WorldWideScience

Sample records for surveys direct observation

  1. Geodetic Survey Water Level Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Over one million images of National Coast & Geodetic Survey (now NOAA's National Geodetic Survey/NGS) forms captured from microfiche. Tabular forms and charts...

  2. Assessing hospital disaster preparedness: a comparison of an on-site survey, directly observed drill performance, and video analysis of teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Amy H; Langford, Vinette; Lewis, Roger J

    2008-09-01

    There is currently no validated method for assessing hospital disaster preparedness. We determine the degree of correlation between the results of 3 methods for assessing hospital disaster preparedness: administration of an on-site survey, drill observation using a structured evaluation tool, and video analysis of team performance in the hospital incident command center. This was a prospective, observational study conducted during a regional disaster drill, comparing the results from an on-site survey, a structured disaster drill evaluation tool, and a video analysis of teamwork, performed at 6 911-receiving hospitals in Los Angeles County, CA. The on-site survey was conducted separately from the drill and assessed hospital disaster plan structure, vendor agreements, modes of communication, medical and surgical supplies, involvement of law enforcement, mutual aid agreements with other facilities, drills and training, surge capacity, decontamination capability, and pharmaceutical stockpiles. The drill evaluation tool, developed by Johns Hopkins University under contract from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, was used to assess various aspects of drill performance, such as the availability of the hospital disaster plan, the geographic configuration of the incident command center, whether drill participants were identifiable, whether the noise level interfered with effective communication, and how often key information (eg, number of available staffed floor, intensive care, and isolation beds; number of arriving victims; expected triage level of victims; number of potential discharges) was received by the incident command center. Teamwork behaviors in the incident command center were quantitatively assessed, using the MedTeams analysis of the video recordings obtained during the disaster drill. Spearman rank correlations of the results between pair-wise groupings of the 3 assessment methods were calculated. The 3 evaluation methods demonstrated

  3. Toward a Direct Realist Account of Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sievers, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Criticizes the account of observation given by Alan Chalmers in "What Is This Thing Called Science?" and provides an alternative based on direct realist approaches to perception. Contains 15 references. (Author/WRM)

  4. Direct hydroacoustic observations of chokka squid Loligo vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the November 1996 survey, seven such targets were observed near the bottom at depths of 115–125 m, directly south of the traditional inshore spawning grounds of chokka squid Loligo vulgaris reynaudii at Cape St Francis. The targets were close to prominent seabed ridges and extended 30–40 m off the bottom.

  5. The Potential of Computer-Assisted Direct Observation Apps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wessel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct behavior observation, i.e., without first creating a video recording, is a challenging, one-shot task. The behavior has to be coded accurately during the situation itself. Mobile devices can assist direct observation, and there already are applications available for these purposes. However, the mobile revolution has led to new developments in devices, infrastructure, and market penetration that have opened up new, yet untapped, possibilities. In this article, expanded activity theory is used to highlight the unused potential of computer assisted direct observation (CADO apps. If this potential is realized, it can provide observation with the same advantages online questionnaires and sites like Mechanical Turk have provided for surveys and Internet experiments.

  6. Direct observation limits on antimatter gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischler, Mark; Lykken, Joe; Roberts, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    The proposed Antihydrogen Gravity experiment at Fermilab (P981) will directly measure the gravitational attraction g between antihydrogen and the Earth, with an accuracy of 1% or better. The following key question has been asked by the PAC: Is a possible 1% difference between g and g already ruled out by other evidence? This memo presents the key points of existing evidence, to answer whether such a difference is ruled out (a) on the basis of direct observational evidence; and/or (b) on the basis of indirect evidence, combined with reasoning based on strongly held theoretical assumptions. The bottom line is that there are no direct observations or measurements of gravitational asymmetry which address the antimatter sector. There is evidence which by indirect reasoning can be taken to rule out such a difference, but the analysis needed to draw that conclusion rests on models and assumptions which are in question for other reasons and are thus worth testing. There is no compelling evidence or theoretical reason to rule out such a difference at the 1% level.

  7. Direct observation of clinical practice in emergency medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Simon

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to summarize the current literature on the effects of direct, clinical observation of residents in emergency departments (EDs) on learners, patients, and departmental functioning. A systematic literature search was conducted in Medline and ERIC, covering the years 1980-2009. Keywords were used to identify postgraduate medical staff working in the ED; direct observation of these trainees by supervising staff; and reports of outcomes relating to Kirkpatrick's levels of reaction, learning, behavior, and institutional change. From an initial 11,433 abstracts and titles, 193 full-text articles were retrieved for further study. Application of inclusion and exclusion criteria yielded seven that were relevant to the topic. These studies comprised a range of methods--descriptive, qualitative evaluation, cohort studies, and a cross-sectional survey. Learner reaction was very enthusiastic. Positive changes in behavior due to feedback provided during direct observation were suggested by two studies. A single study evaluated trainee's perceptions on patient outcomes and noted that thorough assessments and improved management decisions may be at the expense of slower throughput of patients and diversion of senior staff from direct patient care. Three studies noted the resource-intensive nature of direct observation. Direct observation of clinical practice may be useful in ED education; however, further research is required to evaluate its effects. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. 76 FR 58420 - Direct Investment Surveys: BE-12, Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Bureau of Economic Analysis 15 CFR Part 806 RIN 0691-AA80 Direct Investment Surveys: BE-12, Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States AGENCY: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Commerce... 2012 BE-12, ] Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States. Benchmark surveys are...

  9. 75 FR 57217 - Direct Investment Surveys: BE-11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-20

    ... Bureau of Economic Analysis 15 CFR Part 806 RIN 0691-AA74 Direct Investment Surveys: BE-11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad AGENCY: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of... U.S. Direct Investment Abroad. The survey is conducted annually and is a sample survey that obtains...

  10. Direct observation of laser guided corona discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tie-Jun; Wei, Yingxia; Liu, Yaoxiang; Chen, Na; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Sun, Haiyi; Wang, Cheng; Lu, Haihe; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-01-01

    Laser based lightning control holds a promising way to solve the problem of the long standing disaster of lightning strikes. But it is a challenging project due to insufficient understanding of the interaction between laser plasma channel and high voltage electric filed. In this work, a direct observation of laser guided corona discharge is reported. Laser filament guided streamer and leader types of corona discharges were observed. An enhanced ionization took place in the leader (filament) through the interaction with the high voltage discharging field. The fluorescence lifetime of laser filament guided corona discharge was measured to be several microseconds, which is 3 orders of magnitude longer than the fluorescence lifetime of laser filaments. This work could be advantageous towards a better understanding of laser assisted leader development in the atmosphere. PMID:26679271

  11. Direct observation of a magnetic Bose glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Tao [ORNL; Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Manaka, H. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN; Regnault, L.-P. [CEA, Grenoble, France

    2010-01-01

    A Bose glass is a novel state of matter that emerges in systems of interacting bosons in the presence of quenched disorder. At sufficiently low temperatures, disorder-free bosons are subject to so-called Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). BEC can involve atoms in liquid 4He, laser-cooled ions in magnetic traps,2 Cooper pairs in superconductors, or magnons in magnetic systems. Due to peculiarities of Bose statistics, particles lose their individuality and occupy a unique quantum-mechanical state. The wave function of this condensate establishes long-range quantum phase coherence across a macroscopic sample. This, in turn, spawns unique quantum phenomena such as superfluity,5 Josephson effect6 and vortex matter. For repulsive bosons, quenched disorder disrupts the condensate and interferes with phase coherence. The result is a peculiar glassy state with only short-range phase correlations. While some experimental evidence of this was found in ultracold atoms,9 novel high-temperature superconductors,10 and quantum magnets,11, 12 none of the studies were direct. The key characteristic, namely the wave function of the condensate disrupted by disorder on the microscopic scale, remained inaccessible. Hereby we report a direct neutron diffraction observation of short range correlations of the BEC order parameter in a magnetic Bose glass. This phase is realized in the quantum spin ladder compound IPA-Cu(Cl0.96Br0.04)3, where disorder is induced by random chemical substitution.

  12. 76 FR 79054 - Direct Investment Surveys: BE-12, Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Bureau of Economic Analysis 15 CFR Part 806 RIN 0691-AA80 Direct Investment Surveys: BE-12, Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States AGENCY: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Commerce... Foreign Direct Investment in the United States. The BE-12 survey is conducted every five years; the prior...

  13. 75 FR 80294 - Direct Investment Surveys: BE-11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ... Bureau of Economic Analysis 15 CFR Part 806 RIN 0691-AA74 Direct Investment Surveys: BE-11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad AGENCY: Bureau of Economic Analysis, Commerce. ACTION: Final rule... Commerce, to set forth the reporting requirements for the BE-11, Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment...

  14. Magnetotelluric distortions directly observed with lightning data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Lachlan; Macnae, James

    2017-08-01

    Galvanic distortions complicate magnetotelluric (MT) soundings. In this research, we use lightning network data to identify specific sferics in MT measurements and analyse these events on the basis of the lightning source location. Without source information, identification and removal of galvanic distortion is a fundamentally ill-posed problem, unless data are statistically decomposed into determinable and indeterminable parts. We use realistic assumptions of the earth-ionosphere waveguide propagation velocity to accurately predict the time of arrival, azimuth and amplitude for every significant sferic in our time-series data. For each sferic with large amplitude, we calculate the rotation of the electric field from the measured to the predicted arrival azimuth. This rotation of the electric field is a primary parameter of distortion. Our results demonstrate that a rudimentary model for near-surface galvanic distortion consistently fits observed electric field rotations. When local features rotate regional electric fields, then counter-rotating data to predicted arrival azimuths should correct the directional dependence of static shift. Although we used amplitude thresholds to simplify statistical processing, future developments should incorporate both signal-to-noise improvements and multisite decompositions. Lower amplitude signal may also be useful after the appropriate signal processing for noise reduction. We anticipate our approach will be useful for further work on MT distortion.

  15. Survey of CRISM Transition Phase Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelos, F. P.; Murchie, S. L.; Choo, T. H.; McGovern, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) transition phase extends from the end of aerobraking (08/30/06) to the start of the Primary Science Phase (PSP) (11/08/2006). Within this timeframe, the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) will acquire Mars scene observations in association with the deployment of the telescope cover (09/27/06) and during the operational checkout of the full science payload (09/29/06 - 10/05/06). The CRISM cover opening sequence includes scene observations that will be used to verify deployment and to validate the on-orbit instrument wavelength calibration. The limited cover opening observation set consists of: 1. A hyperspectral nadir scan acquired as the cover is deployed (first light) 2. A single targeted (gimbaled) hyperspectral observation in the northern plains 3. A restricted duration nadir multispectral strip The high level objectives for the science payload checkout are to obtain observations in support of in-flight wavelength, radiometric, and geometric instrument calibration, to acquire data that will contribute to the development of a first-order hyperspectral atmospheric correction, and to exercise numerous spacecraft and instrument observing modes and strategies that will be employed during PSP. The science payload checkout also enables a unique collaboration between the Mars Express OMEGA and CRISM teams, with both spectrometers slated to observe common target locations with a minimal time offset for the purpose of instrument cross-calibration. The priority CRISM observations for the payload checkout include: 1. Multispectral nadir and hyperspectral off-nadir targeted observations in support of the cross-calibration experiment with OMEGA 2. Terminator-to-terminator multispectral data acquisition demonstrating the strategy that will be used to construct the global multispectral survey map 3. Terminator-to-terminator atmospheric emission phase function (EPF) data acquisition demonstrating the observation

  16. Simulation Theory Applied to Direct Systematic Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolov, Rumen; Losada, José L

    2017-01-01

    Observational studies entail making several decisions before data collection, such as the observational design to use, the sampling of sessions within the observational period, the need for time sampling within the observation sessions, as well as the observation recording procedures to use. The focus of the present article is on observational recording procedures different from continuous recording (i.e., momentary time sampling, partial and whole interval recording). The main aim is to develop an online software application, constructed using R and the Shiny package, on the basis of simulations using the alternating renewal process (a model implemented in the ARPobservation package). The application offers graphical representations that can be useful to both university students constructing knowledge on Observational Methodology and to applied researchers planning to use discontinuous recording in their studies, because it helps identifying the conditions (e.g., interval length, average duration of the behavior of interest) in which the prevalence of the target behavior is expected to be estimated with less bias or no bias and with more efficiency. The estimation of frequency is another topic covered.

  17. Direct observation of nanowire growth and decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskas, Simas; Shandakov, Sergey D; Jiang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    knowledge, so far this has been only postulated, but never observed at the atomic level. By means of in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy we monitored and examined the atomic layer transformation at the conditions of the crystal growth and its decomposition using CuO nanowires selected...

  18. Construction engineering inspection direct cost survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the study was to provide a rationale to Georgia Department of Transportation : (GDOT) for Direct Costs in terms of salary and wages charged by qualified independent : contractors performing Construction Engineering Inspection (CEI) s...

  19. Direct Observations of Coronal Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Veronig, Astrid; Dennis, Brian R.; Holman, Gordon D.; Wang, Tongjiang; Temmer, Manuela; Gan, Weiqun

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic field reconnection is believed to play a fundamental role in magnetized plasma systems throughout the universe, but never before has it been so clearly demonstrated as in the EUV and X-ray movies of a GOES-C-class solar flare presented here. The multiwavelength EUV observations from SDO/AIA show the predicted inflowing cool loops and newly formed outflowing hot loops while simultaneous RHESSI X-ray spectra and images show the appearance of plasma heated to >10 MK at the expected locations. These two data sets provide solid visual evidence of magnetic reconnection producing a solar flare. The non-uniform, nonsteady, and asymmetric nature of the observed process, together with the measured reconnection rates, supports the so called flux-pile-up reconnection. These new features of plasma inflows should be included in reconnection and flare studies.

  20. Photometric Redshifts with the LSST: Evaluating Survey Observing Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Melissa L.; Connolly, Andrew J.; Ivezić, Željko; Schmidt, Samuel J.; Jones, R. Lynne; Jurić, Mario; Daniel, Scott F.; Yoachim, Peter

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present and characterize a nearest-neighbors color-matching photometric redshift estimator that features a direct relationship between the precision and accuracy of the input magnitudes and the output photometric redshifts. This aspect makes our estimator an ideal tool for evaluating the impact of changes to LSST survey parameters that affect the measurement errors of the photometry, which is the main motivation of our work (i.e., it is not intended to provide the “best” photometric redshifts for LSST data). We show how the photometric redshifts will improve with time over the 10 year LSST survey and confirm that the nominal distribution of visits per filter provides the most accurate photo-z results. The LSST survey strategy naturally produces observations over a range of airmass, which offers the opportunity of using an SED- and z-dependent atmospheric affect on the observed photometry as a color-independent redshift indicator. We show that measuring this airmass effect and including it as a prior has the potential to improve the photometric redshifts and can ameliorate extreme outliers, but that it will only be adequately measured for the brightest galaxies, which limits its overall impact on LSST photometric redshifts. We furthermore demonstrate how this airmass effect can induce a bias in the photo-z results, and caution against survey strategies that prioritize high-airmass observations for the purpose of improving this prior. Ultimately, we intend for this work to serve as a guide for the expectations and preparations of the LSST science community with regard to the minimum quality of photo-z as the survey progresses.

  1. 46 CFR 148.03-3 - Direction and observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Direction and observation. 148.03-3 Section 148.03-3... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN BULK Minimum Transportation Requirements § 148.03-3 Direction and observation... be conducted only under the direction and observation of a person assigned or employed for such duty...

  2. The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo

    2007-01-08

    We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

  3. Simulating Precursor Radial Velocity Surveys for Future Exoplanet Direct Imaging Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Patrick; Plavchan, Peter; Crepp, Justin; Dulz, Shannon; Stark, Chris; Kane, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Future direct imaging missions such as WFIRST, HabEx, and LUVOIR aim to catalog and characterize Earth-analogs around nearby stars. The observing strategy and science yield and are strongly dependent on the frequency of Earth-like planets, and precursor knowledge of which stars specifically host suitable planetary systems. Ground-based radial velocity surveys can potentially identify targets and optimal observations times at a fraction of the cost of blind direct imaging surveys. We present the first phases of simulations of such a survey. We consider multiple telescopes, including their locations, weather conditions, observation time limitations, and instrument sensitivities. Multiple target selection optimization algorithms are considered. We calculate realistic radial velocity uncertainties based upon the known stellar properties of nearby direct imaging targets including effective temperature, metallicity, and surface gravity. We next inject and recover the masses and orbital parameters of real and simulated planets, estimating the effectiveness of a precursor radial velocity survey for direct imaging yield optimization.

  4. Visual aids for aerial observers on forest insect surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.T. Larsen

    1957-01-01

    Aerial surveys are widely used to detect, appraise, and map damage caused to forest trees by insects. The success of these surveys largely depends upon the ability of observers to distinguish differences in foliage color and tree condition. The observers' ability is influenced by several factors.

  5. Direct observation of rectified motion of vortices by Lorentz microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have investigated the vortex dynamics for the 'ratchet' operation in a niobium superconductor via a direct imaging of Lorentz microscopy. We directly observe one-directional selective motion of field-gradient-driven vortices along fabricated channels. This results from the rectification of vortices in a spatially ...

  6. Direct observation of rectified motion of vortices by Lorentz microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have investigated the vortex dynamics for the `ratchet' operation in a niobium superconductor via a direct imaging of Lorentz microscopy. We directly observe one-directional selective motion of field-gradient-driven vortices along fabricated channels. This results from the rectification of vortices in a spatially asymmetric ...

  7. Direct Observation vs. Video-Based Assessment in Flexible Cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagnaes-Hansen, Julia; Mahmood, Oria; Bube, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Direct observation in assessment of clinical skills is prone to bias, demands the observer to be present at a certain location at a specific time, and is time-consuming. Video-based assessment could remove the risk of bias, increase flexibility, and reduce the time spent on assessment....... This study investigated if video-based assessment was a reliable tool for cystoscopy and if direct observers were prone to bias compared with video-raters. DESIGN: This study was a blinded observational trial. Twenty medical students and 9 urologists were recorded during 2 cystoscopies and rated by a direct...... observer and subsequently by 2 blinded video-raters on a global rating scale (GRS) for cystoscopy. Both intrarater and interrater reliability were explored. Furthermore, direct observer bias was explored by a paired samples t-test. RESULTS: Intrarater reliability calculated by Pearson's r was 0...

  8. Staging a performance: learners' perceptions about direct observation during residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDonna, Kori A; Hatala, Rose; Lingard, Lorelei; Voyer, Stephane; Watling, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    Evidence strongly supports that direct observation is a valid and reliable assessment tool; support for its impact on learning is less compelling, and we know that some learners are ambivalent about being observed. However, learners' perceptions about the impact of direct observation on their learning and professional development remain underexplored. To promote learning, we need to understand what makes direct observation valuable for learners. Informed by constructivist grounded theory, we interviewed 22 learners about their observation experiences. Data collection and analysis occurred iteratively; themes were identified using constant comparative analysis. Direct observation was widely endorsed as an important educational strategy, albeit one that created significant anxiety. Opaque expectations exacerbated participants' discomfort, and participants described that being observed felt like being assessed. Consequently, participants exchanged their 'usual' practice for a 'textbook' approach; alterations to performance generated uncertainty about their role, and raised questions about whether observers saw an authentic portrayal of their knowledge and skill. An 'observer effect' may partly explain learners' ambivalence about direct observation; being observed seemed to magnify learners' role ambiguity, intensify their tensions around professional development and raise questions about the credibility of feedback. In turn, an observer effect may impact learners' receptivity to feedback and may explain, in part, learners' perceptions that useful feedback is scant. For direct observation to be valuable, educators must be explicit about expectations, and they must be aware that how learners perform in the presence of an observer may not reflect what they do as independent practitioners. To nurture learners' professional development, educators must create a culture of observation-based coaching that is divorced from assessment and is tailored to developing learners

  9. Total station survey monitoring through an observation window: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total stations are used extensively for taking geodetic and engineering survey measurements. These measurements are made possible by accurate observation of targeted points. One example is deformation surveys, slope stability monitoring, in mines. Continuous monitoring necessitates sheltering or housing the ...

  10. Direct Observation of Neutrino Oscillations at the Sudbury Neutrino ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 10. Direct Observation of Neutrino Oscillations at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. B Ananthanarayan Ritesh K Singh. Research News Volume 7 Issue 10 October 2002 pp 79-82 ...

  11. Direct observation and focused feedback for clinical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder; Kundra, Shaveta; Gupta, Piyush

    2014-09-01

    Direct observation of the medical trainee by an expert assessor and providing authentic feedback is considered an important tool for development of clinical and procedural skills. Mini-clinical evaluation exercise and Direct Observation of Procedural Skills are two important tools to observe the trainee during a clinical encounter or during a procedure, make an expert standardized (though subjective) observation, and use it to provide developmental feedback. Both can be easily integrated into routine work of clinical departments, and both provide a reliable assessment if 6-8 such encounters are used.

  12. 77 FR 772 - International Services Surveys and Direct Investment Surveys Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... 0691-AA81, and referencing the agency name (Bureau of Economic Analysis), by any of the following... Bureau of Economic Analysis 15 CFR Parts 801, 806, and 807 RIN 0691-AA81 International Services Surveys and Direct Investment Surveys Reporting AGENCY: Bureau of Economic Analysis. ACTION: Proposed rule...

  13. Direct link paths detection for observed teleconnections in climate networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Gozolchiani, Avi; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-04-01

    Climate networks have been used to describe certain kind of relations between the climate time series of each pair of nodes. However, all these observed relations should include both the direct relation between these nodes and the indirect effects through other nodes, and the direct link patterns of climate networks are still unclear. In this work, we use the normalized cross-correlation to define both positive and negative link strengths, and for this definition we develop a method based on partial correlation to remove the indirect effect from the observed global air temperature network and obtain the direct positive and negative links. The strong direct links can illustrate how a certain climatic mechanism is propagating step by step in both time and space. Particularly, for the observed teleconnections, we can find the dominant paths of direct links between two nodes by finding the directed shortest paths in the direct link network. The spatial and temporal properties of these paths can help us better understand the origin of such teleconnections.

  14. Routine hand hygiene audit by direct observation: has nemesis arrived?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, D J; Drey, N S; Creedon, S

    2011-04-01

    Infection prevention and control experts have expended valuable health service time developing and implementing tools to audit health workers' hand hygiene compliance by direct observation. Although described as the 'gold standard' approach to hand hygiene audit, this method is labour intensive and may be inaccurate unless performed by trained personnel who are regularly monitored to ensure quality control. New technological devices have been developed to generate 'real time' data, but the cost of installing them and using them during routine patient care has not been evaluated. Moreover, they do not provide as much information about the hand hygiene episode or the context in which hand hygiene has been performed as direct observation. Uptake of hand hygiene products offers an inexpensive alternative to direct observation. Although product uptake would not provide detailed information about the hand hygiene episode or local barriers to compliance, it could be used as a continuous monitoring tool. Regular inspection of the data by infection prevention and control teams and clinical staff would indicate when and where direct investigation of practice by direct observation and questioning of staff should be targeted by highly trained personnel to identify local problems and improve practice. Copyright © 2011 the Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    September 2006 physics pp. 441–447. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase synchronization. HAIHONG LI1, WEIQING LIU1,2, QIONGLING DAI1 and JINGHUA XIAO1. 1School of Science, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Beijing 100876,. China. 2School of Science, Jiangxi ...

  16. Directly-Observed Treatment Strategy implementation practices in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Directly-Observed Treatment Strategy (DOTS) programme is intended to ensure both treatment completion and cure of TB, as well as its evaluation. Despite improved DOTS coverage – the focus of most DOTS studies – the incidence of drug-resistant TB suggests that issues of non-compliance are centrally responsible ...

  17. Directly-Observed Treatment Strategy implementation practices in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-09-09

    Sep 9, 2014 ... The Directly-Observed Treatment Strategy (DOTS) programme is intended to ensure both treatment completion and cure of TB, as well as its evaluation. Despite improved. DOTS coverage – the focus of most DOTS studies – the incidence of drug-resistant TB suggests that issues of non-compliance are ...

  18. Treatment outcome of directly observed therapy short-course for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Treatment outcome of directly observed therapy short-course for pulmonary tuberculosis patients in a Nigerian tertiary institution: An eight-year review. ... Cases detected, sputum conversion and treatment outcome reports were analyzed using percentage. Results: A total of 177 pulmonary TB patients were seen during the ...

  19. Direct hydroacoustic observations of chokka squid Loligo vulgaris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Direct hydroacoustic observations of chokka squid Loligo vulgaris reynaudii spawning activity in deep water. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how to print, ...

  20. Side effects of drugs used in directly observed treatment short ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The study assessed the side effects of drugs used in directly observed treatment short course in a newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients at the chest unit of University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital in Enugu State, Nigeria. Methods: A retrospective study, involving a 3-year review of case files of TB patients ...

  1. Global Observer-Based Attitude Controller Using Direct Inertial Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saâdi Bouhired

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we address the problem of global attitude control using direct inertial measurements. When using direct inertial measurement to observe the rigid body attitude, it is shown that due to a geometrical obstruction, it is impossible to achieve global asymptotic stability. In fact, for a particular initial condition the tracking error quaternion converges to a pure imaginary quaternion formed by an eigenvector of a characteristic matrix related to the inertial constant and known vectors. Our proposition consists of adding a dynamic signal to force the rigid body to escape from such a situation. The proposed observer-based controller is synthesized based on a single Lyapunov function and a stability analysis shows that the controller stabilizes globally and asymptotically the rigid body attitude at the desired one. The effectiveness of the proposed observer-based controller is confirmed by simulation results.

  2. Transforms and Operators for Directional Bioimage Analysis: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Püspöki, Zsuzsanna; Storath, Martin; Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We give a methodology-oriented perspective on directional image analysis and rotation-invariant processing. We review the state of the art in the field and make connections with recent mathematical developments in functional analysis and wavelet theory. We unify our perspective within a common framework using operators. The intent is to provide image-processing methods that can be deployed in algorithms that analyze biomedical images with improved rotation invariance and high directional sensitivity. We start our survey with classical methods such as directional-gradient and the structure tensor. Then, we discuss how these methods can be improved with respect to robustness, invariance to geometric transformations (with a particular interest in scaling), and computation cost. To address robustness against noise, we move forward to higher degrees of directional selectivity and discuss Hessian-based detection schemes. To present multiscale approaches, we explain the differences between Fourier filters, directional wavelets, curvelets, and shearlets. To reduce the computational cost, we address the problem of matching directional patterns by proposing steerable filters, where one might perform arbitrary rotations and optimizations without discretizing the orientation. We define the property of steerability and give an introduction to the design of steerable filters. We cover the spectrum from simple steerable filters through pyramid schemes up to steerable wavelets. We also present illustrations on the design of steerable wavelets and their application to pattern recognition.

  3. 77 FR 58979 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Direct Investment Surveys: BE-15, Annual Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... cost) of the proposed collection of information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity... Bureau of Economic Analysis Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Direct Investment Surveys... Analysis. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to reduce...

  4. Deepwater Horizon MC252 sea turtle data from the Environmental Response Management Application (ERMA) containing synoptic surveys, turtle telemetry, workplan sample observations and tagging, density grids, direct capture, and probabilities of exposure, and related sea turtle data collected between 1989-11-15 and 2013-11-12 during the DWH response in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NCEI Accession 0163813)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Archival Information Package (AIP) contains Environmental Resource Management Application (ERMA) GIS layers that include turtle survey overflight observations,...

  5. Direct observations of blob deformation during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ishida

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ionospheric blobs are localized plasma density enhancements, which are mainly produced by the transportation process of plasma. To understand the deformation process of a blob, observations of plasma parameters with good spatial–temporal resolution are desirable. Thus, we conducted the European Incoherent Scatter radar observations with high-speed meridional scans (60–80 s during October and December 2013, and observed the temporal evolution of a blob during a substorm on 4 December 2013. This paper is the first report of direct observations of blob deformation during a substorm. The blob deformation arose from an enhanced plasma flow shear during the substorm expansion phase, and then the blob split into two smaller-scale blobs, whose scale sizes were more than ~100 km in latitude. Our analysis indicates that the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability and dissociative recombination could have deformed the blob structure.

  6. Direct Observation of Thymine Dimer Repair in DNA by Photolyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dongping

    2006-03-01

    Departments of Physics, Chemistry, and Biochemistry, Programs of Biophysics, Chemical Physics, and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, 191 West Woodruff Avenue, OH 43210. Photolyase uses light energy to split ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in damaged DNA, but its molecular mechanism has never been directly revealed. We report here the direct mapping of catalytic processes through femtosecond synchronization of the enzymatic dynamics with the repair function. We observed direct electron transfer from the excited flavin cofactor to the dimer in 170 ps and back electron transfer from the repaired thymines in 560 ps. Both reactions are strongly modulated by active-site solvation to achieve maximum repair efficiency. These results show that the photocycle of DNA repair by photolyase is through a radical mechanism and completed on subnanosecond time scale at the dynamic active site with no net electron change in redox states of the flavin cofactor.

  7. Direct observation of cerebrospinal fluid bulk flow in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Humberto; Tithof, Jeffrey; Thomas, John; Kelley, Douglas; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2017-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) serves a vital role in normal brain function. Its adequate flow and exchange with interstitial fluid through perivascular spaces (PVS) has been shown to be important in the clearance of toxic metabolites like amyloid- β, and its disturbance can cause severe neurological diseases. It has long been suspected that bulk flow may transport CSF, but limitations in imaging techniques have prevented direct observation of such flows in the PVS. In this talk, we describe a novel approach using high speed two photon laser scanning microscopy which has allowed for the first ever direct observation of CSF flow in the PVS of a mouse brain. By performing particle tracking velocimetry, we quantify the CSF bulk flow speeds and PVS geometry. This technique enables future studies of CSF flow disturbances on a new scale and will pave the way for evaluating the role of these fluxes in neurodegenerative disease. R01NS100366 (to M.N.).

  8. Clustering and community detection in directed networks: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliaros, Fragkiskos D.; Vazirgiannis, Michalis

    2013-12-01

    Networks (or graphs) appear as dominant structures in diverse domains, including sociology, biology, neuroscience and computer science. In most of the aforementioned cases graphs are directed - in the sense that there is directionality on the edges, making the semantics of the edges nonsymmetric as the source node transmits some property to the target one but not vice versa. An interesting feature that real networks present is the clustering or community structure property, under which the graph topology is organized into modules commonly called communities or clusters. The essence here is that nodes of the same community are highly similar while on the contrary, nodes across communities present low similarity. Revealing the underlying community structure of directed complex networks has become a crucial and interdisciplinary topic with a plethora of relevant application domains. Therefore, naturally there is a recent wealth of research production in the area of mining directed graphs - with clustering being the primary method sought and the primary tool for community detection and evaluation. The goal of this paper is to offer an in-depth comparative review of the methods presented so far for clustering directed networks along with the relevant necessary methodological background and also related applications. The survey commences by offering a concise review of the fundamental concepts and methodological base on which graph clustering algorithms capitalize on. Then we present the relevant work along two orthogonal classifications. The first one is mostly concerned with the methodological principles of the clustering algorithms, while the second one approaches the methods from the viewpoint regarding the properties of a good cluster in a directed network. Further, we present methods and metrics for evaluating graph clustering results, demonstrate interesting application domains and provide promising future research directions.

  9. Modern cosmology: Interactive computer simulations that use recent observational surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldenhauer, Jacob; Engelhardt, Larry; Stone, Keenan M.; Shuler, Ezekiel

    2013-06-01

    We present a collection of new, open-source computational tools for numerically modeling recent large-scale observational data sets using modern cosmology theory. These tools allow both students and researchers to constrain the parameter values in competitive cosmological models, thereby discovering both the accelerated expansion of the universe and its composition (e.g., dark matter and dark energy). These programs have several features to help the non-cosmologist build an understanding of cosmological models and their relation to observational data, including a built-in collection of several real observational data sets. The current list of built-in observations includes several recent supernovae Type-Ia surveys, baryon acoustic oscillations, the cosmic microwave background radiation, gamma-ray bursts, and measurements of the Hubble parameter. In this article, we discuss specific results for testing cosmological models using these observational data.

  10. Direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi_b^{-}

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clement, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; De Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutíerrez, P; Gutíerrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panov, G; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Polozov, P; Pompo, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F K; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A F S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, A D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sen-Gupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Skubic, P L; Slattery, P F; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; Van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; Van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Törne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-01-01

    We report the first direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi_b^{-}. We reconstruct the decay Xi_b^{-} to J/psi Xi^{-}, with J/psi to dimuons and Xi^{-} to Lambda pion, in ppbar collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV. Using 1.3 fb^{-1} of data collected by the D0 detector, we observe 15.2 +/- 4.4(stat.)+ 1.9/-0.4(syst.) Xi_b^{-} candidates at a mass of 5.774 +/- 0.011(stat.) +/- 0.015 (syst.) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.5 sigmas, equivalent to a probability of 3.3 X 10^{-8} of it arising from a background fluctuation. Normalizing to the decay Lambda_b to J/psi Lambda, we measure the relative rate to be 0.28 +/- 0.09(stat.)+ 0.09/-0.08 (syst.).

  11. Direct observation of intermolecular interactions mediated by hydrogen bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Marco, Luigi; Reppert, Mike [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Department of Chemistry, James Frank Institute and The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Thämer, Martin; Tokmakoff, Andrei, E-mail: tokmakoff@uchicago.edu [Department of Chemistry, James Frank Institute and The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, The University of Chicago, 929 E 57th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2014-07-21

    Although intermolecular interactions are ubiquitous in physicochemical phenomena, their dynamics have proven difficult to observe directly, and most experiments rely on indirect measurements. Using broadband two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2DIR), we have measured the influence of hydrogen bonding on the intermolecular vibrational coupling between dimerized N-methylacetamide molecules. In addition to strong intramolecular coupling between N–H and C=O oscillators, cross-peaks in the broadband 2DIR spectrum appearing upon dimerization reveal strong intermolecular coupling that changes the character of the vibrations. In addition, dimerization changes the effects of intramolecular coupling, resulting in Fermi resonances between high and low-frequency modes. These results illustrate how hydrogen bonding influences the interplay of inter- and intramolecular vibrations, giving rise to correlated nuclear motions and significant changes in the vibrational structure of the amide group. These observations have direct impact on modeling and interpreting the IR spectra of proteins. In addition, they illustrate a general approach to direct molecular characterization of intermolecular interactions.

  12. Direct observation of microbial inhibition of calcite dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüttge, Andreas; Conrad, Pamela G

    2004-03-01

    Vertical scanning interferometry (VSI) provides a method for quantification of surface topography at the angstrom to nanometer level. Time-dependent VSI measurements can be used to study the surface-normal retreat across crystal and other solid surfaces during dissolution or corrosion processes. Therefore, VSI can be used to directly and nondestructively measure mineral dissolution rates with high precision. We have used this method to compare the abiotic dissolution behavior of a representative calcite (CaCO(3)) cleavage face with that observed upon addition of an environmental microbe, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, to the crystal surface. From our direct observations, we have concluded that the presence of the microbes results in a significant inhibition of the rate of calcite dissolution. This inhibition appears to be a 2nd-order effect that is related to the formation of etch pits. The opening of etch pits was greatly inhibited in the presence of added bacteria, suggesting that the bacterial cells exert their effect by inhibiting the formation of etch pits at high-energy sites at the crystal surface caused by lattice defects, e.g., screw or point dislocations. The experimental methodology thus provides a nondestructive, directly quantifiable, and easily visualized view of the interactions of microbes and minerals during weathering (or corrosion) processes or during mineral precipitation.

  13. Direct Observation of Luminescent Silver Clusters Confined in Faujasite Zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altantzis, Thomas; Coutino-Gonzalez, Eduardo; Baekelant, Wouter; Martinez, Gerardo T; Abakumov, Artem M; Tendeloo, Gustaaf Van; Roeffaers, Maarten B J; Bals, Sara; Hofkens, Johan

    2016-08-23

    One of the ultimate goals in the study of metal clusters is the correlation between the atomic-scale organization and their physicochemical properties. However, direct observation of the atomic organization of such minuscule metal clusters is heavily hindered by radiation damage imposed by the different characterization techniques. We present direct evidence of the structural arrangement, at an atomic level, of luminescent silver species stabilized in faujasite (FAU) zeolites using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Two different silver clusters were identified in Ag-FAU zeolites, a trinuclear silver species associated with green emission and a tetranuclear silver species related to yellow emission. By combining direct imaging with complementary information obtained from X-ray powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis, we were able to elucidate the main differences at an atomic scale between luminescent (heat-treated) and nonluminescent (cation-exchanged) Ag-FAU zeolites. It is expected that such insights will trigger the directed synthesis of functional metal nanocluster-zeolite composites with tailored luminescent properties.

  14. Direct observation of lubricant additives using tomography techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yunyun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Sanchez, Carlos [Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Parkinson, Dilworth Y. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Liang, Hong, E-mail: hliang@tamu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Mechanical Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Lubricants play important roles in daily activities such as driving, walking, and cooking. The current understanding of mechanisms of lubrication, particularly in mechanical systems, has been limited by the lack of capability in direct observation. Here, we report an in situ approach to directly observe the motion of additive particles in grease under the influence of shear. Using the K-edge tomography technique, it is possible to detect particular additives in a grease and observe their distribution through 3D visualization. A commercial grease as a reference was studied with and without an inorganic additive of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} microparticles. The results showed that it was possible to identify these particles and track their movement. Under a shear stress, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles were found to adhere to the edge of calcium complex thickeners commonly used in grease. Due to sliding, the grease formed a film with increased density. This approach enables in-line monitoring of a lubricant and future investigation in mechanisms of lubrication.

  15. Complete control, direct observation and study of molecular super rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Extremely fast rotating molecules carrying significantly more energy in their rotation than in any other degree of freedom are known as "super rotors". It has been speculated that super rotors may exhibit a number of unique and intriguing properties. Theoretical studies showed that ultrafast molecular rotation may change the character of molecular scattering from solid surfaces, alter molecular trajectories in external fields, make super rotors surprisingly stable against collisions, and lead to the formation of gas vortices. New ways of molecular cooling and selective chemical bond breaking by ultrafast spinning have been proposed. Owing to the fundamental laws of nature, bringing a large number of molecules to fast, directional and synchronous rotation is rather challenging. As a result, only indirect evidence of super rotors has been reported to date. Here we demonstrate the first controlled creation, direct observation and study of molecular super rotors. Using intense laser pulses tailored to produce an ...

  16. Optimal strategies of radial velocity observations in planet search surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baluev, Roman V.

    2008-09-01

    Applications of the theory of optimal design of experiments to radial velocity (RV) planet search surveys are considered. Different optimality criteria are discussed, basing on the Fisher, Shannon and Kullback-Leibler informations. Algorithms of optimal scheduling of RV observations for two important practical problems are considered. The first problem is finding the time for future observations to yield the maximum improvement of the precision of exoplanetary orbital parameters and masses. The second problem is finding the most favourable time for distinguishing alternative orbital fits (the scheduling of discriminating observations). These methods of optimal planning are demonstrated to be potentially efficient for multiplanet extrasolar systems, in particular for resonant ones. In these cases, the optimal dates of observations are often concentrated in quite narrow time segments.

  17. Direct Observation of Teacher and Student Behavior in School Settings: Trends, Issues and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Timothy J.; Scott, Terrance M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Wills, Howard P.

    2014-01-01

    Across the modern history of the field of special education and emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD), direct observation of student and educator behavior has been an essential component of the diagnostic process, student progress monitoring, and establishing functional and statistical relationships within research. This article provides an…

  18. Direct Observation of Correlated Interdomain Motion in Alcohol Dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, Ralf; Hoffmann, Bernd; Monkenbusch, Michael; Falus, Peter; Préost, Sylvain; Merkel, Rudolf; Richter, Dieter

    2008-09-01

    Interdomain motions in proteins are essential to enable or promote biochemical function. Neutron spin-echo spectroscopy is used to directly observe the domain dynamics of the protein alcohol dehydrogenase. The collective motion of domains as revealed by their coherent form factor relates to the cleft opening dynamics between the binding and the catalytic domains enabling binding and release of the functional important cofactor. The cleft opening mode hardens as a result of an overall stiffening of the domain complex due to the binding of the cofactor.

  19. Direct Observations of PMC Local Time Variations by Aura OMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Shettle, Eric P.; Thomas, Gary E.; Olivero, John J.

    2010-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite obtains unique measurements for polar mesospheric cloud (PMC) analysis. Its wide cross-track viewing swath and high along-track spatial resolution makes it possible to directly evaluate PMC occurrence frequency and brightness variations between 6S" and 8S' latitude as a function of local time over a 12-14 h continuous period. OMI PMC local time variations are closely coupled to concurrent variations in measurement scattering angle, so that ice phase function effects must be considered when interpreting the observations. Two different phase functions corresponding to bright and faint clouds are examined in this analysis. OMI observations show maximum frequency and albedo values at 8-10 h local time in the Northern Hemisphere, with decreasing amplitude at higher latitudes. Southern Hemisphere values reach a minimum at 18-20 h LT. Larger variations are seen in Northern Hemisphere data. No statistically significant longitudinal dependence was seen.

  20. Direct observation of oxygen configuration on individual graphene oxide sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zilong; Nørgaard, Kasper; Overgaard, Marc H.

    2018-01-01

    a resolution high enough to unambiguously identify oxygen configuration. We used a new, label free spectroscopic technique to map oxygen bonding on GO, with spatial resolution of nanometres and high chemical specificity. AFM-IR, atomic force microscopy coupled with infrared spectroscopy, overcomes conventional...... IR diffraction limits, producing IR spectra from specific points as well as chemical maps that are coupled to topography. We have directly observed oxygen bonding preferentially on areas where graphene is folded, in discrete domains and on edges of GO. From these observations, we propose an updated......Graphene oxide (GO) is an interesting material that has the potential for a wide range of applications. Critical for these applications are the type of oxygen bond and its spatial distribution on the individual GO sheets. This distribution is not yet well understood. Few techniques offer...

  1. Direct observation of photoinduced bent nitrosyl excited-state complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawyer, Karma R.; Steele, Ryan P.; Glascoe, Elizabeth A.; Cahoon, James F.; Schlegel, Jacob P.; Head-Gordon, Martin; Harris, Charles B.

    2008-06-28

    Ground state structures with side-on nitrosyl ({eta}{sup 2}-NO) and isonitrosyl (ON) ligands have been observed in a variety of transition-metal complexes. In contrast, excited state structures with bent-NO ligands have been proposed for years but never directly observed. Here we use picosecond time-resolved infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) modeling to study the photochemistry of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO), a model transition-metal-NO compound. Surprisingly, we have observed no evidence for ON and {eta}{sup 2}-NO structural isomers, but have observed two bent-NO complexes. DFT modeling of the ground and excited state potentials indicates that the bent-NO complexes correspond to triplet excited states. Photolysis of Co(CO){sub 3}(NO) with a 400-nm pump pulse leads to population of a manifold of excited states which decay to form an excited state triplet bent-NO complex within 1 ps. This structure relaxes to the ground triplet state in ca. 350 ps to form a second bent-NO structure.

  2. Public Land Survey System of the United States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set portrays the Public Land Surveys of the United States, including areas of private survey, Donation Land Claims, and Land Grants and Civil Colonies....

  3. Direct Observation Assessment of Milestones: Problems with Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Schott

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency medicine (EM milestones are used to assess residents’ progress. While some milestone validity evidence exists, there is a lack of standardized tools available to reliably assess residents. Inherent to this is a concern that we may not be truly measuring what we intend to assess. The purpose of this study was to design a direct observation milestone assessment instrument supported by validity and reliability evidence. In addition, such a tool would further lend validity evidence to the EM milestones by demonstrating their accurate measurement. Methods: This was a multi-center, prospective, observational validity study conducted at eight institutions. The Critical Care Direct Observation Tool (CDOT was created to assess EM residents during resuscitations. This tool was designed using a modified Delphi method focused on content, response process, and internal structure validity. Paying special attention to content validity, the CDOT was developed by an expert panel, maintaining the use of the EM milestone wording. We built response process and internal consistency by piloting and revising the instrument. Raters were faculty who routinely assess residents on the milestones. A brief training video on utilization of the instrument was completed by all. Raters used the CDOT to assess simulated videos of three residents at different stages of training in a critical care scenario. We measured reliability using Fleiss’ kappa and interclass correlations. Results: Two versions of the CDOT were used: one used the milestone levels as global rating scales with anchors, and the second reflected a current trend of a checklist response system. Although the raters who used the CDOT routinely rate residents in their practice, they did not score the residents’ performances in the videos comparably, which led to poor reliability. The Fleiss’ kappa of each of the items measured on both versions of the CDOT was near zero. Conclusion: The

  4. A hierarchical modeling framework for multiple observer transect surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B Conn

    Full Text Available Ecologists often use multiple observer transect surveys to census animal populations. In addition to animal counts, these surveys produce sequences of detections and non-detections for each observer. When combined with additional data (i.e. covariates such as distance from the transect line, these sequences provide the additional information to estimate absolute abundance when detectability on the transect line is less than one. Although existing analysis approaches for such data have proven extremely useful, they have some limitations. For instance, it is difficult to extrapolate from observed areas to unobserved areas unless a rigorous sampling design is adhered to; it is also difficult to share information across spatial and temporal domains or to accommodate habitat-abundance relationships. In this paper, we introduce a hierarchical modeling framework for multiple observer line transects that removes these limitations. In particular, abundance intensities can be modeled as a function of habitat covariates, making it easier to extrapolate to unsampled areas. Our approach relies on a complete data representation of the state space, where unobserved animals and their covariates are modeled using a reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Observer detections are modeled via a bivariate normal distribution on the probit scale, with dependence induced by a distance-dependent correlation parameter. We illustrate performance of our approach with simulated data and on a known population of golf tees. In both cases, we show that our hierarchical modeling approach yields accurate inference about abundance and related parameters. In addition, we obtain accurate inference about population-level covariates (e.g. group size. We recommend that ecologists consider using hierarchical models when analyzing multiple-observer transect data, especially when it is difficult to rigorously follow pre-specified sampling designs. We provide a new R package

  5. Direct observation of the strange b baryon Xib-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panov, G; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-08-03

    We report the first direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi(b)- (Xi(b)+). We reconstruct the decay Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, with J/psi-->mu+mu-, and Xi--->Lambdapi--->ppi-pi- in pp collisions at square root of s =1.96 TeV. Using 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector, we observe 15.2 +/- 4.4(stat)(-0.4)(+1.9)(syst) Xi(b)- candidates at a mass of 5.774 +/- 0.011(stat) +/- 0.015(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.5 sigma, equivalent to a probability of 3.3 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation. Normalizing to the decay Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda, we measure the relative rate sigma(Xi(b-) x B(Xi)b})- -->J/psiXi-)/sigma(Lambda(b)) x B(Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda) = 0.28+/-0.09(stat)(-0.08)(+0.09)(syst).

  6. Direct observation of ionic structure at solid-liquid interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siretanu, Igor; Ebeling, Daniel; Andersson, Martin Peter

    2014-01-01

    The distribution of ions and charge at solid-water interfaces plays an essential role in a wide range of processes in biology, geology and technology. While theoretical models of the solid-electrolyte interface date back to the early 20th century, a detailed picture of the structure of the electr...... of cations, anions and water, stabilized by hydrogen bonding.......The distribution of ions and charge at solid-water interfaces plays an essential role in a wide range of processes in biology, geology and technology. While theoretical models of the solid-electrolyte interface date back to the early 20th century, a detailed picture of the structure of the electric...... double layer has remained elusive, largely because of experimental techniques have not allowed direct observation of the behaviour of ions, i.e. with subnanometer resolution. We have made use of recent advances in high-resolution Atomic Force Microscopy to reveal, with atomic level precision, the ordered...

  7. Useful technique for submucous myomectomy under direct transcervical resectoscope observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuji Hoshino

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The transcervical resectoscope (TCR is used for resecting a submucous myoma (SMM. Safe grasping of an SMM with forceps and its complete resection under transabdominal ultrasound (TAUS guidance is not always easy. SMMs are slippery, making them difficult to grasp. The SMM moves right to left and anterior to posterior when the surgeon tries to grasp it with placental forceps. Surgeons could use small Martin forceps (65% smaller to grasp SMMs safely and tightly under direct TCR (transcervical resectoscope observation. We present a case in which this operative procedure was used to remove an SMM with Figure and Video. The benefits of this procedure are enormous and could be immeasurably important to hysteroscopists and gynecologists.

  8. Direct observations of field-induced assemblies in magnetite ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, N. S. Susan [Mechanical Engineering Department, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, 6 Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Khapli, Sachin D. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Saadiyat Island, PO Box 129 188, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Kumar, Sunil [Mechanical Engineering Department, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, 6 Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); New York University Abu Dhabi, Saadiyat Island, PO Box 129 188, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-03-14

    Evolution of microstructures in magnetite-based ferrofluids with weak dipolar moments (particle size ≤ 10 nm) is studied with an emphasis on examining the effects of particle concentration (ϕ) and magnetic field strength (H) on the structures. Nanoparticles are dispersed in water at three different concentrations, ϕ = 0.15%, 0.48%, and 0.59% (w/v) [g/ml%] and exposed to uniform magnetic fields in the range of H = 0.05–0.42 T. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy is employed to provide in-situ observations of the field-induced assemblies in such systems. As the magnetic field increases, the Brownian colloids are observed to form randomly distributed chains aligned in the field direction, followed by head-to-tail chain aggregation and then lateral aggregation of chains termed as zippering. By increasing the field in low concentration samples, the number of chains increases, though their length does not change dramatically. Increasing concentration increases the length of the linear particle assemblies in the presence of a fixed external magnetic field. Thickening of the chains due to zippering is observed at relatively high fields. Through a systematic variation of concentration and magnetic field strength, this study shows that both magnetic field strength and change in concentration can strongly influence formation of microstructures even in weak dipolar systems. Additionally, the results of two commonly used support films on electron microscopy grids, continuous carbon and holey carbon films, are compared. Holey carbon film allows us to create local regions of high concentrations that further assist the development of field-induced assemblies. The experimental observations provide a validation of the zippering effect and can be utilized in the development of models for thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity.

