 73 of these samples was analyzed for a suite of 19 organochlorine pesticides by gas chromatography. Only three of these samples had detectable pesticide concentrations. A separate sample of A-horizon soil was collected for microbial characterization by phospholipid fatty acid analysis (PLFA), soil enzyme assays, and determination of selected human and agricultural pathogens. Collection, preservation and analysis of samples for both organic compounds and microbial characterization add a great degree of complication to the sampling and preservation protocols and a significant increase to the cost for a continental-scale survey. Both these issues must be

  12. Sample Archaeological Survey of Public Use Areas, Milford Lake, Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    basic data on Schultz focus mortuary practices and the physical characteristics of these Indians. Dr. Carlyle Smith’s students, in the Department of...destruction of the original topography. The third areas are the public recreation aieas. These sites have been 0 under construction for roads, toilets , picnic...34 In Explorations into Cahokia Archaeology, edited by Melvin L. Fowler. Bulletin 7, Illinois Archaeological Survey, Urbana. 1969. "Valley Focus Mortuary

  13. SPIDERS: selection of spectroscopic targets using AGN candidates detected in all-sky X-ray surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwelly, T.; Salvato, M.; Merloni, A.; Brusa, M.; Buchner, J.; Anderson, S. F.; Boller, Th.; Brandt, W. N.; Budavári, T.; Clerc, N.; Coffey, D.; Del Moro, A.; Georgakakis, A.; Green, P. J.; Jin, C.; Menzel, M.-L.; Myers, A. D.; Nandra, K.; Nichol, R. C.; Ridl, J.; Schwope, A. D.; Simm, T.

    2017-07-01

    SPIDERS (SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources) is a Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) survey running in parallel to the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) cosmology project. SPIDERS will obtain optical spectroscopy for large numbers of X-ray-selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxy cluster members detected in wide-area eROSITA, XMM-Newton and ROSAT surveys. We describe the methods used to choose spectroscopic targets for two sub-programmes of SPIDERS X-ray selected AGN candidates detected in the ROSAT All Sky and the XMM-Newton Slew surveys. We have exploited a Bayesian cross-matching algorithm, guided by priors based on mid-IR colour-magnitude information from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer survey, to select the most probable optical counterpart to each X-ray detection. We empirically demonstrate the high fidelity of our counterpart selection method using a reference sample of bright well-localized X-ray sources collated from XMM-Newton, Chandra and Swift-XRT serendipitous catalogues, and also by examining blank-sky locations. We describe the down-selection steps which resulted in the final set of SPIDERS-AGN targets put forward for spectroscopy within the eBOSS/TDSS/SPIDERS survey, and present catalogues of these targets. We also present catalogues of ˜12 000 ROSAT and ˜1500 XMM-Newton Slew survey sources that have existing optical spectroscopy from SDSS-DR12, including the results of our visual inspections. On completion of the SPIDERS programme, we expect to have collected homogeneous spectroscopic redshift information over a footprint of ˜7500 deg2 for >85 per cent of the ROSAT and XMM-Newton Slew survey sources having optical counterparts in the magnitude range 17 < r < 22.5, producing a large and highly complete sample of bright X-ray-selected AGN suitable for statistical studies of AGN evolution and clustering.

  14. The effect of curriculum sample selection for medical school

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, Marieke; Fluit, Cornelia; Fransen, Jaap; Latijnhouwers, Mieke; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Laan, Roland F. J.

    In the Netherlands, students are admitted to medical school through (1) selection, (2) direct access by high pre-university Grade Point Average (pu-GPA), (3) lottery after being rejected in the selection procedure, or (4) lottery. At Radboud University Medical Center, 2010 was the first year we

  15. Colored Sticky Traps to Selectively Survey Thrips in Cowpea Ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, L D; Zhao, H Y; Fu, B L; Han, Y; Liu, K; Wu, J H

    2016-02-01

    The bean flower thrips, Megalurothrips usitatus (Bagrall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), is an important pest of legume crops in South China. Yellow, blue, or white sticky traps are currently recommended for monitoring and controlling thrips, but it is not known whether one is more efficient than the other or if selectivity could be optimized by trap color. We investigated the response of thrips and beneficial insects to different-colored sticky traps on cowpea, Vigna unguiculata. More thrips were caught on blue, light blue, white, and purple traps than on yellow, green, pink, gray, red, or black traps. There was a weak correlation on the number of thrips caught on yellow traps and survey from flowers (r = 0.139), whereas a strong correlation was found for blue traps and thrips' survey on flowers (r = 0.929). On commercially available sticky traps (Jiaduo®), two and five times more thrips were caught on blue traps than on white and yellow traps, respectively. Otherwise, capture of beneficial insects was 1.7 times higher on yellow than on blue traps. The major natural enemies were the predatory ladybird beetles (63%) and pirate bugs Orius spp. (29%), followed by a number of less representative predators and parasitoids (8%). We conclude the blue sticky trap was the best to monitor thrips on cowpea in South China.

  16. 76 FR 72417 - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control... National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) will not be receiving DNA proposals in 2012... of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for...

  17. Sample Design and Estimation Procedures for a National Health Examination Survey of Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, E. Earl; And Others

    This report presents considerations for sample design and estimation procedures for the Health Examination Survey, one of the major survey programs employed by the National Center for Health Statistics. The survey collects data which provide national estimates and distributions of various health characteristics related to the growth and…

  18. Optimization of sampling effort for a fishery-independent survey with multiple goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Binduo; Zhang, Chongliang; Xue, Ying; Ren, Yiping; Chen, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Fishery-independent surveys are essential for collecting high quality data to support fisheries management. For fish populations with low abundance and aggregated distribution in a coastal ecosystem, high intensity bottom trawl surveys may result in extra mortality and disturbance to benthic community, imposing unnecessarily large negative impacts on the populations and ecosystem. Optimization of sampling design is necessary to acquire cost-effective sampling efforts, which, however, may not be straightforward for a survey with multiple goals. We developed a simulation approach to evaluate and optimize sampling efforts for a stratified random survey with multiple goals including estimation of abundance indices of individual species and fish groups and species diversity indices. We compared the performances of different sampling efforts when the target estimation indices had different spatial variability over different survey seasons. This study suggests that sampling efforts in a stratified random survey can be reduced while still achieving relatively high precision and accuracy for most indices measuring abundance and biodiversity, which can reduce survey mortality. This study also shows that optimal sampling efforts for a stratified random design may vary with survey objectives. A postsurvey analysis, such as this study, can improve survey designs to achieve the most important survey goals.

  19. Selection of Voice Therapy Methods. Results of an Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Iris; Meier, Birte; Nolte, Katharina; Oppermann, Tina; Rogg, Verena; Beushausen, Ulla

    2015-11-01

    Providing an evidence basis for voice therapy in the German-speaking countries faces the challenge that-for historical reasons-a variety of direct voice therapy methods is available. The aim of this study was to clarify which therapy methods are chosen and the underlying principles for this selection. An online survey was implemented to identify to what extent the variety of methods described in theory is also applied in practice. A total of 434 voice therapists in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland were asked, among other things, which methods they prefer. A significant majority of therapists do not apply one specific method but rather work with a unique combination of direct voice therapy methods for individual clients. These results show that the variety of methods described in the literature is also applied in voice therapy practice. The combination of methods becomes apparent during the choice of exercises. The type of voice disorder plays no decisive role in the method selection process, whereas certain patient variables do have an influence on this process. In particular, the patients' movement restrictions, their state of mind or mood on a given day, and aspects of learning theory are taken into account. The results suggest that a patient-oriented selection of appropriate exercises is of primary importance to voice therapists and that they rarely focus on specific direct voice therapy methods. It becomes clear that an evaluation of single methods does not correspond to practical experience, and therefore, an overall evaluation of voice therapy appears to be more useful. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Community-based survey versus sentinel site sampling in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The absence of wasting and the high prevalence of stunting (37,5%) in the community-based sample suggested that the main problem is chronic socioeconomic underdevelopment, rather than a severe or immediate lack of food. The fact that fewer than 20% of households are in any way reliant on domestic production for ...

  1. On The Use Of Network Sampling In Diabetic Surveys | Nafiu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two estimators: Hansen-Hurwitz estimator and Horvitz-Thompson estimator were considered; and the results were obtained using a program written in Microsoft Visual C++ programming language. Keywords: Graph, Sampling Frame, Households, Hansen-Hurwitz estimator and Horvitz-Thompson estimator. JORIND Vol.

  2. A VLBI Survey of a Complete Sample of Lobe-dominated Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, D. H.

    1998-12-01

    We are engaged in a long-term VLBI survey of a complete sample of 25 lobe-dominated quasars selected from the revised 3CR survey. Tha main motivation for this study is to conduct statistical tests of relativistic jet models and AGN unification scenarios, using a complete sample of sources with minimal orientation bias. To date, observations have been made of the nuclei in 24 objects. Each of the 19 objects that has been imaged shows a one-sided parsec-scale jet on the same side of the core as a one-sided kpc-scale jet. No counterjets have been detected. There is some tendency for sources with strong nuclei and small projected linear sizes to exhibit more prominent jets with greater curvature and more pronounced knots. Multiple-epoch images have been made for 11 objects; for 6 of these, it seems clear that the jet speeds are in the range of approximately 1-4c. Recent results include the first evidence for acceleration and nonradial motion of jet components, flat-spectrum cores and steep-spectrum jets, and a transition of the jet magnetic field from perpendicular to parallel to the jet axis. These results are all consistent with beaming and unification of core- and lobe-dominated quasars. (This work is currently supported by NSF grant AST-9422075).

  3. A Survey for Companions and Ages in a Large Sample of G Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, G.; Henry, T. J.; Latham, D. W.; Soderblom, D. R.; Stefanik, R. P.; Davis, R. J.

    1993-05-01

    The NASA High Resolution Microwave Survey (HRMS) consists of two complementary elements: a Sky Survey of the entire sky to a moderate level of sensitivity, and a Targeted Search of nearby stars, one at a time, to a much deeper level of sensitivity. For the main survey of a large sample of nearby solar-type stars, we argue that the selection criteria should be heavily biased by what little we know about the origin and evolution of life. We propose that observations of stars with stellar companions orbiting near the habitable zone should be de-emphasized, because such companions would prevent the formation of habitable planets or would disrupt their orbits if they did manage to form. We also propose that observations of stars younger than about 3 billion years should be de-emphasized in favor of older stars, because we know that our technical civilization took longer than 3 billion years to evolve here on earth. To provide the information needed for the preparation of specific target lists, we have undertaken an inventory of all the solar-type stars out to a distance of 60 pc, with the goal of characterizing the relevant astrophysical properties of these stars, especially their ages and companionship. The initial sample has been assembled from two different sources: a) an all-sky list of 3347 G stars drawn from the Henry Draper Catalog, and classified by Erik Olsen as dwarfs, based on extensive Stromgren photometry; b) the spectral classification work by Nancy Houk in the southern hemisphere. In order to identify the half of the sample that is older than roughly 3 billion years, new spectra are being obtained of southern stars at the Ca II H and K lines, to complement the continuing work on northern stars by Sallie Baliunas. Radial velocities will be used to identify those stars with companions having orbital periods of ten years or less. The northern half of the sample is being monitored with the CfA Digital Speedometers, while the southern half is being observed

  4. Enhanced Sampling and Analysis, Selection of Technology for Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, John; Meikrantz, David

    2010-02-01

    The focus of this study includes the investigation of sampling technologies used in industry and their potential application to nuclear fuel processing. The goal is to identify innovative sampling methods using state of the art techniques that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements. This report details the progress made in the first half of FY 2010 and includes a further consideration of the research focus and goals for this year. Our sampling options and focus for the next generation sampling method are presented along with the criteria used for choosing our path forward. We have decided to pursue the option of evaluating the feasibility of microcapillary based chips to remotely collect, transfer, track and supply microliters of sample solutions to analytical equipment in support of aqueous processes for used nuclear fuel cycles. Microchip vendors have been screened and a choice made for the development of a suitable microchip design followed by production of samples for evaluation by ANL, LANL, and INL on an independent basis.

  5. A Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test for analyzing population genetic surveys with complex sample designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Yesupriya, Ajay; Chang, Man-Huei; Dowling, Nicole F; Khoury, Muin J; Scott, Alastair J

    2010-04-15

    Testing for deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium is a widely recommended practice for population-based genetic association studies. However, current methods for this test assume a simple random sample and may not be appropriate for sample surveys with complex survey designs. In this paper, the authors present a test for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium that adjusts for the sample weights and correlation of data collected in complex surveys. The authors perform this test by using a simple adjustment to procedures developed to analyze data from complex survey designs available within the SAS statistical software package (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina). Using 90 genetic markers from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the authors found that survey-adjusted and -unadjusted estimates of the disequilibrium coefficient were generally similar within self-reported races/ethnicities. However, estimates of the variance of the disequilibrium coefficient were significantly different between the 2 methods. Because the results of the survey-adjusted tests account for correlation among participants sampled within the same cluster, and the possibility of having related individuals sampled from the same household, the authors recommend use of this test when analyzing genetic data originating from sample surveys with complex survey designs to assess deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

  6. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Development of Survey Methods, Sample Characteristics, and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Tim; Brosig, Cheryl L; Hilliard, Marisa E

    2016-03-01

    There are few detailed workforce studies of specialty fields within professional psychology, and none have been reported for pediatric psychology since 2006. Availability of such data could facilitate more-informed decision making by students and trainees, psychologists pursuing employment opportunities, and psychologists involved in employment or compensation negotiations. This article describes the work of a task force of the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 54 (Society of Pediatric Psychology) in the design, construction, pretesting, distribution, and data management for the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) Workforce Survey. The 18-member task force was established to design and implement a workforce survey that balanced needs for breadth, clarity, brevity, and protection of confidentiality. The survey solicits information about demographic characteristics; training, licensure and certifications; employment settings, responsibilities, and productivity metrics; compensation; and employment satisfaction. A survey link was distributed via e-mail to full members of the SPP in June 2015. A total of 404 members (32.3% return rate) completed the survey. This article focuses on the development, methodology, and respondent characteristics for this 1st administration of the workforce survey. Separate articles will report detailed analyses of the survey results such as compensation and work satisfaction. Future distributions of the survey will enable compilation of a longitudinal database to track changes in the profession. SPP members and others may propose additional analyses of these data. This work may provide guidance to other groups of specialized psychologists who may wish to implement similar initiatives.

  7. Society of Pediatric Psychology Workforce Survey: Development of Survey Methods, Sample Characteristics, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysocki, Tim; Brosig, Cheryl L.; Hilliard, Marisa E.

    2016-01-01

    There are few detailed workforce studies of specialty fields within professional psychology, and none have been reported for pediatric psychology since 2006. Availability of such data could facilitate more-informed decision making by students and trainees, psychologists pursuing employment opportunities, and psychologists involved in employment or compensation negotiations. This article describes the work of a task force of the American Psychological Association (APA) Division 54 (Society of Pediatric Psychology) in the design, construction, pretesting, distribution, and data management for the Society of Pediatric Psychology (SPP) Workforce Survey. The 18-member task force was established to design and implement a workforce survey that balanced needs for breadth, clarity, brevity, and protection of confidentiality. The survey solicits information about demographic characteristics; training, licensure and certifications; employment settings, responsibilities, and productivity metrics; compensation; and employment satisfaction. A survey link was distributed via e-mail to full members of the SPP in June 2015. A total of 404 members (32.3% return rate) completed the survey. This article focuses on the development, methodology, and respondent characteristics for this 1st administration of the workforce survey. Separate articles will report detailed analyses of the survey results such as compensation and work satisfaction. Future distributions of the survey will enable compilation of a longitudinal database to track changes in the profession. SPP members and others may propose additional analyses of these data. This work may provide guidance to other groups of specialized psychologists who may wish to implement similar initiatives. PMID:28066693

  8. Selections from 2017: Hubble Survey Explores Distant Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2017, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume in January.CANDELS Multi-Wavelength Catalogs: Source Identification and Photometry in the CANDELS COSMOSSurvey FieldPublished January2017Main takeaway:A publication led byHooshang Nayyeri(UC Irvine and UC Riverside) early this year details acatalog of sources built using the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey(CANDELS), a survey carried out by cameras on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The catalogliststhe properties of 38,000 distant galaxies visiblewithin the COSMOS field, a two-square-degree equatorial field explored in depthto answer cosmological questions.Why its interesting:Illustration showing the three-dimensional map of the dark matter distribution in theCOSMOS field. [Adapted from NASA/ESA/R. Massey(California Institute of Technology)]The depth and resolution of the CANDELS observations areuseful for addressingseveral major science goals, including the following:Studying the most distant objects in the universe at the epoch of reionization in the cosmic dawn.Understanding galaxy formation and evolution during the peak epoch of star formation in the cosmic high noon.Studying star formation from deep ultravioletobservations and studying cosmology from supernova observations.Why CANDELS is a major endeavor:CANDELS isthe largest multi-cycle treasury program ever approved on the Hubble Space Telescope using over 900 orbits between 2010 and 2013 withtwo cameras on board the spacecraftto study galaxy formation and evolution throughout cosmic time. The CANDELS images are all publicly available, and the new catalogrepresents an enormous source of information about distant objectsin our universe.CitationH. Nayyeri et al 2017 ApJS 228 7. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/228/1/7

  9. Aggregate impact testing of selected granite samples from sites in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Aggregate Impact Testing machine was used to measure the resistance to fa ilure of Rocks from five (5) selected granite quarries to a suddenly applied force using S ingapore standard. The results obtained show that brittleness (S20) value of the rocks were between 2 - 10. These values are less than the stated ...

  10. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and Galaxies survey (SLUGGS): sample definition, methods, and initial results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Jennings, Zachary G.; Pota, Vincenzo; Kader, Justin; Roediger, Joel C.; Villaume, Alexa; Arnold, Jacob A.; Woodley, Kristin A. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Strader, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Forbes, Duncan A.; Pastorello, Nicola; Usher, Christopher; Blom, Christina; Kartha, Sreeja S. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Foster, Caroline; Spitler, Lee R., E-mail: jbrodie@ucsc.edu [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

    2014-11-20

    We introduce and provide the scientific motivation for a wide-field photometric and spectroscopic chemodynamical survey of nearby early-type galaxies (ETGs) and their globular cluster (GC) systems. The SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey is being carried out primarily with Subaru/Suprime-Cam and Keck/DEIMOS. The former provides deep gri imaging over a 900 arcmin{sup 2} field-of-view to characterize GC and host galaxy colors and spatial distributions, and to identify spectroscopic targets. The NIR Ca II triplet provides GC line-of-sight velocities and metallicities out to typically ∼8 R {sub e}, and to ∼15 R {sub e} in some cases. New techniques to extract integrated stellar kinematics and metallicities to large radii (∼2-3 R {sub e}) are used in concert with GC data to create two-dimensional (2D) velocity and metallicity maps for comparison with simulations of galaxy formation. The advantages of SLUGGS compared with other, complementary, 2D-chemodynamical surveys are its superior velocity resolution, radial extent, and multiple halo tracers. We describe the sample of 25 nearby ETGs, the selection criteria for galaxies and GCs, the observing strategies, the data reduction techniques, and modeling methods. The survey observations are nearly complete and more than 30 papers have so far been published using SLUGGS data. Here we summarize some initial results, including signatures of two-phase galaxy assembly, evidence for GC metallicity bimodality, and a novel framework for the formation of extended star clusters and ultracompact dwarfs. An integrated overview of current chemodynamical constraints on GC systems points to separate, in situ formation modes at high redshifts for metal-poor and metal-rich GCs.

  11. The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey in the SDSS Footprint. I. Infrared-based Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Yang, Qian; Wu, Jin; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Studies of the most luminous quasars at high redshift directly probe the evolution of the most massive black holes in the early universe and their connection to massive galaxy formation. However, extremely luminous quasars at high redshift are very rare objects. Only wide-area surveys have a chance to constrain their population. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has so far provided the most widely adopted measurements of the quasar luminosity function at z> 3. However, a careful re-examination of the SDSS quasar sample revealed that the SDSS quasar selection is in fact missing a significant fraction of z≳ 3 quasars at the brightest end. We identified the purely optical-color selection of SDSS, where quasars at these redshifts are strongly contaminated by late-type dwarfs, and the spectroscopic incompleteness of the SDSS footprint as the main reasons. Therefore, we designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS), based on a novel near-infrared JKW2 color cut using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE) AllWISE and 2MASS all-sky photometry, to yield high completeness for very bright ({m}{{i}}learning algorithms on SDSS and WISE photometry for quasar-star classification and photometric redshift estimation. The ELQS will spectroscopically follow-up ˜230 new quasar candidates in an area of ˜12,000 deg2 in the SDSS footprint to obtain a well-defined and complete quasar sample for an accurate measurement of the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.0≤slant z≤slant 5.0. In this paper, we present the quasar selection algorithm and the quasar candidate catalog.

  12. Systematic sampling of discrete and continuous populations: sample selection and the choice of estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry T. Valentine; David L. R. Affleck; Timothy G. Gregoire

    2009-01-01

    Systematic sampling is easy, efficient, and widely used, though it is not generally recognized that a systematic sample may be drawn from the population of interest with or without restrictions on randomization. The restrictions or the lack of them determine which estimators are unbiased, when using the sampling design as the basis for inference. We describe the...

  13. The Lyα reference sample. I. Survey outline and first results for Markarian 259

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Östlin, Göran; Hayes, Matthew; Duval, Florent; Sandberg, Andreas; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger; Marquart, Thomas; Adamo, Angela; Melinder, Jens; Guaita, Lucia; Micheva, Genoveva [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Oscar Klein Centre, AlbaNova, Stockholm SE-106 91 (Sweden); Orlitová, Ivana [Observatoire de Genève, Université de Genève, Chemin des Maillettes 51, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Atek, Hakim [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Observatoire de Sauverny, CH-1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Cannon, John M.; Pardy, Stephen A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Gruyters, Pieter [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Astronomy and Space Physics, Uppsala University, Box 516, 75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Herenz, Edmund Christian [Leibniz-Institute for Astrophysics Potsdam (AIP), innoFSPEC, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Kunth, Daniel [Institut d' Astrophysique Paris, 98bis Bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Laursen, Peter [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel [Centro de Astrobiologa (CSIC-INTA), Departamento de Astrofsica, POB 78, E-28691, Villanueva de la Cañada (Spain); Otí-Floranes, Héctor [Instituto de Astronoma, Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico, Apdo. Postal 106, Ensenada B. C. 22800 (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-10

    The Lyα Reference Sample (LARS) is a substantial program with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) that provides a sample of local universe laboratory galaxies in which to study the detailed astrophysics of the visibility and strength of the Lyαline of neutral hydrogen. Lyα is the dominant spectral line in use for characterizing high-redshift (z) galaxies. This paper presents an overview of the survey, its selection function, and HST imaging observations. The sample was selected from the combined GALEX+Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalog at z = 0.028-0.19, in order to allow Lyα to be captured with combinations of long-pass filters in the Solar Blind Channel (SBC) of the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) onboard HST. In addition, LARS utilizes Hα and Hβ narrowband and u, b, i broadband imaging with ACS and the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). In order to study galaxies in which large numbers of Lyα photons are produced (whether or not they escape), we demanded an Hα equivalent width W(Hα) ≥100 Å. The final sample of 14 galaxies covers far-UV (FUV, λ ∼ 1500 Å) luminosities that overlap with those of high-z Lyα emitters (LAEs) and Lyman break galaxies (LBGs), making LARS a valid comparison sample. We present the reduction steps used to obtain the Lyα images, including our LARS eXtraction software (LaXs), which utilizes pixel-by-pixel spectral synthesis fitting of the energy distribution to determine and subtract the continuum at Lyα. We demonstrate that the use of SBC long-pass-filter combinations increase the signal-to-noise ratio by an order of magnitude compared to the nominal Lyα filter available in SBC. To exemplify the science potential of LARS, we also present some first results for a single galaxy, Mrk 259 (LARS #1). This irregular galaxy shows bright and extended (indicative of resonance scattering) but strongly asymmetric Lyα emission. Spectroscopy from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on board HST centered on the brightest UV knot shows a moderate

  14. Penggunaan Metode Respondent Driven Sampling (Rds dalam Survey Pemasaran Beras di Provinsi Kepulauan Riau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herena Pudjihastuti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As a Free Trade Zone (FTZ, the province of Riau Islands has a different pattern of strategic commodity (such as rice marketing comparing to other regions in Indonesia. To anticipate and control the negative effects of the implementation of FTZ policy, It is necessary to study about rice marketing trade system in the Riau Islands region. The study was conducted to identify patterns of supply and marketing of food (rice and analyze the marketing margin and marketing efficiency as well as the factors that influence it. The study was conducted through desk study and field surveys. Secondary data was collected from various sources and primary data collected through interviews with selected respondents using Respondent Driven Sampling method (RDS. The study shows that the structure of the rice market in Riau Islands can be categorized as monopolistic. Most of the rice supply comes from outside the region and import, the supply chain is quite simple, the price is relatively stable and relatively efficient marketing and resilience of rice reserves are relatively high for merchants. Nevertheless, the Riau islands will be very susceptible to interference distribution. Required efforts of the provincial government of Riau Islands to provide sufficient rice reserves. This paper gives an example of the use of the RDS method in marketing surveys.

  15. Analysis of Selected Legacy 85Kr Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jubin, Robert Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bruffey, Stephanie H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Legacy samples composed of 85Kr encapsulated in solid zeolite 5A material and five small metal tubes containing a mixture of the zeolite combined with a glass matrix resulting from hot isostatic pressing have been preserved. The samples were a result of krypton R&D encapsulation efforts in the late 1970s performed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These samples were shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in mid-FY 2014. Upon receipt the outer shipping package was opened, and the inner package, removed and placed in a radiological hood. The individual capsules were double bagged as they were removed from the inner shipping pig and placed into individual glass sample bottles for further analysis. The five capsules were then x-ray imaged. Capsules 1 and 4 appear intact and to contain an amorphous mass within the capsules. Capsule 2 clearly shows the saw marks on the capsule and a quantity of loose pellet or bead-like material remaining in the capsule. Capsule 3 shows similar bead-like material within the intact capsule. Capsule 5 had been opened at an undetermined time in the past. The end of this capsule appears to have been cut off, and there are additional saw marks on the side of the capsule. X-ray tomography allowed the capsules to be viewed along the three axes. Of most interest was determining whether there was any residual material in the closed end of Capsule 5. The images confirmed the presence of residual material within this capsule. The material appears to be compacted but still retains some of the bead-like morphology. Based on the nondestructive analysis (NDA) results, a proposed path forward was formulated to advance this effort toward the original goals of understanding the effects of extended storage on the waste form and package. Based on the initial NDA and the fact that there are at least two breached samples, it was proposed that exploratory tests be conducted with the breached specimens before opening the three intact

  16. Sample Selected Averaging Method for Analyzing the Event Related Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Akira; Ono, Youhei; Kimura, Tomoaki

    The event related potential (ERP) is often measured through the oddball task. On the oddball task, subjects are given “rare stimulus” and “frequent stimulus”. Measured ERPs were analyzed by the averaging technique. In the results, amplitude of the ERP P300 becomes large when the “rare stimulus” is given. However, measured ERPs are included samples without an original feature of ERP. Thus, it is necessary to reject unsuitable measured ERPs when using the averaging technique. In this paper, we propose the rejection method for unsuitable measured ERPs for the averaging technique. Moreover, we combine the proposed method and Woody's adaptive filter method.

  17. A strategy for sampling on a sphere applied to 3D selective RF pulse design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S T; Roos, M S

    1994-12-01

    Conventional constant angular velocity sampling of the surface of a sphere results in a higher sampling density near the two poles relative to the equatorial region. More samples, and hence longer sampling time, are required to achieve a given sampling density in the equatorial region when compared with uniform sampling. This paper presents a simple expression for a continuous sample path through a nearly uniform distribution of points on the surface of a sphere. Sampling of concentric spherical shells in k-space with the new strategy is used to design 3D selective inversion and spin-echo pulses. These new 3D selective pulses have been implemented and verified experimentally.

  18. [Estimate methods used with complex sampling designs: their application in the Cuban 2001 health survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañizares Pérez, Mayilée; Barroso Utra, Isabel; Alfonso León, Alina; García Roche, René; Alfonso Sagué, Karen; Chang de la Rosa, Martha; Bonet Gorbea, Mariano; León, Esther M

    2004-03-01

    To look at the individual features of three different methods used to estimate simple parameters--means, totals, and percentages, as well as their standard errors--and of logistic regression models, and to describe how such methods can be used for analyzing data obtained from complex samples. Data from Cuba's Second National Survey of Risk Factors and Non-Communicable Chronic Ailments [Segunda Encuesta Nacional de Factores de Riesgo y Afecciones Crónicas No Transmisibles], which was conducted in 2001, were studied. A complex, stratified multi-stage cluster sampling design was used. Cuba's 14 provinces and the municipality of Isla de la Juventud served as the strata, while the clusters consisted of sampled geographic areas (SGA), blocks, and sectors. Samples were weighted in inverse proportion to their probability of being selected, and estimates were performed by sex and age group (15-34, 35-54, 55-74, and 75 or more years). Taylor approximations were used to estimate variances. Three statistical methods were compared: conventional analysis, which assumes all data were obtained through simple random sampling; weighted analysis, which only takes into account the weight of the samples when performing estimates; and adjusted analysis, which looks at all aspects of the sampling design (namely, the disparity in the probability of being included in the sample and the effect of clustering on the data). The point estimates obtained with the three different types of analytic methods were similar. Standard error (SE) estimates for the prevalence of overweight and of arterial hypertension that were obtained by conventional analysis were underestimated by 19.3% and by more than 11.5%, respectively, when such estimates were compared to those obtained with the other two analytic methods. On the other hand, weighted analysis generated SE values that were much smaller than those obtained with the other two types of analyses. The same pattern was noted when odds ratios were

  19. Molecular and Serological Survey of Selected Viruses in Free-Ranging Wild Ruminants in Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhid Hemmatzadeh

    Full Text Available A molecular and serological survey of selected viruses in free-ranging wild ruminants was conducted in 13 different districts in Iran. Samples were collected from 64 small wild ruminants belonging to four different species including 25 Mouflon (Ovis orientalis, 22 wild goat (Capra aegagrus, nine Indian gazelle (Gazella bennettii and eight Goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa during the national survey for wildlife diseases in Iran. Serum samples were evaluated using serologic antibody tests for Peste de petits ruminants virus (PPRV, Pestiviruses [Border Disease virus (BVD and Bovine Viral Diarrhoea virus (BVDV], Bluetongue virus (BTV, Bovine herpesvirus type 1 (BHV-1, and Parainfluenza type 3 (PI3. Sera were also ELISA tested for Pestivirus antigen. Tissue samples including spleen, liver, lung, tonsils, mesenteric and mediastinal lymph nodes and white blood cells (WBCs were tested using polymerase chain reaction (PCR for PPRV, Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV, Pestivirus, BTV, Ovine herpesvirus type 2 (OvHV-2 and BHV-1. Serologic tests were positive for antibodies against PPRV (17%, Pestiviruses (2% and BTV (2%. No antibodies were detected for BHV-1 or PI3, and no Pestivirus antigen was detected. PCR results were positive for PPRV (7.8%, FMDV (11%, BTV (3%, OvHV-2 (31% and BHV-1 (1.5%. None of the samples were positive for Pestiviruses.

  20. Effects of sample survey design on the accuracy of classification tree models in species distribution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas C. Edwards; D. Richard Cutler; Niklaus E. Zimmermann; Linda Geiser; Gretchen G. Moisen

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of probabilistic (hereafter DESIGN) and non-probabilistic (PURPOSIVE) sample surveys on resultant classification tree models for predicting the presence of four lichen species in the Pacific Northwest, USA. Models derived from both survey forms were assessed using an independent data set (EVALUATION). Measures of accuracy as gauged by...

  1. Shorlist Masterplan Wind. Evaluation of the sampling grid of the year-round ichthyoplankton survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolle, L.J.; Beek, van J.K.L.

    2011-01-01

    Within the research programme 'Shortlist Masterplan Wind' a year-round ichthyoplankton survey is being carried out. The sampling area is based on known spawning concentrations and prevailing currents.

  2. Random sample community-based health surveys: does the effort to reach participants matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messiah, Antoine; Castro, Grettel; Rodríguez de la Vega, Pura; Acuna, Juan M

    2014-12-15

    Conducting health surveys with community-based random samples are essential to capture an otherwise unreachable population, but these surveys can be biased if the effort to reach participants is insufficient. This study determines the desirable amount of effort to minimise such bias. A household-based health survey with random sampling and face-to-face interviews. Up to 11 visits, organised by canvassing rounds, were made to obtain an interview. Single-family homes in an underserved and understudied population in North Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA. Of a probabilistic sample of 2200 household addresses, 30 corresponded to empty lots, 74 were abandoned houses, 625 households declined to participate and 265 could not be reached and interviewed within 11 attempts. Analyses were performed on the 1206 remaining households. Each household was asked if any of their members had been told by a doctor that they had high blood pressure, heart disease including heart attack, cancer, diabetes, anxiety/ depression, obesity or asthma. Responses to these questions were analysed by the number of visit attempts needed to obtain the interview. Return per visit fell below 10% after four attempts, below 5% after six attempts and below 2% after eight attempts. As the effort increased, household size decreased, while household income and the percentage of interviewees active and employed increased; proportion of the seven health conditions decreased, four of which did so significantly: heart disease 20.4-9.2%, high blood pressure 63.5-58.1%, anxiety/depression 24.4-9.2% and obesity 21.8-12.6%. Beyond the fifth attempt, however, cumulative percentages varied by less than 1% and precision varied by less than 0.1%. In spite of the early and steep drop, sustaining at least five attempts to reach participants is necessary to reduce selection bias. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. The relevance sample-feature machine: a sparse Bayesian learning approach to joint feature-sample selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadeh, Yalda; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid; Reza, Ali M; Bathaee, Najmehsadat; Kalayeh, Mahdi M

    2013-12-01

    This paper introduces a novel sparse Bayesian machine-learning algorithm for embedded feature selection in classification tasks. Our proposed algorithm, called the relevance sample feature machine (RSFM), is able to simultaneously choose the relevance samples and also the relevance features for regression or classification problems. We propose a separable model in feature and sample domains. Adopting a Bayesian approach and using Gaussian priors, the learned model by RSFM is sparse in both sample and feature domains. The proposed algorithm is an extension of the standard RVM algorithm, which only opts for sparsity in the sample domain. Experimental comparisons on synthetic as well as benchmark data sets show that RSFM is successful in both feature selection (eliminating the irrelevant features) and accurate classification. The main advantages of our proposed algorithm are: less system complexity, better generalization and avoiding overfitting, and less computational cost during the testing stage.

  4. Changes in selected biochemical indices resulting from various pre-sampling handling techniques in broilers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chloupek, Petr; Bedanova, Iveta; Chloupek, Jan; Vecerek, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    .... This study focused on detection of changes in the corticosterone level and concentrations of other selected biochemical parameters in broilers handled in two different manners during blood sampling...

  5. Spot the difference : Impact of different selection criteria on observed properties of passive galaxies in zCOSMOS-20k sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moresco, M.; Pozzetti, L.; Cimatti, A.; Zamorani, G.; Bolzonella, M.; Lamareille, F.; Mignoli, M.; Zucca, E.; Lilly, S. J.; Carollo, C. M.; Contini, T.; Kneib, J. -P; Le Fèvre, O.; Mainieri, V.; Renzini, A.; Scodeggio, M.; Bardelli, S.; Bongiorno, A.; Caputi, K.; Cucciati, O.; de la Torre, S.; de Ravel, L.; Franzetti, P.; Garilli, B.; Iovino, A.; Kampczyk, P.; Knobel, C.; Kovač, K.; Le Borgne, J. -F; Le Brun, V.; Maier, C.; Pelló, R.; Peng, Y.; Perez-Montero, E.; Presotto, V.; Silverman, J. D.; Tanaka, M.; Tasca, L.; Tresse, L.; Vergani, D.; Barnes, L.; Bordoloi, R.; Cappi, A.; Diener, C.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Le Floc'h, E.; López-Sanjuan, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Nair, P.; Oesch, P.; Scarlata, C.; Scoville, N.; Welikala, N.

    2013-01-01

    Aims. We present the analysis of photometric, spectroscopic, and morphological properties for differently selected samples of passive galaxies up to z = 1 extracted from the zCOSMOS-20k spectroscopic survey. This analysis intends to explore the dependence of galaxy properties on the selection

  6. The Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey Cluster Sample: Methodology and Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrander, E. J.; Nichol, R. C.; Ratnatunga, K. U.; Griffiths, R. E.

    1998-12-01

    We present a new, objectively selected, sample of galaxy overdensities detected in the Hubble Space Telescope Medium Deep Survey (MDS). These clusters/groups were found using an automated procedure that involved searching for statistically significant galaxy overdensities. The contrast of the clusters against the field galaxy population is increased when morphological data are used to search around bulge-dominated galaxies. In total, we present 92 overdensities above a probability threshold of 99.5%. We show, via extensive Monte Carlo simulations, that at least 60% of these overdensities are likely to be real clusters and groups and not random line-of-sight superpositions of galaxies. For each overdensity in the MDS cluster sample, we provide a richness and the average of the bulge-to-total ratio of galaxies within each system. This MDS cluster sample potentially contains some of the most distant clusters/groups ever detected, with about 25% of the overdensities having estimated redshifts z > ~0.9. We have made this sample publicly available to facilitate spectroscopic confirmation of these clusters and help more detailed studies of cluster and galaxy evolution. We also report the serendipitous discovery of a new cluster close on the sky to the rich optical cluster Cl l0016+16 at z = 0.546. This new overdensity, HST 001831+16208, may be coincident with both an X-ray source and a radio source. HST 001831+16208 is the third cluster/group discovered near to Cl 0016+16 and appears to strengthen the claims of Connolly et al. of superclustering at high redshift.

  7. Nonprobability Web surveys to measure sexual behaviors and attitudes in the general population: a comparison with a probability sample interview survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erens, Bob; Burkill, Sarah; Couper, Mick P; Conrad, Frederick; Clifton, Soazig; Tanton, Clare; Phelps, Andrew; Datta, Jessica; Mercer, Catherine H; Sonnenberg, Pam; Prah, Philip; Mitchell, Kirstin R; Wellings, Kaye; Johnson, Anne M; Copas, Andrew J

    2014-12-08

    Nonprobability Web surveys using volunteer panels can provide a relatively cheap and quick alternative to traditional health and epidemiological surveys. However, concerns have been raised about their representativeness. The aim was to compare results from different Web panels with a population-based probability sample survey (n=8969 aged 18-44 years) that used computer-assisted self-interview (CASI) for sensitive behaviors, the third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3). Natsal-3 questions were included on 4 nonprobability Web panel surveys (n=2000 to 2099), 2 using basic quotas based on age and sex, and 2 using modified quotas based on additional variables related to key estimates. Results for sociodemographic characteristics were compared with external benchmarks and for sexual behaviors and opinions with Natsal-3. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to express differences between the benchmark data and each survey for each variable of interest. A summary measure of survey performance was the average absolute OR across variables. Another summary measure was the number of key estimates for which the survey differed significantly (at the 5% level) from the benchmarks. For sociodemographic variables, the Web surveys were less representative of the general population than Natsal-3. For example, for men, the average absolute OR for Natsal-3 was 1.14, whereas for the Web surveys the average absolute ORs ranged from 1.86 to 2.30. For all Web surveys, approximately two-thirds of the key estimates of sexual behaviors were different from Natsal-3 and the average absolute ORs ranged from 1.32 to 1.98. Differences were appreciable even for questions asked by CASI in Natsal-3. No single Web survey performed consistently better than any other did. Modified quotas slightly improved results for men, but not for women. Consistent with studies from other countries on less sensitive topics, volunteer Web panels provided appreciably biased estimates. The

  8. Nonprobability Web Surveys to Measure Sexual Behaviors and Attitudes in the General Population: A Comparison With a Probability Sample Interview Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkill, Sarah; Couper, Mick P; Conrad, Frederick; Clifton, Soazig; Tanton, Clare; Phelps, Andrew; Datta, Jessica; Mercer, Catherine H; Sonnenberg, Pam; Prah, Philip; Mitchell, Kirstin R; Wellings, Kaye; Johnson, Anne M; Copas, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Background Nonprobability Web surveys using volunteer panels can provide a relatively cheap and quick alternative to traditional health and epidemiological surveys. However, concerns have been raised about their representativeness. Objective The aim was to compare results from different Web panels with a population-based probability sample survey (n=8969 aged 18-44 years) that used computer-assisted self-interview (CASI) for sensitive behaviors, the third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3). Methods Natsal-3 questions were included on 4 nonprobability Web panel surveys (n=2000 to 2099), 2 using basic quotas based on age and sex, and 2 using modified quotas based on additional variables related to key estimates. Results for sociodemographic characteristics were compared with external benchmarks and for sexual behaviors and opinions with Natsal-3. Odds ratios (ORs) were used to express differences between the benchmark data and each survey for each variable of interest. A summary measure of survey performance was the average absolute OR across variables. Another summary measure was the number of key estimates for which the survey differed significantly (at the 5% level) from the benchmarks. Results For sociodemographic variables, the Web surveys were less representative of the general population than Natsal-3. For example, for men, the average absolute OR for Natsal-3 was 1.14, whereas for the Web surveys the average absolute ORs ranged from 1.86 to 2.30. For all Web surveys, approximately two-thirds of the key estimates of sexual behaviors were different from Natsal-3 and the average absolute ORs ranged from 1.32 to 1.98. Differences were appreciable even for questions asked by CASI in Natsal-3. No single Web survey performed consistently better than any other did. Modified quotas slightly improved results for men, but not for women. Conclusions Consistent with studies from other countries on less sensitive topics, volunteer Web

  9. Shapefile of sampling sites for the assessment of groundwater quality at selected wells throughout Puerto Rico, December 2015 to November 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jose M.; Santiago, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of  a point shapefile with the location of the sites used in a sampling program to assess the water quality at selected wells throughout Puerto Rico. The sampling was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board (PREQB) during December 2015 to November 2016.

  10. A Novel Method of Failure Sample Selection for Electrical Systems Using Ant Colony Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jian; Tian, Shulin; Yang, Chenglin; Liu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The influence of failure propagation is ignored in failure sample selection based on traditional testability demonstration experiment method. Traditional failure sample selection generally causes the omission of some failures during the selection and this phenomenon could lead to some fearful risks of usage because these failures will lead to serious propagation failures. This paper proposes a new failure sample selection method to solve the problem. First, the method uses a directed graph and ant colony optimization (ACO) to obtain a subsequent failure propagation set (SFPS) based on failure propagation model and then we propose a new failure sample selection method on the basis of the number of SFPS. Compared with traditional sampling plan, this method is able to improve the coverage of testing failure samples, increase the capacity of diagnosis, and decrease the risk of using.

  11. A clinical trial alert tool to recruit large patient samples and assess selection bias in general practice research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheidt-Nave Christa

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many research projects in general practice face problems when recruiting patients, often resulting in low recruitment rates and an unknown selection bias, thus limiting their value for health services research. The objective of the study is to evaluate the recruitment performance of the practice staff in 25 participating general practices when using a clinical trial alert (CTA tool. Methods The CTA tool was developed for an osteoporosis survey of patients at risk for osteoporosis and fractures. The tool used data from electronic patient records (EPRs to automatically identify the population at risk (net sample, to apply eligibility criteria, to contact eligible patients, to enrol and survey at least 200 patients per practice. The effects of the CTA intervention were evaluated on the basis of recruitment efficiency and selection bias. Results The CTA tool identified a net sample of 16,067 patients (range 162 to 1,316 per practice, of which the practice staff reviewed 5,161 (32% cases for eligibility. They excluded 3,248 patients and contacted 1,913 patients. Of these, 1,526 patients (range 4 to 202 per practice were successfully enrolled and surveyed. This made up 9% of the net sample and 80% of the patients contacted. Men and older patients were underrepresented in the study population. Conclusion Although the recruitment target was unreachable for most practices, the practice staff in the participating practices used the CTA tool successfully to identify, document and survey a large patient sample. The tool also helped the research team to precisely determine a slight selection bias.

  12. Fish survey report of selected impoundments in September 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A fish survey of the following Carolina Sandhills NWR impoundments; Pool L, Lake Bee, Lake 16, Pool G, Mays Lake, Oxpen 1, was conducted in late September of 2004....

  13. A Survey on Selection and Administration of Perioperative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Perioperative antibiotic administration for prophylaxis of surgical site infections can increase the anaesthetists workload. However, timely administration is essential to reduce risks and improve patient outcome. Objective: This survey evaluates anaesthetists' opinion concerning perioperative antibiotic therapy ...

  14. 1996 hazardous waste management survey in selected Asian countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, D.; Christie, K.; Tao, Hong-lei [EnviroSearch International, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This report documents the results of a 42-question survey submitted to countries in Asia concerning their hazardous waste management programs and other issues. The same survey questions were distributed in 1992. This report compares the 1992 and 1996 responses. The respondents were Australia, New Zealand, Malaysia, Philippines, Hong Kong, People`s Republic of China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Singapore, Thailand, and Indonesia. 7 figs.

  15. [Selection of sentinel sites for death surveillance, using cluster or unequal probability sampling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Heng-li; Xu, Yong-yong; Guo, Ling-xia; Tan, Zhi-jun; Liu, Dan-hong; Rao, Ke-qin

    2010-04-01

    To compare the sampling errors from cluster or unequal probability sampling designs and to adopt the unequal probability sampling method to be used for death surveillance. Taking 107 areas from the county level in Shaanxi province as the sampling frame, a set of samples are drawn by equal probability cluster sampling and unequal probability designs methodologies. Sampling error and effect of each design are estimated according to their complex sample plans. Both the sampling errors depend on the sampling plan and the errors of equal probability in stratified cluster sampling appears to be less than simple cluster sampling. The design effects of unequal probability stratified cluster sampling, such as piPS design, are slightly lower than those of equal probability stratified cluster sampling, but the unequal probability stratified cluster sampling can cover a wider scope of monitoring population. Results from the analysis of sampling data can not be conducted without consideration of the sampling plan when the sampling frame is finite and a given sampling plan and parameters, such as sampling proportion and population weights, are assigned in advance. Unequal probability cluster sampling designs seems to be more appropriate in selecting the national death surveillance sites since more available monitoring data can be obtained and having more weight in estimating the mortality for the whole province or the municipality to be selected.

  16. Semi-automatic surface sediment sampling system - A prototype to be implemented in bivalve fishing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufino, Marta M.; Baptista, Paulo; Pereira, Fábio; Gaspar, Miguel B.

    2018-01-01

    In the current work we propose a new method to sample surface sediment during bivalve fishing surveys. Fishing institutes all around the word carry out regular surveys with the aim of monitoring the stocks of commercial species. These surveys comprise often more than one hundred of sampling stations and cover large geographical areas. Although superficial sediment grain sizes are among the main drivers of benthic communities and provide crucial information for studies on coastal dynamics, overall there is a strong lack of this type of data, possibly, because traditional surface sediment sampling methods use grabs, that require considerable time and effort to be carried out on regular basis or on large areas. In face of these aspects, we developed an easy and un-expensive method to sample superficial sediments, during bivalve fisheries monitoring surveys, without increasing survey time or human resources. The method was successfully evaluated and validated during a typical bivalve survey carried out on the Northwest coast of Portugal, confirming that it had any interference with the survey objectives. Furthermore, the method was validated by collecting samples using a traditional Van Veen grabs (traditional method), which showed a similar grain size composition to the ones collected by the new method, on the same localities. We recommend that the procedure is implemented on regular bivalve fishing surveys, together with an image analysis system to analyse the collected samples. The new method will provide substantial quantity of data on surface sediment in coastal areas, using a non-expensive and efficient manner, with a high potential application in different fields of research.

  17. On the problems of PPS sampling in multi-character surveys ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper, which is on the problems of PPS sampling in multi-character surveys, compares the efficiency of some estimators used in PPSWR sampling for multiple characteristics. From a superpopulation model, we computed the expected variances of the different estimators for each of the first two finite populations ...

  18. Horvitz-Thompson survey sample methods for estimating large-scale animal abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, M.D.; Garton, E.O.

    1994-01-01

    Large-scale surveys to estimate animal abundance can be useful for monitoring population status and trends, for measuring responses to management or environmental alterations, and for testing ecological hypotheses about abundance. However, large-scale surveys may be expensive and logistically complex. To ensure resources are not wasted on unattainable targets, the goals and uses of each survey should be specified carefully and alternative methods for addressing these objectives always should be considered. During survey design, the impoflance of each survey error component (spatial design, propofiion of detected animals, precision in detection) should be considered carefully to produce a complete statistically based survey. Failure to address these three survey components may produce population estimates that are inaccurate (biased low), have unrealistic precision (too precise) and do not satisfactorily meet the survey objectives. Optimum survey design requires trade-offs in these sources of error relative to the costs of sampling plots and detecting animals on plots, considerations that are specific to the spatial logistics and survey methods. The Horvitz-Thompson estimators provide a comprehensive framework for considering all three survey components during the design and analysis of large-scale wildlife surveys. Problems of spatial and temporal (especially survey to survey) heterogeneity in detection probabilities have received little consideration, but failure to account for heterogeneity produces biased population estimates. The goal of producing unbiased population estimates is in conflict with the increased variation from heterogeneous detection in the population estimate. One solution to this conflict is to use an MSE-based approach to achieve a balance between bias reduction and increased variation. Further research is needed to develop methods that address spatial heterogeneity in detection, evaluate the effects of temporal heterogeneity on survey

  19. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR SAMPLE SELECTION (SOP-1.10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The procedures for selecting CTEPP study subjects are described in the SOP. The primary, county-level stratification is by region and urbanicity. Six sample counties in each of the two states (North Carolina and Ohio) are selected using stratified random sampling and reflect ...

  20. The Time-domain Spectroscopic Survey: Target Selection for Repeat Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Eracleous, Michael; Ruan, John J.; Runnoe, Jessie; Nielsen Brandt, William; Badenes, Carles; Greene, Jenny; Morganson, Eric; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schwope, Axel; Shen, Yue; Amaro, Rachael; Lebleu, Amy; Filiz Ak, Nurten; Grier, Catherine J.; Hoover, Daniel; McGraw, Sean M.; Dawson, Kyle; Hall, Patrick B.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Mariappan, Vivek; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Chambers, Kenneth; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, Eugene; Metcalfe, Nigel; Waters, Chris Z.

    2018-01-01

    As astronomers increasingly exploit the information available in the time domain, spectroscopic variability in particular opens broad new channels of investigation. Here we describe the selection algorithms for all targets intended for repeat spectroscopy in the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), part of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV. Also discussed are the scientific rationale and technical constraints leading to these target selections. The TDSS includes a large “repeat quasar spectroscopy” (RQS) program delivering ∼13,000 repeat spectra of confirmed SDSS quasars, and several smaller “few-epoch spectroscopy” (FES) programs targeting specific classes of quasars as well as stars. The RQS program aims to provide a large and diverse quasar data set for studying variations in quasar spectra on timescales of years, a comparison sample for the FES quasar programs, and an opportunity for discovering rare, serendipitous events. The FES programs cover a wide variety of phenomena in both quasars and stars. Quasar FES programs target broad absorption line quasars, high signal-to-noise ratio normal broad line quasars, quasars with double-peaked or very asymmetric broad emission line profiles, binary supermassive black hole candidates, and the most photometrically variable quasars. Strongly variable stars are also targeted for repeat spectroscopy, encompassing many types of eclipsing binary systems, and classical pulsators like RR Lyrae. Other stellar FES programs allow spectroscopic variability studies of active ultracool dwarf stars, dwarf carbon stars, and white dwarf/M dwarf spectroscopic binaries. We present example TDSS spectra and describe anticipated sample sizes and results.

  1. 1979 Reserve Force Studies Surveys: Survey Design, Sample Design and Administrative Procedures,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    Dental Service 17 Reception Cnt. 11Other 46 Total 2914 The heterogeneity of the units poses a problem for a unit sampling plan. Namely, if the...regular schoel or collae 04. What is tha ZIP Code ZIP Cods thats you think you will ama c0oMsil In tha futura? If af tha placa whare your highest grade

  2. Resampling method for applying density-dependent habitat selection theory to wildlife surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Olivia; Massé, Ariane; Pelletier, Fanie; Fortin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Isodar theory can be used to evaluate fitness consequences of density-dependent habitat selection by animals. A typical habitat isodar is a regression curve plotting competitor densities in two adjacent habitats when individual fitness is equal. Despite the increasing use of habitat isodars, their application remains largely limited to areas composed of pairs of adjacent habitats that are defined a priori. We developed a resampling method that uses data from wildlife surveys to build isodars in heterogeneous landscapes without having to predefine habitat types. The method consists in randomly placing blocks over the survey area and dividing those blocks in two adjacent sub-blocks of the same size. Animal abundance is then estimated within the two sub-blocks. This process is done 100 times. Different functional forms of isodars can be investigated by relating animal abundance and differences in habitat features between sub-blocks. We applied this method to abundance data of raccoons and striped skunks, two of the main hosts of rabies virus in North America. Habitat selection by raccoons and striped skunks depended on both conspecific abundance and the difference in landscape composition and structure between sub-blocks. When conspecific abundance was low, raccoons and striped skunks favored areas with relatively high proportions of forests and anthropogenic features, respectively. Under high conspecific abundance, however, both species preferred areas with rather large corn-forest edge densities and corn field proportions. Based on random sampling techniques, we provide a robust method that is applicable to a broad range of species, including medium- to large-sized mammals with high mobility. The method is sufficiently flexible to incorporate multiple environmental covariates that can reflect key requirements of the focal species. We thus illustrate how isodar theory can be used with wildlife surveys to assess density-dependent habitat selection over large

  3. Risk Attitudes, Sample Selection and Attrition in a Longitudinal Field Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten Igel

    with respect to risk attitudes. Our design builds in explicit randomization on the incentives for participation. We show that there are significant sample selection effects on inferences about the extent of risk aversion, but that the effects of subsequent sample attrition are minimal. Ignoring sample...... temporal stability. We evaluate the hypothesis that risk preferences are stable over time using a remarkable data set combining administrative information from the Danish registry with longitudinal experimental data we designed to allow better identification of joint selection and attrition effects...... selection leads to inferences that subjects in the population are more risk averse than they actually are. Correcting for sample selection and attrition affects utility curvature, but does not affect inferences about probability weighting. Properly accounting for sample selection and attrition effects leads...

  4. Balanced sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    In balanced sampling a linear relation between the soil property of interest and one or more covariates with known means is exploited in selecting the sampling locations. Recent developments make this sampling design attractive for statistical soil surveys. This paper introduces balanced sampling

  5. Radio-selected Binary Active Galactic Nuclei from the Very Large Array Stripe 82 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hai; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J. M.; Stockton, A.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg2 covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the Hα-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ~60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  6. The electoral register as a sampling frame in a community health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, T J

    1989-03-01

    Experience with the electoral register as a sampling frame in a cross-sectional health study of a Jamaican community is outlined. A satisfactory yield of 83.7% (of possible minimum) was obtained with non-sample or wastage accounting for 7.3% of the chosen sample. The social organisation of the community is seen as limiting the applicability of the register, but overall, it presents itself as a potentially useful tool in community health surveys.

  7. Nationwide survey of policies and practices related to capillary blood sampling in medical laboratories in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krleza, Jasna Lenicek

    2014-01-01

    Capillary sampling is increasingly used to obtain blood for laboratory tests in volumes as small as necessary and as non-invasively as possible. Whether capillary blood sampling is also frequent in Croatia, and whether it is performed according to international laboratory standards is unclear. All medical laboratories that participate in the Croatian National External Quality Assessment Program (N = 204) were surveyed on-line to collect information about the laboratory's parent institution, patient population, types and frequencies of laboratory tests based on capillary blood samples, choice of reference intervals, and policies and procedures specifically related to capillary sampling. Sampling practices were compared with guidelines from the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Of the 204 laboratories surveyed, 174 (85%) responded with complete questionnaires. Among the 174 respondents, 155 (89%) reported that they routinely perform capillary sampling, which is carried out by laboratory staff in 118 laboratories (76%). Nearly half of respondent laboratories (48%) do not have a written protocol including order of draw for multiple sampling. A single puncture site is used to provide capillary blood for up to two samples at 43% of laboratories that occasionally or regularly perform such sampling. Most respondents (88%) never perform arterialisation prior to capillary blood sampling. Capillary blood sampling is highly prevalent in Croatia across different types of clinical facilities and patient populations. Capillary sampling procedures are not standardised in the country, and the rate of laboratory compliance with CLSI and WHO guidelines is low.

  8. Sampling guidelines for oral fluid-based surveys of group-housed animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotolo, Marisa L; Sun, Yaxuan; Wang, Chong; Giménez-Lirola, Luis; Baum, David H; Gauger, Phillip C; Harmon, Karen M; Hoogland, Marlin; Main, Rodger; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2017-09-01

    Formulas and software for calculating sample size for surveys based on individual animal samples are readily available. However, sample size formulas are not available for oral fluids and other aggregate samples that are increasingly used in production settings. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop sampling guidelines for oral fluid-based porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) surveys in commercial swine farms. Oral fluid samples were collected in 9 weekly samplings from all pens in 3 barns on one production site beginning shortly after placement of weaned pigs. Samples (n=972) were tested by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-rtPCR) and the binary results analyzed using a piecewise exponential survival model for interval-censored, time-to-event data with misclassification. Thereafter, simulation studies were used to study the barn-level probability of PRRSV detection as a function of sample size, sample allocation (simple random sampling vs fixed spatial sampling), assay diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, and pen-level prevalence. These studies provided estimates of the probability of detection by sample size and within-barn prevalence. Detection using fixed spatial sampling was as good as, or better than, simple random sampling. Sampling multiple barns on a site increased the probability of detection with the number of barns sampled. These results are relevant to PRRSV control or elimination projects at the herd, regional, or national levels, but the results are also broadly applicable to contagious pathogens of swine for which oral fluid tests of equivalent performance are available. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Analyzing Repeated Measures Marginal Models on Sample Surveys with Resampling Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Knoke

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Packaged statistical software for analyzing categorical, repeated measures marginal models on sample survey data with binary covariates does not appear to be available. Consequently, this report describes a customized SAS program which accomplishes such an analysis on survey data with jackknifed replicate weights for which the primary sampling unit information has been suppressed for respondent confidentiality. First, the program employs the Macro Language and the Output Delivery System (ODS to estimate the means and covariances of indicator variables for the response variables, taking the design into account. Then, it uses PROC CATMOD and ODS, ignoring the survey design, to obtain the design matrix and hypothesis test specifications. Finally, it enters these results into another run of CATMOD, which performs automated direct input of the survey design specifications and accomplishes the appropriate analysis. This customized SAS program can be employed, with minor editing, to analyze general categorical, repeated measures marginal models on sample surveys with replicate weights. Finally, the results of our analysis accounting for the survey design are compared to the results of two alternate analyses of the same data. This comparison confirms that such alternate analyses, which do not properly account for the design, do not produce useful results.

  10. Distance software: design and analysis of distance sampling surveys for estimating population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Len; Buckland, Stephen T; Rexstad, Eric A; Laake, Jeff L; Strindberg, Samantha; Hedley, Sharon L; Bishop, Jon Rb; Marques, Tiago A; Burnham, Kenneth P

    2010-02-01

    1.Distance sampling is a widely used technique for estimating the size or density of biological populations. Many distance sampling designs and most analyses use the software Distance.2.We briefly review distance sampling and its assumptions, outline the history, structure and capabilities of Distance, and provide hints on its use.3.Good survey design is a crucial prerequisite for obtaining reliable results. Distance has a survey design engine, with a built-in geographic information system, that allows properties of different proposed designs to be examined via simulation, and survey plans to be generated.4.A first step in analysis of distance sampling data is modelling the probability of detection. Distance contains three increasingly sophisticated analysis engines for this: conventional distance sampling, which models detection probability as a function of distance from the transect and assumes all objects at zero distance are detected; multiple-covariate distance sampling, which allows covariates in addition to distance; and mark-recapture distance sampling, which relaxes the assumption of certain detection at zero distance.5.All three engines allow estimation of density or abundance, stratified if required, with associated measures of precision calculated either analytically or via the bootstrap.6.Advanced analysis topics covered include the use of multipliers to allow analysis of indirect surveys (such as dung or nest surveys), the density surface modelling analysis engine for spatial and habitat modelling, and information about accessing the analysis engines directly from other software.7.Synthesis and applications. Distance sampling is a key method for producing abundance and density estimates in challenging field conditions. The theory underlying the methods continues to expand to cope with realistic estimation situations. In step with theoretical developments, state-of-the-art software that implements these methods is described that makes the methods

  11. [Sampling plan, weighting process and design effects of the Brazilian Oral Health Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nilza Nunes da; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    To present aspects of the sampling plan of the Brazilian Oral Health Survey (SBBrasil Project). with theoretical and operational issues that should be taken into account in the primary data analyses. The studied population was composed of five demographic groups from urban areas of Brazil in 2010. Two and three stage cluster sampling was used. adopting different primary units. Sample weighting and design effects (deff) were used to evaluate sample consistency. In total. 37,519 individuals were reached. Although the majority of deff estimates were acceptable. some domains showed distortions. The majority (90%) of the samples showed results in concordance with the precision proposed in the sampling plan. The measures to prevent losses and the effects the cluster sampling process in the minimum sample sizes proved to be effective for the deff. which did not exceeded 2. even for results derived from weighting. The samples achieved in the SBBrasil 2010 survey were close to the main proposals for accuracy of the design. Some probabilities proved to be unequal among the primary units of the same domain. Users of this database should bear this in mind, introducing sample weighting in calculations of point estimates, standard errors, confidence intervals and design effects.

  12. The ALFALFA Hα Survey. I. Project Description and The Local Star-formation Rate Density from the Fall Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sistine, Angela; Salzer, John J.; Sugden, Arthur; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Janowiecki, Steven; Jaskot, Anne E.; Wilcots, Eric M.

    2016-06-01

    The ALFALFA Hα survey utilizes a large sample of H I-selected galaxies from the ALFALFA survey to study star formation (SF) in the local universe. ALFALFA Hα contains 1555 galaxies with distances between ˜20 and ˜100 Mpc. We have obtained continuum-subtracted narrowband Hα images and broadband R images for each galaxy, creating one of the largest homogeneous sets of Hα images ever assembled. Our procedures were designed to minimize the uncertainties related to the calculation of the local SF rate density (SFRD). The galaxy sample we constructed is as close to volume-limited as possible, is a robust statistical sample, and spans a wide range of galaxy environments. In this paper, we discuss the properties of our Fall sample of 565 galaxies, our procedure for deriving individual galaxy SF rates, and our method for calculating the local SFRD. We present a preliminary value of log(SFRD[M ⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3]) = -1.747 ± 0.018 (random) ±0.05 (systematic) based on the 565 galaxies in our Fall sub-sample. Compared to the weighted average of SFRD values around z ≈ 2, our local value indicates a drop in the global SFRD of a factor of 10.2 over that lookback time.

  13. Immunization and Nutritional Status Survey of Children in selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: Immunization coverage and anthropometry of a community constitute a good index for measuring child-health status for that community. We therefore, studied the anthropometry, and the coverage of the Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) vaccines in randomly selected rural communities of Sokoto ...

  14. The starfish diagram: Visualising data within the context of survey samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantopoulos, I. S.

    2015-04-01

    As astronomy becomes increasingly invested in large surveys the ample representation of an individual target becomes a significant challenge. Tabulations of basic properties can convey the message in an absolute sense but not within the context of the sample from which the individual is drawn. We present a novel but simple plot that simultaneously visualises the properties of the sample and the individual. Numbers and characters are kept at an absolute minimum to enable the stacking of such plots without introducing too much verbal information. Once the user becomes accustomed to their appearance, a set of starfish diagrams provides a direct representation of the individual within a sample, or between various samples. The utility and versatility of the plot is demonstrated through its application to astrophysical data (SAMI Galaxy Survey) and sports statistics. We provide a brief description of the concept and the source code, which is simple to adapt to any statistical dataset, be it descriptive of physics, demographics, finance, and more.

  15. Health among disaster survivors and health professionals after the Haiyan Typhoon: a self-selected Internet-based web survey

    OpenAIRE

    Hugelius, Karin; Gifford, Mervyn; ?rtenwall, Per; Adolfsson, Annsofie

    2017-01-01

    Background Natural disasters affected millions of people worldwide every year. Evaluation of disaster health and health response interventions is faced with several methodological challenges. This study aimed (1) to describe survivors? and health professionals? health, 30?months after a natural disaster using a web-based self-selected Internet sample survey designed and (2) to evaluate the health effects of disaster response interventions, in the present study with a focus on disaster radio. ...

  16. On the selection of sampling points for myocardial T1 mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakaya, Mehmet; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Roujol, Sébastien; Nezafat, Reza

    2015-05-01

    To provide a method for the optimal selection of sampling points for myocardial T1 mapping, and to evaluate how this selection affects the precision. The Cramér-Rao lower bound on the variance of the unbiased estimator was derived for the sampling of the longitudinal magnetization curve, as a function of T1 , signal-to-noise ratio, and noise mean. The bound was then minimized numerically over a search space of possible sampling points to find the optimal selection of sampling points. Numerical simulations were carried out for a saturation recovery-based T1 mapping sequence, comparing the proposed point selection method to a uniform distribution of sampling points along the recovery curve for various T1 ranges of interest, as well as number of sampling points. Phantom imaging was performed to replicate the scenarios in numerical simulations. In vivo imaging for myocardial T1 mapping was also performed in healthy subjects. Numerical simulations show that the precision can be improved by 13-25% by selecting the sampling points according to the target T1 values of interest. Results of the phantom imaging were not significantly different than the theoretical predictions for different sampling strategies, signal-to-noise ratio and number of sampling points. In vivo imaging showed precision can be improved in myocardial T1 mapping using the proposed point selection method as predicted by theory. The framework presented can be used to select the sampling points to improve the precision without penalties on accuracy or scan time. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Hernandez-Valladares

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Global mass spectrometry (MS-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC. We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  18. Comparing Survey and Sampling Methods for Reaching Sexual Minority Individuals in Flanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewaele Alexis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of a large sexual health study, we used two different approaches to target Sexual Minority Individuals (SMIs. Firstly, we drew on a probability sample (1,832 respondents aged 14-80 of the Flemish population in Belgium. Secondly, we set up a targeted sampling design followed by an Internet survey. Our focus was to explore how two different sampling procedures and survey designs could lead to differences in sample characteristics. Results showed that for female SMIs (we excluded male SMIs from the analyses due to their low numbers the population sample differed from the Internet sample in terms of sociodemographic characteristics (the latter included younger and more highly educated respondents and scores on sexual orientation dimensions (the population sample included more respondents who didn’t identify as lesbian or bisexual but reported same-sex sexual experiences and desire. Respondents’ scores on sexual health indicators differed between the samples for two of the seven variables. We discuss implications for improving the quality and validity of nonrandom samples.

  19. Estimation of finite population variance using auxiliary information in sample surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Housila P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of estimating the finite population variance using auxiliary information in sample surveys. Motivated by (Singh and Vishwakarma, 2009 some estimators of finite population variance have been suggested along with their properties in simple random sampling. The theoretical conditions under which the proposed estimators are more efficient than usual unbiased, usual ratio and (Singh et al., 2009 estimators have been obtained. Numerical illustrations are given in support of the present study.

  20. Development of New Methods and Software for Distance Sampling Surveys of Cetacean Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    2007). Populations of animals were created using the WiSP package of routines developed by Borchers et al. (2002). This package can produce...monotonic manner). Distance sampling methods are also incorporated into the WiSP package, and take into account imperfect detectability along transects...placed within the rectangular survey region. One limitation of the distance sampling implementation of WiSP is that the transects can only be oriented

  1. RESULTS OF THE SELECTION OF BREEDING SAMPLES OF CARROT BASED ON BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    OpenAIRE

    V. K. Cherkasova; O. N. Shabetya

    2014-01-01

    12 samples of carrot were analyzed for biochemical components in roots. 5 genotypes with high content of vitamin C, β-carotene, and total sugar were selected as genetic sources of high biochemical components.

  2. Empirical aspects about Heckman Procedure Application: Is there sample selection bias in the Brazilian Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Flávio Kaue Fiuza-Moura; Katy Maia

    2015-01-01

    There are several labor market researches whose main goal is to analyze the probability of employment and the structure of wage determination and, for empirical purposes, most of these researches deploy Heckman sample selection bias hazard detection and correction procedure. However, few Brazilian studies are focused in this procedure applicability, especially concerning specific industries. This paper aims to approach these issues by testing the existence of sample selection bias in Brazilia...

  3. Cosmological Parameter Constraints from the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program Three Year Spectroscopic Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brout, Dillon

    2018-01-01

    We present cosmological parameter constraints from 251 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia Supernovae (0.02 Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program (DESSN). The photometric calibration, scene modeling photometric pipeline, additional low-z supernovae samples (z<.1), as well as the final cosmological results and systematics analysis are discussed.

  4. Sensitivity and selectivity of cultivation methods to recovery a specific Salmonella serogroup from hatchery plenum samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies have shown that Salmonella serotypes exhibit different growth characteristics in the same enrichment (selective or non-selective) and this can cause certain serotypes like S. Enteritidis to go undetected in a sample. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the serogroup diversity reco...

  5. Combined-sewer overflow data and methods of sample collection for selected sites, Detroit, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweat, M.J.; Wolf, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The discharge of untreated sewage is illegal in Michigan unless permitted under Act 245 due to public health concerns. In October, 1992, the Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR, now the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality) issued a discharge permit to Detroit authorizing discharge from the City's 78 combined-sewer overflows (CSOs), and requiring that a long-term control plan be developed to achieve mandated waterquality standards in receiving waters. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) issued a national CSO policy in April, 1994, which requires (1) operational improvements of existing systems to minimize discharges and prevent their occurrence in dry weather; (2) publicly operated treatment works (POTW) to characterize the frequency and volume of discharges; and (3) construction of CSO discharge control projects where necessary.In 1993, the Southeast Michigan Council of Governments (SEMCOG) requested assistance from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Detroit Water and Sewerage Department (DWSD) and MDNR, Surface Water Quality Division, to address part of the technical data requirements for requirement 2. The USGS scope of services for this interdisciplinary, multiagency investigation consisted of collection, compilation, and interpretation of the necessary hydrologic data, and documentation of results. In addition to USGS personnel, personnel from DWSD assisted with the field collection of samples and in alerting USGS personnel to CSO effluent discharges.From October 1, 1994 through December 31, 1995, four CSOs discharging to the Detroit River in Detroit, Michigan (figure 1) were monitored to characterize storm-related water quantity and quality. Water velocity, stage, and precipitation were measured continuously and recorded at 5-minute intervals. Water-quality samples were collected at discrete times during storms and analyzed for inorganic and organic pollutants. Discharges were sampled between 30 and 78 times

  6. Pairing call-response surveys and distance sampling for a mammalian carnivore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Sara J. K.; Frair, Jacqueline L.; Underwood, Harold B.; Gibbs, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Density estimates accounting for differential animal detectability are difficult to acquire for wide-ranging and elusive species such as mammalian carnivores. Pairing distance sampling with call-response surveys may provide an efficient means of tracking changes in populations of coyotes (Canis latrans), a species of particular interest in the eastern United States. Blind field trials in rural New York State indicated 119-m linear error for triangulated coyote calls, and a 1.8-km distance threshold for call detectability, which was sufficient to estimate a detection function with precision using distance sampling. We conducted statewide road-based surveys with sampling locations spaced ≥6 km apart from June to August 2010. Each detected call (be it a single or group) counted as a single object, representing 1 territorial pair, because of uncertainty in the number of vocalizing animals. From 524 survey points and 75 detections, we estimated the probability of detecting a calling coyote to be 0.17 ± 0.02 SE, yielding a detection-corrected index of 0.75 pairs/10 km2 (95% CI: 0.52–1.1, 18.5% CV) for a minimum of 8,133 pairs across rural New York State. Importantly, we consider this an index rather than true estimate of abundance given the unknown probability of coyote availability for detection during our surveys. Even so, pairing distance sampling with call-response surveys provided a novel, efficient, and noninvasive means of monitoring populations of wide-ranging and elusive, albeit reliably vocal, mammalian carnivores. Our approach offers an effective new means of tracking species like coyotes, one that is readily extendable to other species and geographic extents, provided key assumptions of distance sampling are met.

  7. Amostra mestra e geoprocessamento: tecnologias para inquéritos domiciliares Master sample and geoprocessing: technologies for household surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilza Nunes da Silva

    2003-08-01

    census enumeration areas in several epidemiological surveys using updated information from the National Survey of Households (PNAD. METHODS: Address data file comprising 72 census enumeration areas was kept as primary sampling units for the city of São Paulo. During the period 1995-2000, three distinct household samples were drawn using the two-stage cluster sampling procedure. Geographic Information System (GIS technology allowed delimiting boundaries, blocks and streets for any primary sampling unit and printing updated maps for selected sub-samples. RESULTS: Twenty-five thousand dwellings made up the permanent address data file of the master sample. A cheaper and quicker selection of each sample, plus gathering information on demographic and topographical profiles of census enumeration areas were the main contribution of the study results. CONCLUSIONS: The master sample concept, integrated with GIS technology, is an advantageous alternative sampling design for household surveys in urban areas. Using the list of addresses from the PNAD updated yearly, although limiting its application to the most populated Brazilian cities, avoids the need of creating an independent sampling procedure for each individual survey carried out in the period between demographic censuses, and it is an important contribution for planning sampling surveys in public health.

  8. The economic impact of poor sample quality in clinical chemistry laboratories: results from a global survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Erik P; Mitra, Debanjali; Khangulov, Victor S; Church, Stephen; Plokhoy, Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    Background Despite advances in clinical chemistry testing, poor blood sample quality continues to impact laboratory operations and the quality of results. While previous studies have identified the preanalytical causes of lower sample quality, few studies have examined the economic impact of poor sample quality on the laboratory. Specifically, the costs associated with workarounds related to fibrin and gel contaminants remain largely unexplored. Methods A quantitative survey of clinical chemistry laboratory stakeholders across 10 international regions, including countries in North America, Europe and Oceania, was conducted to examine current blood sample testing practices, sample quality issues and practices to remediate poor sample quality. Survey data were used to estimate costs incurred by laboratories to mitigate sample quality issues. Results Responses from 164 participants were included in the analysis, which was focused on three specific issues: fibrin strands, fibrin masses and gel globules. Fibrin strands were the most commonly reported issue, with an overall incidence rate of ∼3%. Further, 65% of respondents indicated that these issues contribute to analyzer probe clogging, and the majority of laboratories had visual inspection and manual remediation practices in place to address fibrin- and gel-related quality problems (55% and 70%, respectively). Probe maintenance/replacement, visual inspection and manual remediation were estimated to carry significant costs for the laboratories surveyed. Annual cost associated with lower sample quality and remediation related to fibrin and/or gel globules for an average US laboratory was estimated to be $100,247. Conclusions Measures to improve blood sample quality present an important step towards improved laboratory operations.

  9. Low vaccination coverage of Greek Roma children amid economic crisis: national survey using stratified cluster sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papamichail, Dimitris; Petraki, Ioanna; Arkoudis, Chrisoula; Terzidis, Agis; Smyrnakis, Emmanouil; Benos, Alexis; Panagiotopoulos, Takis

    2017-04-01

    Research on Roma health is fragmentary as major methodological obstacles often exist. Reliable estimates on vaccination coverage of Roma children at a national level and identification of risk factors for low coverage could play an instrumental role in developing evidence-based policies to promote vaccination in this marginalized population group. We carried out a national vaccination coverage survey of Roma children. Thirty Roma settlements, stratified by geographical region and settlement type, were included; 7-10 children aged 24-77 months were selected from each settlement using systematic sampling. Information on children's vaccination coverage was collected from multiple sources. In the analysis we applied weights for each stratum, identified through a consensus process. A total of 251 Roma children participated in the study. A vaccination document was presented for the large majority (86%). We found very low vaccination coverage for all vaccines. In 35-39% of children 'minimum vaccination' (DTP3 and IPV2 and MMR1) was administered, while 34-38% had received HepB3 and 31-35% Hib3; no child was vaccinated against tuberculosis in the first year of life. Better living conditions and primary care services close to Roma settlements were associated with higher vaccination indices. Our study showed inadequate vaccination coverage of Roma children in Greece, much lower than that of the non-minority child population. This serious public health challenge should be systematically addressed, or, amid continuing economic recession, the gap may widen. Valid national estimates on important characteristics of the Roma population can contribute to planning inclusion policies.

  10. A Systematic Mid-Infrared Survey of A Sample of Tidal Disruption Events Discovered by ZTF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lin; Van, Sjoert; Kulkarni, Shri; Kasliwal, Mansi; Gezari, Suvi; Cenko, Brad; Blagorodnova, Nadia; Hung, Tiara

    2017-12-01

    Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) saw its first light (press release on Nov 14, 2017) and is currently in the commissioning phase. The science operation is scheduled to start on Feb 1, 2018. Based on the data from Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), ZTF is expected to discover 30 new tidal disruption events (TDE) in the centers of galaxies containing supermassive blackholes. TDEs are rare transient events, and have only been discovered in recent years by large area transient surveys. Observations of optically discovered TDEs appear to show common characteristics, including blackbody temperatures of a few 10,000K, derived bolometric peak luminosities of several 10^43 - 10^44 erg/s, and photospheric radius of 10^15 - 10^16 cm. These properties are in conflict with the classic TDE model predictions, which suggest an order of magnitude higher temperature and peak luminosity. One proposed explanation is the possible existence of a reprocessing gas layer which absorbs X-ray, UV/optical photons and produces a cooler spectral energy distribution (SED). So far, there are only two published mid-IR light curves of TDEs, each with two epochal data. To solve this mystery, we require higher cadence Spitzer observations of a sample of uniformly selected TDEs. Next year is the only opportunity to obtain the critical observations because Spitzer is expected to operate only to March 2019. We request 24.1 hours of Spitzer time to observe 7 ZTF TDEs. This will produce a unique legacy dataset for many future studies of physics of TDEs.

  11. Training Program Efficacy in Developing Health Life Skills among Sample Selected from Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mohtadi, Reham Mohammad; Al Zboon, Habis Sa'ad

    2017-01-01

    This study drove at identifying the training program efficacy in developing the health life skills among sample selected from Kindergarten children. Study sample consisted of 60 children of both genders, ages of which are ranged from 5-6 years old. We have applied herein the pre and post dimension of health life skills scale; consisting of 28…

  12. Optimal Selection of the Sampling Interval for Estimation of Modal Parameters by an ARMA- Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    1993-01-01

    Optimal selection of the sampling interval for estimation of the modal parameters by an ARMA-model for a white noise loaded structure modelled as a single degree of- freedom linear mechanical system is considered. An analytical solution for an optimal uniform sampling interval, which is optimal...

  13. Large area scene selection interface (LASSI): Methodology of selecting landsat imagery for The Global Land Survey 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, S.; Masek, J.G.; Headley, R.M.K.; Gasch, J.; Arvidson, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Global Land Survey (GLS) 2005 is a cloud-free, orthorec-tified collection of Landsat imagery acquired during the 2004 to 2007 epoch intended to support global land-cover and ecological monitoring. Due to the numerous complexities in selecting imagery for the GLS2005, NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) sponsored the development of an automated scene selection tool, the Large Area Scene Selection Interface (LASSI), to aid in the selection of imagery for this data set. This innovative approach to scene selection applied a user-defined weighting system to various scene parameters: image cloud cover, image vegetation greenness, choice of sensor, and the ability of the Landsat-7 Scan Line Corrector (SLC)-off pair to completely fill image gaps, among others. The parameters considered in scene selection were weighted according to their relative importance to the data set, along with the algorithm’s sensitivity to that weight. This paper describes the methodology and analysis that established the parameter weighting strategy, as well as the post-screening processes used in selecting the optimal data set for GLS2005.

  14. Large Area Scene Selection Interface (LASSI). Methodology of Selecting Landsat Imagery for the Global Land Survey 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Shannon; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Headley, Rachel M.; Gasch, John; Arvidson, Terry

    2009-01-01

    The Global Land Survey (GLS) 2005 is a cloud-free, orthorectified collection of Landsat imagery acquired during the 2004-2007 epoch intended to support global land-cover and ecological monitoring. Due to the numerous complexities in selecting imagery for the GLS2005, NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) sponsored the development of an automated scene selection tool, the Large Area Scene Selection Interface (LASSI), to aid in the selection of imagery for this data set. This innovative approach to scene selection applied a user-defined weighting system to various scene parameters: image cloud cover, image vegetation greenness, choice of sensor, and the ability of the Landsat 7 Scan Line Corrector (SLC)-off pair to completely fill image gaps, among others. The parameters considered in scene selection were weighted according to their relative importance to the data set, along with the algorithm's sensitivity to that weight. This paper describes the methodology and analysis that established the parameter weighting strategy, as well as the post-screening processes used in selecting the optimal data set for GLS2005.

  15. Determination of Microlensing Selection Criteria for the SuperMACHO Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, A

    2008-10-10

    The SuperMACHO project is a 5 year survey to determine the nature of the lens population responsible for the excess microlensing rate toward the Large Magellanic Cloud observed by the MACHO project [1]. The survey probes deeper than earlier surveys unveiling many more extragalactic contaminants, particularly type Ia supernovae and active galactic nuclei. Using {approx}10{sup 7} simulated light curves of both microlensing events and type Ia supernovae we determine selection criteria optimized to maximize the microlensing detection efficiency while minimizing the contamination rate from non-microlensing events. We discuss these simulations and the selection criteria.

  16. The ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey: EDIBLES I. Project description, survey sample and quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nick L J; Cami, Jan; Farhang, Amin; Smoker, Jonathan; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Lallement, Rosine; Sarre, Peter J; Marshall, Charlotte C M; Smith, Keith T; Evans, Christopher J; Royer, Pierre; Linnartz, Harold; Cordiner, Martin A; Joblin, Christine; van Loon, Jacco Th; Foing, Bernard H; Bhatt, Neil H; Bron, Emeric; Elyajouri, Meriem; de Koter, Alex; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Javadi, Atefeh; Kaper, Lex; Khosroshadi, Habib G; Laverick, Mike; Le Petit, Franck; Mulas, Giacomo; Roueff, Evelyne; Salama, Farid; Spaans, Marco

    2017-10-01

    The carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are largely unidentified molecules ubiquitously present in the interstellar medium (ISM). After decades of study, two strong and possibly three weak near-infrared DIBs have recently been attributed to the [Formula: see text] fullerene based on observational and laboratory measurements. There is great promise for the identification of the over 400 other known DIBs, as this result could provide chemical hints towards other possible carriers. In an effort to systematically study the properties of the DIB carriers, we have initiated a new large-scale observational survey: the ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES). The main objective is to build on and extend existing DIB surveys to make a major step forward in characterising the physical and chemical conditions for a statistically significant sample of interstellar lines-of-sight, with the goal to reverse-engineer key molecular properties of the DIB carriers. EDIBLES is a filler Large Programme using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. It is designed to provide an observationally unbiased view of the presence and behaviour of the DIBs towards early-spectral type stars whose lines-of-sight probe the diffuse-to-translucent ISM. Such a complete dataset will provide a deep census of the atomic and molecular content, physical conditions, chemical abundances and elemental depletion levels for each sightline. Achieving these goals requires a homogeneous set of high-quality data in terms of resolution (R ~ 70 000 - 100 000), sensitivity (S/N up to 1000 per resolution element), and spectral coverage (305-1042 nm), as well as a large sample size (100+ sightlines). In this first paper the goals, objectives and methodology of the EDIBLES programme are described and an initial assessment of the data is provided.

  17. The ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES) . I. Project description, survey sample, and quality assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nick L. J.; Cami, Jan; Farhang, Amin; Smoker, Jonathan; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Lallement, Rosine; Sarre, Peter J.; Marshall, Charlotte C. M.; Smith, Keith T.; Evans, Christopher J.; Royer, Pierre; Linnartz, Harold; Cordiner, Martin A.; Joblin, Christine; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Foing, Bernard H.; Bhatt, Neil H.; Bron, Emeric; Elyajouri, Meriem; de Koter, Alex; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Javadi, Atefeh; Kaper, Lex; Khosroshadi, Habib G.; Laverick, Mike; Le Petit, Franck; Mulas, Giacomo; Roueff, Evelyne; Salama, Farid; Spaans, Marco

    2017-10-01

    The carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are largely unidentified molecules ubiquitously present in the interstellar medium (ISM). After decades of study, two strong and possibly three weak near-infrared DIBs have recently been attributed to the C60^+ fullerene based on observational and laboratory measurements. There is great promise for the identification of the over 400 other known DIBs, as this result could provide chemical hints towards other possible carriers. In an effort tosystematically study the properties of the DIB carriers, we have initiated a new large-scale observational survey: the ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES). The main objective is to build on and extend existing DIB surveys to make a major step forward in characterising the physical and chemical conditions for a statistically significant sample of interstellar lines-of-sight, with the goal to reverse-engineer key molecular properties of the DIB carriers. EDIBLES is a filler Large Programme using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile. It is designed to provide an observationally unbiased view of the presence and behaviour of the DIBs towards early-spectral-type stars whose lines-of-sight probe the diffuse-to-translucent ISM. Such a complete dataset will provide a deep census of the atomic and molecular content, physical conditions, chemical abundances and elemental depletion levels for each sightline. Achieving these goals requires a homogeneous set of high-quality data in terms of resolution (R 70 000-100 000), sensitivity (S/N up to 1000 per resolution element), and spectral coverage (305-1042 nm), as well as a large sample size (100+ sightlines). In this first paper the goals, objectives and methodology of the EDIBLES programme are described and an initial assessment of the data is provided.

  18. Factors Influencing Physicians' Selection of Continuous Professional Development Activities: A Cross-Specialty National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Price, David W; Wittich, Christopher M; West, Colin P; Blachman, Morris J

    2017-01-01

    We sought to understand what influences physicians' decisions about participation in continuous professional development (CPD) activities, and how often physicians engage in specific CPD activities. From September 2015 to April 2016, we administered a survey to 4648 randomly sampled licensed US physicians. Survey items addressed perceived barriers to CPD, factors that might influence participation in four prototypical CPD activities (reading an article, or completing a local activity, online course, or far-away course), and frequency of CPD engagement. Nine hundred eighty-eight (21.6%) physicians responded. The most important barriers were time (mean [SD] 3.5 [1.3], 1 = not important, 5 = extremely important) and cost (2.9 [1.3]). In prioritizing factors influencing participation in four prototypical CPD activities, topical relevance consistently had the highest average rank. Quality of content and time to complete the activity were also frequently selected. Over the past 3 years, most physicians reported having participated in patient-focused learning and self-directed learning on a weekly basis; quality improvement and local continuing medical education (CME) activities several times per year; online learning, on-site courses, and national board-related activities a few times per year; and interprofessional learning less than once per year. Physicians believed that they ought to engage more often in all of these activities except board-related activities. They would like CME credit for these activities much more often than currently obtained. The reasons physicians select a given CPD activity vary by activity, but invariably include topic and quality of content. Physicians want CME credit for the CPD activities they are already doing.

  19. X-ray Selected Symbiotic Candidates in the Galactic Bulge Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Wetuski, Joshua` D.; Jonker, Peter; Torres, Manuel; Heinke, Craig O.; Maccarone, Tom; Steeghs, Danny; Britt, Christopher; Johnson, Christopher; Nelemans, Gijs

    2017-06-01

    The Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a broad, shallow survey of Bulge X-ray sources with extensive multiwavelength support. The limiting sensitivity, about 2×1032 erg/s at the Bulge distance, is well suited to finding symbiotic X-ray binaries (SyXBs) containing neutron stars accreting from a cool giant wind, as well as X-ray bright white dwarf systems. Giant counterparts can be securely detected in IR photometry, allowing us to estimate the total number of symbiotics detected by the GBS, and identify a good number of promising candidates. Such an X-ray selected symbiotic sample may be quite different to the traditional symbiotic star population which is usually selected by optical spectroscopy, and consequently biased towards systems with rich line emission. Of the 1640 unique X-ray sources identified by the GBS we find 91 significant matches with candidate Bulge giants. We expect 68 coincidences, so estimate a total sample of about 23 X-ray emitting cool giants detected by the GBS. Most of these are likely to be SyXBs or symbiotics of some type. Narrowing our search to sources coincident to 1", we find 23 matches, with only 8 coincidences expected, so this subsample has a relatively high purity, and likely includes most of the GBS symbiotics. The properties of this subsample are mostly consistent with cool giants, with typical SEDs, long-term lightcurves, and spectra. The sources are inconsistent in color with nearby M dwarfs and show small proper motions, so the foreground contamination is likely small. We present a selection of the best studied objects, focusing on one extremely variable X-ray source coincident with a carbon giant. This is quite an unusual object as carbon stars are rare in the Bulge. The scientific results reported in this article are based on observations made by the Chandra X-ray Observatory and data obtained from the Chandra Data Archive. Support for this work was provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration through Chandra

  20. First Kepler results on compact pulsators - I. Survey target selection and the first pulsators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østensen, Roy H.; Silvotti, Roberto; Charpinet, S.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from the first two quarters of a survey to search for pulsations in compact stellar objects with the Kepler spacecraft. The survey sample and the various methods applied in its compilation are described, and spectroscopic observations are presented to separate the objects...

  1. Perils and potentials of self-selected entry to epidemiological studies and surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Niels; Louis, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    that maps results to an intended population. In contrast, recent analytical epidemiology has shifted the focus away from survey-type representativity to internal validity in the sample. Against this background, it is a good time for statisticians to take stock of our role and position regarding surveys...

  2. The XMM-LSS survey: the Class 1 cluster sample over the initial 5 deg2 and its cosmological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Adami, C.; Altieri, B.; Andreon, S.; Chiappetti, L.; Detal, A.; Duc, P.-A.; Galaz, G.; Gueguen, A.; Le Fèvre, J.-P.; Hertling, G.; Libbrecht, C.; Melin, J.-B.; Ponman, T. J.; Quintana, H.; Refregier, A.; Sprimont, P.-G.; Surdej, J.; Valtchanov, I.; Willis, J. P.; Alloin, D.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bremer, M. N.; Garcet, O.; Jean, C.; Jones, L. R.; Le Fèvre, O.; Maccagni, D.; Mazure, A.; Proust, D.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Trinchieri, G.