  9. The Taipan Galaxy Survey: Scientific Goals and Observing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Elisabete; Hopkins, Andrew M.; Colless, Matthew; Taylor, Edward N.; Blake, Chris; Howlett, Cullan; Magoulas, Christina; Lucey, John R.; Lagos, Claudia; Kuehn, Kyler; Gordon, Yjan; Barat, Dilyar; Bian, Fuyan; Wolf, Christian; Cowley, Michael J.; White, Marc; Achitouv, Ixandra; Bilicki, Maciej; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bolejko, Krzysztof; Brown, Michael J. I.; Brown, Rebecca; Bryant, Julia; Croom, Scott; Davis, Tamara M.; Driver, Simon P.; Filipovic, Miroslav D.; Hinton, Samuel R.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Jones, D. Heath; Koribalski, Bärbel; Kleiner, Dane; Lawrence, Jon; Lorente, Nuria; Mould, Jeremy; Owers, Matt S.; Pimbblet, Kevin; Tinney, C. G.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Watson, Fred

    2017-10-01

    The Taipan galaxy survey (hereafter simply `Taipan') is a multi-object spectroscopic survey starting in 2017 that will cover 2π steradians over the southern sky (δ ≲ 10°, |b| ≳ 10°), and obtain optical spectra for about two million galaxies out to z innovative `Starbugs' positioning system capable of rapidly and simultaneously deploying up to 150 spectroscopic fibres (and up to 300 with a proposed upgrade) over the 6° diameter focal plane, and a purpose-built spectrograph operating in the range from 370 to 870 nm with resolving power R ≳ 2000. The main scientific goals of Taipan are (i) to measure the distance scale of the Universe (primarily governed by the local expansion rate, H 0) to 1% precision, and the growth rate of structure to 5%; (ii) to make the most extensive map yet constructed of the total mass distribution and motions in the local Universe, using peculiar velocities based on improved Fundamental Plane distances, which will enable sensitive tests of gravitational physics; and (iii) to deliver a legacy sample of low-redshift galaxies as a unique laboratory for studying galaxy evolution as a function of dark matter halo and stellar mass and environment. The final survey, which will be completed within 5 yrs, will consist of a complete magnitude-limited sample (i ⩽ 17) of about 1.2 × 106 galaxies supplemented by an extension to higher redshifts and fainter magnitudes (i ⩽ 18.1) of a luminous red galaxy sample of about 0.8 × 106 galaxies. Observations and data processing will be carried out remotely and in a fully automated way, using a purpose-built automated `virtual observer' software and an automated data reduction pipeline. The Taipan survey is deliberately designed to maximise its legacy value by complementing and enhancing current and planned surveys of the southern sky at wavelengths from the optical to the radio; it will become the primary redshift and optical spectroscopic reference catalogue for the local extragalactic

  10. Assimilation of wind speed and direction observations: results from real observation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Gao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The assimilation of wind observations in the form of speed and direction (asm_sd by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model Data Assimilation System (WRFDA was performed using real data and employing a series of cycling assimilation experiments for a 2-week period, as a follow-up for an idealised post hoc assimilation experiment. The satellite-derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors (AMV and surface dataset in Meteorological Assimilation Data Ingest System (MADIS were assimilated. This new method takes into account the observation errors of both wind speed (spd and direction (dir, and WRFDA background quality control (BKG-QC influences the choice of wind observations, due to data conversions between (u,v and (spd, dir. The impacts of BKG-QC, as well as the new method, on the wind analysis were analysed separately. Because the dir observational errors produced by different platforms are not known or tuned well in WRFDA, a practical method, which uses similar assimilation weights in comparative trials, was employed to estimate the spd and dir observation errors. The asm_sd produces positive impacts on analyses and short-range forecasts of spd and dir with smaller root-mean-square errors than the u,v-based system. The bias of spd analysis decreases by 54.8%. These improvements result partly from BKG-QC screening of spd and dir observations in a direct way, but mainly from the independent impact of spd (dir data assimilation on spd (dir analysis, which is the primary distinction from the standard WRFDA method. The potential impacts of asm_sd on precipitation forecasts were evaluated. Results demonstrate that the asm_sd is able to indirectly improve the precipitation forecasts by improving the prediction accuracies of key wind-related factors leading to precipitation (e.g. warm moist advection and frontogenesis.

  11. Very metal-poor stars observed by the RAVE survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matijevič, G.; Chiappini, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Kunder, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.

    2017-07-01

    Metal-poor stars trace the earliest phases in the chemical enrichment of the Universe. They give clues about the early assembly of the Galaxy as well as on the nature of the first stellar generations. Multi-object spectroscopic surveys play a key role in finding these fossil records in large volumes. Here we present a novel analysis of the metal-poor star sample in the complete Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) Data Release 5 catalog with the goal of identifying and characterizing all very metal-poor stars observed by the survey. Using a three-stage method, we first identified the candidate stars using only their spectra as input information. We employed an algorithm called t-SNE to construct a low-dimensional projection of the spectrum space and isolate the region containing metal-poor stars. Following this step, we measured the equivalent widths of the near-infrared Ca II triplet lines with a method based on flexible Gaussian processes to model the correlated noise present in the spectra. In the last step, we constructed a calibration relation that converts the measured equivalent widths and the color information coming from the 2MASS and WISE surveys into metallicity and temperature estimates. We identified 877 stars with at least a 50% probability of being very metal-poor ([Fe/H] stars with literature metallicity values shows that our method works reliably and correctly estimates the uncertainties, which typically have valuesσ[Fe/H] ≈ 0.2 dex. In addition, when compared to the metallicity results derived using the RAVE DR5 pipeline, it is evident that we achieve better accuracy than the pipeline and therefore more reliably evaluate the very metal-poor subsample. Based on the repeated observations of the same stars, our method gives very consistent results. We intend to study the identified sample further by acquiring high-resolution spectroscopic follow-up observations. The method used in this work can also easily be extended to other large-scale data sets

  12. Survey on methods of increasing the efficiency of extended state disturbance observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madoński, R; Herman, P

    2015-05-01

    This survey presents various methods of improving the overall estimation quality in the class of extended state observers (ESO), which estimate not only the conventional states of the system, but the acting disturbance as well. This type of observers is crucial in forming the active disturbance rejection control structure (ADRC), where the precision of online perturbation reconstruction and cancellation directly influences the robustness of the closed-loop control system. Various aspects of the observer-based disturbance estimation/rejection loop are covered by this work and divided into three categories, related with observer: structure, tuning, and working conditions. The survey is dedicated to researchers and practitioners who are interested in increasing the efficiency of their ADRC-based governing schemes. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A double-observer method for reducing bias in faecal pellet surveys of forest ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, K.J.; Manly, B.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    1. Faecal surveys are used widely to study variations in abundance and distribution of forest-dwelling mammals when direct enumeration is not feasible. The utility of faecal indices of abundance is limited, however, by observational bias and variation in faecal disappearance rates that obscure their relationship to population size. We developed methods to reduce variability in faecal surveys and improve reliability of faecal indices. 2. We used double-observer transect sampling to estimate observational bias of faecal surveys of Roosevelt elk Cervus elaphus roosevelti and Columbian black-tailed deer Odocoileus hemionus columbianus in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA. We also modelled differences in counts of faecal groups obtained from paired cleared and uncleared transect segments as a means to adjust standing crop faecal counts for a standard accumulation interval and to reduce bias resulting from variable decay rates. 3. Estimated detection probabilities of faecal groups ranged from accumulated over a standard 100-day interval, whereas counts of elk faecal groups required 0% and 46% reductions on flat and sloping terrain, respectively. 5. Synthesis and applications. Double-observer transect sampling provides a cost-effective means of reducing observational bias and variation in faecal decay rates that obscure the interpretation of faecal indices of large mammal abundance. Given the variation we observed in observational bias of faecal surveys and persistence of faeces, we emphasize the need for future researchers to account for these comparatively manageable sources of bias before comparing faecal indices spatially or temporally. Double-observer sampling methods are readily adaptable to study variations in faecal indices of large mammals at the scale of the large forest reserve, natural area, or other forested regions when direct estimation of populations is problematic. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  14. Using direct clinical observation to assess the quality of cesarean delivery in Afghanistan: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Cherrie Lynn; Kim, Young Mi; Yari, Khalid; Ansari, Nasratullah; Tappis, Hannah

    2014-05-27

    As part of a National Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care (EmONC) Needs Assessment, a special study was undertaken in July 2010 to examine the quality of cesarean deliveries in Afghanistan and examine the utility of direct clinical observation as an assessment method in low-resource settings. This cross-sectional assessment of the quality of cesareans at 14 facilities in Afghanistan included a survey of surgeons regarding their routine cesarean practices, direct observation of 29 cesarean deliveries and comparison of observations with facility records for 34 additional cesareans conducted during the 3 days prior to the observation period at each facility. For both observed cases and record reviews, we assessed time intervals between specified points of care-arrival to the ward, first evaluation, detection of a complication, decision for cesarean, incision, and birth. All time intervals with the exception of "decision to skin incision" were longer in the record reviews than in observed cases. Prior cesarean was the most common primary indication for all cases. All mothers in both groups observed survived through one hour postpartum. Among newborns there were two stillbirths (7%) in observed births and seven (21%) record reviews. Although our sample is too small to show statistical significance, the difference is noteworthy. In six of the reviewed cesareans resulting in stillbirth, a fetal heart rate was recorded in the operating theater, although four were recorded as macerated. For the two fresh stillbirths, the cesarean surgeries were recorded as scheduled and not urgent. Direct observation of cesarean deliveries enabled us to assess a number of preoperative, postoperative, and intraoperative procedures that are often not described in medical records in low resource settings. Comparison of observations with findings from provider interviews and facility records allowed us to infer whether observed practices were typical of providers and facilities and detect

  15. Direct spectroscopic observation of quantum jumps of a single molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basché, Th.; Kummer, S.; Bräuchle, C.

    1995-01-01

    BOHR'S notion of quantum jumps between electronic states of an excited atom has now been demonstrated experimentally for single ions confined in radio-frequency traps and interacting with a driving laser field1-3. In these experiments the fluorescence of a strongly allowed transition was shown to cease abruptly when the ion jumped into a metastable state which was coupled to the common electronic ground state by a weak radiative transition. But attempts to monitor quantum jumps of single molecules have been hampered by the fact that the lifetime of the metastable triplet state was too short in relation to the photon detection rate. By using a system with favourable photophysical parameters-terrylene doped into p-terphenyl crystals4-we have now been able to observe directly quantum jumps between electronic states of single terrylene molecules. In contrast to single atoms, here the quantum jumps occur as non-radiative transitions between states of different multiplicity, and are manifested as interruptions of the fluorescence signal. These results demonstrate how single-molecule spectros-copy can reveal truly quantum-mechanical effects in large polyatomic molecules.

  16. Automated Ecological Assessment of Physical Activity: Advancing Direct Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan A. Carlson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances provide opportunities for automating direct observations of physical activity, which allow for continuous monitoring and feedback. This pilot study evaluated the initial validity of computer vision algorithms for ecological assessment of physical activity. The sample comprised 6630 seconds per camera (three cameras in total of video capturing up to nine participants engaged in sitting, standing, walking, and jogging in an open outdoor space while wearing accelerometers. Computer vision algorithms were developed to assess the number and proportion of people in sedentary, light, moderate, and vigorous activity, and group-based metabolic equivalents of tasks (MET-minutes. Means and standard deviations (SD of bias/difference values, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC assessed the criterion validity compared to accelerometry separately for each camera. The number and proportion of participants sedentary and in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA had small biases (within 20% of the criterion mean and the ICCs were excellent (0.82–0.98. Total MET-minutes were slightly underestimated by 9.3–17.1% and the ICCs were good (0.68–0.79. The standard deviations of the bias estimates were moderate-to-large relative to the means. The computer vision algorithms appeared to have acceptable sample-level validity (i.e., across a sample of time intervals and are promising for automated ecological assessment of activity in open outdoor settings, but further development and testing is needed before such tools can be used in a diverse range of settings.

  17. Direct Observation of Asphaltene Nanoparticles on Model Mineral Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Gijo; Lesimple, Alain; Whelan, Jamie; Naumov, Panče

    2017-06-27

    The propensity for adherence to solid surfaces of asphaltenes, a complex solubility class of heteropolycyclic aromatic compounds from the heavy fraction of crude oil, has long been the root cause of scale deposition and remains an intractable problem in the petroleum industry. Although the adhesion is essential to understanding the process of asphaltene deposition, the relationship between the conformation of asphaltene molecules on mineral substrates and its impact on adhesion and mechanical properties of the deposits is not completely understood. To rationalize the primary processes in the process of organic scale deposition, here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize the morphology of petroleum asphaltenes deposited on model mineral substrates. High imaging contrast was achieved by the differential adhesion of the tip between asphaltenes and the mineral substrate. While asphaltenes form smooth continuous films on all substrates at higher concentrations, they deposit as individual nanoparticles at lower concentrations. The size, shape, and spatial distribution of the nanoaggregates are strongly affected by the nature of the substrate; while uniformly distributed spherical particles are formed on highly polar and hydrophilic substrates (mica), irregular islands and thicker patches are observed with substrates of lower polarity (silica and calcite). Asphaltene nanoparticles flatten when adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite due to π-π interactions with the polycyclic core. Force-distance profiles provide direct evidence of the conformational changes of asphaltene molecules on hydrophilic/hydrophobic substrates that result in dramatic changes in adhesion and mechanical properties of asphaltene deposits. Such an understanding of the nature of adhesion and mechanical properties tuned by surface properties, on the level of asphaltene nanoaggregates, would contribute to the design of efficient asphaltene inhibitors for preventing asphaltene

  18. Preparing for the WFIRST Microlensing Survey: Simulations, Requirements, Survey Strategies, and Precursor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudi, Bernard

    As one of the four primary investigations of the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) mission, the microlensing survey will monitor several square degrees of the Galactic bulge for a total of roughly one year. Its primary science goal is to "Complete the statistical census of planetary systems in the Galaxy, from the outer habitable zone to free floating planets, including analogs of all of the planets in our Solar System with the mass of Mars or greater.'' WFIRST will therefore (a) measure the mass function of cold bound planets with masses greater than that of roughly twice the mass of the moon, including providing an estimate of the frequency of sub-Mars-mass embryos, (b) determine the frequency of free-floating planets with masses down to the Earth and below, (c) inform the frequency and habitability of potentially habitable worlds, and (d) revolutionize our understanding of the demographics of cold planets with its exquisite sensitivity to, and large expected yield of, planets in a broad and unexplored region of parameter space. In order for the microlensing survey to be successful, we must develop a plan to go from actual survey observations obtained by the WFIRST telescope and hardware to the final science products. This plan will involve many steps, the development of software, data reduction, and analysis tools at each step, and a list of requirements for each of these components. The overarching goal of this proposal is thus to develop a complete flowdown from the science goals of the microlensing survey to the mission design and hardware components. We have assembled a team of scientists with the breadth of expertise to achieve this primary goal. Our specific subgoals are as follows. Goal 1: We will refine the input Galactic models in order to provide improved microlensing event rates in the WFIRST fields. Goal 2: We will use the improved event rate estimates, along with improvements in our simulation methodology, to provide higher

  19. 77 FR 20550 - Uniform Criteria for State Observational Surveys of Seat Belt Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-05

    ... State Observational Surveys of Seat Belt Use AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... implementation date for use of the revised uniform criteria for State Observational Surveys of Seat Belt Use... Observational Surveys of Seat Belt Use.'' 76 FR 18042. That final rule amended the regulation establishing...

  20. A New Method to Directly Observe Tuberculosis Treatment: Skype Observed Therapy, a Patient-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, Tavora; Cabello, Celina

    Tuberculosis (TB) treatment completion is in part determined by patient's adherence to long-term drug regimens. To best ensure compliance, directly observed therapy (DOT) is considered the standard of practice. Nassau County Department of Health TB Control is responsible for providing DOT to patients with TB. Tuberculosis Control sought to use and evaluate Skype Observed Therapy (SOT) as an alternative to DOT for eligible patients. The evaluation included analysis of patient's acceptance and adherence to drug regimen using SOT. Tuberculosis Control assessed staff efficiency and cost savings for this program. Percentages of SOT of patients and successful SOT visits, mileage, and travel time savings. Twenty percent of the caseload used SOT and 100% of patients who were eligible opted in. Average SOT success was 79%. Total mileage savings and time saved were $9,929.07 and 614 hours. Because SOT saves cost and time and is a suitable alternative to DOT for patients, it should be considered as part of new policies and practices in TB control programs.

  1. Experimental observation of direct current voltage-induced phase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The dynamics of two uncoupled distinct Chua circuits driven by a common direct current voltage is explored experimentally. It was found that, with increasing current intensity, the dominant frequencies of these two Chua circuits will first vary at different speeds, approach an identical value for a certain current intensity and ...

  2. Survey of Galileo Plasma Observations in Jupiter's Plasma Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagenal, Fran; Wilson, Robert J.; Siler, Scott; Paterson, William R.; Kurth, William S.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma science (PLS) Instrument on the Galileo spacecraft (orbiting Jupiter from December 1995 to September 2003) measured properties of the ions that were trapped in the magnetic field. The PLS data provide a survey of the plasma properties between approx. 5 and 30 Jupiter radii [R(sub J)] in the equatorial region. We present plasma properties derived via two analysis methods: numerical moments and forward modeling. We find that the density decreases with radial distance by nearly 5 orders of magnitude from approx. 2 to 3000 cm(exp.-3) at 6R(sub j) to approx. 0.05cm(sub -3) at 30 R(sub j). The density profile did not show major changes from orbit to orbit, suggesting that the plasma production and transport remained constant within about a factor of 2. The radial profile of ion temperature increased with distance which implied that contrary to the concept of adiabatic cooling on expansion, the plasma heats up as it expands out from Io's orbit (where TI is approx.60-80 eV) at approx. 6R(sub j) to a few keV at 30R(sub j).There does not seem to be a long-term, systematic variation in ion temperature with either local time or longitude. This latter finding differs from earlier analysis of Galileo PLS data from a selection of orbits. Further examination of all data from all Galileo orbits suggests that System Ill variations are transitory on timescales of weeks, consistent with the modeling of Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph observations. The plasma flow is dominated by azimuthal flow that is between 80% and 100% of corotation out to 25 R(sub j).

  3. Physical Activity Surveillance in Parks Using Direct Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Thomas L.; Cohen, Deborah; Evenson, Kelly R.; Golinelli, Daniela; Hillier, Amy; Lapham, Sandra C.; Williamson, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Primary features of observational public health surveillance instruments are that they are valid, can reliably estimate physical activity behaviors, and are useful across diverse geographic settings and seasons by different users. Previous studies have reported the validity and reliability of Systematic Observation of Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC) to estimate park and user characteristics. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the use of SOPARC as a surveillance instrument and to situate the findings from the study in the context of the previous literature. Methods We collected data by using SOPARC for more than 3 years in 4 locations: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Columbus, Ohio; Chapel Hill/Durham, North Carolina; and Albuquerque, New Mexico during spring, summer, and autumn. Results We observed a total of 35,990 park users with an overall observer reliability of 94% (range, 85%–99%) conducted on 15% of the observations. We monitored the proportion of park users engaging in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and found marginal differences in MVPA by both city and season. Park users visited parks significantly more on weekend days than weekdays and visitation rates tended to be lower during summer than spring. Conclusion SOPARC is a highly reliable observation instrument that can be used to collect data across diverse geographic settings and seasons by different users and has potential as a surveillance system. PMID:24384304

  4. Assessment of GCM simulated snow albedo using direct observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, A.; Gilgen, H.; Wild, M.; Ohmura, A.

    Annual cycles of monthly albedos simulated with a general circulation model (GCM) are compared with surface observations. The data observed at 35 stations are retrieved from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) and drawn from the soil moisture and meteorological observations in the former Soviet Union. The model data are obtained with the ECHAM4 GCM in a ten-year simulation of the present-day climate at T106 resolution. The model calculated albedo values are modified before they are compared with the surface observations: They are interpolated to the stations and adjusted to account for altitude differences and fractional forest area. During the snow-free period, the model underestimates the albedo by up to 0.05 at the stations (with values between 0.2 and 0.25 measured over short grass) because the albedo for grassland is too low in the model. During the period with seasonal snow cover, the model underestimates the albedo by up to 0.2 at stations in Russia, Scandinavia and Canada, which experience severe winters. This underestimation is due to an oversimplified parameterization of the snow covered grid fraction and an inadequate linear relation between snow albedo and temperature. The derivative of albedo with respect to the forest fraction implemented in ECHAM is in line with the observations, although a small overestimation of the model's gradient has been detected.

  5. Direct optical observation of the formation of some aliphatic alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    decay rate constants for the alcohol radicals produced in methanol and ethanol were evaluated to be 2⋅4 × 109 and 1⋅5 × 109 dm3 mol–1 s–1. The values observed are in fairly good agreement with those reported earlier. Keywords. Aliphatic alcohols; hydroxyl radical; hydrogen atom; rate constant; UV absorption. 1.

  6. Direct observation of localized dipolar excitations on rough nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Markel, V.A.; Coello, V.

    1998-01-01

    Using a photon scanning tunneling microscope (operating alternatively at the wavelengths of 594 and 633 nm) with shear-force feedback we image the topography of silver colloid fractals simultaneously with a near-field intensity distribution. We observe that near-field optical images exhibit spati...

  7. Clear Direction. The Montessori Observer. Volume 32, Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Montessori Society (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    "The Montessori Observer" is mailed four times each year, in March, May, September and November, to Society members throughout the world. The purpose is to provide news and information about the Society's work in Montessori education, and to extend awareness of Montessori principles throughout the world. This issue contains a feature…

  8. Directly observed road safety compliance by Motor Cycle Riders ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the extent of compliance with road safety regulations by motorcycle riders following a five year road safety campaign in Naivasha town, Kenya. Design: A cross sectional study. Setting: Naivasha town, Nakuru county, Kenya. Results: A total of 9,280 MCs ferrying 13,733 people were observed. Less than ...

  9. ROSAT Survey Observation of the Taurus--Auriga T Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhäuser, Ralph

    1996-02-01

    This work presents results from the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) observations in the Taurus--Auriga T association. Prior to the ROSAT mission, about 150 low-mass late-type pre-main sequence stars were known in Taurus--Auriga, about as many classical T Tauri stars (cTTS) with Wλ (H α) > 10Å as weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTS) with H α either weak in emission or in absorption. Observations with the X-ray satellite EINSTEIN led to the conclusion that there might be as many as ~103 wTTS in Taurus--Auriga, many of which could be detectable with the flux-limited but spatially complete RASS. Two thirds of the well-known wTTS, but one sixth of the cTTS were detected with RASS. The energy resolution of the ROSAT PSPC allows some spectral analysis even for low S/N observations with RASS, where TTS are detected with typically 102 counts only or less. It was found that cTTS X-ray spectra appear to be harder than those of wTTS, because circumstellar material around cTTS absorbs X-rays, while wTTS are often clear of disks and envelopes. Correcting for both the X-ray emission energy and the (circumstellar, intercloud, and interstellar) absorption yield X-ray luminosities individually corrected for any detected star, so that one can study X-ray luminosity functions. Comparing cTTS and wTTS Kaplan-Meier estimators (including upper limits of undetected TTS), it was found that wTTS emit intrinsically significantly more X-rays than cTTS, consistent with significantly different RASS detection rates for wTTS and cTTS. There is a significant correlation between X-ray emission and rotation period (and rotational velocity) in TTS suggesting that a dynamo mechanism is responsible for X-ray emission in TTS. The faster a TTS rotates, the larger the stellar magnetic field, so that field line emerge out of the stellar surface forming coronal loops that contain hot plasma. It is well known that cTTS rotate slower than wTTS, thus explaining the significantly different X-ray luminosity functions

  10. Direct Observations of Different Sunspot Waves Influenced by Umbral Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aishawnnya; Gupta, G. R.; Tripathi, Durgesh; Kashyap, V.; Pathak, Amit

    2017-12-01

    We report the simultaneous presence of chromospheric umbral flashes and associated umbral waves, and propagating coronal disturbances, in a sunspot and related active region. We have analyzed time-distance maps obtained using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. These maps show the simultaneous occurrence of different sunspot oscillations and waves such as umbral flashes, umbral waves, and coronal waves. Analysis of the original light curves, i.e., without implementing any Fourier filtering on them, shows that the amplitudes of different sunspot waves observed at different atmospheric layers change in synchronization with the light curves obtained from the umbral flash region, thus demonstrating that these oscillations are modulated by umbral flashes. This study provides the first observational evidence of the influence of sunspot oscillations within the umbra on other sunspot waves extending up to the corona. The properties of these waves and oscillations can be utilized to study the inherent magnetic coupling among different layers of the solar atmosphere above sunspots.

  11. 10 CFR 26.115 - Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. 26... for Testing § 26.115 Collecting a urine specimen under direct observation. (a) Procedures for... specimen under direct observation, the collector shall obtain the agreement of the FFD program manager or...

  12. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  13. Directions of the US Geological Survey Landslide Hazards Reduction Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) Landslide Hazards Reduction Program includes studies of landslide process and prediction, landslide susceptibility and risk mapping, landslide recurrence and slope evolution, and research application and technology transfer. Studies of landslide processes have been recently conducted in Virginia, Utah, California, Alaska, and Hawaii, Landslide susceptibility maps provide a very important tool for landslide hazard reduction. The effects of engineering-geologic characteristics of rocks, seismic activity, short and long-term climatic change on landslide recurrence are under study. Detailed measurement of movement and deformation has begun on some active landslides. -from Author

  14. Direct satellite observation of lightning-produced NOx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Lightning is an important source of NOx in the free troposphere, especially in the tropics, with strong impact on ozone production. However, estimates of lightning NOx (LNOx production efficiency (LNOx per flash are still quite uncertain. In this study we present a systematic analysis of NO2 column densities from SCIAMACHY measurements over active thunderstorms, as detected by the World-Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN, where the WWLLN detection efficiency was estimated using the flash climatology of the satellite lightning sensors LIS/OTD. Only events with high lightning activity are considered, where corrected WWLLN flash rate densities inside the satellite pixel within the last hour are above 1 /km2/h. For typical SCIAMACHY ground pixels of 30 × 60 km2, this threshold corresponds to 1800 flashes over the last hour, which, for literature estimates of lightning NOx production, should result in clearly enhanced NO2 column densities. From 2004–2008, we find 287 coincidences of SCIAMACHY measurements and high WWLLN flash rate densities. For some of these events, a clear enhancement of column densities of NO2 could be observed, indeed. But overall, the measured column densities are below the expected values by more than one order of magnitude, and in most of the cases, no enhanced NO2 could be found at all. Our results are in contradiction to the currently accepted range of LNOx production per flash of 15 (2–40×1025 molec/flash. This probably partly results from the specific conditions for the events under investigation, i.e. events of high lightning activity in the morning (local time and mostly (for 162 out of 287 events over ocean. Within the detected coincidences, the highest NO2 column densities were observed around the US Eastcoast. This might be partly due to interference with ground sources of NOx being uplifted by the convective systems. However, it could also indicate that flashes in this region are particularly productive. We

  15. Direct observation of beam bunching in BWO experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Morimoto, I; Maebara, S; Kishiro, J; Takayama, K; Horioka, K; Ishizuka, H; Kawasaki, S; Shiho, M

    2001-01-01

    Backward Wave Oscillation (BWO) experiments using a Large current Accelerator-1 (Lax-1) Induction Linac as a seed power source for an mm-wave FEL are under way. The Lax-1 is typically operated with a 1 MeV electron beam, a few kA of beam current, and a pulse length of 100 ns. In the BWO experiments, annular and solid beams are injected into a corrugated wave guide with guiding axial magnetic field of 1 T. In the BWO with annular beam an output power of 210 MW at 9.8 GHz was obtained. With a solid beam the output power was 130 MW, and an electron beam bunching with the frequency of 9.6-10.2 GHz was observed by a streak camera.

  16. Radiation damage in dielectric and semiconductor single crystals (direct observation)

    CERN Document Server

    Adawi, M A; Varichenko, V S; Zaitsev, A M

    1998-01-01

    The surfaces of boron-doped synthetic and natural diamonds have been investigated by using the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the scanning electronic microscope (SEM) before and after irradiating the samples with sup 4 sup 0 Ar (25 MeV), sup 8 sup 4 Kr (210 MeV) and sup 1 sup 2 sup 5 Xe (124 MeV) ions. The structures observed after irradiation showed craters with diameters ranging from 3 nm up to 20 nm, which could be interpreted as single ion tracks and multiple hits of ions at the nearest positions of the surface. In the case of argon ion irradiation, the surface was found to be completely amorphous, but after xenon irradiation one could see parts of surface without amorphism. This can be explained by the influence of high inelastic energy losses. The energy and temperature criteria of crater formation as a result of heavy ion irradiation are introduced.

  17. Very metal-poor stars observed by the RAVE survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matijevič, G.; Chiappini, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Kunder, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.; Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W.; Seabroke, G.; Siviero, A.; Steinmetz, M.; Watson, F.

    2017-01-01

    Metal-poor stars trace the earliest phases in the chemical enrichment of the Universe. They give clues about the early assembly of the Galaxy as well as on the nature of the first stellar generations. Multi-object spectroscopic surveys play a key role in finding these fossil records in large

  18. Total Station Survey Monitoring Through an Observation Window: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Windows User

    houses the total station at a mine. This study briefly discusses total station survey monitoring and developed systematic error correction formula to reduce the effect of glass properties, such as thickness and colour, on distance measurements through a shelter window glass in a surface mine environment. Each developed ...

  19. 76 FR 39260 - Direct Investment Surveys: Alignment of Regulations With Current Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... direct investment in the U.S. seafood industry, two schedules of expenditures for property, plant, and... of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad BE-133C, Schedule of Expenditures for Property, Plant, and Equipment... Bureau of Economic Analysis 15 CFR Part 806 RIN 0691-AA78 Direct Investment Surveys: Alignment of...

  20. Directional Medium Access Control (MAC Protocols in Wireless Ad Hoc and Sensor Networks: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Tung Chong Wong

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This survey paper presents the state-of-the-art directional medium access control (MAC protocols in wireless ad hoc and sensor networks (WAHSNs. The key benefits of directional antennas over omni-directional antennas are longer communication range, less multipath interference, more spatial reuse, more secure communications, higher throughput and reduced latency. However, directional antennas lead to single-/multi-channel directional hidden/exposed terminals, deafness and neighborhood, head-of-line blocking, and MAC-layer capture which need to be overcome. Addressing these problems and benefits for directional antennas to MAC protocols leads to many classes of directional MAC protocols in WAHSNs. These classes of directional MAC protocols presented in this survey paper include single-channel, multi-channel, cooperative and cognitive directional MACs. Single-channel directional MAC protocols can be classified as contention-based or non-contention-based or hybrid-based, while multi-channel directional MAC protocols commonly use a common control channel for control packets/tones and one or more data channels for directional data transmissions. Cooperative directional MAC protocols improve throughput in WAHSNs via directional multi-rate/single-relay/multiple-relay/two frequency channels/polarization, while cognitive directional MAC protocols leverage on conventional directional MAC protocols with new twists to address dynamic spectrum access. All of these directional MAC protocols are the pillars for the design of future directional MAC protocols in WAHSNs.

  1. Direct observation of structural heterogeneity in a beta-sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremeens, Matthew E; Zimmermann, Jörg; Yu, Wayne; Dawson, Philip E; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2009-04-29

    Structural heterogeneity is thought to be inherent in many proteins and may be important for their folding and/or function. However, it is difficult to detect by conventional methods. Carbon-deuterium bonds are environmentally sensitive, nonperturbative probes of protein environments whose observation and characterization are facilitated by their unique stretching absorption frequency in an otherwise unobscured region of the IR spectrum. We demonstrate that deuterium atoms incorporated at C(alpha) backbone positions (C(alpha)-D bonds) are sensitive to the local backbone structure and thus may be used not only to detect structural heterogeneity but also to help characterize it structurally. Density functional theory calculations are used to predict that C(alpha)-D bonds of glycine are sensitive to their local structure, with the absorptions red-shifted for an extended beta-sheet relative to gamma- and alpha-helix-like turns. These predictions are confirmed using the N-terminal Src homology 3 (nSH3) domain from the human CrkII adaptor protein, whose function as a signaling domain may require structural heterogeneity. Four nSH3 variants were synthesized in which individual glycine residues were site-specifically modified with C(alpha)D(2) glycine residues. Not only were the C(alpha)-D bonds incorporated within the beta-sheet of nSH3 more red-shifted than those incorporated within loops, but the data also reveal that nSH3 populates at least two discrete beta-sheet core structures. Moreover, the data suggest that the folded core of nSH3 may be less ordered than previously believed and also that the unfolded state may be more ordered than previously thought, and both of these factors may influence the folding and function of these important signaling domains. The C-D-based IR technique should be generally useful in the characterization of structure and heterogeneity of both folded and unfolded states.

  2. Direct observation of ligand dynamics in cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielges, Megan C; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2009-05-06

    Horse heart cytochrome c (cyt c) has emerged as a paradigm for the study of protein folding, in large part because the covalently bound heme facilitates its characterization. The folding of reduced cyt c induced by photodissociation of CO from the CO-bound unfolded protein has been extensively studied. Following a nanosecond light pulse, four transitions with time constants of approximately 1-5, 50-100, 200-500, and 1000-10000 micros have been resolved. While originally thought to be associated with CO rebinding to two different partially folded states of cyt c, the two slower processes are now understood to reflect the bimolecular reassociation of CO followed by religation of His18, which by the base elimination mechanism is induced to dissociate after CO photolysis. Thus, it turns out that the two longer time constants do not report on protein folding but instead reflect the complexity of heme ligation. The two shorter time constants have been attributed to ligation at the heme center by Met65 or Met80 and His33 or His26 and have been used to estimate interchain diffusion rates of the protein. Here, to unambiguously determine the post-photodissociation steps involving CO, we have monitored the CO vibration following photodissociation with step-scan FT-IR spectroscopy. We have found that like the longer time scale processes, the 50-100 mus time scale process is associated not with protein dynamics but with CO ligand dynamics. The data clearly demonstrate that whatever the origins of the spectral changes, they clearly involve CO rebinding or changes in the environment of an already bound CO ligand. We speculate that the observed changes reflect His18 religation after fast geminate recombination of the CO. The data suggest that the associated time constant should not be used as a measure of interchain diffusion, and the results emphasize the importance of studying protein folding with probes that have inherently high structural resolution.

  3. Radio stars observed in the LAMOST spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Yun; Yue, Qiang; Lu, Hong-Peng; Han, Xian-Ming L.; Zhang, Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Wang, Yue-Fei; Hou, Yong-Hui; Zi-Huang, Cao

    2017-09-01

    Radio stars have attracted astronomers’ attention for several decades. To better understand the physics behind stellar radio emissions, it is important to study their optical behaviors. The LAMOST survey provides a large database for researching stellar spectroscopic properties of radio stars. In this work, we concentrate on their spectroscopic properties and infer physical properties from their spectra, such as stellar activity and variability. We mined big data from the LAMOST spectral survey Data Release 2 (DR2), published on 2016 June 30, by cross-matching them with radio stars from FIRST and other surveys. We obtained 783 good stellar spectra with high signal to noise ratio for 659 stars. The criteria for selection were positional coincidence within 1.5‧‧ and LAMOST objects classified as stars. We calculated the equivalent widths (EWs) of the Ca ii H&K, Hδ, Hγ, Hβ, Hα and Ca ii IRT lines by integrating the line profiles. Using the EWs of the Hα line, we detected 147 active stellar spectra of 89 objects having emissions above the Hα continuum. There were also 36 objects with repeated spectra, 28 of which showed chromospheric activity variability. Furthermore, we found 14 radio stars emitting noticeably in the Ca ii IRT lines. The low value of the EW8542/EW8498 ratio for these 14 radio stars possibly alludes to chromospheric plage regions.

  4. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Sullivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of secondary acids and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured with an online single-particle mass spectrometer, the ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles correlate with air masses from different source regions. The uptake of secondary acids depended on the individual dust particle mineralogy; high amounts of nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while high amounts of sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV to S(VI by iron in the aluminosilicate dust is a possible explanation for this enrichment of sulphate, which has important consequences for the fertilization of remote oceans by soluble iron. This study shows the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual aged dust particles for the first time. A transport and aging timeline provides an explanation for the observed segregation. Our data suggests that sulphate became mixed with the dust first. This implies that the transport pathway is more important than the reaction kinetics in determining which species accumulate on mineral dust. Early in the study, dust particles in volcanically influenced air masses were mixed predominately with sulphate. Dust mixed with chloride then dominated over sulphate and nitrate when a major dust front reached the R. V. Ronald Brown. We hypothesize that the rapid increase in chloride on dust was due to mixing with HCl(g released from acidified sea salt particles induced by heterogeneous reaction with volcanic SO2(g, prior to the arrival of the dust front. The amount of ammonium mixed with dust correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent reports that they exist as external mixtures. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous

  5. The XXL Survey. I. Scientific motivations - XMM-Newton observing plan - Follow-up observations and simulation programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Adami, C.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Brusa, M.; Butler, A.; Ciliegi, P.; Chiappetti, L.; Clerc, N.; Corasaniti, P. S.; Coupon, J.; De Breuck, C.; Democles, J.; Desai, S.; Delhaize, J.; Devriendt, J.; Dubois, Y.; Eckert, D.; Elyiv, A.; Ettori, S.; Evrard, A.; Faccioli, L.; Farahi, A.; Ferrari, C.; Finet, F.; Fotopoulou, S.; Fourmanoit, N.; Gandhi, P.; Gastaldello, F.; Gastaud, R.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Giles, P.; Guennou, L.; Guglielmo, V.; Horellou, C.; Husband, K.; Huynh, M.; Iovino, A.; Kilbinger, M.; Koulouridis, E.; Lavoie, S.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; Le Fevre, J. P.; Lidman, C.; Lieu, M.; Lin, C. A.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B. J.; Maurogordato, S.; McCarthy, I. G.; McGee, S.; Melin, J. B.; Melnyk, O.; Menanteau, F.; Novak, M.; Paltani, S.; Plionis, M.; Poggianti, B. M.; Pomarede, D.; Pompei, E.; Ponman, T. J.; Ramos-Ceja, M. E.; Ranalli, P.; Rapetti, D.; Raychaudury, S.; Reiprich, T. H.; Rottgering, H.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Santos, J.; Sauvageot, J. L.; Schimd, C.; Sereno, M.; Smith, G. P.; Smolčić, V.; Snowden, S.; Spergel, D.; Stanford, S.; Surdej, J.; Valageas, P.; Valotti, A.; Valtchanov, I.; Vignali, C.; Willis, J.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The quest for the cosmological parameters that describe our universe continues to motivate the scientific community to undertake very large survey initiatives across the electromagnetic spectrum. Over the past two decades, the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories have supported numerous studies of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the X-ray background. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey; it comes at a time when the Planck mission results are being finalised. Aims: We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of ~5 × 10-15 erg s-1 cm-2 in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The survey's main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programmes. Methods: We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi-λ and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. Results: The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-λ associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. Conclusions: The XXL multi-λ data set will have a unique lasting legacy

  6. Very metal-poor stars observed by the RAVE survey

    OpenAIRE

    Matijevič, G.; Chiappini, C.; Grebel, E. K.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zwitter, T.; Bienaymé, O.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Freeman, K. C.; Gibson, B. K.; Gilmore, G.; Helmi, A.; Kordopatis, G.; Kunder, A.; Munari, U.; Navarro, J. F.

    2017-01-01

    Metal-poor stars trace the earliest phases in the chemical enrichment of the Universe. They give clues about the early assembly of the Galaxy as well as on the nature of the first stellar generations. Multi-object spectroscopic surveys play a key role in finding these fossil records in large volumes. Here we present a novel analysis of the metal-poor star sample in the complete Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) Data Release 5 catalog with the goal of identifying and characterizing all very me...

  7. Successful development of a direct observation program to measure health care worker hand hygiene using multiple trained volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linam, W Matthew; Honeycutt, Michele D; Gilliam, Craig H; Wisdom, Christy M; Bai, Shasha; Deshpande, Jayant K

    2016-05-01

    Direct observation of health care worker (HCW) hand hygiene (HH) remains the gold standard, but implementation is challenging. Our objective was to develop an accurate HH observation program using multiple HCW volunteers. HH compliance was defined as correct HH performed before and after contact with a patient or a patient's environment. HCW volunteers from each unit at our children's hospital were trained by infection preventionists to covertly collect HH observations during routine care using an electronic tool. Questionnaires sent to observers in February and December 2014 recorded demographic characteristics, observation time, and scenarios assessing accuracy. HCWs were surveyed regarding their awareness that their HH behavior was being recorded. There were 146 HH observers. The majority of observers reported making 1-2 observations per shift (65%) and taking ≤10 minutes recording an observation (85%). Between January 2012 and December 2014 there were 22,484 HH observations (average, 622 per month), including nurses (46%), physicians (21%), and other HCWs (33%). Observers correctly recorded HH behavior more than 90% of the time in 5 of the 6 scenarios. Most HCWs (86%) were unaware they were being observed. A direct observation program staffed by multiple HCW volunteers can inexpensively and accurately collect HCW HH data. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Perceived Direction of Self-Motion from Orthogonally Directed Visual and Vestibular Stimulation in Passive and Active Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenzo Sakurai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Perceiving the direction of self-motion is typically a multisensory process. The most effective cue to detect the observer's heading direction is the visual optic-flow pattern. In the initial period of body movement, however, the vestibular sense is another effective cue to detect the direction in which one's body started to move. Here I report our recent research on the perception of self-motion, 1 when observers are passively experiencing their real somatic motion in different body posture, and 2 when observers are actively moving their bodies forward and backward. Previously, we reported that when upright observers passively experience real linear oscillatory somatic motion (leftward/rightward or forward/backward while viewing orthogonal visual optic flow patterns (translating or expanding/contracting, their perceived body motion direction is intermediate to those specified by visual and vestibular information individually (Sakurai et al., 2002, ACV; 2003, ECVP; Sakurai et al., 2010, VSS; Kubodera et al., 2010, APCV. We then generalized those findings exploring other visual/vestibular combinations, investigating when the vertical axis of body coordinates is orthogonal to the gravity axis. Observers lay supinely and reported their perceived direction of self-motion, experiencing real upward/downward or leftward/rightward motion in body coordinates, while viewing orthogonal optic-flow patterns that were phase-locked to the swing motion. The results are very similar to our previous reports, but for combinations of body motion with visual expanding/contracting optic-flow, some observers' judgments were vision-only or vestibular-only, suggesting that multimodal integration in this context is an either-or process for these observers. Compared to our previous reports, one possible reason for this weighted combination failure is the discrepancy between body coordinates and gravity coordinates (Sakurai et al., 2011, ECVP. We recently extended those

  9. X-ray surveys - Observing Sco X-1 With INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Joao; Maiolino, T.; D'Amico, Flavio

    2012-09-01

    In the year that we are celebrating the discovery of the first non-solar X ray source, we'll report here observations of this very source, Sco X-1, using data from the European INTEGRAL satellite showing how Sco still providing us with surprises. We performed a long-term study with 14 observations of INTEGRAL/IBIS spanning from the years 2003 to 2010. We fitted the spectrum up to 200 keV with a combination of a thermal model (we used compTT in XSPEC) and a non-thermal part (Pegpwrlw). The mean photon index found on the observations in which the non-thermal component was present is 3.06(21). This agrees well with observed values for bright LMXBs. We found a tight correlation between the fluxes of the thermal component (20 to 50 keV) and the non-thermal (50 to 200 keV) one. We'll present here our interpretations, arguing that the flux of Sco X-1 up to 200 keV is due to the comptonization of seed photons of lower energies.

  10. On the directional accuracy of survey forecasts: the case of gold and silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsche, U.; Pierdzioch, C.; Rulke, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    We use a nonparametric market-timing test to study the directional accuracy of survey forecasts of the prices of gold and silver. We find that forecasters have market-timing ability with respect to the direction of change of the price of silver at various forecast horizons. In contrast, forecaste...

  11. 30 CFR 250.461 - What are the requirements for directional and inclination surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Other Drilling Requirements § 250.461 What are the requirements for directional and inclination... exceed 1,000 feet during the normal course of drilling; (2) You must also conduct a directional survey...

  12. The importance of standardized observations to evaluate nutritional care quality in the survey process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelle, John F; Bertrand, Rosanna; Hurd, Donna; White, Alan; Squires, David; Feuerberg, Marvin; Hickey, Kelly; Simmons, Sandra F

    2009-10-01

    Guidelines written for government surveyors who assess nursing home (NH) compliance with federal standards contain instructions to observe the quality of mealtime assistance. However, these instructions are vague and no protocol is provided for surveyors to record observational data. This study compared government survey staff observations of mealtime assistance quality to observations by research staff using a standardized protocol that met basic standards for accurate behavioral measurement. Survey staff used either the observation instructions in the standard survey process or those written for the revised Quality Improvement Survey (QIS). Trained research staff observed mealtime care in 20 NHs in 5 states during the same time period that survey staff evaluated care in the same facilities, although it could not be determined if survey and research staff observed the same residents during the same meals. Ten NHs were evaluated by government surveyors using the QIS survey instructions and 10 NHs were evaluated by surveyors using the standard survey instructions. Research staff observations using a standardized observation protocol identified a higher proportion of residents receiving inadequate feeding assistance during meals relative to survey staff using either the standard or QIS survey instructions. For example, more than 50% of the residents who ate less than half of their meals based on research staff observation were not offered an alternative to the served meal, and the lack of alternatives, or meal substitutions, was common in all 20 NHs. In comparison, the QIS survey teams documented only 2 instances when meal substitutes were not offered in 10 NHs and the standard survey teams documented no instances in 10 NHs. Standardized mealtime observations by research staff revealed feeding assistance care quality issues in all 20 study NHs. Surveyors following the instructions in either the standard or revised QIS surveys did not detect most of these care quality

  13. Loggerhead sea turtle bycatch data in artisanal fisheries within a marine protected area: fishermen surveys versus scientific observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lozano, M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Loggerhead sea turtles can be incidentally captured by artisanal gears but information about the impact of this fishing is inconsistent and scarce. Recent studies have observed that the bycatch, or incidental catch rate, in fishermen surveys is irregular. The aim of this study was to compare direct data (onboard observers concerning the incidental catch of loggerhead sea turtles by the artisanal vessels versus data from fishermen surveys. The study area was the Cabo de Gata-Níjar marine protected area, situated in the western Mediterranean (southeast of the Iberian peninsula. We observed two loggerhead turtles that were incidentally caught in a total of 165 fishing operations. According to fishermen surveys, a total of nine loggerheads were incidentally caught in 861 fishing operations. The differences between the loggerhead sea turtle bycatch reported by fishermen surveys and scientific observations versus random distribution (x2 = 0.3146, P = 0.575, df = 1 were not significant. We conclude that the surveys are useful but that findings should be interpreted with caution.

  14. Future directions in clinical child and adolescent psychology: a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Rochelle L; Roberts, Michael C

    2009-10-01

    This study sought to identify the future directions in three domains: clinical practice, research, and training of clinical child and adolescent psychologists in the upcoming decade. Doctoral-level active members in the field were surveyed via a two-round Delphi survey (45 in round 1; 35 in round 2). Evidence-based practice received the greatest consensus by the participants and highest rank in each of the three domains. Other highly ranked clinical practice directions included prevention and early diagnosis and treatment, and clinical services for specific psychological problems. Research directions focused on biological and social factors interactions in the etiology and treatment and specific child and adolescent disorders. In the training domain, major directions included the pursuit of specialty training in child and adolescent psychology and training emphasizing the biological basis of behavior. Implications of these future directions are discussed.

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey:Search Algorithm and Follow-up Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; /Pennsylvania U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, D.L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Craig, Hogan, J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U.; Richmond, Michael W.; /Rochester Inst.; Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Smith, Mathew; /Portsmouth U.; SubbaRao, Mark; /Chicago U. /Tokyo U. /Tokyo U. /South African Astron. Observ. /Tokyo

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey has identified a large number of new transient sources in a 300 deg2 region along the celestial equator during its first two seasons of a three-season campaign. Multi-band (ugriz) light curves were measured for most of the sources, which include solar system objects, Galactic variable stars, active galactic nuclei, supernovae (SNe), and other astronomical transients. The imaging survey is augmented by an extensive spectroscopic follow-up program to identify SNe, measure their redshifts, and study the physical conditions of the explosions and their environment through spectroscopic diagnostics. During the survey, light curves are rapidly evaluated to provide an initial photometric type of the SNe, and a selected sample of sources are targeted for spectroscopic observations. In the first two seasons, 476 sources were selected for spectroscopic observations, of which 403 were identified as SNe. For the Type Ia SNe, the main driver for the Survey, our photometric typing and targeting efficiency is 90%. Only 6% of the photometric SN Ia candidates were spectroscopically classified as non-SN Ia instead, and the remaining 4% resulted in low signal-to-noise, unclassified spectra. This paper describes the search algorithm and the software, and the real-time processing of the SDSS imaging data. We also present the details of the supernova candidate selection procedures and strategies for follow-up spectroscopic and imaging observations of the discovered sources.

  16. The Green Bank Telescope 350 MHz Drift-scan survey. I. Survey Observations and the Discovery of 13 Pulsars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyles, J.; Lynch, R.S.; Ransom, S.M.; Stairs, I.H.; Lorimer, D.R.; McLaughlin, M.A.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Kaspi, V.M.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Archibald, A.; Berndsen, A.; Cardoso, R.F.; Cherry, A.; Epstein, C.R.; Karako-Argaman, C.; McPhee, C.A.; Pennucci, T.; Roberts, M.S.E.; Stovall, K.; van Leeuwen, J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the summer of 2007, we obtained 1191 hr of "drift-scan" pulsar search observations with the Green Bank Telescope at a radio frequency of 350 MHz. Here we describe the survey setup, search procedure, and the discovery and follow-up timing of 13 pulsars. Among the new discoveries, one (PSR

  17. Pacific Remote Islands MNM: Initial Survey Instructions for Terrestrial Plant Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the terrestrial plant observations survey is to document vegetation species presence/absence and distribution on the island unit of the refuge. The...

  18. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) -- A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2009-03-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new γ-ray astrophysics mission concept expected to have unprecedented sensitivity in the nuclear regime. Operating in lunar orbit, LOCO will utilize lunar occultation imaging to survey and probe the cosmos.

  19. 78 FR 14962 - BE-15: Annual Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... to otherwise secure economic advantage, and any ownership of any real estate. Who Must Report (a..., partnership, associated group, association, estate, trust, corporation, or other organization (whether or not... Bureau of Economic Analysis XRIN 0691-XC012 BE-15: Annual Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the...

  20. 78 FR 9032 - Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... advantage, and any ownership of any real estate. Who Must Report: Reports are required from each U.S. person..., association, estate, trust, corporation, or other organization (whether or not organized under the laws of any... Bureau of Economic Analysis XRIN 0691-XC010 Annual Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad AGENCY: Bureau...

  1. The Gaia-ESO Survey: matching chemodynamical simulations to observations of the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B. B.; Few, C. G.; Bergemann, M.; Gibson, B. K.; MacFarlane, B. A.; Serenelli, A.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Vallenari, A.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Francois, P.; Korn, A. J.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Donati, P.; Franciosini, E.; Frasca, A.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Hill, V.; Heiter, U.; Koposov, S. E.; Lanzafame, A.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Magrini, L.; Marconi, G.; Masseron, T.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Pancino, E.; Prisinzano, L.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Sacco, G.; Sousa, S. G.; TautvaišienÄ--, G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2018-01-01

    The typical methodology for comparing simulated galaxies with observational surveys is usually to apply a spatial selection to the simulation to mimic the region of interest covered by a comparable observational survey sample. In this work, we compare this approach with a more sophisticated post-processing in which the observational uncertainties and selection effects (photometric, surface gravity and effective temperature) are taken into account. We compare a 'solar neighbourhood analogue' region in a model Milky Way-like galaxy simulated with RAMSES-CH with fourth release Gaia-ESO survey data. We find that a simple spatial cut alone is insufficient and that the observational uncertainties must be accounted for in the comparison. This is particularly true when the scale of uncertainty is large compared to the dynamic range of the data, e.g. in our comparison, the [Mg/Fe] distribution is affected much more than the more accurately determined [Fe/H] distribution. Despite clear differences in the underlying distributions of elemental abundances between simulation and observation, incorporating scatter to our simulation results to mimic observational uncertainty produces reasonable agreement. The quite complete nature of the Gaia-ESO survey means that the selection function has minimal impact on the distribution of observed age and metal abundances but this would become increasingly more important for surveys with narrower selection functions.

  2. Processing Doppler Lidar and Cloud Radar Observations for Analysis of Convective Mass Flux Parameterizations Using DYNAMO Direct Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    for Analysis of Convective Mass Flux Parameterizations Using DYNAMO Direct Observations R. Michael Hardesty CIRES/University of Colorado/NOAA 325...the RV-Revell during legs 2 & 3 of the DYNAMO experiement to help characterize vertical transport through the boundary layer and to build statistics...obtained during DYNAMO , and to investigate whether cold pools that emanate from convection organize the interplay between humidity and convection and

  3. Objectively Optimized Observation Direction System Providing Situational Awareness for a Sensor Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulov, O.; Lary, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    There is great utility in having a flexible and automated objective observation direction system for the decadal survey missions and beyond. Such a system allows us to optimize the observations made by suite of sensors to address specific goals from long term monitoring to rapid response. We have developed such a prototype using a network of communicating software elements to control a heterogeneous network of sensor systems, which can have multiple modes and flexible viewing geometries. Our system makes sensor systems intelligent and situationally aware. Together they form a sensor web of multiple sensors working together and capable of automated target selection, i.e. the sensors “know” where they are, what they are able to observe, what targets and with what priorities they should observe. This system is implemented in three components. The first component is a Sensor Web simulator. The Sensor Web simulator describes the capabilities and locations of each sensor as a function of time, whether they are orbital, sub-orbital, or ground based. The simulator has been implemented using AGIs Satellite Tool Kit (STK). STK makes it easy to analyze and visualize optimal solutions for complex space scenarios, and perform complex analysis of land, sea, air, space assets, and shares results in one integrated solution. The second component is target scheduler that was implemented with STK Scheduler. STK Scheduler is powered by a scheduling engine that finds better solutions in a shorter amount of time than traditional heuristic algorithms. The global search algorithm within this engine is based on neural network technology that is capable of finding solutions to larger and more complex problems and maximizing the value of limited resources. The third component is a modeling and data assimilation system. It provides situational awareness by supplying the time evolution of uncertainty and information content metrics that are used to tell us what we need to observe and the

  4. Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over premotor cortex facilitates observational learning of a motor sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Stephanie; Hammond, Geoff

    2015-06-01

    Motor skills, including complex movement sequences, can be acquired by observing a model without physical practice of the skill, a phenomenon known as observational learning. Observational learning of motor skills engages the same memory substrate as physical practice, and is thought to be mediated by the action observation network, a bilateral fronto-parietal circuit with mirror-like properties. We examined the effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over premotor cortex, a key node of the action observation network, on observational learning of a serial response time task. Results showed that anodal tDCS during observation of the to-be-learned sequence facilitated reaction times in the subsequent behavioral test. The study provides evidence that increasing excitability of the action observation network during observation can facilitate later motor skill acquisition. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Methodology of estimating restraint use in children: roadside observation or parking lot interview survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, Anne; Rothman, Linda; Slater, Morgan; Kolga, Carol; Hussein, Abdul; Boase, Paul; Howard, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    To compare the differences in Canadian national estimates of correct child restraint use obtained using the standard roadside observation method compared to a detailed parking lot interview. A multi-stage stratified survey design was used to conduct roadside observational and interview data collection at 182 randomly selected sites across Canada. For each site, a roadside intersection location and a parking lot location were used for the roadside observational survey and the interview respectively. Weighted estimates of correct restraint use from both locations were compared. Estimates of correct restraint use were significantly higher for all children under the age of 9 in the parking lot sample. The largest discrepancy between the two samples was in booster seat aged children (ages 4-8) where 29.1% versus 67.8% of children were observed to be correctly restrained using the roadside and the parking lot methodology respectively. There was a 67% participation refusal rate in the parking lot survey. There are specific advantages and limitations to both survey designs. The purpose of the data collection must be considered when selecting the methodology. Parking lot surveys provide richer data regarding restraint use/misuse. Estimates of correct restraint use must be approached with caution due to the effect of consent bias resulting in over inflation of estimates. Roadside observation is adequate and appropriate for providing national estimates of correct restraint use. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparison of video and direct observation methods for measuring oral behaviour in veal calves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Verga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring behaviour, especially oral behaviour, has always been a debated issue: therefore the aim of this paper is to closely examine the study of oral behaviour in calves and the approaching methodology. Behavioural observations were conducted by two media (direct observations by check sheets and indirect observations by videotapes recorded by cam- eras connected to a digital field switcher and a time-lapse video recorder in order to compare data and assess the reli- ability and validity of the two methods in identifying some oral behavioural patterns in calves. The study was carried out on 54 Polish Friesian calves housed in group pens and in individual crates. The behaviour of the calves was investigated during the fattening period on the 2nd, 7th, 13th, 18th and 23rd week, one hour before and one hour after each of the two meals. Two experienced observers checked the behaviour of the calves, including oral behaviours on structures and buckets and oral stereotypies, by direct observations using a scan sampling every 2 min- utes. The calves' behaviour was also video recorded on the same days in which the direct observations were carried out and analysed by the same two observers. Percentages of time spent on each type of behaviour were calculated and anal- ysed by Chi-square test. Regardless of the housing system, the comparison between direct and indirect observations revealed significant differences in almost every behavioural category. Licking, biting and nibbling structures, nibbling and sucking the bucket, playing with the bucket and the teat, chewing and oral stereotypies were significantly higher in direct observations compared to indirect (P < 0.001, while inactivity was higher in video recorded observations (P < 0.001. In conclusion, regardless of the type of housing, our results revealed an objective difficulty in analysing videotapes with very detailed behavioural categories, like oral behaviours. Although video recording can

  7. A Direct Observation Checklist to Measure Respect and Dignity in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrese, Joseph A; Geller, Gail; Branyon, Emily D; Forbes, Lindsay K; Topazian, Rachel J; Weir, Brian W; Khatib, Omar; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2017-02-01

    Treating patients and family members with respect and dignity is a core objective of health care, yet it is unclear how best to measure this in the ICU setting. Accordingly, we sought to create a direct observation checklist to assess the "respect and dignity status" of an ICU. A draft checklist based on previous work was iteratively revised to enhance accuracy and feasibility. Seven ICUs within the Johns Hopkins Health System. A total of 351 patient-clinician encounters with 184 different patients. Four study team members pilot tested the checklist between January and August 2015. Standard psychometric analyses were performed. The direct observation checklist exhibits strong content and face validity as well as high reliability and internal consistency. All items load on one factor that supports the unidimensionality of the total index. Furthermore, concurrent validity of the direct observation checklist is demonstrated by statistically significant differences in mean scores between ICUs, between types of clinicians, and between patients' clinical status and mood. We rigorously developed, pilot tested, and analyzed a direct observation checklist designed to assess the extent to which patients and families in the ICU setting are treated with respect and dignity. Future research should validate this checklist in other settings and compare its results with other measures. Data gathered about individual items on the direct observation checklist could be used to target areas for training and education; doing so should help facilitate more respectful treatment of patients and their families.

  8. A double-observer method to estimate detection rate during aerial waterfowl surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koneff, M.D.; Royle, J. Andrew; Otto, M.C.; Wortham, J.S.; Bidwell, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated double-observer methods for aerial surveys as a means to adjust counts of waterfowl for incomplete detection. We conducted our study in eastern Canada and the northeast United States utilizing 3 aerial-survey crews flying 3 different types of fixed-wing aircraft. We reconciled counts of front- and rear-seat observers immediately following an observation by the rear-seat observer (i.e., on-the-fly reconciliation). We evaluated 6 a priori models containing a combination of several factors thought to influence detection probability including observer, seat position, aircraft type, and group size. We analyzed data for American black ducks (Anas rubripes) and mallards (A. platyrhynchos), which are among the most abundant duck species in this region. The best-supported model for both black ducks and mallards included observer effects. Sample sizes of black ducks were sufficient to estimate observer-specific detection rates for each crew. Estimated detection rates for black ducks were 0.62 (SE = 0.10), 0.63 (SE = 0.06), and 0.74 (SE = 0.07) for pilot-observers, 0.61 (SE = 0.08), 0.62 (SE = 0.06), and 0.81 (SE = 0.07) for other front-seat observers, and 0.43 (SE = 0.05), 0.58 (SE = 0.06), and 0.73 (SE = 0.04) for rear-seat observers. For mallards, sample sizes were adequate to generate stable maximum-likelihood estimates of observer-specific detection rates for only one aerial crew. Estimated observer-specific detection rates for that crew were 0.84 (SE = 0.04) for the pilot-observer, 0.74 (SE = 0.05) for the other front-seat observer, and 0.47 (SE = 0.03) for the rear-seat observer. Estimated observer detection rates were confounded by the position of the seat occupied by an observer, because observers did not switch seats, and by land-cover because vegetation and landform varied among crew areas. Double-observer methods with on-the-fly reconciliation, although not without challenges, offer one viable option to account for detection bias in aerial waterfowl

  9. Attainment of students’ conception in magnetic fields by using of direct observation and symbolic language ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desy Fatmaryanti, Siska; Suparmi; Sarwanto; Ashadi

    2017-11-01

    This study focuses on description attainment of students’ conception in the magnetic field. The conception was based by using of direct observation and symbolic language ability. The method used is descriptive quantitative research. The subject of study was about 86 students from 3 senior high school at Purworejo. The learning process was done by guided inquiry model. During the learning, students were required to actively investigate the concept of a magnetic field around a straight wire electrical current Data retrieval was performed using an instrument in the form of a multiple choice test reasoned and observation during the learning process. There was four indicator of direct observation ability and four indicators of symbolic language ability to grouping category of students conception. The results of average score showed that students conception about the magnitude more better than the direction of magnetic fields in view of symbolic language. From the observation, we found that students could draw the magnetic fields line not from a text book but their direct observation results. They used various way to get a good accuracy of observation results. Explicit recommendations are presented in the discussion section at the end of this paper.

  10. Direct observation of defect structure in protein crystals by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Devaud, G; Furcinitti, P S; Fleming, J.C.; Lyon, M K; Douglas, K

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the structure of S-layers isolated from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From the AFM images, we were able to directly observe individual dimers of the crystal, defects in the crystal structure, and twin boundaries. We have identified two types of boundaries, one defined by a mirror plane and the other by a glide plane. This work shows that twin boundaries are highly structured regions that are directly ...

  11. Observation of Direct Photons in Central 158 A GeV $^{208}Pb+^{208}Pb$ Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Barlag, C.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bock, R.; Bohne, E.-M.; Borocz, Z.; Bucher, D.; Buijs, A.; Busching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chalyshev, V.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherbatchev, R.; Chujo, T.; Claussen, A.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Delagrange, H.; Djordjadze, V.; Donni, P.; Doubovik, I.; Dutt, S.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; El Chenawi, K.; Eliseev, S.; Enosawa, K.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishchuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Ghosh, T.K.; Glasow, R.; Gupta, S.K.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Higuchi, R.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Kampert, K.-H.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kato, S.; Kees, S.; Klein-Bosing, C.; Knoche, S.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Krumpel, T.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Kurita, K.; Kuzmin, N.; Langbein, I.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Lohner, H.; Luquin, L.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Martinez, G.; Maximov, A.; Mgebrichvili, G.; Miake, Y.; Mir, Md.F.; Mishra, G.C.; Miyamoto, Y.; Mohanty, B.; Mora, M.-J.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhyay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Neumaier, S.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nilsson, P.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokonov, P.; Nystrand, J.; Obenshain, F.E.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Pachr, M.; Pavliouk, S.; Peitzmann, T.; Petracek, V.; Pinganaud, W.; Plasil, F.; Poblotzki, U.v.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ramamurthy, V.S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Roy, C.; Rubio, J.M.; Sako, H.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.-R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Shah, T.H.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soderstrom, K.; Solomey, N.; Sood, G.; Sorensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Stefanek, G.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stuken, D.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; Pijll, E.C.v.d.; Eijndhoven, N.v.; Nieuwenhuizen, G.J.v.; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voros, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Yagi, K.; Yokota, Y.; Young, G.R.

    2000-01-01

    A measurement of direct photon production in 208Pb + 208Pb collisions at 158 A GeV has been carried out in the CERN WA98 experiment. The invariant yield of direct photons in central collisions is extracted as a function of transverse momentum in the interval 0.5 1.5 GeV/c. The results constitute the first observation of direct photons in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions which could be significant for diagnosis of quark gluon plasma formation.

  12. 15 CFR 806.17 - Rules and regulations for BE-12, 2007 Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States. 806.17 Section 806.17 Commerce and..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.17 Rules and regulations for BE-12, 2007 Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct Investment in the United States. A BE-12, Benchmark Survey of Foreign Direct...

  13. 15 CFR 806.16 - Rules and regulations for BE-10, Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad-2004. 806.16 Section 806.16 Commerce and Foreign Trade... COMMERCE DIRECT INVESTMENT SURVEYS § 806.16 Rules and regulations for BE-10, Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad—2004. A BE-10, Benchmark Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad will be...

  14. Efficient scheduling of astronomical observations. Application to the CARMENES radial-velocity survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Piquer, A.; Morales, J. C.; Ribas, I.; Colomé, J.; Guàrdia, J.; Perger, M.; Caballero, J. A.; Cortés-Contreras, M.; Jeffers, S. V.; Reiners, A.; Amado, P. J.; Quirrenbach, A.; Seifert, W.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Targeted spectroscopic exoplanet surveys face the challenge of maximizing their planet detection rates by means of careful planning. For a large planet survey, the number of possible observation combinations, I.e., the sequence of observations night after night, both in total time and amount of targets, is enormous. Aims: Sophisticated scheduling tools and the improved understanding of the exoplanet population are employed to investigate an efficient and optimal way to plan the execution of observations. This is applied to the CARMENES instrument, which is an optical and infrared high-resolution spectrograph that has started a survey of about 300 M-dwarf stars in search of terrestrial exoplanets. Methods: We used evolutionary computation techniques to create an automatic scheduler that minimizes the idle periods of the telescope and distributes the observations among all the targets using configurable criteria. We simulated the case of the CARMENES survey with a realistic sample of targets, and we estimated the efficiency of the planning tool both in terms of telescope operations and planet detection. Results: Our scheduling simulations produce plans that use about 99% of the available telescope time (including overheads) and optimally distribute the observations among the different targets. Under such conditions, and using current planet statistics, the optimized plan using this tool should allow the CARMENES survey to discover about 65% of the planets with radial-velocity semi-amplitudes greater than 1 ms-1 when considering only photon noise. Conclusions: The simulations using our scheduling tool show that it is possible to optimize the survey planning by minimizing idle instrument periods and fulfilling the science objectives in an efficient manner to maximize the scientific return.

  15. Observation of the anisotropy in arrival direction of cosmic rays with IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, Simona [IceCube Research Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53703 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a kilometer-scale detector currently under construction at the South Pole. In its final configuration the detector will comprise 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) deployed on 86 strings between 1.5-2.5 km deep within the ice. While still incomplete, the detector has already recorded tens of billions of cosmic ray muons with a median energy of 20 TeV. This large sample has been used to study the arrival direction distribution of the cosmic rays. We report the observation of an anisotropy in the cosmic rays arrival direction at two different angular scales. The observed large scale anisotropy seems to be a continuation of similar structures observed in the Northern Sky by several experiments. IceCube observes also significant features on the angular scale of 20{sup o} - 30{sup o} that might be part of the larger scale structure.

  16. ObsTac: Automated Execution of Dark Energy Survey Observing Tactics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neilsen, E.; Annis, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Dark Energy Survey is a multi-filter survey of the southern galactic cap with two components: a wide component which visits many fields, each ten times over the course of five years; and a time-domain component of ten fields revisited on a regular cadence in each of four filters through the survey. Optimal selection of an observation for any particular time depends on many factors, including weather (including seeing), moon position and phase, image quality of already collected exposures, and others. ObsTac is the component of the observing software system that automates selection of observations based on current conditions. It integrates with the observing software through an observing queue, supporting interactive intervention by observers. It has a modular structure that simplifies replacement of different components of the system, including the implementation of the tactics algorithms themselves and interfaces with data sources that supply, for example, weather and progress data. In addition to its use in observing, obsTac may also be used to run simulations to evaluate strategic and tactical algorithms based on archival weather data.

  17. The JCMT Transient Survey: Identifying Submillimeter Continuum Variability over Several Year Timescales Using Archival JCMT Gould Belt Survey Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairs, Steve; Johnstone, Doug; Kirk, Helen; Lane, James; Bell, Graham S.; Graves, Sarah; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Scicluna, Peter; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Hatchell, Jennifer; Aikawa, Yuri; Chen, Wen-Ping; Kang, Miju; Kang, Sung-Ju; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Morata, Oscar; Pon, Andy; Scholz, Aleks; Takahashi, Satoko; Yoo, Hyunju; The JCMT Transient Team

    2017-11-01

    Investigating variability at the earliest stages of low-mass star formation is fundamental in understanding how a protostar assembles mass. While many simulations of protostellar disks predict non-steady accretion onto protostars, deeper investigation requires robust observational constraints on the frequency and amplitude of variability events characterized across the observable SED. In this study, we develop methods to robustly analyze repeated observations of an area of the sky for submillimeter variability in order to determine constraints on the magnitude and frequency of deeply embedded protostars. We compare 850 μm JCMT Transient Survey data with archival JCMT Gould Belt Survey data to investigate variability over 2-4 year timescales. Out of 175 bright, independent emission sources identified in the overlapping fields, we find seven variable candidates, five of which we classify as Strong, and the remaining two we classify as Extended to indicate that the latter are associated with larger-scale structure. For the Strong variable candidates, we find an average fractional peak brightness change per year of | 4.0| % {{yr}}-1, with a standard deviation of 2.7 % {{yr}}-1. In total, 7% of the protostars associated with 850 μm emission in our sample show signs of variability. Four of the five Strong sources are associated with a known protostar. The remaining source is a good follow-up target for an object that is anticipated to contain an enshrouded, deeply embedded protostar. In addition, we estimate the 850 μm periodicity of the submillimeter variable source, EC 53, to be 567 ± 32 days, based on the archival Gould Belt Survey data.

  18. Electronic monitoring in combination with direct observation as a means to significantly improve hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, John M

    2017-05-01

    Monitoring hand hygiene compliance among health care personnel (HCP) is an essential element of hand hygiene promotion programs. Observation by trained auditors is considered the gold standard method for establishing hand hygiene compliance rates. Advantages of observational surveys include the unique ability to establish compliance with all of the World Health Organization "My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene" initiative Moments and to provide just-in-time coaching. Disadvantages include the resources required for observational surveys, insufficient sample sizes, and nonstandardized methods of conducting observations. Electronic and camera-based systems can monitor hand hygiene performance on all work shifts without a Hawthorne effect and provide significantly more data regarding hand hygiene performance. Disadvantages include the cost of installation, variable accuracy in estimating compliance rates, issues related to acceptance by HCP, insufficient data regarding their cost-effectiveness and influence on health care-related infection rates, and the ability of most systems to monitor only surrogates for Moments 1, 4, and 5. Increasing evidence suggests that monitoring only Moments 1, 4, and 5 provides reasonable estimates of compliance with all 5 Moments. With continued improvement of electronic monitoring systems, combining electronic monitoring with observational methods may provide the best information as part of a multimodal strategy to improve and sustain hand hygiene compliance rates among HCP. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Visibility of St Lawrence belugas to aerial photography, estimated by direct observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael CS Kingsley

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available The depleted population of belugas (Delphinapterus leucas inhabiting the St Lawrence estuary, Canada, was monitored by periodic photographic aerial surveys. In order to correct counts made on aerial survey film and to obtain an estimate of the true size of the population, the diving behaviour and the visibility from the air of these animals was studied. A Secchi-disk turbidity survey in the belugas’ summer range showed that water clarity varied between 1.5 m and 11.6 m. By studying aerial photographs of sheet-plastic models of belugas that had been sunk to different depths below the surface, we found that models of white adults could be seen down to about the same depth as a Secchi disk, but no deeper. Smaller models of dark-grey juveniles could only be seen down to about 50% of Secchi-disk depth. By observing groups of belugas from a hovering helicopter and recording their disappearances and re-appearances, it was found that they were visible for 44.3% of the time, and that an appropriate correction for single photographs would be to multiply the photographic count by about 222% (SE 20%. For surveys in which there was overlap between adjacent frames, the estimated correction would be 209% (SE 16%. This correction factor was slightly conservative and gave an estimate of the true size of the population, based on a single survey, of 1,202 belugas (SE 189 in 1997. An estimate for 1997 based on smoothing 5 surveys 1988–1997 was 1,238 (SE 119.

  20. Ethical aspects of directly observed treatment for tuberculosis: a cross-cultural comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagbakken, Mette; Frich, Jan C; Bjune, Gunnar A; Porter, John D H

    2013-07-02

    Tuberculosis is a major global public health challenge, and a majority of countries have adopted a version of the global strategy to fight Tuberculosis, Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS). Drawing on results from research in Ethiopia and Norway, the aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss ethical aspects of the practice of Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) in a cross-cultural perspective. Research from Ethiopia and Norway demonstrates that the rigid enforcement of directly observed treatment conflicts with patient autonomy, dignity and integrity. The treatment practices, especially when imposed in its strictest forms, expose those who have Tuberculosis to extra burdens and costs. Socially disadvantaged groups, such as the homeless, those employed as day labourers and those lacking rights as employees, face the highest burdens. From an ethical standpoint, we argue that a rigid practice of directly observed treatment is difficult to justify, and that responsiveness to social determinants of Tuberculosis should become an integral part of the management of Tuberculosis.

  1. Affective Evaluations of Objects Are Influenced by Observed Gaze Direction and Emotional Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Andrew P.; Frischen, Alexandra; Fenske, Mark J.; Tipper, Steven P.

    2007-01-01

    Gaze direction signals another person's focus of interest. Facial expressions convey information about their mental state. Appropriate responses to these signals should reflect their combined influence, yet current evidence suggests that gaze-cueing effects for objects near an observed face are not modulated by its emotional expression. Here, we…

  2. Direct observation of free-exciton thermalization in quantum-well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Umlauff, M.; Hoffmann, J.; Kalt, H.

    1998-01-01

    . The subsequent relaxation dynamics within the 1s-exciton dispersion is directly monitored by time-resolved studies of the phonon-assisted photoluminescence. It is demonstrated that the free-exciton distribution remains nonthermal for some 100 ps. The observed dynamics is in reasonable agreement with numerical...

  3. Observational Learning of Academic and Social Behaviors during Small-Group Direct Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledford, Jennifer R.; Wolery, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown that small-group direct instruction is effective and efficient for teaching students with and without disabilities, although relatively few studies have been conducted with heterogeneous groups of preschool participants. In addition, previous studies have primarily assessed whether observational learning occurred for…

  4. Direct observation of surface reconstruction and termination on a complex metal oxide catalyst by electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2012-03-19

    On the surface: The surface reconstruction of an MoVTeO complex metal oxide catalyst was observed directly by various electron microscopic techniques and the results explain the puzzling catalytic behavior. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Tuberculosis treatment outcomes: directly observed therapy compared with self-administered therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, Robert M; Seaman, Christopher B; Gonzalez, Leah C; Kawamura, L Masae; Osmond, Dennis H; Daley, Charles L

    2004-09-01

    Effective treatment of tuberculosis requires adherence to a minimum of 6 months treatment with multiple drugs. To improve adherence and cure rates, directly observed therapy is recommended for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis. We compared treatment outcomes among all culture-positive patients treated for active pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 372) in San Francisco County, California from 1998 through 2000. Patients treated by directly observed therapy at the start of therapy (n = 149) had a significantly higher cure rate compared with patients treated by self-administered therapy (n = 223) (the sum of bacteriologic cure and completion of treatment, 97.8% versus 88.6%, p < 0.002), and decreased tuberculosis-related mortality (0% vs. 5.5%, p = 0.002). Rates of treatment failure, relapse, and acquired drug resistance were similar between the two groups. Forty-four percent of patients who received self-administered therapy had risk factors for nonadherence and should have been assigned to directly observed therapy. We conclude that treatment plans that emphasize directly observed therapy from the start of therapy have the greatest success in improving tuberculosis treatment outcomes.

  6. Direct Observation of Sub-100 fs Mobile Charge Generation in a Polymer-Fullerene Film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, D. G.; Krebs, Frederik C; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2012-01-01

    The formation of mobile charges in a roll-to-roll processed poly-3-hexylthiophene-fullerene bulk heterojunction film is observed directly by using transient terahertz spectroscopy with sub-100 fs temporal resolution. The transient terahertz ac conductivity reveals that 20% of the incident pump...

  7. Direct observation of lipid domains in free standing bilayers: from simple to complex lipid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis A

    2003-01-01

    reported from our laboratory, regarding the direct observation of lipid domain coexistence at the level of single vesicles in artificial and natural lipid mixtures. In addition, key points concerning our experimental approach will be discussed. The unique advantages of the fluorescent probe 6-dodecanoyl-2......The direct observation of temperature-dependent lipid phase equilibria, using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of different lipid mixtures, provides novel information about the physical characteristics of lipid domain coexistence. Physical......-dimethylamino-naphthalene (LAURDAN) under the two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy will be particularly addressed, especially, the possibility to obtain information about the phase-state of different lipid domains directly from the fluorescent images. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jan...

  8. At-sea aerial survey species observations in southern California, 1999-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Broad survey lines, island radial survey lines, coastal survey lines, and focal-area (Santa Barbara Channel) survey lines were surveyed during each oceanographic...

  9. Detection and plant monitoring programs: lessons from an intensive survey of Asclepias meadii with five observers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Alexander

    Full Text Available Monitoring programs, where numbers of individuals are followed through time, are central to conservation. Although incomplete detection is expected with wildlife surveys, this topic is rarely considered with plants. However, if plants are missed in surveys, raw count data can lead to biased estimates of population abundance and vital rates. To illustrate, we had five independent observers survey patches of the rare plant Asclepias meadii at two prairie sites. We analyzed data with two mark-recapture approaches. Using the program CAPTURE, the estimated number of patches equaled the detected number for a burned site, but exceeded detected numbers by 28% for an unburned site. Analyses of detected patches using Huggins models revealed important effects of observer, patch state (flowering/nonflowering, and patch size (number of stems on probabilities of detection. Although some results were expected (i.e. greater detection of flowering than nonflowering patches, the importance of our approach is the ability to quantify the magnitude of detection problems. We also evaluated the degree to which increased observer numbers improved detection: smaller groups (3-4 observers generally found 90 - 99% of the patches found by all five people, but pairs of observers or single observers had high error and detection depended on which individuals were involved. We conclude that an intensive study at the start of a long-term monitoring study provides essential information about probabilities of detection and what factors cause plants to be missed. This information can guide development of monitoring programs.

  10. Participant observation of time allocation, direct patient contact and simultaneous activities in hospital physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Müller, Andreas; Zupanc, Andrea; Angerer, Peter

    2009-06-29

    Hospital physicians' time is a critical resource in medical care. Two aspects are of interest. First, the time spent in direct patient contact - a key principle of effective medical care. Second, simultaneous task performance ('multitasking') which may contribute to medical error, impaired safety behaviour, and stress. There is a call for instruments to assess these aspects. A preliminary study to gain insight into activity patterns, time allocation and simultaneous activities of hospital physicians was carried out. Therefore an observation instrument for time-motion-studies in hospital settings was developed and tested. 35 participant observations of internists and surgeons of a German municipal 300-bed hospital were conducted. Complete day shifts of hospital physicians on wards, emergency ward, intensive care unit, and operating room were continuously observed. Assessed variables of interest were time allocation, share of direct patient contact, and simultaneous activities. Inter-rater agreement of Kappa = .71 points to good reliability of the instrument. Hospital physicians spent 25.5% of their time at work in direct contact with patients. Most time was allocated to documentation and conversation with colleagues and nursing staff. Physicians performed parallel simultaneous activities for 17-20% of their work time. Communication with patients, documentation, and conversation with colleagues and nursing staff were the most frequently observed simultaneous activities. Applying logit-linear analyses, specific primary activities increase the probability of particular simultaneous activities. Patient-related working time in hospitals is limited. The potential detrimental effects of frequently observed simultaneous activities on performance outcomes need further consideration.

  11. The XXL Survey I. Scientific Motivations - Xmm-Newton Observing Plan - Follow-up Observations and Simulation Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, M.; Pacaud, F.; Adami, C.; Alis, S.; Altieri, B.; Baran, N.; Benoist, C.; Birkinshaw, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Bremer, M. N.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The quest for the cosmological parameters that describe our universe continues to motivate the scientific community to undertake very large survey initiatives across the electromagnetic spectrum. Over the past two decades, the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories have supported numerous studies of X-ray-selected clusters of galaxies, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the X-ray background. The present paper is the first in a series reporting results of the XXL-XMM survey; it comes at a time when the Planck mission results are being finalized. Aims. We present the XXL Survey, the largest XMM programme totaling some 6.9 Ms to date and involving an international consortium of roughly 100 members. The XXL Survey covers two extragalactic areas of 25 deg2 each at a point-source sensitivity of approx. 5 x 10(exp 15) erg/s/sq cm in the [0.5-2] keV band (completeness limit). The surveys main goals are to provide constraints on the dark energy equation of state from the space-time-distribution of clusters of galaxies and to serve as a pathfinder for future, wide-area X-ray missions. We review science objectives, including cluster studies, AGN evolution, and large-scale structure, that are being conducted with the support of approximately 30 follow-up programs. Methods. We describe the 542 XMM observations along with the associated multi- and numerical simulation programmes. We give a detailed account of the X-ray processing steps and describe innovative tools being developed for the cosmological analysis. Results. The paper provides a thorough evaluation of the X-ray data, including quality controls, photon statistics, exposure and background maps, and sky coverage. Source catalogue construction and multi-associations are briefly described. This material will be the basis for the calculation of the cluster and AGN selection functions, critical elements of the cosmological and science analyses. Conclusions. The XXL multi- data set will have a unique lasting legacy value for

  12. Identifying patterns of item missing survey data using latent groups: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwee, Paul; Nathan, Andrea; Burton, Nicola W; Turrell, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether respondents to a survey of health and physical activity and potential determinants could be grouped according to the questions they missed, known as ‘item missing’. Design Observational study of longitudinal data. Setting Residents of Brisbane, Australia. Participants 6901 people aged 40–65 years in 2007. Materials and methods We used a latent class model with a mixture of multinomial distributions and chose the number of classes using the Bayesian information criterion. We used logistic regression to examine if participants’ characteristics were associated with their modal latent class. We used logistic regression to examine whether the amount of item missing in a survey predicted wave missing in the following survey. Results Four per cent of participants missed almost one-fifth of the questions, and this group missed more questions in the middle of the survey. Eighty-three per cent of participants completed almost every question, but had a relatively high missing probability for a question on sleep time, a question which had an inconsistent presentation compared with the rest of the survey. Participants who completed almost every question were generally younger and more educated. Participants who completed more questions were less likely to miss the next longitudinal wave. Conclusions Examining patterns in item missing data has improved our understanding of how missing data were generated and has informed future survey design to help reduce missing data. PMID:29084795

  13. A Review of Direct Observation Research within the Past Decade in the Field of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Reesha M.; Wachsmuth, Sean T.

    2014-01-01

    This study reviewed prominent journals within the field of emotional and behavioral disorders to identify direct observation approaches, reported reliability statistics, and key features of direct observation. Selected journals were systematically reviewed for the past 10 years identifying and quantifying specific direct observation systems and…

  14. Illusory Centrifugal Motion Direction Observed in Brief Stimuli: Psychophysics and Energy Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruyuan Zhang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available All stationary stimuli of fixed duration have motion energy and the amount of motion energy increases with decreasing duration. Consequently, perception of motion direction could be biased if the readout mechanisms are unbalanced. Previous physiological study showed prefered direction of MT neurons in peripheral tend to be oriented away from fovea(Albright, 1989. Given the broadening of motion energy in brief stimuli, such effect should increase as the stimulus duration decreases. Here, we tested this hypothesis by presenting vertical gratings (0.5c/deg, raised cosine spatial envelope, radius = 5deg, 98% contrast with different speeds(2,4,8 16deg/sec and direction(moving towards fovea or moving away from fovea. And Stimuli were presented in a temporal Gaussian envelope with durations ranging between 5 and 500ms. Observers' task was to identify perceived motion direction (guessing when unsure. Results showed that as predicted, the observers were biased to perceive these stimuli as moving away from fovea. In summary, briefly presented stationary stimuli are perceived as moving in centrifugal direction when presented in visual periphery. One possible explanation for this illusion is that these stimuli, by virtue of their broad temporal frequency spectrum, stimulate centrifugally biased motion mechanisms in area MT.

  15. National survey of owner-directed aggression in English Springer Spaniels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisner, Ilana R; Houpt, Katherine A; Shofer, Frances S

    2005-11-15

    To determine prevalence of owner-directed aggression and identify associated environmental and genetic factors in English Springer Spaniels. Prevalence survey. 1,053 adult English Springer Spaniels. A mail survey was sent to 2,400 randomly selected owners of adult American Kennel Club-registered English Springer Spaniels. Dogs with a history of aggression to family members and familiar humans were compared with dogs without such a history. 1,053 questionnaires (56.1% of the 1,877 delivered) were completed. A history of owner-directed growling or more intense aggression was reported in 510 (48.4%) dogs. Two hundred seventy-seven (26.3%) dogs had bitten a human in the past; 65.2% of bites were directed at familiar (owner or nonowner) adults and children. Variables associated with owner-directed aggression included sex of dog (male), neuter status (neutered, regardless of sex), show or bench lines, age > 4 years, aggression to unfamiliar adults and children, acquisition from a hobby breeder, less responsiveness to obedience cues, and a specific kennel and 1 popular sire from that kennel in a 4-generation pedigree. Owner-directed aggression in adult English Springer Spaniels was associated with a number of environmental, sex-related, and inherited factors. To reduce the risk of aggression, prospective owners might seek a female, hunting-type English Springer Spaniel from an experienced breeder. However, because risk factors are broad and varied, there are limitations to the extent to which behavior can be predicted and further study is needed of the inheritance of aggression in this breed.

  16. Analysis of the GPS Observations of the Site Survey at Sheshan 25-m Radio Telescope in August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Cheng, Z. Y.; Li, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of the GPS observations of the site survey at Sheshan 25-m radio telescope in August 2008 is reported. Because each session in this survey is only about six hours, not allowing the subdaily high frequency variations in the station coordinates to be reasonably smoothed, and because there are serious cycle slips in the observations and a large volume of data would be rejected during the software automatic adjustment of slips, the ordinary solution settings of GAMIT needed to be adjusted by loosening the constraints in the a priori coordinates to 10 m, adopting the "quick" mode in the solution iteration, and combining Cview manual operation with GAMIT automatic fixing of cycle slips. The resulting coordinates of the local control polygon in ITRF2005 are then compared with conventional geodetic results. Due to large rotations and translations in the two sets of coordinates (geocentric versus quasi-topocentric), the seven transformation parameters cannot be solved for directly. With various trial solutions it is shown that with a partial pre-removal of the large parameters, high precision transformation parameters can be obtained with post-fit residuals at the millimeter level. This analysis is necessary to prepare the follow-on site and transformation survey of the VLBI and SLR telescopes at Sheshan

  17. A multimethod investigation including direct observation of 3751 patient visits to 120 dental offices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Wotman

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Stephen Wotman1, Catherine A Demko1, Kristin Victoroff1, Joseph J Sudano2, James A Lalumandier11Department of Community Dentistry, Case Western Reserve University, School of Dental Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2Center of Health Care Research and Policy, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: This report defines verbal interactions between practitioners and patients as core activities of dental practice. Trained teams spent four days in 120 Ohio dental practices observing 3751 patient encounters with dentists and hygienists. Direct observation of practice characteristics, procedures performed, and how procedure and nonprocedure time was utilized during patient visits was recorded using a modified Davis Observation Code that classified patient contact time into 24 behavioral categories. Dentist, hygienist, and patient characteristics were gathered by questionnaire. The most common nonprocedure behaviors observed for dentists were chatting, evaluation feedback, history taking, and answering patient questions. Hygienists added preventive counseling. We distinguish between preventive procedures and counseling in actual dental offices that are members of a practice-based research network. Almost a third of the dentist’s and half of the hygienist’s patient contact time is utilized for nonprocedure behaviors during patient encounters. These interactions may be linked to patient and practitioner satisfaction and effectiveness of self-care instruction.Keywords: dental practice, dental practice core activities, direct observation of dental practice, Dental Davis Observation Code, dentist, hygienist patient behaviors

  18. Directly Observing Micelle Fusion and Growth in Solution by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Lucas R; Bakalis, Evangelos; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K; Park, Chiwoo; de Pablo, Juan; Zerbetto, Francesco; Patterson, Joseph P; Gianneschi, Nathan C

    2017-11-29

    Amphiphilic small molecules and polymers form commonplace nanoscale macromolecular compartments and bilayers, and as such are truly essential components in all cells and in many cellular processes. The nature of these architectures, including their formation, phase changes, and stimuli-response behaviors, is necessary for the most basic functions of life, and over the past half-century, these natural micellar structures have inspired a vast diversity of industrial products, from biomedicines to detergents, lubricants, and coatings. The importance of these materials and their ubiquity have made them the subject of intense investigation regarding their nanoscale dynamics with increasing interest in obtaining sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to directly observe nanoscale processes. However, the vast majority of experimental methods involve either bulk-averaging techniques including light, neutron, and X-ray scattering, or are static in nature including even the most advanced cryogenic transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here, we employ in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) to directly observe the evolution of individual amphiphilic block copolymer micellar nanoparticles in solution, in real time with nanometer spatial resolution. These observations, made on a proof-of-concept bioconjugate polymer amphiphile, revealed growth and evolution occurring by unimer addition processes and by particle-particle collision-and-fusion events. The experimental approach, combining direct LCTEM observation, quantitative analysis of LCTEM data, and correlated in silico simulations, provides a unique view of solvated soft matter nanoassemblies as they morph and evolve in time and space, enabling us to capture these phenomena in solution.

  19. Directly Observing Micelle Fusion and Growth in Solution by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, Lucas R. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Bakalis, Evangelos [Dipartimento; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo [Materials; Institute; Kammeyer, Jacquelin K. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Park, Chiwoo [Department; de Pablo, Juan [Materials; Institute; Zerbetto, Francesco [Dipartimento; Patterson, Joseph P. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States; Laboratory; Gianneschi, Nathan C. [Department; amp, Biochemistry, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, United States

    2017-11-16

    Amphiphilic small molecules and polymers form commonplace nanoscale macromolecular compartments and bilayers, and as such are truly essential components in all cells and in many cellular processes. The nature of these architectures, including their formation, phase changes, and stimuli-response behaviors, is necessary for the most basic functions of life, and over the past half-century, these natural micellar structures have inspired a vast diversity of industrial products, from biomedicines to detergents, lubricants, and coatings. The importance of these materials and their ubiquity have made them the subject of intense investigation regarding their nanoscale dynamics with increasing interest in obtaining sufficient temporal and spatial resolution to directly observe nanoscale processes. However, the vast majority of experimental methods involve either bulk-averaging techniques including light, neutron, and X-ray scattering, or are static in nature including even the most advanced cryogenic transmission electron microscopy techniques. Here, we employ in situ liquid-cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM) to directly observe the evolution of individual amphiphilic block copolymer micellar nanoparticles in solution, in real time with nanometer spatial resolution. These observations, made on a proof-of-concept bioconjugate polymer amphiphile, revealed growth and evolution occurring by unimer addition processes and by particle-particle collision-and-fusion events. The experimental approach, combining direct LCTEM observation, quantitative analysis of LCTEM data, and correlated in silico simulations, provides a unique view of solvated soft matter nanoassemblies as they morph and evolve in time and space, enabling us to capture these phenomena in solution.

  20. Ultraviolet Observations of Star-planet Interactions - Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin

    2017-05-01

    Interactions between exoplanets and their host stars are the dominant factors in determining the composition, chemical state, and stability of planetary atmospheres. In this talk, I will discuss the various forms that these Star-Planet Interactions (SPI) can take, and in particular how these processes are traced with ultraviolet (90 - 320 nm) observations. I will first address stellar inputs into exoplanetary atmospheres, focusing on how the high-energy radiation and particle environments influence atmospheric photochemistry and escape, on both rocky and gas giant planets. I will then consider magnetic interactions between planets and their host stars, and discuss how ultraviolet stellar observations may be used to infer the presence of exoplanetary magnetic fields. I will discuss these SPIs in the context of recent observations made by the Hubble Space Telescope and present future observational directions using small satellites, Hubble, and large missions such as LUVOIR and HabEx.

  1. Direct observation of shear deformation during equal channel angular pressing of pure aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shan, A. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China); Moon, I.G.; Ko, H.S.; Park, J.W. [Korean Inst. of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Div. of Metals

    1999-07-23

    Equal Channel Angular (ECA) pressing is a method through which intense plastic strain can be introduced into materials by simple shear. It is suggested that during ECA pressing, only simple shear deformation is introduced into the specimen. The degree of shear deformation can be well predicted by theory and is assumed to be uniform across the specimen except the top and end part. The theory had been proved to be correct by observation of ECA pressing of plasticine with a transparent plexiglass tool and by finite element modeling. However, direct observation of shear deformation had not yet been conducted in metallic materials. One difficulty in observing the shear deformation is that marks or scratches on the surface of the specimen will be erased or destroyed by severe surface deformation caused by friction. In this research, a special method is employed to eliminate the surface friction effect so that a clear shear deformation figure can be observed.

  2. Validation of simulated flow direction and hydraulic gradients with hydraulic head observations using open source GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersteen, Katrijn; Rogiers, Bart; Gedeon, Matej

    2015-04-01

    It is recommended to check hydraulic gradients and flow directions predicted by a groundwater flow model that is calibrated solely with hydraulic head observations. It has been demonstrated in literature that substantial errors can be made when the model is not calibrated on these state variables. Therefore, in this work, we perform a validation of a steady-state groundwater flow model, representing part of the Neogene aquifer (60 km2) in Belgium. This model was developed and calibrated solely on groundwater head measurements, in the framework of the environmental impact assessment of the near surface repository for low- and intermediate-level short-lived waste, realized by ONDRAF/NIRAS at Dessel, Belgium. Horizontal flow directions, horizontal and vertical gradients for the entire area of the groundwater model were estimated from measurements at shallow monitoring wells within the groundwater flow model domain, and compared to the flow directions and vertical gradients predicted by the model. For obtaining horizontal flow directions and gradients, triangulation of groundwater levels was performed for combinations of three neighboring hydraulic head observations in the same hydrogeological layer within the model. The simulated equivalents at the same monitoring wells were used to repeat the same methodology, and calculate flow direction components. This analysis was performed in SAGA GIS and was visualized through QGIS. Comparison of the flow directions and flow gradients obtained from measurements and simulations gives an indication on the model performance. The calculations were performed for three sandy hydrogeological units used in the model. A similar procedure was performed for the vertical hydraulic head gradients, where any combination of two hydraulic head observations at the same location but at different levels within the aquifer were used to validate the vertical gradients predicted by the model. Besides model validation on average hydraulic heads, the

  3. Direct observation of electric field induced pattern formation and particle aggregation in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajnak, Michal; Kopcansky, Peter; Timko, Milan [Institute of Experimental Physics SAS, Watsonova 47, 04001 Košice (Slovakia); Petrenko, Viktor I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Avdeev, Mikhail V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ivankov, Olexandr I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Kyiv Taras Shevchenko National University, Volodymyrska Street 64, Kyiv 01033 (Ukraine); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Institutskiy per. 9, Dolgoprudniy 141700 (Russian Federation); Feoktystov, Artem [Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS) at Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Dolnik, Bystrik; Kurimsky, Juraj [Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics, Technical University of Košice, Letná 9, 04200 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-08-17

    Ferrofluids typically respond to magnetic fields and can be manipulated by external magnetic fields. Here, we report on formation of visually observable patterns in a diluted low-polarity ferrofluid exposed to external electric fields. This presents a specific type of ferrofluid structure driven by a combined effect of electrohydrodynamics and electrical body forces. The free charge and permittivity variation are considered to play a key role in the observed phenomenon. The corresponding changes in the ferrofluid structure have been found at nanoscale as well. By small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), we show that the magnetic nanoparticles aggregate in direct current (dc) electric field with a strong dependence on the field intensity. The anisotropic aggregates preferably orient in the direction of the applied electric field. Conducting SANS experiments with alternating current (ac) electric fields of various frequencies, we found a critical frequency triggering the aggregation process. Our experimental study could open future applications of ferrofluids based on insulating liquids.

  4. Direct observation of depth-dependent atomic displacements associated with dislocations in gallium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, J G; Yang, H; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; D'Alfonso, A J; Yasuhara, A; Okunishi, E; Zhang, S; Humphreys, C J; Allen, L J; Galindo, P L; Hirsch, P B; Nellist, P D

    2014-09-26

    We demonstrate that the aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope has a sufficiently small depth of field to observe depth-dependent atomic displacements in a crystal. The depth-dependent displacements associated with the Eshelby twist of dislocations in GaN normal to the foil with a screw component of the Burgers vector are directly imaged. We show that these displacements are observed as a rotation of the lattice between images taken in a focal series. From the sense of the rotation, the sign of the screw component can be determined.

  5. Assessing the potential for bias in direct observation of adult commuter cycling and helmet use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, John D; Zaccaro, Heather N; Roffenbender, Jason S; Baig, Sabeeh A; Graves, Megan E; Hauler, Katherine J; Hussain, Aamir N; Mulroy, Faith E

    2015-02-01

    Bicycling and helmet surveillance, research, and programme evaluation depend on accurate measurement by direct observation, but it is unclear whether weather and other exogenous factors introduce bias into observed counts of cyclists and helmet use. To address this issue, a time series was created of cyclists observed at two observation points in Washington, DC, at peak commuting times and locations between September 2012 and February 2013. Using multiple linear regression with Newey-West SEs to account for possible serial correlation, the association between various factors and cyclist counts and helmet use was investigated. The number of cyclists observed per 1 h session was significantly associated with predicted daily high temperature, chance of rain, and actual rain. Additionally, fewer cyclists were observed on Fridays. Helmet use was significantly lower during evening commutes than morning and also lower on Fridays. Helmet use was not associated with weather variables. Controlling for observable cyclists characteristics weakened the association between helmet use and the time of day and day of the week, but it did not eliminate that association. Direct observation to measure commuter cycling trends or evaluate interventions should control for weather and day of week. Measurement of helmet use is unlikely to be meaningfully biased by weather factors, but time of day and day of week should be taken into account. Failing to control for these factors could lead to significant bias in assessments of the level of, and trends in, commuter cycling and helmet use. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Factors that effect sputum culture conversion rate in hospitalized patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who were applied directly observation therapy and non-directly observation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzundağ Işeri, Ayşe; Dulkar, Güngör; Selçuk Sönmez, Ozlem; Yilmaz Aydin, Leyla; Yilmaz, Birsen

    2010-01-01

    Directly observation therapy (DOT) has been accepted as the basic method for controlling tuberculosis. The present study aimed to determine the risk factors that affect sputum culture conversion rate in the DOT managed and non-DOT managed hospitalized patients. The study was included 50 cases with positive sputum cultures between the dates April 2001-April 2002 when DOT was not applied and 60 cases between the dates May 2002-May 2003 when DOT was applied. The relation between sputum culture conversion rate and the risk factors of age, gender, cough, hemoptysis, primary drug sensitivity, high initial bacillary load, smoking and alcohol consumption, presence of diabetes mellitus (DM), and radiological dissemination were determined. In the present study, sputum culture conversion rate was found 68.3% in DOT managed patients, 62% in non-DOT managed patients. In DOT managed and non-DOT managed patients; there was no statistically significant difference between complaints of cough, sputum, night sweating, hemoptysis, DM, bacillary load, primary drug resistance and culture conversion rate. In DOT managed patients; a significant difference was determined between smoking and alcohol consumption and culture conversion rate. The factors determined above as being related with the sputum culture conversion rate were similar with the results of the other studies investigating the same topic. Despite no statistical significance, an increase in the sputum culture conversion rate in DOT managed patients, when compared with non-DOT managed patients was determined.

  7. Observation of continuum radiations from the Cluster fleet: first results from direction finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. E. Décréau

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster fleet offers the first possibility of comparing non-thermal terrestrial continuum radiation from similarly equipped nearby observation points. A very rich data set has already been acquired on the Cluster polar orbit, between 4 and 19 Earth radii geocentric distances, and preliminary analysis has been carried out on these emissions. We focus in this paper on direction finding performed from all four spacecraft as a means to locate the position of the sources of this continuum radiation. Directions are derived from spin modulation properties, under the usual analysis assumptions of the wave vector of the radiation lying in the plane containing the spin axis and the antenna position at electric field minimum. All the spin axes of the four Cluster spacecraft are aligned perpendicular to the ecliptic, thus the aligned spacecraft antenna spin planes provide redundant 2-D views of the propagation path of the radiation and source location. Convincing 2-D triangulation results have been obtained in the vicinity of the source region. In addition, the out of spin plane component of the wave vector reveals itself to a certain extent through directivity characteristics compared at different distances of the spin plane to the ecliptic. The four case events studied (two of them taken near apogee, the other two near perigee have confirmed general properties derived from previous observations: trapping in the lower frequency range, radiation escaping into the magnetosheath region in the higher frequency range. All propagation directions are compatible with source positions in the plasmapause region, however, at a significant distance from the equator in one case. Our observations have also revealed new properties, like the importance of small-scale density irregularities in the local amplification of continuum radiation. We conclude that more detailed generation and propagation models are needed to fit the observations.

  8. Direct observation of 2-(1-methoxycarbonylnaphthyl)methyl radical via photo-claisen type rearrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshimi, Yasuharu; Mizuno, Kazuhiko; Maeda, Hajime [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Sakai, Osaka (Japan); Ichinose, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Tomoko; Kawanishi, Shun-ichi [Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The photo-Claisen type rearrangement of 2-(1-methoxycarbonylnaphthyl)methyl phenyl ether derivatives 1a-f was investigated. The 2-(1-methoxycarbonylnaphthyl)methyl radical and its fluorescence by use of two colored laser flash photolysis (LFP) technique were directly observed as a reactive intermediate. The reactivity of the photorearrangement depended on the p-substituents on the phenoxy group. (author)

  9. PreCam: A Precursor Observational Campaign for Calibration of the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, K.; Kuhlmann, S.; Allam, S.; Annis, J. T.; Bailey, T.; Balbinot, E.; Bernstein, J. P.; Biesiadzinski, T.; Burke, D. L.; Butner, M.; Camargo, J. I. B.; da Costa, L. A. N.; DePoy, D.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Estrada, J.; Fausti, A.; Gerke, B.; Guarino, V.; Head, H. H.; Kessler, R.; Lin, H.; Lorenzon, W.; Maia, M. A. G.; Maki, L.; Marshall, J.; Nord, B.; Neilsen, E.; Ogando, R. L. C.; Park, D.; Peoples, J.; Rastawicki, D.; Rheault, J. -P.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Seitzer, P.; Smith, J. A.; Spinka, H.; Sypniewski, A.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.