    2007-12-01

    We present a sample of 29 galaxy clusters from the XMM-LSS survey over an area of some 5 deg2 out to a redshift of z = 1.05. The sample clusters, which represent about half of the X-ray clusters identified in the region, follow well-defined X-ray selection criteria and are all spectroscopically confirmed. For all clusters, we provide X-ray luminosities and temperatures as well as masses, obtained from dedicated spatial and spectral fitting. The cluster distribution peaks around z = 0.3 and T = 1.5 keV, half of the objects being groups with a temperature below 2 keV. Our LX-T(z) relation points towards self-similar evolution, but does not exclude other physically plausible models. Assuming that cluster scaling laws follow self-similar evolution, our number density estimates up to z = 1 are compatible with the predictions of the concordance cosmology and with the findings of previous ROSAT surveys. Our well-monitored selection function allowed us to demonstrate that the inclusion of selection effects is essential for the correct determination of the evolution of the LX-T relation, which may explain the contradictory results from previous studies. Extensive simulations show that extending the survey area to 10 deg2 has the potential to exclude the non-evolution hypothesis, but those constraints on more refined intracluster medium models will probably be limited by the large intrinsic dispersion of the LX-T relation, whatever be the sample size. We further demonstrate that increasing the dispersion in the scaling laws increases the number of detectable clusters, hence generating further degeneracy [in addition to σ8,Ωm, LX-T(z)] in the cosmological interpretation of the cluster number counts. We provide useful empirical formulae for the cluster mass-flux and mass-count rate relations as well as a comparison between the XMM-LSS mass sensitivity and that of forthcoming Sunyaev-Zel'dovich surveys. Based on data collected with XMM, Very Large Telescope, Magellan, NTT and

  3. [The methodology and sample description of the National Survey on Addiction Problems in Hungary 2015 (NSAPH 2015)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksi, Borbala; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Magi, Anna; Felvinczi, Katalin

    2017-06-01

    This paper introduces the methods and methodological findings of the National Survey on Addiction Problems in Hungary (NSAPH 2015). Use patterns of smoking, alcohol use and other psychoactive substances were measured as well as that of certain behavioural addictions (problematic gambling - PGSI, DSM-V, eating disorders - SCOFF, problematic internet use - PIUQ, problematic on-line gaming - POGO, problematic social media use - FAS, exercise addictions - EAI-HU, work addiction - BWAS, compulsive buying - CBS). The paper describes the applied measurement techniques, sample selection, recruitment of respondents and the data collection strategy as well. Methodological results of the survey including reliability and validity of the measures are reported. The NSAPH 2015 research was carried out on a nationally representative sample of the Hungarian adult population aged 16-64 yrs (gross sample 2477, net sample 2274 persons) with the age group of 18-34 being overrepresented. Statistical analysis of the weight-distribution suggests that weighting did not create any artificial distortion in the database leaving the representativeness of the sample unaffected. The size of the weighted sample of the 18-64 years old adult population is 1490 persons. The extent of the theoretical margin of error in the weighted sample is ±2,5%, at a reliability level of 95% which is in line with the original data collection plans. Based on the analysis of reliability and the extent of errors beyond sampling within the context of the database we conclude that inconsistencies create relatively minor distortions in cumulative prevalence rates; consequently the database makes possible the reliable estimation of risk factors related to different substance use behaviours. The reliability indexes of measurements used for prevalence estimates of behavioural addictions proved to be appropriate, though the psychometric features in some cases suggest the presence of redundant items. The comparison of

  4. ReGenesees: an Advanced R System for Calibration, Estimation and Sampling Error Assessment in Complex Sample Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zardetto Diego

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ReGenesees is a new software system for design-based and model-assisted analysis of complex sample surveys, based on R. As compared to traditional estimation platforms, it ensures easier and safer usage and achieves a dramatic reduction in user workload for both the calibration and the variance estimation tasks. Indeed, ReGenesees allows the specification of calibration models in a symbolic way, using R model formulae. Driven by this symbolic metadata, the system automatically and transparently generates the right values and formats for the auxiliary variables at the sample level, and assists the user in defining and calculating the corresponding population totals. Moreover, ReGenesees can handle arbitrary complex estimators, provided they can be expressed as differentiable functions of Horvitz-Thompson or calibration estimators of totals. Complex estimators can be defined in a completely free fashion: the user only needs to provide the system with the symbolic expression of the estimator as a mathematical function. ReGenesees is in fact able to automatically linearize such complex estimators, so that the estimation of their variance comes at no cost at all to the user. Remarkably, all the innovative features sketched above leverage a particular strong point of the R programming language, namely its ability to process symbolic information.

  5. Not too big, not too small: a goldilocks approach to sample size selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broglio, Kristine R; Connor, Jason T; Berry, Scott M

    2014-01-01

    We present a Bayesian adaptive design for a confirmatory trial to select a trial's sample size based on accumulating data. During accrual, frequent sample size selection analyses are made and predictive probabilities are used to determine whether the current sample size is sufficient or whether continuing accrual would be futile. The algorithm explicitly accounts for complete follow-up of all patients before the primary analysis is conducted. We refer to this as a Goldilocks trial design, as it is constantly asking the question, "Is the sample size too big, too small, or just right?" We describe the adaptive sample size algorithm, describe how the design parameters should be chosen, and show examples for dichotomous and time-to-event endpoints.

  6. Empirical aspects about Heckman Procedure Application: Is there sample selection bias in the Brazilian Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Kaue Fiuza-Moura

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There are several labor market researches whose main goal is to analyze the probability of employment and the structure of wage determination and, for empirical purposes, most of these researches deploy Heckman sample selection bias hazard detection and correction procedure. However, few Brazilian studies are focused in this procedure applicability, especially concerning specific industries. This paper aims to approach these issues by testing the existence of sample selection bias in Brazilian manufacturing industry, and to analyze the impact of the bias correction procedure over the estimated coefficients of OLS Mincer equations. We found sample selection bias hazard only in manufacturing segments which average wages are lower than market average and only in groups of workers which average wage level is below the market average (women, especially blacks. The analysis and comparison of Mincer equations with and without Heckman’s sample selection bias correction procedure brought up that the estimation’s coefficients related to wage differential for male over female workers and the wage differential for urban over non-urban workers tends to be overestimated in cases which the sample selection bias isn’t corrected.

  7. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    KAUST Repository

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H.

    2014-02-01

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  8. Correcting Type Ia Supernova Distances for Selection Biases and Contamination in Photometrically Identified Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R.; Scolnic, D.

    2017-02-01

    We present a new technique to create a bin-averaged Hubble diagram (HD) from photometrically identified SN Ia data. The resulting HD is corrected for selection biases and contamination from core-collapse (CC) SNe, and can be used to infer cosmological parameters. This method, called “BEAMS with Bias Corrections” (BBC), includes two fitting stages. The first BBC fitting stage uses a posterior distribution that includes multiple SN likelihoods, a Monte Carlo simulation to bias-correct the fitted SALT-II parameters, and CC probabilities determined from a machine-learning technique. The BBC fit determines (1) a bin-averaged HD (average distance versus redshift), and (2) the nuisance parameters α and β, which multiply the stretch and color (respectively) to standardize the SN brightness. In the second stage, the bin-averaged HD is fit to a cosmological model where priors can be imposed. We perform high-precision tests of the BBC method by simulating large (150,000 event) data samples corresponding to the Dark Energy Survey Supernova Program. Our tests include three models of intrinsic scatter, each with two different CC rates. In the BBC fit, the SALT-II nuisance parameters α and β are recovered to within 1% of their true values. In the cosmology fit, we determine the dark energy equation of state parameter w using a fixed value of {{{Ω }}}{{M}} as a prior: averaging over all six tests based on 6 × 150,000 = 900,000 SNe, there is a small w-bias of 0.006+/- 0.002. Finally, the BBC fitting code is publicly available in the SNANA package.

  9. Methodology of the fasting sub-sample from the Mexican Health Survey, 2000 Metodología de la submuestra de suero de la Encuesta Nacional de Salud 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Simón Barquera; Citlalli Carrión; Ismael Campos; Juan Espinosa; Juan Rivera; Gustavo Olaiz-Fernández

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To report the comparative results of the sub-sample of fasting adults selected for the biochemical measurement of cardiovascular risk factors and the rest of the Mexican Health Survey (MHS) (2000) participants. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The nationally representative, cross-sectional Mexican Health Survey (2000) was analyzed. Survey participants reporting a fasting state period of 9- to 12-h were included in a sub-sample (n= 2 535) and compared with all other participants (n= 41 126). P...

  10. Creel survey sampling designs for estimating effort in short-duration Chinook salmon fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha sport fisheries in the Columbia River basin are commonly monitored using roving creel survey designs and require precise, unbiased catch estimates. The objective of this study was to examine the relative bias and precision of total catch estimates using various sampling designs to estimate angling effort under the assumption that mean catch rate was known. We obtained information on angling populations based on direct visual observations of portions of Chinook Salmon fisheries in three Idaho river systems over a 23-d period. Based on the angling population, Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the properties of effort and catch estimates for each sampling design. All sampling designs evaluated were relatively unbiased. Systematic random sampling (SYS) resulted in the most precise estimates. The SYS and simple random sampling designs had mean square error (MSE) estimates that were generally half of those observed with cluster sampling designs. The SYS design was more efficient (i.e., higher accuracy per unit cost) than a two-cluster design. Increasing the number of clusters available for sampling within a day decreased the MSE of estimates of daily angling effort, but the MSE of total catch estimates was variable depending on the fishery. The results of our simulations provide guidelines on the relative influence of sample sizes and sampling designs on parameters of interest in short-duration Chinook Salmon fisheries.

  11. Sampling effects on the identification of roadkill hotspots: Implications for survey design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara M; Marques, J Tiago; Lourenço, André; Medinas, Denis; Barbosa, A Márcia; Beja, Pedro; Mira, António

    2015-10-01

    Although locating wildlife roadkill hotspots is essential to mitigate road impacts, the influence of study design on hotspot identification remains uncertain. We evaluated how sampling frequency affects the accuracy of hotspot identification, using a dataset of vertebrate roadkills (n = 4427) recorded over a year of daily surveys along 37 km of roads. "True" hotspots were identified using this baseline dataset, as the 500-m segments where the number of road-killed vertebrates exceeded the upper 95% confidence limit of the mean, assuming a Poisson distribution of road-kills per segment. "Estimated" hotspots were identified likewise, using datasets representing progressively lower sampling frequencies, which were produced by extracting data from the baseline dataset at appropriate time intervals (1-30 days). Overall, 24.3% of segments were "true" hotspots, concentrating 40.4% of roadkills. For different groups, "true" hotspots accounted from 6.8% (bats) to 29.7% (small birds) of road segments, concentrating from 60% (lizards, lagomorphs, carnivores) of roadkills. Spatial congruence between "true" and "estimated" hotspots declined rapidly with increasing time interval between surveys, due primarily to increasing false negatives (i.e., missing "true" hotspots). There were also false positives (i.e., wrong "estimated" hotspots), particularly at low sampling frequencies. Spatial accuracy decay with increasing time interval between surveys was higher for smaller-bodied (amphibians, reptiles, small birds, small mammals) than for larger-bodied species (birds of prey, hedgehogs, lagomorphs, carnivores). Results suggest that widely used surveys at weekly or longer intervals may produce poor estimates of roadkill hotspots, particularly for small-bodied species. Surveying daily or at two-day intervals may be required to achieve high accuracy in hotspot identification for multiple species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. New Survey Questions and Estimators for Network Clustering with Respondent-Driven Sampling Data

    CERN Document Server

    Verdery, Ashton M; Siripong, Nalyn; Abdesselam, Kahina; Bauldry, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a popular method for sampling hard-to-survey populations that leverages social network connections through peer recruitment. While RDS is most frequently applied to estimate the prevalence of infections and risk behaviors of interest to public health, like HIV/AIDS or condom use, it is rarely used to draw inferences about the structural properties of social networks among such populations because it does not typically collect the necessary data. Drawing on recent advances in computer science, we introduce a set of data collection instruments and RDS estimators for network clustering, an important topological property that has been linked to a network's potential for diffusion of information, disease, and health behaviors. We use simulations to explore how these estimators, originally developed for random walk samples of computer networks, perform when applied to RDS samples with characteristics encountered in realistic field settings that depart from random walks. In partic...

  13. Risk Attitudes, Sample Selection and Attrition in a Longitudinal Field Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrison, Glenn W.; Lau, Morten; Yoo, Hong Il

    incentives can affect sample response rates and help one identify the effects of selection. Correcting for endogenous sample selection and panel attrition changes inferences about risk preferences in an economically and statistically significant manner. We draw mixed conclusions on temporal stability of risk......Longitudinal experiments allow one to evaluate the temporal stability of latent preferences, but raise concerns about sample selection and attrition that may confound inferences about temporal stability. We evaluate the hypothesis of temporal stability in risk preferences using a remarkable data...... set that combines socio-demographic information from the Danish Civil Registry with information on risk attitudes from a longitudinal field experiment. Our experimental design builds in explicit randomization on the incentives for participation. The results show that the use of different participation...

  14. Analysis of training sample selection strategies for regression-based quantitative landslide susceptibility mapping methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erener, Arzu; Sivas, A. Abdullah; Selcuk-Kestel, A. Sevtap; Düzgün, H. Sebnem

    2017-07-01

    All of the quantitative landslide susceptibility mapping (QLSM) methods requires two basic data types, namely, landslide inventory and factors that influence landslide occurrence (landslide influencing factors, LIF). Depending on type of landslides, nature of triggers and LIF, accuracy of the QLSM methods differs. Moreover, how to balance the number of 0 (nonoccurrence) and 1 (occurrence) in the training set obtained from the landslide inventory and how to select which one of the 1's and 0's to be included in QLSM models play critical role in the accuracy of the QLSM. Although performance of various QLSM methods is largely investigated in the literature, the challenge of training set construction is not adequately investigated for the QLSM methods. In order to tackle this challenge, in this study three different training set selection strategies along with the original data set is used for testing the performance of three different regression methods namely Logistic Regression (LR), Bayesian Logistic Regression (BLR) and Fuzzy Logistic Regression (FLR). The first sampling strategy is proportional random sampling (PRS), which takes into account a weighted selection of landslide occurrences in the sample set. The second method, namely non-selective nearby sampling (NNS), includes randomly selected sites and their surrounding neighboring points at certain preselected distances to include the impact of clustering. Selective nearby sampling (SNS) is the third method, which concentrates on the group of 1's and their surrounding neighborhood. A randomly selected group of landslide sites and their neighborhood are considered in the analyses similar to NNS parameters. It is found that LR-PRS, FLR-PRS and BLR-Whole Data set-ups, with order, yield the best fits among the other alternatives. The results indicate that in QLSM based on regression models, avoidance of spatial correlation in the data set is critical for the model's performance.

  15. 75 FR 32191 - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples: Guidelines for Proposals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... Environmental Health (NCEH) for processing. DNA samples from these specimens are being made available to the... and control of selected diseases; (3) to monitor trends in risk behaviors and environmental exposures... present the results of this project? (C). Data Dictionary: Includes (1) NCHS Restricted Data Dictionary (2...

  16. A Selective Dynamic Sampling Back-Propagation Approach for Handling the Two-Class Imbalance Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Alejo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we developed a Selective Dynamic Sampling Approach (SDSA to deal with the class imbalance problem. It is based on the idea of using only the most appropriate samples during the neural network training stage. The “average samples”are the best to train the neural network, they are neither hard, nor easy to learn, and they could improve the classifier performance. The experimental results show that the proposed method is a successful method to deal with the two-class imbalance problem. It is very competitive with respect to well-known over-sampling approaches and dynamic sampling approaches, even often outperforming the under-sampling and standard back-propagation methods. SDSA is a very simple method for automatically selecting the most appropriate samples (average samples during the training of the back-propagation, and it is very efficient. In the training stage, SDSA uses significantly fewer samples than the popular over-sampling approaches and even than the standard back-propagation trained with the original dataset.

  17. A two-stage cluster sampling method using gridded population data, a GIS, and Google EarthTM imagery in a population-based mortality survey in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galway LP

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mortality estimates can measure and monitor the impacts of conflict on a population, guide humanitarian efforts, and help to better understand the public health impacts of conflict. Vital statistics registration and surveillance systems are rarely functional in conflict settings, posing a challenge of estimating mortality using retrospective population-based surveys. Results We present a two-stage cluster sampling method for application in population-based mortality surveys. The sampling method utilizes gridded population data and a geographic information system (GIS to select clusters in the first sampling stage and Google Earth TM imagery and sampling grids to select households in the second sampling stage. The sampling method is implemented in a household mortality study in Iraq in 2011. Factors affecting feasibility and methodological quality are described. Conclusion Sampling is a challenge in retrospective population-based mortality studies and alternatives that improve on the conventional approaches are needed. The sampling strategy presented here was designed to generate a representative sample of the Iraqi population while reducing the potential for bias and considering the context specific challenges of the study setting. This sampling strategy, or variations on it, are adaptable and should be considered and tested in other conflict settings.

  18. Ethnopharmacological survey: a selection strategy to identify medicinal plants for a local phytotherapy program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Liparini Pereira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ethnopharmacological studies are important for documenting and protecting cultural and traditional knowledge associated with the medical use of biodiversity. In this paper, we present a survey on medicinal plants used by locals in a community of Nova Viçosa, Viçosa, MG, Brazil, as a strategy to select medicinal plants for a phytotherapy-based local healthcare program. Eleven knowledgeable local informants were chosen by snowball sampling and interviewed about the use of medicinal plants. Plant samples were collected, herborised and then identified using traditional techniques and specialised literature. We sampled 107 medicinal plant species belonging to 86 genera and 39 families, predominantly Asteraceae with 16 species. Costus spicatus (Jacq. Sw, M. pulegium L., Rosmarinus officinalis L. and Ruta graveolens L. were found to have Consensus of Main Use corrected (CMUc values above 50%, which were in agreement with the traditional uses described by the informants. However, species with CMUc values equal to or above 20%, combined with the scientific information survey, were also used to select medicinal plants for the phytotherapy-based local healthcare program. The selection of medicinal plants based on the CMUc index from this particular community, in combination with the scientific survey, appears to be an effective strategy for the implementation of phytotherapy programs.Estudos etnofarmacológicos são importantes no registro e na preservação de conhecimentos de uma cultura tradicional associada ao uso medicinal da biodiversidade. No presente trabalho, foi realizado o levantamento das plantas medicinais utilizadas por conhecedores populares na comunidade de Nova Viçosa, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brasil, como ferramenta para auxiliar na seleção de espécies vegetais visando à implantação de um programa de fitoterapia local na comunidade estudada. Participaram 11 conhecedores escolhidos por amostragem Bola de Neve e submetidos a

  19. A state-of-art survey on project selection using MCDM techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheil Sadi-Nezhad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Project selection is considered as the first essential part of project portfolio management. Project selection is also considered as a process to evaluate each project idea and chooses the one with the biggest priority. Project selection plays an essential role in the entire life cycle of different projects. This paper presents a survey for project selection using multiple criteria decision mak-ing techniques. The study considers 60 papers from over the period 1980-2017. The results of the survey have indicated that integration of Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS and analytical hierarchy process/analytical network process was the most popular techniques for project selection followed by VIKOR method.

  20. Principal Stratification in sample selection problems with non normal error terms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocci, Roberto; Mellace, Giovanni

    The aim of the paper is to relax distributional assumptions on the error terms, often imposed in parametric sample selection models to estimate causal effects, when plausible exclusion restrictions are not available. Within the principal stratification framework, we approximate the true distribut......The aim of the paper is to relax distributional assumptions on the error terms, often imposed in parametric sample selection models to estimate causal effects, when plausible exclusion restrictions are not available. Within the principal stratification framework, we approximate the true...

  1. Electromembrane extraction as a rapid and selective miniaturized sample preparation technique for biological fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjelstad, Astrid; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Seip, Knut Fredrik

    2015-01-01

    of organic solvent, and into an aqueous receiver solution. The extraction is promoted by application of an electrical field, causing electrokinetic migration of the charged analytes. The method has shown to perform excellent clean-up and selectivity from complicated aqueous matrices like biological fluids......This special report discusses the sample preparation method electromembrane extraction, which was introduced in 2006 as a rapid and selective miniaturized extraction method. The extraction principle is based on isolation of charged analytes extracted from an aqueous sample, across a thin film...

  2. X-ray reflection and scatter measurements on selected optical samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, S. A.; Reynolds, J. M.; Holland, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    The results from an experimental program to determine the reflection efficiency and scatter parameters of selected optical samples are presented. The measurements were made using 8.34A X-rays at various angles of incidence. Selected samples were contaminated after being measured and then remeasured to determine the effects of contamination. The instrumentation involved in taking the data, including the X-ray reflectometer and data processing equipment, is discussed in detail. The condition of the optical surfaces, the total reflection measurements, the scatter measurements, and the analysis are discussed.

  3. The Galex Time Domain Survey. I. Selection And Classification of Over a Thousand Ultraviolet Variable Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, S.; Martin, D. C.; Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Huber, M.; Heckman, T.; Bianchi, L.; Morrissey, P.; Neff, S. G.; Seibert, M.; hide

    2013-01-01

    We present the selection and classification of over a thousand ultraviolet (UV) variable sources discovered in approximately 40 deg(exp 2) of GALEX Time Domain Survey (TDS) NUV images observed with a cadence of 2 days and a baseline of observations of approximately 3 years. The GALEX TDS fields were designed to be in spatial and temporal coordination with the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, which provides deep optical imaging and simultaneous optical transient detections via image differencing. We characterize the GALEX photometric errors empirically as a function of mean magnitude, and select sources that vary at the 5 sigma level in at least one epoch. We measure the statistical properties of the UV variability, including the structure function on timescales of days and years. We report classifications for the GALEX TDS sample using a combination of optical host colors and morphology, UV light curve characteristics, and matches to archival X-ray, and spectroscopy catalogs. We classify 62% of the sources as active galaxies (358 quasars and 305 active galactic nuclei), and 10% as variable stars (including 37 RR Lyrae, 53 M dwarf flare stars, and 2 cataclysmic variables). We detect a large-amplitude tail in the UV variability distribution for M-dwarf flare stars and RR Lyrae, reaching up to absolute value(?m) = 4.6 mag and 2.9 mag, respectively. The mean amplitude of the structure function for quasars on year timescales is five times larger than observed at optical wavelengths. The remaining unclassified sources include UV-bright extragalactic transients, two of which have been spectroscopically confirmed to be a young core-collapse supernova and a flare from the tidal disruption of a star by dormant supermassive black hole. We calculate a surface density for variable sources in the UV with NUV less than 23 mag and absolute value(?m) greater than 0.2 mag of approximately 8.0, 7.7, and 1.8 deg(exp -2) for quasars, active galactic nuclei, and RR Lyrae stars

  4. SDSS-IV MaNGA: faint quenched galaxies - I. Sample selection and evidence for environmental quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Masters, Karen L.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Law, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freischlad, Gordon; Gaulme, Patrick; Grabowski, Katie; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Wake, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Using kinematic maps from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, we reveal that the majority of low-mass quenched galaxies exhibit coherent rotation in their stellar kinematics. Our sample includes all 39 quenched low-mass galaxies observed in the first year of MaNGA. The galaxies are selected with Mr > -19.1, stellar masses 109 M⊙ 1.9. They lie on the size-magnitude and σ-luminosity relations for previously studied dwarf galaxies. Just six (15 ± 5.7 per cent) are found to have rotation speeds ve, rot 5 × 1010 M⊙), supporting the hypothesis that galaxy-galaxy or galaxy-group interactions quench star formation in low-mass galaxies. The local bright galaxy density for our sample is ρproj = 8.2 ± 2.0 Mpc-2, compared to ρproj = 2.1 ± 0.4 Mpc-2 for a star-forming comparison sample, confirming that the quenched low-mass galaxies are preferentially found in higher density environments.

  5. Classification of epileptic EEG signals based on simple random sampling and sequential feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayab, Hadi Ratham Al; Li, Yan; Abdulla, Shahab; Diykh, Mohammed; Wan, Xiangkui

    2016-06-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are used broadly in the medical fields. The main applications of EEG signals are the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer, sleep problems and so on. This paper presents a new method which extracts and selects features from multi-channel EEG signals. This research focuses on three main points. Firstly, simple random sampling (SRS) technique is used to extract features from the time domain of EEG signals. Secondly, the sequential feature selection (SFS) algorithm is applied to select the key features and to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Finally, the selected features are forwarded to a least square support vector machine (LS_SVM) classifier to classify the EEG signals. The LS_SVM classifier classified the features which are extracted and selected from the SRS and the SFS. The experimental results show that the method achieves 99.90, 99.80 and 100 % for classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity, respectively.

  6. A new selective enrichment procedure for isolating Pasteurella multocida from avian and environmental samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, M.K.; Cicnjak-Chubbs, L.; Gates, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    A selective enrichment procedure, using two new selective media, was developed to isolate Pasteurella multocida from wild birds and environmental samples. These media were developed by testing 15 selective agents with six isolates of P. multocida from wild avian origin and seven other bacteria representing genera frequently found in environmental and avian samples. The resulting media—Pasteurella multocida selective enrichment broth and Pasteurella multocida selective agar—consisted of a blood agar medium at pH 10 containing gentamicin, potassium tellurite, and amphotericin B. Media were tested to determine: 1) selectivity when attempting isolation from pond water and avian carcasses, 2) sensitivity for detection of low numbers of P. multocida from pure and mixed cultures, 3) host range specificity of the media, and 4) performance compared with standard blood agar. With the new selective enrichment procedure, P. multocida was isolated from inoculated (60 organisms/ml) pond water 84% of the time, whereas when standard blood agar was used, the recovery rate was 0%.

  7. [An optimal selection method of samples of calibration set and validation set for spectral multivariate analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhao, Zhong; Yuan, Hong-Fu; Song, Chun-Feng; Li, Xiao-Yu

    2014-04-01

    The side effects in spectral multivariate modeling caused by the uneven distribution of sample numbers in the region of the calibration set and validation set were analyzed, and the "average" phenomenon that samples with small property values are predicted with larger values, and those with large property values are predicted with less values in spectral multivariate calibration is showed in this paper. Considering the distribution feature of spectral space and property space simultaneously, a new method of optimal sample selection named Rank-KS is proposed. Rank-KS aims at improving the uniformity of calibration set and validation set. Y-space was divided into some regions uniformly, samples of calibration set and validation set were extracted by Kennard-Stone (KS) and Random-Select (RS) algorithm respectively in every region, so the calibration set was distributed evenly and had a strong presentation. The proposed method were applied to the prediction of dimethylcarbonate (DMC) content in gasoline with infrared spectra and dimethylsulfoxide in its aqueous solution with near infrared spectra. The "average" phenomenon showed in the prediction of multiple linear regression (MLR) model of dimethylsulfoxide was weakened effectively by Rank-KS. For comparison, the MLR models and PLS1 models of MDC and dimethylsulfoxide were constructed by using RS, KS, Rank-Select, sample set partitioning based on joint X- and Y-blocks (SPXY) and proposed Rank-KS algorithms to select the calibration set, respectively. Application results verified that the best prediction was achieved by using Rank-KS. Especially, for the distribution of sample set with more in the middle and less on the boundaries, or none in the local, prediction of the model constructed by calibration set selected using Rank-KS can be improved obviously.

  8. Multivariate genetic analysis of atopy phenotypes in a selected sample of twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, SF; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli; Kyvik, KO

    2006-01-01

    , airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), and positive skin prick test (posSPT) in a sample of adult twins. METHODS: Within a sampling frame of 21,162 twin subjects, 20-49 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, a total of 575 subjects (256 intact pairs and 63 single twins), who either themselves and....../or their co-twins reported a history of asthma at a nationwide questionnaire survey, were clinically examined. Symptoms of wheeze and rhinitis were obtained by interview; airway responsiveness and skin test reactivity were measured using standard techniques. Correlations in liability between the different...

  9. OSSOS: constraints on resonant trans-Neptunian populations from the full survey sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Kathryn; Murray-Clay, Ruth; Gladman, Brett; Chen, Ying-Tung; Lin, Hsing Wen; Dawson, Rebekah Ilene; Lawler, Samantha; Ip, Wing-Huen; Greenstreet, Sarah; Lykawka, Patryk S.; Alexandersen, Mike; Bannister, Michele T.; Gwyn, Stephen; Kavelaars, J. J.; Petit, Jean-Marc

    2017-10-01

    The Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS) has discovered more than 300 objects in mean motion resonances with Neptune, including more than 100 objects in Neptune’s 3:2 resonance. This quadruples the available characterized sample of resonant trans-Neptunian objects. This sample can be used to test models of the current populations of these resonances and the distributions of objects within them, which will provide valuable constraints on the dynamical history of Neptune. We will report on the distribution of objects within the 3:2 resonant population and provide updated constraints on their H magnitude and eccentricity distribution. We will provide an updated estimate of the intrinsic population ratios between Neptune’s resonances based on the full OSSOS sample, highlight interesting constraints for individual resonant populations, and report new discoveries in resonances not previously known to be occupied.

  10. A comprehensive survey on selective breeding programs and seed market in the European aquaculture fish industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chavanne, Hervé; Janssen, Kasper; Hofherr, Johann

    2016-01-01

    The use of selective breeding is still relatively limited in aquaculture species. Information on such activities is sparse, hindering an overall evaluation of their success. Here, we report on the results of an online survey of the major aquaculture breeding companies operating in Europe. Six main...... reared fish species were targeted. A total of 31 respondents contributed to the survey, representing 75 % of European breeding organizations. Family-based breeding schemes were predominant, but individual selection was more frequently applied in marine species. Artificial fertilization is the preferred...

  11. The Planck-ATCA Co-eval Observations (PACO) project: the spectrally-selected sample

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, Laura; Massardi, Marcella; de Zotti, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Planck AustraliaTelescope Compact Array (Planck-ATCA)Co-evalObservations (PACO) have provided multi-frequency (5-40 GHz) flux density measurements of complete samples of Australia Telescope 20 GHz (AT20G) radio sources at frequencies below and overlapping with Planck frequency bands, almost simultaneously with Planck observations. In this work we analyse the data in total intensity for the spectrally selected PACO sample, a complete sample of 69 sources brighter than S20 GHz = 200 mJy sel...

  12. A Hierarchical Feature and Sample Selection Framework and Its Application for Alzheimer’s Disease Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Le; Adeli, Ehsan; Liu, Mingxia; Zhang, Jun; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2017-03-01

    Classification is one of the most important tasks in machine learning. Due to feature redundancy or outliers in samples, using all available data for training a classifier may be suboptimal. For example, the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is correlated with certain brain regions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and identification of relevant features is critical for computer-aided diagnosis. Many existing methods first select features from structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or SNPs and then use those features to build the classifier. However, with the presence of many redundant features, the most discriminative features are difficult to be identified in a single step. Thus, we formulate a hierarchical feature and sample selection framework to gradually select informative features and discard ambiguous samples in multiple steps for improved classifier learning. To positively guide the data manifold preservation process, we utilize both labeled and unlabeled data during training, making our method semi-supervised. For validation, we conduct experiments on AD diagnosis by selecting mutually informative features from both MRI and SNP, and using the most discriminative samples for training. The superior classification results demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, as compared with the rivals.

  13. Gender Wage Gap : A Semi-Parametric Approach With Sample Selection Correction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picchio, M.; Mussida, C.

    2010-01-01

    Sizeable gender differences in employment rates are observed in many countries. Sample selection into the workforce might therefore be a relevant issue when estimating gender wage gaps. This paper proposes a new semi-parametric estimator of densities in the presence of covariates which incorporates

  14. Statistical methods for genetic association studies with response-selective sampling designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balliu, Brunilda

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes new statistical methods designed to improve the power of genetic association studies. Of particular interest are studies with a response-selective sampling design, i.e. case-control studies of unrelated individuals and case-control studies of family members. The

  15. RESULTS OF THE SELECTION OF BREEDING SAMPLES OF CARROT BASED ON BIOCHEMICAL COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Cherkasova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 12 samples of carrot were analyzed for biochemical components in roots. 5 genotypes with high content of vitamin C, β-carotene, and total sugar were selected as genetic sources of high biochemical components.

  16. Phytochemical analysis and biological evaluation of selected African propolis samples from Cameroon and Congo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papachroni, D.; Graikou, K.; Kosalec, I.; Damianakos, H.; Ingram, V.J.; Chinou, I.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was the chemical analysis of four selected samples of African propolis (Congo and Cameroon) and their biological evaluation. Twenty-one secondary metabolites belonging to four different chemical groups were isolated from the 70% ethanolic extracts of propolis and their

  17. Decomposing the Gender Wage Gap in the Netherlands with Sample Selection Adjustments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, James; Vuuren, van Aico; Vroman, Susan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we use quantile regression decomposition methods to analyzethe gender gap between men and women who work full time in the Nether-lands. Because the fraction of women working full time in the Netherlands isquite low, sample selection is a serious issue. In addition to shedding light

  18. DOUBLE-PEAKED NARROW EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY. I. SAMPLE AND BASIC PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge Junqiang; Hu Chen; Wang Jianmin; Zhang Shu [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Bai Jinming, E-mail: wangjm@mail.ihep.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2012-08-01

    Recently, much attention has been paid to double-peaked narrow emission-line (NEL) galaxies, some of which are suggested to be related to merging galaxies. We make a systematic search to build the largest sample of these sources from Data Release 7 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). With reasonable criteria for fluxes, FWHMs of the emission lines, and separations of the peaks, we select 3030 double-peaked NEL galaxies. In light of the existence of broad Balmer lines and the locations of the two components of double-peaked NELs distinguished by the Kauffmann et al. criteria in the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, we find that there are 81 Type I active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 837 double Type II AGNs (2-Type II), 708 galaxies with double star-forming components (2-SF), 400 with mixed star-forming and Type II AGN components (Type II + SF), and 1004 unknown-type objects. As a by-product, a sample of galaxies (12,582) with asymmetric or top-flat profiles of emission lines is established. After visually inspecting the SDSS images of the two samples, we find 54 galaxies with dual cores. The present samples can be used to study the dynamics of merging galaxies, the triggering mechanism of black hole activity, the hierarchical growth of galaxies, and the dynamics of narrow line regions driven by outflows and a rotating disk.

  19. Assessment of selected contaminants in streambed- and suspended-sediment samples collected in Bexar County, Texas, 2007-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jennifer T.

    2011-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of sediment-associated contaminants are typically associated with urban areas such as San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County, the seventh most populous city in the United States. This report describes an assessment of selected sediment-associated contaminants in samples collected in Bexar County from sites on the following streams: Medio Creek, Medina River, Elm Creek, Martinez Creek, Chupaderas Creek, Leon Creek, Salado Creek, and San Antonio River. During 2007-09, the U.S. Geological Survey periodically collected surficial streambed-sediment samples during base flow and suspended-sediment (large-volume suspended-sediment) samples from selected streams during stormwater runoff. All sediment samples were analyzed for major and trace elements and for organic compounds including halogenated organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Selected contaminants in streambed and suspended sediments in watersheds of the eight major streams in Bexar County were assessed by using a variety of methods—observations of occurrence and distribution, comparison to sediment-quality guidelines and data from previous studies, statistical analyses, and source indicators. Trace elements concentrations were low compared to the consensus-based sediment-quality guidelines threshold effect concentration (TEC) and probable effect concentration (PEC). Trace element concentrations were greater than the TEC in 28 percent of the samples and greater than the PEC in 1.5 percent of the samples. Chromium concentrations exceeded sediment-quality guidelines more frequently than concentrations of any other constituents analyzed in this study (greater than the TEC in 69 percent of samples and greater than the PEC in 8 percent of samples). Mean trace element concentrations generally are lower in Bexar County samples compared to concentrations in samples collected during previous studies in the Austin and Fort Worth, Texas, areas, but considering the relatively

  20. Attitudes Towards (Psychotherapy) Groups: Results of a Survey in a Representative Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Bernhard; Spangenberg, Lena; Brähler, Elmar; Bormann, Bianca

    2015-07-01

    Based upon observations indicating decreasing attractiveness of groups within and outside the clinical field, the present study aimed to determine attitudes toward, and expectations of, groups in a representative sample of 2512 German citizens. The survey also included questions specifically related to group psychotherapy and its acceptance. In addition, psychological characteristics of respondents (measures of narcissism, psychological impairment, and emotion regulation) and socio-demographic variables were assessed to examine their potential association with group-related attitudes. In total, the survey revealed a relatively positive picture of attitudes and expectations toward groups in general and psychotherapy groups in particular. Those with more open attitudes towards groups were comparatively less distressed, anxious, and depressed; they favored emotional reappraisal instead of suppression as the dominant strategy to regulate their emotions. Contrary to prediction, narcissism did not influence attitudes towards groups. The results are related to current discussions of the attractiveness of groups and to implications for the practice of group psychotherapy.

  1. Spatial scales of variation in lichens: implications for sampling design in biomonitoring surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Paolo; Brunialti, Giorgio; Frati, Luisa; Incerti, Guido; Ianesch, Luca; Vallone, Emanuele; Bacaro, Giovanni; Maccherini, Simona

    2013-02-01

    The variability of biological data is a main constraint affecting the quality and reliability of lichen biomonitoring surveys for estimation of the effects of atmospheric pollution. Although most epiphytic lichen bioindication surveys focus on between-site differences at the landscape level, associated with the large scale effects of atmospheric pollution, current protocols are based on multilevel sampling, thus adding further sources of variation and affecting the error budget. We test the hypothesis that assemblages of lichen communities vary at each spatial scale examined, in order to determine what scales should be included in future monitoring studies. We compared four sites in Italy, along gradients of atmospheric pollution and climate, to test the partitioning of the variance components of lichen diversity across spatial scales (from trunks to landscapes). Despite environmental heterogeneity, we observed comparable spatial variance. However, residuals often overcame between-plot variability, leading to biased estimation of atmospheric pollution effects.

  2. Transfer function design based on user selected samples for intuitive multivariate volume exploration

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Liang

    2013-02-01

    Multivariate volumetric datasets are important to both science and medicine. We propose a transfer function (TF) design approach based on user selected samples in the spatial domain to make multivariate volumetric data visualization more accessible for domain users. Specifically, the user starts the visualization by probing features of interest on slices and the data values are instantly queried by user selection. The queried sample values are then used to automatically and robustly generate high dimensional transfer functions (HDTFs) via kernel density estimation (KDE). Alternatively, 2D Gaussian TFs can be automatically generated in the dimensionality reduced space using these samples. With the extracted features rendered in the volume rendering view, the user can further refine these features using segmentation brushes. Interactivity is achieved in our system and different views are tightly linked. Use cases show that our system has been successfully applied for simulation and complicated seismic data sets. © 2013 IEEE.

  3. Automatic training sample selection for a multi-evidence based crop classification approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chellasamy, Menaka; Ferre, Ty; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    An approach to use the available agricultural parcel information to automatically select training samples for crop classification is investigated. Previous research addressed the multi-evidence crop classification approach using an ensemble classifier. This first produced confidence measures using...... three Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural networks trained separately with spectral, texture and vegetation indices; classification labels were then assigned based on Endorsement Theory. The present study proposes an approach to feed this ensemble classifier with automatically selected training samples....... The available vector data representing crop boundaries with corresponding crop codes are used as a source for training samples. These vector data are created by farmers to support subsidy claims and are, therefore, prone to errors such as mislabeling of crop codes and boundary digitization errors. The proposed...

  4. Semiparametric efficient and robust estimation of an unknown symmetric population under arbitrary sample selection bias

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Yanyuan

    2013-09-01

    We propose semiparametric methods to estimate the center and shape of a symmetric population when a representative sample of the population is unavailable due to selection bias. We allow an arbitrary sample selection mechanism determined by the data collection procedure, and we do not impose any parametric form on the population distribution. Under this general framework, we construct a family of consistent estimators of the center that is robust to population model misspecification, and we identify the efficient member that reaches the minimum possible estimation variance. The asymptotic properties and finite sample performance of the estimation and inference procedures are illustrated through theoretical analysis and simulations. A data example is also provided to illustrate the usefulness of the methods in practice. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  5. Selection of nursing teaching strategies in mainland China: A questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, HouXiu; Liu, MengJie; Zeng, Jing; Zhu, JingCi

    2016-04-01

    In nursing education, the traditional lecture and direct demonstration teaching method cannot cultivate the various skills that nursing students need. How to choose a more scientific and rational teaching method is a common concern for nursing educators worldwide. To investigate the basis for selecting teaching methods among nursing teachers in mainland China, the factors affecting the selection of different teaching methods, and the application of different teaching methods in theoretical and skill-based nursing courses. Questionnaire survey. Seventy one nursing colleges from 28 provincial-level administrative regions in mainland China. Following the principle of voluntary informed consent, 262 nursing teachers were randomly selected through a nursing education network platform and a conference platform. The questionnaire contents included the basis for and the factors influencing the selection of nursing teaching methods, the participants' common teaching methods, and the teaching experience of the surveyed nursing teachers. The questionnaires were distributed through the network or conference platform, and the data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0 software. The surveyed nursing teachers selected teaching methods mainly based on the characteristics of the teaching content, the characteristics of the students, and their previous teaching experiences. The factors affecting the selection of teaching methods mainly included large class sizes, limited class time, and limited examination formats. The surveyed nursing teachers primarily used lectures to teach theory courses and the direct demonstration method to teach skills courses, and the application frequencies of these two teaching methods were significantly higher than those of other teaching methods (P=0.000). More attention should be paid to the selection of nursing teaching methods. Every teacher should strategically choose teaching methods before each lesson, and nursing education training focused on selecting

  6. [Sampling procedure for a survey of an interventional study on acute respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramón Bravo, J; González Ochoa, E

    1993-01-01

    A description is made of the methodology used for obtaining a sample made up of 500 children under 5 years and 500 adults 65 year old and more, in order to carry out an intervention study on acute respiratory tract infections in an urban zone in Havana City and in a rural zone in Matanzas province, where different intervention stops will be taken with regards sanitary education about management of acute respiratory tract infections for the population and training for primary care medical personnel. We show the way the selected sample fits was planned with a very homogeneous distribution in the 8 areas under study, which allows for great reliability in the results.

  7. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: the intrinsic shape of kinematically selected galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, C.; van de Sande, J.; D'Eugenio, F.; Cortese, L.; McDermid, R. M.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brough, S.; Bryant, J.; Croom, S. M.; Goodwin, M.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lawrence, J.; López-Sánchez, Á. R.; Medling, A. M.; Owers, M. S.; Richards, S. N.; Scott, N.; Taranu, D. S.; Tonini, C.; Zafar, T.

    2017-11-01

    Using the stellar kinematic maps and ancillary imaging data from the Sydney AAO Multi Integral field (SAMI) Galaxy Survey, the intrinsic shape of kinematically selected samples of galaxies is inferred. We implement an efficient and optimized algorithm to fit the intrinsic shape of galaxies using an established method to simultaneously invert the distributions of apparent ellipticities and kinematic misalignments. The algorithm output compares favourably with previous studies of the intrinsic shape of galaxies based on imaging alone and our re-analysis of the ATLAS3D data. Our results indicate that most galaxies are oblate axisymmetric. We show empirically that the intrinsic shape of galaxies varies as a function of their rotational support as measured by the `spin' parameter proxy λ _{R_e}. In particular, low-spin systems have a higher occurrence of triaxiality, while high-spin systems are more intrinsically flattened and axisymmetric. The intrinsic shape of galaxies is linked to their formation and merger histories. Galaxies with high-spin values have intrinsic shapes consistent with dissipational minor mergers, while the intrinsic shape of low-spin systems is consistent with dissipationless multimerger assembly histories. This range in assembly histories inferred from intrinsic shapes is broadly consistent with expectations from cosmological simulations.

  8. Data from selected U.S. Geological Survey national stream water quality monitoring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R.B.; Slack, J.R.; Ludtke, A.S.; Fitzgerald, K.K.; Schertz, T.L.

    1998-01-01

    A nationally consistent and well-documented collection of water quality and quantity data compiled during the past 30 years for streams and rivers in the United States is now available on CD-ROM and accessible over the World Wide Web. The data include measurements from two U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) national networks for 122 physical, chemical, and biological properties of water collected at 680 monitoring stations from 1962 to 1995, quality assurance information that describes the sample collection agencies, laboratories, analytical methods, and estimates of laboratory measurement error (bias and variance), and information on selected cultural and natural characteristics of the station watersheds. The data are easily accessed via user-supplied software including Web browser, spreadsheet, and word processor, or may be queried and printed according to user-specified criteria using the supplied retrieval software on CD-ROM. The water quality data serve a variety of scientific uses including research and educational applications related to trend detection, flux estimation, investigations of the effects of the natural environment and cultural sources on water quality, and the development of statistical methods for designing efficient monitoring networks and interpreting water resources data.

  9. Men who have sex with men in Great Britain: comparing methods and estimates from probability and convenience sample surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prah, Philip; Hickson, Ford; Bonell, Chris; McDaid, Lisa M; Johnson, Anne M; Wayal, Sonali; Clifton, Soazig; Sonnenberg, Pam; Nardone, Anthony; Erens, Bob; Copas, Andrew J; Riddell, Julie; Weatherburn, Peter; Mercer, Catherine H

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine sociodemographic and behavioural differences between men who have sex with men (MSM) participating in recent UK convenience surveys and a national probability sample survey. Methods We compared 148 MSM aged 18–64 years interviewed for Britain's third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3) undertaken in 2010–2012, with men in the same age range participating in contemporaneous convenience surveys of MSM: 15 500 British resident men in the European MSM Internet Survey (EMIS); 797 in the London Gay Men's Sexual Health Survey; and 1234 in Scotland's Gay Men's Sexual Health Survey. Analyses compared men reporting at least one male sexual partner (past year) on similarly worded questions and multivariable analyses accounted for sociodemographic differences between the surveys. Results MSM in convenience surveys were younger and better educated than MSM in Natsal-3, and a larger proportion identified as gay (85%–95% vs 62%). Partner numbers were higher and same-sex anal sex more common in convenience surveys. Unprotected anal intercourse was more commonly reported in EMIS. Compared with Natsal-3, MSM in convenience surveys were more likely to report gonorrhoea diagnoses and HIV testing (both past year). Differences between the samples were reduced when restricting analysis to gay-identifying MSM. Conclusions National probability surveys better reflect the population of MSM but are limited by their smaller samples of MSM. Convenience surveys recruit larger samples of MSM but tend to over-represent MSM identifying as gay and reporting more sexual risk behaviours. Because both sampling strategies have strengths and weaknesses, methods are needed to triangulate data from probability and convenience surveys. PMID:26965869

  10. Sampling and Analysis Plan for Supplemental Environmental Project: Aquatic Life Surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berryhill, Jesse Tobias [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gaukler, Shannon Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-26

    As part of a settlement agreement for nuclear waste incidents in 2014, several supplemental environment projects (SEPs) were initiated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) between the U.S. Department of Energy and the state of New Mexico. One SEP from this agreement consists of performing aquatic life surveys and will be used to assess the applicability of using generic ambient water-quality criteria (AWQC) for aquatic life. AWQC are generic criteria developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to cover a broad range of aquatic species and are not unique to a specific region or state. AWQC are established by a composition of toxicity data, called species sensitivity distributions (SSDs), and are determined by LC50 (lethal concentration of 50% of the organisms studied) acute toxicity experiments for chemicals of interest. It is of interest to determine whether aquatic species inhabiting waters on the Pajarito Plateau are adequately protected using the current generic AWQC. The focus of this study will determine which aquatic species are present in ephemeral, intermittent, and perennial waters within LANL boundaries and from reference waters adjacent to LANL. If the species identified from these waters do not generally represent species used in the SSDs, then SSDs may need to be modified and AWQC may need to be updated. This sampling and analysis plan details the sampling methodology, surveillance locations, temporal scheduling, and analytical approaches that will be used to complete aquatic life surveys. A significant portion of this sampling and analysis plan was formalized by referring to Appendix E: SEP Aquatic Life Surveys DQO (Data Quality Objectives).

  11. Studies on natural recovery from alcohol dependence: sample selection bias by media solicitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpf, H J; Bischof, G; Hapke, U; Meyer, C; John, U

    2000-05-01

    To assess the selection bias of recruiting participants in studies on natural recovery from alcohol dependence through media solicitation. Two samples with different recruitment strategies are compared. Media solicitation and general population. Sample 1 consists of 176 alcohol-dependent individuals remitted without formal help and recruited through media solicitation, sample 2 consists of 32 natural remitters derived from a representative general population study with a sample size of 4075 respondents and a response rate of 70.2%. Several triggering mechanisms and maintenance factors of remission were assessed in a personal interview using standardized questionnaires. Results of logistic regression analyses show that media-solicited subjects were more often abstinent in the last 12 months, were more severely dependent, were less satisfied with eight life domains prior to remission and showed higher scores in a coping behaviour measure. Besides these major differences from the multivariate analysis, media subjects revealed more health problems prior to remission, experienced more social pressure to change drinking behaviour, and showed differences in reasons for not seeking help. Media solicitation leads to a sample selection bias in research on natural recovery from alcohol dependence. When measures to foster self-change are derived from such studies, findings from representative samples have to be considered.

  12. Bayesian model selection: Evidence estimation based on DREAM simulation and bridge sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpi, Elena; Schoups, Gerrit; Firmani, Giovanni; Vrugt, Jasper A.

    2017-04-01

    Bayesian inference has found widespread application in Earth and Environmental Systems Modeling, providing an effective tool for prediction, data assimilation, parameter estimation, uncertainty analysis and hypothesis testing. Under multiple competing hypotheses, the Bayesian approach also provides an attractive alternative to traditional information criteria (e.g. AIC, BIC) for model selection. The key variable for Bayesian model selection is the evidence (or marginal likelihood) that is the normalizing constant in the denominator of Bayes theorem; while it is fundamental for model selection, the evidence is not required for Bayesian inference. It is computed for each hypothesis (model) by averaging the likelihood function over the prior parameter distribution, rather than maximizing it as by information criteria; the larger a model evidence the more support it receives among a collection of hypothesis as the simulated values assign relatively high probability density to the observed data. Hence, the evidence naturally acts as an Occam's razor, preferring simpler and more constrained models against the selection of over-fitted ones by information criteria that incorporate only the likelihood maximum. Since it is not particularly easy to estimate the evidence in practice, Bayesian model selection via the marginal likelihood has not yet found mainstream use. We illustrate here the properties of a new estimator of the Bayesian model evidence, which provides robust and unbiased estimates of the marginal likelihood; the method is coined Gaussian Mixture Importance Sampling (GMIS). GMIS uses multidimensional numerical integration of the posterior parameter distribution via bridge sampling (a generalization of importance sampling) of a mixture distribution fitted to samples of the posterior distribution derived from the DREAM algorithm (Vrugt et al., 2008; 2009). Some illustrative examples are presented to show the robustness and superiority of the GMIS estimator with

  13. School Selection by Students. First Results from the GMAC's New Matriculants Survey. GMAC Occasional Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Ross M.; Giarrusso, Roseann

    A description of the Graduate Management Admission Council's New Matriculants Survey focusing on school selection by Masters of Business Administration students is presented. Four sections are as follows: (1) reasons for applying and enrolling (including student differences in reasons for applying); (2) who applies to more than one school (e.g.,…

  14. Deep far infrared ISOPHOT survey in "Selected Area 57" - I. Observations and source counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linden-Vornle, M.J.D.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    We present here the results of a deep survey in a 0.4 deg(2) blank field in Selected Area 57 conducted with the ISOPHOT instrument aboard ESAs Infrared Space Observatory (ISO1) at both 60 mu m and 90 mu m. The resulting sky maps have a spatial resolution of 15 x 23 arcsrc(2) per pixel which is much...

  15. Sampling and Selection Factors that Enhance the Diversity of Microbial Collections: Application to Biopesticide Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Kyung Park

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Diverse bacteria are known to colonize plants. However, only a small fraction of that diversity has been evaluated for their biopesticide potential. To date, the criteria for sampling and selection in such bioprospecting endeavors have not been systematically evaluated in terms of the relative amount of diversity they provide for analysis. The present study aimed to enhance the success of bio-prospecting efforts by increasing the diversity while removing the genotypic redundancy often present in large collections of bacteria. We developed a multivariate sampling and marker-based selection strategy that significantly increase the diversity of bacteria recovered from plants. In doing so, we quantified the effects of varying sampling intensity, media composition, incubation conditions, plant species, and soil source on the diversity of recovered isolates. Subsequent sequencing and high-throughput phenotypic analyses of a small fraction of the collected isolates revealed that this approach led to the recovery of over a dozen rare and, to date, poorly characterized genera of plant-associated bacteria with significant biopesticide activities. Overall, the sampling and selection approach described led to an approximately 5-fold improvement in efficiency and the recovery of several novel strains of bacteria with significant biopesticide potential.

  16. Nested sampling algorithm for subsurface flow model selection, uncertainty quantification, and nonlinear calibration

    KAUST Repository

    Elsheikh, A. H.

    2013-12-01

    Calibration of subsurface flow models is an essential step for managing ground water aquifers, designing of contaminant remediation plans, and maximizing recovery from hydrocarbon reservoirs. We investigate an efficient sampling algorithm known as nested sampling (NS), which can simultaneously sample the posterior distribution for uncertainty quantification, and estimate the Bayesian evidence for model selection. Model selection statistics, such as the Bayesian evidence, are needed to choose or assign different weights to different models of different levels of complexities. In this work, we report the first successful application of nested sampling for calibration of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems. The estimated Bayesian evidence by the NS algorithm is used to weight different parameterizations of the subsurface flow models (prior model selection). The results of the numerical evaluation implicitly enforced Occam\\'s razor where simpler models with fewer number of parameters are favored over complex models. The proper level of model complexity was automatically determined based on the information content of the calibration data and the data mismatch of the calibrated model.

  17. Sample Selected Extreme Learning Machine Based Intrusion Detection in Fog Computing and MEC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingshuo An

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fog computing, as a new paradigm, has many characteristics that are different from cloud computing. Due to the resources being limited, fog nodes/MEC hosts are vulnerable to cyberattacks. Lightweight intrusion detection system (IDS is a key technique to solve the problem. Because extreme learning machine (ELM has the characteristics of fast training speed and good generalization ability, we present a new lightweight IDS called sample selected extreme learning machine (SS-ELM. The reason why we propose “sample selected extreme learning machine” is that fog nodes/MEC hosts do not have the ability to store extremely large amounts of training data sets. Accordingly, they are stored, computed, and sampled by the cloud servers. Then, the selected sample is given to the fog nodes/MEC hosts for training. This design can bring down the training time and increase the detection accuracy. Experimental simulation verifies that SS-ELM performs well in intrusion detection in terms of accuracy, training time, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC value.

  18. Soft X-Ray Observations of a Complete Sample of X-Ray--selected BL Lacertae Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.; Wang, Q. Daniel; Morris, Simon L.

    1996-01-01

    We present the results of ROSAT PSPC observations of the X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects (XBLs) in the complete Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey (EM MS) sample. None of the objects is resolved in their respective PSPC images, but all are easily detected. All BL Lac objects in this sample are well-fitted by single power laws. Their X-ray spectra exhibit a variety of spectral slopes, with best-fit energy power-law spectral indices between α = 0.5-2.3. The PSPC spectra of this sample are slightly steeper than those typical of flat ratio-spectrum quasars. Because almost all of the individual PSPC spectral indices are equal to or slightly steeper than the overall optical to X-ray spectral indices for these same objects, we infer that BL Lac soft X-ray continua are dominated by steep-spectrum synchrotron radiation from a broad X-ray jet, rather than flat-spectrum inverse Compton radiation linked to the narrower radio/millimeter jet. The softness of the X-ray spectra of these XBLs revives the possibility proposed by Guilbert, Fabian, & McCray (1983) that BL Lac objects are lineless because the circumnuclear gas cannot be heated sufficiently to permit two stable gas phases, the cooler of which would comprise the broad emission-line clouds. Because unified schemes predict that hard self-Compton radiation is beamed only into a small solid angle in BL Lac objects, the steep-spectrum synchrotron tail controls the temperature of the circumnuclear gas at r ≤ 1018 cm and prevents broad-line cloud formation. We use these new ROSAT data to recalculate the X-ray luminosity function and cosmological evolution of the complete EMSS sample by determining accurate K-corrections for the sample and estimating the effects of variability and the possibility of incompleteness in the sample. Our analysis confirms that XBLs are evolving "negatively," opposite in sense to quasars, with Ve/Va = 0.331±0.060. The statistically significant difference between the values for X

  19. Dermatology Residency Selection Criteria with an Emphasis on Program Characteristics: A National Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorouhi, Farzam; Alikhan, Ali; Rezaei, Arash; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-01-01

    Background. Dermatology residency programs are relatively diverse in their resident selection process. The authors investigated the importance of 25 dermatology residency selection criteria focusing on differences in program directors' (PDs') perception based on specific program demographics. Methods. This cross-sectional nationwide observational survey utilized a 41-item questionnaire that was developed by literature search, brainstorming sessions, and online expert reviews. The data were analyzed utilizing the reliability test, two-step clustering, and K-means methods as well as other methods. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in PDs' perception regarding the importance of the selection criteria based on program demographics. Results. Ninety-five out of 114 PDs (83.3%) responded to the survey. The top five criteria for dermatology residency selection were interview, letters of recommendation, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I scores, medical school transcripts, and clinical rotations. The following criteria were preferentially ranked based on different program characteristics: “advanced degrees,” “interest in academics,” “reputation of undergraduate and medical school,” “prior unsuccessful attempts to match,” and “number of publications.” Conclusions. Our survey provides up-to-date factual data on dermatology PDs' perception in this regard. Dermatology residency programs may find the reported data useful in further optimizing their residency selection process. PMID:24772165

  20. The X-Shooter Lens Survey - II. Sample presentation and spatially-resolved kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiniello, C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Trager, S. C.; Barnabè, M.; Treu, T.; Czoske, O.; Vegetti, S.; Bolton, A.

    2015-09-01

    We present the X-Shooter Lens Survey (XLENS) data. The main goal of XLENS is to disentangle the stellar and dark matter content of massive early-type galaxies (ETGs), through combined strong gravitational lensing, dynamics and spectroscopic stellar population studies. The sample consists of 11 lens galaxies covering the redshift range from 0.1 to 0.45 and having stellar velocity dispersions between 250 and 380 km s-1. All galaxies have multiband, high-quality HST imaging. We have obtained long-slit spectra of the lens galaxies with X-Shooter on the VLT. We are able to disentangle the dark and luminous mass components by combining lensing and extended kinematics data sets, and we are also able to precisely constrain stellar mass-to-light ratios and infer the value of the low-mass cut-off of the initial mass functions (IMF), by adding spectroscopic stellar population information. Our goal is to correlate these IMF parameters with ETG masses and investigate the relation between baryonic and non-baryonic matter during the mass assembly and structure formation processes. In this paper, we provide an overview of the survey, highlighting its scientific motivations, main goals and techniques. We present the current sample, briefly describing the data reduction and analysis process, and we present the first results on spatially-resolved kinematics.

  1. Progressive sampling-based Bayesian optimization for efficient and automatic machine learning model selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xueqiang; Luo, Gang

    2017-12-01

    Machine learning is broadly used for clinical data analysis. Before training a model, a machine learning algorithm must be selected. Also, the values of one or more model parameters termed hyper-parameters must be set. Selecting algorithms and hyper-parameter values requires advanced machine learning knowledge and many labor-intensive manual iterations. To lower the bar to machine learning, miscellaneous automatic selection methods for algorithms and/or hyper-parameter values have been proposed. Existing automatic selection methods are inefficient on large data sets. This poses a challenge for using machine learning in the clinical big data era. To address the challenge, this paper presents progressive sampling-based Bayesian optimization, an efficient and automatic selection method for both algorithms and hyper-parameter values. We report an implementation of the method. We show that compared to a state of the art automatic selection method, our method can significantly reduce search time, classification error rate, and standard deviation of error rate due to randomization. This is major progress towards enabling fast turnaround in identifying high-quality solutions required by many machine learning-based clinical data analysis tasks.

  2. Detecting and Quantifying Changing Selection Intensities from Time-Sampled Polymorphism Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjin Shim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available During his well-known debate with Fisher regarding the phenotypic dataset of Panaxia dominula, Wright suggested fluctuating selection as a potential explanation for the observed change in allele frequencies. This model has since been invoked in a number of analyses, with the focus of discussion centering mainly on random or oscillatory fluctuations of selection intensities. Here, we present a novel method to consider nonrandom changes in selection intensities using Wright-Fisher approximate Bayesian (ABC-based approaches, in order to detect and evaluate a change in selection strength from time-sampled data. This novel method jointly estimates the position of a change point as well as the strength of both corresponding selection coefficients (and dominance for diploid cases from the allele trajectory. The simulation studies of this method reveal the combinations of parameter ranges and input values that optimize performance, thus indicating optimal experimental design strategies. We apply this approach to both the historical dataset of P. dominula in order to shed light on this historical debate, as well as to whole-genome time-serial data from influenza virus in order to identify sites with changing selection intensities in response to drug treatment.

  3. A GMM-Based Test for Normal Disturbances of the Heckman Sample Selection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Pfaffermayr

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Heckman sample selection model relies on the assumption of normal and homoskedastic disturbances. However, before considering more general, alternative semiparametric models that do not need the normality assumption, it seems useful to test this assumption. Following Meijer and Wansbeek (2007, the present contribution derives a GMM-based pseudo-score LM test on whether the third and fourth moments of the disturbances of the outcome equation of the Heckman model conform to those implied by the truncated normal distribution. The test is easy to calculate and in Monte Carlo simulations it shows good performance for sample sizes of 1000 or larger.

  4. Measuring the health of the Indian elderly: evidence from National Sample Survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahal Ajay

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparable health measures across different sets of populations are essential for describing the distribution of health outcomes and assessing the impact of interventions on these outcomes. Self-reported health (SRH is a commonly used indicator of health in household surveys and has been shown to be predictive of future mortality. However, the susceptibility of SRH to influence by individuals' expectations complicates its interpretation and undermines its usefulness. Methods This paper applies the empirical methodology of Lindeboom and van Doorslaer (2004 to investigate elderly health in India using data from the 52nd round of the National Sample Survey conducted in 1995-96 that includes both an SRH variable as well as a range of objective indicators of disability and ill health. The empirical testing was conducted on stratified homogeneous groups, based on four factors: gender, education, rural-urban residence, and region. Results We find that region generally has a significant impact on how women perceive their health. Reporting heterogeneity can arise not only from cut-point shifts, but also from differences in health effects by objective health measures. In contrast, we find little evidence of reporting heterogeneity due to differences in gender or educational status within regions. Rural-urban residence does matter in some cases. The findings are robust with different specifications of objective health indicators. Conclusions Our exercise supports the thesis that the region of residence is associated with different cut-points and reporting behavior on health surveys. We believe this is the first paper that applies the Lindeboom-van Doorslaer methodology to data on the elderly in a developing country, showing the feasibility of applying this methodology to data from many existing cross-sectional health surveys.

  5. Image classification by multi-instance learning with base sample selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qiang; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Xiong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    We propose a similarity-based learning style algorithm by regarding each image as a multi-instance (MI) sample for image classification. An image featured as vectorial representation interesting regions is transferred to a MI sample. Then a similarity like matrix is constructed using MI kernel between given images and some carefully selected base images, as the new representation of given images. Three selection strategies are proposed to build the base images set to find an optimal solution. A Weka implementation decision tree is used as the main learner in this paper. Experiments on image data repository ALOI and Corel Image 2000 show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm compared to some previous based line methods.

  6. SNP selection and classification of genome-wide SNP data using stratified sampling random forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingyao; Ye, Yunming; Liu, Yang; Ng, Michael K

    2012-09-01

    For high dimensional genome-wide association (GWA) case-control data of complex disease, there are usually a large portion of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are irrelevant with the disease. A simple random sampling method in random forest using default mtry parameter to choose feature subspace, will select too many subspaces without informative SNPs. Exhaustive searching an optimal mtry is often required in order to include useful and relevant SNPs and get rid of vast of non-informative SNPs. However, it is too time-consuming and not favorable in GWA for high-dimensional data. The main aim of this paper is to propose a stratified sampling method for feature subspace selection to generate decision trees in a random forest for GWA high-dimensional data. Our idea is to design an equal-width discretization scheme for informativeness to divide SNPs into multiple groups. In feature subspace selection, we randomly select the same number of SNPs from each group and combine them to form a subspace to generate a decision tree. The advantage of this stratified sampling procedure can make sure each subspace contains enough useful SNPs, but can avoid a very high computational cost of exhaustive search of an optimal mtry, and maintain the randomness of a random forest. We employ two genome-wide SNP data sets (Parkinson case-control data comprised of 408 803 SNPs and Alzheimer case-control data comprised of 380 157 SNPs) to demonstrate that the proposed stratified sampling method is effective, and it can generate better random forest with higher accuracy and lower error bound than those by Breiman's random forest generation method. For Parkinson data, we also show some interesting genes identified by the method, which may be associated with neurological disorders for further biological investigations.

  7. Martian oxidation processes and selection of ancient sedimentary samples for bio-organic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oro, J.

    1988-01-01

    The results obtained by the Viking Missions concerning organic and biological analysis are summarized and it is indicated that these results do not preclude the existence in buried or protected regions of the planet, organic molecules or fossil life. The use of automated instruments is suggested for the analyses of samples obtained from certain regions of the planet, as a preliminary step before they are selected, retrieved, and returned to Earth for more complete analysis.

  8. Classification of epileptic EEG signals based on simple random sampling and sequential feature selection

    OpenAIRE

    Ghayab, Hadi Ratham Al; Li, Yan; Abdulla, Shahab; Diykh, Mohammed; Wan, Xiangkui

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are used broadly in the medical fields. The main applications of EEG signals are the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as epilepsy, Alzheimer, sleep problems and so on. This paper presents a new method which extracts and selects features from multi-channel EEG signals. This research focuses on three main points. Firstly, simple random sampling (SRS) technique is used to extract features from the time domain of EEG signals. Secondly, the sequential fea...

  9. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Practical guidance for selection, calibration, and implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Upal; Driscoll, Susan Kane; Burgess, Robert M.; Jonker, Michiel To; Reible, Danny; Gobas, Frank; Choi, Yongju; Apitz, Sabine E; Maruya, Keith A; Gala, William R; Mortimer, Munro; Beegan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article provides practical guidance on the use of passive sampling methods (PSMs) that target the freely dissolved concentration (C free) for improved exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments. Primary considerations for selecting a PSM for a specific application include clear delineation of measurement goals for C free, whether laboratory-based “ex situ” and/or field-based “in situ” application is desired, and ultimately which PSM is best-suited to fulfill the me...

  10. Random sampling for a mental health survey in a deprived multi-ethnic area of Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Adrian P; Aichberger, Marion C; Kliewe, Thomas; Ignatyev, Yuriy; Yayla, Seda; Heimann, Hannah; Schouler-Ocak, Meryam; Busch, Markus; Rapp, Michael; Heinz, Andreas; Ströhle, Andreas

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the response to random sampling for a mental health survey in a deprived multi-ethnic area of Berlin, Germany, with a large Turkish-speaking population. A random list from the registration office with 1,000 persons stratified by age and gender was retrieved from the population registry and these persons were contacted using a three-stage design including written information, telephone calls and personal contact at home. A female bilingual interviewer contacted persons with Turkish names. Of the persons on the list, 202 were not living in the area, one was deceased, 502 did not respond. Of the 295 responders, 152 explicitly refused(51.5%) to participate. We retained a sample of 143 participants(48.5%) representing the rate of multi-ethnicity in the area (52.1% migrants in the sample vs. 53.5% in the population). Turkish migrants were over-represented(28.9% in the sample vs. 18.6% in the population). Polish migrants (2.1 vs. 5.3% in the population) and persons from the former Yugoslavia (1.4 vs. 4.8% in the population)were under-represented. Bilingual contact procedures can improve the response rates of the most common migrant populations to random sampling if migrants of the same origin gate the contact. High non-contact and non-response rates for migrant and non-migrant populations in deprived urban areas remain a challenge for obtaining representative random samples.

  11. Population genetics inference for longitudinally-sampled mutants under strong selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerda, Miguel; Seoighe, Cathal

    2014-11-01

    Longitudinal allele frequency data are becoming increasingly prevalent. Such samples permit statistical inference of the population genetics parameters that influence the fate of mutant variants. To infer these parameters by maximum likelihood, the mutant frequency is often assumed to evolve according to the Wright-Fisher model. For computational reasons, this discrete model is commonly approximated by a diffusion process that requires the assumption that the forces of natural selection and mutation are weak. This assumption is not always appropriate. For example, mutations that impart drug resistance in pathogens may evolve under strong selective pressure. Here, we present an alternative approximation to the mutant-frequency distribution that does not make any assumptions about the magnitude of selection or mutation and is much more computationally efficient than the standard diffusion approximation. Simulation studies are used to compare the performance of our method to that of the Wright-Fisher and Gaussian diffusion approximations. For large populations, our method is found to provide a much better approximation to the mutant-frequency distribution when selection is strong, while all three methods perform comparably when selection is weak. Importantly, maximum-likelihood estimates of the selection coefficient are severely attenuated when selection is strong under the two diffusion models, but not when our method is used. This is further demonstrated with an application to mutant-frequency data from an experimental study of bacteriophage evolution. We therefore recommend our method for estimating the selection coefficient when the effective population size is too large to utilize the discrete Wright-Fisher model. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  12. Magnetically separable polymer (Mag-MIP) for selective analysis of biotin in food samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzuriaga-Sánchez, Rosario Josefina; Khan, Sabir; Wong, Ademar; Picasso, Gino; Pividori, Maria Isabel; Sotomayor, Maria Del Pilar Taboada

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an efficient method for the preparation of magnetic nanoparticles modified with molecularly imprinted polymers (Mag-MIP) through core-shell method for the determination of biotin in milk food samples. The functional monomer acrylic acid was selected from molecular modeling, EGDMA was used as cross-linking monomer and AIBN as radical initiator. The Mag-MIP and Mag-NIP were characterized by FTIR, magnetic hysteresis, XRD, SEM and N2-sorption measurements. The capacity of Mag-MIP for biotin adsorption, its kinetics and selectivity were studied in detail. The adsorption data was well described by Freundlich isotherm model with adsorption equilibrium constant (KF) of 1.46 mL g(-1). The selectivity experiments revealed that prepared Mag-MIP had higher selectivity toward biotin compared to other molecules with different chemical structure. The material was successfully applied for the determination of biotin in diverse milk samples using HPLC for quantification of the analyte, obtaining the mean value of 87.4% recovery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Fuzzy Supplier Selection Application Using Large Survey Datasets of Delivery Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Davis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is developed using fuzzy probability to screen survey data across relevant criteria for selecting suppliers based on fuzzy expected values. The values are derived from qualitative variables and expert opinion of membership in these variables found in industry survey data. The application is made to a supply chain management decision of supplier selection based upon delivery performance which is further divided into attributes that comprise this criterion. The algorithm allows multiple criteria to be considered for each decision parameter. Large sets of survey data regarding six suppliers in the electronic parts industry are gathered from over 150 purchasers and are analyzed through spreadsheet modeling of the fuzzy algorithm. The resulting decision support system allows supply chain managers to improve supplier selection decisions by applying fuzzy measures of criteria and associated beliefs across the dataset. The proposed model and method are highly adaptable to existing survey datasets, including datasets that have incomplete data, and can be implemented in organizations with low decision support resources, such as small and medium sized organizations.

  14. The Effects of Survey Administration on Disclosure Rates to Sensitive Items Among Men: A Comparison of an Internet Panel Sample with a RDD Telephone Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Denise A; Douglas, Emily M; Mahmood, Sehar

    2010-11-01

    Research using Internet surveys is an emerging field, yet research on the legitimacy of using Internet studies, particularly those targeting sensitive topics, remains under-investigated. The current study builds on the existing literature by exploring the demographic differences between Internet panel and RDD telephone survey samples, as well as differences in responses with regard to experiences of intimate partner violence perpetration and victimization, alcohol and substance use/abuse, PTSD symptomatology, and social support. Analyses indicated that after controlling for demographic differences, there were few differences between the samples in their disclosure of sensitive information, and that the online sample was more socially isolated than the phone sample. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for using Internet samples in research on sensitive topics.

  15. Criteria for selecting implementation science theories and frameworks: results from an international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Birken

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theories provide a synthesizing architecture for implementation science. The underuse, superficial use, and misuse of theories pose a substantial scientific challenge for implementation science and may relate to challenges in selecting from the many theories in the field. Implementation scientists may benefit from guidance for selecting a theory for a specific study or project. Understanding how implementation scientists select theories will help inform efforts to develop such guidance. Our objective was to identify which theories implementation scientists use, how they use theories, and the criteria used to select theories. Methods We identified initial lists of uses and criteria for selecting implementation theories based on seminal articles and an iterative consensus process. We incorporated these lists into a self-administered survey for completion by self-identified implementation scientists. We recruited potential respondents at the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health and via several international email lists. We used frequencies and percentages to report results. Results Two hundred twenty-three implementation scientists from 12 countries responded to the survey. They reported using more than 100 different theories spanning several disciplines. Respondents reported using theories primarily to identify implementation determinants, inform data collection, enhance conceptual clarity, and guide implementation planning. Of the 19 criteria presented in the survey, the criteria used by the most respondents to select theory included analytic level (58%, logical consistency/plausibility (56%, empirical support (53%, and description of a change process (54%. The criteria used by the fewest respondents included fecundity (10%, uniqueness (12%, and falsifiability (15%. Conclusions Implementation scientists use a large number of criteria to select theories, but there is little

  16. Criteria for selecting implementation science theories and frameworks: results from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Powell, Byron J; Shea, Christopher M; Haines, Emily R; Alexis Kirk, M; Leeman, Jennifer; Rohweder, Catherine; Damschroder, Laura; Presseau, Justin

    2017-10-30

    Theories provide a synthesizing architecture for implementation science. The underuse, superficial use, and misuse of theories pose a substantial scientific challenge for implementation science and may relate to challenges in selecting from the many theories in the field. Implementation scientists may benefit from guidance for selecting a theory for a specific study or project. Understanding how implementation scientists select theories will help inform efforts to develop such guidance. Our objective was to identify which theories implementation scientists use, how they use theories, and the criteria used to select theories. We identified initial lists of uses and criteria for selecting implementation theories based on seminal articles and an iterative consensus process. We incorporated these lists into a self-administered survey for completion by self-identified implementation scientists. We recruited potential respondents at the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health and via several international email lists. We used frequencies and percentages to report results. Two hundred twenty-three implementation scientists from 12 countries responded to the survey. They reported using more than 100 different theories spanning several disciplines. Respondents reported using theories primarily to identify implementation determinants, inform data collection, enhance conceptual clarity, and guide implementation planning. Of the 19 criteria presented in the survey, the criteria used by the most respondents to select theory included analytic level (58%), logical consistency/plausibility (56%), empirical support (53%), and description of a change process (54%). The criteria used by the fewest respondents included fecundity (10%), uniqueness (12%), and falsifiability (15%). Implementation scientists use a large number of criteria to select theories, but there is little consensus on which are most important. Our results suggest that the

  17. Novel joint selection methods can reduce sample size for rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials with ultrasound endpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John C; Thumboo, Julian; Lye, Weng Kit; Conaghan, Philip G; Chew, Li-Ching; Tan, York Kiat

    2017-10-03

    To determine whether novel methods of selecting joints through (i) ultrasonography (individualized-ultrasound [IUS] method), or (ii) ultrasonography and clinical examination (individualized-composite-ultrasound [ICUS] method) translate into smaller rheumatoid arthritis (RA) clinical trial sample sizes when compared to existing methods utilizing predetermined joint sites for ultrasonography. Cohen's effect size (ES) was estimated (ES^) and a 95% CI (ES^L, ES^U) calculated on a mean change in 3-month total inflammatory score for each method. Corresponding 95% CIs [nL(ES^U), nU(ES^L)] were obtained on a post hoc sample size reflecting the uncertainty in ES^. Sample size calculations were based on a one-sample t-test as the patient numbers needed to provide 80% power at α = 0.05 to reject a null hypothesis H0 : ES = 0 versus alternative hypotheses H1 : ES = ES^, ES = ES^L and ES = ES^U. We aimed to provide point and interval estimates on projected sample sizes for future studies reflecting the uncertainty in our study ES^S. Twenty-four treated RA patients were followed up for 3 months. Utilizing the 12-joint approach and existing methods, the post hoc sample size (95% CI) was 22 (10-245). Corresponding sample sizes using ICUS and IUS were 11 (7-40) and 11 (6-38), respectively. Utilizing a seven-joint approach, the corresponding sample sizes using ICUS and IUS methods were nine (6-24) and 11 (6-35), respectively. Our pilot study suggests that sample size for RA clinical trials with ultrasound endpoints may be reduced using the novel methods, providing justification for larger studies to confirm these observations. © 2017 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. A Principle Component Analysis of Galaxy Properties from a Large, Gas-Selected Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Yen Chang

    2012-01-01

    concluded that this is in conflict with the CDM model. Considering the importance of the issue, we reinvestigate the problem using the principal component analysis on a fivefold larger sample and additional near-infrared data. We use databases from the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array Survey for the gas properties, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for the optical properties, and the Two Micron All Sky Survey for the near-infrared properties. We confirm that the parameters are indeed correlated where a single physical parameter can explain 83% of the variations. When color (g-i is included, the first component still dominates but it develops a second principal component. In addition, the near-infrared color (i-J shows an obvious second principal component that might provide evidence of the complex old star formation. Based on our data, we suggest that it is premature to pronounce the failure of the CDM model and it motivates more theoretical work.

  19. A complete hard X-ray selected sample of local, luminous AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, Leonard; Davies, Ric; Lin, Ming-yi; Orban de Xivry, Gilles; Rosario, David

    2016-08-01

    Choosing a very well defined sample is essential for studying the AGN phenomenon. Only the most luminous AGNs can be expected to require a coherent feeding mechanism to sustain their activity and since host galaxy properties and AGN activity are essentially uncorrelated, nuclear scales must be resolved in order to shed light on the feeding mechanisms of AGNs. For these reasons we are compiling a sample of the most powerful, local AGNs. In this talk we present our on-going programme to observe a complete volume limited sample of nearby active galaxies selected by their 14-195 keV luminosity, and outline its rationale for studying the mechanisms regulating gas inflow and outflow.

  20. Impact of repeated measures and sample selection on genome-wide association studies of fasting glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Alonso, Alvaro; Li, Man; Kao, Wen; Köttgen, Anna; Yan, Yuer; Couper, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Pankow, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Although GWAS have been performed in longitudinal studies, most used only a single trait measure. GWAS of fasting glucose have generally included only normoglycemic individuals. We examined the impact of both repeated measures and sample selection on GWAS in ARIC, a study which obtained four longitudinal measures of fasting glucose and included both individuals with and without prevalent diabetes. The sample included Caucasians and the Affymetrix 6.0 chip was used for genotyping. Sample sizes for GWAS analyses ranged from 8372 (first study visit) to 5782 (average fasting glucose). Candidate SNP analyses with SNPs identified through fasting glucose or diabetes GWAS were conducted in 9133 individuals, including 761 with prevalent diabetes. For a constant sample size, smaller p-values were obtained for the average measure of fasting glucose compared to values at any single visit, and two additional significant GWAS signals were detected. For four candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs7903146, and rs4607517), the strength of association between genotype and glucose was significantly (p-interaction fasting glucose candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs560887, rs4607517, rs13266634) the association with measured fasting glucose was more significant in the smaller sample without prevalent diabetes than in the larger combined sample of those with and without diabetes. This analysis demonstrates the potential utility of averaging trait values in GWAS studies and explores the advantage of using only individuals without prevalent diabetes in GWAS of fasting glucose. PMID:20839289

  1. Antibiotic content of selective culture media for isolation of Capnocytophaga species from oral polymicrobial samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, E; Jolivet-Gougeon, A; Bonnaure-Mallet, M; Fosse, T

    2013-10-01

    In oral microbiome, because of the abundance of commensal competitive flora, selective media with antibiotics are necessary for the recovery of fastidious Capnocytophaga species. The performances of six culture media (blood agar, chocolate blood agar, VCAT medium, CAPE medium, bacitracin chocolate blood agar and VK medium) were compared with literature data concerning five other media (FAA, LB, TSBV, CapR and TBBP media). To understand variable growth on selective media, the MICs of each antimicrobial agent contained in this different media (colistin, kanamycin, trimethoprim, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, aztreonam and bacitracin) were determined for all Capnocytophaga species. Overall, VCAT medium (Columbia, 10% cooked horse blood, polyvitaminic supplement, 3·75 mg l(-1) of colistin, 1·5 mg l(-1) of trimethoprim, 1 mg l(-1) of vancomycin and 0·5 mg l(-1) of amphotericin B, Oxoid, France) was the more efficient selective medium, with regard to the detection of Capnocytophaga species from oral samples (P culture, a simple blood agar allowed the growth of all Capnocytophaga species. Nonetheless, in oral samples, because of the abundance of commensal competitive flora, selective media with antibiotics are necessary for the recovery of Capnocytophaga species. The demonstrated superiority of VCAT medium made its use essential for the optimal detection of this bacterial genus. This work showed that extreme caution should be exercised when reporting the isolation of Capnocytophaga species from oral polymicrobial samples, because the culture medium is a determining factor. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Watersheds for U.S Geological Survey National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) sampling sites 1996-2000.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A digital representation of the watersheds of 43 sites on large river systems sampled by the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) of the U. S....

  3. Sampling and analysis plan for the preoperational environmental survey for the immobilized low activity waste (ILAW) project W-465

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.M.

    1998-09-28

    This document provides a detailed description of the Sampling and Analysis Plan for the Preoperational Survey to be conducted at the Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) Project Site in the 200 East Area.

  4. Equity in the Utilization of Healthcare Services in India: Evidence from National Sample Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitra Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The pursuit of equity in health and healthcare has been the key feature of health policy in India. However, despite the policy significance, the volume of literature available on this issue is scarce. Therefore, this paper is an attempt to examine the horizontal inequities in healthcare utilization, consisting of outpatient and inpatient care in 15 major states and north-eastern region of India. Methods Cross-sectional data were taken from the National Sample Survey Organization (NSSO 60th round (2004, the survey on ‘morbidity and healthcare’. While outpatient care was assessed using the probability of outpatient visit 15 days prior to the survey date, the indicators of inpatient care utilization were based on the following variables: the probability of hospital admission and length of stay in hospital over a 12-month period. All these measures of healthcare utilization were standardized for need differences and controlled for socio-economic factors. Need standardized concentration indices were used to measure interstate and intrastate income-related inequities in healthcare utilization. Results Absolute inequalities were found between states in the proportion of the population reporting a visit to an outpatient provider, in the range of 4.42% to 21.72%. Similarly, inpatient care varied from 1% to 10%. The magnitude of inequity for both outpatient and inpatient care was pro-rich across rural and urban areas of India and in majority of the states. In fact, in majority of the states, the horizontal inequity across types of curative care was noticeably higher within the rural population than in the urban population. The analysis demonstrated that high per capita government health spending was significantly associated with low inequity in utilization of inpatient care. Conclusion The study concludes that it would be necessary to address the prevailing inequities in healthcare by substantially scaling up the public spending on health

  5. A biogeochemical and genetic survey of acetylene fermentation by environmental samples and bacterial isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence G.; Baesman, Shaun M.; Kirshtein, Julie; Voytek, Mary A.; Oremland, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Anoxic samples (sediment and groundwater) from 13 chemically diverse field sites were assayed for their ability to consume acetylene (C2H2). Over incubation periods ranging from ˜ 10 to 80 days, selected samples from 7 of the 13 tested sites displayed significant C2H2 removal. No significant formation of ethylene was noted in these incubations; therefore, C2H2 consumption could be attributed to acetylene hydratase (AH) rather than nitrogenase activity. This putative AH (PAH) activity was observed in only 21% of the total of assayed samples, while amplification of AH genes from extracted DNA using degenerate primers derived from Pelobacter acetylenicus occurred in even fewer (9.8%) samples. Acetylene-fermenting bacteria were isolated as a pure culture from the sediments of a tidal mudflat in San Francisco Bay (SFB93) and as an enrichment culture from freshwater Searsville Lake (SV7). Comparison of 16S rDNA clone libraries revealed that SFB93 was closely related to P. carbolinicus, while SV7 consisted of several unrelated bacteria. AH gene was amplified from SFB93 but not SV7. The inability of the primers to generate amplicons in the SV7 enrichment, as well as from several of the environmental samples that displayed PAH activity, implied that either the primers were too highly constrained in their specificity or that there was a different type of AH gene in these environmental samples than occurs in P. acetylenicus. The significance of this work with regard to the search for life in the outer Solar System, where C2HL2 is abundant, is discussed.

  6. Definition of healthy eating in the Spanish adult population: a national sample in a pan-European survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Gonzalez, M A; Lopez-Azpiazu, I; Kearney, J; Kearney, M; Gibney, M; Martinez, J A

    1998-03-01

    A national survey was carried out to find out how the Spanish adult population defined 'healthy eating'. Consumers were asked to describe in their own words what 'healthy eating' means to them. The sample included 1009 Spanish subjects over 15 y of age selected by a multietapic procedure. This study belongs to the Spanish partnership in a pan-European survey about attitudes to food, nutrition and health coordinated by the Institute of European Food Studies of Dublin. The results were shown as the percentages of the sample who gave one of the five most frequently mentioned descriptions ('more vegetables', 'balanced diet', 'more fruit', 'less fat' and 'more fish') and the distribution of responses by age, sex, region, socio-economic level and education level. A multivariable logistic regression model was fitted to assess the characteristics independently related to the use of the definition 'balance and variety' for healthy eating. The majority of the Spanish people defined 'healthy eating' as a diet with 'more vegetables' as the main description. Other descriptions commonly mentioned were 'less fat', 'more fruit', 'more fish', and 'more lean meat'. A higher age was associated with a lower likelihood of mentioning the concept of balanced diet. A higher educational level was also independently and strongly related to a higher prevalence of this definition. Differences between men and women showed only borderline significance. Our results suggest the need to improve nutritional education about fiber, low fat and cholesterol. It would be interesting to develop strategies in Spain to educate people on a definition of 'healthy eating' based upon 'balance and variety'.

  7. The prevalence of workaholism: a survey study in a nationally representative sample of Norwegian employees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilie Schou Andreassen

    Full Text Available Workaholism has become an increasingly popular area for empirical study. However, most studies examining the prevalence of workaholism have used non-representative samples and measures with poorly defined cut-off scores. To overcome these methodological limitations, a nationally representative survey among employees in Norway (N = 1,124 was conducted. Questions relating to gender, age, marital status, caretaker responsibility for children, percentage of full-time equivalent, and educational level were asked. Workaholism was assessed by the use of a psychometrically validated instrument (i.e., Bergen Work Addiction Scale. Personality was assessed using the Mini-International Personality Item Pool. Results showed that the prevalence of workaholism was 8.3% (95% CI  = 6.7-9.9%. An adjusted logistic regression analysis showed that workaholism was negatively related to age and positively related to the personality dimensions agreeableness, neuroticism, and intellect/imagination. Implications for these findings are discussed.

  8. Application of Method of Financial Risk in Serbian Companies - Survey Sample Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelisavka Bulatovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to obtain information on the use of financial instruments hedging the Serbian large and medium-sized enterprises, as well as to detect any differences between the characteristics of companies that use them or not used. Survey researches based on telephone interviews with financial or accounting managers with a stratified random sample of 101 Serbian companies and conducted in 2010. The contribution of this study comes from testing hypotheses about the relationships between the characteristics of Serbian companies and the use of financial instruments hedging. Finally, in the future, researchers should make use of this work and make a deeper study based on differentiation from Serbian companies. In this way, it would be possible to include different sizes of companies (on the number of employees to include different types of financial measures in relation to the size of the company, for example, the factor of annual revenues.

  9. Selection of Sampling Pumps Used for Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2001-11-05

    The variable frequency drive centrifugal submersible pump, Redi-Flo2a made by Grundfosa, was selected for universal application for Hanford Site groundwater monitoring. Specifications for the selected pump and five other pumps were evaluated against current and future Hanford groundwater monitoring performance requirements, and the Redi-Flo2 was selected as the most versatile and applicable for the range of monitoring conditions. The Redi-Flo2 pump distinguished itself from the other pumps considered because of its wide range in output flow rate and its comparatively moderate maintenance and low capital costs. The Redi-Flo2 pump is able to purge a well at a high flow rate and then supply water for sampling at a low flow rate. Groundwater sampling using a low-volume-purging technique (e.g., low flow, minimal purge, no purge, or micropurgea) is planned in the future, eliminating the need for the pump to supply a high-output flow rate. Under those conditions, the Well Wizard bladder pump, manufactured by QED Environmental Systems, Inc., may be the preferred pump because of the lower capital cost.

  10. A novel variable selection approach that iteratively optimizes variable space using weighted binary matrix sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bai-chuan; Yun, Yong-huan; Liang, Yi-zeng; Yi, Lun-zhao

    2014-10-07

    In this study, a new optimization algorithm called the Variable Iterative Space Shrinkage Approach (VISSA) that is based on the idea of model population analysis (MPA) is proposed for variable selection. Unlike most of the existing optimization methods for variable selection, VISSA statistically evaluates the performance of variable space in each step of optimization. Weighted binary matrix sampling (WBMS) is proposed to generate sub-models that span the variable subspace. Two rules are highlighted during the optimization procedure. First, the variable space shrinks in each step. Second, the new variable space outperforms the previous one. The second rule, which is rarely satisfied in most of the existing methods, is the core of the VISSA strategy. Compared with some promising variable selection methods such as competitive adaptive reweighted sampling (CARS), Monte Carlo uninformative variable elimination (MCUVE) and iteratively retaining informative variables (IRIV), VISSA showed better prediction ability for the calibration of NIR data. In addition, VISSA is user-friendly; only a few insensitive parameters are needed, and the program terminates automatically without any additional conditions. The Matlab codes for implementing VISSA are freely available on the website: https://sourceforge.net/projects/multivariateanalysis/files/VISSA/.

  11. Towards an optimal sampling of peculiar velocity surveys for Wiener Filter reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Jenny G.; Hoffman, Yehuda; Gottlöber, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The Wiener Filter (WF) technique enables the reconstruction of density and velocity fields from observed radial peculiar velocities. This paper aims at identifying the optimal design of peculiar velocity surveys within the WF framework. The prime goal is to test the dependence of the reconstruction quality on the distribution and nature of data points. Mock data sets, extending to 250 h-1 Mpc, are drawn from a constrained simulation that mimics the local Universe to produce realistic mock catalogues. Reconstructed fields obtained with these mocks are compared to the reference simulation. Comparisons, including residual distributions, cell-to-cell and bulk velocities, imply that the presence of field data points is essential to properly measure the flows. The fields reconstructed from mocks that consist only of galaxy cluster data points exhibit poor-quality bulk velocities. In addition, the reconstruction quality depends strongly on the grouping of individual data points into single points to suppress virial motions in high-density regions. Conversely, the presence of a Zone of Avoidance hardly affects the reconstruction. For a given number of data points, a uniform sample does not score any better than a sample with decreasing number of data points with the distance. The best reconstructions are obtained with a grouped survey containing field galaxies: assuming no error, they differ from the simulated field by less than 100 km s-1 up to the extreme edge of the catalogues or up to a distance of three times the mean distance of data points for non-uniform catalogues. The overall conclusions hold when errors are added.

  12. SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS OF TYPE 1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE COSMOS SURVEY. I. THE XMM-COSMOS SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvis, M.; Hao, H.; Civano, F. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Brusa, M.; Salvato, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Cappelluti, N. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Capak, P. [California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zamorani, G.; Comastri, A.; Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Jahnke, K.; Lusso, E.; Cisternas, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, Heidelberg, D-69117 (Germany); Mainieri, V. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Trump, J. R. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ho, L. C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institute for Science, Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Aussel, H. [AIM Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA CNRS, Universite Paris VII UMR n158, Paris (France); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Hasinger, G., E-mail: elvis@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: hhao@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2012-11-01

    The 'Cosmic Evolution Survey' (COSMOS) enables the study of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) because of the deep coverage and rich sampling of frequencies from X-ray to radio. Here we present an SED catalog of 413 X-ray (XMM-Newton)-selected type 1 (emission line FWHM > 2000 km s{sup -1}) AGNs with Magellan, SDSS, or VLT spectrum. The SEDs are corrected for Galactic extinction, broad emission line contributions, constrained variability, and host galaxy contribution. We present the mean SED and the dispersion SEDs after the above corrections in the rest-frame 1.4 GHz to 40 keV, and show examples of the variety of SEDs encountered. In the near-infrared to optical (rest frame {approx}8 {mu}m-4000 A), the photometry is complete for the whole sample and the mean SED is derived from detections only. Reddening and host galaxy contamination could account for a large fraction of the observed SED variety. The SEDs are all available online.

  13. New journal selection for quantitative survey of infectious disease research: application for Asian trend analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative survey of research articles, as an application of bibliometrics, is an effective tool for grasping overall trends in various medical research fields. This type of survey has been also applied to infectious disease research; however, previous studies were insufficient as they underestimated articles published in non-English or regional journals. Methods Using a combination of Scopus™ and PubMed, the databases of scientific literature, and English and non-English keywords directly linked to infectious disease control, we identified international and regional infectious disease journals. In order to ascertain whether the newly selected journals were appropriate to survey a wide range of research articles, we compared the number of original articles and reviews registered in the selected journals to those in the 'Infectious Disease Category' of the Science Citation Index Expanded™ (SCI Infectious Disease Category) during 1998-2006. Subsequently, we applied the newly selected journals to survey the number of original articles and reviews originating from 11 Asian countries during the same period. Results One hundred journals, written in English or 7 non-English languages, were newly selected as infectious disease journals. The journals published 14,156 original articles and reviews of Asian origin and 118,158 throughout the world, more than those registered in the SCI Infectious Disease Category (4,621 of Asian origin and 66,518 of the world in the category). In Asian trend analysis of the 100 journals, Japan had the highest percentage of original articles and reviews in the area, and no noticeable increase in articles was revealed during the study period. China, India and Taiwan had relatively large numbers and a high increase rate of original articles among Asian countries. When adjusting the publication of original articles according to the country population and the gross domestic product (GDP), Singapore and Taiwan were the most

  14. Ground-survey and water-quality data for selected wetlands on or near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation in South Dakota, 2012-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzert, Kathleen M.; Thompson, Ryan F.