    2013-04-01

    PreCam, a precursor observational campaign supporting the Dark Energy Survey (DES), is designed to produce a photometric and astrometric catalog of nearly a hundred thousand standard stars within the DES footprint, while the PreCam instrument also serves as a prototype testbed for the Dark Energy Camera's hardware and software. This catalog represents a potential 100-fold increase in Southern Hemisphere photometric standard stars, and therefore will be an important component in the calibration of the Dark Energy Survey. We provide details on the PreCam instrument's design, construction, and testing, as well as results from a subset of the 51 nights of PreCam survey observations on the University of Michigan Department of Astronomy's Curtis-Schmidt telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). We briefly describe the preliminary data processing pipeline that has been developed for PreCam data and the preliminary results of the instrument performance, as well as astrometry and photometry of a sample of stars previously included in other southern sky surveys.

  10. Not seeing or feeling is still believing: conscious and non-conscious pain modulation after direct and observational learning

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Egorova; Joel Park; Orr, Scott P.; Irving Kirsch; Gollub, Randy L; Jian Kong

    2015-01-01

    Our experience with the world is shaped not only directly through personal exposure but also indirectly through observing others and learning from their experiences. Using a conditioning paradigm, we investigated how directly and observationally learned information can affect pain perception, both consciously and non-consciously. Differences between direct and observed cues were manifest in higher pain ratings and larger skin conductance responses to directly experienced cues. However, the pa...

  11. Warming experiments elucidate the drivers of observed directional changes in tundra vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Robert D; May, Jeremy L; Kremers, Kelseyann S; Tweedie, Craig E; Oberbauer, Steven F; Liebig, Jennifer A; Botting, Timothy F; Barrett, Robert T; Gregory, Jessica L

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have clearly linked long-term monitoring with in situ experiments to clarify potential drivers of observed change at a given site. This is especially necessary when findings from a site are applied to a much broader geographic area. Here, we document vegetation change at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska, occurring naturally and due to experimental warming over nearly two decades. An examination of plant cover, canopy height, and community indices showed more significant differences between years than due to experimental warming. However, changes with warming were more consistent than changes between years and were cumulative in many cases. Most cases of directional change observed in the control plots over time corresponded with a directional change in response to experimental warming. These included increases in canopy height and decreases in lichen cover. Experimental warming resulted in additional increases in evergreen shrub cover and decreases in diversity and bryophyte cover. This study suggests that the directional changes occurring at the sites are primarily due to warming and indicates that further changes are likely in the next two decades if the regional warming trend continues. These findings provide an example of the utility of coupling in situ experiments with long-term monitoring to accurately document vegetation change in response to global change and to identify the underlying mechanisms driving observed changes. PMID:26140204

  12. Observation of landslide movement by GPS static survey; GPS sokuryo ni yoru jisuberi ido kansoku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuoka, H. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Disaster Prevention Research Inst.; Ezaki, T.; Kodama, N. [Fuken Co. Ltd., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    This paper introduces results of mobile observations on landslides by using static GPS surveys in the Nuta{center_dot}Youne landslide area inKochi Prefecture and the Taguchi landslide area in Okayama Prefecture. Because the base line analysis was performed by using one frequency only although some receivers were of two-frequency corresponding type, all the analysis data are based on one frequency. Time bands in which signals can be received from more than four GPS satellites were selected in each observation, and the observations have lasted for 3 to 4 hours per session. The number of receivers used was four to six, although the number is not the same in each observation. Nominal accuracy for the receivers used was 5 mm + 2 ppm times the base line length. However, since the base line lengths used in the present observations were all less than 2 km, the error is about 9 mm at maximum. At the Nuta{center_dot}Youne landslide area, displacements of greater than 1.5 cm were observed at all the observation points. At the Taguchi landslide area, displacements from 2 to 3.5 cm were observed at all points. At bankings built relatively newly, it was observed that displacement of 5.5 cm was cumulated during the same observation time period, disclosing the necessity that some measures should be provided urgently. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  13. The trillion planet survey: an optical search for directed intelligence in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Andrew; Lubin, Philip

    2017-09-01

    In realm of optical SETI, searches for pulsed laser signals have historically been preferred over those for continuous wave beacons. There are many valid reasons for this, namely the near elimination of false positives and simple experimental components. However, due to significant improvements in laser technologies and light-detection systems since the mid-20th century, as well as new data from the recent Kepler mission, continuous wave searches should no longer be ignored. In this paper we propose a search for continuous wave laser beacons from an intelligent civilization in the Andromeda galaxy. Using only a 0.8 meter telescope, a standard photometric system, and an image processing pipeline, we expect to be able to detect any CW laser signal directed at us from an extraterrestrial civilization in M31, as long as the civilization is operating at a wavelength we can "see" and has left the beacon on long enough for us to detect it here on Earth. The search target is M31 due to its high stellar density relative to our own Milky Way galaxy. Andromeda is home to at least one trillion stars, and thus at least one trillion planets. As a result, in surveying M31, we are surveying one trillion planets, and consequently one trillion possible locations of intelligent life. This is an unprecedented number of targets relative to other past SETI searches. We call this the TPS or Trillion Planet Survey.

  14. Participant observation of time allocation, direct patient contact and simultaneous activities in hospital physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zupanc Andrea

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital physicians' time is a critical resource in medical care. Two aspects are of interest. First, the time spent in direct patient contact – a key principle of effective medical care. Second, simultaneous task performance ('multitasking' which may contribute to medical error, impaired safety behaviour, and stress. There is a call for instruments to assess these aspects. A preliminary study to gain insight into activity patterns, time allocation and simultaneous activities of hospital physicians was carried out. Therefore an observation instrument for time-motion-studies in hospital settings was developed and tested. Methods 35 participant observations of internists and surgeons of a German municipal 300-bed hospital were conducted. Complete day shifts of hospital physicians on wards, emergency ward, intensive care unit, and operating room were continuously observed. Assessed variables of interest were time allocation, share of direct patient contact, and simultaneous activities. Inter-rater agreement of Kappa = .71 points to good reliability of the instrument. Results Hospital physicians spent 25.5% of their time at work in direct contact with patients. Most time was allocated to documentation and conversation with colleagues and nursing staff. Physicians performed parallel simultaneous activities for 17–20% of their work time. Communication with patients, documentation, and conversation with colleagues and nursing staff were the most frequently observed simultaneous activities. Applying logit-linear analyses, specific primary activities increase the probability of particular simultaneous activities. Conclusion Patient-related working time in hospitals is limited. The potential detrimental effects of frequently observed simultaneous activities on performance outcomes need further consideration.

  15. On observation distributions for state space models of population survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knape, Jonas; Jonzén, Niclas; Sköld, Martin

    2011-11-01

    1. State space models are starting to replace more simple time series models in analyses of temporal dynamics of populations that are not perfectly censused. By simultaneously modelling both the dynamics and the observations, consistent estimates of population dynamical parameters may be obtained. For many data sets, the distribution of observation errors is unknown and error models typically chosen in an ad-hoc manner. 2. To investigate the influence of the choice of observation error on inferences, we analyse the dynamics of a replicated time series of red kangaroo surveys using a state space model with linear state dynamics. Surveys were performed through aerial counts and Poisson, overdispersed Poisson, normal and log-normal distributions may all be adequate for modelling observation errors for the data. We fit each of these to the data and compare them using AIC. 3. The state space models were fitted with maximum likelihood methods using a recent importance sampling technique that relies on the Kalman filter. The method relaxes the assumption of Gaussian observation errors required by the basic Kalman filter. Matlab code for fitting linear state space models with Poisson observations is provided. 4. The ability of AIC to identify the correct observation model was investigated in a small simulation study. For the parameter values used in the study, without replicated observations, the correct observation distribution could sometimes be identified but model selection was prone to misclassification. On the other hand, when observations were replicated, the correct distribution could typically be identified. 5. Our results illustrate that inferences may differ markedly depending on the observation distributions used, suggesting that choosing an adequate observation model can be critical. Model selection and simulations show that for the models and parameter values in this study, a suitable observation model can typically be identified if observations are

  16. Direct observation of imprinted antiferromagnetic vortex state in CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, J.; Carlton, D.; Park, J. S.; Meng, Y.; Arenholz, E.; Doran, A.; Young, A.T.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, C.; Zhao, H. W.; Bokor, J.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2010-12-21

    In magnetic thin films, a magnetic vortex is a state in which the magnetization vector curls around the center of a confined structure. A vortex state in a thin film disk, for example, is a topological object characterized by the vortex polarity and the winding number. In ferromagnetic (FM) disks, these parameters govern many fundamental properties of the vortex such as its gyroscopic rotation, polarity reversal, core motion, and vortex pair excitation. However, in antiferromagnetic (AFM) disks, though there has been indirect evidence of the vortex state through observations of the induced FM-ordered spins in the AFM disk, they have never been observed directly in experiment. By fabricating single crystalline NiO/Fe/Ag(001) and CoO/Fe/Ag(001) disks and using X-ray Magnetic Linear Dichroism (XMLD), we show direct observation of the vortex state in an AFM disk of AFM/FM bilayer system. We observe that there are two types of AFM vortices, one of which has no analog in FM structures. Finally, we show that a frozen AFM vortex can bias a FM vortex at low temperature.

  17. Variation in Direct Access to Tests to Investigate Cancer: A Survey of English General Practitioners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D Nicholson

    Full Text Available The 2015 NICE guidelines for suspected cancer recommend that English General Practitioners have direct access to diagnostic tests to investigate symptoms of cancer that do not meet the criteria for urgent referral. We aimed to identify the proportion of GPs in England with direct access to these tests.We recruited 533 English GPs through a national clinical research network to complete an online survey about direct access to laboratory, radiology, and endoscopy tests in the three months leading up to the release of the 2015 NICE guidance. If they had direct access to a diagnostic test, GPs were asked about the time necessary to arrange a test and receive a report. Results are reported by NHS sub-region and, adjusting for sampling, for England as a whole.Almost all GPs reported direct access to x-ray and laboratory investigations except faecal occult blood testing (54%, 95% CI 49-59% and urine protein electrophoresis (89%, 95% CI 84-92%. Fewer GPs had direct access to CT scans (54%, 95% CI 49-59% or endoscopy (colonoscopy 32%, 95% CI 28-37%; gastroscopy 72%, 95% CI 67-77%. There was significant variation in direct access between NHS regions for the majority of imaging tests-for example, from 20 to 85% to MRI. Apart from x-ray, very few GPs (1-22% could access radiology and endoscopy within the timescales recommended by NICE. The modal request to test time was 2-4 weeks for routine radiology and 4-6 weeks for routine endoscopy with results taking another 1-2 weeks.At the time that the 2015 NICE guideline was released, local investment was required to not only provide direct access but also reduce the interval between request and test and speed up reporting. Further research using our data as a benchmark is now required to identify whether local improvements in direct access have been achieved in response to the NICE targets. If alternative approaches to test access are to be proposed they must be piloted comprehensively and underpinned by robust

  18. Survey of 25 years of observations with the aim of detecting intelligent extraterrestrial beings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallee, J. P.

    1985-02-01

    Observational programs intended to detect the presence of intelligent extraterrestrial life or to locate stars with potentially life-supporting planets are surveyed for the period 1960-1985. The astrometric, spectroscopic, photometric, and linear-polarimetric techniques employed are explained; the 45 programs undertaken are listed in tables; a typical observation at Algonquin Radioastronomy Observatory is described; theoretical computations of the number of life-supporting planets are summarized; and hypotheses advanced to explain the fact that no contact appears to have been made are discussed.

  19. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333

    OpenAIRE

    Hatchell, J.; Wilson, T; Drabek, E.; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D.; Di Francesco, J.; consortium, D. Ward-Thompson on behalf of the JCMT GBS

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other youn...

  20. Feedback in formative OSCEs: comparison between direct observation and video-based formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noëlle Junod Perron

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Switzerland, have the opportunity to practice clinical skills with simulated patients during formative sessions in preparation for clerkships. These sessions are given in two formats: 1 direct observation of an encounter followed by verbal feedback (direct feedback and 2 subsequent review of the videotaped encounter by both student and supervisor (video-based feedback. The aim of the study was to evaluate whether content and process of feedback differed between both formats. Methods: In 2013, all second- and third-year medical students and clinical supervisors involved in formative sessions were asked to take part in the study. A sample of audiotaped feedback sessions involving supervisors who gave feedback in both formats were analyzed (content and process of the feedback using a 21-item feedback scale. Results: Forty-eight audiotaped feedback sessions involving 12 supervisors were analyzed (2 direct and 2 video-based sessions per supervisor. When adjusted for the length of feedback, there were significant differences in terms of content and process between both formats; the number of communication skills and clinical reasoning items addressed were higher in the video-based format (11.29 vs. 7.71, p=0.002 and 3.71 vs. 2.04, p=0.010, respectively. Supervisors engaged students more actively during the video-based sessions than during direct feedback sessions (self-assessment: 4.00 vs. 3.17, p=0.007; active problem-solving: 3.92 vs. 3.42, p=0.009. Students made similar observations and tended to consider that the video feedback was more useful for improving some clinical skills. Conclusion: Video-based feedback facilitates discussion of clinical reasoning, communication, and professionalism issues while at the same time actively engaging students. Different time and conceptual frameworks may explain observed differences. The choice of feedback format should depend on

  1. Joint US-Japan Observations with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO): Deep Surveys and Observations of High-Z Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, David B.

    1997-01-01

    Several important milestones were passed during the past year of our ISO observing program: (1) Our first ISO data were successfully obtained. ISOCAM data were taken for our primary deep field target in the 'Lockman Hole'. Thirteen hours of integration (taken over 4 contiguous orbits) were obtained in the LW2 filter of a 3 ft x 3 ft region centered on the position of minimum HI column density in the Lockman Hole. The data were obtained in microscanning mode. This is the deepest integration attempted to date (by almost a factor of 4 in time) with ISOCAM. (2) The deep survey data obtained for the Lockman Hole were received by the Japanese P.I. (Yoshi Taniguchi) in early December, 1996 (following release of the improved pipeline formatted data from Vilspa), and a copy was forwarded to Hawaii shortly thereafter. These data were processed independently by the Japan and Hawaii groups during the latter part of December 1996, and early January, 1997. The Hawaii group made use of the U.S. ISO data center at IPAC/Caltech in Pasadena to carry out their data reduction, while the Japanese group used a copy of the ISOCAM data analysis package made available to them through an agreement with the head of the ISOCAM team, Catherine Cesarsky. (3) Results of our LW2 Deep Survey in the Lockman Hole were first reported at the ISO Workshop "Taking ISO to the Limits: Exploring the Faintest Sources in the Infrared" held at the ISO Science Operations Center in Villafranca, Spain (VILSPA) on 3-4 February, 1997. Yoshi Taniguchi gave an invited presentation summarizing the results of the U.S.-Japan team, and Dave Sanders gave an invited talk summarizing the results of the Workshop at the conclusion of the two day meeting. The text of the talks by Taniguchi and Sanders are included in the printed Workshop Proceedings, and are published in full on the Web. By several independent accounts, the U.S.-Japan Deep Survey results were one of the highlights of the Workshop; these data showed

  2. Direct observation of Li diffusion in Li-doped ZnO nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guohua; Yu, Lei; Hudak, Bethany M.; Chang, Yao-Jen; Baek, Hyeonjun; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Strachan, Douglas R.; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Guiton, Beth S.

    2016-05-01

    The direct observation of Li diffusion in Li-doped zinc oxide nanowires (NWs) was realized by using in situ heating in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). A continuous increase of low atomic mass regions within a single NW was observed between 200 °C and 600 °C when heated in vacuum, which was explained by the conversion of interstitial to substitutional Li in the ZnO NW host lattice. A kick-out mechanism is introduced to explain the migration and conversion of the interstitial Li (Lii) to Zn-site substitutional Li (LiZn), and this mechanism is verified with low-temperature (11 K) photoluminescence measurements on as-grown and annealed Li-doped zinc oxide NWs, as well as the observation of an increase of NW surface roughing with applied bias.

  3. Direct observation of the microstructure in cluster glass compound U(2)IrSi(3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yubuta, K; Yamamura, T; Shiokawa, Y

    2006-07-05

    We have examined the structure of a U(2)IrSi(3) compound exhibiting ferromagnetic cluster glass behaviour by means of electron diffraction observation and high-resolution electron microscopy. The structure of U(2)IrSi(3) has been proposed as a new one of the U(2)RuSi(3)-type with a short-range ordered double stacking sequence of the U(2)RuSi(3)-type structure along the c-axis, and long-range ordered atomic arrangements in the a-b plane. The calculated patterns reproduce the characteristic features of observed electron patterns well. The Fourier-filtered high-resolution image clearly exhibits a micro-domain structure, which is considered to relate directly to the origin of the observed cluster glass behaviour in U(2)IrSi(3).

  4. Direct Observation of Heavy-Tailed Storage Times of Bed Load Tracer Particles Causing Anomalous Superdiffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. Nathan

    2017-12-01

    A consensus has formed that the step length distribution of fluvial bed load is thin tailed and that the observed anomalous superdiffusion of bed load tracer particles must arise from heavy-tailed resting times. However, heavy-tailed resting times have never been directly observed in the field over multiple floods. Using 9 years of data from a large bed load tracer experiment, I show that the spatial variance of the tracer plume scales faster than linearly with integrated excess stream power, indicating anomalous superdiffusion. The superdiffusion is caused by a heavy-tailed distribution of observed storage times that is fit with a truncated Pareto distribution with a tail parameter that is predicted by anomalous diffusion theory. The heavy-tailed distribution of storage times causes the tracer virtual velocity to slow over time, indicated by a sublinear increase in the mean displacement that is predicted by the storage time distribution tail parameter.

  5. A survey of Galileo plasma wave instrument observations of Jovian whistler-mode chorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Menietti

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey of plasma wave observations at Jupiter obtained by the plasma wave instrument on board the Galileo spacecraft is presented. The observations indicate that chorus emissions are observed commonly in the Jovian magnetosphere near the magnetic equator in the approximate radial range 6survey includes almost all local times but not equally sampled in radial distance due to the spacecraft trajectory. The data suggest that chorus emissions are somewhat more intense on the dayside, but this may be a result of insufficient nightside observations. The orbit of Galileo is also restricted to ±3° of the Jovigraphic equator, but the tilt of the magnetic field permits coverage of a range of magnetic latitudes of −13°<λmag<+13°. The similarities of chorus emissions to terrestrial observations are a good reason to speculate that Jovian chorus emission may play a significant role in the stochastic acceleration of electrons in the radial range 6–10 RJ as recent studies indicate. These electrons may then be transported inward by radial diffusion where they are additionally accelerated to form the synchrotron radiation belt source.

  6. The FluxCompensator: Making Radiative Transfer Models of Hydrodynamical Simulations Directly Comparable to Real Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepferl, Christine M.; Robitaille, Thomas P.

    2017-11-01

    When modeling astronomical objects throughout the universe, it is important to correctly treat the limitations of the data, for instance finite resolution and sensitivity. In order to simulate these effects, and to make radiative transfer models directly comparable to real observations, we have developed an open-source Python package called the FluxCompensator that enables the post-processing of the output of 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes, such as Hyperion. With the FluxCompensator, realistic synthetic observations can be generated by modeling the effects of convolution with arbitrary point-spread functions, transmission curves, finite pixel resolution, noise, and reddening. Pipelines can be applied to compute synthetic observations that simulate observatories, such as the Spitzer Space Telescope or the Herschel Space Observatory. Additionally, this tool can read in existing observations (e.g., FITS format) and use the same settings for the synthetic observations. In this paper, we describe the package as well as present examples of such synthetic observations.

  7. A Genetic Algorithm Method for Direct estimation of paleostress states from heterogeneous fault-slip observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, D. C.

    2016-12-01

    A Genetic Algorithm Method for Direct estimation of paleostress states from heterogeneous fault-slip observationsDeepak C. Srivastava, Prithvi Thakur and Pravin K. GuptaDepartment of Earth Sciences, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667, India. Abstract Paleostress estimation from a group of heterogeneous fault-slip observations entails first the classification of the observations into homogeneous fault sets and then a separate inversion of each homogeneous set. This study combines these two issues into a nonlinear inverse problem and proposes a heuristic search method that inverts the heterogeneous fault-slip observations. The method estimates different paleostress states in a group of heterogeneous fault-slip observations and classifies it into homogeneous sets as a byproduct. It uses the genetic algorithm operators, elitism, selection, encoding, crossover and mutation. These processes translate into a guided search that finds successively fitter solutions and operate iteratively until the termination criteria is met and the globally fittest stress tensors are obtained. We explain the basic steps of the algorithm on a working example and demonstrate validity of the method on several synthetic and a natural group of heterogeneous fault-slip observations. The method is independent of any user-defined bias or any entrapment of solution in a local optimum. It succeeds even in the difficult situations where other classification methods are found to fail.

  8. Direct observation of keyhole plasma characteristics in deep penetration laser welding of aluminum alloy 6016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiangzhong; Zeng, Licheng; Cheng, Yuanyong

    2012-06-01

    Deep penetration laser welding is associated with violent plasma generation which consists of metal vapour, ionized ions and electrons. The plasma resides both outside and inside the keyhole, known as the plasma plume and keyhole plasma, respectively. Plasma plumes have been studied extensively due to the convenience of observing them. However, very little work has been carried out on the investigation of keyhole plasmas. In this paper, a novel experimental set-up is designed to observe the keyhole plasma directly in CW and PW deep penetration laser welding of aluminum alloy 6016. Then on the basis of the experimentally obtained spectra, the electron temperature distribution of the keyhole plasma both in the radial and depth directions of the keyhole is calculated, and the effects of processing parameters such as laser power, welding velocity and defocus on the keyhole plasma temperature are studied. The results show that the electron temperature of the keyhole plasma both in the radial and depth directions is not uniformly distributed. The temperature increases as the laser power increases, decreases as the welding velocity increases and decreases as the location of the laser beam focal point is moved from within to above the keyhole.

  9. Investigating common clinical presentations in first opinion small animal consultations using direct observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, N. J.; Dean, R. S.; Cobb, M.; Brennan, M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding more about the clinical presentations encountered in veterinary practice is vital in directing research towards areas relevant to practitioners. The aim of this study was to describe all problems discussed during a convenience sample of consultations using a direct observation method. A data collection tool was used to gather data by direct observation during small animal consultations at eight sentinel practices. Data were recorded for all presenting and non-presenting specific health problems discussed. A total of 1901 patients were presented with 3206 specific health problems discussed. Clinical presentation varied widely between species and between presenting and non-presenting problems. Skin lump, vomiting and inappetence were the most common clinical signs reported by the owner while overweight/obese, dental tartar and skin lump were the most common clinical examination findings. Skin was the most frequently affected body system overall followed by non-specific problems then the gastrointestinal system. Consultations are complex, with a diverse range of different clinical presentations seen. Considering the presenting problem only may give an inaccurate view of the veterinary caseload, as some common problems are rarely the reason for presentation. Understanding the common diagnoses made is the next step and will help to further focus questions for future research. PMID:25564472

  10. Development of a direct observation of procedural skills rubric for fourth-year pharmacy students in ambulatory care rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linedecker, Sara J; Barner, Jamie; Ridings-Myhra, Jennifer; Garza, Aida; Lopez, Debra; McIntyre, William

    2017-03-01

    The development and implementation of a pilot program requiring direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS) assessments of fourth-year pharmacy students during ambulatory care rotations are described. All fourth-year pharmacy students at the University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy who engaged in a required advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) in ambulatory care during the period January-May 2015 participated in a DOPS pilot program. The DOPS process required students to select a patient for a medication-focused "workup," evaluate the selected patient case, present the results to a preceptor, and conduct a preceptor-supervised patient interview. Preceptors used a DOPS rubric to rate students' performance in 12 domains. At the time of submission of DOPS evaluation forms, program participants were invited to complete online surveys soliciting feedback on the effectiveness of the DOPS evaluation process and other aspects of the program. A total of 81 students and preceptors participated in the DOPS pilot program, with 47 DOPS evaluation forms submitted; the median ± S.D. score was 90.4% ± 29.7%. Results of the online surveys indicated that the overall perception of the DOPS program was positive, with majorities of both students and preceptors supporting DOPS incorporation into the curriculum for fourth-year pharmacy students. The DOPS rubric was a useful tool for evaluating clinical skills of APPE students on ambulatory care rotations. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. THE GREEN BANK TELESCOPE 350 MHz DRIFT-SCAN SURVEY. I. SURVEY OBSERVATIONS AND THE DISCOVERY OF 13 PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyles, J.; Lorimer, D. R.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Cardoso, R. F. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Lynch, R. S.; Kaspi, V. M.; Archibald, A.; Karako-Argaman, C. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 University St., Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States); Stairs, I. H.; Berndsen, A.; Cherry, A.; McPhee, C. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Hessels, J. W. T.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Van Leeuwen, J. [ASTRON, The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, Postbus 2, 7990 AA, Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Epstein, C. R. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pennucci, T. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Roberts, M. S. E. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer Street, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 94602-3017 (United States); Stovall, K., E-mail: jason.boyles@wku.edu [Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Over the summer of 2007, we obtained 1191 hr of 'drift-scan' pulsar search observations with the Green Bank Telescope at a radio frequency of 350 MHz. Here we describe the survey setup, search procedure, and the discovery and follow-up timing of 13 pulsars. Among the new discoveries, one (PSR J1623-0841) was discovered only through its single pulses, two (PSRs J1327-0755 and J1737-0814) are millisecond pulsars, and another (PSR J2222-0137) is a mildly recycled pulsar. PSR J1327-0755 is a 2.7 ms pulsar at a dispersion measure (DM) of 27.9 pc cm{sup -3} in an 8.7 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.22 M {sub Sun }. PSR J1737-0814 is a 4.2 ms pulsar at a DM of 55.3 pc cm{sup -3} in a 79.3 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 0.06 M {sub Sun }. PSR J2222-0137 is a 32.8 ms pulsar at a very low DM of 3.27 pc cm{sup -3} in a 2.4 day orbit with a minimum companion mass of 1.11 M {sub Sun }. It is most likely a white-dwarf-neutron-star system or an unusual low-eccentricity double neutron star system. Ten other pulsars discovered in this survey are reported in the companion paper Lynch et al.

  12. Merging LIDAR digital terrain model with direct observed elevation points for urban flood numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Campo, Lorenzo

    2017-04-01

    In last years, the concern about the economical and lives loss due to urban floods has grown hand in hand with the numerical skills in simulating such events. The large amount of computational power needed in order to address the problem (simulating a flood in a complex terrain such as a medium-large city) is only one of the issues. Among them it is possible to consider the general lack of exhaustive observations during the event (exact extension, dynamic, water level reached in different parts of the involved area), needed for calibration and validation of the model, the need of considering the sewers effects, and the availability of a correct and precise description of the geometry of the problem. In large cities the topographic surveys are in general available with a number of points, but a complete hydraulic simulation needs a detailed description of the terrain on the whole computational domain. LIDAR surveys can achieve this goal, providing a comprehensive description of the terrain, although they often lack precision. In this work an optimal merging of these two sources of geometrical information, measured elevation points and LIDAR survey, is proposed, by taking into account the error variance of both. The procedure is applied to a flood-prone city over an area of 35 square km approximately starting with a DTM from LIDAR with a spatial resolution of 1 m, and 13000 measured points. The spatial pattern of the error (LIDAR vs points) is analysed, and the merging method is tested with a series of Jackknife procedures that take into account different densities of the available points. A discussion of the results is provided.

  13. The SEEDS Direct Imaging Survey for Planets and Scattered Dust Emission in Debris Disk Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Markus; Brandt, Timothy; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Usuda, Tomonori; Thalmann, Christian; Carson, Joseph C.; Goto, Miwa; Currie, Thayne; McElwain, M. W.; Itoh, Yoichi; hide

    2013-01-01

    Debris disks around young main-sequence stars often have gaps and cavities which for a long time have been interpreted as possibly being caused by planets. In recent years, several giant planet discoveries have been made in systems hosting disks of precisely this nature, further implying that interactions with planets could be a common cause of such disk structures. As part of the SEEDS high-contrast imaging survey, we are surveying a population of debris disk-hosting stars with gaps and cavities implied by their spectral energy distributions, in order to attempt to spatially resolve the disk as well as to detect any planets that may be responsible for the disk structure. Here we report on intermediate results from this survey. Five debris disks have been spatially resolved, and a number of faint point sources have been discovered, most of which have been tested for common proper motion, which in each case has excluded physical companionship with the target stars. From the detection limits of the 50 targets that have been observed, we find that beta Pic b-like planets (approximately 10M(sub jup) planets around G-A-type stars) near the gap edges are less frequent than 15-30%, implying that if giant planets are the dominant cause of these wide (27 AU on average) gaps, they are generally less massive than beta Pic b.

  14. Freud's views on early female sexuality in the light of direct child observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeman, J A

    1976-01-01

    Freud's writings on early female sexuality are reviewed in order to demonstrate which of his central assumptions are supported and which have been corrected by the direct observation of young children. The study of the emergence of core gender identity in little girls is a key to the modification of Freud's statements on the onset of and crucial factors in the development of femininity. Cognitive functions, learning experiences, and language are believed to be more important than Freud stressed, and penis envy and feelings of inferiority are relegated to a less universal and less necessary place in the onset of femininity. The role of the father is given different emphasis. Direct observation clarifies many aspects of masturbation or early genital self-stimulation in the young female: its onset; its feminine rather than masculine character; its early vicissitudes; its importance relative to other behavior; the impact of the discovery of anatomical difference; one special way it is affected by parental attitude; and how it contrasts with comparable behavior in the young male. Observation refutes Freud's often quoted statement that masturbation is further removed from the nature of women than of men.

  15. Tracking individual membrane proteins and their biochemistry: The power of direct observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barden, Adam O; Goler, Adam S; Humphreys, Sara C; Tabatabaei, Samaneh; Lochner, Martin; Ruepp, Marc-David; Jack, Thomas; Simonin, Jonathan; Thompson, Andrew J; Jones, Jeffrey P; Brozik, James A

    2015-11-01

    The advent of single molecule fluorescence microscopy has allowed experimental molecular biophysics and biochemistry to transcend traditional ensemble measurements, where the behavior of individual proteins could not be precisely sampled. The recent explosion in popularity of new super-resolution and super-localization techniques coupled with technical advances in optical designs and fast highly sensitive cameras with single photon sensitivity and millisecond time resolution have made it possible to track key motions, reactions, and interactions of individual proteins with high temporal resolution and spatial resolution well beyond the diffraction limit. Within the purview of membrane proteins and ligand gated ion channels (LGICs), these outstanding advances in single molecule microscopy allow for the direct observation of discrete biochemical states and their fluctuation dynamics. Such observations are fundamentally important for understanding molecular-level mechanisms governing these systems. Examples reviewed here include the effects of allostery on the stoichiometry of ligand binding in the presence of fluorescent ligands; the observation of subdomain partitioning of membrane proteins due to microenvironment effects; and the use of single particle tracking experiments to elucidate characteristics of membrane protein diffusion and the direct measurement of thermodynamic properties, which govern the free energy landscape of protein dimerization. The review of such characteristic topics represents a snapshot of efforts to push the boundaries of fluorescence microscopy of membrane proteins to the absolute limit. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. First direct observation of two protons in the decay of {sup 45}Fe with a TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovinazzo, J.; Blank, B.; Borcea, C.; Canchel, G.; Demonchy, C.E.; Hay, L.; Huikari, J.; Leblanc, S.; Matea, I.; Pedroza, J.L.; Pibernat, J.; Serani, L. [Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan - Universite Bordeaux 1 - UMR 5797 CNRS/IN2P3, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Oliveira Santos, F. de; Grevy, S.; Perrot, L.; Stodel, C.; Thomas, J.C. [Grand Accelerateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM - CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 CAEN Cedex 5 (France); Dossat, C. [DAPNIA, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2007-03-15

    The decay of the ground-state two-proton emitter {sup 45}Fe was studied with a time-projection chamber and the emission of two protons was unambiguously identified. The total decay energy and the half-life measured in this work agree with the results from previous experiments. The present result constitutes the first direct observation of the individual protons in the two-proton decay of a long-lived ground-state emitter. In parallel, we identified for the first time directly two-proton emission from {sup 43}Cr, a known {beta}-delayed two-proton emitter. The technique developed in the present work opens the way to a detailed study of the mechanism of ground-state as well as {beta}-delayed two-proton radioactivity. (authors)

  17. Direct observation of chiral currents and magnetic reflection in atomic flux lattices

    CERN Document Server

    An, Fangzhao Alex; Gadway, Bryce

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of studying topologically nontrivial phases with the precision and control of atomic physics has driven the development of many techniques for engineering artificial magnetic fields and spin-orbit interactions in atomic gases. Recently, the idea of engineering nontrivial topology through the use of discrete internal (or external) atomic states as effective "artificial dimensions" has garnered attraction for its versatility and promise of immunity from sources of heating. Here, we directly engineer tunable artificial gauge fields through the local control of tunneling phases in an effectively two-dimensional manifold of discrete atomic momentum states. We demonstrate the ability to engineer homogeneous artificial gauge fields of arbitrary value, directly imaging the site-resolved dynamics of induced chiral currents. We furthermore engineer the first inhomogeneous artificial gauge fields for cold atoms, enabling the observation of magnetic reflection of atoms incident upon a step-like variation of ...

  18. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  19. First direct observation of two protons in the decay of $^{45}$Fe with a TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Giovinazzo, J; Borcea, C; Canchel, G; De Santos, F O; Demonchy, C E; Dossat, C; Grévy, S; Hay, L; Huikari, J; Leblanc, S; Matea, I; Pedroza, J L; Perrot, L; Pibernat, J; Serani, L; Stodel, C; Thomas, J C

    2007-01-01

    The decay of the ground-state two-proton emitter 45Fe was studied with a time-projection chamber and the emission of two protons was unambiguously identified. The total decay energy and the half-life measured in this work agree with the results from previous experiments. The present result constitutes the first direct observation of the individual protons in the two-proton decay of a long-lived ground-state emitter. In parallel, we identified for the first time directly two-proton emission from 43Cr, a known beta-delayed two-proton emitter. The technique developped in the present work opens the way to a detailed study of the mechanism of ground-state as well as beta-delayed two-proton radioactivity.

  20. Direct assessment of groundwater vulnerability from single observations of multiple contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, F.; Kolpin, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    Groundwater vulnerability is a central concept in pollution risk assessment, yet its estimation has been largely a matter of expert judgment. This work applies a method for the direct calculation of vulnerability from monitoring well observations of pesticide concentrations. The method has two major advantages: it is independent of the compounds being examined, and it has a direct probabilistic interpretation making it ideal for risk assessment. The methodology was applied to data from a groundwater monitoring program in the midwestern United States. The distribution of the vulnerabilities was skewed toward zero. Spatial distribution of the vulnerabilities shows them to be controlled by both regional and local factors. Methods are presented for estimating the necessary sample sizes for vulnerability studies. The further application of the approach developed in this study to understanding groundwater pollution is discussed.

  1. Increasing Reliability of Direct Observation Measurement Approaches in Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders Research Using Generalizability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Nicholas A.; Prykanowski, Debra; Hirn, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Reliability of direct observation outcomes ensures the results are consistent, dependable, and trustworthy. Typically, reliability of direct observation measurement approaches is assessed using interobserver agreement (IOA) and the calculation of observer agreement (e.g., percentage of agreement). However, IOA does not address intraobserver…

  2. Airborne hyperspectral observations of surface and cloud directional reflectivity using a commercial digital camera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ehrlich

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Spectral radiance measurements by a digital single-lens reflex camera were used to derive the directional reflectivity of clouds and different surfaces in the Arctic. The camera has been calibrated radiometrically and spectrally to provide accurate radiance measurements with high angular resolution. A comparison with spectral radiance measurements with the Spectral Modular Airborne Radiation measurement sysTem (SMART-Albedometer showed an agreement within the uncertainties of both instruments (6% for both. The directional reflectivity in terms of the hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF was obtained for sea ice, ice-free ocean and clouds. The sea ice, with an albedo of ρ = 0.96 (at 530 nm wavelength, showed an almost isotropic HDRF, while sun glint was observed for the ocean HDRF (ρ = 0.12. For the cloud observations with ρ = 0.62, the cloudbow – a backscatter feature typically for scattering by liquid water droplets – was covered by the camera. For measurements above heterogeneous stratocumulus clouds, the required number of images to obtain a mean HDRF that clearly exhibits the cloudbow has been estimated at about 50 images (10 min flight time. A representation of the HDRF as a function of the scattering angle only reduces the image number to about 10 (2 min flight time.

    The measured cloud and ocean HDRF have been compared to radiative transfer simulations. The ocean HDRF simulated with the observed surface wind speed of 9 m s−1 agreed best with the measurements. For the cloud HDRF, the best agreement was obtained by a broad and weak cloudbow simulated with a cloud droplet effective radius of Reff = 4 μm. This value agrees with the particle sizes derived from in situ measurements and retrieved from the spectral radiance of the SMART-Albedometer.

  3. A line rate calculation method for arbitrary directional imaging of an Earth observing satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Moon-Jin; Kim, Eunghyun; Lim, Seong-Bin; Choi, Seok-Weon

    2016-10-01

    For an earth observing satellite, a line rate is the number of lines which the CCD of push broom type camera scans in a second. It can be easily calculated by ground velocity divided by ground sample distance. Accurate calculation of line rate is necessary to obtain high quality image using TDI CCD. The earth observing satellite has four types of imaging missions which are strip imaging, stereo imaging, multi-point imaging, and arbitrary directional imaging. For the first three types of imaging, ground scanning direction is aligned with satellite velocity direction. Therefore, if the orbit propagation and spacecraft attitude information are available, the ground velocity and ground sample distance could be easily calculated. However, the calculation method might not be applicable to the arbitrary directional imaging. In the arbitrary directional imaging mode, the ground velocity is not fixed value which could be directly derived by orbit information. Furthermore, the ground sample distance might not be easily calculated by simple trigonometry which is possible for the other types of imaging. In this paper, we proposed a line rate calculation method for the arbitrary directional imaging. We applied spherical geometry to derive the equation of ground point which is the intersection between the line of sight vector of the camera and earth surface. The derivative of this equation for time is the ground velocity except the factor of earth rotation. By adding this equation and earth rotation factor, the true ground velocity vector could be derived. For the ground sample distance, we applied the equation of circle and ellipse for yaw angle difference. The equation of circle is used for the yaw angle representation on the plane which is orthogonal to the line of sight vector. The equation of ellipse is used for the yaw angle representation on the ground surface. We applied the proposed method to the KOMPSAT-3A (Korea Multi-Purpose Satellite 3A) mission which is the first

  4. Friction of elastomer-on-glass system and direct observation of its frictional interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Yoshihiro; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Sugiura, Jun-ichi; Hirano, Motohisa; Nitta, Takahiro [Department of Mathematical and Design Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu, 501-1193 (Japan)

    2007-11-15

    We performed a study on the static friction of PDMS elastomers with well-defined surface topography sliding over glass. An experimental setup for simultaneous measurements of friction force and direct observations of frictional interface has been developed. The static friction force was nearly proportional to normal load. The static friction force was independent of stick time. The simultaneous measurements revealed that the static friction force was proportional to the total area of contact. The coefficient was nearly independent of the surface topography of PDMS elastomers.

  5. Direct observation of elementary radical events: low- and high-energy radiation femtochemistry in solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozek-Pluska, Beata [Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry, Technical University of Lodz, 15 Wroblewskiego Street, 93-590 Lodz (Poland); Gliger, David; Hallou, Abdeslem [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique-ENS Techniques Avancees, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Malka, Victor; Gauduel, Yann A. [Laboratoire d' Optique Appliquee, CNRS UMR 7639, Ecole Polytechnique-ENS Techniques Avancees, 91761 Palaiseau Cedex (France)]. E-mail: yann.gauduel@ensta.fr

    2005-02-01

    The fundamental importance of understanding the primary effects of ionizing radiations in liquid phase and solutions is emphasized in fields such as electron transfer reactions, radical chemistry and radiobiology. With the advent of ultrashort optical pulses and powerful laser systems (TW lasers), ultrafast spectroscopic investigations might conjecture the direct observation of primary events induced by low-energy (photons) and high-energy (relativistic electrons) radiations. The different points discussed in this paper concern the investigation of short-time solvent caging effects on elementary radical reactions in homogeneous liquid phase and nascent spurs.

  6. Religious Observance and Well-Being among Israeli Jewish Adults: Findings from the Israel Social Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Levin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study reports on analyses of Jewish respondents (N = 6,056 from the 2009 Israel Social Survey. Multivariable methods were used to investigate whether religiously observant Jews have greater physical and psychological well-being. After adjustment for age and other sociodemographic correlates of religion and well-being and for a measure of Israeli Jewish religious identity (i.e., secular, traditional, religious, ultra-Orthodox, two findings stand out. First, greater Jewish religious observance is significantly associated with higher scores on indicators of self-rated health, functional health, and life satisfaction. Second, there is a gradient-like trend such that greater religiousness and life satisfaction are observed as one moves “rightward” across religious identity categories. These findings withstand adjustment for effects of all covariates, including Israeli nativity and Jewish religious identity.

  7. Rip current evidence by hydrodynamic simulations, bathymetric surveys and UAV observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benassai, Guido; Aucelli, Pietro; Budillon, Giorgio; De Stefano, Massimo; Di Luccio, Diana; Di Paola, Gianluigi; Montella, Raffaele; Mucerino, Luigi; Sica, Mario; Pennetta, Micla

    2017-09-01

    The prediction of the formation, spacing and location of rip currents is a scientific challenge that can be achieved by means of different complementary methods. In this paper the analysis of numerical and experimental data, including RPAS (remotely piloted aircraft systems) observations, allowed us to detect the presence of rip currents and rip channels at the mouth of Sele River, in the Gulf of Salerno, southern Italy. The dataset used to analyze these phenomena consisted of two different bathymetric surveys, a detailed sediment analysis and a set of high-resolution wave numerical simulations, completed with Google EarthTM images and RPAS observations. The grain size trend analysis and the numerical simulations allowed us to identify the rip current occurrence, forced by topographically constrained channels incised on the seabed, which were compared with observations.

  8. Direct self-repairing control for a helicopter via quantum multi-model and disturbance observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuyang; Cai, Ling; Jiang, Bin; Tao, Gang

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a new direct self-repairing control scheme is developed for a helicopter flight control system with unknown actuator faults and external disturbance. The design of multi-model-based adaptive control is used to accommodate the faulty system under different fault conditions. By appropriate switching based on quantum information technique, the system can be converted to the best model and the corresponding controller. Asymptotic model following performance and system stability is guaranteed. A disturbance observer is introduced to observe the disturbance of the system, which can produce corresponding control signals according to the disturbance. The results including a numerical simulation and a semi-physical verification demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed self-repairing control approach for the helicopter flight control system.

  9. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  10. The Census of Social Institutions (CSI): a public health direct observation measure of local land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Katie M; Hughey, Joseph; Randles, Anthony; Wall, Dustin; Peterson, N Andrew; Jitnarin, Nattinee; Berkel, LaVerne; Eaton, Peter; Bowles, Doug; Haddock, C Keith; Poston, W S Carlos

    2010-05-01

    This manuscript describes the development of the Census of Social Institutions (CSI), a reliable direct observation parcel-level built environment measure. The CSI was used to measure all non-residential parcels (n = 10,842) in 21 one-mile-radius neighborhoods centered around census block groups of varying income and ethnicity in a large metropolitan area. One year test-retest and inter-rater intra-class correlations showed high reliability for major use type and detail code observations. The CSI accurately captured the presence of about 9,500 uses, including 828 multiple major use and 431 mixed major use parcels that would have been missed in standard commercial databases. CSI data can be utilized to determine the health impacts of environmental settings.

  11. Direct observation and imaging of a spin-wave soliton with p-like symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, S.; Kukreja, R.; Chen, Z.; Macià, F.; Hernàndez, J. M.; Eklund, A.; Backes, D.; Frisch, J.; Katine, J.; Malm, G.; Urazhdin, S.; Kent, A. D.; Stöhr, J.; Ohldag, H.; Dürr, H. A.

    2015-11-01

    Spin waves, the collective excitations of spins, can emerge as nonlinear solitons at the nanoscale when excited by an electrical current from a nanocontact. These solitons are expected to have essentially cylindrical symmetry (that is, s-like), but no direct experimental observation exists to confirm this picture. Using a high-sensitivity time-resolved magnetic X-ray microscopy with 50 ps temporal resolution and 35 nm spatial resolution, we are able to create a real-space spin-wave movie and observe the emergence of a localized soliton with a nodal line, that is, with p-like symmetry. Micromagnetic simulations explain the measurements and reveal that the symmetry of the soliton can be controlled by magnetic fields. Our results broaden the understanding of spin-wave dynamics at the nanoscale, with implications for the design of magnetic nanodevices.

  12. Perspectives on advance directives in Japanese society: A population-based questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slingsby Brian

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, discussion concerning advance directives (ADs has been on the rise during the past decade. ADs are one method proposed to facilitate the process of communication among patients, families and health care providers regarding the plan of care of a patient who is no longer capable of communicating. In this paper, we report the results of the first in-depth survey on the general population concerning the preferences and use of ADs in Japan. Method A self-administered questionnaire was sent via mail to a stratified random sampling of 560 residents listed in the residential registry of one district of Tokyo, Japan (n = 165,567. Association between correlating factors and specific preferences toward ADs was assessed using contingency table bivariate analysis and multivariate regression model to estimate independent contribution. Results Of the 560 questionnaires sent out, a total of 425 participants took part in the survey yielding a response rate of 75.9 %. The results of the present study indicate that: 1 the most important components to be addressed are the specifics of medical treatment at the end of life stage and disclosure of diagnosis and prognosis; 2 the majority of participants found it suitable to express their directives by word to family and/or physician and not by written documentation; 3 there is no strong need for legal measures in setting up an AD; 4 it is permissible for family and physician to loosely interpret one's directives; 5 the most suitable proxy is considered to be a family member, relative, or spouse. Multivariate analysis found the following five factors as significantly associated with preferences: 1 awareness regarding living wills, 2 experience with the use of ADs, 3 preferences for end-of-life treatment, 4 preferences for information disclosure, and 5 intentions of creating a will. Conclusions Written ADs might be useful in the Japanese setting when the individual either wishes: 1 to not

  13. Advancing vector biology research: a community survey for future directions, research applications and infrastructure requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie; Schnettler, Esther; Crisanti, Andrea; Supparo, Clelia; Christophides, George K; Kersey, Paul J; Maslen, Gareth L; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M; Oliva, Clelia F; Busquets, Núria; Abad, F Xavier; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Levashina, Elena A; Wilson, Anthony J; Veronesi, Eva; Pichard, Maëlle; Arnaud Marsh, Sarah; Simard, Frédéric; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target transmission by the vector. While insecticides are an important part of this arsenal, appearance of resistance mechanisms is increasingly common. Novel tools for genetic manipulation of vectors, use of Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria, and other biological control mechanisms to prevent pathogen transmission have led to promising new intervention strategies, adding to strong interest in vector biology and genetics as well as vector-pathogen interactions. Vector research is therefore at a crucial juncture, and strategic decisions on future research directions and research infrastructure investment should be informed by the research community. A survey initiated by the European Horizon 2020 INFRAVEC-2 consortium set out to canvass priorities in the vector biology research community and to determine key activities that are needed for researchers to efficiently study vectors, vector-pathogen interactions, as well as access the structures and services that allow such activities to be carried out. We summarize the most important findings of the survey which in particular reflect the priorities of researchers in European countries, and which will be of use to stakeholders that include researchers, government, and research organizations.

  14. First direct observation of runaway electron-driven whistler waves in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2017-10-01

    Whistlers are electromagnetic waves that can be driven unstable by energetic electrons and are observed in natural plasmas, such as the ionosphere and Van Allen belts. Recent DIII-D experiments at low density demonstrate the first direct observation of whistlers in tokamaks, with 100-200 MHz waves excited by runaway electrons (REs) in the multi-MeV range. Whistler activity is correlated with RE intensity and the frequencies scale with magnetic field strength and electron density consistent with a whistler dispersion relation. Fluctuations occur in discrete frequency bands, and not a continuum as would be expected from plane wave analysis, suggesting the important role of toroidicity. An MHD model including the bounded/periodic nature of the plasma identifies multiple eigenmode branches. For a toroidal mode number n = 10, the predicted frequencies and spacing are similar to observations. The instabilities are stabilized with increasing magnetic field, as expected from the anomalous Doppler resonance. The whistler amplitudes show intermittent time variations. Predator-prey cycles with electron cyclotron emission (ECE) signals are observed, which can be interpreted as wave-induced pitch angle scattering of moderate energy REs. Such nonlinear dynamics are supported by quasi-linear simulations indicating that REs are scattered both by whistlers and high frequency magnetized plasma waves. The whistler wave predominantly scatters the high energy REs, while the magnetized plasma wave scatters the low energy REs, abruptly enhancing the ECE signal. Amplitude variations are also associated with sawtooth activity, indicating that the REs sample the q = 1 surface. These features of the RE-driven whistler have connections to ionospheric plasmas and open up new directions for the modeling and active control of tokamak REs. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-FG02-07ER54917, DE-SC00-16268, and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  15. Direct microscopic observation of hologram build-up in photorefractive crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bányász, István; Mandula, Gábor

    2006-05-01

    A method, based on phase-contrast and interference microscopy, was developed for direct microscopic observation of temporal evolution of phase holograms in photorefractive crystals. Interference microscopy was adapted to the study of photorefractive holograms. First a hologram was recorded in the sample, and diffraction efficiency was monitored during hologram build-up using inactinic laser light. Thus kinetics of hologram build-up could be determined. The initial hologram was erased using white light. Then a series of write-erase cycles were performed with increasing exposure times up to an exposure corresponding to saturation of the grating. Holograms were observed by interference microscope after each exposure. The time elapsed between the exposure and the microscopic observation was negligible compared to the relaxation time of the hologram. The obtained temporal evolution of grating profile gives a deeper insight into the physical mechanism of hologram formation in photorefractive materials than diffraction efficiency measurements. Congruently grown samples of LiNbO 3: Fe, with Fe concentrations in melting of 10 -3 were studied by the above method. Sample thickness was set to 300 μm to allow correct microscopic observation. Plane-wave holograms were recorded in the samples using an Ar-ion laser at λ=514 nm of grating constants of 3.3 and 7.0 μm.