    2015-08-20

    Numerous lakes, ponds, and wetlands are located within the Lower Brule Indian Reservation. Wetlands are an important resource providing aquatic habitat for plants and animals, and acting as a natural water filtration system. Several of the wetlands on or near the reservation are of particular interest, but information on the physical and biological integrity of these wetlands was needed to provide a base-line reference when planning for future water management needs. A reconnaissance-level study of selected wetlands on and near the Lower Brule Indian Reservation was completed in 2012–13 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe using ground surveys and water-quality analyses. Ground surveys of six wetland areas (Dorman Slough, Little Bend Wetlands, Miller Pond, Potter Slough, an unnamed slough, and West Brule Community wetlands) were completed to map land, water, vegetation, and man-made features of the selected wetland areas using real-time kinematic global navigation satellite systems equipment. Water samples were collected from four of the selected wetlands. Two separate waterbodies were sampled at one of the wetlands for a total of five sampling locations. Water samples were analyzed for physical properties, selected inorganics, metals, nutrients, and suspended sediment. Concentrations of calcium, sodium, and sulfate were greater at the two wetland sites fed by ground water, compared to the wetland sites fed by surface runoff.

  15. Effects of soil water saturation on sampling equilibrium and kinetics of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pil-Gon; Roh, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Yongseok; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2017-10-01

    Passive sampling can be applied for measuring the freely dissolved concentration of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in soil pore water. When using passive samplers under field conditions, however, there are factors that might affect passive sampling equilibrium and kinetics, such as soil water saturation. To determine the effects of soil water saturation on passive sampling, the equilibrium and kinetics of passive sampling were evaluated by observing changes in the distribution coefficient between sampler and soil (Ksampler/soil) and the uptake rate constant (ku) at various soil water saturations. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) passive samplers were deployed into artificial soils spiked with seven selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In dry soil (0% water saturation), both Ksampler/soil and ku values were much lower than those in wet soils likely due to the contribution of adsorption of PAHs onto soil mineral surfaces and the conformational changes in soil organic matter. For high molecular weight PAHs (chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene, and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene), both Ksampler/soil and ku values increased with increasing soil water saturation, whereas they decreased with increasing soil water saturation for low molecular weight PAHs (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene). Changes in the sorption capacity of soil organic matter with soil water content would be the main cause of the changes in passive sampling equilibrium. Henry's law constant could explain the different behaviors in uptake kinetics of the selected PAHs. The results of this study would be helpful when passive samplers are deployed under various soil water saturations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Selection of Candidate Housekeeping Genes for Normalization in Human Postmortem Brain Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Pagano

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The most frequently used technique to study the expression profile of genes involved in common neurological disorders is quantitative real-time RT-PCR, which allows the indirect detection of very low amounts of selected mRNAs in tissue samples. Expression analysis by RT-qPCR requires an appropriate normalization to the expression level of genes characterized by a stable, constitutive transcription. However, the identification of a gene transcribed at a very stable level is difficult if not impossible, since significant fluctuations of the level of mRNA synthesis often accompanies changes of cell behavior. The aim of this study is to identify the most stable genes in postmortem human brain samples of patients affected by Alzheimer’s disease (AD suitable as reference genes. The experiments analyzed 12 commonly used reference genes in brain samples from eight individuals with AD and seven controls. After a careful analysis of the results calculated by geNorm and NormFinder algorithms, we found that CYC1 and EIF4A2 are the best reference genes. We remark on the importance of the determination of the best reference genes for each sample to be analyzed and suggest a practical combination of reference genes to be used in the analysis of human postmortem samples.

  17. Detection of Salmonella spp. in veterinary samples by combining selective enrichment and real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Laura B; McDonough, Patrick L; Anderson, Renee R; Franklin-Guild, Rebecca J; Ryan, James R; Perkins, Gillian A; Thachil, Anil J; Glaser, Amy L; Thompson, Belinda S

    2017-11-01

    Rapid screening for enteric bacterial pathogens in clinical environments is essential for biosecurity. Salmonella found in veterinary hospitals, particularly Salmonella enterica serovar Dublin, can pose unique challenges for culture and testing because of its poor growth. Multiple Salmonella serovars including Dublin are emerging threats to public health given increasing prevalence and antimicrobial resistance. We adapted an automated food testing method to veterinary samples and evaluated the performance of the method in a variety of matrices including environmental samples ( n = 81), tissues ( n = 52), feces ( n = 148), and feed ( n = 29). A commercial kit was chosen as the basis for this approach in view of extensive performance characterizations published by multiple independent organizations. A workflow was established for efficiently and accurately testing veterinary matrices and environmental samples by use of real-time PCR after selective enrichment in Rappaport-Vassiliadis soya (RVS) medium. Using this method, the detection limit for S. Dublin improved by 100-fold over subculture on selective agars (eosin-methylene blue, brilliant green, and xylose-lysine-deoxycholate). Overall, the procedure was effective in detecting Salmonella spp. and provided next-day results.

  18. Unbiased Large Spectroscopic Surveys of Galaxies Selected by SPICA Using Dust Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Wada, T.; Armus, L.; Baes, M.; Charmandaris, V.; Czerny, B.; Efstathiou, A.; Fernández-Ontiveros, J. A.; Ferrara, A.; González-Alfonso, E.; Griffin, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Imanishi, M.; Kohno, K.; Kwon, J.; Nakagawa, T.; Onaka, T.; Pozzi, F.; Scott, D.; Smith, J.-D. T.; Spinoglio, L.; Suzuki, T.; van der Tak, F.; Vaccari, M.; Vignali, C.; Wang, L.

    2017-11-01

    The mid-infrared range contains many spectral features associated with large molecules and dust grains such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and silicates. These are usually very strong compared to fine-structure gas lines, and thus valuable in studying the spectral properties of faint distant galaxies. In this paper, we evaluate the capability of low-resolution mid-infrared spectroscopic surveys of galaxies that could be performed by SPICA. The surveys are designed to address the question how star formation and black hole accretion activities evolved over cosmic time through spectral diagnostics of the physical conditions of the interstellar/circumnuclear media in galaxies. On the basis of results obtained with Herschel far-infrared photometric surveys of distant galaxies and Spitzer and AKARI near- to mid-infrared spectroscopic observations of nearby galaxies, we estimate the numbers of the galaxies at redshift z > 0.5, which are expected to be detected in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon features or dust continuum by a wide (10 deg2) or deep (1 deg2) blind survey, both for a given observation time of 600 h. As by-products of the wide blind survey, we also expect to detect debris disks, through the mid-infrared excess above the photospheric emission of nearby main-sequence stars, and we estimate their number. We demonstrate that the SPICA mid-infrared surveys will efficiently provide us with unprecedentedly large spectral samples, which can be studied further in the far-infrared with SPICA.

  19. Changes in Selected Biochemical Indices Resulting from Various Pre-sampling Handling Techniques in Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloupek Petr

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since it is not yet clear whether it is possible to satisfactorily avoid sampling-induced stress interference in poultry, more studies on the pattern of physiological response and detailed quantification of stress connected with the first few minutes of capture and pre-sampling handling in poultry are required. This study focused on detection of changes in the corticosterone level and concentrations of other selected biochemical parameters in broilers handled in two different manners during blood sampling (involving catching, carrying, restraint, and blood collection itself that lasted for various time periods within the interval 30-180 seconds. Methods Stress effects of pre-sampling handling were studied in a group (n = 144 of unsexed ROSS 308 broiler chickens aged 42 d. Handling (catching, carrying, restraint, and blood sampling itself was carried out in a gentle (caught, held and carried carefully in an upright position or rough (caught by the leg, held and carried with lack of care in inverted position manner and lasted for 30 s, 60 s, 90 s, 120 s, 150 s, and 180 s. Plasma corticosterone, albumin, glucose, cholesterol, lactate, triglycerides and total protein were measured in order to assess the stress-induced changes to these biochemical indices following handling in the first few minutes of capture. Results Pre-sampling handling in a rough manner resulted in considerably higher plasma concentrations of all biochemical indices monitored when compared with gentle handling. Concentrations of plasma corticosterone after 150 and 180 s of handling were considerably higher (P Conclusions These results indicate that the pre-sampling procedure may be a considerably stressful procedure for broilers, particularly when carried out with lack of care and exceeding 120 seconds.

  20. Rapid determination of trace level copper in tea infusion samples by solid contact ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysenur Birinci

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A new solid contact copper selective electrode with a poly (vinyl chloride (PVC membrane consisting of o-xylylenebis(N,N-diisobutyldithiocarbamate as ionophore has been prepared. The main novelties of constructed ion selective electrode concept are the enhanced robustness, cheapness, and fastness due to the use of solid contacts. The electrode exhibits a rapid (< 10 seconds and near-Nernstian response to Cu2+ activity from 10−1 to 10−6 mol/L at the pH range of 4.0–6.0. No serious interference from common ions was found. The electrode characterizes by high potential stability, reproducibility, and full repeatability. The electrode was used as an indicator electrode in potentiometric titration of Cu(II ions with EDTA and for the direct assay of tea infusion samples by means of the calibration graph technique. The results compared favorably with those obtained by the atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS.

  1. Location and analysis of sediment samples collected in 2014 by the U.S. Geological Survey offshore of Fire Island, NY (Esri point shapefile, GCS WGS 84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a geophysical and sampling survey in October 2014 that focused on a series of shoreface-attached ridges offshore of...

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PACO spectrally selected sample (Bonaldi+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Massardi, M.; de Zotti, G.

    2014-01-01

    The SS PACO sample comprises all the 69 sources with S20GHz>200mJy and spectra classified in the AT20G catalogue (Massardi et al. 2011MNRAS.412..318M) as inverted or upturning in the frequency range 4.8-20GHz, selected over the whole Southern sky. These sources have been re-observed for the PACO project between 2009 September and 2010 February, with a scheduling process optimized to allow observations at all the frequencies almost simultaneous (i.e. within 10 d) with the Planck satellite. (2 data files).

  3. Sample-based Attribute Selective AnDE for Large Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Shenglei; Martinez, Ana; Webb, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    More and more applications come with large data sets in the past decade. However, existing algorithms cannot guarantee to scale well on large data. Averaged n-Dependence Estimators (AnDE) allows for flexible learning from out-of-core data, by varying the value of n (number of super parents). Hence...... AnDE is especially appropriate for large data learning. In this paper, we propose a sample-based attribute selection technique for AnDE. It needs one more pass through the training data, in which a multitude of approximate AnDE models are built and efficiently assessed by leave-one-out cross...

  4. Mobile acoustic transects miss rare bat species: implications of survey method and spatio-temporal sampling for monitoring bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun de Torrez, Elizabeth C; Wallrichs, Megan A; Ober, Holly K; McCleery, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasing threats facing bats, long-term monitoring protocols are needed to inform conservation strategies. Effective monitoring should be easily repeatable while capturing spatio-temporal variation. Mobile acoustic driving transect surveys ('mobile transects') have been touted as a robust, cost-effective method to monitor bats; however, it is not clear how well mobile transects represent dynamic bat communities, especially when used as the sole survey approach. To assist biologists who must select a single survey method due to resource limitations, we assessed the effectiveness of three acoustic survey methods at detecting species richness in a vast protected area (Everglades National Park): (1) mobile transects, (2) stationary surveys that were strategically located by sources of open water and (3) stationary surveys that were replicated spatially across the landscape. We found that mobile transects underrepresented bat species richness compared to stationary surveys across all major vegetation communities and in two distinct seasons (dry/cool and wet/warm). Most critically, mobile transects failed to detect three rare bat species, one of which is federally endangered. Spatially replicated stationary surveys did not estimate higher species richness than strategically located stationary surveys, but increased the rate at which species were detected in one vegetation community. The survey strategy that detected maximum species richness and the highest mean nightly species richness with minimal effort was a strategically located stationary detector in each of two major vegetation communities during the wet/warm season.

  5. Mobile acoustic transects miss rare bat species: implications of survey method and spatio-temporal sampling for monitoring bats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth C. Braun de Torrez

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing threats facing bats, long-term monitoring protocols are needed to inform conservation strategies. Effective monitoring should be easily repeatable while capturing spatio-temporal variation. Mobile acoustic driving transect surveys (‘mobile transects’ have been touted as a robust, cost-effective method to monitor bats; however, it is not clear how well mobile transects represent dynamic bat communities, especially when used as the sole survey approach. To assist biologists who must select a single survey method due to resource limitations, we assessed the effectiveness of three acoustic survey methods at detecting species richness in a vast protected area (Everglades National Park: (1 mobile transects, (2 stationary surveys that were strategically located by sources of open water and (3 stationary surveys that were replicated spatially across the landscape. We found that mobile transects underrepresented bat species richness compared to stationary surveys across all major vegetation communities and in two distinct seasons (dry/cool and wet/warm. Most critically, mobile transects failed to detect three rare bat species, one of which is federally endangered. Spatially replicated stationary surveys did not estimate higher species richness than strategically located stationary surveys, but increased the rate at which species were detected in one vegetation community. The survey strategy that detected maximum species richness and the highest mean nightly species richness with minimal effort was a strategically located stationary detector in each of two major vegetation communities during the wet/warm season.

  6. A genetic algorithm-based framework for wavelength selection on sample categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzanello, Michel J; Yamashita, Gabrielli; Marcelo, Marcelo; Fogliatto, Flávio S; Ortiz, Rafael S; Mariotti, Kristiane; Ferrão, Marco F

    2017-08-01

    In forensic and pharmaceutical scenarios, the application of chemometrics and optimization techniques has unveiled common and peculiar features of seized medicine and drug samples, helping investigative forces to track illegal operations. This paper proposes a novel framework aimed at identifying relevant subsets of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) wavelengths for classifying samples into two classes, for example authentic or forged categories in case of medicines, or salt or base form in cocaine analysis. In the first step of the framework, the ATR-FTIR spectra were partitioned into equidistant intervals and the k-nearest neighbour (KNN) classification technique was applied to each interval to insert samples into proper classes. In the next step, selected intervals were refined through the genetic algorithm (GA) by identifying a limited number of wavelengths from the intervals previously selected aimed at maximizing classification accuracy. When applied to Cialis®, Viagra®, and cocaine ATR-FTIR datasets, the proposed method substantially decreased the number of wavelengths needed to categorize, and increased the classification accuracy. From a practical perspective, the proposed method provides investigative forces with valuable information towards monitoring illegal production of drugs and medicines. In addition, focusing on a reduced subset of wavelengths allows the development of portable devices capable of testing the authenticity of samples during police checking events, avoiding the need for later laboratorial analyses and reducing equipment expenses. Theoretically, the proposed GA-based approach yields more refined solutions than the current methods relying on interval approaches, which tend to insert irrelevant wavelengths in the retained intervals. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Indoor Air Quality in Selected Samples of Primary Schools in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzuki Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have found out that indoor air quality affects human especially children and the elderly more compared to ambient atmospheric air. This study aims to investigate indoor air pollutants concentration in selected vernacular schools with different surrounding human activities in Kuala Terengganu, the administrative and commercial center of Terengganu state. Failure to identify and establish indoor air pollution status can increase the chance of long-term and short-term health problems for these young students and staff; reduction in productivity of teachers; and degrade the youngsters learning environment and comfort. Indoor air quality (IAQ parameters in three primary schools were conducted during the monsoon season of November 2008 for the purposes of assessing ventilation rates, levels of particulate matter (PM10 and air quality differences between schools. In each classroom, carbon monoxide (CO, CO2, air velocity, relative humidity and temperature were performed during school hours, and a complete walkthrough survey was completed. Results show a statistically significant difference for the five IAQ parameters between the three schools at the 95.0% confidence level. We conclude our findings by confirming the important influence of surrounding human activities on indoor concentrations of pollutants in selected vernacular schools in Kuala Terengganu.

  8. Sampling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Steven K

    2012-01-01

    Praise for the Second Edition "This book has never had a competitor. It is the only book that takes a broad approach to sampling . . . any good personal statistics library should include a copy of this book." —Technometrics "Well-written . . . an excellent book on an important subject. Highly recommended." —Choice "An ideal reference for scientific researchers and other professionals who use sampling." —Zentralblatt Math Features new developments in the field combined with all aspects of obtaining, interpreting, and using sample data Sampling provides an up-to-date treat

  9. Improved age determination of blood and teeth samples using a selected set of DNA methylation markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekaert, Bram; Kamalandua, Aubeline; Zapico, Sara C; Van de Voorde, Wim; Decorte, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    Age estimation from DNA methylation markers has seen an exponential growth of interest, not in the least from forensic scientists. The current published assays, however, can still be improved by lowering the number of markers in the assay and by providing more accurate models to predict chronological age. From the published literature we selected 4 age-associated genes (ASPA, PDE4C, ELOVL2, and EDARADD) and determined CpG methylation levels from 206 blood samples of both deceased and living individuals (age range: 0-91 years). This data was subsequently used to compare prediction accuracy with both linear and non-linear regression models. A quadratic regression model in which the methylation levels of ELOVL2 were squared showed the highest accuracy with a Mean Absolute Deviation (MAD) between chronological age and predicted age of 3.75 years and an adjusted R(2) of 0.95. No difference in accuracy was observed for samples obtained either from living and deceased individuals or between the 2 genders. In addition, 29 teeth from different individuals (age range: 19-70 years) were analyzed using the same set of markers resulting in a MAD of 4.86 years and an adjusted R(2) of 0.74. Cross validation of the results obtained from blood samples demonstrated the robustness and reproducibility of the assay. In conclusion, the set of 4 CpG DNA methylation markers is capable of producing highly accurate age predictions for blood samples from deceased and living individuals.

  10. Cold Spray Deposition of Freestanding Inconel Samples and Comparative Analysis with Selective Laser Melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherifard, Sara; Roscioli, Gianluca; Zuccoli, Maria Vittoria; Hadi, Mehdi; D'Elia, Gaetano; Demir, Ali Gökhan; Previtali, Barbara; Kondás, Ján; Guagliano, Mario

    2017-10-01

    Cold spray offers the possibility of obtaining almost zero-porosity buildups with no theoretical limit to the thickness. Moreover, cold spray can eliminate particle melting, evaporation, crystallization, grain growth, unwanted oxidation, undesirable phases and thermally induced tensile residual stresses. Such characteristics can boost its potential to be used as an additive manufacturing technique. Indeed, deposition via cold spray is recently finding its path toward fabrication of freeform components since it can address the common challenges of powder-bed additive manufacturing techniques including major size constraints, deposition rate limitations and high process temperature. Herein, we prepared nickel-based superalloy Inconel 718 samples with cold spray technique and compared them with similar samples fabricated by selective laser melting method. The samples fabricated using both methods were characterized in terms of mechanical strength, microstructural and porosity characteristics, Vickers microhardness and residual stresses distribution. Different heat treatment cycles were applied to the cold-sprayed samples in order to enhance their mechanical characteristics. The obtained data confirm that cold spray technique can be used as a complementary additive manufacturing method for fabrication of high-quality freestanding components where higher deposition rate, larger final size and lower fabrication temperatures are desired.

  11. Evaluation of a gas chromatography method for azelaic acid determination in selected biological samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garelnabi, Mahdi; Litvinov, Dmitry; Parthasarathy, Sampath

    2010-01-01

    Background: Azelaic acid (AzA) is the best known dicarboxilic acid to have pharmaceutical benefits and clinical applications and also to be associated with some diseases pathophysiology. Materials and Methods: We extracted and methylesterified AzA and determined its concentration in human plasma obtained from healthy individuals and also in mice fed AzA containing diet for three months. Results: AzA was detected in Gas Chromatography (GC) and confirmed by Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LCMS), and gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMC). Our results have shown that AzA can be determined efficiently in selected biological samples by GC method with 1nM limit of detection (LoD) and the limit of quantification (LoQ); was established at 50nM. Analytical Sensitivity as assayed by hexane demonstrated an analytical sensitivity at 0.050nM. The method has demonstrated 8-10% CV batch repeatability across the sample types and 13-18.9% CV for the Within-Lab Precision analysis. The method has shown that AzA can efficiently be recovered from various sample preparation including liver tissue homogenate (95%) and human plasma (97%). Conclusions: Because of its simplicity and lower limit of quantification, the present method provides a useful tool for determining AzA in various biological sample preparations. PMID:22558586

  12. X-Ray Temperatures, Luminosities, and Masses from XMM-Newton Follow-upof the First Shear-selected Galaxy Cluster Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Amruta J.; Hughes, John P.; Wittman, David

    2017-04-01

    We continue the study of the first sample of shear-selected clusters from the initial 8.6 square degrees of the Deep Lens Survey (DLS); a sample with well-defined selection criteria corresponding to the highest ranked shear peaks in the survey area. We aim to characterize the weak lensing selection by examining the sample’s X-ray properties. There are multiple X-ray clusters associated with nearly all the shear peaks: 14 X-ray clusters corresponding to seven DLS shear peaks. An additional three X-ray clusters cannot be definitively associated with shear peaks, mainly due to large positional offsets between the X-ray centroid and the shear peak. Here we report on the XMM-Newton properties of the 17 X-ray clusters. The X-ray clusters display a wide range of luminosities and temperatures; the L X -T X relation we determine for the shear-associated X-ray clusters is consistent with X-ray cluster samples selected without regard to dynamical state, while it is inconsistent with self-similarity. For a subset of the sample, we measure X-ray masses using temperature as a proxy, and compare to weak lensing masses determined by the DLS team. The resulting mass comparison is consistent with equality. The X-ray and weak lensing masses show considerable intrinsic scatter (˜48%), which is consistent with X-ray selected samples when their X-ray and weak lensing masses are independently determined. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  13. Peer Effects and Measurement Error: The Impact of Sampling Variation in School Survey Data (Evidence from PISA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklewright, John; Schnepf, Sylke V.; Silva, Pedro N.

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of peer effects on achievement with sample survey data on schools may mean that only a random sample of the population of peers is observed for each individual. This generates measurement error in peer variables similar in form to the textbook case of errors-in-variables, resulting in the estimated peer group effects in an OLS…

  14. Selective extraction of dimethoate from cucumber samples by use of molecularly imprinted microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao-Jiao Du

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecularly imprinted polymers for dimethoate recognition were synthesized by the precipitation polymerization technique using methyl methacrylate (MMA as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA as the cross-linker. The morphology, adsorption and recognition properties were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, static adsorption test, and competitive adsorption test. To obtain the best selectivity and binding performance, the synthesis and adsorption conditions of MIPs were optimized through single factor experiments. Under the optimized conditions, the resultant polymers exhibited uniform size, satisfactory binding capacity and significant selectivity. Furthermore, the imprinted polymers were successfully applied as a specific solid-phase extractants combined with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC for determination of dimethoate residues in the cucumber samples. The average recoveries of three spiked samples ranged from 78.5% to 87.9% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs less than 4.4% and the limit of detection (LOD obtained for dimethoate as low as 2.3 μg/mL. Keywords: Molecularly imprinted polymer, Precipitation polymerization, Dimethoate, Cucumber, HPLC

  15. The Important Selection Criteria in Choosing Islamic Banks: A Survey in Bahrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Hamzah Al-Hadrami

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Selection criteria of banks in general and Islamic banks in particular have been given high attention by the marketing researchers nowadays. But this kind of research is still insufficient in numbers especially in the developing countries. Therefore, this study aims to identify the important selection criteria that are considered by customers in selecting Islamic banks in the Kingdom of Bahrain. A 5-Likert scale survey questionnaire and ANOVA were used as the research method. The results indicate that the religious factors were ranked as the most important selection criteria for selecting Islamic banks. The study also found service quality factors as the second important selection criteria. This study is expected to provide Islamic banks in Bahrain with some inputs in setting up their marketing strategies in order to attract new customers and retain their existing customers. This study is also expected to add value to the literature by providing the updated empirical study in the area. DOI: 10.15408/aiq9i2.4635

  16. A quick method based on SIMPLISMA-KPLS for simultaneously selecting outlier samples and informative samples for model standardization in near infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Na; Ma, Chang-Ming; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Ren-Cheng

    2017-12-01

    A novel method based on SIMPLe-to-use Interactive Self-modeling Mixture Analysis (SIMPLISMA) and Kernel Partial Least Square (KPLS), named as SIMPLISMA-KPLS, is proposed in this paper for selection of outlier samples and informative samples simultaneously. It is a quick algorithm used to model standardization (or named as model transfer) in near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The NIR experiment data of the corn for analysis of the protein content is introduced to evaluate the proposed method. Piecewise direct standardization (PDS) is employed in model transfer. And the comparison of SIMPLISMA-PDS-KPLS and KS-PDS-KPLS is given in this research by discussion of the prediction accuracy of protein content and calculation speed of each algorithm. The conclusions include that SIMPLISMA-KPLS can be utilized as an alternative sample selection method for model transfer. Although it has similar accuracy to Kennard-Stone (KS), it is different from KS as it employs concentration information in selection program. This means that it ensures analyte information is involved in analysis, and the spectra (X) of the selected samples is interrelated with concentration (y). And it can be used for outlier sample elimination simultaneously by validation of calibration. According to the statistical data results of running time, it is clear that the sample selection process is more rapid when using KPLS. The quick algorithm of SIMPLISMA-KPLS is beneficial to improve the speed of online measurement using NIR spectroscopy.

  17. Report on a Survey of Program Directors Regarding Selection Factors in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Norma E.; Gray, George T.

    1979-01-01

    A national sample of 25 percent of the graduate education program directors in internal medicine, family medicine, surgery, and pediatrics were asked to judge the importance of 31 variables in the selection of house staff. A rank-ordering of variables for all respondents placed interpersonal skills demonstrated in the interview as number one.…

  18. Differential efficiencies of dip-net sampling versus sampling surface-floating pupal exuviae in a biodiversity survey of Chironomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Charles Ferrington Jr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Relative efficiencies of standard dip-net sampling (SDN versus collections of surface-floating pupal exuviae (SFPE were determined for detecting Chironomidae at catchment and site scales and at subfamily/tribe-, genus- and species-levels based on simultaneous, equal-effort sampling on a monthly basis for one year during a biodiversity assessment of Bear Run Nature Reserve. Results showed SFPE was more efficient than SDN at catchment scales for detecting both genera and species. At site scales, SDN sampling was more efficient for assessment of a first-order site. No consistent pattern, except for better efficiency of SFPE to detect Orthocladiinae genera, was observed at genus-level for two second-order sites. However, SFPE was consistently more efficient at detecting species of Orthocladiinae, Chironomini and Tanytarsini at the second order sites. SFPE was more efficient at detecting both genera and species at two third-order sites. The differential efficiencies of the two methods are concluded to be related to stream order and size, substrate size, flow and water velocity, depth and habitat heterogeneity, and differential ability to discriminate species among pupal exuviae specimens versus larval specimens. Although both approaches are considered necessary for comprehensive biodiversity assessments of Chironomidae, our results suggest that there is an optimal, but different, allocation of sampling effort for detecting Chironomidae across stream orders and at differing spatial and taxonomic scales.Article submitted 13. August 2014, accepted 31. October 2014, published 22. December 2014.

  19. The XMM-BCS galaxy cluster survey: I. The X-ray selected cluster catalog from the initial 6 deg$^2$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suhada, R.; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U.; Song, J.; /Michigan U.; Bohringer, H.; /Munich, Tech. U.; Mohr, J.J.; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. /Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Chon, G.; /Munich, Tech. U.; Finoguenov, A.; /Munich, Tech. U. /CSST, Baltimore; Fassbender, R.; /Munich, Tech. U. /CSST, Baltimore; Desai, S.; /Munich U. /Illinois U., Urbana; Armstrong, R.; /Illinois U., Urbana; Zenteno, A.; /Munich U. /Munich, Tech. U., Universe; Barkhouse, W.A.; /North Dakota U. /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.

    2011-11-01

    The XMM-Newton - Blanco Cosmology Survey project (XMM-BCS) is a coordinated X-ray, optical and mid-infrared cluster survey in a field also covered by Sunyaev-Zel dovich effect (SZE) surveys by the South Pole Telescope and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. The aim of the project is to study the cluster population in a 14 deg{sup 2} field (center: {alpha} {approx} 23:29:18.4, {delta} {approx} -54:40:33.6). The uniform multi-wavelength coverage will also allow us for the first time to comprehensively compare the selection function of the different cluster detection approaches in a single test field and perform a cross-calibration of cluster scaling relations. In this work, we present a catalog of 46 X-ray selected clusters from the initial 6 deg{sup 2} survey core.We describe the XMM-BCS source detection pipeline and derive physical properties of the clusters. We provide photometric redshift estimates derived from the BCS imaging data and spectroscopic redshift measurements for a low redshift subset of the clusters. The photometric redshift estimates are found to be unbiased and in good agreement with the spectroscopic values. Our multi-wavelength approach gives us a comprehensive look at the cluster and group population up to redshifts z {approx} 1. The median redshift of the sample is 0.47 and the median mass M{sub 500} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 14} M{sub {circle_dot}} ({approx} 2 keV). From the sample, we derive the cluster log N - log S using an approximation to the survey selection function and find it in good agreement with previous studies. We compare optical mass estimates from the Southern Cosmology Survey available for part of our cluster sample with our estimates derived from the X-ray luminosity. Weak lensing masses available for a subset of the cluster sample are in agreement with our estimates. Optical masses based on cluster richness and total optical luminosity are found to be significantly higher than the X-ray values. The present results illustrate the

  20. Geospatial database of the study boundary, sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones developed for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagaki, Naomi; Qi, Sharon L.; Frey, Jeffrey W.; Button, Daniel T.; Baker, Nancy T.; Burley, Thomas E.; Van Metre, Peter C.

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the first of several Regional Stream Quality Assessments (RSQA) was done in the Midwest United States. The Midwest Stream Quality Assessment (MSQA) was a collaborative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA), the USGS Columbia Environmental Research Center, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Rivers and Streams Assessment (NRSA). One of the objectives of the RSQA, and thus the MSQA, is to characterize the relationships between water-quality stressors and stream ecology and to determine the relative effects of these stressors on aquatic biota within the streams (U.S. Geological Survey, 2012). To meet this objective, a framework of fundamental geospatial data was required to develop physical and anthropogenic characteristics of the study region, sampled sites and corresponding watersheds, and riparian zones. This dataset is composed of the four fundamental geospatial data layers that were developed for the Midwest study: 1) study boundary, 2) sampled sites, 3) watershed boundaries, and 4) riparian-zone boundaries.References cited:Nakagaki, N., Qi, S.L., and Baker, N.T., 2016, Selected environmental characteristics of sampled sites, watersheds, and riparian zones for the U.S. Geological Survey Midwest Stream Quality Assessment: U.S. Geological Survey data release, http://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F77W699S.U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, The Midwest stream quality assessment: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2012-3124, 2 p.

  1. Male Circumcision and STI Acquisition in Britain: Evidence from a National Probability Sample Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Homfray

    Full Text Available It is well-established that male circumcision reduces acquisition of HIV, herpes simplex virus 2, chancroid, and syphilis. However, the effect on the acquisition of non-ulcerative sexually transmitted infections (STIs remains unclear. We examined the relationship between circumcision and biological measures of three STIs: human papillomavirus (HPV, Chlamydia trachomatis and Mycoplasma genitalium.A probability sample survey of 15,162 men and women aged 16-74 years (including 4,060 men aged 16-44 years was carried out in Britain between 2010 and 2012. Participants completed a computer-assisted personal interview, including a computer-assisted self-interview, which asked about experience of STI diagnoses, and circumcision. Additionally, 1,850 urine samples from sexually-experienced men aged 16-44 years were collected and tested for STIs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios (AOR to quantify associations between circumcision and i self-reporting any STI diagnosis and ii presence of STIs in urine, in men aged 16-44 years, adjusting for key socio-demographic and sexual behavioural factors.The prevalence of circumcision in sexually-experienced men aged 16-44 years was 17.4% (95%CI 16.0-19.0. There was no association between circumcision and reporting any previous STI diagnoses, and specifically previous chlamydia or genital warts. However, circumcised men were less likely to have any HPV type (AOR 0.26, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.13-0.50 including high-risk HPV types (HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and/or 68 (AOR 0.14, 95% CI 0.05-0.40 detected in urine.Circumcised men had reduced odds of HPV detection in urine. These findings have implications for improving the precision of models of STI transmission in populations with different circumcision prevalence and in designing interventions to reduce STI acquisition.

  2. China's human resources for maternal and child health: a national sampling survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenghong; Song, Peige; Theodoratou, Evropi; Guo, Sufang; An, Lin

    2015-12-16

    In order to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) 4 and 5, the Chinese Government has invested greatly in improving maternal and child health (MCH) with impressive results. However, one of the most important barriers for further improvement is the uneven distribution of MCH human resources. There is little information about the distribution, quantity and capacity of the Chinese MCH human resources and we sought to investigate this. Cities at prefectural level were selected by random cluster sampling. All medical and health institutions providing MCH-related services in the sampled areas were investigated using a structured questionnaire. The data were weighted based on the proportion of the sampled districts/cities. Amount, proportions and numbers per 10,000 population of MCH human resources were estimated in order to reveal the quantity of the Chinese MCH human resources. The capacity of MCH human resources was evaluated by analyzing data on the education level and professional skills of the staff. There were 77,248 MCH workers in China in 2010. In general, 67.6% and 71.9% of the women's and children's health care professionals had an associate degree or higher, whereas around 30% had only high-school or lower degrees. More than 40% of the women's health workers were capable of providing skilled birth attendance, but these proportions varied between different institutions and locations. Evidence from this study highlights that Chinese MCH human resources are not in shortage in the national level. However, the quantity and capacity of MCH human resources are not evenly distributed among different institutions and locations. Finally there is a need in the improvement of the MCH services by improving the quality of MCH human resources.

  3. Tackling city-regional dynamics into a survey using grid sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo Laaksonen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a Finnish human survey that takes advantage of explicit stratification. Stratification is not ordinary, since there are two types of stratification. In one, the strata are municipality based that are much used earlier. But in the second, these take advantage of the grid data base in which the grid size is 250 metres times 250 metres. Using the grid data base the two explicit strata are constructed, one consisting of such grids where the median tax income of the adults is low (called ‘poor’ grids, whereas the median income is high in the second explicit stratum of such grids (‘rich’ grids. In order to correctly handle these both stratified data, it is required first to merge them together, next to create the single sampling weights, and finally, due to 60 per cent non-response to adjust for these weights. This helps in reducing the bias of the estimates. The adjustment is strengthened with good auxiliary data both from the grid data base and other administrative sources

  4. Survey Response Styles, Acculturation, and Culture Among a Sample of Mexican American Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Rachel E; Resnicow, Ken; Couper, Mick P

    2011-10-01

    A number of studies have investigated use of extreme (ERS) and acquiescent (ARS) response styles across cultural groups. However, due to within-group heterogeneity, it is important to also examine use of response styles, acculturation, and endorsement of cultural variables at the individual level. This study explores relationships between acculturation, six Mexican cultural factors, ERS, and ARS among a sample of 288 Mexican American telephone survey respondents. Three aspects of acculturation were assessed: Spanish use, the importance of preserving Mexican culture, and interaction with Mexican Americans versus Anglos. These variables were hypothesized to positively associate with ERS and ARS. Participants with higher Spanish use did utilize more ERS and ARS; however, value for preserving Mexican culture and interaction with Mexican Americans were not associated with response style use. In analyses of cultural factors, endorsement of familismo and simpatia were related to more frequent ERS and ARS, machismo was associated with lower ERS among men, and la mujer was related to higher ERS among women. Caballerismo was marginally associated with utilization of ERS among men. No association was found between la mujer abnegada and ERS among women. Relationships between male gender roles and ARS were nonsignificant. Relationships between female gender roles and ARS were mixed but trended in the positive direction. Overall, these findings suggest that Mexican American respondents vary in their use of response styles by acculturation and cultural factors. This usage may be specifically influenced by participants' valuing of and engagement with constructs directly associated with social behavior.

  5. Location and Age Database for Selected Foraminifer Samples Collected by Exxon Petroleum Geologists in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabb, Earl E.; Parker, John M.

    2003-01-01

    Most of the geologic maps published for central California before 1960 were made without the benefit of age determinations from microfossils. The ages of Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks in the mostly poorly exposed and structurally complex sedimentary rocks represented in the Coast Ranges are critical in determining stratigraphic succession or lack of it, and in determining whether the juxtaposition of similar appearing but different age formations means a fault is present. Since the 1930’s, at least, oil company geologists have used microfossils to assist them in geologic mapping and in determining the environments of deposition of the sediment containing the microfossils. This information has been so confidential that some companies even coded the names of foraminifers to prevent disclosure. In the past 20 years, however, the attitude of petroleum companies about this information has changed, and many of the formerly confidential materials and reports are now available. We report here on 1,964 Exxon foraminifer samples mostly from surface localities in the San Francisco Bay region, and elsewhere in California. Most but not all the samples were plotted on U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7.5’ topographic maps or on obsolete USGS 15’ maps. The information from the slides can be used to update geologic maps prepared without the benefit of microfossil data, to analyze the depth and temperature of ocean water covering parts of California during the Mesozoic and Cenozoic Eras, and for solving nomenclature and other scientific problems. A similar report on more than 30,000 slides for surface samples collected by Chevron geologists has been released (Brabb and Parker, 2003), and another report provides information on slides for more than 2000 oil test wells in Northern California (Brabb, Powell, and Brocher, 2001).

  6. Selective attrition and bias in a longitudinal health survey among survivors of a disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stellato Rebecca

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the response mechanisms among survivors of disasters. We studied the selective attrition and possible bias in a longitudinal study among survivors of a fireworks disaster. Methods Survivors completed a questionnaire three weeks (wave 1, 18 months (wave 2 and four years post-disaster (wave 3. Demographic characteristics, disaster-related factors and health problems at wave 1 were compared between respondents and non-respondents at the follow-up surveys. Possible bias as a result of selective response was examined by comparing prevalence estimates resulting from multiple imputation and from complete case analysis. Analysis were stratified according to ethnic background (native Dutch and immigrant survivors. Results Among both native Dutch and immigrant survivors, female survivors and survivors in the age categories 25–44 and 45–64 years old were more likely to respond to the follow-up surveys. In general, disasters exposure did not differ between respondents and non-respondents at follow-up. Response at follow-up differed between native Dutch and non-western immigrant survivors. For example, native Dutch who responded only to wave 1 reported more depressive feelings at wave 1 (59.7%; 95% CI 51.2–68.2 than Dutch survivors who responded to all three waves (45.4%; 95% CI 41.6–49.2, p p Conclusion Our results indicate that despite selective response, the complete case prevalence estimates were only somewhat biased. Future studies, both among survivors of disasters and among the general population, should not only examine selective response, but should also investigate whether selective response has biased the complete case prevalence estimates of health problems by using statistical techniques such as multiple imputation.

  7. Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test results in European countries: an ESCMID cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Céline; Tebano, Gianpiero; Mutters, Nico T; Tacconelli, Evelina; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jarlier, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results is one possible laboratory-based antibiotic stewardship intervention. The primary aim of this study was to identify where and how selective reporting of AST results is implemented in Europe both in inpatient and in outpatient settings. An ESCMID cross-sectional, self-administered, internet-based survey was conducted among all EUCIC (European Committee on Infection Control) or EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) national representatives in Europe and Israel. Of 38 countries, 36 chose to participate in the survey. Selective reporting of AST results was implemented in 11/36 countries (31%), was partially implemented in 4/36 (11%) and was limited to local initiatives or was not adopted in 21/36 (58%). It was endorsed as standard of care by health authorities in only three countries. The organisation of selective reporting was everywhere discretionally managed by each laboratory, with a pronounced intra- and inter-country variability. The most frequent application was in uncomplicated community-acquired infections, particularly urinary tract and skin and soft-tissue infections. The list of reported antibiotics ranged from a few first-line options, to longer reports where only last-resort antibiotics were hidden. Several barriers to implementation were reported, mainly lack of guidelines, poor system support, insufficient resources, and lack of professionals' capability. In conclusion, selective reporting of AST results is poorly implemented in Europe and is applied with a huge heterogeneity of practices. Development of an international framework, based on existing initiatives and identified barriers, could favour its dissemination as one important element of antibiotic stewardship programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Sociodemographic Differences by Survey Mode in a Respondent-Driven Sampling Study of Transgender People in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheim, Ayden I; Bauer, Greta R; Coleman, Todd A

    2016-10-01

    To describe survey mode uptake and sociodemographic differences by mode among respondents to a respondent-driven sampling survey of transgender people in Ontario, Canada. Survey mode was left to participant choice. Data were collected from 433 transgender Ontarians in 2009-2010 through a self-administered questionnaire, available online, by paper copy, or by telephone with language interpretation. Paper respondents (9.5%) were significantly more likely to be Aboriginal or persons of color, underhoused, sex workers, and unemployed or receiving disability benefits. In Canada and similar high-income countries, sampling transgender populations that are diverse with respect to social determinants of health may be best carried out with multimode surveys.

  9. A Survey Analysis Of The Resource Selection Models In Agile/Virtual Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pires

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a survey is made of the analysis of the resource selection process. We approach the process also fromthe point of view of conventional enterprises but with particular emphasis on the existent models in Agile/VirtualEnterprises in order to identify the main limitations and shortcomings of the process.This analysis was focused in the global process of the resource selection, namely in terms of the pre-selection andselection phases, requisites, mathematical models, tools and other relevant areas in the existent models.It is concluded that the resource pre-selection is an area that is not adequately explored in a systematic way. Thevalue concept is not incorporated in the selection process. As a result, a reasoned analysis is not performed of thedecision-making process for creating an Agile/Virtual Enterprise. These conclusions were made to envision a futureapproach that allows the incorporation of new areas that contribute to the improvement of the resource selectionprocess.

  10. The (w)hole survey: An unbiased sample study of transition disk candidates based on Spitzer catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, N.; Verhaar, B. W.; van Terwisga, S.; Merín, B.; Herczeg, G.; Ligterink, N. F. W.; van Dishoeck, E. F.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding disk evolution and dissipation is essential for studies of planet formation. Transition disks, I.e., disks with large dust cavities and gaps, are promising candidates of active evolution. About two dozen candidates, selected by their spectral energy distribution (SED), have been confirmed to have dust cavities through millimeter interferometric imaging, but this sample is biased toward the brightest disks. The Spitzer surveys of nearby low-mass star-forming regions have resulted in more than 4000 young stellar objects. Using color criteria, we selected a sample of ~150 candidates and an additional 40 candidates and known transition disks from the literature. The Spitzer data were complemented by new observations at longer wavelengths, including new JCMT and APEX submillimeter photometry, and WISE and Herschel-PACS mid- and far-infrared photometry. Furthermore, optical spectroscopy was obtained and stellar types were derived for 85% of the sample, including information from the literature. The SEDs were fit to a grid of RADMC-3D disk models with a limited number of parameters: disk mass, inner disk mass, scale height and flaring, and disk cavity radius, where the latter is the main parameter of interest. About 72% of our targets possibly have dust cavities based on the SED. The derived cavity sizes are consistent with imaging/modeling results in the literature, where available. Trends are found with Ldisk over L∗ ratio and stellar mass and a possible connection with exoplanet orbital radii. A comparison with a previous study where color observables are used reveals large overlap between their category of planet-forming disks and our transition disks with cavities. A large number of the new transition disk candidates are suitable for follow-up observations with ALMA. Full Tables 4, 5, A.1-A.3, C.1, and D.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  11. Comparative studies on polyphenolic profile and antimicrobial activity of propolis samples selected from distinctive geographical areas of Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Szabolcs; Mikuska, Kata; Patonay, Katalin; Sisa, Krisztina; Daood, Hussein G; Némedi, Erzsébet; Kiss, Attila

    2017-06-01

    The present paper reports about a comparative survey on the chemical composition, antioxidant activity and in vitro antimicrobial activity of selected propolis samples collected in Hungary. The total levels of polyphenolic compounds including flavonoids in ethanolic extracts of propolis were assessed. The major constituents of ethanolic extracts of propolis were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis. Total phenolic content was determined spectrophotometrically using a Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Free radical scavenging activities were evaluated by means of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay. In vitro inhibitory activity was investigated against eight different bacterial strains by agar well diffusion assay. An extensive comparison was carried out regarding general parameters and specific polyphenolic components. The experimental data led to the observation that there is considerable variability in terms of the quality and the biological value of the distinctive propolis samples. These findings confirm the hypothesis of the study; versatile experimental results are required for proper, well-reasoned, balanced and standardised industrial applications. The major flavonoid components were found to be chrysin and pinocembrin; however, versatile minor components were also detected. The total polyphenol content of ethanolic extracts of propolis ranged between 104.6 mg/g and 286.9 mg/g (gallic acid equivalent). The radical scavenging activity of ethanolic extracts of propolis varied between 101.7 mg/g and 286.9 mg/g (ascorbic acid equivalent). As the quality of propolis depends on the season, vegetation and the area of collection, marked differences were found among the different products examined in terms of both composition and general characteristics. The studied samples exhibited significant differences in term of antimicrobial activities.