  16. Clinical observation of Ahmed glaucoma valve implantation for refractory glaucoma by directly puncturing the sclerotic tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ke Xu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the clinic effects and complication of Ahmed glaucoma valve(AGVimplantation in refractory glaucoma by using the 23G syringe needle direct puncture the sclerotic tunnel.METHODS: Forty-four cases(44 eyesof refractory glaucoma underwent AGV implantation by useing the 23G syringe needle direct puncture the sclerotic tunnel. The intraocular pressure(IOP, visual acuity, and complication of post-operation were contrasted with those of pre-operation. RESULTS:The success rate was 84.1%, the mean preoperative IOP in research group was 52.1±10.1mmHg, and the last follow up mean IOP was 15.6±6.9mmHg. Compared with the preoperative visual acuity, 11 eyes increased, 27 eyes had no changes and 6 eyes decreased. The main post-operative complications included shallow anterior chamber(4 eyes, choroidal detachment(3 eyes, drainage tube shift(1 eye, hyphema(6 eyes, drainage tube blockage(1 eye, expulsive choroidal hemorrhage(1 eye, and fiber wrap of drainage tray(5 eyes.CONCLUSION: AGV implantation by direct puncture the sclerotic tunnel is feasible and easy. It avoids of making sclerotic petal and the xenogenic sclera transplanting, simplified the operation technique, prevent the leakage of around tube. The shallow anterior chamber rate is lower. It is an effective procedure for refractory glaucoma.

  17. The DES Bright Arcs Survey: Hundreds of Candidate Strongly Lensed Galaxy Systems from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification and Year 1 Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, H. T. [Fermilab

    2017-06-09

    We report the results of our searches for strong gravitational lens systems in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verication and Year 1 observations. The Science Verication data spans approximately 250 sq. deg. with median i

  18. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF SOLAR CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS BY VECTOR TOMOGRAPHY OF THE CORONAL EMISSION LINE POLARIZATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramar, M. [Physics Department, The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue NE, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Lin, H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 34 Ohia Ku Street, Pukalani, Maui, HI 96768 (United States); Tomczyk, S., E-mail: kramar@cua.edu, E-mail: lin@ifa.hawaii.edu, E-mail: tomczyk@ucar.edu [High Altitude Observatory, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    We present the first direct “observation” of the global-scale, 3D coronal magnetic fields of Carrington Rotation (CR) Cycle 2112 using vector tomographic inversion techniques. The vector tomographic inversion uses measurements of the Fe xiii 10747 Å Hanle effect polarization signals by the Coronal Multichannel Polarimeter (CoMP) and 3D coronal density and temperature derived from scalar tomographic inversion of Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO)/Extreme Ultraviolet Imager (EUVI) coronal emission lines (CELs) intensity images as inputs to derive a coronal magnetic field model that best reproduces the observed polarization signals. While independent verifications of the vector tomography results cannot be performed, we compared the tomography inverted coronal magnetic fields with those constructed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations based on observed photospheric magnetic fields of CR 2112 and 2113. We found that the MHD model for CR 2112 is qualitatively consistent with the tomography inverted result for most of the reconstruction domain except for several regions. Particularly, for one of the most noticeable regions, we found that the MHD simulation for CR 2113 predicted a model that more closely resembles the vector tomography inverted magnetic fields. In another case, our tomographic reconstruction predicted an open magnetic field at a region where a coronal hole can be seen directly from a STEREO-B/EUVI image. We discuss the utilities and limitations of the tomographic inversion technique, and present ideas for future developments.

  19. Modeling an Optical and Infrared Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Survey with Exoplanet Direct Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vides, Christina; Macintosh, Bruce; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Nielsen, Eric; Povich, Matthew Samuel

    2018-01-01

    Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is a direct high contrast imaging instrument coupled to the Gemini South Telescope. Its purpose is to image extrasolar planets around young (~Intelligence), we modeled GPI’s capabilities to detect an extraterrestrial continuous wave (CW) laser broadcasted within the H-band have been modeled. By using sensitivity evaluated for actual GPI observations of young target stars, we produced models of the CW laser power as a function of distance from the star that could be detected if GPI were to observe nearby (~ 3-5 pc) planet-hosting G-type stars. We took a variety of transmitters into consideration in producing these modeled values. GPI is known to be sensitive to both pulsed and CW coherent electromagnetic radiation. The results were compared to similar studies and it was found that these values are competitive to other optical and infrared observations.

  20. Cortical kinematic processing of executed and observed goal-directed hand actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Brice; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Jousmäki, Veikko; Wens, Vincent; Op de Beeck, Marc; Van Bogaert, Patrick; Goldman, Serge; Hari, Riitta; De Tiège, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    Motor information conveyed by viewing the kinematics of an agent's action helps to predict how the action will unfold. Still, how observed movement kinematics is processed in the brain remains to be clarified. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine at which frequency and where in the brain, the neural activity is coupled with the kinematics of executed and observed motor actions. Whole-scalp MEG signals were recorded from 11 right-handed healthy adults while they were executing (Self) or observing (Other) similar goal-directed hand actions performed by an actor placed in front of them. Actions consisted of pinching with the right hand green foam-made pieces mixed in a heap with pieces of other colors placed on a table, and put them in a plastic pot on the right side of the heap. Subjects' and actor's forefinger movements were monitored with an accelerometer. The coherence between movement acceleration and MEG signals was computed at the sensor level. Then, cortical sources coherent with movement acceleration were identified with Dynamic Imaging of Coherent Sources. Statistically significant sensor-level coherence peaked at the movement frequency (F0) and its first harmonic (F1) in both movement conditions. Apart from visual cortices, statistically significant local maxima of coherence were observed in the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (F0), bilateral superior parietal lobule (F0 or F1) and primary sensorimotor cortex (F0 or F1) in both movement conditions. These results suggest that observing others' actions engages the viewer's brain in a similar kinematic-related manner as during own action execution. These findings bring new insights into how human brain activity covaries with essential features of observed movements of others. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. XMM-Newton Observations of the DLS Shear-Selected Cluster Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellAntonio, Ian

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project continues to be to test the selection effects in cluster surveys by investigating the X-ray properties of the first shear-selected sample of galaxy clusters, the Deep Lens Survey (DLS). Because lensing signal is only sensitive to mass (albeit with projection effects), lensing signal can be used to select a sample that is independent of its X-ray properties. If a lensing-selected sample has very different X-ray properties from an X-ray selected sample, it would have important consequences for evolutionary studies based on existing cluster samples was aimed at refining the lensing-selected sample as part of this continuing study The grant supported a KPNO run to obtain data on another region of the sky to extend the cluster sample, and also the purchase of a disk array for archiving the optical mosaic data (Two terabytes worth) from which the lensing maps are derived As a result of the grant, we have extended the lensing cluster sample to another 4-square degree patch of the sky, adding another three clusters to our sample to be observed While the sample of X-ray observed clusters is too small to derive a firm conclusion yet, our preliminary finding is that the X-ray properties of the observed sample do not differ from those of X-ray selected surveys A paper discussing the first results has been published, and a second paper on the mass differences is still in preparation (with J Hughes as first author)

  2. Effects of the observation method (direct v. from video) and of the presence of an observer on behavioural results in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leruste, H.; Bokkers, E.A.M.; Sergent, O.; Wolthuis-Fillerup, M.; Reenen, van C.G.; Lensink, B.J.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effect of the observation method (direct or from video) and the effect of the presence of an observer on the behavioural results in veal calves kept on a commercial farm. To evaluate the effect of the observation method, 20 pens (four to five calves per pen) were

  3. Surveying all public drinking water fountains in a city: outdoor field observations and Google Street View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nick; Signal, Louise; Thomson, George

    2018-02-01

    Drinking fountains are a public amenity that may help counter the obesogenic environment (sugary beverages) and reduce the risk of heat stroke during heat waves. As a case study, we aimed to survey all public fountains in a city: Wellington, New Zealand, and to determine the utility of Google Street View in studying drinking fountains. Using a sample of all public drinking fountains in a City Council map, a field observer assessed their exact location and tap functionality, and photographed them. Google Street View was also used by the field observer and an independent observer to attempt fountain detection. There were 47 fountains, found in only 6% of children's playgrounds and 29% of the parks (for a sample of the 10 largest suburbs). While the field observations showed that all 74 taps at the fountains delivered water, only 47% had taps for easy filling of drinking water bottles, and only 15% had bowls for dogs to drink from. Visible discolouration from algae/metal degradation was adjacent to 47% of nozzles. Google Street View detection of fountains by the field observer was successful for 68% and for 52% by the independent observer. The fountains were of generally high quality, but discolouration around the nozzle was common. Implications for public health: Additional investment in public fountains may be needed. © 2017 The Authors.

  4. Monitoring greenhouse gas emissions in Australian landscapes: Comparing ground based mobile surveying data to GOSAT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, S.; Iverach, C.; Kelly, B. F. J.

    2016-12-01

    Climate change is threatening the health and stability of the natural world and human society. Such concerns were emphasized at COP21 conference in Paris 2015 which highlighted the global need to improve our knowledge of sources of greenhouse gas and to develop methods to mitigate the effects of their emissions. Ongoing spatial and temporal measurements of greenhouse gases at both point and regional scales is important for clarification of climate change mechanisms and accounting. The Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is designed to monitor the global distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) from orbit. As existing ground monitoring stations are limited and still unevenly distributed, satellite observations provide important frequent, spatially extensive, but low resolution observations. Recent developments in portable laser based greenhouse gas measurement systems have enabled the rapid measurement of greenhouse gases in ppb at the ground surface. This study was conducted to map major sources of CO2 and CH4 in the eastern states of Australia at the landscape scale and to compare the results to GOSAT observations. During April 2016 we conducted a regional CH4 and CO2 mobile survey, using an LGR greenhouse gas analyzer. Measurements were made along a 4000 KM circuit through major cities, country towns, dry sclerophyll forests, coastal wetlands, coal mining regions, coal seam gas developments, dryland farming and irrigated agricultural landscapes. The ground-based survey data were then compared with the data (L2) from GOSAT. Ground-based mobile surveys showed that there are clear statistical differences in the ground level atmospheric concentration of CH4 and CO2 associated with all major changes in land use. These changes extend for kilometers, and cover one or more GOSAT pixels. In the coal mining districts the ground-level atmospheric concentration of CH4 exceeded 2 ppm for over 40 km, yet this was not discernable in the retrieved data (L2

  5. Wind estimation around the shipwreck of Oriental Star based on field damage surveys and radar observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhiyong; Yao, Dan; Bai, Lanqiang; Zheng, Yongguang; Xue, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhao, Kun; Tian, Fuyou; Wang, Mingjun

    Based on observational analyses and on-site ground and aerial damage surveys, this work aims to reveal the weather phenomena-especially the wind situation-when Oriental Star capsized in the Yangtze River on June 1, 2015. Results demonstrate that the cruise ship capsized when it encountered strong winds at speeds of at least 31 m s-1 near the apex of a bow echo embedded in a squall line. As suggested by the fallen trees within a 2-km radius around the wreck location, such strong winds were likely caused by microburst straight-line wind and/or embedded small vortices, rather than tornadoes.

  6. 78 FR 11141 - BE-577: Quarterly Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad- Direct Transactions of U.S. Reporter...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... purposes or to otherwise secure economic advantage, and any ownership of any real estate. Who Must Report..., branch, partnership, associated group, association, estate, trust, corporation, or other organization... Bureau of Economic Analysis XRIN 0691-XC002 BE-577: Quarterly Survey of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad...

  7. Assessing distractors and teamwork during surgery: developing an event-based method for direct observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelandt, Julia C; Tschan, Franziska; Keller, Sandra; Beldi, Guido; Jenni, Nadja; Kurmann, Anita; Candinas, Daniel; Semmer, Norbert K

    2014-11-01

    To develop a behavioural observation method to simultaneously assess distractors and communication/teamwork during surgical procedures through direct, on-site observations; to establish the reliability of the method for long (>3 h) procedures. Observational categories for an event-based coding system were developed based on expert interviews, observations and a literature review. Using Cohen's κ and the intraclass correlation coefficient, interobserver agreement was assessed for 29 procedures. Agreement was calculated for the entire surgery, and for the 1st hour. In addition, interobserver agreement was assessed between two tired observers and between a tired and a non-tired observer after 3 h of surgery. The observational system has five codes for distractors (door openings, noise distractors, technical distractors, side conversations and interruptions), eight codes for communication/teamwork (case-relevant communication, teaching, leadership, problem solving, case-irrelevant communication, laughter, tension and communication with external visitors) and five contextual codes (incision, last stitch, personnel changes in the sterile team, location changes around the table and incidents). Based on 5-min intervals, Cohen's κ was good to excellent for distractors (0.74-0.98) and for communication/teamwork (0.70-1). Based on frequency counts, intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for distractors (0.86-0.99) and good to excellent for communication/teamwork (0.45-0.99). After 3 h of surgery, Cohen's κ was 0.78-0.93 for distractors, and 0.79-1 for communication/teamwork. The observational method developed allows a single observer to simultaneously assess distractors and communication/teamwork. Even for long procedures, high interobserver agreement can be achieved. Data collected with this method allow for investigating separate or combined effects of distractions and communication/teamwork on surgical performance and patient outcomes. Published by the

  8. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients under directly observed treatment in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getahun, Belete; Ameni, Gobena; Medhin, Girmay; Biadgilign, Sibhatu

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading causes of mortality among infectious diseases worldwide. For effective tuberculosis control, it is a pre-requisite to detect the cases as early as possible, and to ensure that the tuberculosis patients complete their treatment and get cured. However, in many resource-constrained settings treatment outcome for tuberculosis has not been satisfactory. The aim of the study was to assess the treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients and investigate the association of demographic and clinical factors with treatment success of patients enrolled in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course program in government owned health centers over the course of five consecutive years in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. A register based historical cohort study covering the period of July 2004 to June 2009 was conducted to determine the treatment outcome of Directly Observed Treatment Short Course in government owned health centers in Addis Ababa. Sex and age of tuberculosis patients, health center at which the patient was treated, year of treatment, type of tuberculosis for which the patient was treated, type of treatment offered to the patient, follow-up status and documented treatment outcome were extracted from the Directly Observed Treatment Short Course clinics of three randomly selected health centers. Records of 6450 registered tuberculosis patients (n=3147 males and 3433 females) were included in this document review. Of these patients 18.1% were reported as being cured, 64.6% were documented as treatment completed, 3.7% died during follow-up, 5.1% were reported as defaulters, 0.4% were documented as treatment failure and 8.2% were transferred out to another health institution. Treatment center and year of enrollment were significantly associated with treatment success. Year of enrollment and treatment center were significantly associated with treatment success. Although the overall treatment success obtained in this study is in line with the World

  9. Treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients under directly observed treatment in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belete Getahun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis is one of the leading causes of mortality among infectious diseases worldwide. For effective tuberculosis control, it is a pre-requisite to detect the cases as early as possible, and to ensure that the tuberculosis patients complete their treatment and get cured. However, in many resource-constrained settings treatment outcome for tuberculosis has not been satisfactory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to assess the treatment outcome of tuberculosis patients and investigate the association of demographic and clinical factors with treatment success of patients enrolled in Directly Observed Treatment Short Course program in government owned health centers over the course of five consecutive years in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. METHODS: A register based historical cohort study covering the period of July 2004 to June 2009 was conducted to determine the treatment outcome of Directly Observed Treatment Short Course in government owned health centers in Addis Ababa. Sex and age of tuberculosis patients, health center at which the patient was treated, year of treatment, type of tuberculosis for which the patient was treated, type of treatment offered to the patient, follow-up status and documented treatment outcome were extracted from the Directly Observed Treatment Short Course clinics of three randomly selected health centers. RESULT: Records of 6450 registered tuberculosis patients (n = 3147 males and 3433 females were included in this document review. Of these patients 18.1% were reported as being cured, 64.6% were documented as treatment completed, 3.7% died during follow-up, 5.1% were reported as defaulters, 0.4% were documented as treatment failure and 8.2% were transferred out to another health institution. Treatment center and year of enrollment were significantly associated with treatment success. CONCLUSION: Year of enrollment and treatment center were significantly associated with treatment success. Although the

  10. Current Directions in Adding Value to Earth Observation Products for Decision Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryker, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Natural resource managers and infrastructure planners face increasingly complex challenges, given competing demands for resources and changing conditions due to climate and land use change. These pressures create demand for high-quality, timely data; for both one-time decision support and long-term monitoring; and for techniques to articulate the value of resources in monetary and nonmonetary terms. To meet the need for data, the U.S. government invests several billion dollars per year in Earth observations collected from satellite, airborne, terrestrial, and ocean-based systems. Earth observation-based decision support is coming of age; user surveys show that these data are used in an increasing variety of analyses. For example, since the U.S. Department of the Interior/U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) 2008 free and open data policy for the Landsat satellites, downloads from the USGS archive have increased from 20,000 Landsat scenes per year to 10 million per year and climbing, with strong growth in both research and decision support fields. However, Earth observation-based decision support still poses users a number of challenges. Many of those Landsat downloads support a specialized community of remote sensing scientists, though new technologies promise to increase the usability of remotely sensed data for the larger GIS community supporting planning and resource management. Serving this larger community also requires supporting the development of increasingly interpretive products, and of new approaches to host and update products. For example, automating updates will add value to new essential climate variable products such as surface water extent and wildfire burned area extent. Projections of future urbanization in the southeastern U.S. are most useful when long-term land cover trends are integrated with street-level community data and planning tools. The USGS assessment of biological carbon sequestration in vegetation and shallow soils required a significant

  11. The EDGE-CALIFA Survey: Interferometric Observations of 126 Galaxies with CARMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolatto, Alberto D.; Wong, Tony; Utomo, Dyas; Blitz, Leo; Vogel, Stuart N.; Sánchez, Sebastián F.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Cao, Yixian; Colombo, Dario; Dannerbauer, Helmut; García-Benito, Rubén; Herrera-Camus, Rodrigo; Husemann, Bernd; Kalinova, Veselina; Leroy, Adam K.; Leung, Gigi; Levy, Rebecca C.; Mast, Damián; Ostriker, Eve; Rosolowsky, Erik; Sandstrom, Karin M.; Teuben, Peter; van de Ven, Glenn; Walter, Fabian

    2017-09-01

    We present interferometric CO observations, made with the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA) interferometer, of galaxies from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE). These galaxies are selected from the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area (CALIFA) sample, mapped with optical integral field spectroscopy. EDGE provides good-quality CO data (3σ sensitivity {{{Σ }}}{mol}˜ 11 {M}⊙ {{pc}}-2 before inclination correction, resolution ˜1.4 kpc) for 126 galaxies, constituting the largest interferometric CO survey of galaxies in the nearby universe. We describe the survey and data characteristics and products, then present initial science results. We find that the exponential scale lengths of the molecular, stellar, and star-forming disks are approximately equal, and galaxies that are more compact in molecular gas than in stars tend to show signs of interaction. We characterize the molecular-to-stellar ratio as a function of Hubble type and stellar mass and present preliminary results on the resolved relations between the molecular gas, stars, and star-formation rate. We then discuss the dependence of the resolved molecular depletion time on stellar surface density, nebular extinction, and gas metallicity. EDGE provides a key data set to address outstanding topics regarding gas and its role in star formation and galaxy evolution, which will be publicly available on completion of the quality assessment.

  12. THE ROLE OF DIRECT OBSERVED TREATMENT IN TUBERCULOSIS TREATMENT SUCCESSFUL AT COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursalam Nursalam

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : The succeeded of the tuberculosis treatment depends on the obedience of the patient in taking the tuberculosis’s medication assisted by the direct observed treatment shortcourse (DOTS to refrain resistancy and dropping out of the program. The aimed of this study was to analyze the correlation between DOTS’s role with the successfullness of lung’s tuberculosis treatment program at Bajawa city. Method : A cross sectional simple random sampling design was used in this study. Population were all the Direct Observed Treatment Supervisors and patients who have had finished their treatment of tuberculosis. Sample were 43 respondents. The independent variables in this study were the role of the DOTSs, education level, family support, motivation and the DOTSs attitude. The dependent variables were the patient’s obedience in taking medication and the evaluation of the acid fast bacterias in their sputum. Data were collected by using questionnaire and observation sputum the to evaluate acid fast bacteria. Data were analyzed by using Spearman Rho with significance level with α<0.05.Result : The result showed that role of the DOTSs had significance correlation with the succeeding program of tuberculosis (r=0.023, education level had significance correlation (r=0.043, family support as the DOTS had significance correlation (r=0.021, motivation (r=0.032 and attitude (r=0.014. Analysis : It can be concluded that the role of the DOTS has correlation with succesing tuberculosis treatment. Discussion : The role of PMO cause the succesfully of Tb treatment for the community in Bajawa City, Ngada NTT.

  13. Toward the Direct Measurement of Coronal Magnetic Fields: An Airborne Infrared Spectrometer for Eclipse Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samra, J.; DeLuca, E. E.; Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.

    2014-12-01

    The solar magnetic field enables the heating of the corona and provides its underlying structure. Energy stored in coronal magnetic fields is released in flares and coronal mass ejections (CME) and provides the ultimate source of energy for space weather. Therefore, direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance understanding of coronal dynamics and improve solar forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe only the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, a proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are four forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 2 and 4 μm. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer, and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the August 2017 total solar eclipse. The project incorporates several optical engineering challenges, centered around maintaining adequate spectral and spatial resolution in a compact and inexpensive package and on a moving platform. Design studies are currently underway to examine the tradeoffs between various optical geometries and control strategies for the pointing/stabilization system. The results will be presented and interpreted in terms of the consequences for the scientific questions. In addition, results from a laboratory prototype and simulations of the final system will be presented.

  14. The direct health-care burden of valvular heart disease: evidence from US national survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Matt Moore,1 Jie Chen,2 Peter J Mallow,3 John A Rizzo4 1Global Health Economic Strategy, Edwards Lifesciences Inc, Irvine, CA, 2Department of Health Services and Administration, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 3Health Economics and Outcomes Research, CTI Clinical Trial & Consulting Services Inc, Cincinnati, OH, 4Department of Preventive Medicine and Economics, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY, USA Purpose: This study quantified the overall effects of aortic valve disease (AVD and mitral valve disease (MVD by disease severity on direct health-care costs to insurers and patients.Materials and methods: Based on 1996–2011 data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS, a large, nationally representative US database, multivariate analyses were performed to assess the relationship between AVD and MVD and direct annual health-care costs to insurers and patients, at individual and US-aggregate levels. Adults aged 18 years and over with diagnosis codes for AVD or MVD based on International Classification of Diseases (ninth revision diagnosis codes were identified. Subjects were further classified as symptomatic AVD, asymptomatic AVD, symptomatic MVD, and asymptomatic MVD. These classifications were determined with clinical assistance and based in part on data availability in the MEPS.Results: The MEPS database included 148 patients with AVD: 53 patients with symptomatic AVD, 95 patients with asymptomatic AVD, and 1,051 with MVD, including 315 patients with symptomatic MVD and 736 patients with asymptomatic MVD. Symptomatic AVD had the largest incremental effect on annual per patient health-care expenditure: $12,789 for symptomatic AVD, $10,816 for asymptomatic AVD, $5,163 for symptomatic MVD, and $1,755 for asymptomatic MVD. When aggregated to the US population, heart-valve disease accounted for an incremental annual cost of $23.4 billion. The largest aggregate annual costs were incurred by patients with symptomatic MVD ($7

  15. Not seeing or feeling is still believing: conscious and non-conscious pain modulation after direct and observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Natalia; Park, Joel; Orr, Scott P; Kirsch, Irving; Gollub, Randy L; Kong, Jian

    2015-11-18

    Our experience with the world is shaped not only directly through personal exposure but also indirectly through observing others and learning from their experiences. Using a conditioning paradigm, we investigated how directly and observationally learned information can affect pain perception, both consciously and non-consciously. Differences between direct and observed cues were manifest in higher pain ratings and larger skin conductance responses to directly experienced cues. However, the pain modulation effects produced by conditioning were of comparable magnitude for direct and observational learning. These results suggest that social observation can induce positive and negative pain modulation. Importantly, the fact that cues learned by observation and activated non-consciously still produced a robust conditioning effect that withstood extinction highlights the role of indirect exposure in placebo and nocebo effects.

  16. Simulation platform for direct load control of household appliances. Literature survey and G2 implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolm, J.; Vlaheli, A.

    1996-10-01

    There is an incentive for the power utilities to look for other ways than building new power stations to satisfy increasing customer power needs. One way to fulfill this demand is by redistributing the available electric power between the different power consumers. This method can successfully be used during high peak hours. The utility is also able to make financial profits selling the redistributed electric power at a higher price to customers with temporary high power demands. Direct Load Control - DLC, a Demand Side Management - DSM tool, is one way to achieve a redistribution of electric power. This masters thesis project consisted in developing a user-friendly simulation platform for domestic appliances combined with an electric power control system to be employed for Direct Load Control. The platform contains the necessary facilities for designing an electrical distribution network model and is implemented in G2, an object-oriented real-time environment. The final application provides an on-line instrument for the utility to control the power consumption over the entire system in terms of dispensing power in an electrical network. The report consists of two main parts. The first part describes a literature survey we systematically compiled to gather literature sources. The second part outlines our design and implementation of the G2 simulation platform for a water-heater model with a Direct Load Control system. The entire simulation platform is designed to allow a flexible change and improvement of the different models. Consequently, our software is a powerful tool for studying a wide range of problems related to a Load Management program involving electrical household loads. 9 refs, 32 figs

  17. Introduction of direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription drugs in Canada: an opinion survey on regulatory policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzes, Barbara; Barer, Morris; Lexchin, Joel; Bassett, Ken L

    2005-06-01

    Canada is strongly influenced by US cross-border direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) and has held consultations to discuss introduction of DTCA since 1996. This article describes a survey of Canadian drug policy experts carried out in 2001, during one such legislative review. The survey results are compared to more recent DTCA policy developments. We recruited key informants on pharmaceutical policy to complete a faxed questionnaire that queried their opinions on DTCA information quality, effects on drug and health care use, and regulatory issues. Respondents were asked about the evidence they had used to back their opinions. Analysis was descriptive. Of 79 identified potential participants, 60 (76%) participated, 40% of whom were from federal and provincial government; 3% were private insurers; 18%, 15%, and 8% were from health professional groups, consumer groups, and patient groups, respectively; 8% and 7% were from pharmaceutical and advertising industries, respectively. Opinions were highly polarized on the effects of DTCA on drug and health care use. Advertising and pharmaceutical industry respondents were generally positive, public sector, health professional and consumer groups generally negative. Over 80% believed DTCA leads to higher private and public drug costs and more frequent physician visits. Fewer judged billboards or television to be appropriate media for DTCA than magazines or the Internet, and most believed that children and adolescents should not be targeted. Given the polarization observed within this survey, we examined how DTCA policy has evolved in Canada since 2001. The federal government has legislative authority over DTCA, but bears few of the additional costs potentially incurred through policy change. These fall to the provinces, which provide an eroding patchwork of public coverage for prescription drugs in the face of rapidly increasing costs. No new federal legislation has been tabled since 2001. However, considerable shifts in

  18. Authors’ perspectives on academic publishing: initial observations from a large-scale global survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil D’Souza

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Authors are at the heart of academic publishing, but their voices are underrepresented in discussions about improving the academic publishing system. To understand the viewpoints of authors on various aspects of academic publishing and the challenges they face, we developed a large-scale survey entitled “Author perspectives on the academic publishing process” and made it available in December 2016. The survey has received 8,795 responses; this paper is based on the interim results drawn from 5,293 survey responses, and presents some interesting and thought-provoking trends that were observed in the authors’ responses, such as their interpretation of plagiarism and decisive factors in journal selection, as well as their thoughts on what needs to change in the publishing system for it to be more author-friendly. Some of the most important findings of the survey were: (1 the majority of the authors found manuscript preparation to be the most challenging task in the publication process, (2 the impact factor of a journal was reported to be the most important consideration for journal selection, (3 most authors found journal guidelines to be incomplete, (4 major gaps existed in author-journal communication, and (5 although awareness of ethics was high, awareness of good publication practice standards was low. Moreover, more than half of the participants indicated that among areas for improvement in the publishing system, they would like to see changes in the time it takes to publish a paper, the peer review process, and the fairness and objectivity of the publication process. These findings indicate the necessity of making the journal publication process more author-centered and smoothing the way for authors to get published.

  19. Direct observation of the two-plasmon-decay common plasma wave using ultraviolet Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, R. K. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics and Dept. of Physics and Astronomy.; Edgell, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics.; Henchen, R. J. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics.; Hu, S. X. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics.; Katz, J. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics.; Michel, D. T. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics.; Myatt, J. F. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics.; Shaw, J. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics.; Froula, D. H. [Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics and Dept. of Physics and Astronomy.

    2015-03-26

    A 263-nm Thomson-scattering beam was used to directly probe two-plasmon-decay (TPD) excited electron plasma waves (EPWs) driven by between two and five 351-nm beams on the OMEGA Laser System. The amplitude of these waves was nearly independent of the number of drive beams at constant overlapped intensity, showing that the observed EPWs are common to the multiple beams. In an experimental configuration where the Thomson-scattering diagnostic was not wave matched to the common TPD EPWs, a broad spectrum of TPD-driven EPWs was observed, indicative of nonlinear effects associated with TPD saturation. Electron plasma waves corresponding to Langmuir decay of TPD EPWs were observed in both Thomson-scattering spectra, suggesting the Langmuir decay instability as a TPD saturation mechanism. Simulated Thomson-scattering spectra from three-dimensional numerical solutions of the extended Zakharov equations of TPD are in excellent agreement with the experimental spectra and verify the presence of the Langmuir decay instability.

  20. Direct radiative effect of aerosols based on PARASOL and OMI satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Torres, Omar

    2017-02-01

    Accurate portrayal of the aerosol characteristics is crucial to determine aerosol contribution to the Earth's radiation budget. We employ novel satellite retrievals to make a new measurement-based estimate of the shortwave direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA), both over land and ocean. Global satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function from PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) are used in synergy with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) SSA. Aerosol information is combined with land-surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function and cloud characteristics from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite products. Eventual gaps in observations are filled with the state-of-the-art global aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM2. It is found that our estimate of DREA is largely insensitive to model choice. Radiative transfer calculations show that DREA at top-of-atmosphere is -4.6 ± 1.5 W/m2 for cloud-free and -2.1 ± 0.7 W/m2 for all-sky conditions, during year 2006. These fluxes are consistent with, albeit generally less negative over ocean than, former assessments. Unlike previous studies, our estimate is constrained by retrievals of global coverage SSA, which may justify different DREA values. Remarkable consistency is found in comparison with DREA based on CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and MODIS observations.

  1. Direct Radiative Effect of Aerosols Based on PARASOL and OMI Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacagnina, Carlo; Hasekamp, Otto P.; Torres, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Accurate portrayal of the aerosol characteristics is crucial to determine aerosol contribution to the Earth's radiation budget. We employ novel satellite retrievals to make a new measurement-based estimate of the shortwave direct radiative effect of aerosols (DREA), both over land and ocean. Global satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth, single-scattering albedo (SSA), and phase function from PARASOL (Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with Observations from a Lidar) are used in synergy with OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) SSA. Aerosol information is combined with land-surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function and cloud characteristics from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) satellite products. Eventual gaps in observations are filled with the state-of-the-art global aerosol model ECHAM5-HAM2. It is found that our estimate of DREA is largely insensitive to model choice. Radiative transfer calculations show that DREA at top-of-atmosphere is -4.6 +/- 1.5 W/sq m for cloud-free and -2.1 +/- 0.7 W/sq m for all-sky conditions, during year 2006. These fluxes are consistent with, albeit generally less negative over ocean than, former assessments. Unlike previous studies, our estimate is constrained by retrievals of global coverage SSA, which may justify different DREA values. Remarkable consistency is found in comparison with DREA based on CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) and MODIS observations.

  2. SMA OBSERVATIONS OF CLASS 0 PROTOSTARS: A HIGH ANGULAR RESOLUTION SURVEY OF PROTOSTELLAR BINARY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xuepeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Arce, Hector G.; Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Zhang Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Launhardt, Ralf; Henning, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jorgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute and Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Copenhagen University, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Lee, Chin-Fei [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Foster, Jonathan B. [Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Pineda, Jaime E., E-mail: xpchen@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: xuepeng.chen@yale.edu [ESO, Karl Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2013-05-10

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 {mu}m dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.''5, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 AU to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64 {+-} 0.08 and 0.91 {+-} 0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I young stellar objects, and approximately three (for MF) and four (for CSF) times larger than the values found among main-sequence stars, with a similar range of separations. Furthermore, the observed fraction of high-order multiple systems to binary systems in Class 0 protostars (0.50 {+-} 0.09) is also larger than the fractions found in Class I young stellar objects (0.31 {+-} 0.07) and main-sequence stars ({<=}0.2). These results suggest that binary properties evolve as protostars evolve, as predicted by numerical simulations. The distribution of separations for Class 0 protostellar binary/multiple systems shows a general trend in which CSF increases with decreasing companion separation. We find that 67% {+-} 8% of the protobinary systems have circumstellar mass ratios below 0.5, implying that unequal-mass systems are preferred in the process of binary star formation. We suggest an empirical sequential fragmentation picture for binary star formation, based on this

  3. An Elizabethan Survey and Possible Astronomical Observations on the Oregon Coast: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haramundanis, Katherine; Gaposchkin, E.

    2007-12-01

    We present preliminary results of our investigations of inscribed rocks found along the Oregon Coast. The roughly 30 rocks contain Latin letters, numbers, and other signs. Bawlf (2000), after Costaggini and Schultz (1977), suggested that the artifacts represent a survey and longitude observation made by Francis Drake in 1579 during his circumnavigation. We have analyzed old records and photographs, and made preliminary site visits to evaluate if these suggestions have merit. The artifacts were first seen in the late 19th century by settlers along the Nehalem River and inspired early searches for treasure on the mountainside, which is rugged, rocky, and steep. The nearby wreck of a Spanish galleon confounded the interpretations. The director of the local Tillamook County Pioneer Museum, Wayne Jensen, with an enthusiastic colleague, Don Viles, spent two decades looking for artifacts and commissioned the existing site survey from the Civil Engineering Department of Oregon State University. Both Viles (1982, 1990) and Jensen (1990) published descriptions of the finds and their search methods. We present photographs of several of the larger artifacts, our conclusions about what the site represents and who may have created it, and suggestions about the meaning of some of the markings and artifacts, including calculations for possible astronomical observations. We solicit comments from the audience regarding any similar sites.

  4. Direct observation of syringeal muscle function in songbirds and a parrot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Goller, Franz

    2002-01-01

    . Under the experimental conditions used in this study, full constriction of the syringeal lumen could not be achieved by stimulating adductor muscles. Full closure may require simultaneous activation of extrinsic syringeal muscles or the supine positioning of the bird may have exerted excessive tension....... In parrots (cockatiels, Nymphicus hollandicus), direct observations show that even during quiet respiration the lateral tympaniform membranes (LTMs) are partially adducted into the tracheal lumen to form a narrow slot. Contraction of the superficial intrinsic muscle, m. syringealis superficialis, adducts...... the LTMs further into the tracheal lumen but does not close the syringeal aperture fully. The intrinsic deep muscle, m. syringealis profundus, abducts the LTMs through cranio-laterad movement of a paired, protruding half-ring. The weakly developed extrinsic m. sternotrachealis seems to increase tension...

  5. An integrated review of directly observed therapy for tuberculosis in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga, Julie Ann

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be one of the main causes of death in adults globally. Failure to complete TB treatment can lead to treatment-resistant TB and continued transmission of the infection. Directly observed therapy (DOT) is the treatment recommended by the World Health Organization. This article sought to synthesize DOT data to identify important variables in DOT research, including original research studies conducted in a Latin American country on pulmonary TB. Medication supervisors included family members or health professionals who provided support, education, and counseling. Age, past treatment, drug abuse, and housing in poor neighborhoods were negatively correlated to DOT adherence. Community-based DOT programs were more successful than clinic-based programs. Cost and convenience of DOT treatment seem to be barriers to treatment completion. TB rates have fallen since the inception of DOT, but studies have not shown a significant difference between DOT and self-administered therapy.

  6. In-situ observation of porosity formation during directional solidification of Al-Si casting alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Lei

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In-situ observation of porosity formation during directional solidification of two Al-Si alloys (7%Si and 13%Si was made by using of micro-focus X-ray imaging. In both alloys, small spherical pores initially form in the melt far away from the eutectic solid-liquid (S/L interface and then grow and coagulate during solidification. Some pores can float and escape from the solidifying melt front at a relatively high velocity. At the end of solidification, the remaining pores maintain spherical morphology in the near eutectic alloy but become irregular in the hypoeutectic alloy. This is attributed to different solidification modes and aluminum dendrite interactions between the two alloys. The mechanism of the porosity formation is briefly discussed in this paper.

  7. Direct observation of resistive heating at graphene wrinkles and grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Kyle L. [University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign; Dorgan, Vincent E. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Estrada, David [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Wood, Joshua D. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Vlassiouk, Ivan V [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Lyding, Joseph W [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; King, William P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana-Champaign; Pop, Eric [Stanford University

    2014-01-01

    We directly measure the nanometer-scale temperature rise at wrinkles and grain boundaries (GBs) in functioning graphene devices by scanning Joule expansion microscopy with 50 nm spatial and 0.2K temperature resolution. We observe a small temperature increase at select wrinkles and a large (100 K) temperature increase at GBs between coalesced hexagonal grains. Comparisons of measurements with device simulations estimate the GB resistivity (8 150 X lm) among the lowest reported for graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. An analytical model is developed, showing that GBs can experience highly localized resistive heating and temperature rise, most likely affecting the reliability of graphene devices. Our studies provide an unprecedented view of thermal effects surrounding nanoscale defects in nanomaterials such as graphene.

  8. Direct Observation of Sulfur Radicals as Reaction Media in lithium Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Jianming; Walter, Eric D.; Pan, Huilin; Lu, Dongping; Zuo, Pengjian; Chen, Honghao; Deng, Zhiqun; Liaw, Bor Yann; Yu, Xiqian; Yang, Xiaoning; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2014-12-09

    Lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery has been regaining tremendous interest in recent years because of its attractive attributes such as high gravimetric energy, low cost and environmental benignity. However, it is still not conclusively known how polysulfide ring/chain participates in the whole cycling and whether the discharge and charge process follow the same pathway. Herein, we demonstrate the direct observation of sulfur radicals by using in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Based on the concentration changes of sulfur radicals at different potentials, it is revealed that the chemical and electrochemical reactions in Li-S cell are driven each other to proceed through sulfur radicals, leading to two completely different reaction pathways during discharge and charge. The proposed radical mechanism may provide new insights to investigate the interactions between sulfur species and the electrolyte, inspiring novel strategies to develop Li-S battery technology.

  9. Direct quantum process tomography via measuring sequential weak values of incompatible observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yosep; Kim, Yong-Su; Lee, Sang-Yun; Han, Sang-Wook; Moon, Sung; Kim, Yoon-Ho; Cho, Young-Wook

    2018-01-15

    The weak value concept has enabled fundamental studies of quantum measurement and, recently, found potential applications in quantum and classical metrology. However, most weak value experiments reported to date do not require quantum mechanical descriptions, as they only exploit the classical wave nature of the physical systems. In this work, we demonstrate measurement of the sequential weak value of two incompatible observables by making use of two-photon quantum interference so that the results can only be explained quantum physically. We then demonstrate that the sequential weak value measurement can be used to perform direct quantum process tomography of a qubit channel. Our work not only demonstrates the quantum nature of weak values but also presents potential new applications of weak values in analyzing quantum channels and operations.

  10. Direct observation and dynamics of spontaneous skyrmion-like magnetic domains in a ferromagnet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Masahiro; So, Yeong-Gi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Masaaki; Hara, Toru; Ishizuka, Kazuo; Kimoto, Koji

    2013-05-01

    The structure and dynamics of submicrometre magnetic domains are the main factors determining the physical properties of magnetic materials. Here, we report the first observation of skyrmion-like magnetic nanodomains in a ferromagnetic manganite, La0.5Ba0.5MnO3, using Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM). The skyrmion-like magnetic domains appear as clusters above the Curie temperature. We found that the repeated reversal of magnetic chirality is caused by thermal fluctuation. The closely spaced clusters exhibit dynamic coupling, and the repeated magnetization reversal becomes fully synchronized with the same chirality. Quantitative analysis of such dynamics was performed by LTEM to directly determine the barrier energy for the magnetization reversal of skyrmion-like nanometre domains. This study is expected to pave the way for further investigation of the unresolved nature and dynamics of magnetic vortex-like nanodomains.

  11. Direct observation of heterogeneous valence state in Yb-based quasicrystalline approximants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunami, M.; Oura, M.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Ideta, S.; Tanaka, K.; Takeuchi, T.; Yamada, T.; Tsai, A. P.; Imura, K.; Deguchi, K.; Sato, N. K.; Ishimasa, T.

    2017-12-01

    We study the electronic structure of Tsai-type cluster-based quasicrystalline approximants, Au64Ge22Yb14 (AGY-I), Au63.5Ge20.5Yb16 (AGY-II), and Zn85.4Yb14.6 (Zn-Yb), by means of photoemission spectroscopy. In the valence band hard x-ray photoemission spectra of AGY-II and Zn-Yb, we separately observe a fully occupied Yb 4 f state and a valence fluctuation derived Kondo resonance peak, reflecting two inequivalent Yb sites, a single Yb atom in the cluster center and its surrounding Yb icosahedron, respectively. The fully occupied 4 f signal is absent in AGY-I containing no Yb atom in the cluster center. The results provide direct evidence for a heterogeneous valence state in AGY-II and Zn-Yb.

  12. Direct observation of single DNA structural alterations at low forces with surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Satish; Raj, Saurabh; Cossins, Benjamin; Marro, Monica; Guallar, Victor; Petrov, Dmitri

    2013-01-08

    DNA experiences numerous mechanical events, necessitating single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to provide insight into DNA mechanics as a whole system. Inherent Brownian motion limits current force spectroscopy methods from observing possible bond level structural changes. We combine optical trapping and surface-enhanced Raman scattering to establish a direct relationship between DNA's extension and structure in the low force, entropic regime. A DNA molecule is trapped close to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate to facilitate a detectable Raman signal. DNA Raman modes shift in response to applied force, indicating phosphodiester mechanical alterations. Molecular dynamic simulations confirm the local structural alterations and the Raman sensitive band identified experimentally. The combined Raman and force spectroscopy technique, to our knowledge, is a novel methodology that can be generalized to all single-molecule studies. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding the experiences of caregivers of children with tuberculosis in directly observed therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatiana de Medeiros Vale da Silva

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the situations and communications experienced by caregivers of children with tuberculosis (TB with regard to directly observed therapy (DOT. Method A descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach was applied and developed in the ambulatory of Programa Einstein na Comunidade de Paraisópolis (PECP. The data were collected using semi-structured interviews of 13 caregivers of children with TB in DOT. The Collective Subject Discourse (CSD method was used to analyze the data. Results Seven CSDs were identified and grouped into four categories: "Living in a difficult situation", "Changing the family routine", "Responsibility almost always fall son the mother", and "Adapting to the DOT". Conclusions The difficulties faced by the caregiver of the child at the beginning of DOT significantly changed the familiar routine. The responsibility for its continuity was assigned to the mother, who must adapt to the demands of the treatment and face the situation.

  14. Understanding the experiences of caregivers of children with tuberculosis in directly observed therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatiana de Medeiros Vale da Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To understand the situations and communications experienced by caregivers of children with tuberculosis (TB with regard to directly observed therapy (DOT. Method A descriptive exploratory study with a qualitative approach was applied and developed in the ambulatory of Programa Einstein na Comunidade de Paraisópolis (PECP. The data were collected using semi-structured interviews of 13 caregivers of children with TB in DOT. The Collective Subject Discourse (CSD method was used to analyze the data. Results Seven CSDs were identified and grouped into four categories: "Living in a difficult situation", "Changing the family routine", "Responsibility almost always fall son the mother", and "Adapting to the DOT". Conclusions The difficulties faced by the caregiver of the child at the beginning of DOT significantly changed the familiar routine. The responsibility for its continuity was assigned to the mother, who must adapt to the demands of the treatment and face the situation.

  15. Direct observation of the hyperfine transition of ground-state positronium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, T; Miyazaki, A; Suehara, T; Namba, T; Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Saito, H; Ogawa, I; Idehara, T; Sabchevski, S

    2012-06-22

    We report the first direct measurement of the hyperfine transition of the ground state positronium. The hyperfine structure between ortho-positronium and para-positronium is about 203 GHz. We develop a new optical system to accumulate about 10 kW power using a gyrotron, a mode converter, and a Fabry-Pérot cavity. The hyperfine transition has been observed with a significance of 5.4 standard deviations. The transition probability is measured to be A = 3.1(-1.2)(+1.6) × 10(-8) s(-1) for the first time, which is in good agreement with the theoretical value of 3.37 × 10(-8) s(-1).

  16. Build a better mouse: directly-observed issues in computer use for adults with SMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Anne C; Serowik, Kristin L; Schensul, Jean J; Bowen, Anne M; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-03-01

    Integrating information technology into healthcare has the potential to bring treatment to hard-to-reach people. Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI), however, may derive limited benefit from these advances in care because of lack of computer ownership and experience. To date, conclusions about the computer skills and attitudes of adults with SMI have been based primarily on self-report. In the current study, 28 psychiatric outpatients with co-occurring cocaine use were interviewed about their computer use and opinions, and 25 were then directly observed using task analysis and think aloud methods as they navigated a multi-component health informational website. Participants reported low rates of computer ownership and use, and negative attitudes towards computers. Self-reported computer skills were higher than demonstrated in the task analysis. However, some participants spontaneously expressed more positive attitudes and greater computer self-efficacy after navigating the website. Implications for increasing access to computer-based health information are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of the implementation of the directly observed treatment strategy for tuberculosis in a large city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavôr, Débora Cristina Brasil da Silva; Pinheiro, Jair Dos Santos; Gonçalves, Maria Jacirema Ferreira

    2016-04-01

    To assess the degree of implementation of the Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course - DOTS for tuberculosis (TB) in a large city. Assessment of the implementation of the logic model, whose new cases of infectious pulmonary TB were recruited from specialized clinics and followed-up in basic health units. The judgment matrix covering the five components of the DOTS strategy were used. The result of the logic model indicates DOTS was partially implemented. In external, organizational and implementation contexts, the DOTS strategy was partially implemented; and, the effectiveness was not implemented. The partial implementation of the DOTS strategy in the city of Manaus did not reflect in TB control compliance, leading to low effectiveness of the program. Avaliar o grau de implantação da estratégia de tratamento diretamente observado (Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course - DOTS) para tuberculose (TB) em um município de grande porte. Avaliação de implantação por meio de modelo lógico, cujos casos novos de TB pulmonar bacilífera foram recrutados em ambulatórios especializados e acompanhados nas unidades básicas de saúde. Utilizou-se matriz de julgamento que abrange os cinco componentes da estratégia DOTS. O resultado do modelo lógico indica DOTS implantada parcialmente. Nos contextos externo, organizacional e de implantação, a estratégia DOTS está implantada parcialmente; e, na efetividade não está implantada. A implantação parcial da estratégia DOTS, na cidade de Manaus, reflete na não conformidade do controle da TB, levando à baixa efetividade do programa.

  18. Quantifying the Hawthorne Effect in Hand Hygiene Compliance Through Comparing Direct Observation With Automated Hand Hygiene Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Stefan; Reischke, Jana; Kesselmeier, Miriam; Winning, Johannes; Gastmeier, Petra; Brunkhorst, Frank M; Scherag, André; Pletz, Mathias W

    2015-08-01

    To quantify the Hawthorne effect of hand hygiene performance among healthcare workers using direct observation. Prospective observational study. Intensive care unit, university hospital. Direct observation of hand hygiene compliance over 48 audits of 2 hours each. Simultaneously, hand hygiene events (HHEs) were recorded using electronic alcohol-based handrub dispensers. Directly observed and electronically recorded HHEs during the 2 hours of direct observation were compared using Spearman correlations and Bland-Altman plots. To quantify the Hawthorne effect, we compared the number of electronically recorded HHEs during the direct observation periods with the re-scaled electronically recorded HHEs in the 6 remaining hours of the 8-hour working shift. A total of 3,978 opportunities for hand hygiene were observed during the 96 hours of direct observation. Hand hygiene compliance was 51% (95% CI, 49%-53%). There was a strong positive correlation between directly observed compliance and electronically recorded HHEs (ρ=0.68 [95% CI, 0.49-0.81], Phand hygiene performance.

  19. Calibrating the lithium-age relation with open clusters observed with GES (Gaia-ESO Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Albarrán, M. L.; Montes, D.; Gómez Garrido, M.; Tabernero, H. M..; González Hernández, J. I.; GES Survey Builders

    2017-03-01

    Li depletion is strongly age-dependent but currently available data have shown a complex pattern of Li depletion on the pre- and main-sequence stars that is not yet understood. The lithium abundance observed in late-type stars depend not only of the age and the temperature but also on metallicity, mixing mechanisms, convection structure, rotation and magnetic activity. The large number of stars observed within the Gaia-ESO survey (GES - https://www.gaia-eso.eu/) for many open clusters and associations can be used to calibrate the lithium-age relation and its dependence with other parameters that can be derived from the UVES and GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations. We present here the preliminary results of the analysis of membership and Li abundance of the young clusters and associations, as well as of the intermediate-age and old open clusters, observed until now in GES (iDR4) in order to conduct a comparative study. All this information allowed us to characterize the properties of the members of these clusters and identify a series of field contaminant stars, both lithium-rich giants and non-giant outliers.

  20. Guidelines: The do's, don'ts and don't knows of direct observation of clinical skills in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Jennifer R; Hatala, Rose; Hauer, Karen E; Holmboe, Eric

    2017-09-27

    Direct observation of clinical skills is a key assessment strategy in competency-based medical education. The guidelines presented in this paper synthesize the literature on direct observation of clinical skills. The goal is to provide a practical list of Do's, Don'ts and Don't Knows about direct observation for supervisors who teach learners in the clinical setting and for educational leaders who are responsible for clinical training programs. We built consensus through an iterative approach in which each author, based on their medical education and research knowledge and expertise, independently developed a list of Do's, Don'ts, and Don't Knows about direct observation of clinical skills. Lists were compiled, discussed and revised. We then sought and compiled evidence to support each guideline and determine the strength of each guideline. A final set of 33 Do's, Don'ts and Don't Knows is presented along with a summary of evidence for each guideline. Guidelines focus on two groups: individual supervisors and the educational leaders responsible for clinical training programs. Guidelines address recommendations for how to focus direct observation, select an assessment tool, promote high quality assessments, conduct rater training, and create a learning culture conducive to direct observation. High frequency, high quality direct observation of clinical skills can be challenging. These guidelines offer important evidence-based Do's and Don'ts that can help improve the frequency and quality of direct observation. Improving direct observation requires focus not just on individual supervisors and their learners, but also on the organizations and cultures in which they work and train. Additional research to address the Don't Knows can help educators realize the full potential of direct observation in competency-based education.

  1. Direct observation of small cluster mobility and ripening. [during annealing of metal films on amorphous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, K.; Poppa, H.

    1975-01-01

    Direct evidence is reported for the simultaneous occurrence of Ostwald ripening and short-distance cluster mobility during annealing of discontinuous metal films on clean amorphous substrates. The annealing characteristics of very thin particulate deposits of silver on amorphized clean surfaces of single crystalline thin graphite substrates were studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) under controlled environmental conditions (residual gas pressure of 10 to the minus 9th power torr) in the temperature range from 25 to 450 C. Sputter cleaning of the substrate surface, metal deposition, and annealing were monitored by TEM observation. Pseudostereographic presentation of micrographs in different annealing stages, the observation of the annealing behavior at cast shadow edges, and measurements with an electronic image analyzing system were employed to aid the visual perception and the analysis of changes in deposit structure recorded during annealing. Slow Ostwald ripening was found to occur in the entire temperature range, but the overriding surface transport mechanism was short-distance cluster mobility.

  2. Gossip as an alternative for direct observation in games of indirect reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeld, Ralf D; Krambeck, Hans-Jürgen; Semmann, Dirk; Milinski, Manfred

    2007-10-30

    Communication about social topics is abundant in human societies, and many functions have been attributed to such gossiping. One of these proposed functions is the management of reputations. Reputation by itself has been shown to have a strong influence on cooperation dynamics in games of indirect reciprocity, and this notion helps to explain the observed high level of cooperation in humans. Here we designed a game to test a widespread assumption that gossip functions as a vector for the transmission of social information. This empirical study (with 14 groups of nine students each) focuses on the composition of gossip, information transfer by gossip, and the behavior based on gossip information. We show that gossip has a strong influence on the resulting behavior even when participants have access to the original information (i.e., direct observation) as well as gossip about the same information. Thus, it is evident that gossip has a strong manipulative potential. Furthermore, gossip about cooperative individuals is more positive than gossip about uncooperative individuals, gossip comments transmit social information successfully, and cooperation levels are higher when people encounter positive compared with negative gossip.

  3. Direct observation of shear piezoelectricity in poly-l-lactic acid nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Smith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric polymers are capable of interconverting mechanical and electrical energy, and are therefore candidate materials for biomedical applications such as sensors, actuators, and energy harvesters. In particular, nanowires of these materials are attractive as they can be unclamped, flexible and sensitive to small vibrations. Poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA nanowires have been investigated for their use in biological applications, but their piezoelectric properties have never been fully characterised, even though macroscopic films and fibres have been shown to exhibit shear piezoelectricity. This piezoelectric mode is particularly interesting for in vivo applications where shear forces are especially relevant, and is similar to what has been observed in natural materials such as bone and DNA. Here, using piezo-response force microscopy (PFM, we report the first direct observation of shear piezoelectricity in highly crystalline and oriented PLLA nanowires grown by a novel template-wetting method. Our results are validated using finite-element simulations and numerical analysis, which importantly and more generally allow for accurate interpretation of PFM signals in soft nanostructured materials. Our work opens up the possibility for the development of biocompatible and sustainable piezoelectric nanogenerators and sensors based on polymer nanowires.

  4. Validity and feasibility of the EMG direct observation tool (EMG-DOT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leep Hunderfund, Andrea N; Rubin, Devon I; Laughlin, Ruple S; Sorenson, Eric J; Watson, James C; Jones, Lyell K; Juul, Dorthea; Park, Yoon Soo

    2016-04-26

    To develop a new workplace-based EMG direct observation tool (EMG-DOT) and gather validity evidence supporting its use for assessing electrodiagnostic skills among postgraduate medical trainees. The EMG-DOT was developed by experts using an iterative process. Validity evidence from content, response process, internal structure, relations to other variables, and consequences of testing was collected during the 2013-2014 academic year. Of 3,412 studies performed by trainees during the study period, 299 (9%) were assessed using the EMG-DOT. Of these, 203 (68%) involved a physician rater and 96 (32%) involved a technician rater. The 14-item EMG-DOT had excellent internal-consistency reliability (Cronbach α 0.94). Correlations between individual items and criterion-referenced global ratings of performance ranged from 0.36 to 0.72 (all p EMG rotation (p EMG-DOT improved the quality of care provided to patients in 58% (133/230). Trainees were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with the observational assessment exercise in 96% of encounters (234/243). This study provides validity evidence supporting the use of EMG-DOT scores to assess electrodiagnostic skills of residents and fellows. The EMG-DOT can be used to inform milestone-based assessments of trainee performance in neurology, child neurology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neuromuscular, and clinical neurophysiology training programs. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  5. Direct Observation of THF Hydrate Formation in Porous Microstructure Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The porous microstructure of hydrates governs the mechanical strength of the hydrate-bearing sediment. To investigate the growth law and microstructure of hydrates in porous media, the growth process of tetrahydrofuran (THF hydrate under different concentration of THF solution is directly observed using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. The images show that the THF hydrate grows as different models under different concentration of THF solution (19%, 11.4% and 5.7% by weight at 1 °C. When the concentration is 19% (stoichiometric molar ratio of THF/H2O = 1:17, the THF hydrate grows as cementing model. However, with the decreasing concentration of THF, the growth model transfers from cementing model to floating model. The results show that the growth of the THF hydrate was influenced by the dissolved quantity of THF in the water. The extension of the observed behavior to methane hydrate could have implications in understanding their role in seafloor and permafrost stability.

  6. Incorporating a disturbance observer with direct velocity feedback for control of human-induced vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyawako, Donald; Reynolds, Paul; Hudson, Emma

    2016-04-01

    Feedback control strategies are desirable for disturbance rejection of human-induced vibrations in civil engineering structures as human walking forces cannot easily be measured. In relation to human-induced vibration control studies, most past researches have focused on floors and footbridges and the widely used linear controller implemented in the trials has been the direct velocity feedback (DVF) scheme. With appropriate compensation to enhance its robustness, it has been shown to be effective at damping out the problematic modes of vibration of the structures in which the active vibration control systems have been implemented. The work presented here introduces a disturbance observer (DOB) that is used with an outer-loop DVF controller. Results of analytical studies presented in this work based on the dynamic properties of a walkway bridge structure demonstrate the potential of this approach for enhancing the vibration mitigation performance offered by a purely DVF controller. For example, estimates of controlled frequency response functions indicate improved attenuation of vibration around the dominant frequency of the walkway bridge structure as well as at higher resonant frequencies. Controlled responses from three synthesized walking excitation forces on a walkway bridge structure model show that the inclusion of the disturbance observer with an outer loop DVF has potential to improve on the vibration mitigation performance by about 3.5% at resonance and 6-10% off-resonance. These are realised with hard constraints being imposed on the low frequency actuator displacements.

  7. Direct observation of interfacial Au atoms on TiO₂ in three dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenpei; Sivaramakrishnan, Shankar; Wen, Jianguo; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2015-04-08

    Interfacial atoms, which result from interactions between the metal nanoparticles and support, have a large impact on the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles. However, they are difficult to observe; the lack of knowledge has been a major obstacle toward unraveling their role in chemical transformations. Here we report conclusive evidence of interfacial Au atoms formed on the rutile (TiO2) (110) surfaces by activation using high-temperature (∼500 °C) annealing in air. Three-dimensional imaging was performed using depth-sectioning enabled by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Results show that the interface between Au nanocrystals and TiO2 (110) surfaces consists of a single atomic layer with Au atoms embedded inside Ti-O. The number of interfacial Au atoms is estimated from ∼1-8 in an interfacial atomic column. Direct impact of interfacial Au atoms is observed on an enhanced Au-TiO2 interaction and the reduction of surface TiO2; both are critical to Au catalysis.

  8. Observations of IceCube HESE track directions with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satalecka, K.; Bernardini, E.; Góra, D.; Noda, K.; Pedaletti, G.

    2017-01-01

    The MAGIC telescopes are strongly involved in several multimessenger programs. One of them are follow-up observations of astrophysical neutrino events, to search for hadronic γ-ray emission from the neutrino direction and identify potential neutrino sources. In 2013 the IceCube collaboration reported the first detection of astrophysical neutrinos and up to now 55 events, which interact inside the IceCube detector active volume, dubbed High Energy Starting Events (HESE), have been reported. These include 13 track-like events, caused usually by muon neutrino charge current interactions. The track-like events (as opposed to cascade-like neutral current interactions) are characterised by a very good angular resolution of events from the Northern hemisphere: HESE-37, HESE-38, HET (ATel #7856) and the GCN HESE alert from 27/04/2016 (GCN #19363). No signal was detected. Here we present the results of those observations and discuss the implications for the constraints on the density of the astrophysical neutrino sources.

  9. Direct observation of shear piezoelectricity in poly-l-lactic acid nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael; Calahorra, Yonatan; Jing, Qingshen; Kar-Narayan, Sohini

    2017-07-01

    Piezoelectric polymers are capable of interconverting mechanical and electrical energy, and are therefore candidate materials for biomedical applications such as sensors, actuators, and energy harvesters. In particular, nanowires of these materials are attractive as they can be unclamped, flexible and sensitive to small vibrations. Poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) nanowires have been investigated for their use in biological applications, but their piezoelectric properties have never been fully characterised, even though macroscopic films and fibres have been shown to exhibit shear piezoelectricity. This piezoelectric mode is particularly interesting for in vivo applications where shear forces are especially relevant, and is similar to what has been observed in natural materials such as bone and DNA. Here, using piezo-response force microscopy (PFM), we report the first direct observation of shear piezoelectricity in highly crystalline and oriented PLLA nanowires grown by a novel template-wetting method. Our results are validated using finite-element simulations and numerical analysis, which importantly and more generally allow for accurate interpretation of PFM signals in soft nanostructured materials. Our work opens up the possibility for the development of biocompatible and sustainable piezoelectric nanogenerators and sensors based on polymer nanowires.

  10. The Sunburst Arc: Direct Lyman α escape observed in the brightest known lensed galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Thorsen, T. E.; Dahle, H.; Gronke, M.; Bayliss, M.; Rigby, J. R.; Simcoe, R.; Bordoloi, R.; Turner, M.; Furesz, G.

    2017-11-01

    We present rest-frame ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy of the brightest lensed galaxy yet discovered, at redshift z = 2.4. The source reveals a characteristic triple-peaked Lyman α profile that has been predicted in various theoretical works, but to our knowledge has not been unambiguously observed previously. The feature is well fit by a superposition of two components: a double-peak profile emerging from substantial radiative transfer, and a narrow, central component resulting from directly escaping Lyman α photons, but it is poorly fit by either component alone. We demonstrate that the feature is unlikely to contain contamination from nearby sources, and that the central peak is unaffected by radiative transfer effects except for very slight absorption. The feature is detected at signal-to-noise ratios exceeding 80 per pixel at line center, and bears strong resemblance to synthetic profiles predicted by numerical models. Based on observations obtained at the Magellan-I (Baade) Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  11. Direct observation measurement of drowning risk exposure for surf beach bathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Damian; Ozanne-Smith, Joan; Triggs, Tom

    2009-07-01

    Because not all persons bathe at surf beaches, drowning rates based on resident population are likely to be underreported. To facilitate more precise drowning risk exposure data, this study aimed to develop a reliable direct observation measure of frequency and duration for surf beach bather exposure to water, by gender and age group. Bathers were defined as persons entering the water to wade, swim or surf with equipment. Observed bathers were systematically selected entering the water in daylight hours at six patrolled or unpatrolled beaches over 10 days. Variables measured were: weather and water conditions, water entries, duration of water exposure, water exposure location and person factors. The dataset comprised 204 (69.6%) males and 89 (30.4%) females, with males more likely to be in an older age group (psurfing equipment, and mainly used a surf zone located farther from the shore in deeper water (psurf zone occupied (based on water depth and distance from shore); and surf equipment used. The study provides new information about water exposure for bathers at surf beaches and new methods for measuring exposure to drowning risk. The findings suggest that overrepresentation of adolescent and adult males in surf beach drowning statistics is in part a product of greater total exposure to the water plus more frequent exposure to deeper water and bathing farther from shore.

  12. Quality of Care during Neonatal Resuscitation in Kakamega County General Hospital, Kenya: A Direct Observation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan N. Shikuku

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Birth asphyxia is the leading cause of neonatal mortality in Kenya. Quality care during neonatal resuscitation (NR can contribute to a reduction in neonatal mortality related to birth asphyxia by 30 percent. This study assessed the quality of care (QoC during NR for newborns with birth asphyxia. Methods. Direct observations of 138 newborn resuscitations were done in labor ward and maternity theatre. Twenty-eight healthcare providers were observed 3–5 times using a structured checklist. Descriptive and inferential statistics were calculated and quality of care scores computed. Ordered logistic regression model identified HCPs characteristics associated with the QoC scores during NR. Results. Overall QoC scores were good for airway clearance (83%. Suctioning in meconium presence (40% was poorly performed. Years of experience working in maternity were associated with good drying/stimulation (β = 1.86, P=0.003, CI = 0.626–3.093 and airway maintenance (β = 1.887, P=0.009, CI = 0.469–3.305; nurses were poor compared to doctors during initial bag and mask ventilation (β = −2.338, P=0.05, CI = −4.732–0.056. Conclusion. Key steps in NR are poorly performed during drying and warmth, airway maintenance in meconium presence, and ventilation. Mentorship with periodic refresher training can improve the care provided during NR.

  13. Direct observations of evolving subglacial drainage beneath the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Lauren C; Catania, Ginny A; Hoffman, Matthew J; Gulley, Jason D; Lüthi, Martin P; Ryser, Claudia; Hawley, Robert L; Neumann, Thomas A

    2014-10-02

    Seasonal acceleration of the Greenland Ice Sheet is influenced by the dynamic response of the subglacial hydrologic system to variability in meltwater delivery to the bed via crevasses and moulins (vertical conduits connecting supraglacial water to the bed of the ice sheet). As the melt season progresses, the subglacial hydrologic system drains supraglacial meltwater more efficiently, decreasing basal water pressure and moderating the ice velocity response to surface melting. However, limited direct observations of subglacial water pressure mean that the spatiotemporal evolution of the subglacial hydrologic system remains poorly understood. Here we show that ice velocity is well correlated with moulin hydraulic head but is out of phase with that of nearby (0.3-2 kilometres away) boreholes, indicating that moulins connect to an efficient, channelized component of the subglacial hydrologic system, which exerts the primary control on diurnal and multi-day changes in ice velocity. Our simultaneous measurements of moulin and borehole hydraulic head and ice velocity in the Paakitsoq region of western Greenland show that decreasing trends in ice velocity during the latter part of the melt season cannot be explained by changes in the ability of moulin-connected channels to convey supraglacial melt. Instead, these observations suggest that decreasing late-season ice velocity may be caused by changes in connectivity in unchannelized regions of the subglacial hydrologic system. Understanding this spatiotemporal variability in subglacial pressures is increasingly important because melt-season dynamics affect ice velocity beyond the conclusion of the melt season.

  14. Repair vs replacement of direct composite restorations: a survey of teaching and operative techniques in Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Paul A; Ghazali, Amna; Tarif, Zahidah H; Loch, Carolina; Lynch, Christopher; Wilson, Nairn; Blum, Igor R

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the teaching and operative techniques for the repair and/or replacement of direct resin-based composite restorations (DCRs) in dental schools in Oceania. A 14-item questionnaire was mailed to the heads of operative dentistry in 16 dental schools in Oceania (Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and Papua New Guinea). The survey asked whether the repair of DCRs was taught within the curriculum; the rationale behind the teaching; how techniques were taught, indications for repair, operative techniques, materials used, patient acceptability, expected longevity and recall systems. All 16 schools participated in the study. Thirteen (81%) reported the teaching of composite repairs as an alternative to replacement. Most schools taught the theoretical and practical aspects of repair at a clinical level only. All 13 schools (100%) agreed on tooth substance preservation being the main reason for teaching repair. The main indications for repair were marginal defects (100%), followed by secondary caries (69%). All 13 schools that performed repairs reported high patient acceptability, and considered it a definitive measure. Only three schools (23%) claimed to have a recall system in place following repair of DCRs. Most respondents either did not know or did not answer when asked about the longevity of DCRs. Repair of DCRs seems to be a viable alternative to replacement, which is actively taught within Oceania. Advantages include it being minimally invasive, preserving tooth structure, and time and money saving. However, standardised guidelines need to be developed and further clinical long-term studies need to be carried out. The decision between replacing or repairing a defective composite restoration tends to be based on what clinicians have been taught, tempered by experience and judgement. This study investigated the current status of teaching and operative techniques of repair of direct composite restorations in dental schools in Oceania. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  15. Influence of observed diurnal cycles of aerosol optical depth on aerosol direct radiative effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arola

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD can be significant, depending on location and dominant aerosol type. However, these diurnal cycles have rarely been taken into account in measurement-based estimates of aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF or aerosol direct radiative effect (ADRE. The objective of our study was to estimate the influence of diurnal aerosol variability at the top of the atmosphere ADRE estimates. By including all the possible AERONET sites, we wanted to assess the influence on global ADRE estimates. While focusing also in more detail on some selected sites of strongest impact, our goal was to also see the possible impact regionally. We calculated ADRE with different assumptions about the daily AOD variability: taking the observed daily AOD cycle into account and assuming diurnally constant AOD. Moreover, we estimated the corresponding differences in ADREs, if the single AOD value for the daily mean was taken from the the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Terra or Aqua overpass times, instead of accounting for the true observed daily variability. The mean impact of diurnal AOD variability on 24 h ADRE estimates, averaged over all AERONET sites, was rather small and it was relatively small even for the cases when AOD was chosen to correspond to the Terra or Aqua overpass time. This was true on average over all AERONET sites, while clearly there can be much stronger impact in individual sites. Examples of some selected sites demonstrated that the strongest observed AOD variability (the strongest morning afternoon contrast does not typically result in a significant impact on 24 h ADRE. In those cases, the morning and afternoon AOD patterns are opposite and thus the impact on 24 h ADRE, when integrated over all solar zenith angles, is reduced. The most significant effect on daily ADRE was induced by AOD cycles with either maximum or minimum AOD close to local noon. In these cases, the impact on

  16. 1999 Breeding Bird Survey Route Paths for the Lower 48 States - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map layer portrays a 1999 snapshot of the approximate route paths of active Breeding Bird Survey routes in the lower 48 States. The paths are a visual...

  17. Direct observation of a photochemical activation energy: a case study of acetone photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Markus; Heim, Pascal; Thaler, Bernhard; Kitzler, Markus; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2017-06-01

    The ability to observe and quantify the conversion of electronic potential energy to vibrational kinetic energy in a molecule after photoexcitation is essential to understand and control the outcome of photoinduced molecular fragmentation. We exploit the high selectivity of photoelectron-photoion coincidence detection to distinguish different relaxation channels and observe the fragmentation behavior of each channel. We demonstrate the concept by investigating the fragmentation of gas-phase acetone molecules initiated by three-photon excitation to high lying Rydberg states between 9.0 and 9.5 eV above the ground state. By applying variations of the photon energy, pulse duration (100-200 fs) and pulse energy, we are able to fully characterize the fragmentation process. Rydberg states between 5s and 8s are populated, which undergo ultrafast internal conversion to lower states. The corresponding non-adiabatic dynamics in the neutral molecule cause the conversion of electronic to vibrational energy, leading to fragmentation. Our scheme allows us to directly measure the activation energy for fragmentation of acetone to an acetyl ion and a methyl radical, which we determine to be (0.79 ± 0.04) eV. Longer laser pulses result in an increased fragment-to-parent ratio, representing a higher probability for relaxation because the relaxation time constants are comparable to the pulse duration. Upon excitation to Rydberg states at 9.5 eV we surprisingly observe reduced fragmentation, although ˜2 eV are coupled into vibrational energy, indicating that different relaxation pathways become active, which results in a change of the redistribution of vibrational energy within the molecule. Fragmentation due to subsequent excitation of the cation is found to play a minor role.

  18. Direct observations of active school transportation and stroller use in kindergarten children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Rothman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about kindergarten students' active school transportation (AST and stroller/wagon use as sedentary travel devices. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of kindergarten children arriving to school by active and sedentary modes, including strollers, in Toronto elementary schools and compare to students in kindergarten to grade 6 (K–6. The secondary objective was to examine factors associated with AST in kindergarten and K–6 students. School travel mode was counted using direct observations at elementary schools in the City of Toronto in 2015. Two samples were observed: 1 Kindergarten sample: a random sample of schools with separate kindergarten entrances (n = 26 schools, 1069 children; 2 Kindergarten to grade 6 sample: observations were conducted at arrival locations at 50% of eligible elementary schools for students of all ages (n = 88 schools, 17,224 children. Proportions arriving by different travel modes were compared using Chi-square analysis. Negative binomial regression was conducted to examine the association between school characteristics and AST. AST was lower in the kindergarten compared to the K–6 sample (60% versus 74%, χ2 = 91.37, p < 0.001. The predominant sedentary mode for kindergarten students was by vehicle (38%, with <2% using strollers/wagons. Recent immigrant status was related to higher AST in kindergarten students; higher social disadvantage, crossing guards, school population and collision rates were related to higher AST in the K–6 sample. Factors influencing AST in young students require further investigation to influence the development of healthy active lifestyles at an early age.

  19. Direct observations of active school transportation and stroller use in kindergarten children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Linda; Macpherson, Alison K; Howard, Andrew; Parkin, Patricia C; Richmond, Sarah A; Birken, Catherine S

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about kindergarten students' active school transportation (AST) and stroller/wagon use as sedentary travel devices. The primary objective of this cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of kindergarten children arriving to school by active and sedentary modes, including strollers, in Toronto elementary schools and compare to students in kindergarten to grade 6 (K-6). The secondary objective was to examine factors associated with AST in kindergarten and K-6 students. School travel mode was counted using direct observations at elementary schools in the City of Toronto in 2015. Two samples were observed: 1) Kindergarten sample: a random sample of schools with separate kindergarten entrances (n = 26 schools, 1069 children); 2) Kindergarten to grade 6 sample: observations were conducted at arrival locations at 50% of eligible elementary schools for students of all ages (n = 88 schools, 17,224 children). Proportions arriving by different travel modes were compared using Chi-square analysis. Negative binomial regression was conducted to examine the association between school characteristics and AST. AST was lower in the kindergarten compared to the K-6 sample (60% versus 74%, χ2 = 91.37, p strollers/wagons. Recent immigrant status was related to higher AST in kindergarten students; higher social disadvantage, crossing guards, school population and collision rates were related to higher AST in the K-6 sample. Factors influencing AST in young students require further investigation to influence the development of healthy active lifestyles at an early age.

  20. Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN) I: survey description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogh, Michael L.; Gilbank, David G.; Muzzin, Adam; Rudnick, Gregory; Cooper, Michael C.; Lidman, Chris; Biviano, Andrea; Demarco, Ricardo; McGee, Sean L.; Nantais, Julie B.; Noble, Allison; Old, Lyndsay; Wilson, Gillian; Yee, Howard K. C.; Bellhouse, Callum; Cerulo, Pierluigi; Chan, Jeffrey; Pintos-Castro, Irene; Simpson, Rane; van der Burg, Remco F. J.; Zaritsky, Dennis; Ziparo, Felicia; Alonso, María Victoria; Bower, Richard G.; De Lucia, Gabriella; Finoguenov, Alexis; Lambas, Diego Garcia; Muriel, Hernan; Parker, Laura C.; Rettura, Alessandro; Valotto, Carlos; Wetzel, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    We describe a new Large Program in progress on the Gemini North and South telescopes: Gemini Observations of Galaxies in Rich Early Environments (GOGREEN). This is an imaging and deep spectroscopic survey of 21 galaxy systems at 1 10 in halo mass. The scientific objectives include measuring the role of environment in the evolution of low-mass galaxies, and measuring the dynamics and stellar contents of their host haloes. The targets are selected from the SpARCS, SPT, COSMOS, and SXDS surveys, to be the evolutionary counterparts of today's clusters and groups. The new red-sensitive Hamamatsu detectors on GMOS, coupled with the nod-and-shuffle sky subtraction, allow simultaneous wavelength coverage over λ ˜ 0.6-1.05 μm, and this enables a homogeneous and statistically complete redshift survey of galaxies of all types. The spectroscopic sample targets galaxies with AB magnitudes z΄ < 24.25 and [3.6] μm < 22.5, and is therefore statistically complete for stellar masses M* ≳ 1010.3 M⊙, for all galaxy types and over the entire redshift range. Deep, multiwavelength imaging has been acquired over larger fields for most systems, spanning u through K, in addition to deep IRAC imaging at 3.6 μm. The spectroscopy is ˜50 per cent complete as of semester 17A, and we anticipate a final sample of ˜500 new cluster members. Combined with existing spectroscopy on the brighter galaxies from GCLASS, SPT, and other sources, GOGREEN will be a large legacy cluster and field galaxy sample at this redshift that spectroscopically covers a wide range in stellar mass, halo mass, and clustercentric radius.

  1. Measuring Learning Styles with Questionnaires versus Direct Observation of Preferential Choice Behavior in Authentic Learning Situations: The Visualizer/Verbalizer Behavior Observation Scale (VV-BOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutner, Detlev; Plass, Jan L.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of the VV-BOS (Visualizer/Verbalizer Behavior Observation Scale), a computer-based instrument for direct observation of students' preferences for visual or verbal learning material. Results of a study with second-language learners indicated a high degree of reliability as an alternative to conventional questionnaires.…

  2. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Rebull, L. M. [Spitzer Science Center (SSC), California Institute of Technology, M/S 220-6, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Assef, R. J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 169-530, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  3. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  4. 'Sometimes the work just needs to be done': socio-cultural influences on direct observation in medical training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Christopher; LaDonna, Kori A; Lingard, Lorelei; Voyer, Stephane; Hatala, Rose

    2016-10-01

    Direct observation promises to strengthen both coaching and assessment, and calls for its increased use in medical training abound. Despite its apparent potential, the uptake of direct observation in medical training remains surprisingly limited outside the formal assessment setting. The limited uptake of observation raises questions about cultural barriers to its use. In this study, we explore the influence of professional culture on the use of direct observation within medical training. Using a constructivist grounded theory approach, we interviewed 22 residents or fellows (10 male, 12 female) about their experiences of being observed during training. Participants represented a range of specialties and training levels. Data collection and analysis were conducted iteratively. Themes were identified using constant comparative analysis. Observation was used selectively; specialties tended to observe the clinical acts that they valued most. Despite these differences, we found two cultural values that consistently challenged the ready implementation of direct observation across specialties: (i) autonomy in learning and (ii) efficiency in health care provision. Furthermore, we found that direct observation was a primarily learner-driven activity, which left learners caught in the middle, wanting observation but also wanting to appear independent and efficient. The cultural values of autonomy in learning and practice and efficiency in health care provision challenge the integration of direct observation into clinical training. Medical learners are often expected to ask for observation, but such requests are socially and culturally fraught, and likely to constrain the wider uptake of direct observation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  5. National survey of health in the tattoo industry: Observational study of 448 French tattooists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluger, Nicolas

    2017-02-21

    The data regarding the health of professional tattooists is inexistent. Tattooists are usually heavily tattooed and exposed daily to body fluids and skin-to-skin contacts with customers, tattoo inks, solvents, allergens, irritants, and work for hours often in inadequate positions using vibrating tattoo machines. We analyzed the health status of active French professional tattooists. An observational self-reported Internet survey was performed among 448 tattooists who were members of the French Tattoo Union in November 2013. The main physical complaints were musculoskeletal: back pain (65%), finger pain (41.5%) and muscular pain (28.8%). Finger pain, back pain, muscular pain and carpal tunnel symptoms/tingling sensations on the fingers occurred among 88%, 61.5%, 68% and 84% of the cases after having started their activity (p tattoo machine. Tattooists have a unique environment that imply developing intervention and preventive strategies for them. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(1):111-120.

  6. Experimental observation of oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, J.; Mota, F. L.; Chen, L.; Billia, B.; Tourret, D.; Song, Y.; Debierre, J.-M.; Guérin, R.; Karma, A.; Trivedi, R.; Bergeon, N.

    2017-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of oscillatory modes during three-dimensional cellular growth in a diffusive transport regime. We ground our analysis primarily on in situ observations of directional solidification experiments of a transparent succinonitrile 0.24 wt % camphor alloy performed in microgravity conditions onboard the International Space Station. This study completes our previous reports [Bergeon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 226102 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.226102; Tourret et al., Phys. Rev. E 92, 042401 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.042401] from an experimental perspective, and results are supported by additional phase-field simulations. We analyze the influence of growth parameters, crystal orientation, and sample history on promoting oscillations, and on their spatiotemporal characteristics. Cellular patterns display a remarkably uniform oscillation period throughout the entire array, despite a high array disorder and a wide distribution of primary spacing. Oscillation inhibition may be associated to crystalline disorientation, which stems from polygonization and is manifested as pattern drifting. We determine a drifting velocity threshold above which oscillations are inhibited, thereby demonstrating that inhibition is due to cell drifting and not directly to disorientation, and also explaining the suppression of oscillations when the pulling velocity history favors drifting. Furthermore, we show that the array disorder prevents long-range coherence of oscillations, but not short-range coherence in localized ordered regions. For regions of a few cells exhibiting hexagonal (square) ordering, three (two) subarrays oscillate with a phase shift of approximately ±120∘ (180∘), with square ordering occurring preferentially near subgrain boundaries.

  7. Spectroscopic observation of CSS161010 and SN2016gxp by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, T.; Dong, S.; Fraser, M.; Stritzinger, M.; Mattila, S.; Lundqvist, P.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Harmanen, J.; Kangas, T.; Somero, A.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Taddia, F.

    2016-10-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of the hostless transient CSS161010:045834-081803 and further observation of SN2016gxp in NGC51.

  8. Effects of the observation method (direct v. from video) and of the presence of an observer on behavioural results in veal calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leruste, H; Bokkers, E A M; Sergent, O; Wolthuis-Fillerup, M; van Reenen, C G; Lensink, B J

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed at assessing the effect of the observation method (direct or from video) and the effect of the presence of an observer on the behavioural results in veal calves kept on a commercial farm. To evaluate the effect of the observation method, 20 pens (four to five calves per pen) were observed by an observer for 60 min (two observation sessions of 30 min) and video-recorded at the same time. To evaluate the effect of the presence of the observer in front of the pen, 24 pens were video-recorded on 4 consecutive days and an observer was present in front of each pen for 60 min (two observation sessions of 30 min) on the third day. Behaviour was recorded using instantaneous scan sampling. For the study of the observer's effect, the analysis was limited to the posture, abnormal oral behaviour and manipulation of substrates. The two observation methods gave similar results for the time spent standing, but different results for all other behaviours. The presence of an observer did not affect the behaviour of calves at day level; however, their behaviour was affected when the observer was actually present in front of the pens. A higher percentage of calves were standing and were manipulating substrate in the presence of the observer, but there was no effect on abnormal oral behaviour. In conclusion, direct observations are a more suitable observation method than observations from video recordings for detailed behaviours in veal calves. The presence of an observer has a short-term effect on certain behaviours of calves that will have to be taken into consideration when monitoring these behaviours.

  9. CAN-DOO: The Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubman, B.; Sherman, J. P.; Perry, L. B.; Markham, J.; Kelly, G.

    2011-12-01

    The urgency of climate change demands a greater understanding of our climate system, not only by the leaders of today, but by the scientists, policy makers, and citizens of tomorrow. Unfortunately, a large segment of the population currently possesses inadequate knowledge of climate science. In direct response to a need for greater scientific literacy with respect to climate science, researchers from Appalachian State University's Appalachian Atmospheric Interdisciplinary Research (AppalAIR) group, with support from NASA, have developed CAN-DOO: the Climate Action Network through Direct Observations and Outreach. CAN-DOO addresses climate science literacy by 1) Developing the infrastructure for sustaining and expanding public outreach through long-term climate measurements capable of complementing existing NASA measurements, 2) Enhancing public awareness of climate science and NASA's role in advancing our understanding of the Earth System, and 3) Introducing Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics principles to homeschooled, public school, and Appalachian State University students through applied climate science activities. Project partners include the Grandfather Mountain Stewardship Foundation, Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute, and local elementary schools. In partnership with Grandfather Mountain, climate science awareness is promoted through citizen science activities, interactive public displays, and staff training. CAN-DOO engages students by involving them in the entire scientific investigative process as applied to climate science. We introduce local elementary and middle school students, homeschooled students throughout North Carolina, and undergraduate students in a new Global Climate Change course and select other courses at Appalachian State University to instrument assembly, measurement techniques, data collection, hypothesis testing, and drawing conclusions. Results are placed in the proper context via comparisons with other student

  10. Modelled radiative forcing of the direct aerosol effect with multi-observation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Myhre

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A high-resolution global aerosol model (Oslo CTM2 driven by meteorological data and allowing a comparison with a variety of aerosol observations is used to simulate radiative forcing (RF of the direct aerosol effect. The model simulates all main aerosol components, including several secondary components such as nitrate and secondary organic carbon. The model reproduces the main chemical composition and size features observed during large aerosol campaigns. Although the chemical composition compares best with ground-based measurement over land for modelled sulphate, no systematic differences are found for other compounds. The modelled aerosol optical depth (AOD is compared to remote sensed data from AERONET ground and MODIS and MISR satellite retrievals. To gain confidence in the aerosol modelling, we have tested its ability to reproduce daily variability in the aerosol content, and this is performing well in many regions; however, we also identified some locations where model improvements are needed. The annual mean regional pattern of AOD from the aerosol model is broadly similar to the AERONET and the satellite retrievals (mostly within 10–20%. We notice a significant improvement from MODIS Collection 4 to Collection 5 compared to AERONET data. Satellite derived estimates of aerosol radiative effect over ocean for clear sky conditions differs significantly on regional scales (almost up to a factor two, but also in the global mean. The Oslo CTM2 has an aerosol radiative effect close to the mean of the satellite derived estimates. We derive a radiative forcing (RF of the direct aerosol effect of −0.35 Wm−2 in our base case. Implementation of a simple approach to consider internal black carbon (BC mixture results in a total RF of −0.28 Wm−2. Our results highlight the importance of carbonaceous particles, producing stronger individual RF than considered in the recent IPCC estimate; however, net RF is less different

  11. Direct observation of the myosin Va recovery stroke that contributes to unidirectional stepping along actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Shiroguchi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Myosins are ATP-driven linear molecular motors that work as cellular force generators, transporters, and force sensors. These functions are driven by large-scale nucleotide-dependent conformational changes, termed "strokes"; the "power stroke" is the force-generating swinging of the myosin light chain-binding "neck" domain relative to the motor domain "head" while bound to actin; the "recovery stroke" is the necessary initial motion that primes, or "cocks," myosin while detached from actin. Myosin Va is a processive dimer that steps unidirectionally along actin following a "hand over hand" mechanism in which the trailing head detaches and steps forward ∼72 nm. Despite large rotational Brownian motion of the detached head about a free joint adjoining the two necks, unidirectional stepping is achieved, in part by the power stroke of the attached head that moves the joint forward. However, the power stroke alone cannot fully account for preferential forward site binding since the orientation and angle stability of the detached head, which is determined by the properties of the recovery stroke, dictate actin binding site accessibility. Here, we directly observe the recovery stroke dynamics and fluctuations of myosin Va using a novel, transient caged ATP-controlling system that maintains constant ATP levels through stepwise UV-pulse sequences of varying intensity. We immobilized the neck of monomeric myosin Va on a surface and observed real time motions of bead(s attached site-specifically to the head. ATP induces a transient swing of the neck to the post-recovery stroke conformation, where it remains for ∼40 s, until ATP hydrolysis products are released. Angle distributions indicate that the post-recovery stroke conformation is stabilized by ≥ 5 k(BT of energy. The high kinetic and energetic stability of the post-recovery stroke conformation favors preferential binding of the detached head to a forward site 72 nm away. Thus, the recovery

  12. Direct observation of a single proton in a Penning trap. Towards a direct measurement of the proton g-factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreim, Susanne Waltraud

    2009-08-25

    This PhD thesis presents experiments performed on a single proton stored in a Penning trap. The eigenmotion of an isolated, free proton could be detected electronically via a coupling to a resonance circuit. This represents a non-destructive measurement, i.e. the particle is not lost during the measurement. The free cyclotron frequency emerging from the measured eigenfrequencies is one of the two frequencies required for the determination of the magnetic moment. This enables a direct determination of the g-factor contrary to already existing works. Design, developing, and commissioning of the experimental setup have been accomplished within the scope of this work leading to a measuring accuracy of 10{sup -7}. The technical challenges for the determination of the second frequency (the Larmor frequency) arising from the smallness of the magnetic moment were mastered. Since the spin state required for this measurement is an internal degree of freedom, it can only be accessed through a coupling of the magnetic moment to the eigenmotion. A novel, hybrid penning trap is presented in this work, which imprints the spin information onto the eigenmotion, thus, realizing a quantum jump spectrometer. Therewith, the frequency shift of the two spin states resulting from the magnetic coupling reaches for the first time an electronically detectable range. (orig.)

  13. ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES) - Merging Observations and Laboratory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2016-01-01

    laboratory facilities, MIS and COSmIC, that have been developed for this study and discuss the findings resulting from the comparison of the laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. MIS stands for Matrix Isolation Spectroscopy, a well-proven technique for isolating cold molecular species in inert solid environments. COSmIC stands for Cosmic Simulation Chamber. It combines a supersonic free jet expansion with discharge plasma and high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass spectrometry detection tools for the generation and the detection of cold, isolated gas-phase molecules and ions under experimental conditions that closely mimic interstellar conditions. The column densities of the individual neutral PAH molecules and ions probed in these surveys are derived from the comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data lead to clear and unambiguous conclusions regarding the expected abundances for PAHs of various sizes and charge states in the interstellar environments probed in the surveys. Band profile comparisons between laboratory and astronomical spectra lead to information regarding the molecular structures and characteristics associated with the DIB carriers in the corresponding lines-of-sight. These quantitative surveys of neutral and ionized PAHs in the optical range open the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs and complex organics in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments.

  14. A high-resolution spectropolarimetric survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars - I. Observations and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alecian, E.; Wade, G. A.; Catala, C.; Grunhut, J. H.; Landstreet, J. D.; Bagnulo, S.; Böhm, T.; Folsom, C. P.; Marsden, S.; Waite, I.

    2013-02-01

    This is the first in a series of papers in which we describe and report the analysis of a large survey of Herbig Ae/Be stars in circular spectropolarimetry. Using the ESPaDOnS and Narval high-resolution spectropolarimeters at the Canada-France-Hawaii and Bernard Lyot Telescopes, respectively, we have acquired 132 circularly polarized spectra of 70 Herbig Ae/Be stars and Herbig candidates. The large majority of these spectra are characterized by a resolving power of about 65 000, and a spectral coverage from about 3700 Å to 1 μm. The peak signal-to-noise ratio per CCD pixel ranges from below 100 (for the faintest targets) to over 1000 (for the brightest). The observations were acquired with the primary aim of searching for magnetic fields in these objects. However, our spectra are suitable for a variety of other important measurements, including rotational properties, variability, binarity, chemical abundances, circumstellar environment conditions and structure, etc. In this paper, we describe the sample selection, the observations and their reduction, and the measurements that will comprise the basis of much of our following analysis. We describe the determination of fundamental parameters for each target. We detail the least-squares deconvolution (LSD) that we have applied to each of our spectra, including the selection, editing and tuning of the LSD line masks. We describe the fitting of the LSD Stokes I profiles using a multicomponent model that yields the rotationally broadened photospheric profile (providing the projected rotational velocity and radial velocity for each observation) as well as circumstellar emission and absorption components. Finally, we diagnose the longitudinal Zeeman effect via the measured circular polarization, and report the longitudinal magnetic field and Stokes V Zeeman signature detection probability. As an appendix, we provide a detailed review of each star observed.

  15. Does direct observation of procedural skills reflect trainee's progress in otolaryngology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Z; Hayden, L; Muthuswamy, K; Ziprin, P; Darzi, A; Tolley, N S

    2014-06-01

    UK surgical trainees are required to undertake work-based assessments each year in order to progress in their training. Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) is one of these assessments. We aim to investigate the validity of DOPS in assessing otolaryngology trainees at all levels. A retrospective search of the portfolios of all otolaryngology trainees in North Thames was carried out to identify otolaryngology-specific DOPS. A score (Cs) was calculated for each DOPS based on the percentage of satisfactorily-rated items. The overall performance rating (Ps) was analysed as a separate variable and compared with Cs. The Ps and Cs results were then compared across trainee grades and levels within each grade: Core trainees (CT1-CT2) and specialty trainees (ST3-ST8). Seven hundred and sixty-seven otolaryngology DOPS were completed between August 2008 and September 2013. The tool was found to be reliable and internally consistent. Trainees in ST grade had higher Cs and Ps scores than CT grade (P Otolaryngology DOPS is a useful tool in assessing otolaryngology trainees especially from CT1-ST3 level. DOPS can also differentiate between junior and senior trainees. However, it was not able to demonstrate progress at levels above ST3, most likely due to the simplicity of the procedures which trainees tend to master in the first few years of training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Direct observation of bacterial deposition onto clean and organic-fouled polyamide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramani, Arun; Huang, Xiaofei; Hoek, Eric M V

    2009-08-01

    Nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes are commonly applied to produce highly purified water from municipal wastewater effluents. In these applications, biofouling limits overall process performance and increases the cost of operation. Initial bacteria adhesion onto a membrane surface is a critical early step in the overall process of membrane biofouling. However, adsorption of effluent organic matter onto the membrane may precede bacterial deposition and change membrane surface properties. Herein we employed direct microscopic observation to elucidate mechanisms governing bacterial cell deposition onto clean and organic-fouled NF and RO membranes. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and alginic acid (AA) were used as models for protein and polysaccharide rich organic matter in secondary wastewater effluents. In all experiments, organic fouling increased membrane hydraulic resistance and salt rejection, in addition to interfacial hydrophilicity and roughness. Even though surface hydrophilicity increased, the rougher surfaces presented by organic-fouled membranes produced nano-scale features that promoted localized bacterial deposition. An extended DLVO analysis of bacterial cells and membrane surface properties suggested that bacterial deposition correlated most strongly with the Lewis acid-base free energy of adhesion and root mean square (RMS) roughness, whereas van der Waals and electrostatic free energies were weakly correlated. This was true for both clean and organic-fouled membranes. Bacterial deposition rates were clearly influenced by an antagonistic interplay between macroscopic surface hydrophilicity and nano-scale surface roughness.

  17. Direct Observation of a Dark State in the Photocycle of a Light-Driven Molecular Motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirjalayer, Saeed; Cnossen, Arjen; Browne, Wesley R; Feringa, Ben L; Buma, Wybren J; Woutersen, Sander

    2016-11-03

    Controlling the excited-state properties of light driven molecular machines is crucial to achieving high efficiency and directed functionality. A key challenge in achieving control lies in unravelling the complex photodynamics and especially in identifying the role played by dark states. Here we use the structure sensitivity and high time resolution of UV-pump/IR-probe spectroscopy to build a detailed and comprehensive model of the structural evolution of light driven molecular rotors. The photodynamics of these chiral overcrowded alkene derivatives are determined by two close-lying excited electronic states. The potential energy landscape of these "bright" and "dark" states gives rise to a broad excited-state electronic absorption band over the entire mid-IR range that is probed for the first time and modeled by quantum mechanical calculations. The transient IR vibrational fingerprints observed in our studies allow for an unambiguous identification of the identity of the "dark" electronic excited state from which the photon's energy is converted into motion, and thereby pave the way for tuning the quantum yield of future molecular rotors based on this structural motif.

  18. Direct observation of lithium polysulfides in lithium-sulfur batteries using operando X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, Joanna; Bouchet, Renaud; Trabesinger, Sigita; Marino, Cyril; Gubler, Lorenz; Villevieille, Claire

    2017-06-01

    In the on going quest towards lithium-battery chemistries beyond the lithium-ion technology, the lithium-sulfur system is emerging as one of the most promising candidates. The major outstanding challenge on the route to commercialization is controlling the so-called polysulfide shuttle, which is responsible for the poor cycling efficiency of the current generation of lithium-sulfur batteries. However, the mechanistic understanding of the reactions underlying the polysulfide shuttle is still incomplete. Here we report the direct observation of lithium polysulfides in a lithium-sulfur cell during operation by means of operando X-ray diffraction. We identify signatures of polysulfides adsorbed on the surface of a glass-fibre separator and monitor their evolution during cycling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the adsorption of the polysulfides onto SiO2 can be harnessed for buffering the polysulfide redox shuttle. The use of fumed silica as an electrolyte additive therefore significantly improves the specific charge and Coulombic efficiency of lithium-sulfur batteries.

  19. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320–570 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke; Korhonen, Johanna; Yasuyuki Aono,

    2016-01-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443–2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693–2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  20. Direct Observation of Impurity Segregation at Dislocation Cores in an Ionic Crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochigi, Eita; Kezuka, Yuki; Nakamura, Akiho; Nakamura, Atsutomo; Shibata, Naoya; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2017-05-10

    Dislocations, one-dimensional lattice defects, are known to strongly interact with impurity atoms in a crystal. This interaction is generally explained on the basis of the long-range strain field of the dislocation. In ionic crystals, the impurity-dislocation interactions must be influenced by the electrostatic effect in addition to the strain effect. However, such interactions have not been verified yet. Here, we show a direct evidence of the electrostatic impurity-dislocation interaction in α-Al2O3 by visualizing the dopant atom distributions at dislocation cores using atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). It was found that the dopant segregation behaviors strongly depend on the kind of elements, and their valence states are considered to be a critical factor. The observed segregation behaviors cannot be explained by the elastic interactions only, but can be successfully understood if the electrostatic interactions are taken into account. The present findings will lead to the precise and quantitative understanding of impurity induced dislocation properties in many materials and devices.

  1. Direct observations of ice seasonality reveal changes in climate over the past 320-570 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sapna; Magnuson, John J.; Batt, Ryan D.; Winslow, Luke A.; Korhonen, Johanna; Aono, Yasuyuki

    2016-04-01

    Lake and river ice seasonality (dates of ice freeze and breakup) responds sensitively to climatic change and variability. We analyzed climate-related changes using direct human observations of ice freeze dates (1443-2014) for Lake Suwa, Japan, and of ice breakup dates (1693-2013) for Torne River, Finland. We found a rich array of changes in ice seasonality of two inland waters from geographically distant regions: namely a shift towards later ice formation for Suwa and earlier spring melt for Torne, increasing frequencies of years with warm extremes, changing inter-annual variability, waning of dominant inter-decadal quasi-periodic dynamics, and stronger correlations of ice seasonality with atmospheric CO2 concentration and air temperature after the start of the Industrial Revolution. Although local factors, including human population growth, land use change, and water management influence Suwa and Torne, the general patterns of ice seasonality are similar for both systems, suggesting that global processes including climate change and variability are driving the long-term changes in ice seasonality.

  2. Direct observation of surface-state thermal oscillations in SmB6 oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Brian; Stern, Alex; Efimkin, Dmitry K.; Fisk, Zachary; Xia, Jing

    2018-01-01

    SmB6 is a mixed valence Kondo insulator that exhibits a sharp increase in resistance following an activated behavior that levels off and saturates below 4 K. This behavior can be explained by the proposal of SmB6 representing a new state of matter, a topological Kondo insulator, in which a Kondo gap is developed, and topologically protected surface conduction dominates low-temperature transport. Exploiting its nonlinear dynamics, a tunable SmB6 oscillator device was recently demonstrated, where a small dc current generates large oscillating voltages at frequencies from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz. This behavior was explained by a theoretical model describing the thermal and electronic dynamics of coupled surface and bulk states. However, a crucial aspect of this model, the predicted temperature oscillation in the surface state, has not been experimentally observed to date. This is largely due to the technical difficulty of detecting an oscillating temperature of the very thin surface state. Here we report direct measurements of the time-dependent surface-state temperature in SmB6 with a RuO2 microthermometer. Our results agree quantitatively with the theoretically simulated temperature waveform, and hence support the validity of the oscillator model, which will provide accurate theoretical guidance for developing future SmB6 oscillators at higher frequencies.

  3. Direct observation of generation and propagation of magnetosonic waves following substorm injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Wang, Geng; Liu, Nigang; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui

    2017-08-01

    Magnetosonic whistler mode waves play an important role in the radiation belt electron dynamics. Previous theory has suggested that these waves are excited by the ring distributions of hot protons and can propagate radially and azimuthally over a broad spatial range. However, because of the challenging requirements on satellite locations and data processing techniques, this theory was difficult to validate directly. Here we present some experimental tests of the theory on the basis of Van Allen Probes observations of magnetosonic waves following substorm injections. At higher L shells with significant substorm injections, the discrete magnetosonic emission lines started approximately at the proton gyrofrequency harmonics, qualitatively consistent with the prediction of linear proton Bernstein mode instability. In the frequency-time spectrograms, these emission lines exhibited a clear rising tone characteristic with a long duration of 15-25 min, implying the additional contribution of other undiscovered mechanisms. Nearly at the same time, the magnetosonic waves arose at lower L shells without substorm injections. The wave signals at two different locations, separated by ΔL up to 2.0 and by ΔMLT up to 4.2, displayed the consistent frequency-time structures, strongly supporting the hypothesis about the radial and azimuthal propagation of magnetosonic waves.

  4. Direct Observation of a Carbon Filament in Water-Resistant Organic Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Hagyoul; Seong, Hyejeong; Lee, Dong-Il; Park, Hongkeun; Choi, Young Joo; Im, Sung-Gap; Kim, Sang Ouk; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-07-28

    The memory for the Internet of Things (IoT) requires versatile characteristics such as flexibility, wearability, and stability in outdoor environments. Resistive random access memory (RRAM) to harness a simple structure and organic material with good flexibility can be an attractive candidate for IoT memory. However, its solution-oriented process and unclear switching mechanism are critical problems. Here we demonstrate iCVD polymer-intercalated RRAM (i-RRAM). i-RRAM exhibits robust flexibility and versatile wearability on any substrate. Stable operation of i-RRAM, even in water, is demonstrated, which is the first experimental presentation of water-resistant organic memory without any waterproof protection package. Moreover, the direct observation of a carbon filament is also reported for the first time using transmission electron microscopy, which puts an end to the controversy surrounding the switching mechanism. Therefore, reproducibility is feasible through comprehensive modeling. Furthermore, a carbon filament is superior to a metal filament in terms of the design window and selection of the electrode material. These results suggest an alternative to solve the critical issues of organic RRAM and an optimized memory type suitable for the IoT era.