  12. Application of nonparametric multivariate analyses to the authentication of wild and farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Results of a survey on fish sampled in the retail trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasolato, Luca; Novelli, Enrico; Salmaso, Luigi; Corain, Livio; Camin, Federica; Perini, Matteo; Antonetti, Paolo; Balzan, Stefania

    2010-10-27

    The aim of this study was to apply biometric measurements and analyses of proximate composition, fatty acid composition, and ratios of stable isotopes of carbon (δ(13)C) and nitrogen (δ(15)N) in muscle tissue to reliably differentiate between wild and farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax). Farmed (n = 20) and wild (n = 19) European sea bass were purchased between March and May 2008 and used as standard samples. In the same months, a survey was conducted to evaluate the truthfulness of the statements on the labels of European sea bass sold in retail markets (declared farmed n = 34 and declared wild n = 33). In addition, data from the literature (reference) were employed to build the profile type of wild and farmed European sea bass. Primarily, an exploration and comparison of the analytical data of the standard data set based on principal component analysis and permutation test were performed. Afterward, an inferential statistical approach based on nonparametric combination test methodology (NPC) was applied on standard samples to check its suitability in discriminating the production method. This multivariate statistical analysis selected 30 variables on a total of 36 available. The validation of standard fish data set was accomplished by a novel nonparametric rank-based method according to profile type (just 1 misclassification over 39 samples). Both the NPC test and nonparametric rank-based method were then applied to survey fishes using the selected variables with the aim to classify the individual European sea bass as "true farmed" or "true wild". The former test segregated 10 fishes over 33 declared wild, whereas the results obtained by the nonparametric rank-based method showed that 11 of 33 declared wild European sea bass samples could be unquestionably attributed to the wild cluster. Moreover, considering the comparative contribution of profile type, a few surveyed farmed samples were ascribed to the wild cluster.

  13. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Physical Properties and Purity of a Galaxy Cluster Sample Selected Via the Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menanteau, Felipe; Gonzalez, Jorge; Juin, Jean-Baptiste; Marriage, Tobias; Reese, Erik D.; Acquaviva, Viviana; Aguirre, Paula; Appel, John Willam; Baker, Andrew J.; Barrientos, L. Felipe; hide

    2010-01-01

    We present optical and X-ray properties for the first confirmed galaxy cluster sample selected by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect from 148 GHz maps over 455 square degrees of sky made with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. These maps. coupled with multi-band imaging on 4-meter-class optical telescopes, have yielded a sample of 23 galaxy clusters with redshifts between 0.118 and 1.066. Of these 23 clusters, 10 are newly discovered. The selection of this sample is approximately mass limited and essentially independent of redshift. We provide optical positions, images, redshifts and X-ray fluxes and luminosities for the full sample, and X-ray temperatures of an important subset. The mass limit of the full sample is around 8.0 x 10(exp 14) Stellar Mass. with a number distribution that peaks around a redshift of 0.4. For the 10 highest significance SZE-selected cluster candidates, all of which are optically confirmed, the mass threshold is 1 x 10(exp 15) Stellar Mass and the redshift range is 0.167 to 1.066. Archival observations from Chandra, XMM-Newton. and ROSAT provide X-ray luminosities and temperatures that are broadly consistent with this mass threshold. Our optical follow-up procedure also allowed us to assess the purity of the ACT cluster sample. Eighty (one hundred) percent of the 148 GHz candidates with signal-to-noise ratios greater than 5.1 (5.7) are confirmed as massive clusters. The reported sample represents one of the largest SZE-selected sample of massive clusters over all redshifts within a cosmologically-significant survey volume, which will enable cosmological studies as well as future studies on the evolution, morphology, and stellar populations in the most massive clusters in the Universe.

  14. Outflows, infall and evolution of a sample of embedded low-mass protostars. The William Herschel Line Legacy (WILL) survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottram, J. C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L. E.; Karska, A.; San José-García, I.; Khanna, S.; Herczeg, G. J.; André, Ph.; Bontemps, S.; Cabrit, S.; Carney, M. T.; Drozdovskaya, M. N.; Dunham, M. M.; Evans, N. J.; Fedele, D.; Green, J. D.; Harsono, D.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Könyves, V.; Nisini, B.; Persson, M. V.; Tafalla, M.; Visser, R.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Herschel observations of water and highly excited CO (J > 9) have allowed the physical and chemical conditions in the more active parts of protostellar outflows to be quantified in detail for the first time. However, to date, the studied samples of Class 0/I protostars in nearby star-forming regions have been selected from bright, well-known sources and have not been large enough for statistically significant trends to be firmly established. Aims: We aim to explore the relationships between the outflow, envelope and physical properties of a flux-limited sample of embedded low-mass Class 0/I protostars. Methods: We present spectroscopic observations in H2O, CO and related species with Herschel HIFI and PACS, as well as ground-based follow-up with the JCMT and APEX in CO, HCO+ and isotopologues, of a sample of 49 nearby (d < 500 pc) candidate protostars selected from Spitzer and Herschel photometric surveys of the Gould Belt. This more than doubles the sample of sources observed by the WISH and DIGIT surveys. These data are used to study the outflow and envelope properties of these sources. We also compile their continuum spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from the near-IR to mm wavelengths in order to constrain their physical properties (e.g. Lbol, Tbol and Menv). Results: Water emission is dominated by shocks associated with the outflow, rather than the cooler, slower entrained outflowing gas probed by ground-based CO observations. These shocks become less energetic as sources evolve from Class 0 to Class I. Outflow force, measured from low-J CO, also decreases with source evolutionary stage, while the fraction of mass in the outflow relative to the total envelope (I.e. Mout/Menv) remains broadly constant between Class 0 and I. The median value of 1% is consistent with a core to star formation efficiency on the order of 50% and an outflow duty cycle on the order of 5%. Entrainment efficiency, as probed by FCO/Ṁacc, is also invariant with source

  15. A survey of variable selection methods in two Chinese epidemiology journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Henry S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although much has been written on developing better procedures for variable selection, there is little research on how it is practiced in actual studies. This review surveys the variable selection methods reported in two high-ranking Chinese epidemiology journals. Methods Articles published in 2004, 2006, and 2008 in the Chinese Journal of Epidemiology and the Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine were reviewed. Five categories of methods were identified whereby variables were selected using: A - bivariate analyses; B - multivariable analysis; e.g. stepwise or individual significance testing of model coefficients; C - first bivariate analyses, followed by multivariable analysis; D - bivariate analyses or multivariable analysis; and E - other criteria like prior knowledge or personal judgment. Results Among the 287 articles that reported using variable selection methods, 6%, 26%, 30%, 21%, and 17% were in categories A through E, respectively. One hundred sixty-three studies selected variables using bivariate analyses, 80% (130/163 via multiple significance testing at the 5% alpha-level. Of the 219 multivariable analyses, 97 (44% used stepwise procedures, 89 (41% tested individual regression coefficients, but 33 (15% did not mention how variables were selected. Sixty percent (58/97 of the stepwise routines also did not specify the algorithm and/or significance levels. Conclusions The variable selection methods reported in the two journals were limited in variety, and details were often missing. Many studies still relied on problematic techniques like stepwise procedures and/or multiple testing of bivariate associations at the 0.05 alpha-level. These deficiencies should be rectified to safeguard the scientific validity of articles published in Chinese epidemiology journals.

  16. [Analysis of liver cancer mortality in the national retrospective sampling survey of death causes in China, 2004 - 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-guo; Zhang, Si-wei; Chen, Wan-qing

    2010-05-01

    To analyze the patterns and changes of liver cancer mortality in China. Data of national retrospective sampling survey for the years of 2004 - 2005 from 158 counties/cities/districts was used for the settings, covering a 2-year's population of 142 660 482 person years, in which 47 899 806 in urban areas, and 94 760 676 in rural areas. Furthermore, the areas of Eastern, Central, and Western were divided into the subsets, with populations of 52 556 694, 49 781 225 and 40 322 563 person years, respectively. The crude rate (CR) and the age-standardized rate by Chinese population of 1982 (CASR) and by world's population of 1985 (WASR) were calculated. The historical comparisons with the national survey data of 1973 - 1975 (First time) and with the sampling survey of 1990 - 1992 (Second time) were made, and the global comparisons with some selected countries were performed. A total of 37 645 death cases with liver cancer were recorded from the 158 samples in the year 2004 - 2005, with the CR of 26.26 per 100 000 (males: 27 398 cases, 37.55 per 100 000, and females: 10 067 cases, 14.45 per 100 000), which ranked the second after lung cancer, accounted for 19.33% of all sites of cancers (37 465/193 841). 93.04% of the sampling districts (147/158) showed the CRs amongst 10.00 to 39.00 per 100 000. The CASR was 17.86 per 100 000 (males: 26.44, females: 9.20), and the WASR was 23.48 per 100 000 (males: 34.61, females: 12.34). In the urban areas, the CR of liver cancer was 24.94 per 100 000 (11 945 cases, CASR: 15.34), and 26.93 per 100 000 (25 520 cases, CASR: 19.32) in the rural areas. The sex ratio of the male to female mortality rate was 2.60:1 (2.68:1 in urban areas, and 2.56:1 in rural areas). The death cases in the Eastern, Central, and Western areas were 14 909, 13 349 and 9 207, with CRs of 28.37, 26.82, and 22.83 per 100 000, respectively. The CR was increased by 89.77% compared with the data from the First time (1973 - 1975: 10.75 per 100 000), and increased by 28

  17. Adaptive geostatistical sampling enables efficient identification of malaria hotspots in repeated cross-sectional surveys in rural Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinune N Kabaghe

    Full Text Available In the context of malaria elimination, interventions will need to target high burden areas to further reduce transmission. Current tools to monitor and report disease burden lack the capacity to continuously detect fine-scale spatial and temporal variations of disease distribution exhibited by malaria. These tools use random sampling techniques that are inefficient for capturing underlying heterogeneity while health facility data in resource-limited settings are inaccurate. Continuous community surveys of malaria burden provide real-time results of local spatio-temporal variation. Adaptive geostatistical design (AGD improves prediction of outcome of interest compared to current random sampling techniques. We present findings of continuous malaria prevalence surveys using an adaptive sampling design.We conducted repeated cross sectional surveys guided by an adaptive sampling design to monitor the prevalence of malaria parasitaemia and anaemia in children below five years old in the communities living around Majete Wildlife Reserve in Chikwawa district, Southern Malawi. AGD sampling uses previously collected data to sample new locations of high prediction variance or, where prediction exceeds a set threshold. We fitted a geostatistical model to predict malaria prevalence in the area.We conducted five rounds of sampling, and tested 876 children aged 6-59 months from 1377 households over a 12-month period. Malaria prevalence prediction maps showed spatial heterogeneity and presence of hotspots-where predicted malaria prevalence was above 30%; predictors of malaria included age, socio-economic status and ownership of insecticide-treated mosquito nets.Continuous malaria prevalence surveys using adaptive sampling increased malaria prevalence prediction accuracy. Results from the surveys were readily available after data collection. The tool can assist local managers to target malaria control interventions in areas with the greatest health impact and is

  18. Multi-stage sampling for large scale natural resources surveys: A case study of rice and waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, J.D.; Reinecke, K.J.; Kaminski, R.M.; Gerard, P.D.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale sample surveys to estimate abundance and distribution of organisms and their habitats are increasingly important in ecological studies. Multi-stage sampling (MSS) is especially suited to large-scale surveys because of the natural clustering of resources. To illustrate an application, we: (1) designed a stratified MSS to estimate late autumn abundance (kg/ha) of rice seeds in harvested fields as food for waterfowl wintering in the Mississippi Alluvial Valley (MAV); (2) investigated options for improving the MSS design; and (3) compared statistical and cost efficiency of MSS to simulated simple random sampling (SRS). During 2000?2002, we sampled 25?35 landowners per year, 1 or 2 fields per landowner per year, and measured seed mass in 10 soil cores collected within each field. Analysis of variance components and costs for each stage of the survey design indicated that collecting 10 soil cores per field was near the optimum of 11?15, whereas sampling >1 field per landowner provided few benefits because data from fields within landowners were highly correlated. Coefficients of variation (CV) of annual estimates of rice abundance ranged from 0.23 to 0.31 and were limited by variation among landowners and the number of landowners sampled. Design effects representing the statistical efficiency of MSS relative to SRS ranged from 3.2 to 9.0, and simulations indicated SRS would cost, on average, 1.4 times more than MSS because clustering of sample units in MSS decreased travel costs. We recommend MSS as a potential sampling strategy for large-scale natural resource surveys and specifically for future surveys of the availability of rice as food for waterfowl in the MAV and similar areas.

  19. [Personality Traits Screening in a Colombian Adult Population Sample - Colombian National Survey of Mental Health-2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oviedo, Gabriel Fernando; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; Rondón, Martín; Borda Bohigas, Juan Pablo; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    Personality refers to the individual style in characteristic patterns of thinking, feeling and behaving. Traits may configure a personality disorder when there is a long-lasting rigid pattern of inner experience that deviates from the expectations of the individual's culture, are inflexible and form maladaptative schemes in different interpersonal scenarios. Given the pervasiveness of this structure, they cause impairment of functioning in the affected person. To establish the prevalence of personality traits in all selected adults, using the module-structured interview WHO WHM-CIDI-CAPI for clusters A, B and C of personality traits. Colombian National Survey on Mental Health with persons older than 18 years of age. Personality traits that are the most frequently described: Cluster A 46% (95%CI, 45.2-48.1) of people believe they are convinced that there are conspiracies behind many things in the world. Regarding the features of cluster B, 35.6% (95%CI, 34.2-37.0) of the population reports that generally they do not feel bad when offending or upsetting someone and 35.4% (95%CI, 33.9-36.8) refer to show feelings to anyone. The highest proportion of traits were found to the probable borderline personality disorder, as 4.6% (95%CI, 4.1-5.2) of the Colombian population aged 18 and older has 6 or more features of this type, and is the widely reported as an individual entity with similar rates in men and women. The high prevalence of disruptive personality traits requires more research. The high prevalence reported for borderline personality traits suggests the need to implement measures to improve and integrate a collaborative model of care for people afflicted with a possible borderline personality disorder. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  20. Drainage areas for selected stream-sampling stations, Missouri River Basin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA), an investigation of the Missouri River Basin is being conducted to...

  1. Selective determination of total vanadium in water samples by cloud point extraction of its ternary complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Hayati; Yanaz, Zeynep; Apak, Reşat

    2008-07-14

    A highly sensitive micelle-mediated extraction methodology for the preconcentration of trace levels of vanadium as a prior step to its determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) has been developed. Vanadium was complexed with 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) and hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium (0.2 mol L(-1) phosphoric acid) using Triton X-100 as surfactant and quantitatively extracted into a small volume of the surfactant-rich phase after centrifugation. The color reaction of vanadium ions with hydrogen peroxide and PAN in phosphoric acid medium is highly selective. The chemical variables affecting cloud point extraction (CPE) were evaluated and optimized. The R.S.D. for 5 replicate determinations at the 20 microg L(-1)V level was 3.6%. The calibration graph using the preconcentration system for vanadium was linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.99 at levels near the detection limits up to at least 0.6 microg L(-1). The method has good sensitivity and selectivity and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of vanadium in water samples with satisfactory result. The proposed method is a rare application of CPE-atomic spectrometry to vanadium assay, and is superior to most other similar methods, because its useful pH range is in the moderately acidic range achieved with phosphoric acid. At this pH, many potential interferents are not chelated with PAN, and iron(III) as the major interferent is bound in a stable phosphate complex.

  2. Determination of Nd3+ Ions in Solution Samples by a Coated Wire Ion-Selective Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ali Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new coated wire electrode (CWE using 5-(methylsulfanyl-3-phenyl-1H-1,2,4-triazole (MPT as an ionophore has been developed as a neodymium ion-selective sensor. The sensor exhibits Nernstian response for the Nd3+ ions in the concentration range of 1.0×10−6-1.0×10−2 M with detection limit of 3.7×10−7 M. It displays a Nernstian slope of 20.2±0.2 mV/decade in the pH range of 2.7–8.1. The proposed sensor also exhibits a fast response time of ∼5 s. The sensor revealed high selectivity with respect to all common alkali, alkaline earth, transition and heavy metal ions, including members of the lanthanide family other than Nd3+. The electrode was used as an indicator electrode in the potentiometric titration of Nd(III ions with EDTA. The electrode was also employed for the determination of the Nd3+ ions concentration in water solution samples.

  3. Probing BL Lac and Cluster Evolution via a Wide-angle, Deep X-ray Selected Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, E.; Jones, L.; White, N.; Angelini, L.; Giommi, P.; McHardy, I.; Wegner, G.

    1994-12-01

    The WARPS survey (Wide-Angle ROSAT Pointed Survey) has been constructed from the archive of all public ROSAT PSPC observations, and is a subset of the WGACAT catalog. WARPS will include a complete sample of >= 100 BL Lacs at F_x >= 10(-13) erg s(-1) cm(-2) . A second selection technique will identify ~ 100 clusters at 0.15 = 0.304 +/- 0.062 for XBLs but = 0.60 +/- 0.05 for RBLs. Models of the X-ray luminosity function (XLF) are also poorly constrained. WARPS will allow us to compute an accurate XLF, decreasing the error bars above by over a factor of two. We will also test for low-luminosity BL Lacs, whose non-thermal nuclear sources are dim compared to the host galaxy. Browne and Marcha (1993) claim the EMSS missed most of these objects and is incomplete. If their predictions are correct, 20-40% of the BL Lacs we find will fall in this category, enabling us to probe the evolution and internal workings of BL Lacs at lower luminosities than ever before. By removing likely QSOs before optical spectroscopy, WARPS requires only modest amounts of telescope time. It will extend measurement of the cluster XLF both to higher redshifts (z>0.5) and lower luminosities (LX<1x10(44) erg s(-1) ) than previous measurements, confirming or rejecting the 3sigma detection of negative evolution found in the EMSS, and constraining Cold Dark Matter cosmologies. Faint NELGs are a recently discovered major contributor to the X-ray background. They are a mixture of Sy2s, starbursts and galaxies of unknown type. Detailed classification and evolution of their XLF will be determined for the first time.

  4. Using Selective Sampling for Binary Choice Models to Reduce Survey Costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.D. Donkers (Bas); Ph.H.B.F. Franses (Philip Hans); P.C. Verhoef (Peter)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMarketing problems sometimes concern the analysis of dichotomous variables, like for example ``buy'' and ``not buy'' and ``respond'' and ``not respond''. It can happen that one outcome strongly outnumbers the other, for example when many households do not respond (to a direct mailing,

  5. Survey of bottled drinking water sold in Canada. Part 2. Selected volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, B D; Conacher, H B; Salminen, J; Nixon, G R; Riedel, G; Mori, B; Gagnon, J; Brousseau, Y

    1993-01-01

    Selected volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants were determined in 182 samples of retail bottled waters purchased in Canada. Samples included spring water (86) packaged in containers of polyethylene or in smaller containers of transparent plastic or glass, mineral water (61) packaged only in transparent plastic or glass, and miscellaneous bottled waters (35). Analyses were performed by 3 laboratories, each using headspace sampling and capillary gas chromatography with either mass spectrometric (1 laboratory) or flame ionization detection with mass spectrometric confirmation, if required (2 laboratories). Benzene, the contaminant of primary interest, was detected in only 1 of the 182 samples at 2 micrograms/kg. Other VOC contaminants detected (number of positive samples, average, and range of positives in micrograms/kg) included toluene (20, 6.92, 0.5-63), cyclohexane (23, 39.2, 3-108), chloroform (12, 25.8, 3.7-70), and dichloromethane (4, 59, 22-97). Cyclohexane was found in the plastic and as a migrant from the plastic in 20 samples of spring water, but it was found in only 1 of 61 mineral water samples analyzed at only 3 micrograms/kg. Chloroform was found almost exclusively in samples that could have been obtained from public water supplies. It was not found in mineral water samples, but it was found in 1 spring water sample at 3.76 micrograms/kg. The source of the toluene contamination was not known. Other VOCs detected include ethanol and limonene, associated with added flavoring; pentane, as a migrant from a foamed polystyrene cap liner; and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethylene in a sample of demineralized water.

  6. U.S. Geological Survey nutrient preservation experiment; nutrient concentration data for surface-, ground-, and municipal-supply water samples and quality-assurance samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Charles J.; Truitt, Earl P.

    1995-01-01

    This report is a compilation of analytical results from a study conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey, National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL) in 1992 to assess the effectiveness of three field treatment protocols to stabilize nutrient concentra- tions in water samples stored for about 1 month at 4C. Field treatments tested were chilling, adjusting sample pH to less than 2 with sulfuric acid and chilling, and adding 52 milligrams of mercury (II) chloride per liter of sample and chilling. Field treatments of samples collected for determination of ammonium, nitrate plus nitrite, nitrite, dissolved Kjeldahl nitrogen, orthophosphate, and dissolved phosphorus included 0.45-micrometer membrane filtration. Only total Kjeldahl nitrogen and total phosphorus were determined in unfiltered samples. Data reported here pertain to water samples collected in April and May 1992 from 15 sites within the continental United States. Also included in this report are analytical results for nutrient concentrations in synthetic reference samples that were analyzed concurrently with real samples.

  7. Dream characteristics in a Brazilian sample: an online survey focusing on lucid dreaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A.; Targino, Zé H.; Souza, Bryan C.; Blanco, Wilfredo; Araujo, John F.; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2013-01-01

    During sleep, humans experience the offline images and sensations that we call dreams, which are typically emotional and lacking in rational judgment of their bizarreness. However, during lucid dreaming (LD), subjects know that they are dreaming, and may control oneiric content. Dreaming and LD features have been studied in North Americans, Europeans and Asians, but not among Brazilians, the largest population in Latin America. Here we investigated dreams and LD characteristics in a Brazilian sample (n = 3,427; median age = 25 years) through an online survey. The subjects reported recalling dreams at least once a week (76%), and that dreams typically depicted actions (93%), known people (92%), sounds/voices (78%), and colored images (76%). The oneiric content was associated with plans for the upcoming days (37%), memories of the previous day (13%), or unrelated to the dreamer (30%). Nightmares usually depicted anxiety/fear (65%), being stalked (48%), or other unpleasant sensations (47%). These data corroborate Freudian notion of day residue in dreams, and suggest that dreams and nightmares are simulations of life situations that are related to our psychobiological integrity. Regarding LD, we observed that 77% of the subjects experienced LD at least once in life (44% up to 10 episodes ever), and for 48% LD subjectively lasted less than 1 min. LD frequency correlated weakly with dream recall frequency (r = 0.20, p < 0.01), and LD control was rare (29%). LD occurrence was facilitated when subjects did not need to wake up early (38%), a situation that increases rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) duration, or when subjects were under stress (30%), which increases REMS transitions into waking. These results indicate that LD is relatively ubiquitous but rare, unstable, difficult to control, and facilitated by increases in REMS duration and transitions to wake state. Together with LD incidence in USA, Europe and Asia, our data from Latin America strengthen the notion that LD

  8. Dream characteristics in a Brazilian sample: an online survey focusing on lucid dreaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota-Rolim, Sérgio A; Targino, Zé H; Souza, Bryan C; Blanco, Wilfredo; Araujo, John F; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2013-01-01

    During sleep, humans experience the offline images and sensations that we call dreams, which are typically emotional and lacking in rational judgment of their bizarreness. However, during lucid dreaming (LD), subjects know that they are dreaming, and may control oneiric content. Dreaming and LD features have been studied in North Americans, Europeans and Asians, but not among Brazilians, the largest population in Latin America. Here we investigated dreams and LD characteristics in a Brazilian sample (n = 3,427; median age = 25 years) through an online survey. The subjects reported recalling dreams at least once a week (76%), and that dreams typically depicted actions (93%), known people (92%), sounds/voices (78%), and colored images (76%). The oneiric content was associated with plans for the upcoming days (37%), memories of the previous day (13%), or unrelated to the dreamer (30%). Nightmares usually depicted anxiety/fear (65%), being stalked (48%), or other unpleasant sensations (47%). These data corroborate Freudian notion of day residue in dreams, and suggest that dreams and nightmares are simulations of life situations that are related to our psychobiological integrity. Regarding LD, we observed that 77% of the subjects experienced LD at least once in life (44% up to 10 episodes ever), and for 48% LD subjectively lasted less than 1 min. LD frequency correlated weakly with dream recall frequency (r = 0.20, p < 0.01), and LD control was rare (29%). LD occurrence was facilitated when subjects did not need to wake up early (38%), a situation that increases rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) duration, or when subjects were under stress (30%), which increases REMS transitions into waking. These results indicate that LD is relatively ubiquitous but rare, unstable, difficult to control, and facilitated by increases in REMS duration and transitions to wake state. Together with LD incidence in USA, Europe and Asia, our data from Latin America strengthen the notion that LD

  9. A survey of suicidality and views on suicide in an Indian sample of adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilamadhab Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Suicide is a major public health concern in India. There is limited information regarding views about suicide and suicidality in the community. Aims: It was intended to study the suicidal cognitions and behavior in a sample of adults in India along with views about suicide. Methodology: It was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, anonymous survey conducted in four tertiary level medical centers. The subjects included patients and their attendants and health professionals in the organizations. The questionnaire included items on suicidal cognitions, suicide attempt history, current and past physical and mental illness, stress, views on suicide and the interventions along with information on the sociodemographic variables. Results: A considerable proportions of participants reported lifetime suicidal cognitions: Life not worth living, 44.2%; death wish, 26.9%; suicidal ideas, 24.6%; made suicidal plans, 12.4%; and 7.1% had a history of suicide attempt. These cognitions were significantly associated with suicide attempt. There was a general awareness of risks and supportive measures. The finding that 29.7% of participants might consider suicide for themselves in certain circumstances suggested the degree of acceptability of suicide in the community. Contrasting views were also present where suicide was considered as a sin by 66.2%, but 10.4% felt that their religion allows it in certain situations. The majority of participants felt that suicide is preventable. Conclusions: Suicidal thought and behaviors were common in the community. The results suggest that there is still a need for public education increasing awareness about the risks, support systems available in the local community and timely help-seeking that may improve the scope for suicide prevention.

  10. Adjusting National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey sample weights for women of childbearing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer; Branum, Amy; Axelrad, Daniel; Cohen, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Maternal risk factors have been tabulated for women of childbearing age using defined age ranges. However, statistics for factors strongly related to age may be overly influenced by values for the youngest and oldest women in a range, because pregnancies are most likely for ages 20-35. This report evaluates adjustment methods, based on the probability of pregnancy, for calculating estimates of risk factors for women of childbearing age. Adjusted and unadjusted estimates for environmental and nutritional variables were calculated from the 1999-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for women aged 16-49. U.S. births were used to determine the probability of pregnancy. Adjusted and unadjusted estimates differed for some, but not all, examined variables. More marked differences were observed for the environmental variables compared with the nutritional variables. Adjusted estimates were within about 5% of the unadjusted estimates for the nutritional variables. Adjusted geometric means for lead and mercury were about 7%-10% lower, and for polychlorinated biphenyl (or PCB) about 25% lower, than their respective unadjusted geometric means. With few exceptions, different adjustment methods led to similar estimates. When calculating statistics for women of childbearing age, the decision to adjust for age or not to adjust appears to be more important than the choice of adjustment method. Although the results suggest only small differences among adjustment methods, approaches based on the NHANES design and sample weighting methodology may be the most robust for other applications. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  11. Dream characteristics in a Brazilian sample: an online survey focusing on lucid dreaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Arthuro Mota-Rolim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During sleep, humans experience the offline images and sensations that we call dreams, which are typically emotional and lacking in rational judgment of their bizarreness. However, during lucid dreaming (LD, subjects know that they are dreaming, and may control oneiric content. Dreaming and LD features have been studied in North Americans, Europeans and Asians, but not among Brazilians, the largest population in Latin America. Here we investigated dreams and LD characteristics in a Brazilian sample (n=3,427; median age=25 years through an online survey. The subjects reported recalling dreams at least once a week (76%. Dreams typically depicted actions (93%, known people (92%, sounds/voices (78%, and colored images (76%. The oneiric content was associated with plans for the upcoming days (37%, memories of the previous day (13%, or unrelated to the dreamer (30%. Nightmares usually depicted anxiety/fear (65%, being stalked (48%, or other unpleasant sensations (47%. These data corroborate Freudian notion of day residue, and suggest that dreams are simulations of life situations that are related to our psychobiological integrity. Regarding LD, we observed that 77% of the subjects experienced LD at least once in life (44% up to 10 episodes ever, and for 48% LD subjectively lasted less than 1 minute. LD frequency correlated weakly with dream recall frequency (r=0.20, p<0.01, and LD control was rare (29%. LD occurrence was facilitated when subjects did not need to wake up early (38%, a situation that increases REMS duration, or when subjects were under stress (30%, which increases REMS transitions into waking. These results indicate that LD is a relatively ubiquitous but not frequent state, being unstable, difficult to control, and facilitated by increases in REMS duration and transitions to wake state. Together with LD incidence in USA, Europe and Asia, our data from Latin America strengthen the notion that LD is a general phenomenon of the human

  12. The XXL Survey. XIII. Baryon content of the bright cluster sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, D.; Ettori, S.; Coupon, J.; Gastaldello, F.; Pierre, M.; Melin, J.-B.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; McCarthy, I. G.; Adami, C.; Chiappetti, L.; Faccioli, L.; Giles, P.; Lavoie, S.; Lefèvre, J. P.; Lieu, M.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B.; McGee, S.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Sadibekova, T.; Smith, G. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, galaxy clusters have been expected to retain all the material accreted since their formation epoch. For this reason, their matter content should be representative of the Universe as a whole, and thus their baryon fraction should be close to the Universal baryon fraction Ωb/ Ωm. We make use of the sample of the 100 brightest galaxy clusters discovered in the XXL Survey to investigate the fraction of baryons in the form of hot gas and stars in the cluster population. Since it spans a wide range of mass (1013-1015 M⊙) and redshift (0.05-1.1) and benefits from a large set of multiwavelength data, the XXL-100-GC sample is ideal for measuring the global baryon budget of massive halos. We measure the gas masses of the detected halos and use a mass-temperature relation directly calibrated using weak-lensing measurements for a subset of XXL clusters to estimate the halo mass. We find that the weak-lensing calibrated gas fraction of XXL-100-GC clusters is substantially lower than was found in previous studies using hydrostatic masses. Our best-fit relation between gas fraction and mass reads fgas,500 = 0.055-0.006+0.007(M500/1014 M⊙)0.21-0.10+0.11. The baryon budget of galaxy clusters therefore falls short of the Universal baryon fraction by about a factor of two at r500,MT. Our measurements require a hydrostatic bias 1-b = MX/MWL = 0.72-0.07+0.08 to match the gas fraction obtained using lensing and hydrostatic equilibrium, which holds independently of the instrument considered. Comparing our gas fraction measurements with the expectations from numerical simulations, we find that our results favour an extreme feedback scheme in which a significant fraction of the baryons are expelled from the cores of halos. This model is, however, in contrast with the thermodynamical properties of observed halos, which might suggest that weak-lensing masses are overestimated. In light of these results, we note that a mass bias 1-b = 0.58 as required to reconcile Planck

  13. The Relationship between Multiple Substance Use, Perceived Academic Achievements, and Selected Socio-Demographic Factors in a Polish Adolescent Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Joanna; Tabak, Izabela; Dzielska, Anna; Wąż, Krzysztof; Oblacińska, Anna

    2016-12-21

    Predictors of high-risk patterns of substance use are often analysed in relation to demographic and school-related factors. The interaction between these factors and the additional impact of family wealth are still new areas of research. The aim of this study was to find determinants of the most common patterns of psychoactive substance use in mid-adolescence, compared to non-users. A sample of 1202 Polish students (46.1% boys, mean age of 15.6 years) was surveyed in 2013/2014. Four patterns of psychoactive substance use were defined using cluster analysis: non-users-71.9%, mainly tobacco and alcohol users-13.7%, high alcohol and cannabis users-7.2%, poly-users-7.2%. The final model contained the main effects of gender and age, and one three-way (perceived academic achievement × gender × family affluence) interaction. Girls with poor perception of school performance (as compared to girls with better achievements) were at significantly higher risk of being poly-users, in both less and more affluent families (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 5.55 and OR = 3.60, respectively). The impact of family affluence was revealed only in interaction with other factors. Patterns of substance use in mid-adolescence are strongly related to perceived academic achievements, and these interact with selected socio-demographic factors.

  14. The Relationship between Multiple Substance Use, Perceived Academic Achievements, and Selected Socio-Demographic Factors in a Polish Adolescent Sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Mazur

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Predictors of high-risk patterns of substance use are often analysed in relation to demographic and school-related factors. The interaction between these factors and the additional impact of family wealth are still new areas of research. The aim of this study was to find determinants of the most common patterns of psychoactive substance use in mid-adolescence, compared to non-users. A sample of 1202 Polish students (46.1% boys, mean age of 15.6 years was surveyed in 2013/2014. Four patterns of psychoactive substance use were defined using cluster analysis: non-users—71.9%, mainly tobacco and alcohol users—13.7%, high alcohol and cannabis users—7.2%, poly-users—7.2%. The final model contained the main effects of gender and age, and one three-way (perceived academic achievement × gender × family affluence interaction. Girls with poor perception of school performance (as compared to girls with better achievements were at significantly higher risk of being poly-users, in both less and more affluent families (adjusted odds ratio (OR = 5.55 and OR = 3.60, respectively. The impact of family affluence was revealed only in interaction with other factors. Patterns of substance use in mid-adolescence are strongly related to perceived academic achievements, and these interact with selected socio-demographic factors.

  15. Genome-Wide Survey of Genes Under Positive Selection in Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Thaís Cabrera Galvão; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Hongo, Jorge Augusto; Vicentini, Renato; Verma, Renu; Maluta, Renato Pariz; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias

    2017-05-01

    The ability to obtain bacterial genomes from the same host has allowed for comparative studies that help in the understanding of the molecular evolution of specific pathotypes. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is a group of extraintestinal strains responsible for causing colibacillosis in birds. APEC is also suggested to possess a role as a zoonotic agent. Despite its importance, APEC pathogenesis still has several cryptic pathogenic processes that need to be better understood. In this work, a genome-wide survey of eight APEC strains for genes with evidence of recombination revealed that ∼14% of the homologous groups evaluated present signs of recombination. Enrichment analyses revealed that nine Gene Ontology (GO) terms were significantly more represented in recombinant genes. Among these GO terms, several were noted to be ATP-related categories. The search for positive selection in these APEC genomes revealed 32 groups of homologous genes with evidence of positive selection. Among these groups, we found several related to cell metabolism, as well as several uncharacterized genes, beyond the well-known virulence factors ompC, lamB, waaW, waaL, and fliC. A GO term enrichment test showed a prevalence of terms related to bacterial cell contact with the external environment (e.g., viral entry into host cell, detection of virus, pore complex, bacterial-type flagellum filament C, and porin activity). Finally, the genes with evidence of positive selection were retrieved from genomes of non-APEC strains and tested as were done for APEC strains. The result revealed that none of the groups of genes presented evidence of positive selection, confirming that the analysis was effective in inferring positive selection for APEC and not for E. coli in general, which means that the study of the genes with evidence of positive selection identified in this study can contribute for the better understanding of APEC pathogenesis processes.

  16. REDSHIFTS, SAMPLE PURITY, AND BCG POSITIONS FOR THE GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOG FROM THE FIRST 720 SQUARE DEGREES OF THE SOUTH POLE TELESCOPE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, J. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zenteno, A.; Desai, S.; Bazin, G. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Muenchen (Germany); Stalder, B.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Aird, K. A. [Department of Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Armstrong, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Bertin, E. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrosifica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica, Santiago (Chile); De Haan, T. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); and others

    2012-12-10

    We present the results of the ground- and space-based optical and near-infrared (NIR) follow-up of 224 galaxy cluster candidates detected with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect in the 720 deg{sup 2} of the South Pole Telescope (SPT) survey completed in the 2008 and 2009 observing seasons. We use the optical/NIR data to establish whether each candidate is associated with an overdensity of galaxies and to estimate the cluster redshift. Most photometric redshifts are derived through a combination of three different cluster redshift estimators using red-sequence galaxies, resulting in an accuracy of {Delta}z/(1 + z) = 0.017, determined through comparison with a subsample of 57 clusters for which we have spectroscopic redshifts. We successfully measure redshifts for 158 systems and present redshift lower limits for the remaining candidates. The redshift distribution of the confirmed clusters extends to z = 1.35 with a median of z{sub med} = 0.57. Approximately 18% of the sample with measured redshifts lies at z > 0.8. We estimate a lower limit to the purity of this SPT SZ-selected sample by assuming that all unconfirmed clusters are noise fluctuations in the SPT data. We show that the cumulative purity at detection significance {xi} > 5({xi} > 4.5) is {>=}95% ({>=}70%). We present the red brightest cluster galaxy (rBCG) positions for the sample and examine the offsets between the SPT candidate position and the rBCG. The radial distribution of offsets is similar to that seen in X-ray-selected cluster samples, providing no evidence that SZ-selected cluster samples include a different fraction of recent mergers from X-ray-selected cluster samples.

  17. Wetland survey of selected areas in the K-24 Site Area of responsibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosensteel, B.A.; Awl, D.J. [JAYCOR, Environmental Division, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    In accordance with DOE Regulations for Compliance with Floodplain/Wetlands Environmental Review Requirements, wetland surveys were conducted in selected areas within the K-25 Area of Responsibility during the summer of 1994. These areas are Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, the K-770 OU, Duct Island Peninsula, the Powerhouse area, and the K-25 South Corner. Previously surveyed areas included in this report are the main plant area of the K-25 Site, the K-901 OU, the AVLIS site, and the K-25 South Site. Wetland determinations were based on the USACE methodology. Forty-four separate wetland areas, ranging in size from 0.13 to 4.23 ha, were identified. Wetlands were identified in all of the areas surveyed with the exception of the interior of the Duct Island Peninsula and the main plant area of the K-25 Site. Wetlands perform functions such as floodflow alteration, sediment stabilization, sediment and toxicant retention, nutrient transformation, production export, and support of aquatic species and wildlife diversity and abundance. The forested, scrub-shrub, and emergent wetlands identified in the K-25 area perform some or all of these functions to varying degrees.

  18. An X-Ray-selected Active Galactic Nucleus at z=4.6 Discovered by the CYDER Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treister, E.; Castander, F.J.; Maccarone, T.J.; Herrera, D.; Gawiser, E.; Maza, J.; Coppi, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    We present the discovery of a high-redshift, X-ray-selected active galactic nucleus (AGN) by the Calan-Yale Deep Extragalactic Research (CYDER) survey: CXOCY J033716.7-050153, located at z=4.61, the second high-redshift AGN discovered by this survey. Here we present its optical, near-IR, and X-ray

  19. Selection of representative calibration sample sets for near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy to predict nitrogen concentration in grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, Nisha; Rinnan, Åsmund; Gislum, René

    2012-01-01

    squares regression (PLSR), a chemometric method, has been applied on NIR spectroscopy data for the determination of the nitrogen (N) concentration in these grass samples. The sample selection method based on NIR spectral data proposed by Puchwein and the CADEX (computer aided design of experiments......) algorithm were used and compared. Both Puchwein and CADEX methods provide a calibration set equally distributed in space, and both methods require a minimum prior of knowledge. The samples were also selected randomly using complete random, cultivar random (year fixed), year random (cultivar fixed......) and interaction (cultivar × year fixed) random procedures to see the influence of different factors on sample selection. Puchwein's method performed best with lowest RMSEP followed by CADEX, interaction random, year random, cultivar random and complete random. Out of 118 samples of the complete calibration set...

  20. A Study of Urban-Rural Differences in College Student Employment--Based on National College Sample Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xulu, Zhang; Cheng, Jiang; Lili, Li

    2017-01-01

    Using large sample data from the 2013 National College Graduate Employment Survey, this article compares and analyzes differences in the job-seeking process and results for college students with urban and rural household registrations and uses a measurement model to explore factors affecting the starting salaries of college students. The research…

  1. Survey Research: Determining Sample Size and Representative Response. and The Effects of Computer Use on Keyboarding Technique and Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Daniel R.; Gades, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    Two articles are presented. The first reviews and suggests procedures for determining appropriate sample sizes and for determining the response representativeness in survey research. The second presents a study designed to determine the effects of computer use on keyboarding technique and skill. (CT)

  2. Psychometric Properties of the Social and Emotional Health Survey with a Small Sample of Academically At-Risk Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Tyler L.

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the psychometric properties of the Social and Emotional Health Survey (SEHS), which is a 32-item self-report behavior rating scale for assessing youths' social-emotional competencies, with a small sample (N = 77) of academically at-risk students attending a limited-residency charter school. This study is the first to…

  3. Off-road sampling reveals a different grassland bird community than roadside sampling: implications for survey design and estimates to guide conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy I. Wellicome

    2014-06-01

    concern. Our results highlight the need to develop appropriate corrections for bias in estimates derived from roadside sampling, and the need to design surveys that sample bird communities across a more representative cross-section of the landscape, both near and far from roads.

  4. Effectiveness of quadrat sampling on terrestrial cave fauna survey - a case study in a Neotropical cave

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Elina Bichuette; Luiza Bertelli Simões; Diego Monteiro von Schimonsky; Jonas Eduardo Gallão

    2015-01-01

    Quadrat sampling is a method used for a long time in plant ecology studies but only recently it has been used with focus on fauna. For the cave fauna samplings, there are rare works applying this methodology. The present study compared the methods of quadrat sampling with direct search qualitative for terrestrial cave fauna. For this, we conducted five sampling collections in a limestone cave in central Brazil. Quadrat sampling contributed with 121 exclusive species and 716 specimens and dire...

  5. Models of self-peptide sampling by developing T cells identify candidate mechanisms of thymic selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iren Bains

    Full Text Available Conventional and regulatory T cells develop in the thymus where they are exposed to samples of self-peptide MHC (pMHC ligands. This probabilistic process selects for cells within a range of responsiveness that allows the detection of foreign antigen without excessive responses to self. Regulatory T cells are thought to lie at the higher end of the spectrum of acceptable self-reactivity and play a crucial role in the control of autoimmunity and tolerance to innocuous antigens. While many studies have elucidated key elements influencing lineage commitment, we still lack a full understanding of how thymocytes integrate signals obtained by sampling self-peptides to make fate decisions. To address this problem, we apply stochastic models of signal integration by T cells to data from a study quantifying the development of the two lineages using controllable levels of agonist peptide in the thymus. We find two models are able to explain the observations; one in which T cells continually re-assess fate decisions on the basis of multiple summed proximal signals from TCR-pMHC interactions; and another in which TCR sensitivity is modulated over time, such that contact with the same pMHC ligand may lead to divergent outcomes at different stages of development. Neither model requires that T(conv and T(reg are differentially susceptible to deletion or that the two lineages need qualitatively different signals for development, as have been proposed. We find additional support for the variable-sensitivity model, which is able to explain apparently paradoxical observations regarding the effect of partial and strong agonists on T(conv and T(reg development.

  6. Geophysical Surveys of Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho, September 2002 - Grab Sample Data (GRABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bear Lake is a tectonic lake that has existed for at least several hundred thousand years. The lake basin is a relatively simple half graben, a spoon-shaped...

  7. Geophysical Surveys of Bear Lake, Utah-Idaho, September 2002 - JPEG Images of Grab Samples

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Bear Lake is a tectonic lake that has existed for at least several hundred thousand years. The lake basin is a relatively simple half graben, a spoon-shaped...

  8. Model selection for the North American Breeding Bird Survey: A comparison of methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, William; Sauer, John; Niven, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) provides data for >420 bird species at multiple geographic scales over 5 decades. Modern computational methods have facilitated the fitting of complex hierarchical models to these data. It is easy to propose and fit new models, but little attention has been given to model selection. Here, we discuss and illustrate model selection using leave-one-out cross validation, and the Bayesian Predictive Information Criterion (BPIC). Cross-validation is enormously computationally intensive; we thus evaluate the performance of the Watanabe-Akaike Information Criterion (WAIC) as a computationally efficient approximation to the BPIC. Our evaluation is based on analyses of 4 models as applied to 20 species covered by the BBS. Model selection based on BPIC provided no strong evidence of one model being consistently superior to the others; for 14/20 species, none of the models emerged as superior. For the remaining 6 species, a first-difference model of population trajectory was always among the best fitting. Our results show that WAIC is not reliable as a surrogate for BPIC. Development of appropriate model sets and their evaluation using BPIC is an important innovation for the analysis of BBS data.

  9. Patient preferences in selecting a dentist: survey results from the urban population of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huraib, Sahar Bin; Nahas, Nadia Al; Al-Balbeesi, Hana O; Abu-Aljadayl, Faida Moawia; Vellappally, Sajith; Sukumaran, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Awareness of gender- or nationality-driven preconceptions can help dentists to have a better interpretation of the dentist-patient relationship. It is even more noteworthy to understand these predilections in Saudi society, where women and men are usually segregated due to religion- and culture-based considerations. This study is one of the first to explore the preferences of patients when selecting a dentist with respect to gender and nationality in the city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 445 community residents residing in Riyadh were randomly selected for a cross-sectional study. The participants completed a survey designed to assess which of two factors (gender and/or nationality) were perceived as most relevant in choosing a dentist. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using the SPSS 11.5 software. Female participants did not show any preference for the gender of the dentist, whereas 40% of the male participants preferred a male dentist. Participants also favored male dentists in the felds of oral surgery (78.9%), implants (74.1%), endodontics (67.5%), orthodontics (65.8%) and prosthodontics (64.2%). An exception was noted in pediatric dentistry, for which female dentists were favored by 52.8% of the participants. Additionally, most (66.1%) participants did not have any preference for the nationality of the dentist. Riyadh residents showed a general preference for a male dentist but demonstrated no preference for nationality when selecting a dentist.

  10. Redshifts for a sample of fainter galaxies in the first CfA survey slice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstensen, J. R.; Wegner, G. A.; Hamwey, R.; Boley, F.; Geller, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Redshifts were measured for 93 of the 94 galaxies in the Zwicky-Nilson merged catalog with the value of m(B/01) between 15.5 and 15.7 and with right ascension alpha between 8(h) and 17(h) and declination delta between 29 and 30 deg. This region is within the one covered by the first slice of the CfA (Center for Astrophysics) survey. The galaxies reinforce features already visible in the earlier survey.