  5. The Stochastic Engine Initiative: Improving Prediction of Behavior in Geologic Environments We Cannot Directly Observe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aines, R; Nitao, J; Newmark, R; Carle, S; Ramirez, A; Harris, D; Johnson, J; Johnson, V; Ermak, D; Sugiyama, G; Hanley, W; Sengupta, S; Daily, W; Glaser, R; Dyer, K; Fogg, G; Zhang, Y; Yu, Z; Levine, R

    2002-05-09

    The stochastic engine uses modern computational capabilities to combine simulations with observations. We integrate the general knowledge represented by models with specific knowledge represented by data, using Bayesian inferencing and a highly efficient staged Metropolis-type search algorithm. From this, we obtain a probability distribution characterizing the likely configurations of the system consistent with existing data. The primary use will be optimizing knowledge about the configuration of a system for which sufficient direct observations cannot be made. Programmatic applications include underground systems ranging from environmental contamination to military bunkers, optimization of complex nonlinear systems, and timely decision-making for complex, hostile environments such as battlefields or the detection of secret facilities. We create a stochastic ''base representation'' of system configurations (states) from which the values of measurable parameters can be calculated using forward simulators. Comparison of these predictions to actual measurements drives embedded Bayesian inferencing, updating the distributions of states in the base representation using the Metropolis method. Unlike inversion methods that generate a single bestcase deterministic solution, this method produces all the likely solutions, weighted by their likelihoods. This flexible method is best applied to highly non-linear, multi-dimensional problems. Staging of the Metropolis searches permits us to run the simplest model systems, such as lithology estimators, at the lower stages. The majority of possible configurations are thus eliminated from further consideration by more complex simulators, such as flow and transport models. Because the method is fully automated, large data sets of a variety of types can be used to refine the system configurations. The most important prerequisites for optimal use of this method are well-characterized forward simulators, realistic

  6. Spectroscopic observation of ASASSN-17he by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Benetti, S.; Dong, S.; Stritzinger, M.; Stanek, K.; Brimacombe, J.; Sagues, A.; Galindo, P.; Losada, I. Rivero

    2017-10-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of ASASSN-17he. The candidate was discovered by by the All-Sky Automated Survey for Supernovae.

  7. Non-Observation Bias in an Address-Register-Based CATI/CAPI Mixed Mode Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Lipps, O.

    2016-01-01

    Landline surveys suffer from an increasing risk of excluding a relevant share of the population. To analyze and correct telephone coverage issues, face-to-face surveys are often used, which contain questions about landline ownership and registration. Others use dual frame approaches and compare results from the landline with another mode. However, such surveys lack information about unobserved sample members. In this article we analyze representation bias using a household survey...

  8. Participating on Equal Terms? The Gender Dimensions of Direct Participation in Organisational Change: Findings from the EPOC Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Annette; Webster, Juliet

    The gender dimensions of direct participation in organizational change were examined in a survey of general managers at 32,582 workplaces in the following European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Responses were received from 5,786 managers (response rate,…

  9. Tools for the direct observation and assessment of psychomotor skills in medical trainees: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelovsek, J Eric; Kow, Nathan; Diwadkar, Gouri B

    2013-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestone Project mandates programmes to assess the attainment of training outcomes, including the psychomotor (surgical or procedural) skills of medical trainees. The objectives of this study were to determine which tools exist to directly assess psychomotor skills in medical trainees on live patients and to identify the data indicating their psychometric and edumetric properties. An electronic search was conducted for papers published from January 1948 to May 2011 using the PubMed, Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Web of Science electronic databases and the review of references in article bibliographies. A study was included if it described a tool or instrument designed for the direct observation of psychomotor skills in patient care settings by supervisors. Studies were excluded if they referred to tools that assessed only clinical or non-technical skills, involved non-medical health professionals, or assessed skills performed on a simulator. Overall, 4114 citations were screened, 168 (4.1%) articles were reviewed for eligibility and 51 (1.2%) manuscripts were identified as meeting the study inclusion criteria. Three authors abstracted and reviewed studies using a standardised form for the presence of key psychometric and edumetric elements as per ACGME and American Psychological Association (APA) recommendations, and also assigned an overall grade based on the ACGME Committee on Educational Outcome Assessment grading system. A total of 30 tools were identified. Construct validity based on associations between scores and training level was identified in 24 tools, internal consistency in 14, test-retest reliability in five and inter-rater reliability in 20. The modification of attitudes, knowledge or skills was reported using five tools. The seven-item Global Rating Scale and the Procedure-Based Assessment received an

  10. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: first results from SCUBA-2 observations of the Cepheus Flare region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattle, K.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Kirk, J. M.; Di Francesco, J.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J. C.; Keown, J.; Buckle, J.; Beaulieu, S. F.; Berry, D. S.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M. J.; Fich, M.; Hatchell, J.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Nutter, D.; Pineda, J. E.; Quinn, C.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Bastien, P.; Bresnahan, D.; Butner, H.; Chen, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Coudé, S.; Davis, C. J.; Drabek-Maunder, E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Fiege, J.; Friberg, P.; Friesen, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Graves, S.; Greaves, J.; Gregson, J.; Holland, W.; Joncas, G.; Knee, L. B. G.; Mairs, S.; Marsh, K.; Matthews, B. C.; Moriarty-Schieven, G.; Mowat, C.; Rawlings, J.; Richer, J.; Robertson, D.; Rosolowsky, E.; Rumble, D.; Sadavoy, S.; Thomas, H.; Tothill, N.; Viti, S.; White, G. J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present observations of the Cepheus Flare obtained as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Legacy Survey (GBLS) with the SCUBA-2 instrument. We produce a catalogue of sources found by SCUBA-2, and separate these into starless cores and protostars. We determine masses and densities for each of our sources, using source temperatures determined by the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We compare the properties of starless cores in four different molecular clouds: L1147/58, L1172/74, L1251 and L1228. We find that the core mass functions for each region typically show shallower-than-Salpeter behaviour. We find that L1147/58 and L1228 have a high ratio of starless cores to Class II protostars, while L1251 and L1174 have a low ratio, consistent with the latter regions being more active sites of current star formation, while the former are forming stars less actively. We determine that if modelled as thermally supported Bonnor-Ebert spheres, most of our cores have stable configurations accessible to them. We estimate the external pressures on our cores using archival 13CO velocity dispersion measurements and find that our cores are typically pressure confined, rather than gravitationally bound. We perform a virial analysis on our cores, and find that they typically cannot be supported against collapse by internal thermal energy alone, due primarily to the measured external pressures. This suggests that the dominant mode of internal support in starless cores in the Cepheus Flare is either non-thermal motions or internal magnetic fields.

  11. Model Atmospheres and Spectral Irradiance Library of the Exoplanet Host Stars Observed in the MUSCLES Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Jeffrey

    2017-08-01

    We propose to compute state-of-the-art model atmospheres (photospheres, chromospheres, transition regions and coronae) of the 4 K and 7 M exoplanet host stars observed by HST in the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, the nearest host star Proxima Centauri, and TRAPPIST-1. Our semi-empirical models will fit theunique high-resolution panchromatic (X-ray to infrared) spectra of these stars in the MAST High-Level Science Products archive consisting of COS and STIS UV spectra and near-simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ground-based observations. We will compute models with the fully tested SSRPM computer software incorporating 52 atoms and ions in full non-LTE (435,986 spectral lines) and the 20 most-abundant diatomic molecules (about 2 million lines). This code has successfully fit the panchromatic spectrum of the M1.5 V exoplanet host star GJ 832 (Fontenla et al. 2016), the first M star with such a detailed model, and solar spectra. Our models will (1) predict the unobservable extreme-UV spectra, (2) determine radiative energy losses and balancing heating rates throughout these atmospheres, (3) compute a stellar irradiance library needed to describe the radiation environment of potentially habitable exoplanets to be studied by TESS and JWST, and (4) in the long post-HST era when UV observations will not be possible, the stellar irradiance library will be a powerful tool for predicting the panchromatic spectra of host stars that have only limited spectral coverage, in particular no UV spectra. The stellar models and spectral irradiance library will be placed quickly in MAST.

  12. Public Awareness and Use of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Tests: Results From 3 State Population-Based Surveys, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Debra; Zlot, Amy; Johnson, Jenny; Annis-Emeott, Ann; Lee, Patrick W.; Bland, Mary Pat; Edwards, Karen L.; Oehlke, Kristin; Giles, Rebecca T.; Rafferty, Ann; Cook, Michelle L.; Khoury, Muin J.

    2009-01-01

    We conducted population-based surveys on direct-to-consumer nutrigenomic testing in Michigan, Oregon, and Utah as part of the 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Awareness of the tests was highest in Oregon (24.4%) and lowest in Michigan (7.6%). Predictors of awareness were more education, higher income, and increasing age, except among those 65 years or older. Less than 1% had used a health-related direct-to-consumer genetic test. Public health systems should increase consumer and provider education and continue surveillance on direct-to-consumer genetic tests. PMID:19106425

  13. Social communication with virtual agents: The effects of body and gaze direction on attention and emotional responding in human observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschner, Linda; Pannasch, Sebastian; Schulz, Johannes; Graupner, Sven-Thomas

    2015-08-01

    In social communication, the gaze direction of other persons provides important information to perceive and interpret their emotional response. Previous research investigated the influence of gaze by manipulating mutual eye contact. Therefore, gaze and body direction have been changed as a whole, resulting in only congruent gaze and body directions (averted or directed) of another person. Here, we aimed to disentangle these effects by using short animated sequences of virtual agents posing with either direct or averted body or gaze. Attention allocation by means of eye movements, facial muscle response, and emotional experience to agents of different gender and facial expressions were investigated. Eye movement data revealed longer fixation durations, i.e., a stronger allocation of attention, when gaze and body direction were not congruent with each other or when both were directed towards the observer. This suggests that direct interaction as well as incongruous signals increase the demands of attentional resources in the observer. For the facial muscle response, only the reaction of muscle zygomaticus major revealed an effect of body direction, expressed by stronger activity in response to happy expressions for direct compared to averted gaze when the virtual character's body was directed towards the observer. Finally, body direction also influenced the emotional experience ratings towards happy expressions. While earlier findings suggested that mutual eye contact is the main source for increased emotional responding and attentional allocation, the present results indicate that direction of the virtual agent's body and head also plays a minor but significant role. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Photochemical Reflectance Index from Directional Cornfield Reflectances: Observations and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Zhang, Qingyuan; Corp, Lawrence A.; Dandois, Jonathan; Kustas, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The two-layer Markov chain Analytical Canopy Reflectance Model (ACRM) was linked with in situ hyperspectral leaf optical properties to simulate the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI) for a corn crop canopy at three different growth stages. This is an extended study after a successful demonstration of PRI simulations for a cornfield previously conducted at an early vegetative growth stage. Consistent with previous in situ studies, sunlit leaves exhibited lower PRI values than shaded leaves. Since sunlit (shaded) foliage dominates the canopy in the reflectance hotspot (coldspot), the canopy PRI derived from field hyperspectral observations displayed sensitivity to both view zenith angle and relative azimuth angle at all growth stages. Consequently, sunlit and shaded canopy sectors were most differentiated when viewed along the azimuth matching the solar principal plane. These directional PRI responses associated with sunlit/shaded foliage were successfully reproduced by the ACRM. As before, the simulated PRI values from the current study were closer to in situ values when both sunlit and shaded leaves were utilized as model input data in a two-layer mode, instead of a one-layer mode with sunlit leaves only. Model performance as judged by correlation between in situ and simulated values was strongest for the mature corn crop (r = 0.87, RMSE = 0.0048), followed by the early vegetative stage (r = 0.78; RMSE = 0.0051) and the early senescent stage (r = 0.65; RMSE = 0.0104). Since the benefit of including shaded leaves in the scheme varied across different growth stages, a further analysis was conducted to investigate how variable fractions of sunlit/shaded leaves affect the canopy PRI values expected for a cornfield, with implications for 20 remote sensing monitoring options. Simulations of the sunlit to shaded canopy ratio near 50/50 +/- 10 (e.g., 60/40) matching field observations at all growth stages were examined. Our results suggest in the importance of the

  15. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves from Advanced LIGO's First Observing Run.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Belgin, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Biscoveanu, A S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campbell, W; Canepa, M; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, H-P; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, E; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dasgupta, A; Da Silva Costa, C F; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Davis, D; Daw, E J; Day, B; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devenson, J; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Doctor, Z; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorrington, I; Douglas, R; Dovale Álvarez, M; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Essick, R C; Etienne, Z; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Fauchon-Jones, E J; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Fernández Galiana, A; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Forsyth, S S; Fournier, J-D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fries, E M; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H; Gadre, B U; Gaebel, S M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gayathri, V; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghonge, S; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Henry, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Junker, J; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kéfélian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J C; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W; Kim, Y-M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kirchhoff, R; Kissel, J S; Klein, B; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koch, P; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Krämer, C; Kringel, V; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lang, R N; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lanza, R K; Lartaux-Vollard, A; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lehmann, J; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Liu, J; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macfoy, S; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matas, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGrath, C; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, A; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Muniz, E A M; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Napier, K; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Neri, M; Nery, M; Neunzert, A; Newport, J M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Noack, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pace, A E; Page, J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perez, C J; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Pratt, J W W; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Qiu, S; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Scheuer, J; Schlassa, S; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Schwalbe, S G; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T J; Shahriar, M S; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, B; Smith, J R; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Spencer, A P; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strigin, S E; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, D; Tápai, M; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tippens, T; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Trinastic, J; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Tso, R; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Varma, V; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Venugopalan, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Viets, A D; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Watchi, J; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whiting, B F; Whittle, C; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, T; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, S J; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2017-03-24

    We employ gravitational-wave radiometry to map the stochastic gravitational wave background expected from a variety of contributing mechanisms and test the assumption of isotropy using data from the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory's (aLIGO) first observing run. We also search for persistent gravitational waves from point sources with only minimal assumptions over the 20-1726 Hz frequency band. Finding no evidence of gravitational waves from either point sources or a stochastic background, we set limits at 90% confidence. For broadband point sources, we report upper limits on the gravitational wave energy flux per unit frequency in the range F_{α,Θ}(f)<(0.1-56)×10^{-8}    erg cm^{-2} s^{-1} Hz^{-1}(f/25  Hz)^{α-1} depending on the sky location Θ and the spectral power index α. For extended sources, we report upper limits on the fractional gravitational wave energy density required to close the Universe of Ω(f,Θ)<(0.39-7.6)×10^{-8}  sr^{-1}(f/25  Hz)^{α} depending on Θ and α. Directed searches for narrowband gravitational waves from astrophysically interesting objects (Scorpius X-1, Supernova 1987 A, and the Galactic Center) yield median frequency-dependent limits on strain amplitude of h_{0}<(6.7,5.5,  and  7.0)×10^{-25}, respectively, at the most sensitive detector frequencies between 130-175 Hz. This represents a mean improvement of a factor of 2 across the band compared to previous searches of this kind for these sky locations, considering the different quantities of strain constrained in each case.

  16. The Green Bank Ammonia Survey: Observations of Hierarchical Dense Gas Structures in Cepheus-L1251

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keown, Jared; Di Francesco, James; Kirk, Helen; Friesen, Rachel K.; Pineda, Jaime E.; Rosolowsky, Erik; Ginsburg, Adam; Offner, Stella S. R.; Caselli, Paola; Alves, Felipe; Chacón-Tanarro, Ana; Punanova, Anna; Redaelli, Elena; Seo, Young Min; Matzner, Christopher D.; Chun-Yuan Chen, Michael; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Chen, How-Huan; Shirley, Yancy; Singh, Ayushi; Arce, Hector G.; Martin, Peter; Myers, Philip C.

    2017-11-01

    We use Green Bank Ammonia Survey observations of NH3 (1, 1) and (2, 2) emission with 32″ FWHM resolution from a ˜10 pc2 portion of the Cepheus-L1251 molecular cloud to identify hierarchical dense gas structures. Our dendrogram analysis of the NH3 data results in 22 top-level structures, which reside within 13 lower-level parent structures. The structures are compact (0.01 {pc}≲ {R}{eff}≲ 0.1 {pc}) and are spatially correlated with the highest H2 column density portions of the cloud. We also compare the ammonia data to a catalog of dense cores identified by higher-resolution (18.″2 FWHM) Herschel Space Observatory observations of dust continuum emission from Cepheus-L1251. Maps of kinetic gas temperature, velocity dispersion, and NH3 column density, derived from detailed modeling of the NH3 data, are used to investigate the stability and chemistry of the ammonia-identified and Herschel-identified structures. We show that the dust and dense gas in the structures have similar temperatures, with median T dust and T K measurements of 11.7 ± 1.1 K and 10.3 ± 2.0 K, respectively. Based on a virial analysis, we find that the ammonia-identified structures are gravitationally dominated, yet may be in or near a state of virial equilibrium. Meanwhile, the majority of the Herschel-identified dense cores appear to be not bound by their own gravity and instead confined by external pressure. CCS (20 - 10) and HC5N (9-8) emission from the region reveal broader line widths and centroid velocity offsets when compared to the NH3 (1, 1) emission in some cases, likely due to these carbon-based molecules tracing the turbulent outer layers of the dense cores.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of agitation in newly hospitalized schizophrenia patients in China: An observational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Weifeng; Zhang, Suzhen; Liu, Qi; Yang, Fude; Wang, Yong; Li, Tao; Mei, Qiyi; He, Hongbo; Chen, Zhiyu; Su, Zhonghua; Liu, Tiebang; Xie, Shiping; Tan, Qingrong; Zhang, Jinbei; Zhang, Congpei; Sang, Hong; Chen, Wenhao; Shi, Le; Li, Lingzhi; Shi, Ying; Guo, Lihua; Zhang, Hongyan; Lu, Lin

    2017-07-01

    This multi-center observational study investigated the prevalence of agitation in newly hospitalized schizophrenia patients in China and its potential risk factors. It was performed in 2014 and covered 14 hospitals. Newly hospitalized patients with schizophrenia or suspected schizophrenia who met the diagnostic criteria of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, 10th revision, were recruited. Agitation and related risk factors were evaluated by a questionnaire designed for the survey. General demographic data, disease characteristics, scores on schizophrenia rating scales and agitation rating scales (e.g., Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale-Excited Component [PANSS-EC] and Behavioral Activity Rating Scale [BARS]) were collected. Among the 1512 patients screened in the study, 1400 (92.59%) were eligible. According to the PANSS-EC and BARS, the prevalence of agitation was 60.92% (853 of 1400) and 59.00% (826 of 1400), respectively. The overall prevalence of agitation was 47.50% (665 of 1400). The most important risk factor of agitation was being aggressive at baseline (Modified Overt Aggression Scale score ≥4, odds ratio=6.54; 95% confidence interval=4.93-8.69). Other risk factors included a history of aggressive behavior, northern region of residence, involuntary hospitalization, disease severity, low level of education, living alone, being unemployed or retired. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. National survey of health in the tattoo industry: Observational study of 448 French tattooists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Kluger

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The data regarding the health of professional tattooists is inexistent. Tattooists are usually heavily tattooed and exposed daily to body fluids and skin-to-skin contacts with customers, tattoo inks, solvents, allergens, irritants, and work for hours often in inadequate positions using vibrating tattoo machines. We analyzed the health status of active French professional tattooists. Material and Methods: An observational self-reported Internet survey was performed among 448 tattooists who were members of the French Tattoo Union in November 2013. Results: The main physical complaints were musculoskeletal: back pain (65%, finger pain (41.5% and muscular pain (28.8%. Finger pain, back pain, muscular pain and carpal tunnel symptoms/tingling sensations on the fingers occurred among 88%, 61.5%, 68% and 84% of the cases after having started their activity (p < 0.001. Other chronic diseases, autoimmune diseases and cancers remained at a low level here. Conclusions: Professional tattooists have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal complaints about back pain due to repetitive movements, awkward postures and use of a vibrating tattoo machine. Tattooists have a unique environment that imply developing intervention and preventive strategies for them. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(1:111–120

  19. Ventilatory and hemodynamic management of potential organ donors: an observational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Luciana; Bosma, Karen; Pasero, Daniela; Galli, Tamara; Cortese, Gerardo; Donadio, Pierpaolo; Bosco, Riccardo

    2006-02-01

    To determine the current standard ventilatory and cardiovascular management in potential organ donors. Prospective, multiple-center, observational survey. A total of 15 intensive care units in 13 hospitals in Piedmont, Italy. A total of 34 brain-dead patients enrolled in 6 months. Demographics and reasons for lung transplant exclusion were recorded. Ventilatory and hemodynamic variables were compared before and after confirmation of brain death. A total of 23 potential donors were ineligible for lung donation based on pulmonary status and age. Of the 11 eligible lung donors, only two donated the lungs because five had Pao2/Fio2 ratios of tests were performed with apneic oxygenation after disconnection from the ventilator in all cases; tracheal suction was performed with an open circuit in eight cases, and no recruitment maneuvers were performed. Crystalloid infusion was increased after diagnosis of brain death from 187 +/- 151 to 275 +/- 158 mL/hr (p < .05), and central venous pressure increased from 6 +/- 3 to 7 +/- 3 mm Hg (p < .05). Inotropic support was used in 24 donors (70%). Five of 11 potential lung donors (45%) had a Pao2/Fio2 ratio of <300, making them ineligible for lung donation. After the diagnosis of brain death, ventilatory management remained the same, no maneuvers for prevention of derecruitment of the lung were performed, and cardiovascular management was modified to optimize peripheral organ perfusion. These data represent the current standard of care for ventilatory management of potential organ donors and may be suboptimal in preserving lung function.

  20. 76 FR 19282 - Direct Investment Surveys: Alignment of Regulations With Current Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ...-21), two schedules of expenditures for property, plant, and equipment of U.S. direct investment... Expenditures for Property, Plant, and Equipment of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad BE-133C, Schedule of Expenditures for Property, Plant, and Equipment of U.S. Direct Investment Abroad BE-507, Industry...

  1. Observation of Microlensing towards the Galactic Spiral Arms EROS II 2 year survey

    CERN Document Server

    Derue, F; Alard, C; Albert, J N; Andersen, J; Ansari, R; Aubourg, E; Bareyre, P; Bauer, F; Beaulieu, J P; Bouquet, A; Char, S; Charlot, X; Couchot, F; Coutures, C; Ferlet, R; Glicenstein, J F; Goldman, B; Gould, A; Graff, D S; Gros, M H; Haïssinski, J; Hamilton, J C; Hardin, D P; De Kat, J; Kim, A; Lasserre, T; Lesquoy, E; Loup, C; Magneville, C; Mansoux, B; Marquette, J B; Maurice, E; Milshtein, A I; Moniez, M; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Perdereau, O; Prévôt, L; Regnault, N; Rich, J; Spiro, Michel; Vidal-Madjar, A; Vigroux, L; Zylberajch, S

    1999-01-01

    We present the analysis of the light curves of 8.5 million stars observed during two seasons by EROS (Experience de Recherche d'Objets Sombres), in the galactic plane away from the bulge. Three stars have been found that exhibit luminosity variations compatible with gravitational microlensing effects due to unseen objects. The corresponding optical depth, averaged over four directions, is 0.38 (+0.53, -0.15) 10^{-6}. All three candidates have long Einstein radius crossing times ($\\sim$ 70 to 100 days). For one of them, the lack of evidence for a parallax or a source size effect enabled us to constrain the lens-source % geometric configuration. Another candidate displays a modulation of the magnification, which is compatible with the lensing of a binary source. The interpretation of the optical depths inferred from these observations is hindered by the imperfect knowledge of the distance to the target stars. Our measurements are compatible with expectations from simple galactic models under reasonable assumpti...

  2. Direct observation of subtropical mode water circulation in the western North Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratantoni, David M.; Kwon, Young-Oh; Hodges, Benjamin A.

    2013-07-01

    Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is the dominant subtropical mode water of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre and is hypothesized as an interannual reservoir of anomalous heat, nutrients and CO2. Although isolated beneath the stratified upper-ocean at the end of each winter, EDW may re-emerge in subsequent years to influence mixed layer properties and consequently air-sea interaction and primary productivity. Here we report on recent quasi-Lagrangian measurements of EDW circulation and stratification in the western subtropical gyre using an array of acoustically-tracked, isotherm-following, bobbing profiling floats programmed to track and intensively sample the vertically homogenized EDW layer and directly measure velocity on the 18.5 °C isothermal surface. The majority of the CLIVAR Mode Water Dynamics Experiment (CLIMODE) bobbers drifted within the subtropical gyre for 2.5-3.5 years, many exhibiting complex looping patterns indicative of an energetic eddy field. Bobber-derived Lagrangian integral time and length scales (3 days, 68 km) associated with motion on 18.5 °C were consistent with previous measurements in the Gulf Stream extension region and fall between previous estimates at the ocean surface and thermocline depth. Several bobbers provided evidence of long-lived submesoscale coherent vortices associated with substantial EDW thickness. While the relative importance of such vortices remains to be determined, our observations indicate that these features can have a profound effect on EDW distribution. EDW thickness (defined using a vertical temperature gradient criterion) exhibits seasonal changes in opposition to a layer bounded by the 17 °C and 19 °C isotherms. In particular, EDW thickness is generally greatest in winter (as a result of buoyancy-forced convection), while the 17°-19 °C layer is thickest in summer consistent with seasonal Ekman pumping. Contrary to previous hypotheses, the bobber data suggest that a substantial fraction of subducted EDW

  3. Direct Observations of GPS L1 Signal-to-Noise Degradation due to Solar Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerruti, A. P.; Kintner, P. M.; Gary, D.; Lanzerotti, L.

    2006-05-01

    GPS signals, systems, and navigation accuracy are vulnerable to a variety of space weather effects mostly caused by the ionosphere. This paper considers a different class of space weather effects on GPS signals: solar radio bursts. We present the first direct observations of GPS L1 (1.6 GHz) carrier-to-noise degradation on two different models of GPS receivers due to the solar radio burst associated with the 7 September, 2005 solar flare. The solar radio burst consisted of two periods of 1.6 GHz activity at approximately 17:40 UT and again at 18:30 UT. All the receivers that were affected by the solar radio burst were in the sun-lit hemisphere: three identical receivers were collocated at the Arecibo Observatory, and four identical receivers of a different model were located in Brazil. For both models, all GPS satellites in view were affected similarly. In some cases the decrease in the GPS L1 signal-to-noise agreed perfectly with the solar radio burst amplitudes, while in other cases there was no association. Further analysis indicated that only the right hand circularly polarized (RHCP) emissions affected the GPS signals. Since GPS signals are RHCP and GPS antennas are also RHCP, the null effect of the LHCP power confirms our hypothesis that the solar radio bursts are causal. The maximum solar radio burst power associated with the 7 September 2005 flare had a peak intensity of about 8,700 solar flux units (SFU) RHCP at 1,600 MHz, which caused a corresponding decrease in the signal- to-noise of about 2.5 dB across all visible satellites. Furthermore, an event with a peak intensity of 5,000 SFU RHCP at 1,600 MHz caused a 2 dB fade for nearly 15 minutes. To further investigate the effect of solar radio bursts, we also examined the emissions associated with the 28 October 2003 flare. Although polarization data was not available for this even, a similar association was found between 1,400 MHz solar radio power and GPS signal-to-noise degradation. The maximum

  4. The Biasing Effects of Labels on Direct Observation by Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allday, R. Allan; Duhon, Gary J.; Blackburn-Ellis, Sarah; Van Dycke, Jamie L.

    2011-01-01

    Observational bias can significantly affect results attained through observation. This study focused on 122 preservice teacher educators who conducted a structured observation, using momentary time sampling procedures with 10-second intervals, to measure student on-task and off-task behaviors. The experimental variable altered was the…

  5. 49 CFR 40.67 - When and how is a directly observed collection conducted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Urine Specimen Collections § 40.67 When and how is a... other specimen. (g) As the collector, you must ensure that the observer is the same gender as the employee. You must never permit an opposite gender person to act as the observer. The observer can be a...

  6. Observations of Wind-Direction Variability in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Francisco; Belušić, Danijel; Siems, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Large sudden wind-direction shifts and submeso variability under nocturnal conditions are examined using a micrometeorological network of stations in north-western Victoria, Australia. The network was located in an area with mostly homogeneous and flat terrain. We have investigated the main characteristics of the horizontal propagation of events causing the wind-direction shift and not addressed in previous studies. The submeso motions at the study site exhibit behaviour typical of flat terrain, such as the lower relative mesovelocity scale and smaller cross-wind variances than that for complex terrain. The distribution of wind-direction shifts shows that there is a small but persistent preference for counter-clockwise rotation, occurring for 55% of the time. Large wind-direction shifts tend to be associated with a sharp decrease in air temperature (74% of the time), which is associated with rising motion of cold air, followed by an increase in turbulent mixing. The horizontal propagation of events was analyzed using the cross-correlation function method. There is no preferred mean wind direction associated with the events nor is there any relationship between the mean wind and propagation directions. The latter indicates that the events are most likely not local flow perturbations advected by the mean flow but are rather features of generally unknown origin. This needs to be taken into account when developing parametrizations of the stable boundary layer in numerical models.

  7. Improving the accuracy and reliability of MWD/magnetic-Wellbore-Directional surveying in the barents sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, I.; Nyrnes, E.; Johnsen, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The years ahead will see increased petroleum-related activity in the Barents Sea, with operations far off the coast of Norway. The region is at high geomagnetic latitude in the auroral zone, and therefore, directional drilling by use of magnetic reference will experience enlarged azimuth uncertai......, the planned wells must be assigned adequate positional-uncertainty models and, if possible, be designed in a direction that minimizes the wellbore directional uncertainty. ©2014 Society of Petroleum Engineers....

  8. Direct observation of large quantum interference effect in anthraquinone solid-state junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabache, Vincent; Chaste, Julien; Petit, Philippe; Della Rocca, Maria Luisa; Martin, Pascal; Lacroix, Jean-Christophe; McCreery, Richard L; Lafarge, Philippe

    2013-07-17

    Quantum interference in cross-conjugated molecules embedded in solid-state devices was investigated by direct current-voltage and differential conductance transport measurements of anthraquinone (AQ)-based large area planar junctions. A thin film of AQ was grafted covalently on the junction base electrode by diazonium electroreduction, while the counter electrode was directly evaporated on top of the molecular layer. Our technique provides direct evidence of a large quantum interference effect in multiple CMOS compatible planar junctions. The quantum interference is manifested by a pronounced dip in the differential conductance close to zero voltage bias. The experimental signature is well developed at low temperature (4 K), showing a large amplitude dip with a minimum >2 orders of magnitude lower than the conductance at higher bias and is still clearly evident at room temperature. A temperature analysis of the conductance curves revealed that electron-phonon coupling is the principal decoherence mechanism causing large conductance oscillations at low temperature.

  9. A RELATION BETWEEN THE WARM NEUTRAL AND IONIZED MEDIA OBSERVED IN THE CANADIAN GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brandon University, 270 18th Street, Brandon, Manitoba R7A 6A9 (Canada); Kothes, R. [National Research Council Canada, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Brown, J. C., E-mail: Tyler.Foster@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2013-08-10

    We report on a comparison between 21 cm rotation measure (RM) and the optically thin atomic hydrogen column density (N{sub H{sub I}}({tau} {yields} 0)) measured toward unresolved extragalactic sources in the Galactic plane of the northern sky. H I column densities integrated to the Galactic edge are measured immediately surrounding each of nearly 2000 sources in 1 arcmin 21 cm line data, and are compared to RMs observed from polarized emission of each source. RM data are binned in column density bins 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} wide, and one observes a strong relationship between the number of hydrogen atoms in a 1 cm{sup 2} column through the plane and the mean RM along the same line of sight and path length. The relationship is linear over one order of magnitude (from 0.8 to 14 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} atoms cm{sup -2}) of column densities, with a constant RM/N{sub H{sub I}}{approx} -23.2 {+-} 2.3 rad m{sup -2}/10{sup 21} atoms cm{sup -2}, and a positive RM of 45.0 {+-} 13.8 rad m{sup -2} in the presence of no atomic hydrogen. This slope is used to calculate a mean volume-averaged magnetic field in the second quadrant of (B{sub Parallel-To }) {approx}1.0 {+-} 0.1 {mu}G directed away from the Sun, assuming an ionization fraction of 8% (consistent with the warm-neutral medium; WNM). The remarkable consistency between this field and (B) = 1.2 {mu}G found with the same RM sources and a Galactic model of dispersion measures (DMs) suggests that electrons in the partially ionized WNM are mainly responsible for pulsar DMs, and thus the partially ionized WNM is the dominant form of the magneto-ionic interstellar medium.

  10. Direct Marketing Promotion and Electronic Cigarette Use Among US Adults, National Adult Tobacco Survey, 2013–2014

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Hongying; Hao, Jianqiang

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) among US adults has increased since 2007. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of direct marketing promotion of e-cigarettes and its association with e-cigarette use among US adults. Methods We used using data from the 2013–2014 National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS) to estimate prevalence of e-cigarette promotions received by mail or email. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the associations ...

  11. Comparison between AGC and a Tuning-less LFC Approach Based on Direct Observation of DERs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prostejovsky, Alexander; Marinelli, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Automatic Generation Control (AGC) used in secondary frequency control requires manual tuning to maintain a balance between reaction speed and stability. This task becomes increasingly difficult due to the rising number of inverter-coupled devices and High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) links......, and the resulting reduction of available inertia. In this paper, we propose a tuning-less Load-Frequency Control (LFC) approach able to cope with the changing dynamics of electric power grids. Harnessing the possibilities of modern monitoring and communication means, the so-called Direct Load-Frequency Control...

  12. Comparison between AGC and a tuningless LFC approach based on direct observation of DERs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prostejovsky, Alexander Maria; Marinelli, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    Automatic Generation Control (AGC) used in secondary frequency control requires manual tuning to maintain a balance between reaction speed and stability. This task becomes increasingly difficult due to the rising number of inverter-coupled devices and High-Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) links......, and the resulting reduction of available inertia. In this paper, we propose a tuningless Load-Frequency Control (LFC) approach able to cope with the changing dynamics of electric power grids. Harnessing the possibilities of modern monitoring and communication means, the so-called Direct Load-Frequency Control (DLFC...

  13. High-J CO survey of low-mass protostars observed with Herschel-HIFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yıldız, U. A.; Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; San José-García, I.; Karska, A.; Harsono, D.; Tafalla, M.; Fuente, A.; Visser, R.; Jørgensen, J. K.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2013-08-01

    Context. In the deeply embedded stage of star formation, protostars start to heat and disperse their surrounding cloud cores. The evolution of these sources has traditionally been traced through dust continuum spectral energy distributions (SEDs), but the use of CO excitation as an evolutionary probe has not yet been explored due to the lack of high-J CO observations. Aims: The aim is to constrain the physical characteristics (excitation, kinematics, column density) of the warm gas in low-mass protostellar envelopes using spectrally resolved Herschel data of CO and compare those with the colder gas traced by lower excitation lines. Methods: Herschel-HIFI observations of high-J lines of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O (up to Ju = 10, Eu up to 300 K) are presented toward 26 deeply embedded low-mass Class 0 and Class I young stellar objects, obtained as part of the Water In Star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) key program. This is the first large spectrally resolved high-J CO survey conducted for these types of sources. Complementary lower J CO maps were observed using ground-based telescopes, such as the JCMT and APEX and convolved to matching beam sizes. Results: The 12CO 10-9 line is detected for all objects and can generally be decomposed into a narrow and a broad component owing to the quiescent envelope and entrained outflow material, respectively. The 12CO excitation temperature increases with velocity from ~60 K up to ~130 K. The median excitation temperatures for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O derived from single-temperature fits to the Ju = 2-10 integrated intensities are ~70 K, 48 K and 37 K, respectively, with no significant difference between Class 0 and Class I sources and no trend with Menv or Lbol. Thus, in contrast to the continuum SEDs, the spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) do not show any evolution during the embedded stage. In contrast, the integrated line intensities of all CO isotopologs show a clear decrease with evolutionary stage as the envelope is

  14. The geological effect of direct exploring the hydrocarbon reservoir in Chaidamu basin using airborne magnetic survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luling, L.; Yongxia, Z.; Fuhong, Z.

    1987-04-01

    There are good geological and geophysical conditions for airborne magnetic survey in Chaidamu basin because there is no igneous rock in sedimentary formation, and a little civilization interference in the basin. The upmigrated hydrocarbon from reservoir caused chemical reaction in overburden to form magnetite, which results in magnetic anomaly. The minimum altitude airborne magnetic survey (with large scale and high accuracy) mapped weak magnetic anomaly which covers a large area. It has been proved that the weak magnetic anomaly is related to hydrocarbon accumulation. This experience can also be used in other sedimentary basins in Northwest China which have analogous geological and geophysical conditions.

  15. WSRT AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF HI IN THE DIRECTION OF 3C-10

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHWARZ, UJ; GOSS, WM; KALBERLA, PM; BENAGLIA, P

    Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope HI observations combined with Effelsberg 100 m antenna observations have been made of the galactic supernova remnant 3C 10 (Tycho) with an angular resolution similar or equal to 50 '' and a velocity resolution of 0.62 km s(-1) and with the VLA with resolutions of

  16. Direct Observations of Children at Risk for Academic Failure: Benefits of an Intergenerational Visiting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcia, S. Marx; Alicia, R. Pannell; Parpura-Gill, Aleksandra; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska

    2004-01-01

    Ten elementary school students in need of a positive self-image and/or a sense of appropriate social conduct took part in a monthly intergenerational visiting program at an assisted living facility. In comparison to systematic observations obtained in their classrooms, the children were observed to be significantly less anxious, more interested,…

  17. Prioritising between direct observation of therapy and case-finding interventions for tuberculosis: use of population impact measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchan Iain

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population impact measures (PIMs have been developed as tools to help policy-makers with locally relevant decisions over health risks and benefits. This involves estimating and prioritising potential benefits of interventions in specific populations. Using tuberculosis (TB in India as an example, we examined the population impact of two interventions: direct observation of therapy and increasing case-finding. Methods PIMs were calculated using published literature and national data for India, and applied to a notional population of 100 000 people. Data included the incidence or prevalence of smear-positive TB and the relative risk reduction from increasing case finding and the use of direct observation of therapy (applied to the baseline risks over the next year, and the incremental proportion of the population eligible for the proposed interventions. Results In a population of 100 000 people in India, the directly observed component of the Directly Observed Treatment, Short-course (DOTS programme may prevent 0.188 deaths from TB in the next year compared with 1.79 deaths by increasing TB case finding. The costs of direct observation are (in international dollars I$5960 and of case finding are I$4839 or I$31702 and I$2703 per life saved respectively. Conclusion Increasing case-finding for TB will save nearly 10 times more lives than will the use of the directly observed component of DOTS in India, at a smaller cost per life saved. The demonstration of the population impact, using simple and explicit numbers, may be of value to policy-makers as they prioritise interventions for their populations.

  18. Drainage of single Plateau borders: Direct observation of rigid and mobile interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, Stephan A.; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha; Weeks, Eric R.; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-01-01

    Foam drainage varies with surfactant. We present direct measurements of the flow velocity profiles across single Plateau borders, which make up the interconnected channel-like network for liquid flow. For protein foams the interface is rigid, whereas small-surfactant foams show significant

  19. Direct observations of the MOF (UiO-66) structure by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Liangkui

    2013-01-01

    As a demonstration of ab initio structure characterizations of nano metal organic framework (MOF) crystals by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction tomography methods, a Zr-MOF (UiO-66) structure was determined and further confirmed by Rietveld refinements of powder X-ray diffraction. HRTEM gave direct imaging of the channels. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  20. Direct observation of nucleation in the bulk of an opaque sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chaoling; Zhang, Yubin; Godfrey, Andrew William

    2017-01-01

    length scale affect this nucleation process. We present here the first experimental measurements that relate directly nucleation of recrystallization to the local deformation microstructure in the bulk of a sample of cold rolled aluminum, further deformed locally by a hardness indentation. White beam...

  1. Transient process spectroscopy for the direct observation of inter-molecular photo-dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Hashimoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient process spectroscopy has previously been thought to be applicable only to the analysis of intra-molecular processes. Two metal ion bridges used in the present work have allowed us to visualize real-time variations of the molecular vibration frequencies during photo-disproportionation inside bimolecule aggregates, which directly shows transient inter-molecular reactions.

  2. Global Observations of the Wave Field Direction: Revisiting an old idea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flampouris, Stylianos

    2017-04-01

    The direction of the wave field propagation is one of the most important wave field properties. But in global scale, the directional measurements are mainly satellite products from synthetic aperture radar and therefore have limited spatial and temporal resolution. In the last five years, there is a significant increase of commercial and public constellations of satellites which provide high resolution (up to 0.3m) panchromatic images and/or High Definition videos. This presents an opportunity to accumulate a high volume of wave directional information by revisiting the analysis of sea surface photography. In this paper, data from panchromatic sensors are analyzed using a targeted multistep approach. These steps include, but are not limited to: filtering according to cloud coverage, linear detrending and smoothing in physical space, 2D spectral analysis and filtering to calculate the directional information of the wave field. Landsat-8 datasets from two different locations (mid-Atlantic and Hawaii) are analyzed and validated with in-situ and SAR wave spectra. Additionally, the method is demonstrated with high resolution data from WorldView-4 satellite.

  3. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  4. Spectroscopic observation of SN 2017pp by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, A.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Terreran, G.; Tomasella, L.; Tronsgaard, R.

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of SN 2017pp in PGC 1378162. The candidate was discovered by F. Ciabattari, E. Mazzoni, S. Donati (ISSP; http://italiansupernovae.org).

  5. Spectroscopic observations of four transients by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncarayakti, H.; Mattila, S.; Harmanen, J.; Kangas, T.; Reynolds, T.; Somero, A.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Hamanowicz, A.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Z.; Fraser, M.; Stritzinger, M.; Pastorello, A.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Lundqvist, P.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Un-biased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports spectroscopic classifications of two supernovae in anonymous host galaxies, one cataclysmic variable star, and one object of undetermined class.

  6. Spectroscopic observation of SN2017gkk by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onori, F.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Losada, Illa R.; Gafton, E.; NUTS Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of supernova SN2017gkk (=MASTER OT J091344.71762842.5) in host galaxy NGC 2748.

  7. Observations of Whooping Cranes During Winter Aerial Surveys: 1950–2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The Aransas-Wood Buffalo population of whooping cranes (Grus americana) declined to near extinction by the 1940s. Starting in winter 1950–1951, annual aerial surveys...

  8. Nano-aquarium for dynamic observation of aquatic microorganisms fabricated by femtosecond laser direct writing of photostructurable glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Y.; Sugioka, K.; Kawano, H.; Ishikawa, I.; Miyawaki, A.; Midorikawa, K.

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of three-dimensional (3-D) hollow microstructures embedded in photostructurable glass by a femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing. Fs laser direct writing followed by annealing and successive wet etching in dilute hydrofluoric (HF) acid solution resulted in the rapid manufacturing of microchips with 3-D hollow microstructures for the dynamic observation of living microorganisms in fresh water. The embedded microchannel structure enables us to analyze the continuous motion of Euglena gracilis. A microchamber with a movable microneedle demonstrates its ability for the elucidation of the information transmission process in Pleurosira laevis. Such microchips, referred to as nano-aquariums realize the efficient and highly functional observation of microorganisms.

  9. The LBTI Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial Systems (HOSTS) Survey: a Key NASA Science Program on the Road to Exoplanet Imaging Missions (SPIE Proceedings 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Bailey, V.; Defrere, D.; Haniff, C.; Hinz, P.; Kennedy, G.; Mennesson, B.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Rieke, G.; Roberge, Aki; hide

    2014-01-01

    Telescope Interferometer (LBTI) will survey nearby stars for faint exozodiacal dust (exozodi). This warm circumstellar dust, analogous to the interplanetary dust found in the vicinity of the Earth in our own system, is produced in comet breakups and asteroid collisions. Emission and or scattered light from the exozodi will be the major source of astrophysical noise for a future space telescope aimed at direct imaging and spectroscopy of terrestrial planets (exo- Earths) around nearby stars. About 20 of nearby field stars have cold dust coming from planetesimals at large distances from the stars (Eiroa et al. 2013, AA, 555, A11; Siercho et al. 2014, ApJ, 785, 33). Much less is known about exozodi; current detection limits for individual stars are at best 500 times our solar system's level (aka. 500 zodi). LBTI-HOSTS will be the first survey capable of measuring exozodi at the 10 zodi level (3). Detections of warm dust will also reveal new information about planetary system architectures and evolution. We will describe the motivation for the survey and progress on target selection, not only the actual stars likely to be observed by such a mission but also those whose observation will enable sensible extrapolations for stars that will not be observed with LBTI. We briefly describe the detection of the debris disk around Crv, which is the first scientific result from the LBTI coming from the commissioning of the instrument in December 2013, shortly after the first time the fringes were stabilized.

  10. A Class of Speed Sensorless Sliding Mode Observers for Direct Torque Controlled Induction Motor Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lascu, Cristian; Boldea, Ion; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2004-01-01

    A family of speed-sensorless sliding-mode observers for induction motors has been developed. Three topologies have been investigated in order to determine their feasibility, parameter sensitivity and practical applicability. The salient feature of all schemes is that they do not require the rotor...... speed adaptation, that is, they are inherently sensorless observers. The most versatile is a dual-reference-frame observer. The other two schemes, implemented in stator frame and rotor frame, respectively, are simpler and are insensitive to detuning some of the motor parameters. Main theoretical aspects...

  11. Anna Freud: the Hampstead War Nurseries and the role of the direct observation of children for psychoanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midgley, Nick

    2007-08-01

    The psychoanalytic tradition of direct observation of children has a long history, going back to the early 20th century, when psychoanalysis and the emerging field of 'child studies' came into fruitful contact in Freud's Vienna. As a leading figure in the attempted integration of direct observation with the new psychoanalytic knowledge emerging from the consulting room, Anna Freud played a crucial role in the emergence of this field. But her major contribution to the theory and practice of observing children came during the Second World War, when she founded the Hampstead War Nurseries. The author describes in detail this important period of Anna Freud's career, and discusses the impact it had on later work. He explores the theoretical contribution that Anna Freud made in the post-war years to the debate about the place of direct observation in psychoanalysis, and concludes that Anna Freud's 'double approach' (direct observation plus analytic reconstruction) still has a great deal to offer as a method of both psychoanalytic research and education.

  12. Direct Observations of Lunar Pickup Ions in the Magnetosphere Tail-Lobes by ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, R. L.; Poppe, A. R.; Halekas, J. S.; Delory, G. T.; Angelopoulos, V.; Farrell, W. M.

    2012-03-01

    We present ARTEMIS observations of pickup ions on the dayside of the Moon in the terrestrial magnetotail lobes. We attempt to determine the composition of these ions, presumably from either the surface or the exosphere, via ion tracing simulations.

  13. Directly observed treatment increases drug compliance in lymphatic filariasis mass drug administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutik Ida Rosanti

    2016-08-01

    Families as the source of observers was associated with increased filariasis drug compliance. It is therefore essential to address the issues linked to low compliance to make the program more efficient and achieve the goal of filariasis elimination.

  14. Cross-Sectional and Panel Data Analyses of an Incompletely Observed Variable Derived from the Nonrandomized Method for Surveying Sensitive Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    This article describes (1) the survey methodological and statistical characteristics of the nonrandomized method for surveying sensitive questions for both cross-sectional and panel survey data and (2) the way to use the incompletely observed variable obtained from this survey method in logistic regression and in loglinear and log-multiplicative…

  15. Direct observation of strong localization of quasi-two-dimensional light waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Scattering of surface plasmon polaritons on rough metal surfaces is investigated by using scanning near-field optical microscopy. Different scattering regimes, i.e. single, double and multiple scattering, are observed and related to the spatial Fourier spectra of the corresponding near-field opti...... caused by surface roughness. Similar bright light spots are observed with light scattering by silver colloid clusters deposited on glass substrates. Differences and similarities in these scattering phenomena are discussed....

  16. Observations Directly Linking Relativistic Electron Microbursts to Whistler Mode Chorus: Van Allen Probes and FIREBIRD II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A. W.; Crew, A.; Sample, J.; Klumpar, D.; Johnson, A.; Agapitov, O.; Shumko, M.; Turner, D. L.; Santolik, O.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C. A.; Thaller, S.; Blake, B.; Spence, H.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2017-11-01

    We present observations that provide the strongest evidence yet that discrete whistler mode chorus packets cause relativistic electron microbursts. On 20 January 2016 near 1944 UT the low Earth orbiting CubeSat Focused Investigations of Relativistic Electron Bursts: Intensity, Range, and Dynamics (FIREBIRD II) observed energetic microbursts (near L = 5.6 and MLT = 10.5) from its lower limit of 220 keV, to 1 MeV. In the outer radiation belt and magnetically conjugate, Van Allen Probe A observed rising-tone, lower band chorus waves with durations and cadences similar to the microbursts. No other waves were observed. This is the first time that chorus and microbursts have been simultaneously observed with a separation smaller than a chorus packet. A majority of the microbursts do not have the energy dispersion expected for trapped electrons bouncing between mirror points. This confirms that the electrons are rapidly (nonlinearly) scattered into the loss cone by a coherent interaction with the large amplitude (up to ˜900 pT) chorus. Comparison of observed time-averaged microburst flux and estimated total electron drift shell content at L = 5.6 indicate that microbursts may represent a significant source of energetic electron loss in the outer radiation belt.

  17. THE LEECH EXOPLANET IMAGING SURVEY: CHARACTERIZATION OF THE COLDEST DIRECTLY IMAGED EXOPLANET, GJ 504 b, AND EVIDENCE FOR SUPERSTELLAR METALLICITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Leisenring, Jarron; Bailey, Vanessa; Hinz, Philip; Defrére, Denis; Apai, Dániel; Close, Laird; Eisner, Josh [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave. Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Morley, Caroline V.; Fortney, Jonathan [University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High St. Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Zimmerman, Neil T.; Buenzli, Esther; Bonnefoy, Mickael; Biller, Beth; Brandner, Wolfgang [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Skrutskie, Michael F. [University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Rd., Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Esposito, Simone [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, 50125, Florence (Italy); Crepp, Justin R. [Notre Dame University, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); De Rosa, Robert J. [Arizona State University, 781 South Terrace Rd, Tempe, AZ 85281 (United States); Desidera, Silvano [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica-Padova Astronomical Observatory, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, 35122 Padova (Italy); and others

    2016-02-01

    As gas giant planets and brown dwarfs radiate away the residual heat from their formation, they cool through a spectral type transition from L to T, which encompasses the dissipation of cloud opacity and the appearance of strong methane absorption. While there are hundreds of known T-type brown dwarfs, the first generation of directly imaged exoplanets were all L type. Recently, Kuzuhara et al. announced the discovery of GJ 504 b, the first T dwarf exoplanet. GJ 504 b provides a unique opportunity to study the atmosphere of a new type of exoplanet with a ∼500 K temperature that bridges the gap between the first directly imaged planets (∼1000 K) and our own solar system's Jupiter (∼130 K). We observed GJ 504 b in three narrow L-band filters (3.71, 3.88, and 4.00 μm), spanning the red end of the broad methane fundamental absorption feature (3.3 μm) as part of the LBTI Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt (LEECH) exoplanet imaging survey. By comparing our new photometry and literature photometry with a grid of custom model atmospheres, we were able to fit GJ 504 b's unusual spectral energy distribution for the first time. We find that GJ 504 b is well fit by models with the following parameters: T{sub eff} = 544 ± 10 K, g < 600 m s{sup −2}, [M/H] = 0.60 ± 0.12, cloud opacity parameter of f{sub sed} = 2–5, R = 0.96 ± 0.07 R{sub Jup}, and log(L) = −6.13 ± 0.03 L{sub ⊙}, implying a hot start mass of 3–30 M{sub jup} for a conservative age range of 0.1–6.5 Gyr. Of particular interest, our model fits suggest that GJ 504 b has a superstellar metallicity. Since planet formation can create objects with nonstellar metallicities, while binary star formation cannot, this result suggests that GJ 504 b formed like a planet, not like a binary companion.