  11. Gamma radiation measurement in select sand samples from Camburi beach - Vitoria, Espirito Santo, Brazil: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barros, Livia F.; Pecequilo, Brigitte R.S.; Aquino, Reginaldo R., E-mail: lfbarros@ipen.b, E-mail: brigitte@ipen.b, E-mail: raquino@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The variation of natural radioactivity along the surface of the beach sands of Camburi, located in Vitoria, capital of Espirito Santo, southeastern Brazil, was determined from the contents of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th and {sup 40}K. Eleven collecting points was selected along all the 6 km extension of the Camburi beach. Sand samples collected from all established points on January 2011 were dried and sealed in standard 100 mL polyethylene flasks and measured by high resolution gamma spectrometry after a 4 weeks ingrowth period, in order to allow the secular equilibrium in the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series. The {sup 226}Ra concentration was determined from the weighted average concentrations of {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi. The {sup 232}Th concentration was determined from the weighted average concentrations of {sup 228}Ac, {sup 212}Pb and {sup 212}Bi and the {sup 40}K from its single gamma transition. Preliminary results show activity concentrations varying from 5 Bq.kg{sup -1} to {sup 222} Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra and from 14 Bq.kg{sup -1} to 1074 Bq.kg{sup -'}1 for {sup 232}Th, both with the highest values for Camburi South and Central. For {sup 40}K, the activity concentrations ranged from 14 Bq.kg{sup -1} to 179 Bq.kg{sup -1} and the highest values were obtained for Camburi South. (author)

  12. Crude protein, fibre and phytic acid in vitro digestibility of selected legume and buckwheat samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Vojtíšková

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine crude protein, fibre and phytic acid in vitro digestibility of selected legumes and buckwheat products. All analyses except the phytic acid contents were performed in the line with the Commission Regulation (EC No. 152/2009. A modified version of Holt’s Method was used for phytic acid (phytate determination. None of all samples contained more than 11% of moisture. Soybeans are rich in crude protein; they contain nearly 40% of this compound. The content of crude protein in buckwheat flours was about 14%. The highest amount of phytate was found in common beans and soybeans-about 2 g/100 g of dry matter. On the other hand, the lowest phytate content was observed in buckwheat pasta (F. esculentum groats was 1.9 g per 100 g of dry matter. In vitro digestibility was determined using an incubator Daisy and pepsin enzymes and the combination of pepsin and pancreatin. The highest coefficient of crude protein digestibility was discovered to be in peels and wholemeal flour. The greatest fibre digestibility coefficients were obtained for peels, which contain about 65% of fibre in their dry matter. When pepsin was used, a higher phytic acid digestibility coefficient for G. max, Ph. vulgaris, peels, flour, groats and broken groats was observed; while when the combination of pepsin and pancreatin was used, higher phytic acid digestibility coefficients for peas, lentil and wholemeal flour were observed.

  13. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: Practical guidance for selection, calibration, and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Upal; Driscoll, Susan Kane; Burgess, Robert M; Jonker, Michiel To; Reible, Danny; Gobas, Frank; Choi, Yongju; Apitz, Sabine E; Maruya, Keith A; Gala, William R; Mortimer, Munro; Beegan, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article provides practical guidance on the use of passive sampling methods (PSMs) that target the freely dissolved concentration (Cfree) for improved exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic chemicals in sediments. Primary considerations for selecting a PSM for a specific application include clear delineation of measurement goals for Cfree, whether laboratory-based “ex situ” and/or field-based “in situ” application is desired, and ultimately which PSM is best-suited to fulfill the measurement objectives. Guidelines for proper calibration and validation of PSMs, including use of provisional values for polymer–water partition coefficients, determination of equilibrium status, and confirmation of nondepletive measurement conditions are defined. A hypothetical example is described to illustrate how the measurement of Cfree afforded by PSMs reduces uncertainty in assessing narcotic toxicity for sediments contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The article concludes with a discussion of future research that will improve the quality and robustness of Cfree measurements using PSMs, providing a sound scientific basis to support risk assessment and contaminated sediment management decisions. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:210–223. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:24288273

  14. A survey of organochlorine pesticide residues in cheese samples from three Mexican regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, L A; Alpuche, L; Bárcenas, C; Rendón, J

    1990-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticide residues were determined in cheese samples from three Mexican regions. All samples were found to be contaminated by these residues: p,p'-DDE was present in 100% of the samples. Other pesticides found with high frequencies were HCB, three of the BHC isomers, as well as heptachlor and its epoxide. Also found, although less frequently, were residues of p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, aldrin, dieldrin and endrin. Samples from the region known as Comarca Lagunera had the highest number of pesticides per sample. The highest concentrations of residues were found in cheese samples from the Soconusco and the Comarca Lagunera regions.

  15. An HI selected sample of galaxies : The HI mass function and the surface brightness distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, M; Briggs, F; Sprayberry, D

    Results from the Arecibo HI Strip Survey, an unbiased extragalactic HI survey, combined with optical and 21 cm follow-up observations, determine the HI mass function and the cosmological mass density of HI at the present epoch. Both are consistent with earlier estimates, computed for the population

  16. A comparison of selection at list time and time-stratified sampling for estimating suspended sediment loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert B. Thomas; Jack Lewis

    1993-01-01

    Time-stratified sampling of sediment for estimating suspended load is introduced and compared to selection at list time (SALT) sampling. Both methods provide unbiased estimates of load and variance. The magnitude of the variance of the two methods is compared using five storm populations of suspended sediment flux derived from turbidity data. Under like conditions,...

  17. MOIRCS Deep Survey. VI. Near-infrared Spectroscopy of K-Selected Star-forming Galaxies at z ~ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Tomohiro; Akiyama, Masayuki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Alexander, David M.; Ohta, Kouji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Tokoku, Chihiro; Uchimoto, Yuka K.; Konishi, Masahiro; Yamada, Toru; Tanaka, Ichi; Omata, Koji; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Brandt, Niel; Ichikawa, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    We present the results of near-infrared multi-object spectroscopic observations for 37 BzK-color-selected star-forming galaxies conducted with MOIRCS on the Subaru Telescope. The sample is drawn from the Ks -band-selected catalog of the MOIRCS Deep Survey in the GOODS-N region. About half of our samples are selected from the publicly available 24 μm-source catalog of the Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. Hα emission lines are detected from 23 galaxies, of which the median redshift is 2.12. We derived the star formation rates (SFRs) from extinction-corrected Hα luminosities. The extinction correction is estimated from the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of multiband photometric data covering UV to near-infrared wavelengths. The Balmer decrement of the stacked emission lines shows that the amount of extinction for the ionized gas is larger than that for the stellar continuum. From a comparison of the extinction-corrected Hα luminosity and other SFR indicators, we found that the relation between the dust properties of stellar continuum and ionized gas is different depending on the intrinsic SFR (differential extinction). We compared SFRs estimated from extinction-corrected Hα luminosities with stellar masses estimated from SED fitting. The comparison shows no correlation between SFR and stellar mass. Some galaxies with stellar mass smaller than ~1010 M sun show SFRs higher than ~100 M sun yr-1. The specific SFRs (SSFRs) of these galaxies are remarkably high; galaxies which have SSFR higher than ~10-8 yr-1 are found in eight of the present sample. From the best-fit parameters of SED fitting for these high-SSFR galaxies, we find that the average age of the stellar population is younger than 100 Myr, which is consistent with the implied high SSFR. The large SFR implies the possibility that the high-SSFR galaxies significantly contribute to the cosmic SFR density of the universe at z ~ 2. When we apply the

  18. A national baseline prevalence survey of schistosomiasis in the Philippines using stratified two-step systematic cluster sampling design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, Lydia; Rivera, Pilarita; Saniel, Ofelia; Villacorte, Elena; Lebanan, May Antonnette; Crisostomo, Bobby; Hernandez, Leda; Baquilod, Mario; Erce, Edgardo; Martinez, Ruth; Velayudhan, Raman

    2012-01-01

    For the first time in the country, a national baseline prevalence survey using a well-defined sampling design such as a stratified two-step systematic cluster sampling was conducted in 2005 to 2008. The purpose of the survey was to stratify the provinces according to prevalence of schistosomiasis such as high, moderate, and low prevalence which in turn would be used as basis for the intervention program to be implemented. The national survey was divided into four phases. Results of the first two phases conducted in Mindanao and the Visayas were published in 2008. Data from the last two phases showed three provinces with prevalence rates higher than endemic provinces surveyed in the first two phases thus changing the overall ranking of endemic provinces at the national level. Age and sex distribution of schistosomiasis remained the same in Luzon and Maguindanao. Soil-transmitted and food-borne helminthes were also recorded in these surveys. This paper deals with the results of the last 2 phases done in Luzon and Maguindanao and integrates all four phases in the discussion.

  19. A National Baseline Prevalence Survey of Schistosomiasis in the Philippines Using Stratified Two-Step Systematic Cluster Sampling Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time in the country, a national baseline prevalence survey using a well-defined sampling design such as a stratified two-step systematic cluster sampling was conducted in 2005 to 2008. The purpose of the survey was to stratify the provinces according to prevalence of schistosomiasis such as high, moderate, and low prevalence which in turn would be used as basis for the intervention program to be implemented. The national survey was divided into four phases. Results of the first two phases conducted in Mindanao and the Visayas were published in 2008. Data from the last two phases showed three provinces with prevalence rates higher than endemic provinces surveyed in the first two phases thus changing the overall ranking of endemic provinces at the national level. Age and sex distribution of schistosomiasis remained the same in Luzon and Maguindanao. Soil-transmitted and food-borne helminthes were also recorded in these surveys. This paper deals with the results of the last 2 phases done in Luzon and Maguindanao and integrates all four phases in the discussion.

  20. Survey lines of the video and photos from the mini-SEABOSS sampling system acquired in Boston Harbor and approaches (surveylines_vid)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are the trackline from the seafloor photograph and video survey conducted September 2004 using the mini-SeaBOSS sampling system on the R/V Rafael in...

  1. Occurrence of selected radionuclides in ground water used for drinking water in the United States; a reconnaissance survey, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focazio, Michael J.; Szabo, Zoltan; Kraemer, Thomas F.; Mullin, Ann H.; Barringer, Thomas H.; dePaul, Vincent T.

    2001-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the American Water Works Association, and the American Water Works Service Company, completed a targeted national reconnaissance survey of selected radionuclides in public ground-water supplies. Radionuclides analyzed included radium-224 (Ra-224), radium-226 (Ra-226), radium-228 (Ra-228), polonium-210 (Po-210) and lead-210 (Pb-210).This U.S. Geological Survey reconnaissance survey focused intentionally on areas with known or suspected elevated concentrations of radium in ground water to determine if Ra-224 was also present in the areas where other isotopes of radium had previously been detected and to determine the co-occurrence characteristics of the three radium isotopes (Ra-224, Ra-226, and Ra-228) in those areas. Ninety-nine raw-water samples (before water treatment) were collected once over a 6-month period in 1998 and 1999 from wells (94 of which are used for public drinking water) in 27 States and 8 physiographic provinces. Twenty-one of the 99 samples exceeded the current U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking-water maximum contaminant level of 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) for combined radium (Ra-226 + Ra-228). Concentrations of Ra-224 were reported to exceed 1 pCi/L in 30 percent of the samples collected, with a maximum concentration of 73.6 pCi/L measured in water from a nontransient, noncommunity, public-supply well in Maryland. Radium-224 concentrations generally were higher than those of the other isotopes of radium. About 5 percent of the samples contained concentrations of Ra-224 greater than 10 pCi/L, whereas only 2 percent exceeded 10 pCi/L for either Ra-226 or Ra-228. Concentrations of Ra-226 greater than 1 pCi/L were reported in 33 percent of the samples, with a maximum concentration of 16.9 pCi/L measured in water from a public-supply well in Iowa. Concentrations of Ra-228 greater than 1 pCi/L were reported in 22 samples, with a maximum

  2. Empirically simulated study to compare and validate sampling methods used in aerial surveys of wildlife populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaemba, W.M.; Stein, A.; Rasch, D.; Leeuw, de J.; Georgiadis, N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper compares the distribution, sampling and estimation of abundance for two animal species in an African ecosystem by means of an intensive simulation of the sampling process under a geographical information system (GIS) environment. It focuses on systematic and random sampling designs,

  3. A field survey on parasites and antibodies against selected pathogens in owned dogs in Lilongwe, Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Alvåsen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to screen for selected parasites and antibody levels against vectorborne pathogens in owned dogs in Lilongwe, Malawi. The study population consisted of 100 dogs; 80 participating in vaccination–spaying campaigns and 20 visiting a veterinary clinic as paying clients. All dogs went through a general physical examination including visual examination for signs of ectoparasites. A total of 100 blood samples were analysed using commercial snap tests and 40 faecal samples by egg flotation in saturated sodium chloride. The sampled dogs had a seroprevalence of 12% for Anaplasma spp., 22% for Ehrlichia spp., 4% for Dirofilaria immitis and 1% for Leishmania spp. Eggs from Ancylostoma spp. were found in 80% of the faecal samples, whereas eggs of Trichuris vulpis, Toxocara canis and Toxascaris leonina were only present in 3%, 8% and 13% of the samples, respectively. Ectoparasites such as Ctenocephalides sp., Trichodectes sp. and ticks were present on 98%, 25% and 11%, respectively, of the campaign dogs. Among client dogs, 35% had Ctenocephalides fleas, 10% had Trichodectes lice and none had ticks. Public education and prophylactic treatment could be used to improve the animal welfare of dogs; this would most likely also have positive impact on public health.

  4. Factors Influencing the Likelihood of Overeducation: A Bivariate Probit with Sample Selection Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubb, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Contrary to expectations, the likelihood of overeducation is shown to be inversely related to unemployment rates when not control for selectivity. Furthermore, incidence data show that overeducation is more common among men than women and among Whites than Blacks. At issue is selectivity: employment must be selected for overeducation to occur.…

  5. Survey and analysis of materials research and development at selected federal laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, J.E.; Fink, C.R.

    1984-04-01

    This document presents the results of an effort to transfer existing, but relatively unknown, materials R and D from selected federal laboratories to industry. More specifically, recent materials-related work at seven federal laboratories potentially applicable to improving process energy efficiency and overall productiviy in six energy-intensive manufacturing industries was evaluated, catalogued, and distributed to industry representatives to gauge their reaction. Laboratories surveyed include: Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratories Material Laboratory (AFWAL). Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), National Aeronautics and Space Administration Marshall Flight Center (NASA Marshall), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). Industries included in the effort are: aluminum, cement, paper and allied products, petroleum, steel and textiles.

  6. Can smartphones measure momentary quality of life and participation? A proof of concept using experience sampling surveys with university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jacki; Wishink, Anna; Springfield, Liz; Gustafsson, Louise; Ireland, David; Silburn, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Understanding quality of life and participation is a key aspect of occupational therapy research. The use of smartphones to deliver experience-sampling surveys may provide an accessible way to monitor these outcomes. This study used smartphone-based experience sampling methods (ESM) to investigate factors influencing momentary quality of life (mQOL) of university students. A convenience sample of students at an Australian university participated. Using a custom smartphone application, ESM surveys were sent six to eight times, every second day, over a week. Participants indicated their mQOL, occupational participation, occupational enjoyment, social context and location via surveys and provided demographic and health information in a single self-report questionnaire. The relationship between mQOL and variables was analysed at the survey level using logistic regression. Forty students completed 391 surveys. Higher mQOL was significantly related to participation in productive occupations (z = 3.48; P = 0.001), moderate (z = 4.00; P < 0.001) or high occupational enjoyment (z = 7.06; P < 0.001), being with someone (z = 2.15, P = 0.031), being at home (z = 2.49; P = 0.013) and an excellent self-rated health status (z = 2.35; P = 0.019). The magnitude of differences in mQOL was small. This study suggests that mQOL amongst university students relates to personal, environmental and occupational factors. The use of smartphone-based ESM appears to be a practical approach for investigating participation and QOL. Further research utilising a more diverse sample, analysing at the individual level, and using ESM in conjunction with other methodologies is recommended. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  7. Geochemistry of Selected Coal Samples from Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    and ash (generally initiative has collected and published extensive coal quality data from the world's largest coal producers and consumers. The important aspects of the WoCQI program are; (1) samples from active mines are collected, (2) the data have a high degree of internal consistency with a broad array of coal quality parameters, and (3) the data are linked to GIS and available through the world-wide-web. The coal quality parameters include proximate and ultimate analysis, sulfur forms, major-, minor-, and trace-element concentrations and various technological tests. This report contains geochemical data from a selected group of Indonesian coal samples from a range of coal types, localities, and ages collected for the WoCQI program.

  8. The U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS)—A master catalog and collections management plan for U.S. Geological Survey geologic samples and sample collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is widely recognized in the earth science community as possessing extensive collections of earth materials collected by research personnel over the course of its history. In 2006, a Geologic Collections Inventory was conducted within the USGS Geology Discipline to determine the extent and nature of its sample collections, and in 2008, a working group was convened by the USGS National Geologic and Geophysical Data Preservation Program to examine ways in which these collections could be coordinated, cataloged, and made available to researchers both inside and outside the USGS. The charge to this working group was to evaluate the proposition of creating a Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS), a centralized database that would (1) identify all existing USGS geologic collections, regardless of size, (2) create a virtual link among the collections, and (3) provide a way for scientists and other researchers to obtain access to the samples and data in which they are interested. Additionally, the group was instructed to develop criteria for evaluating current collections and to establish an operating plan and set of standard practices for handling, identifying, and managing future sample collections. Policies and procedures promoted by the GCMS would be based on extant best practices established by the National Science Foundation and the Smithsonian Institution. The resulting report—USGS Circular 1410, “The U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Collections Management System (GCMS): A Master Catalog and Collections Management Plan for U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Samples and Sample Collections”—has been developed for sample repositories to be a guide to establishing common practices in the collection, retention, and disposal of geologic research materials throughout the USGS.

  9. Validity of Suicidality Items from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey in a High School Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Alexis; Klonsky, E. David

    2011-01-01

    The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is used by the United States Centers for Disease Control to estimate rates of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in adolescents. This study investigated the validity of the YRBS suicidality items by examining their relationship to criterion variables including loneliness, anxiety, depression, substance use, and…

  10. 77 FR 34387 - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Health and Nutrition Examination... Health and Human Services (DHHS). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Health and Nutrition Examination...: Geraldine McQuillan, Ph.D., Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health...

  11. Surveying drainage culvert use by carnivores: sampling design and cost-benefit analyzes of track-pads vs. video-surveillance methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, Ana Rita A; Grilo, Clara; Santos-Reis, Margarida

    2011-10-01

    Environmental assessment studies often evaluate the effectiveness of drainage culverts as habitat linkages for species, however, the efficiency of the sampling designs and the survey methods are not known. Our main goal was to estimate the most cost-effective monitoring method for sampling carnivore culvert using track-pads and video-surveillance. We estimated the most efficient (lower costs and high detection success) interval between visits (days) when using track-pads and also determined the advantages of using each method. In 2006, we selected two highways in southern Portugal and sampled 15 culverts over two 10-day sampling periods (spring and summer). Using the track-pad method, 90% of the animal tracks were detected using a 2-day interval between visits. We recorded a higher number of crossings for most species using video-surveillance (n = 129) when compared with the track-pad technique (n = 102); however, the detection ability using the video-surveillance method varied with type of structure and species. More crossings were detected in circular culverts (1 m and 1.5 m diameter) than in box culverts (2 m to 4 m width), likely because video cameras had a reduced vision coverage area. On the other hand, carnivore species with small feet such as the common genet Genetta genetta were detected less often using the track-pad surveying method. The cost-benefit analyzes shows that the track-pad technique is the most appropriate technique, but video-surveillance allows year-round surveys as well as the behavior response analyzes of species using crossing structures.

  12. Towards the harmonization between National Forest Inventory and Forest Condition Monitoring. Consistency of plot allocation and effect of tree selection methods on sample statistics in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Patrizia; Di Cosmo, Lucio; Cenni, Enrico; Pompei, Enrico; Ferretti, Marco

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of a process aiming at harmonizing National Forest Inventory (NFI) and ICP Forests Level I Forest Condition Monitoring (FCM) in Italy, we investigated (a) the long-term consistency between FCM sample points (a subsample of the first NFI, 1985, NFI_1) and recent forest area estimates (after the second NFI, 2005, NFI_2) and (b) the effect of tree selection method (tree-based or plot-based) on sample composition and defoliation statistics. The two investigations were carried out on 261 and 252 FCM sites, respectively. Results show that some individual forest categories (larch and stone pine, Norway spruce, other coniferous, beech, temperate oaks and cork oak forests) are over-represented and others (hornbeam and hophornbeam, other deciduous broadleaved and holm oak forests) are under-represented in the FCM sample. This is probably due to a change in forest cover, which has increased by 1,559,200 ha from 1985 to 2005. In case of shift from a tree-based to a plot-based selection method, 3,130 (46.7%) of the original 6,703 sample trees will be abandoned, and 1,473 new trees will be selected. The balance between exclusion of former sample trees and inclusion of new ones will be particularly unfavourable for conifers (with only 16.4% of excluded trees replaced by new ones) and less for deciduous broadleaves (with 63.5% of excluded trees replaced). The total number of tree species surveyed will not be impacted, while the number of trees per species will, and the resulting (plot-based) sample composition will have a much larger frequency of deciduous broadleaved trees. The newly selected trees have-in general-smaller diameter at breast height (DBH) and defoliation scores. Given the larger rate of turnover, the deciduous broadleaved part of the sample will be more impacted. Our results suggest that both a revision of FCM network to account for forest area change and a plot-based approach to permit statistical inference and avoid bias in the tree sample

  13. Determination of selected metals in coal samples from Lafia-Obi and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    coal samples were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). All the samples have comparable chromium and copper contents, while iron, aluminum, magnesium and potassium content vary to some extent. Metals concentrations in both Lafia-Obi and Chikila coal samples are within the limits allowed by the ...

  14. Knowledge, attitudes and practices survey on organ donation among a selected adult population of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Taimur

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding organ donation in a selected adult population in Pakistan. Methods Convenience sampling was used to generate a sample of 440; 408 interviews were successfully completed and used for analysis. Data collection was carried out via a face to face interview based on a pre-tested questionnaire in selected public areas of Karachi, Pakistan. Data was analyzed using SPSS v.15 and associations were tested using the Pearson's Chi square test. Multiple logistic regression was used to find independent predictors of knowledge status and motivation of organ donation. Results Knowledge about organ donation was significantly associated with education (p = 0.000 and socioeconomic status (p = 0.038. 70/198 (35.3% people expressed a high motivation to donate. Allowance of organ donation in religion was significantly associated with the motivation to donate (p = 0.000. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that higher level of education and higher socioeconomic status were significant (p Conclusion Better knowledge may ultimately translate into the act of donation. Effective measures should be taken to educate people with relevant information with the involvement of media, doctors and religious scholars.

  15. The team selection inventory: Empirical data from a New Zealand sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burch, G.St.J.; Anderson, N.

    2008-01-01

    Within personnel selection there is an increasing emphasis on multi-level selection. However, while there are a range of psychometrically robust tools available for assessing person—job fit, substantially fewer are available for assessing person—team or person—organization fit. One of the few tools

  16. THE BOSS EMISSION-LINE LENS SURVEY. IV. SMOOTH LENS MODELS FOR THE BELLS GALLERY SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Yiping [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Bolton, Adam S.; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Cornachione, Matthew A.; Zheng, Zheng; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Mao, Shude [Physics Department and Tsinghua Centre for Astrophysics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy and Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Marques-Chaves, Rui [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38205 San Cristóbal de La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Oguri, Masamune [Research Center for the Early Universe, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ménard, Brice, E-mail: yiping.shu@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope F606W-band imaging observations of 21 galaxy-Ly α emitter lens candidates in the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Emission-Line Lens Survey (BELLS) for the GALaxy-Ly α EmitteR sYstems (BELLS GALLERY) survey. Seventeen systems are confirmed to be definite lenses with unambiguous evidence of multiple imaging. The lenses are primarily massive early-type galaxies (ETGs) at redshifts of approximately 0.55, while the lensed sources are Ly α emitters (LAEs) at redshifts from two to three. Although most of the lens systems are well fit by smooth lens models consisting of singular isothermal ellipsoids in an external shear field, a thorough exploration of dark substructures in the lens galaxies is required. The Einstein radii of the BELLS GALLERY lenses are, on average, 60% larger than those of the BELLS lenses because of the much higher source redshifts. This will allow for a detailed investigation of the radius evolution of the mass profile in ETGs. With the aid of the average ∼13× lensing magnification, the LAEs are frequently resolved into individual star-forming knots with a wide range of properties. They have characteristic sizes from less than 100 pc to several kiloparsecs, rest-frame far-UV apparent AB magnitudes from 29.6 to 24.2, and typical projected separations of 500 pc to 2 kpc.

  17. Effectiveness of quadrat sampling on terrestrial cave fauna survey - a case study in a Neotropical cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elina Bichuette

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quadrat sampling is a method used for a long time in plant ecology studies but only recently it has been used with focus on fauna. For the cave fauna samplings, there are rare works applying this methodology. The present study compared the methods of quadrat sampling with direct search qualitative for terrestrial cave fauna. For this, we conducted five sampling collections in a limestone cave in central Brazil. Quadrat sampling contributed with 121 exclusive species and 716 specimens and direct search qualitative method contributed with 91 exclusive species and 355 specimens. Mann-Whitney test evidenced significant differences between the two methods. We demonstrated that quadrat sampling method was slightly more efficient to analyze the species richness and much more effective to assess the abundance than the use of only direct search qualitative method, mainly considering tiny and/or cryptobiotic invertebrates (e.g., earth worms, symphylans, psocopterans, trichopterans, dipterans, small spiders, and small isopods. We recommend the association of different methods to test patterns in cave fauna, since incomplete sampling may lead to erroneous estimates and equivocated decisions about management, impact studies and cave conservation.

  18. Mycotoxin survey of wheat samples graded according to their technological quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Slikova

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wheat grain samples from 108 fields in Slovakia were analysed for their technological quality parameters and deoxynivalenol (DON content. A total of 206 samples were sorted into those that were suitable (S; n = 186 and those that were unsuitable for human consumption (U; n = 20. The S samples were sorted into grain quality grades (E – elite; A – standard; B – minimum; P – biscuit. The natural occurrences of DON were 72.3 % in the E; 84.9 % in the A; 86.1 % in the B; 58.1 % in the P and 100.0 % in the U samples. The mean DON content was 0.55 mg kg−1 in the E; 0.47 mg kg−1 in the A; 0.67 mg kg−1 in the B; 0.36 mg kg−1 in the P and 1.67 mg kg−1 in the U samples. The natural mean DON contamination of the human consumption samples was lower (0.52 mg kg−1 than for the samples that were unsuitable for human consumption (1.67 mg kg−1.

  19. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens Sample from the Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Oguri, Masamune; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Shin, Min-Su; /Michigan U. /Princeton U. Observ.; Kayo, Issha; /Tokyo U., ICRR; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; /UC, Berkeley /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Morokuma, Tomoki; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan; Becker, Robert H.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; White, Richard L.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; /Ohio State U.; Gregg, Michael D.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Exeter U.

    2010-05-01

    We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i < 19.1 in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1 < {theta} < 20 and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, 3 have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.84{sub -0.08}{sup +0.06}(stat.){sub -0.07}{sup + 0.09}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of 7 binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.1 to 16.6, which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.

  20. Métodos de amostragem para estimação da cobertura vacinal Methods of sample selection for estimates of vaccination coverage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Pinho de Castro Silva

    1986-10-01

    nearest household until a total of 7 individuals is obtained (all individuals of the appropriate age living in the last household falling within the sample are included. Second method: the first stage is like that of the first method; previously to the second stage there is a census in each PSU selected in order to prepare a list of all dwelling units where one or more children live; applying systematic selection, 7 dwelling units are selected from this list. Third method: 30 PSU's are selected with probability proportional to Di (number of dwelling units in the PSU i given by the Census; the dwelling units in the selected PSU are considered in a fixed order; at the second stage, each selected PSU is exhaustively visited, according to the order of the dwelling units; during this visit, only the dwelling units where one or more children live are listed; to these dwellings a systematic selection is applied, the interval Di/b of which is such that with these two stages there is an equal probability selection method (epsem; the over-all sampling fraction is n/^C with n given by 210/a% (a%is the expected response rate and ^C is the estimate of the number of children living in the area of interest during the survey. The probability of selection of each individual of the appropriate age, in the first method, depends on the ratio Pi/Di'(Pi is the population of the i th PSU; Di' is the number of dwelling units in this PSU, during the survey, it depends too on the number of dwelling units with no children living in them, situated between two dwellings with children, as well as on the number of children living in each dwelling unit. When the ratios Pi/Di' are equal for all the PSU's, and the second item has the same values for the whole area of interest and this happens also with the third item, we shall then have a selection method of equal probability (epsem to the first. The second method is a probability one, since Pi/D'ci can be known for all the PSU's of the area of interest

  1. ATLASGAL-selected massive clumps in the inner Galaxy. III. Dust continuum characterization of an evolutionary sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, C.; Urquhart, J. S.; Csengeri, T.; Leurini, S.; Wyrowski, F.; Giannetti, A.; Wienen, M.; Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J.; Menten, K. M.; Schuller, F.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Massive-star formation and the processes involved are still poorly understood. The ATLASGAL survey provides an ideal basis for detailed studies of large numbers of massive-star forming clumps covering the whole range of evolutionary stages. The ATLASGAL Top100 is a sample of clumps selected by their infrared and radio properties to be representative for the whole range of evolutionary stages. Aims: The ATLASGAL Top100 sources are the focus of a number of detailed follow-up studies that will be presented in a series of papers. In the present work we use the dust continuum emission to constrain the physical properties of this sample and identify trends as a function of source evolution. Methods: We determine flux densities from mid-infrared to submillimeter wavelength (8-870 μm) images and use these values to fit their spectral energy distributions and determine their dust temperature and flux. Combining these with recent distances from the literature including maser parallax measurements we determine clump masses, luminosities and column densities. Results: We define four distinct source classes from the available continuum data and arrange these into an evolutionary sequence. This begins with sources found to be dark at 70 μm, followed by 24 μm weak sources with an embedded 70 μm source, continues through mid-infrared bright sources and ends with infrared bright sources associated with radio emission (i.e., H ii regions). We find trends for increasing temperature, luminosity, and column density with the proposed evolution sequence, confirming that this sample is representative of different evolutionary stages of massive star formation. Our sources span temperatures from approximately 11 to 41 K, with bolometric luminosities in the range 57 L⊙-3.8 × 106L⊙. The highest masses reach 4.3 × 104M⊙ and peak column densities up to 1.1 × 1024 cm-1, and therefore have the potential to form the most massive O-type stars. We show that at least 93 sources

  2. Micronekton sampling gear Intercalibration Experiment Survey #1 (MIE-1) (SE0413L2, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goal of the cruise was to collect micronekton samples using three different type of midwater trawl: Cobb trawl, Isaacs Kidd Midwater Trawl (IKMT), and a Hokkaido...

  3. Field sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods for explosives in soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crockett, A.B.; Craig, H.D.; Jenkins, T.F.; Sisk, W.E.

    1996-12-01

    A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling because of the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult because of the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of the samples, and extracting larger samples. This publication is intended to provide guidance to Remedial Project Managers regarding field sampling and on-site analytical methods for detecting and quantifying secondary explosive compounds in soils, and is not intended to include discussions of the safety issues associated with sites contaminated with explosive residues.

  4. Selective Extraction and Effective Separation of Galactosylsphingosine (Psychosine) and Glucosylsphingosine from Other Glycosphingolipids in Pathological Tissue Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yu-Teh; Li, Su-Chen; Buck, Wayne R.; Haskins, Mark E.; Wu, Sz-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Sidransky, Ellen; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate the study of the chemical pathology of galactosylsphingosine (psychosine, GalSph) in Krabbe disease and glucosylsphingosine (GlcSph) in Gaucher disease, we have devised a facile method for the effective separation of these two glycosylsphingosines from other glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in Krabbe brain and Gaucher spleen samples. The procedure involves the use of acetone to selectively extract GalSph and GlcSph, respectively, from Krabbe brain and Gaucher spleen samples. Since acet...

  5. Results of a detailed infill lake-sediment survey in the Snow Lake area: Evaluation and comparison of grab sample and short core data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friske, P.W.B.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the Exploration Science and Technology Initiative (EXTECH) program a detailed infill lake-sediment and water survey was undertaken in the Snow Lake area during the fall of 1991. This involved the collection of 346 lake sediment grab samples and concomitant waters. In 1993, additional work was undertaken involving the collection of 23 short cores from selected grab sample sites. The primary objectives of the infill survey and short core work were to: 1) evaluate the effectiveness of lake sediment geochemistry in detecting known mineralization in the Snow Lake area; 2) evaluate and develop new approaches in the use of lake sediment geochemistry; and, 3) define, if possible, new exploration targets. At most sites, data from the cores verify the original grab sample results. However, at a few sites the original anomalous grab sample results are interpreted as being related to contamination as opposed to naturally elevated levels. An unusually thick sequence of contaminated surface sediments with extremely high concentrations of trace metals is a likely contributing factor, a condition which is restricted to lakes in the immediate vicinity of local anthropogenic activity. Collection of lake cores provides a useful new approach to the follow-up of grab sample data and to the application of lake sediment geochemistry, particularly in areas with significant local contamination. Much of the known mineralization in the area is clearly reflected by the lake sediment data. Character of the anomalies mirror the composition of the nearby mineralization. The lake sediment data also identify a number of areas that warrant further investigation, several of which are discussed.

  6. Automated Gel Size Selection to Improve the Quality of Next-generation Sequencing Libraries Prepared from Environmental Water Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyaguari-Diaz, Miguel I; Slobodan, Jared R; Nesbitt, Matthew J; Croxen, Matthew A; Isaac-Renton, Judith; Prystajecky, Natalie A; Tang, Patrick

    2015-04-17

    Next-generation sequencing of environmental samples can be challenging because of the variable DNA quantity and quality in these samples. High quality DNA libraries are needed for optimal results from next-generation sequencing. Environmental samples such as water may have low quality and quantities of DNA as well as contaminants that co-precipitate with DNA. The mechanical and enzymatic processes involved in extraction and library preparation may further damage the DNA. Gel size selection enables purification and recovery of DNA fragments of a defined size for sequencing applications. Nevertheless, this task is one of the most time-consuming steps in the DNA library preparation workflow. The protocol described here enables complete automation of agarose gel loading, electrophoretic analysis, and recovery of targeted DNA fragments. In this study, we describe a high-throughput approach to prepare high quality DNA libraries from freshwater samples that can be applied also to other environmental samples. We used an indirect approach to concentrate bacterial cells from environmental freshwater samples; DNA was extracted using a commercially available DNA extraction kit, and DNA libraries were prepared using a commercial transposon-based protocol. DNA fragments of 500 to 800 bp were gel size selected using Ranger Technology, an automated electrophoresis workstation. Sequencing of the size-selected DNA libraries demonstrated significant improvements to read length and quality of the sequencing reads.

  7. Survey of Hygienic quality of honey samples collected form Qazvin province during 2011-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razzagh Mahmoudi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study : Consumption of honey has remarkably increased in the last years all over the world. Factors such as plant species, environmental, processing, and storing condition are affecting honey quality. The purpose of this study was to evaluation of Hygienic quality of honey samples produced from Qazvin province. Materials and Methods: 34 fresh honey Samples were obtained from beekeepers from different regions of the alamut area in the period between June and November 2011. The microbial contamination (bacteria and fungi was determined using conventional microbiological methods and the total aflatoxin was detected by “high performance liquid chromatography” (HPLC. Results: The results of microbial analysis showed that the aerobic mesophil bacteria count (50 cfu/g and fungal count (1.5*10 2 cfu/g were in low levels. However, coliforms were not detected in any of the honey sample. The most prevalent bacteria and fungi were Bacillus cereus and Aspergillus flavus respectively. Based on the HPLC method analysis, all of honey samples were contaminated whit aflatoxin and the mean concentration of aflatoxin was 3.67 ppb. Also the aflatoxin levels in 35% honey samples were higher than the maximum allowable amount of Europe ::::union:::: (4 µg/kg. Conclusion : According to the results, should have more control on the Hygienic quality of honey over the production, storage and supply periods in this area.  

  8. Guidelines for sample collecting and analytical methods used in the U.S. Geological Survey for determining chemical composition of coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Vernon Emanuel; Huffman, Claude

    1976-01-01

    This report is intended to meet the many requests for information on current U.S. Geological Survey procedures in handling coal samples. In general, the exact type and number of samples of coal and associated rock to be collected are left to the best judgment of the geologist. Samples should be of unweathered coal or rock and representative of the bed or beds sampled; it is recommended that two channel samples, separated by 10 to 100 yards (10 to 100 metres) and weighing 4 to 5 pounds ( 1.8 to 2.3 kilograms) each, be collected of each 5 feet ( 1.5 metres) of vertical section. Care must be taken to avoid any sample contamination, and to record the exact locality, thickness, and stratigraphic information for each sample. Analytical methods are described for the determination of major, minor, and trace elements in coal. Hg, As, Sb, F, Se, U, and Th are determined in the raw coal, and the following 34 elements are determined after ashing the coal: Si, Al, Ca, Mg, Na, K, Fe (total), Cl, Ti, Mn, P, S (total), Cd, Li, Cu, Zn, Pb, B, Ba, Be, Co, Cr, Ga, La, Mo, Nb, Ni, Sc, Sr, Ti, V, Y, Yb, and Zr. The methods used to determine these elements include atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, optical emission spectroscopy, spectrophotometry, selective-ion electrode, and neutron activation analysis. A split of representative coal samples is submitted to the U.S. Bureau of Mines for proximate, ultimate, forms of sulfur, and Btu determinations.

  9. A descriptive survey of management and operations at selected sports medicine centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, D

    1996-11-01

    No uniform guidelines for operations or accreditation standards for sports medicine center were available and, at the time of this study, little information on the management and operation of sports medicine centers was available in the literature. The purpose of the study was to determine the management structure and function of selected sports medicine centers in the United States. Questionnaires were mailed to 200 randomly selected centers throughout the United State from a directory of sports medicine centers published in Physician and Sportsmedicine (1992) to gather descriptive information on eight areas, including 1) general background, 2) staffing, 3) services, facilities, and equipment, 4) billing, collections, and revenue, 5) clientele, caseloads, and referrals, 6) ownership and financing, 7) school and club outreach contracts, and 8) marketing strategies and future trends. A total of 71 surveys (35.5%) were returned in the allotted time frame. Data were analyzed using ranges, means, medians, modes, and percentages. Results yielded several conclusions about sports medicine centers. Nearly all (93%) of the centers employed physical therapists; physical therapists were clinical directors at 70.2% of centers; orthopaedists were most often medical directors; rehabilitation was the most frequently offered service (93%); physical therapy produced the highest revenue; sports injuries accounted for a mean 34.5% of patients, who were mostly recreational or high school athletes between 13-60 years of age; primary shareholders were most often physical therapists or physicians; most were involved in outreach services for schools; marketing strategies primarily involved communication with referral sources; and managed care was identified most frequently as a trend affecting the future of sports medicine centers. Findings identified common aspects of sports medicine centers and may assist in establishing guidelines for operations or accreditation of sports medicine

  10. Prevalence and Predisposing Factors for Depressive Status in Chinese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: A Large-Sample Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yaozhang; Li, Xuewu; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Sihua; Sang, Jianzhong; Tian, Xiufen; Cao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there are few studies reporting on depressive status and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in China. A large-sample survey was to be performed to explore the prevalence of depressive status and related factors in Chinese patients with OSA. From among a randomly-selected group of OSA patients, 1,327 met inclusion criteria. After screening with the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90) and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS), patients were assigned to OSA without depressive status (control group, n = 698) and OSA with depressive status (n = 629) groups. Using chi-squared testing, the correlation analyses between the depressive status and OSA patient demographic and clinical variables were tested. Then depression-related risk factors in OSA patients were analysed using stepwise linear regression analysis. The effects of family and social factors on depressive status in OSA patients were investigated using Mann-Whitney U (one of nonparametric test). The prevalence of depressive status was 47.4% in OSA patients. Depressive status was significantly associated with female gender, single status, Family Burden Scale of Disease (FBS), Family APGAR Index (APGAR), apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI), and Perceived Social Support Scale (PSSS). Stepwise linear regression analysis further indicated that single status, hypoxemia, APGAR, AHI, PSSS, AHI, and FBS were all risk factors for depressive status in OSA patients. The total of the FBS score and three of its sub-factors scores (family daily activities, family relationships and mental health of family members) were higher, and the total of the APGAR score and two of its sub-factors scores (adaptability and affection) were lower in OSA with depressive status compared with the control group. Besides, the total score for the PSSS and scores for its two sub-factors (family support and social support) were all lower in OSA patients with depressive status than those of the control group. Depressive status has high comorbid rate in Chinese OSA

  11. Rotational mixing in Be stars: nitrogen abundances for a sample of Be stars from the MiMeS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A.; Sigut, T. A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Photospheric nitrogen abundances for a sample of 26 Be stars and 16 normal B stars were found using high-resolution spectra from the Magnetism in Massive Stars (MiMeS) spectroscopic survey. Nitrogen abundances were obtained using non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium equivalent widths and line profiles, and Monte Carlo simulation was used to determine the error bounds of the measured nitrogen abundances due to uncertainties in the adopted stellar parameters, continuum normalization and atomic data. In addition, the effects of gravitational darkening and disc contamination on the measured Be star nitrogen abundances were investigated. About one third of the sample of Be stars and half of the normal B-type stars have nitrogen enrichment that may be due to rotational mixing in these rapidly rotating objects. Corrections for gravitational darkening and disc contamination do not significantly change the overall results for the Be star sample. The average nitrogen abundance of the B and Be star samples coincides with the solar abundance, although the dispersion in the nitrogen abundances is much larger in the Be star sample. The Be star sample also has a significant fraction of sub-solar nitrogen abundance objects that are not present in significant numbers in the B star sample. This may point to yet unresolved systematic errors in the analysis of the Be stars.

  12. Survey of sampling-based methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Helton, Jon Craig; Sallaberry, Cedric J. PhD. (.; .); Storlie, Curt B. (Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO)

    2006-06-01

    Sampling-based methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis are reviewed. The following topics are considered: (1) Definition of probability distributions to characterize epistemic uncertainty in analysis inputs, (2) Generation of samples from uncertain analysis inputs, (3) Propagation of sampled inputs through an analysis, (4) Presentation of uncertainty analysis results, and (5) Determination of sensitivity analysis results. Special attention is given to the determination of sensitivity analysis results, with brief descriptions and illustrations given for the following procedures/techniques: examination of scatterplots, correlation analysis, regression analysis, partial correlation analysis, rank transformations, statistical tests for patterns based on gridding, entropy tests for patterns based on gridding, nonparametric regression analysis, squared rank differences/rank correlation coefficient test, two dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, tests for patterns based on distance measures, top down coefficient of concordance, and variance decomposition.

  13. Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods for select space propulsion system components (PSAM). Volume 3: Literature surveys and technical reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The technical effort and computer code developed during the first year are summarized. Several formulations for Probabilistic Finite Element Analysis (PFEA) are described with emphasis on the selected formulation. The strategies being implemented in the first-version computer code to perform linear, elastic PFEA is described. The results of a series of select Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) component surveys are presented. These results identify the critical components and provide the information necessary for probabilistic structural analysis.

  14. Sampling and coverage issues of telephone surveys used for collecting health information in Australia: results from a face-to-face survey from 1999 to 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grande Eleonora

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the trend of "mobile only" households, and households that have a mobile phone or landline telephone listed in the telephone directory, and to describe these groups by various socio-demographic and health indicators. Method Representative face-to-face population health surveys of South Australians, aged 15 years and over, were conducted in 1999, 2004, 2006, 2007 and 2008 (n = 14285, response rates = 51.9% to 70.6%. Self-reported information on mobile phone ownership and usage (1999 to 2008 and listings in White Pages telephone directory (2006 to 2008, and landline telephone connection and listings in the White Pages (1999 to 2008, was provided by participants. Additional information was collected on self-reported health conditions and health-related risk behaviours. Results Mobile only households have been steadily increasing from 1.4% in 1999 to 8.7% in 2008. In terms of sampling frame for telephone surveys, 68.7% of South Australian households in 2008 had at least a mobile phone or landline telephone listed in the White Pages (73.8% in 2006; 71.5% in 2007. The proportion of mobile only households was highest among young people, unemployed, people who were separated, divorced or never married, low income households, low SES areas, rural areas, current smokers, current asthma or people in the normal weight range. The proportion with landlines or mobiles telephone numbers listed in the White Pages telephone directory was highest among older people, married or in a defacto relationship or widowed, low SES areas, rural areas, people classified as overweight, or those diagnosed with arthritis or osteoporosis. Conclusion The rate of mobile only households has been increasing in Australia and is following worldwide trends, but has not reached the high levels seen internationally (12% to 52%. In general, the impact of mobile telephones on current sampling frames (exclusion or non-listing of mobile only households or not

  15. Interval-value Based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm for cancer-type specific gene selection and sample classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ramyachitra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technology allows simultaneous measurement of the expression levels of thousands of genes within a biological tissue sample. The fundamental power of microarrays lies within the ability to conduct parallel surveys of gene expression using microarray data. The classification of tissue samples based on gene expression data is an important problem in medical diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In gene expression data, the number of genes is usually very high compared to the number of data samples. Thus the difficulty that lies with data are of high dimensionality and the sample size is small. This research work addresses the problem by classifying resultant dataset using the existing algorithms such as Support Vector Machine (SVM, K-nearest neighbor (KNN, Interval Valued Classification (IVC and the improvised Interval Value based Particle Swarm Optimization (IVPSO algorithm. Thus the results show that the IVPSO algorithm outperformed compared with other algorithms under several performance evaluation functions.

  16. Interval-value Based Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm for cancer-type specific gene selection and sample classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramyachitra, D; Sofia, M; Manikandan, P

    2015-09-01

    Microarray technology allows simultaneous measurement of the expression levels of thousands of genes within a biological tissue sample. The fundamental power of microarrays lies within the ability to conduct parallel surveys of gene expression using microarray data. The classification of tissue samples based on gene expression data is an important problem in medical diagnosis of diseases such as cancer. In gene expression data, the number of genes is usually very high compared to the number of data samples. Thus the difficulty that lies with data are of high dimensionality and the sample size is small. This research work addresses the problem by classifying resultant dataset using the existing algorithms such as Support Vector Machine (SVM), K-nearest neighbor (KNN), Interval Valued Classification (IVC) and the improvised Interval Value based Particle Swarm Optimization (IVPSO) algorithm. Thus the results show that the IVPSO algorithm outperformed compared with other algorithms under several performance evaluation functions.

  17. Gathering Opinions on Depression Information Needs and Preferences: Samples and Opinions in Clinic Versus Web-Based Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Matthew T; Walker, John R; Sexton, Kathryn A; Katz, Alan; Beatie, Brooke E

    2017-04-24

    There has been limited research on the information needs and preferences of the public concerning treatment for depression. Very little research is available comparing samples and opinions when recruitment for surveys is done over the Web as opposed to a personal invitation to complete a paper survey. This study aimed to (1) to explore information needs and preferences among members of the public and (2) compare Clinic and Web samples on sample characteristics and survey findings. Web survey participants were recruited with a notice on three self-help association websites (N=280). Clinic survey participants were recruited by a research assistant in the waiting rooms of a family medicine clinic and a walk-in medical clinic (N=238) and completed a paper version of the survey. The Clinic and Web samples were similar in age (39.0 years, SD 13.9 vs 40.2 years, SD 12.5, respectively), education, and proportion in full time employment. The Clinic sample was more diverse in demographic characteristics and closer to the demographic characteristics of the region (Winnipeg, Canada) with a higher proportion of males (102/238 [42.9%] vs 45/280 [16.1%]) and nonwhites (Aboriginal, Asian, and black) (69/238 [29.0%] vs 39/280 [13.9%]). The Web sample reported a higher level of emotional distress and had more previous psychological (224/280 [80.0%] vs 83/238 [34.9%]) and pharmacological (202/280 [72.1%] vs 57/238 [23.9%]) treatment. In terms of opinions, most respondents in both settings saw information on a wide range of topics around depression treatment as very important including information about treatment choices, effectiveness of treatment, how long it takes treatment to work, how long treatment continues, what happens when treatment stops, advantages and disadvantages of treatments, and potential side effects. Females, respondents with a white background, and those who had received or felt they would have benefited from therapy in the past saw more information topics as very

  18. Gathering Opinions on Depression Information Needs and Preferences: Samples and Opinions in Clinic Versus Web-Based Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Matthew T; Sexton, Kathryn A; Katz, Alan; Beatie, Brooke E

    2017-01-01

    Background There has been limited research on the information needs and preferences of the public concerning treatment for depression. Very little research is available comparing samples and opinions when recruitment for surveys is done over the Web as opposed to a personal invitation to complete a paper survey. Objective This study aimed to (1) to explore information needs and preferences among members of the public and (2) compare Clinic and Web samples on sample characteristics and survey findings. Methods Web survey participants were recruited with a notice on three self-help association websites (N=280). Clinic survey participants were recruited by a research assistant in the waiting rooms of a family medicine clinic and a walk-in medical clinic (N=238) and completed a paper version of the survey. Results The Clinic and Web samples were similar in age (39.0 years, SD 13.9 vs 40.2 years, SD 12.5, respectively), education, and proportion in full time employment. The Clinic sample was more diverse in demographic characteristics and closer to the demographic characteristics of the region (Winnipeg, Canada) with a higher proportion of males (102/238 [42.9%] vs 45/280 [16.1%]) and nonwhites (Aboriginal, Asian, and black) (69/238 [29.0%] vs 39/280 [13.9%]). The Web sample reported a higher level of emotional distress and had more previous psychological (224/280 [80.0%] vs 83/238 [34.9%]) and pharmacological (202/280 [72.1%] vs 57/238 [23.9%]) treatment. In terms of opinions, most respondents in both settings saw information on a wide range of topics around depression treatment as very important including information about treatment choices, effectiveness of treatment, how long it takes treatment to work, how long treatment continues, what happens when treatment stops, advantages and disadvantages of treatments, and potential side effects. Females, respondents with a white background, and those who had received or felt they would have benefited from therapy in the

  19. THE HIGH A{sub V} Quasar Survey: Reddened Quasi-Stellar Objects selected from optical/near-infrared photometry. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vestergaard, M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Geier, S. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Venemans, B. P. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ledoux, C. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Møller, P. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschildstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Noterdaeme, P. [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Kangas, T.; Pursimo, T.; Smirnova, O. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Apartado 474, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain); Saturni, F. G. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, 21500 Piikkiö (Finland)

    2015-03-15

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are reddened by dust either in their host galaxies or in intervening absorber galaxies are to a large degree missed by optical color selection criteria like the ones used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To overcome this bias against red QSOs, we employ a combined optical and near-infrared (near-IR) color selection. In this paper, we present a spectroscopic follow-up campaign of a sample of red candidate QSOs which were selected from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic data and SDSS/UKIDSS photometry are supplemented by mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In our sample of 159 candidates, 154 (97%) are confirmed to be QSOs. We use a statistical algorithm to identify sightlines with plausible intervening absorption systems and identify nine such cases assuming dust in the absorber similar to Large Magellanic Cloud sightlines. We find absorption systems toward 30 QSOs, 2 of which are consistent with the best-fit absorber redshift from the statistical modeling. Furthermore, we observe a broad range in SED properties of the QSOs as probed by the rest-frame 2 μm flux. We find QSOs with a strong excess as well as QSOs with a large deficit at rest-frame 2 μm relative to a QSO template. Potential solutions to these discrepancies are discussed. Overall, our study demonstrates the high efficiency of the optical/near-IR selection of red QSOs.

  20. Mining the Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey: submillimetre-selected blazars in equatorial fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Caniego, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Massardi, M.; Bonavera, L.; Herranz, D.; Negrello, M.; De Zotti, G.; Carrera, F. J.; Danese, L.; Fleuren, S.; Hardcastle, M.; Jarvis, M. J.; Klöckner, H.-R.; Mauch, T.; Procopio, P.; Righini, S.; Sutherland, W.; Auld, R.; Baes, M.; Buttiglione, S.; Clark, C. J. R.; Cooray, A.; Dariush, A.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Hopwood, R.; Hoyos, C.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Valiante, E.

    2013-04-01

    The Herschel-Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (H-ATLAS) provides an unprecedented opportunity to search for blazars at sub-mm wavelengths. We cross-matched the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm (FIRST) radio source catalogue with the 11 655 sources brighter than 35 mJy at 500 μm in the ˜135 deg2 of the sky covered by the H-ATLAS equatorial fields at 9h and 15h, plus half of the field at 12h. We found that 379 of the H-ATLAS sources have a FIRST counterpart within 10 arcsec, including eight catalogued blazars (plus one known blazar that was found at the edge of one of the H-ATLAS maps). To search for additional blazar candidates we have devised new diagnostic diagrams and found that known blazars occupy a region of the log (S500 μm/S350 μm) versus log (S500 μm/S1.4 GHz) plane separated from that of sub-mm sources with radio emission powered by star formation, but shared with radio galaxies and steep-spectrum radio quasars. Using this diagnostic we have selected 12 further possible candidates that turn out to be scattered in the (r - z) versus (u - r) plane or in the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer colour-colour diagram, where known blazars are concentrated in well defined strips. This suggests that the majority of them are not blazars. Based on an inspection of all the available photometric data, including unpublished VISTA Kilo-degree Infrared Galaxy survey photometry and new radio observations, we found that the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of only one out of the 12 newly selected sources are compatible with being synchrotron dominated at least up to 500 μm, i.e. with being a blazar. Another object may consist of a faint blazar nucleus inside a bright star-forming galaxy. The possibility that some blazar hosts are endowed with active star formation is supported by our analysis of the SEDs of Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue blazars detected at both 545 and 857 GHz. The estimated rest-frame synchrotron peak

  1. A Review of Selected Engineered Nanoparticles in the Atmosphere: Sources, Transformations, and Techniques for Sampling and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A state-of-the-science review was undertaken to identify and assess sampling and analysis methods to detect and quantify selected nanomaterials (NMs) in the ambient atmosphere. The review is restricted to five types of NMs of interest to the Office of Research and Development Nan...

  2. Trait aggression in two representative U.S. surveys: Testing the generalizability of college samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmoe, Nathan P

    2015-03-01

    Aggression research often relies upon convenient samples with unknown generalizability to populations of interest, potentially threatening external validity. This article details the measurement properties of the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire Short Form (BPAQ-SF) and its subscales in two nationally representative U.S. samples (N = 924) and a concurrent study with U.S. college students (N = 384). The results provide useful benchmarks for generalizing BPAQ-SF results from convenient samples to U.S. adults, including distributions, reliability, and factor structure. The results also confirm basic relationships between trait aggression and key social and demographic variables such as sex, age, and socioeconomic status while establishing convergent validity with violent political attitudes. Results from the national studies closely align with those from the student sample, providing reasonable support for generalizing trait aggression elements to U.S. adults. Aggr. Behav. Aggr. Behav. 42:171-188, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Survey of statistical and sampling needs for environmental monitoring of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, L.L.; Thomas, J.M.

    1986-07-01

    This project was designed to develop guidance for implementing 10 CFR Part 61 and to determine the overall needs for sampling and statistical work in characterizing, surveying, monitoring, and closing commercial low-level waste sites. When cost-effectiveness and statistical reliability are of prime importance, then double sampling, compositing, and stratification (with optimal allocation) are identified as key issues. If the principal concern is avoiding questionable statistical practice, then the applicability of kriging (for assessing spatial pattern), methods for routine monitoring, and use of standard textbook formulae in reporting monitoring results should be reevaluated. Other important issues identified include sampling for estimating model parameters and the use of data from left-censored (less than detectable limits) distributions.

  4. Automatic Samples Selection Using Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG Feature Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inzar Salfikar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Finding victims at a disaster site is the primary goal of Search-and-Rescue (SAR operations. Many technologies created from research for searching disaster victims through aerial imaging. but, most of them are difficult to detect victims at tsunami disaster sites with victims and backgrounds which are look similar. This research collects post-tsunami aerial imaging data from the internet to builds dataset and model for detecting tsunami disaster victims. Datasets are built based on distance differences from features every sample using Histogram-of-Oriented-Gradient (HOG method. We use the longest distance to collect samples from photo to generate victim and non-victim samples. We claim steps to collect samples by measuring HOG feature distance from all samples. the longest distance between samples will take as a candidate to build the dataset, then classify victim (positives and non-victim (negatives samples manually. The dataset of tsunami disaster victims was re-analyzed using cross-validation Leave-One-Out (LOO with Support-Vector-Machine (SVM method. The experimental results show the performance of two test photos with 61.70% precision, 77.60% accuracy, 74.36% recall and f-measure 67.44% to distinguish victim (positives and non-victim (negatives.

  5. The French national survey on food consumption of children under 3 years of age - Nutri-Bébé 2013: design, methodology, population sampling and feeding practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouraqui, Jean-Pierre; Tavoularis, Gabriel; Emery, Yves; Francou, Aurée; Hébel, Pascale; Bocquet, Magali; Hankard, Régis; Turck, Dominique

    2017-11-02

    To update the data on food consumption and practices in children under 3 years of age in metropolitan France. The Nutri-Bébé 2013 cross-sectional study selected a random sample, according to the quota sampling method. After giving their informed consent, parents had to record the food consumption during three non-consecutive days framed by two face-to-face interviews, using for quantitative information different portion size measurement aids. One thousand one hundred and eighty-four children were enrolled. Mothers' mean age was 30·8 (sd 5·4) years; 38 % were primiparous; 89 % lived with a partner; 60 % had an occupation. Of the infants younger than 4 months, 31 % were breast-fed. One thousand and thirty-five children consumed infant formula followed by growing-up milk in 63 % of them; solid foods were introduced at a mean age of 5·4 (sd 2·13) months. From 8 months onwards, 25 % of children consumed the same foods as their parents on a more or less regular basis; 29 % ate in front of a screen, with a daily average screen time of 43·0 (sd 40·4) min. This robust survey highlights the low prevalence and duration of breast-feeding in France and shows a modest improvement since the previous survey of 2005 in the observance of recommendations concerning other feeding practices. The frequent consumption of adult foods and the screen time are of concern.

  6. Correlates of Salvia divinorum use in a national sample: findings from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jason A; Watkins, William C; Blumenstein, Lindsey

    2011-11-01

    Salvia, a hallucinogenic plant legally available in most of the United States, has become a widely discussed drug in the media. The extant research on Salvia use relies on non-probability samples and studies of college students. There is a clear need for research that identifies the correlates of Salvia use using data from a large sample that is nationally representative. The current study fills this important gap in the literature by using data from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Use and Health. This survey includes data from nearly 70,000 respondents ages 12 and older living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia. Due to survey design, separate analyses are conducted among adolescents and adults. Findings indicate that 1.66% of adolescents (respondents ages 12 to 17) and 5.08% of adults (respondents ages 18-34) report the use of Salvia at some point in their lifetime. Correlates of use among adolescents include age, gender, income, peer and parent attitudes toward substance use, and other forms of drug use. Correlates of use among adults include age, gender, race, religiosity, marital status, criminal involvement, and other forms of substance use. Implications of the findings and limitations of the current study are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Informed Design of Mixed-Mode Surveys : Evaluating mode effects on measurement and selection error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klausch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    “Mixed-mode designs” are innovative types of surveys which combine more than one mode of administration in the same project, such as surveys administered partly on the web (online), on paper, by telephone, or face-to-face. Mixed-mode designs have become increasingly popular in international survey

  8. MANAGERIAL DECISION IN INNOVATIVE EDUCATION SYSTEMS STATISTICAL SURVEY BASED ON SAMPLE THEORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe SĂVOIU

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Before formulating the statistical hypotheses and the econometrictesting itself, a breakdown of some of the technical issues is required, which are related to managerial decision in innovative educational systems, the educational managerial phenomenon tested through statistical and mathematical methods, respectively the significant difference in perceiving the current qualities, knowledge, experience, behaviour and desirable health, obtained through a questionnaire applied to a stratified population at the end,in the educational environment, either with educational activities, or with simultaneously managerial and educational activities. The details having to do with research focused on the survey theory, turning into a working tool the questionnaires and statistical data that are processed from those questionnaires, are summarized below.

  9. The role of public relations for image creating in health services: a sample patient satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdar, YalçIn

    2007-01-01

    This study discusses the role of public relations for image creating in health services. Hospitals require public relations activities to distinguish them from competitors, provide bidirectional communication between the society and the hospital, and assist to create of a strong hospital image and culture. A satisfaction survey was conducted on 264 patients who have received health services at Maltepe University Hospital. The research focused on how the Hospital's examination, care, catering and physical services; doctor and nurse politeness towards patients and patient relatives, their attitudes and behaviors; examination, check-in, bedding and discharge operations; public relations activities in and out of the hospital were perceived. Another subject of the study was the degree of recommendation of patients who have been served by the hospital's health services to prospective patients seeking treatment.

  10. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Zane Hills, Hughes and Shungnak quadrangles, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential.The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska.For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 105 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Zane Hills area in the Hughes and Shungnak quadrangles, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be incorporated into the statewide geochemical databases of both agencies.

  11. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Tonsina area, Valdez Quadrangle, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 128 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Tonsina area in the Chugach Mountains, Valdez quadrangle, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be incorporated into the statewide geochemical databases of both agencies

  12. Why sample selection matters in exploratory factor analysis: implications for the 12-item World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Lambert, Sylvie D; Bowe, Steven J; Orellana, Liliana

    2017-03-11

    Sample selection can substantially affect the solutions generated using exploratory factor analysis. Validation studies of the 12-item World Health Organization (WHO) Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0 (WHODAS 2.0) have generally involved samples in which substantial proportions of people had no, or minimal, disability. With the WHODAS 2.0 oriented towards measuring disability across six life domains (cognition, mobility, self-care, getting along, life activities, and participation in society), performing factor analysis with samples of people with disability may be more appropriate. We determined the influence of the sampling strategy on (a) the number of factors extracted and (b) the factor structure of the WHODAS 2.0. Using data from adults aged 50+ from the six countries in Wave 1 of the WHO's longitudinal Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE), we repeatedly selected samples (n = 750) using two strategies: (1) simple random sampling that reproduced nationally representative distributions of WHODAS 2.0 summary scores for each country (i.e., positively skewed distributions with many zero scores indicating the absence of disability), and (2) stratified random sampling with weights designed to obtain approximately symmetric distributions of summary scores for each country (i.e. predominantly including people with varying degrees of disability). Samples with skewed distributions typically produced one-factor solutions, except for the two countries with the lowest percentages of zero scores, in which the majority of samples produced two factors. Samples with approximately symmetric distributions, generally produced two- or three-factor solutions. In the two-factor solutions, the getting along domain items loaded on one factor (commonly with a cognition domain item), with remaining items loading on a second factor. In the three-factor solutions, the getting along and self-care domain items loaded separately on two factors and three other domains

  13. Woody species diversity in forest plantations in a mountainous region of Beijing, China: effects of sampling scale and species selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Zhang

    Full Text Available The role of forest plantations in biodiversity conservation has gained more attention in recent years. However, most work on evaluating the diversity of forest plantations focuses only on one spatial scale; thus, we examined the effects of sampling scale on diversity in forest plantations. We designed a hierarchical sampling strategy to collect data on woody species diversity in planted pine (Pinus tabuliformis Carr., planted larch (Larix principis-rupprechtii Mayr., and natural secondary deciduous broadleaf forests in a mountainous region of Beijing, China. Additive diversity partition analysis showed that, compared to natural forests, the planted pine forests had a different woody species diversity partitioning pattern at multi-scales (except the Simpson diversity in the regeneration layer, while the larch plantations did not show multi-scale diversity partitioning patterns that were obviously different from those in the natural secondary broadleaf forest. Compare to the natural secondary broadleaf forests, the effects of planted pine forests on woody species diversity are dependent on the sampling scale and layers selected for analysis. Diversity in the planted larch forest, however, was not significantly different from that in the natural forest for all diversity components at all sampling levels. Our work demonstrated that the species selected for afforestation and the sampling scales selected for data analysis alter the conclusions on the levels of diversity supported by plantations. We suggest that a wide range of scales should be considered in the evaluation of the role of forest plantations on biodiversity conservation.

  14. The Survey of Microbial Quality of the Dry Sample, Extract and Brewing of some Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh VALIASILL

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Medicinal plants may be exposed to a wide range of microbial contamination during pre- and post- harvest stages and they can present high microbial counts. In this study, the microbial quality of 44 samples of dry herbs namely: mint (Menthaspp., lemon balm (Melissa officinalis, summer savory (Satureja hortensis, zataria (Zataria multiflora, Indian valerian (Valeriana wallichii, their brewing and extracts were analyzed. Total count using plate count agar medium (PCA, coliform count by Violet Red Bile Agar (VRBL, Enterobacteriacea by Violet Red Bile Glucose (VRBG were evaluated. Medium Baird-Parker agar (BP medium and Tryptone Bile X-Gluc (TBX medium were used for the isolation and enumeration of Staphylococcus aurous and E. coli spp. respectively. Furthermore, Xylose Lysine Deoxycholate agar medium (XLD and Bismuth Sulfite Agar medium(BSA were used for detection of Salmonella spp. Fungal and mold contamination was assessed using yeast extract glucose chloramphenicol agar. The results showed that the contamination of the samples with total count (100% and Enterobacteriaceae (85%, total coliform (83%, mold and yeast (98% and E. coli ssp. (2.27 were detected, including in the study samples the absence of pathogenic bacteria like Staphylococcus aurous, Salmonella spp. Moreover, the extract had a lower microbial load in comparison to dry herb samples. Also, the lowest and the highest of contamination rates were observed for Indian valerian and zataria, respectively. According to the results, there is a need to control the environmental conditions and improve hygiene in the production process; even more, it is recommended to choose a suitable decontamination method for disinfection during packing medicinal plants and during post-packing manipulation and transport.

  15. The psychometric properties of the AUDIT: a survey from a random sample of elderly Swedish adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Källmén, Håkan; Wennberg, Peter; Ramstedt, Mats; Hallgren, Mats

    2014-07-01

    Increasing alcohol consumption and related harms have been reported among the elderly population of Europe. Consequently, it is important to monitor patterns of alcohol use, and to use a valid and reliable tool when screening for risky consumption in this age group. The aim was to evaluate the internal consistency reliability and construct validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in elderly Swedish adults, and to compare the results with the general Swedish population. Another aim was to calculate the level of alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C) to be used for comparison in future studies. The questionnaire was sent to 1459 Swedish adults aged 79-80 years with a response rate of 73.3%. Internal consistency reliability, were assessed using Cronbach alpha, and confirmatory factor analysis assessed construct validity of the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) in elderly population as compared to a Swedish general population sample. The results showed that AUDIT was more reliable and valid among the Swedish general population sample than among the elderly and that Item 1 and 4 in AUDIT was less reliable and valid among the elderly. While the AUDIT showed acceptable psychometric properties in the general population sample, it's performance was of less quality among the elderly respondents. Further psychometric assessments of the AUDIT in elderly populations are required before it is implemented more widely.

  16. A large sample of shear-selected clusters from the Hyper Suprime-Cam Subaru Strategic Program S16A Wide field mass maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Satoshi; Oguri, Masamune; Hamana, Takashi; Shirasaki, Masato; Koike, Michitaro; Komiyama, Yutaka; Umetsu, Keiichi; Utsumi, Yousuke; Okabe, Nobuhiro; More, Surhud; Medezinski, Elinor; Lin, Yen-Ting; Miyatake, Hironao; Murayama, Hitoshi; Ota, Naomi; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki

    2017-12-01

    We present the result of searching for clusters of galaxies based on weak gravitational lensing analysis of the ˜160 deg2 area surveyed by Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) as a Subaru Strategic Program. HSC is a new prime focus optical imager with a 1.5°-diameter field of view on the 8.2 m Subaru telescope. The superb median seeing on the HSC i-band images of 0{^''.}56 allows the reconstruction of high angular resolution mass maps via weak lensing, which is crucial for the weak lensing cluster search. We identify 65 mass map peaks with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio larger than 4.7, and carefully examine their properties by cross-matching the clusters with optical and X-ray cluster catalogs. We find that all the 39 peaks with S/N > 5.1 have counterparts in the optical cluster catalogs, and only 2 out of the 65 peaks are probably false positives. The upper limits of X-ray luminosities from the ROSAT All Sky Survey (RASS) imply the existence of an X-ray underluminous cluster population. We show that the X-rays from the shear-selected clusters can be statistically detected by stacking the RASS images. The inferred average X-ray luminosity is about half that of the X-ray-selected clusters of the same mass. The radial profile of the dark matter distribution derived from the stacking analysis is well modeled by the Navarro-Frenk-White profile with a small concentration parameter value of c500 ˜ 2.5, which suggests that the selection bias on the orientation or the internal structure for our shear-selected cluster sample is not strong.

  17. Use of Lot quality assurance sampling surveys to evaluate community health worker performance in rural Zambia: a case of Luangwa district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Moses; Zulu, Japhet; Topp, Stephanie M; Musonda, Patrick; Mutale, Wilbroad; Chilengi, Roma

    2017-04-17

    The Better Health Outcomes through Mentoring and Assessment (BHOMA) project is a cluster randomized controlled trial aimed at reducing age-standardized mortality rates in three rural districts through involvement of Community Health Workers (CHWs), Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs), and Neighborhood Health Committees (NHCs). CHWs conduct quarterly surveys on all households using a questionnaire that captures key health events occurring within their catchment population. In order to validate contact with households, we utilize the Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) methodology. In this study, we report experiences of applying the LQAS approach to monitor performance of CHWs in Luangwa District. Between April 2011 and December 2013, seven health facilities in Luangwa district were enrolled into the BHOMA project. The health facility catchment areas were divided into 33 geographic zones. Quality assurance was performed each quarter by randomly selecting zones representing about 90% of enrolled catchment areas from which 19 households per zone where also randomly identified. The surveys were conducted by CHW supervisors who had been trained on using the LQAS questionnaire. Information collected included household identity number (ID), whether the CHW visited the household, duration of the most recent visit, and what health information was discussed during the CHW visit. The threshold for success was set at 75% household outreach by CHWs in each zone. There are 4,616 total households in the 33 zones. This yielded a target of 32,212 household visits by community health workers during the 7 survey rounds. Based on the set cutoff point for passing the surveys (at least 75% households confirmed as visited), only one team of CHWs at Luangwa high school failed to reach the target during round 1 of the surveys; all the teams otherwise registered successful visits in all the surveys. We have employed the LQAS methodology for assurance that quarterly surveys were

  18. Selectivity and limitations of carbon sorption tubes for capturing siloxanes in biogas during field sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Surita, Sharon C

    2016-06-01

    Siloxane levels in biogas can jeopardize the warranties of the engines used at the biogas to energy facilities. The chemical structure of siloxanes consists of silicon and oxygen atoms, alternating in position, with hydrocarbon groups attached to the silicon side chain. Siloxanes can be either in cyclic (D) or linear (L) configuration and referred with a letter corresponding to their structure followed by a number corresponding to the number of silicon atoms present. When siloxanes are burned, the hydrocarbon fraction is lost and silicon is converted to silicates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of activated carbon gas samplers for quantitative analysis of siloxanes in biogas samples. Biogas samples were collected from a landfill and an anaerobic digester using multiple carbon sorbent tubes assembled in series. One set of samples was collected for 30min (sampling 6-L gas), and the second set was collected for 60min (sampling 12-L gas). Carbon particles were thermally desorbed and analyzed by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). The results showed that biogas sampling using a single tube would not adequately capture octamethyltrisiloxane (L3), hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6). Even with 4 tubes were used in series, D5 was not captured effectively. The single sorbent tube sampling method was adequate only for capturing trimethylsilanol (TMS) and hexamethyldisiloxane (L2). Affinity of siloxanes for activated carbon decreased with increasing molecular weight. Using multiple carbon sorbent tubes in series can be an appropriate method for developing a standard procedure for determining siloxane levels for low molecular weight siloxanes (up to D3). Appropriate quality assurance and quality control procedures should be developed for adequately quantifying the levels of the higher molecular weight siloxanes in biogas with sorbent tubes

  19. Point process models for spatio-temporal distance sampling data from a large-scale survey of blue whales

    KAUST Repository

    Yuan, Yuan

    2017-12-28

    Distance sampling is a widely used method for estimating wildlife population abundance. The fact that conventional distance sampling methods are partly design-based constrains the spatial resolution at which animal density can be estimated using these methods. Estimates are usually obtained at survey stratum level. For an endangered species such as the blue whale, it is desirable to estimate density and abundance at a finer spatial scale than stratum. Temporal variation in the spatial structure is also important. We formulate the process generating distance sampling data as a thinned spatial point process and propose model-based inference using a spatial log-Gaussian Cox process. The method adopts a flexible stochastic partial differential equation (SPDE) approach to model spatial structure in density that is not accounted for by explanatory variables, and integrated nested Laplace approximation (INLA) for Bayesian inference. It allows simultaneous fitting of detection and density models and permits prediction of density at an arbitrarily fine scale. We estimate blue whale density in the Eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean from thirteen shipboard surveys conducted over 22 years. We find that higher blue whale density is associated with colder sea surface temperatures in space, and although there is some positive association between density and mean annual temperature, our estimates are consistent with no trend in density across years. Our analysis also indicates that there is substantial spatially structured variation in density that is not explained by available covariates.

  20. A survey of dog and cat anaesthesia in a sample of veterinary practices in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, H; Barker, K; Odom, T; Lewis, K; Giordano, P; Walsh, V; Chambers, J P

    2017-12-05

    To survey current anaesthesia practices for dogs and cats in small and mixed animal practices in New Zealand in order to improve anaesthesia education. A questionnaire was sent to 440 small and mixed animal practices, including questions regarding the type of practice, preanaesthetic examination, anaesthetic drugs and management, anaesthetic machines, monitoring and topics of interest for continuing professional development. Responses were obtained from 113/440 (26%) practices, with 78 (69%) respondents from small and 35 (31%) from mixed animal practices. A preanaesthetic physical examination was carried out by >95% of respondents and premedication was usually given to dogs (112/113; 99%) and cats (95/113; 85%). Acepromazine was the preferred sedative for dogs and cats, with morphine or buprenorphine. Propofol and alfaxalone were the preferred induction agents, and isoflurane was preferred for maintenance in both dogs and cats. A venous catheter was usually placed for anaesthesia in dogs (59/113; 52%), but less so in cats (39/113; 35%). Perioperative fluid was administered at 10 mL/kg/hour by 62/110 (56%) respondents. Intubation was usually used for anaesthesia in dogs (111/112; 99%), and cats (87/112; 78%). Almost 40% of respondents usually administered supplementary oxygen if patients were not intubated. Local analgesia was used by 69/111 (88%) respondents sometimes or always if applicable. Morphine or buprenorphine, and meloxicam were common choices for post-operative analgesia after neuter surgery in dogs and cats. A semiclosed (non-rebreathing) system was used in animals weighing <10 kg, and a Mapleson E or F non-rebreathing circuit was used by 66/109 (61%) practices. Only 15/111 (14%) practices had a ventilator in their practice. A dedicated anaesthetist was usually used by 104/113 (92%) practices, and apnoea alarms, pulse oximeters, thermometers and oesophageal stethoscopes were the main monitoring devices available in practices. Loco-regional block, pain

  1. The German Environmental Survey on Children 2003-2006 (GerES IV). Sample and study description; Der Kinder-Umwelt-Survey 2003-2006 (KUS). Stichprobe und Studienbeschreibung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Christine; Seiwert, Margarete; Becker, Kerstin; Conrad, Andre; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike [Umweltbundesamt, Dessau-Rossau / Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The German Environmental Survey on Children (GerES IV) carried out by the German Federal Environment Agency (Umweltbundesamt, UBA) provides representative population data to describe health-related environmental exposure of 3 to 14 year old children in Germany and environment-related effects on the children's health. In addition, the conjunction of GerES IV with the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (German acronym: KiGGS), conducted by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), makes it possible to study the relationship between environmental influences and adverse health effects. From May 2003 to May 2006, a random sample of 1,790 children aged 3 to 14 from 150 locations, and their parents, participated in GerES IV and in KiGGS. 77.3% of the selected children participated in KUS. Since participation in GerES IV was limited to children that had previously participated in KiGGS, total response in GerES IV resulted in 52.6%. Response rates did not differ significantly between western and eastern Germany, different community sizes, age groups and genders. The basic study programme included sampling of blood, morning urine, tap water and house dust as well as extensive questionnaire-based interviews. In addition, sub-groups were studied with regard to ''hearing capacity, noise and stress hormones'', ''chemical compounds in indoor air'' and ''biological pollutants indoors''. A key element of the field work in GerES IV was a home visit to carry out measurements, collect samples - except for blood sampling, which took place in KiGGS and do the interview. The quality of the field work, of data collection and evaluation, and of the chemical, biological and physical analyses was successfully evaluated by internal and external quality assurance. (orig.)

  2. The impact of sample size and marker selection on the study of haplotype structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiao

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several studies of haplotype structures in the human genome in various populations have found that the human chromosomes are structured such that each chromosome can be divided into many blocks, within which there is limited haplotype diversity. In addition, only a few genetic markers in a putative block are needed to capture most of the diversity within a block. There has been no systematic empirical study of the effects of sample size and marker set on the identified block structures and representative marker sets, however. The purpose of this study was to conduct a detailed empirical study to examine such impacts. Towards this goal, we have analysed three representative autosomal regions from a large genome-wide study of haplotypes with samples consisting of African-Americans and samples consisting of Japanese and Chinese individuals. For both populations, we have found that the sample size and marker set have significant impact on the number of blocks and the total number of representative markers identified. The marker set in particular has very strong impacts, and our results indicate that the marker density in the original datasets may not be adequate to allow a meaningful characterisation of haplotype structures. In general, we conclude that we need a relatively large sample size and a very dense marker panel in the study of haplotype structures in human populations.

  3. A national survey on availability, price and affordability of selected essential medicines for non communicable diseases in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabare, Panthihage Ruvini L; Wanigatunge, Chandanie A; Beneragama, Bvs Hemantha

    2014-08-08

    Access to medicines is a universal right. Low availability and low affordability of medicines are issues that deny this right to a significant proportion of the world population. The objective of this study was to determine the availability, price and affordability of essential medicines prescribed to treat non communicable diseases in Sri Lanka. Methodology was based on the 2nd edition of the World Health Organization Health Action International Manual. A country survey was conducted and facilities representing both public and private pharmacies were selected. A total of 109 facilities was surveyed. At each facility data on the availability and prices of 50 essential medicines for non communicable diseases were collected. Percentage availability, median price of originator brand and lowest priced generic, median price ratio to the International Reference Price were calculated for surveyed medicines. Affordability was determined using the daily incomes of the lowest--paid unskilled government worker. Semi government community pharmacies had the highest (>80%) availability while outdoor pharmacies of public health care facilities, private pharmacies and outdoor pharmacies of private hospital showed a fairly high availability (50 - 80%) of surveyed medicines.Unit price of 76% of selected individual medicines was less than ten Sri Lankan rupees. Out of these 28% of medicines cost less than one Sri Lanka rupee. For 21 of the surveyed medicines the median price ratio to the international reference price was less than one. The prices of originator brands for 14 surveyed medicines were more than five times that of the lowest price generics.Less than a single day's wages was adequate to purchase a month's supply of the lowest priced generic of more than 67% of surveyed medicines. The availability of selected essential medicines was fairly high in both public and private sectors in Sri Lanka. Most medicines are affordable to the lowest income earners in the community. There

  4. Passive sampling survey of polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardants in indoor and outdoor air in Ottawa, Canada: implications for sources and exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilford, Bryony H; Harner, Tom; Zhu, Jiping; Shoeib, Mahiba; Jones, Kevin C

    2004-10-15

    The polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widely used as flame retardants in plastics of soft furnishings, TV sets and computers, and insulation in the indoor environment. The penta-BDEs--now banned in most parts of Europe but still used in North America--are additive flame retardants that may be released to the indoor environment via volatilization or as dusts. In this study, to investigate general population PBDE exposure, air was sampled in 74 randomly selected homes in Ottawa, Canada and at seven outdoor sites during the winter of 2002--3, using polyurethane foam (PUF) disk passive air samplers. The passive sampling rate (2.5 m3 day(-1)) was determined through a pilot study employing active and passive samplers side-by-side at selected indoor locations. Indoor air concentrations of PBDEs were log-normally distributed with a geometric mean of 120 pg m(-3) and a median of 100 pg m(-3), approximately 50 times higher than the range of outdoor air concentrations (<0.1-4.4 pg m(-3)). The maximum daily human exposure via the inhalation pathway based on median PBDE levels found in this survey was estimated to be 1.9 ng day(-1) (female) and 2.0 ng day(-1) (male), representing 4.1% (f) and 4.4% (m) of overall daily intake.

  5. A survey on the experience with dental tourism in a sample of Italian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, D; Filippucci, L; Celestino, S; Carrassi, A; Delia, S; Lodi, G

    2012-01-01

    Dentistry in Italy is mainly private and therefore perceived as forcedly expensive. Dental tourism is becoming popular in order to get cheap dental care. The aim of this study was to carry out a survey aimed at investigating the perception of dental tourism by Italian patients who have recently received such dental care abroad. A questionnaire was posted on the web site of an Italian consumers association (Altroconsumo) and members were invited to fill in the questionnaire in case they had experienced dental treatment abroad. Eighty-one complete forms were included in the study. The main motivation for turning to dental tourism was saving money. Another frequent reason for choosing dental tourism was that full rehabilitation was offered in a short time span, usually one week. Patients have often underlined that they appreciated different aspects of the foreign dentists, like speed, kindness, humanity, interest in the course of the treatment, the feeling of ease conveyed by the environment and the personnel. Past negative experiences with Italian dentists were in some cases advocated as reasons for searching dental care abroad. Such negative experiences resulted in a lack of trust in Italian dentists. Some patients reported that while the overall treatment abroad was carried out in a short time, single prosthetic sessions were very long, up to 6 hours. Most patients were satisfied with dental tourism.

  6. Fast Convolutional Neural Network Training Using Selective Data Sampling: Application to Hemorrhage Detection in Color Fundus Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Grinsven, Mark J J P; van Ginneken, Bram; Hoyng, Carel B; Theelen, Thomas; Sanchez, Clara I

    2016-05-01

    Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are deep learning network architectures that have pushed forward the state-of-the-art in a range of computer vision applications and are increasingly popular in medical image analysis. However, training of CNNs is time-consuming and challenging. In medical image analysis tasks, the majority of training examples are easy to classify and therefore contribute little to the CNN learning process. In this paper, we propose a method to improve and speed-up the CNN training for medical image analysis tasks by dynamically selecting misclassified negative samples during training. Training samples are heuristically sampled based on classification by the current status of the CNN. Weights are assigned to the training samples and informative samples are more likely to be included in the next CNN training iteration. We evaluated and compared our proposed method by training a CNN with (SeS) and without (NSeS) the selective sampling method. We focus on the detection of hemorrhages in color fundus images. A decreased training time from 170 epochs to 60 epochs with an increased performance-on par with two human experts-was achieved with areas under the receiver operating characteristics curve of 0.894 and 0.972 on two data sets. The SeS CNN statistically outperformed the NSeS CNN on an independent test set.

  7. Survey and Rapid detection of Bordetella pertussis in clinical samples targeting the BP485 in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eLiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis is an important human respiratory pathogen. Here, we describe a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method for the rapid detection of B. pertussis in clinical samples based on a visual test. The LAMP assay detected the BP485 target sequence within 60 min with a detection limit of 1.3 pg/µl, a 10-fold increase in sensitivity compared with conventional PCR. All 31 non-pertussis respiratory pathogens tested were negative for LAMP detection, indicating the high specificity of the primers for B. pertussis. To evaluate the application of the LAMP assay to clinical diagnosis, of 105 sputum and nasopharyngeal samples collected from the patients with suspected respiratory infections in China, a total of 12 Bordetella pertussis isolates were identified from 33 positive samples detected by LAMP-based surveillance targeting BP485. Strikingly, a 4.5 months old baby and her mother were found to be infected with B. pertussis at the same time. All isolates belonged to different B. pertussis multilocus sequence typing (MLST groups with different alleles of the virulence-related genes including 4 alleles of ptxA, 6 of prn, 4 of tcfA, 2 of fim2 and 3 of fim3. The diversity of B. pertussis carrying toxin genes in clinical strains indicates a rapid and continuing evolution of B. pertussis. This combined with its high prevalence will make it difficult to control. In conclusion, we have developed a visual detection LAMP assay, which could be a useful tool for rapid B. pertussis detection, especially in situations where resources are poor and in point-of-care tests.

  8. Development of a SPME-GC-ECD methodology for selected pesticides in must and wine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, M; Delerue-Matos, C; Alves, A

    2001-04-01

    A method for the determination of some pesticide residues in must and wine samples was developed using solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC/ECD). The procedure only needs dilution as sample pre-treatment and is therefore simple, fast and solvent-free. Eight fungicides (vinclozolin, procymidone, iprodione, penconazole, fenarimol, folpet, nuarimol and hexaconazole), one insecticide (chlorpyriphos) and two acaricides (bromopropylate and tetradifon) can be quantified. Good linearity was observed for all the compounds in the range 5-100 microg/L. The reproducibility of the measurements was found acceptable (with RSD's below 20%). Detection limits of 11 microg/L, on average, are sufficiently below the proposed maximum residue limits (MRL's) for these compounds in wine. The analytical method was applied to the determination of these compounds in Portuguese must and wine samples from the Demarcated Region of Alentejo, where any residues could be detected.

  9. Electrochemical behavior and determination of major phenolic antioxidants in selected coffee samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Neto, Jerônimo Raimundo; Rezende, Stefani Garcia; de Fátima Reis, Carolina; Benjamin, Stephen Rathinaraj; Rocha, Matheus Lavorenti; de Souza Gil, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The redox behavior of commercial roasted coffee products were evaluated by electroanalysis, whereas high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used for determination of cinnamic acid markers, the total phenolic content (TPC) was achieved by Folin-Ciocalteu assay, and the traditional DPPH (1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) method for antioxidant power determination. In turn, an optimized electrochemical index was proposed to estimate the antioxidant power of different samples and it was found a great correlation between all methods. The voltammetric profile of all coffee samples was quite similar, presenting the same number of peaks at the same potential values. Minor differences on current levels were in agreement with the total phenolic and major markers content, as well as, to the antioxidant power. Therefore, the electrochemical methods showed to be practical, low cost and very useful to evaluate the antioxidant properties of coffee samples, which is a relevant quality parameter of this widely consumed beverage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Surveying a complex potential energy landscape: Overcoming broken ergodicity using basin-sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, David J.

    2013-10-01

    A new basin-sampling scheme is introduced to obtain equilibrium thermodynamic properties by combining results from global optimisation and parallel tempering calculations. Regular minimisation is used to obtain a two-dimensional density of states. A model anharmonic form is optimised using a multihistogram approach for potential energy bins corresponding to local minima, connecting the results obtained for low and high temperatures. This procedure provides accurate densities of states and thermodynamic properties for benchmark atomic clusters exhibiting broken ergodicity. It can also be used to calculate the potential energy density of local minima for distinct permutation-inversion isomers and distinct structures.

  11. Analysis of selected phthalates in Canadian indoor dust collected using household vacuum and standardized sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubwabo, C; Rasmussen, P E; Fan, X; Kosarac, I; Wu, F; Zidek, A; Kuchta, S L

    2013-12-01

    Phthalates have been used extensively as plasticizers to improve the flexibility of polymers, and they also have found many industrial applications. They are ubiquitous in the environment and have been detected in a variety of environmental and biological matrices. The goal of this study was to develop a method for the determination of 17 phthalate esters in house dust. This method involved sonication extraction, sample cleanup using solid phase extraction, and isotope dilution GC/MS/MS analysis. Method detection limits (MDLs) and recoveries ranged from 0.04 to 2.93 μg/g and from 84 to 117%, respectively. The method was applied to the analysis of phthalates in 38 paired household vacuum samples (HD) and fresh dust (FD) samples. HD and FD samples compared well for the majority of phthalates detected in house dust. Data obtained from 126 household dust samples confirmed the historical widespread use of bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), with a concentration range of 36 μg/g to 3840 μg/g. Dibutyl phthalate (DBP), benzyl butyl phthalate (BzBP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), and diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP) were also found in most samples at relatively high concentrations. Another important phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate (DIBP), was detected at a frequency of 98.4% with concentrations ranging from below its MDL of 0.51 μg/g to 69 μg/g. © 2013 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Indoor Air © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Reproduced with the permission of the Minister of Health Canada.

  12. A REPORT OF SAMPLE SURVEY ON BIRTHS AND DEATHS IN AGRA DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deoki Nandan

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The government of India has considered Agra to be made a ‘target free district'for MCH and family welfare programmes. For Intervention of this strategy, it is necessary to know the current trends of births, deaths and other parameters related to mother and child health, present study was under­taken in selected rural and urban slum areas of Agra district, covering total population of44,868. It was found that birth rate, death rate, infant mor­tality rate and maternal mortality rate was higher in rural area as compared to urban area. Maximum number of births were recorded during October and November and death rate vraj higher during November and December. Main causes of infact mortality ;were prematurity, low birth weight, diar­rhoea and pnettmonie and that of maternal mortality were puerperal sepsis and haemorrhage

  13. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, E.; Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th; Khosroshahi, H.; Abedi, A.; Bamber, J.; Hashemi, S. A.; Nikzat, F.; Molaei Nezhad, A.

    2017-06-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss.

  14. Multivariate genetic analysis of atopy phenotypes in a selected sample of twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, S F; Ulrik, C S; Kyvik, K O

    2006-01-01

    , airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR), and positive skin prick test (posSPT) in a sample of adult twins. METHODS: Within a sampling frame of 21,162 twin subjects, 20-49 years of age, from the Danish Twin Registry, a total of 575 subjects (256 intact pairs and 63 single twins), who either themselves and...... traits were estimated and latent factor models of genetic and environmental effects were fitted to the observed data using maximum likelihood methods. RESULTS: The various phenotypic correlations between wheeze, rhinitis, AHR and posSPT were all significant and ranged between 0.50 and 0.86. Traits...

  15. Mean consumption, poverty and inequality in rural India in the 60th round of the National Sample Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Raghbendra; Gaiha, Raghav; Sharma, Anurag

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on mean consumption, poverty (all three FGT measures) and inequality during 2004 for rural India using National Sample Survey (NSS) data for the 60th Round. Mean consumption at the national level is much higher than the poverty line. However, the Gini coefficient is higher than in recent earlier rounds. The headcount ratio is 22.9 per cent. Mean consumption, all three measures of poverty and the Gini coefficient are computed at the level of 20 states and 63 agro-climatic zones in these 20 states. It is surmised that despite impressive growth rates deprivation is pervasive, pockets of severe poverty persist, and inequality is rampant.

  16. Indoor Air Quality in Selected Samples of Primary Schools in Kuala Terengganu, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Marzuki Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Studies have found out that indoor air quality affects human especially children and the elderly more compared to ambient atmospheric air. This study aims to investigate indoor air pollutants concentration in selected vernacular schools with different surrounding human activities in Kuala Terengganu, the administrative and commercial center of Terengganu state. Failure to identify and establish indoor air pollution status can increase the chance of long-term and short-term health problems for...

  17. A survey: Glucose sedative effect in neonates during Venus blood sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fariba Tarhani

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The number of invasive procedures performed in newborns admitted in neonatal units is very high. Nonpharmacologic interventions are valuable alternatives for pain relief during minor procedures in neonates. The aim of this study was to assess the analgesic effect of orally administered glucose with different concentration in neonate using a validated behavioral acute pain rating scale. Materials and methods: A clinical trial study was conducted in 65 neonates. Each infant received 3 treatments with sterile water, 30% Dextrose Solution and 50% solution during consecutive Venus blood sampling and their responses was measured by behavioral acute pain rating scale for neonate (DAN score. This study was done in form of double blind and observer was unaware. Data analysis was perform using SPSS software. Results: Results of this study showed that pain score significantly is lower in neonates that received sweet solution. Mean of pain scores for sterile water, Dextrose 30% and Dextrose 50% solutions, respectively were 8.74, 6.9 and 5.48. There was no statistical relationship between sex, gestational age and weight with pain score. Conclusions: A small dose (0.5ml of 30% or 50% of oral glucose have an analgesic effect in neonates during Venus blood sampling. This effect is higher in 50% glucose solution and it can be detected by a behavioral pain rating scale.

  18. The CFHTLS-Strong Lensing Lega