  18. Analyzing the contribution of aerosols to an observed increase in direct normal irradiance in Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riihimaki, L. D.; Vignola, F.; Long, Charles N.

    2009-01-22

    Annual average total irradiance increases by 1-2% per decade at three monitoring stations in Oregon over the period from 1980 to 2007. Direct normal irradiance measurements increase by 5% per decade over the same time period. The measurements show no sign of a dimming before 1990. Clear-sky periods from this long direct normal time series are used in conjunction with radiative transfer calculations to look for changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Stratospheric aerosols from the volcanic eruptions of El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo are clearly seen in the measurements. The period from 1987 to 2007 shows no detectable change in aerosols not explained by the volcanic aerosols. All three sites show relatively low clear-sky measurements before the eruption of El Chichon in 1982, suggesting higher aerosol loads during this period.

  19. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  20. Analyzing the Contribution of Aerosols to an Observed Increase in Direct Normal Irradiance in Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Vignola, F.; Long, Charles N.

    2009-01-22

    Annual average total irradiance increases by 1-2% per decade at three mon- itoring stations in Oregon over the period from 1980 to 2007. Direct normal irradiance measurements increase by 5% per decade over the same time pe- riod. The measurements show no sign of a dimming before 1990. The impact of high concentrations of stratospheric aerosols following the volcanic erup- tions of El Chich¶on and Mt. Pinatubo are clearly seen in the measurements. Removing these years from the annual average all-sky time series reduces the trends in both total and direct normal irradiance. Clear-sky periods from this long direct normal time series are used in conjunction with radiative trans- fer calculations to test whether part of the increase could be caused by an- thropogenic aerosols. All three sites show relatively low clear-sky measure- ments before the eruption of El Chich¶on in 1982, suggesting higher aerosol loads during this period. After removing the periods most strongly impacted by volcanic eruptions, two of the sites show statistically signi¯cant increases in clear-sky direct normal irradiance from 1987 to 2007. Radiative transfer calculations of the impact of volcanic aerosols and tropospheric water vapor indicate that only about 20% of that clear-sky increase between background aerosol periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo can be explained by these two factors. Thus, a statistically signi¯cant clear-sky trend remains between 1987 and 2007 that is consistent with the hypothesis that at least some of the increase in surface irradiance could be caused by a reduction of anthropogenic aerosols. D

  1. Virtual Visits and Patient-Centered Care: Results of a Patient Survey and Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrail, Kimberlyn Marie; Ahuja, Megan Alyssa; Leaver, Chad Andrew

    2017-05-26

    Virtual visits are clinical interactions in health care that do not involve the patient and provider being in the same room at the same time. The use of virtual visits is growing rapidly in health care. Some health systems are integrating virtual visits into primary care as a complement to existing modes of care, in part reflecting a growing focus on patient-centered care. There is, however, limited empirical evidence about how patients view this new form of care and how it affects overall health system use. Descriptive objectives were to assess users and providers of virtual visits, including the reasons patients give for use. The analytic objective was to assess empirically the influence of virtual visits on overall primary care use and costs, including whether virtual care is with a known or a new primary care physician. The study took place in British Columbia, Canada, where virtual visits have been publicly funded since October 2012. A survey of patients who used virtual visits and an observational study of users and nonusers of virtual visits were conducted. Comparison groups included two groups: (1) all other BC residents, and (2) a group matched (3:1) to the cohort. The first virtual visit was used as the intervention and the main outcome measures were total primary care visits and costs. During 2013-2014, there were 7286 virtual visit encounters, involving 5441 patients and 144 physicians. Younger patients and physicians were more likely to use and provide virtual visits (Pvirtual visit patients indicated that virtual visits were liked by patients, with 372 (93.2%) of respondents saying their virtual visit was of high quality and 364 (91.2%) reporting their virtual visit was "very" or "somewhat" helpful to resolve their health issue. Segmented regression analysis and the corresponding regression parameter estimates suggested virtual visits appear to have the potential to decrease primary care costs by approximately Can $4 per quarter (Can -$3.79, P=.12

  2. Direct torque control of an asynchronous machine: observation structures: application to multi-machine/multi-converter systems; Commande directe en couple d'une machine asynchrone: structures d'observations: application aux systemes multimachines-multiconvertisseurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belhadj, J.

    2001-07-15

    The aim of this work is the development of an observation structure of the direct torque control (DTC) variables of an asynchronous machine. This structure has to solve the dilemma between its robustness and a minimum calculation time. The control law obtained will be used for the control of multi-machine/multi-converter systems. The new control laws based on direct stator flux control and electromagnetic torque control are studied first, in particular the DTC and the principles of flux and torque adjustment and the associated switching logic. Then, three observation structures are developed: the full order state observer, the sliding mode observer, and the decoupled observer. A comparative study between these three structures and the classical estimator shows that the decoupled observer is an interesting structure which answers the problem of very low-speed operation. In the case of the multi-machine application, two systems are studied: the single inverter/dual-machine system and the dual-inverter/dual-machine system. The control is performed with the DTC and the vectorial control. The DTC gives interesting results for the control of multi-machine systems. In the last part, an architecture is defined for the mono- and multi-machine validation. It consists in a pseudo-experimental validation of the control law associated to the observation structure developed. This validation is performed with a mixed analog/numerical simulation. (J.S.)

  3. The Westerbork HI survey of spiral and irregular galaxies - III. HI observations of early-type disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordermeer, E; van der Hulst, JM; Sancisi, R; Swaters, RA; van Albada, TS

    2005-01-01

    We present H. observations of 68 early-type disk galaxies from the WHISP survey. They have morphological types between S0 and Sab and absolute B-band magnitudes between - 14 and - 22. These galaxies form the massive, high surface-brightness extreme of the disk galaxy population, few of which have

  4. The Westerbork HI Survey os spiral and irregular galaxies III : HI observations of early-type disk galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordermeer, E.; Hulst, J.M. van der; Sancisi, R.; Swaters, R.A.; Abada, T.S. van

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: We present HI observations of 68 early-type disk galaxies from the WHISP survey. They have morphological types between S0 and Sab and absolute B-band magnitudes between -14 and -22. These galaxies form the massive, high surface-brightness extreme of the disk galaxy population, few of which

  5. Direct observations of plasma upflows and condensation in a catastrophically cooling solar transition region loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, N. B.; Chesny, D. L.; Oluseyi, H. M.; Hesterly, K.; Patel, M.; Champey, P. [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Minimal observational evidence exists for fast transition region (TR) upflows in the presence of cool loops. Observations of such occurrences challenge notions of standard solar atmospheric heating models as well as their description of bright TR emission. Using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, we observe fast upflows (v {sub λ} ≤ –10 km s{sup –1}) over multiple TR temperatures (5.8 ≤log T ≤ 6.0) at the footpoint sites of a cool loop (log T ≤ 6.0). Prior to cool loop energizing, asymmetric flows of +5 km s{sup –1} and –60 km s{sup –1} are observed at footpoint sites. These flows, speeds, and patterns occur simultaneously with both magnetic flux cancellation (at the site of upflows only) derived from the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Helioseismic Magnetic Imager's line-of-sight magnetogram images, and a 30% mass influx at coronal heights. The incurred non-equilibrium structure of the cool loop leads to a catastrophic cooling event, with subsequent plasma evaporation indicating that the TR is the heating site. From the magnetic flux evolution, we conclude that magnetic reconnection between the footpoint and background field is responsible for the observed fast TR plasma upflows.

  6. Preparing tomorrow's behavioral medicine scientists and practitioners: a survey of future directions for education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Carly M; Minges, Karl E; Schoffman, Danielle E; Cases, Mallory G

    2017-02-01

    Behavioral medicine training is due for an overhaul given the rapid evolution of the field, including a tight funding climate, changing job prospects, and new research and industry collaborations. The purpose of the present study was to collect responses from trainee and practicing members of a multidisciplinary professional society about their perceptions of behavioral medicine training and their suggestions for changes to training for future behavioral medicine scientists and practitioners. A total of 162 faculty and 110 students (total n = 272) completed a web-based survey on strengths of their current training programs and ideas for changes. Using a mixed-methods approach, the survey findings are used to highlight seven key areas for improved preparation of the next generation of behavioral medicine scientists and practitioners, which are grant writing, interdisciplinary teamwork, advanced statistics and methods, evolving research program, publishable products from coursework, evolution and use of theory, and non-traditional career paths.

  7. Direct observation of magnetization reversal of hot-deformed Nd-Fe-B magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoyun; Tang, Xu; Pei, Ke; Tian, Yue; Liu, Jinjun; Xia, Weixing; Zhang, Jian; Liu, J. Ping; Chen, Renjie; Yan, Aru

    2018-01-01

    The dynamic magnetic domain structure in magnetization and demagnetization process of hot-deformed and NdCu-diffused Nd2Fe14B magnets were in-situ observed by Lorentz transmission electron microscopy (LTEM). The demagnetization process of hot-deformed sample is dominated by domain-wall pinning, while that of NdCu-diffused sample is mainly the magnetization reversal of single grains or grain aggregations. This firstly observed result gives an explicit evidence to understand the coercivity mechanism of magnetically segregated magnet. The effect of magnetic field of TEM on decrease in domain wall energy was theoretically analyzed, which helps to understand the in-situ observation process of magnetic materials.

  8. Direct observations of the formation of the solar wind halo from the strahl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurgiolo, C. [Bitterroot Basic Research, Hamilton, MT (United States); Goldstein, M.L.; Vinas, A.F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Geospace Science Lab.; Fazakerley, A.N. [Univ. College London, Holmbury St. Mary Dorking, Surrey (United Kingdom). Mullard Space Science Lab.

    2012-07-01

    Observations of a continual erosion of the strahl and build up of the halo with distance from the sun suggests that, at least in part, the halo may be formed as a result of scattering of the strahl. This hypothesis is supported in this paper by observation of intense scattering of strahl electrons, which gives rise to a proto-halo electron population. This population eventually merges into, or becomes the halo. The fact that observations of intense scattering of the strahl are not common implies that the formation of the halo may not be a continuous process, but one that occurs, in part, in bursts in regions where the conditions responsible for the scattering are optimum. (orig.)

  9. The CHAOS-X Model and Uncertainty Values for Magnetic Directional Surveying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herland, E. V.; Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils

    2017-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field provides a unique natural source of orientation information that is particularly useful for subsurface magnetic measurement-while-drilling (MWD) navigation. In order to utilize the MWD magnetic field measurements for calculating the orientation of the bottom hole assemb...... argue that using a model with an accurate description of the time variations improves recent magnetic surveys while drilling, since the description of the rapid time variations can be updated near real-time. Copyright: Society of Petroleum Engineers...

  10. Direct injection into the dorsal root ganglion: technical, behavioral, and histological observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Gregory; Kostic, Sandra; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Park, Frank; Sapunar, Damir; Yu, Hongwei; Hogan, Quinn

    2011-07-15

    Direct injection of agents into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) offers the opportunity to manipulate sensory neuron function at a segmental level to explore pathophysiology of painful conditions. However, there is no described method that has been validated in detail for such injections in adult rats. We have found that 2 μl of dye injected through a pulled glass pipette directly into the distal DRG, exposed by a minimal foraminotomy, produces complete filling of the DRG with limited extension into the spinal roots. Injection into the spinal nerve required 3 μl to achieve comparable DRG filling, produced preferential spread into the ventral root, and was accompanied by substantial leakage of injected solution from the injection site. Injections into the sciatic nerve of volumes up to 10 μl did not reach the DRG. Transient hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation at threshold (von Frey) and noxious levels (pin) developed after 2 μl saline injection directly into the DRG that was in part attributable to the surgical exposure procedure alone. Only minimal astrocyte activation in the spinal dorsal horn was evident after DRG saline injections. Injection of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector conveying green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgene resulted in expression as soon as 1 day after injection into the DRG, including fibers in the spinal dorsal horn and columns. AAV injection into the DRG produced additional thermal hypersensitivity and withdrawal from the stroke of a brush and compromised motor performance. These findings demonstrate a method for selective injection of agents into single DRGs for anatomically restricted actions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Direct observation of the transition from free to constrained single segment motion in entangled polymer melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monkenbusch, M.; Wischnewski, A.; Willner, L.; Richter, D

    2004-07-15

    Incoherent neutron-spin-echo spectroscopy (NSE) has been employed to directly determine the time-dependent mean-squared segment displacement of a polymer chain in the melt covering the transition from free to constraint Rouse relaxation along the virtual tube of the reptation model. The predicted transition of the time dependence of from {proportional_to}t{sup 1/2} to {proportional_to}t{sup 1/4} is clearly corroborated by the incoherent NSE results.

  12. Replication of Non-Trivial Directional Motion in Multi-Scales Observed by the Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Yamada, Kenta; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    Non-trivial autocorrelation in up-down statistics in financial market price fluctuation is revealed by a multi-scale runs test(Wald-Wolfowitz test). We apply two models, a stochastic price model and dealer model to understand this property. In both approaches we successfully reproduce the non-stationary directional price motions consistent with the runs test by tuning parameters in the models. We find that two types of dealers exist in the markets, a short-time-scale trend-follower and an extended-time-scale contrarian who are active in different time periods.

  13. Direct Observation of Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions in an Interacting Many-Body System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcevic, P; Shen, H; Hauke, P; Maier, C; Brydges, T; Hempel, C; Lanyon, B P; Heyl, M; Blatt, R; Roos, C F

    2017-08-25

    The theory of phase transitions represents a central concept for the characterization of equilibrium matter. In this work we study experimentally an extension of this theory to the nonequilibrium dynamical regime termed dynamical quantum phase transitions (DQPTs). We investigate and measure DQPTs in a string of ions simulating interacting transverse-field Ising models. During the nonequilibrium dynamics induced by a quantum quench we show for strings of up to 10 ions the direct detection of DQPTs by revealing nonanalytic behavior in time. Moreover, we provide a link between DQPTs and the dynamics of other quantities such as the magnetization, and we establish a connection between DQPTs and entanglement production.

  14. Direct Observation of Electrostatically Driven Band Gap Renormalization in a Degenerate Perovskite Transparent Conducting Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebens-Higgins, Z.; Scanlon, D. O.; Paik, H.; Sallis, S.; Nie, Y.; Uchida, M.; Quackenbush, N. F.; Wahila, M. J.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Arena, Dario A.; Woicik, J. C.; Schlom, D. G.; Piper, L. F. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have directly measured the band gap renormalization associated with the Moss-Burstein shift in the perovskite transparent conducting oxide (TCO), La-doped BaSnO 3 , using hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We determine that the band gap renormalization is almost entirely associated with the evolution of the conduction band. Our experimental results are supported by hybrid density functional theory supercell calculations. We determine that unlike conventional TCOs where interactions with the dopant orbitals are important, the band gap renormalization in La - BaSnO 3 is driven purely by electrostatic interactions.

  15. Direct observation of surface mode excitation and slow light coupling in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, V.S.; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    A scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) is used to systematically study the properties of guided modes in linear and slow-light regimes of silicon-on-insulator (SOI)-based photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWs) with different terminations of the photonic lattice. High quality SNOM images...... are obtained for light at telecom wavelengths propagating in the PhCW, demonstrating directly, for the first time to our knowledge, drastic widening of the PhCW guided mode in the slow-light regime and excitation of surface waves at the PhCW interface along with their feeding into the guided mode...

  16. Directly Observed Physical Activity among 3-Year-Olds in Finnish Childcare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soini, Anne; Villberg, Jari; Sääkslahti, Arja; Gubbels, Jessica; Mehtälä, Anette; Kettunen, Tarja; Poskiparta, Marita

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to determine 3-year-olds' physical activity levels and how these vary across season, gender, time of day, location, and the physical and social environment in childcare settings in Finland. A modified version of the Observational System for Recording Physical Activity in Children-Preschool (OSRAC-P) was used to…

  17. Direct observations of surface water-groundwater interaction using electrical resistivity tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noell, Ursula; Wießner, Claudia; Ganz, Christina; Westhoff, Martijn

    2011-01-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography is a helpful tool to observe the infiltration process in and through the soil. Array 3-D measurements and 3-D inversion schemes are required for reliable interpretation of heterogeneous subsurface structures. Smoothing of the inversion can be minimized by using

  18. Direct observation of enzymes replicating DNA using a single-molecule DNA stretching assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulczyk, A.W.; Tanner, N.A.; Loparo, J.J.; Richardson, C.C.; Oijen, A.M. van

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for observing real time replication of individual DNA molecules mediated by proteins of the bacteriophage replication system. Linearized lambda DNA is modified to have a biotin on the end of one strand, and a digoxigenin moiety on the other end of the same strand. The

  19. Direct Observation of Protein Microcrystals in Crystallization Buffer by Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikara Sato

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available X-ray crystallography requires high quality crystals above a given size. This requirement not only limits the proteins to be analyzed, but also reduces the speed of the structure determination. Indeed, the tertiary structures of many physiologically important proteins remain elusive because of the so-called “crystallization bottleneck”. Once microcrystals have been obtained, crystallization conditions can be optimized to produce bigger and better crystals. However, the identification of microcrystals can be difficult due to the resolution limit of optical microscopy. Electron microscopy has sometimes been utilized instead, with the disadvantage that the microcrystals usually must be observed in vacuum, which precludes the usage for crystal screening. The atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM allows samples to be observed in solution. Here, we report the use of this instrument in combination with a special thin-membrane dish with a crystallization well. It was possible to observe protein crystals of lysozyme, lipase B and a histone chaperone TAF-Iβ in crystallization buffers, without the use of staining procedures. The smallest crystals observed with ASEM were a few µm in width, and ASEM can be used with non-transparent solutions. Furthermore, the growth of salt crystals could be monitored in the ASEM, and the difference in contrast between salt and protein crystals made it easy to distinguish between these two types of microcrystals. These results indicate that the ASEM could be an important new tool for the screening of protein microcrystals.

  20. Direct observation of the nutrition care practices of Australian general practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ball LE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Nutrition care refers to nutrition-related advice or counselling provided by health professionals in an attempt to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe the practices of a sample of Australian general practitioners (GPs when providing nutrition care to adult patients. METHODS: Eighteen GPs (13 male, 5 female were observed by fourth-year medical students during their general practice rotation. Each GP was observed for five consultations that included nutrition care, totalling 90 observed consultations. In each consultation, students completed a 31-item nutrition care checklist of nutrition care practices that could feasibly occur in a standard consultation. Each practice was marked with either a ‘yes’ (completed, ‘no’ (did not complete or ‘completed by practice nurse prior to or after the consultation’. RESULTS: Twenty-eight nutrition care practices were observed at least once. The most frequently observed practices were measuring and discussing blood pressure (76.7%; n=69, followed by general questions about current diet (74.4%; n=67. Approximately half of the consultations included a statement of a nutrition-related problem (52.2%; n=47, and the provision of nutrition advice that focused on a nutrient (45.6%; n=41 or food group (52.2%; n=47. Consultations with male GPs, as well as GPs with more than 25 years of experience, were associated with an increased number of nutrition care practices per consultation. DISCUSSION: The GPs performed nutrition care practices in varying frequencies. Further research is required to identify the most effective GP nutrition care practices to improve the nutrition behaviour of patients.

  1. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  2. An observational study of direct oral anticoagulant awareness indicating inadequate recognition with potential for patient harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaiya, A; Lurie, B; Watt, B; McDonald, L; Greaves, M; Watson, H G

    2016-05-01

    Essentials Ignorance of direct oral anticoagulants' effects on coagulation tests may be a safety issue. An electronic questionnaire was sent to prescribers in NHS Grampian with 143 respondents. We found widespread evidence of inappropriate interpretation of the clinical scenarios given. The study suggests potential for patient harm due to lack of knowledge and education is required. Background Lack of awareness of the nature of the direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) combined with the poor correlation between routine coagulation test prolongation and the activity of these drugs represents a potential for patient harm. Objectives To establish the level of awareness of the different DOACs, and to assess whether prescribers were able to recognize the state of anticoagulation in a hypothetical patient. Methods and results An electronic questionnaire was sent by email to prescribers in our health board. Among 143 respondents, we found significant differences in awareness of the currently licensed drugs. Of the respondents, 88%, 80% and 50%, respectively, recognized rivaroxaban, dabigatran, and apixaban. When provided with a routine clinical situation, only 13.5%, 17.5% and 16.8%, respectively, recognized that the hypothetical patient was anticoagulated, and only 55-58% recognized that it was unsafe to proceed with an invasive procedure. Conclusion These results indicate a significant risk for patient harm related to lack of knowledge about this new group of frequently used drugs, and indicate that additional education and training on this subject are required. © 2016 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  3. Direct observation of titanium-centered octahedra in titanium-antimony-tellurium phase-change material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Feng; Song, Zhitang; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Xiaosong; Xia, Mengjiao; Li, Wei; Ding, Keyuan; Feng, Xuefei; Zhu, Min; Feng, Songlin

    2015-11-27

    Phase-change memory based on Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material has one order of magnitude faster Set speed and as low as one-fifth of the Reset energy compared with the conventional Ge2Sb2Te5 based device. However, the phase-transition mechanism of the Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material remains inconclusive due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here we report a direct atom-by-atom chemical identification of titanium-centered octahedra in crystalline Ti0.4Sb2Te3 material with a state-of-the-art atomic mapping technology. Further, by using soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density function theory simulations, we identify in amorphous Ti0.4Sb2Te3 the titanium atoms preferably maintain the octahedral configuration. Our work may pave the way to more thorough understanding and tailoring of the nature of the Ti-Sb-Te material, for promoting the development of dynamic random access memory-like phase-change memory as an emerging storage-class memory to reform current memory hierarchy.

  4. A direct observation method for auditing large urban centers using stratified sampling, mobile GIS technology and virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafontaine, Sean J V; Sawada, M; Kristjansson, Elizabeth

    2017-02-16

    With the expansion and growth of research on neighbourhood characteristics, there is an increased need for direct observational field audits. Herein, we introduce a novel direct observational audit method and systematic social observation instrument (SSOI) for efficiently assessing neighbourhood aesthetics over large urban areas. Our audit method uses spatial random sampling stratified by residential zoning and incorporates both mobile geographic information systems technology and virtual environments. The reliability of our method was tested in two ways: first, in 15 Ottawa neighbourhoods, we compared results at audited locations over two subsequent years, and second; we audited every residential block (167 blocks) in one neighbourhood and compared the distribution of SSOI aesthetics index scores with results from the randomly audited locations. Finally, we present interrater reliability and consistency results on all observed items. The observed neighbourhood average aesthetics index score estimated from four or five stratified random audit locations is sufficient to characterize the average neighbourhood aesthetics. The SSOI was internally consistent and demonstrated good to excellent interrater reliability. At the neighbourhood level, aesthetics is positively related to SES and physical activity and negatively correlated with BMI. The proposed approach to direct neighbourhood auditing performs sufficiently and has the advantage of financial and temporal efficiency when auditing a large city.

  5. Direct in situ observations of single Fe atom catalytic processes and anomalous diffusion at graphene edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Avdoshenko, Stanislav M.; Fu, Lei; Eckert, Jürgen; Rümmeli, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Single-atom catalysts are of great interest because of their high efficiency. In the case of chemically deposited sp2 carbon, the implementation of a single transition metal atom for growth can provide crucial insight into the formation mechanisms of graphene and carbon nanotubes. This knowledge is particularly important if we are to overcome fabrication difficulties in these materials and fully take advantage of their distinct band structures and physical properties. In this work, we present atomically resolved transmission EM in situ investigations of single Fe atoms at graphene edges. Our in situ observations show individual iron atoms diffusing along an edge either removing or adding carbon atoms (viz., catalytic action). The experimental observations of the catalytic behavior of a single Fe atom are in excellent agreement with supporting theoretical studies. In addition, the kinetics of Fe atoms at graphene edges are shown to exhibit anomalous diffusion, which again, is in agreement with our theoretical investigations. PMID:25331874

  6. Deep far infrared ISOPHOT survey in "Selected Area 57" - I. Observations and source counts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linden-Vornle, M.J.D.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, H.E.

    2000-01-01

    We present here the results of a deep survey in a 0.4 deg(2) blank field in Selected Area 57 conducted with the ISOPHOT instrument aboard ESAs Infrared Space Observatory (ISO1) at both 60 mu m and 90 mu m. The resulting sky maps have a spatial resolution of 15 x 23 arcsrc(2) per pixel which is much...

  7. Monitoring Distributed Real-Time Systems: A Survey and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodloe, Alwyn E.; Pike, Lee

    2010-01-01

    Runtime monitors have been proposed as a means to increase the reliability of safety-critical systems. In particular, this report addresses runtime monitors for distributed hard real-time systems. This class of systems has had little attention from the monitoring community. The need for monitors is shown by discussing examples of avionic systems failure. We survey related work in the field of runtime monitoring. Several potential monitoring architectures for distributed real-time systems are presented along with a discussion of how they might be used to monitor properties of interest.

  8. A Flexible Reporter System for Direct Observation and Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binwu Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many tumors are hierarchically organized with a minority cell population that has stem-like properties and enhanced ability to initiate tumorigenesis and drive therapeutic relapse. These cancer stem cells (CSCs are typically identified by complex combinations of cell-surface markers that differ among tumor types. Here, we developed a flexible lentiviral-based reporter system that allows direct visualization of CSCs based on functional properties. The reporter responds to the core stem cell transcription factors OCT4 and SOX2, with further selectivity and kinetic resolution coming from use of a proteasome-targeting degron. Cancer cells marked by this reporter have the expected properties of self-renewal, generation of heterogeneous offspring, high tumor- and metastasis-initiating activity, and resistance to chemotherapeutics. With this approach, the spatial distribution of CSCs can be assessed in settings that retain microenvironmental and structural cues, and CSC plasticity and response to therapeutics can be monitored in real time.

  9. Direct observation of two-step crystallization in nanoparticle superlattice formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jungwon; Zheng, Haimei; Lee, Won Chul; Geissler, Phillip L.; Rabani, Eran; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-10-06

    Direct imaging of nanoparticle solutions by liquid phase transmission electron microscopy has enabled unique in-situ studies of nanoparticle motion and growth. In the present work, we report on real-time formation of two-dimensional nanoparticle arrays in the very low diffusive limit, where nanoparticles are mainly driven by capillary forces and solvent fluctuations. We find that superlattice formation appears to be segregated into multiple regimes. Initially, the solvent front drags the nanoparticles, condensing them into an amorphous agglomerate. Subsequently, the nanoparticle crystallization into an array is driven by local fluctuations. Following the crystallization event, superlattice growth can also occur via the addition of individual nanoparticles drawn from outlying regions by different solvent fronts. The dragging mechanism is consistent with simulations based on a coarse-grained lattice gas model at the same limit.

  10. Direct observation of ClO from chlorine nitrate photolysis. [as mechanism of polar ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Moore, Teresa A.; Okumura, Mitchio

    1992-01-01

    Chlorine nitrate photolysis has been investigated with the use of a molecular beam technique. Excitation at both 248 and 193 nanometers led to photodissociation by two pathways, ClONO2 yields ClO + NO2 and ClONO2 yields Cl + NO3, with comparable yields. This experiment provides a direct measurement of the ClO product channel and consequently raises the possibility of an analogous channel in ClO dimer photolysis. Photodissociation of the ClO dimer is a critical step in the catalytic cycle that is presumed to dominate polar stratospheric ozone destruction. A substantial yield of ClO would reduce the efficiency of this cycle.

  11. Direct Structural Observation of a Molecular Junction by High-Energy X-ray Reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefenfeld,M.; Baumert, J.; Sloutskin, E.; Kuzmenko, I.; Pershan, P.; Deutsch, M.; Nuckolls, C.; Ocko, B.

    2006-01-01

    We report a direct angstrom resolution measurement of the structure of a molecular-size electronic junction comprising a single (or a double) layer of alkyl-thiol and alkyl-silane molecules at the buried interface between solid silicon and liquid mercury. The high-energy synchrotron x-ray measurements reveal densely packed layers comprising roughly interface-normal molecule . The monolayer's thickness is found to be 3-4 Angstroms larger than that of similar layers at the free surfaces of both mercury and silicon. The origins of this and the other unusual features detected are discussed in this article. Measurements of the bilayer junction with an applied potential did not show visible changes in the surface normal structure.

  12. Experimental Observation of Direct Particle Acceleration by Stimulated Emission of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banna, Samer; Berezovsky, Valery; Schächter, Levi

    2006-09-01

    We report the first experimental evidence for direct particle acceleration by stimulated emission of radiation. In the framework of this proof-of-principle experiment, a 45 MeV electron macrobunch was modulated by a high-power CO2 laser and then injected into an excited CO2 gas mixture. The emerging microbunches experienced a 0.15% relative change in the kinetic energy, in a less than 40 cm long interaction region. According to our experimental results, a fraction of these electrons have gained more than 200 keV each, implying that such an electron has undergone an order of magnitude of 2×106 collisions of the second kind.

  13. Direct Observation of Insulin Association Dynamics with Time-Resolved X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimmerman, Dolev [Department; Leshchev, Denis [Department; Hsu, Darren J. [Department; Hong, Jiyun [Department; Kosheleva, Irina [Center; Chen, Lin X. [Department; Chemical

    2017-09-05

    Biological functions frequently require protein-protein interactions that involve secondary and tertiary structural perturbation. Here we study protein-protein dissociation and reassociation dynamics in insulin, a model system for protein oligomerization. Insulin dimer dissociation into monomers was induced by a nanosecond temperature-jump (T-jump) of ~8 °C in aqueous solution, and the resulting protein and solvent dynamics were tracked by time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) on time scales of 10 ns to 100 ms. The protein scattering signals revealed the formation of five distinguishable transient species during the association process that deviate from simple two state kinetics. Our results show that the combination of T-jump pump coupled to TRXSS probe allows for direct tracking of structural dynamics in nonphotoactive proteins.

  14. Observations and Simulations of the Impact of Wave-Current Interaction on Wave Direction in the Surf Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Julia; Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt

    2017-04-01

    Accurately characterizing the interaction of waves and currents can improve predictions of wave propagation and subsequent sediment transport in the nearshore. Along the southern shoreline of Martha's Vineyard, MA, waves propagate across strong tidal currents as they shoal, providing an ideal environment for investigating wave-current interaction. Wave directions and mean currents observed for two 1-month-long periods in 7- and 2-m water depths along 11 km of the Martha's Vineyard shoreline have strong tidal modulations. Wave directions shift by as much as 70 degrees over a tidal cycle in 7 m depth, and by as much as 25 degrees in 2 m depth. The magnitude of the tidal modulations in the wave field decreases alongshore to the west, consistent with the observed decrease in tidal currents from 2.1 to 0.2 m/s. The observations are reproduced accurately by a numerical model (SWAN and Deflt3D-FLOW) that simulates waves and currents over the observed bathymetry. Model simulations with and without wave-current interaction and tidal depth changes demonstrate that the observed tidal modulations of the wave field primarily are caused by wave-current interaction and not by tidal changes to water depths over the nearby complex shoals. Sediment transport estimates from simulated wave conditions using a range of tidal currents and offshore wave fields indicate that the modulation of the wave field at Martha's Vineyard can impact the direction of wave-induced alongshore sediment transport, sometimes driving transport opposing the direction of the offshore incident wave field. As such, the observations and model simulations suggest the importance of wave-current interaction to tidally averaged transport in mixed-energy wave-and-current nearshore environments. Supported by ASD(R&E), NSF, NOAA (Sea Grant), and ONR.

  15. Chemical stratification in the Orion Bar : JCMT Spectral Legacy Survey observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiel, M.H.D. van der; Tak, F.F.S. van der; Ossenkopf, V.; Spaans, M.; Roberts, H.; Fuller, G.A.; Plume, R.

    2009-01-01

    The discrepancies between the models and observations indicate that more sophisticated models, including production of H2CO through grain surface chemistry, are needed to quantitatively match the observations of this region.

  16. Synthesis of Fluorescent Gelators and Direct Observation of Gelation with a Fluorescence Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanabusa, Kenji; Ueda, Takuya; Takata, Shingo; Suzuki, Masahiro

    2016-11-14

    Fluorescein-, benzothiazole-, quinoline-, stilbene-, and carbazole-containing fluorescent gelators have been synthesized by connecting gelation-driving segments, including l-isoleucine, l-valine, l-phenylalanine, l-leucine residue, cyclo(l-asparaginyl-l-phenylalanyl), and trans-(1R,2R)-diaminocyclohexane. The emission behaviors of the gelators were investigated, and their gelation abilities studied against 15 solvents. The minimum gel concentration, variable-temperature spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy (FM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) were used to characterize gelation. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the N-H and C=O of amide, van der Waals interactions and π-π stacking play important roles in gelation. The colors of emission are related to the fluorescence structures of gelators. Fibrous aggregates characterized by the color of their emission were observed by FM. 3D images are produced by the superposition of images captured by CLSM every 0.1 μm to a settled depth. The 3D images show that the large micrometer-sized aggregates spread out three dimensionally. FM observations of mixed gelators are studied. In the case of gelation, two structurally related gelators with the same gelation-driving segment lead to the gelators build up of the same aggregates through similar hydrogen-bonding patterns. When two gelators with structurally different gelation-driving segments induce gelation, the gelators build up each aggregate through individual hydrogen-bonding patterns. A fluorescent reagent that was incorporated into the aggregates of gels through van der Waals interactions was developed. The addition of this fluorescent reagent enables the successful observation of nonfluorescent gelators' aggregates by FM. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Direct observation of exchange bias related uncompensated spins at the CoO/Cu interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valev, V K; Gruyters, M; Kirilyuk, A; Rasing, Th

    2006-02-17

    Magnetization-induced optical second harmonic generation (MSHG) from the exchange-biased CoO/Cu-(X)/Fe multilayer shows the presence of pinned uncompensated spins at the CoO/Cu interface. For increasing Cu spacer thickness, the exchange bias measured via the hysteresis loop shift diminishes and disappears at X = 3.5 nm, while the MSHG signal still shows a strong magnetic contribution from the CoO interface. This indicates that the magnetic interaction between Fe and CoO layers is sufficiently strong to induce order in the antiferromagnetic layer even at a spacer thickness for which there is no observable hysteresis loop shift.

  18. Extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of G191-B2B - Direct observation of ionization edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Erik; Green, James C.; Cash, Webster

    1992-01-01

    We present the first spectrum of the hot, DA white dwarf G191-B2B (wd 0501 + 527) between 200 and 330 A. The spectrum, which has about 2 A resolution, was obtained with a sounding rocket-borne, grazing incidence spectrograph. The spectrum shows no evidence of He II, the expected primary opacity source in this wavelength region. Three ionization edges and one absorption feature were observed and are suggestive of O III existing in the photosphere of G191-B2B. Also noted is a broad spectral depression that may result from Fe VI in the photosphere.

  19. Direct observation of a photo induced lattice distortion in CdTe:In

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, F. J.; Mustre de Leon, J.; Zapata-Torres, M.; Pena, J. L.; Conradson, S. D.

    1997-03-01

    Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure measurements of the K-edges of Cd, Te and In were performed in CdTe:In at an Indium concentration of 10 atomic percent. A first set of measurements were performed cooling the sample to 80 K in the dark. After a five minute illumination of the sample, dark conditions were restored and a second set of measurements were performed. A change in the fine structure of the Te K-edge was observed with Cd and In K-edges exhibiting smaller changes. Quantitative analisys showed a new shell in the neighbor environment of Te after illumination.

  20. Direct Observations of Three Dimensional Growth of Hydrates Hosted in Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerkar, P.; Jones, K; Kleinberg, R; Lindquist, W; Tomov, S; Feng, H; Mahajan, D

    2009-01-01

    The visualization of time-resolved three-dimensional growth of tetrahydrofuran hydrates with glass spheres of uniform size as porous media using synchrotron x-ray computed microtomography is presented. The images of hydrate patches, formed from excess tetrahydrofuran in aqueous solution, show random nucleation and growth concomitant with grain movement but independent of container-wall effect. Away from grain surfaces, hydrate surface curvature was convex showing that liquid, not hydrate, was the wetting phase, similar to ice growth in porous media. The extension of the observed behavior to methane hydrates could have implications in understanding their role in seafloor stability and climate change.

  1. Critical appraisal of advance directives given by patients with fatal acute stroke: an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, A; Dörr, D; Szabo, K

    2017-02-02

    Advance directives (AD) imply the promise of determining future medical treatment in case of decisional incapacity. However, clinical practice increasingly indicates that standardized ADs often fail to support patients' autonomy. To date, little data are available about the quality and impact of ADs on end-of-life decisions for incapacitated acute stroke patients. We analyzed the ADs of patients with fatal stroke, focusing on: (a) their availability and type, (b) stated circumstances to which the AD should apply, and (c) stated wishes regarding specific treatment options. Between 2011 and 2014, 143 patients died during their hospitalization on our stroke unit. Forty-two of them (29.4%) had a completed and signed, written AD, as reported by their family, but only 35 ADs (24.5%) were available. The circumstances in which the AD should apply were stated by 21/35 (60%) as a "terminal condition that will cause death within a relatively short time" or an ongoing "dying process." A retrospective review found only 16 of 35 ADs (45.7%) described circumstances that, according to the medical file, could have been considered applicable by the treating physicians. A majority of patients objected to cardiopulmonary resuscitation (22/35, 62.9%), mechanical ventilation (19/35, 54.3%), and artificial nutrition (26/35, 74.3%), while almost all (33/35, 94.3%) directed that treatment for alleviation of pain or discomfort should be provided at all times even if it could hasten death. The prevalence of ADs among patients who die from acute stroke is still low. A major flaw of the ADs in our cohort was their attempt to determine single medical procedures without focusing on a precise description of applicable scenarios. Therefore, less than half of the ADs were considered applicable for severe acute stroke. These findings stress the need to foster educational programs for the general public about advance care planning to facilitate the processing of timely, comprehensive, and

  2. Comparative safety of direct oral anticoagulants and warfarin in venous thromboembolism: multicentre, population based, observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Min; Lix, Lisa M; Durand, Madeleine; Dahl, Matt; Paterson, J Michael; Dormuth, Colin R; Ernst, Pierre; Yao, Shenzhen; Renoux, Christel; Tamim, Hala; Wu, Cynthia; Mahmud, Salaheddin M

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety of direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) use compared with warfarin use for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. Design Retrospective matched cohort study conducted between 1 January 2009 and 31 March 2016. Setting Community based, using healthcare data from six jurisdictions in Canada and the United States. Participants 59 525 adults (12 489 DOAC users; 47 036 warfarin users) with a new diagnosis of venous thromboembolism and a prescription for a DOAC or warfarin within 30 days of diagnosis. Main outcome measures Outcomes included hospital admission or emergency department visit for major bleeding and all cause mortality within 90 days after starting treatment. Propensity score matching and shared frailty models were used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios of the outcomes comparing DOACs with warfarin. Analyses were conducted independently at each site, with meta-analytical methods used to estimate pooled hazard ratios across sites. Results Of the 59 525 participants, 1967 (3.3%) had a major bleed and 1029 (1.7%) died over a mean follow-up of 85.2 days. The risk of major bleeding was similar for DOAC compared with warfarin use (pooled hazard ratio 0.92, 95% confidence interval 0.82 to 1.03), with the overall direction of the association favouring DOAC use. No difference was found in the risk of death (pooled hazard ratio 0.99, 0.84 to 1.16) for DOACs compared with warfarin use. There was no evidence of heterogeneity across centres, between patients with and without chronic kidney disease, across age groups, or between male and female patients. Conclusions In this analysis of adults with incident venous thromboembolism, treatment with DOACs, compared with warfarin, was not associated with an increased risk of major bleeding or all cause mortality in the first 90 days of treatment. Trial registration Clinical trials NCT02833987. PMID:29042362

  3. A bibliography of research conducted by the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Office, U.S. Geological Survey : 1975-1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Helen L.

    1984-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program was established in 1967 by Secretarial order to plan and develop techniques for collecting and analyzing remotely sensed data, and to apply these techniques to the resource inventory and management responsibilities of the Department of the Interior. U.S. Geological Survey scientists, realizing the potential benefits of synoptic views of the Earth, were among the first members of America's scientific community to press for the launch of civilian Earth-surface observation satellites. Under the leadership of Director William T. Pecora, U.S. Geological Survey initiatives greatly influenced the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) development of the Landsat program.As part of the Landsat program, an agreement between NASA and the Geological Survey was signed to provide Landsat archiving and data production capabilities at the EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. This partnership with NASA began in 1972 and continued until Presidential Directive 54 designated the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the Department of Commerce as the manager of U.S. civil operational land remote-sensing activities. NOAA has managed the Landsat program since Fiscal Year 1983, and EROS continues to process, archive, reproduce, and distribute Landsat data under a Memorandum of Understanding between NOAA and the Geological Survey. Archives at the EROS Data Center include over 2 million worldwide Landsat scenes and over 5 million aerial photographs, primarily of U.S. sites. Since the launch of Landsat 1, global imaging of the Earth's surface has become an operational tool for resource exploration and land management. As technology evolved, so did the EROS Program mission. Research and applications efforts began at the EROS Headquarters Office in the Washington metropolitan area in 1966; at the EROS Data Center in 1971; and at the EROS Field Office in Anchorage

  4. Direct observation of microcavitation in underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heepe, Lars; Kovalev, Alexander E; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2014-01-01

    In this work we report on experiments aimed at testing the cavitation hypothesis [Varenberg, M.; Gorb, S. J. R. Soc., Interface 2008, 5, 383-385] proposed to explain the strong underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructures (MSAMSs). For this purpose, we measured the pull-off forces of individual MSAMSs by detaching them from a glass substrate under different wetting conditions and simultaneously video recording the detachment behavior at very high temporal resolution (54,000-100,000 fps). Although microcavitation was observed during the detachment of individual MSAMSs, which was a consequence of water inclusions present at the glass-MSAMS contact interface subjected to negative pressure (tension), the pull-off forces were consistently lower, around 50%, of those measured under ambient conditions. This result supports the assumption that the recently observed strong underwater adhesion of MSAMS is due to an air layer between individual MSAMSs [Kizilkan, E.; Heepe, L.; Gorb, S. N. Underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructure: An air-entrapment effect. In Biological and biomimetic adhesives: Challenges and opportunities; Santos, R.; Aldred, N.; Gorb, S. N.; Flammang, P., Eds.; The Royal Society of Chemistry: Cambridge, U.K., 2013; pp 65-71] rather than by cavitation. These results obtained due to the high-speed visualisation of the contact behavior at nanoscale-confined interfaces allow for a microscopic understanding of the underwater adhesion of MSAMSs and may aid in further development of artificial adhesive microstructures for applications in predominantly liquid environments.

  5. Direct observation of graphene growth and associated copper substrate dynamics by in situ scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhu-Jun; Weinberg, Gisela; Zhang, Qiang; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Klein-Hoffmann, Achim; Kurnatowska, Michalina; Plodinec, Milivoj; Li, Qing; Chi, Lifeng; Schloegl, R; Willinger, Marc-Georg

    2015-02-24

    This work highlights the importance of in situ experiments for an improved understanding of graphene growth on copper via metal-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Graphene growth inside the chamber of a modified environmental scanning electron microscope under relevant low-pressure CVD conditions allows visualizing structural dynamics of the active catalyst simultaneously with graphene nucleation and growth in an unparalleled way. It enables the observation of a complete CVD process from substrate annealing through graphene nucleation and growth and, finally, substrate cooling in real time and nanometer-scale resolution without the need of sample transfer. A strong dependence of surface dynamics such as sublimation and surface premelting on grain orientation is demonstrated, and the influence of substrate dynamics on graphene nucleation and growth is presented. Insights on the growth mechanism are provided by a simultaneous observation of the growth front propagation and nucleation rate. Furthermore, the role of trace amounts of oxygen during growth is discussed and related to graphene-induced surface reconstructions during cooling. Above all, this work demonstrates the potential of the method for in situ studies of surface dynamics on active metal catalysts.

  6. Direct observation of hygiene in a Peruvian shantytown: not enough handwashing and too little water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, William E.; Hunter, Gabrielle C.; Lescano, Andres G.; Cabrera, Lilia; Leontsini, Elli; Pan, William K.; Soldan, Valerie Paz; Gilman, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary OBJECTIVE To document frequency of hygiene practices of mothers and children in a shantytown in Lima, Peru. METHODS Continuous monitoring over three 12-h sessions in households without in-house water connections to measure: (i) water and soap use of 32 mothers; (ii) frequency of interrupting faecal-hand contamination by washing; and (iii) the time until faecal-hand contamination became a possible transmission event. RESULTS During 1008 h of observation, 55% (65/119) of mothers’ and 69% (37/54) of children's faecal-hand contamination events were not followed within 15 min by handwashing or bathing. Nearly 40% (67/173) of faecal-hand contamination events became possible faecal-oral transmission events. There was no difference in the time-until-transmission between mothers and children (P = 0.43). Potential transmission of faecal material to food or mouth occurred in 64% of cases within 1 h of hand contamination. Mean water usage (6.5 l) was low compared to international disaster relief standards. CONCLUSIONS We observed low volumes of water usage, inadequate handwashing, and frequent opportunities for faecal contamination and possible transmission in this water-scarce community. PMID:19055623

  7. GhostNet marine debris survey in the Gulf of Alaska--satellite guidance and aircraft observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel, William G; Veenstra, Timothy S; Churnside, James H; Arabini, Elena; Friedman, Karen S; Foley, David G; Brainard, Russell E; Kiefer, Dale; Ogle, Simeon; Clemente-Colón, Pablo; Li, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    Marine debris, particularly debris that is composed of lost or abandoned fishing gear, is recognized as a serious threat to marine life, vessels, and coral reefs. The goal of the GhostNet project is the detection of derelict nets at sea through the use of weather and ocean models, drifting buoys and satellite imagery to locate convergent areas where nets are likely to collect, followed by airborne surveys with trained observers and remote sensing instruments to spot individual derelict nets. These components of GhostNet were first tested together in the field during a 14-day marine debris survey of the Gulf of Alaska in July and August 2003. Model, buoy, and satellite data were used in flight planning. A manned aircraft survey with visible and IR cameras and a LIDAR instrument located debris in the targeted locations, including 102 individual pieces of debris of anthropogenic or terrestrial origin. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Direct observation of entangled multiexciton states in organic semiconductors (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Chaw Keong; Musser, Andrew J.; Clark, Jenny; Anthony, John E.; Beljonne, David; Friend, Richard H.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-09-01

    The standard view of singlet exciton fission in organic semiconductor is that one photon creates a singlet exciton which subsequently decays into a correlated triplet pair state (TT) multiexciton states. The triplet pair state then splits to form two free triplets. Although the theoretical description of (TT) is well developed since 1970, it has so far proved difficult to determine the role and nature of the (TT) state in solid films from experiment directly. Here, using a combination of highly sensitive broadband transient absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopies on a range of polyacene films, we demonstrate that the (TT) multiexciton states is bound and energetically stabilised with respect to free triplets in even the most efficient singlet fission materials, such as TIPS-pentacene and pentacene. The (TT) multiexciton state is emissive, and we find that charge-transfer from one (TT) state to the neighboring electron acceptors has a yield of >100%, i.e. more than one charge is transferred per charge-transfer event. Our findings suggest that the formation of spin-correlated (TT) states emits as one particle and generates 2 charges in organic solar cells and thus open a range of fascinating questions regarding the potential to use entanglement to enhance organic photovoltaic efficiency and the application of organic materials in quantum information

  9. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-02-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1-x Si x induced by the influence of an "edge" of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion "Σ7" domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders.

  10. Polymer tensiometers with ceramic cones: direct observations of matric pressures in drying soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. van der Ploeg

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring soil water potentials is crucial to characterize vadose zone processes. Conventional tensiometers only measure until approximately −0.09 MPa, and indirect methods may suffer from the non-uniqueness in the relationship between matric potential and measured properties. Recently developed polymer tensiometers (POTs are able to directly measure soil matric potentials until the theoretical wilting point (−1.6 MPa. By minimizing the volume of polymer solution inside the POT while maximizing the ceramic area in contact with that polymer solution, response times drop to acceptable ranges for laboratory and field conditions. Contact with the soil is drastically improved with the use of cone-shaped solid ceramics instead of flat ceramics. The comparison between measured potentials by polymer tensiometers and indirectly obtained potentials with time domain reflectometry highlights the risk of using the latter method at low water contents. By combining POT and time domain reflectometry readings in situ moisture retention curves can be measured over the range permitted by the measurement range of both POT and time domain reflectometry.

  11. Direct observation of temperature-driven magnetic symmetry transitions by vectorial resolved MOKE magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuñado, Jose Luis F.; Pedrosa, Javier; Ajejas, Fernando; Perna, Paolo; Miranda, Rodolfo; Camarero, Julio

    2017-10-01

    Angle- and temperature-dependent vectorial magnetometry measurements are necessary to disentangle the effective magnetic symmetry in magnetic nanostructures. Here we present a detailed study on an Fe(1 0 0) thin film system with competing collinear biaxial (four-fold symmetry) and uniaxial (two-fold) magnetic anisotropies, carried out with our recently developed full angular/broad temperature range/vectorial-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometer, named TRISTAN. The data give direct views on the angular and temperature dependence of the magnetization reversal pathways, from which characteristic axes, remanences, critical fields, domain wall types, and effective magnetic symmetry are obtained. In particular, although the remanence shows four-fold angular symmetry for all investigated temperatures (15 K-400 K), the critical fields show strong temperature and angular dependencies and the reversal mechanism changes for specific angles at a given (angle-dependent) critical temperature, showing signatures of an additional collinear two-fold symmetry. This symmetry-breaking is more relevant as temperature increases to room temperature. It originates from the competition between two anisotropy contributions with different symmetry and temperature evolution. The results highlight the importance of combining temperature and angular studies, and the need to look at different magnetic parameters to unravel the underlying magnetic symmetries and temperature evolutions of the symmetry-breaking effects in magnetic nanostructures.

  12. Direct Telephonic Communication in a Heart Failure Transitional Care Program: An observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Ken S; Beutler, David S; Sheikh, Hassam; Weiss, Jessica L; Parkinson, Dallin; Nguyen, Peter; Gerkin, Richard D; Loli, Akil I

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated the trend of phone calls in the Banner Good Samaritan Medical Center (BGSMC) Heart Failure Transitional Care Program (HFTCP). The primary goal of the HFTCP is to reduce 30-Day readmissions for heart failure patients by using a multi-pronged approach. This study included 104 patients in the HFTCP discharged over a 51-week period who had around-the-clock telephone access to the Transitionalist. Cellular phone records were reviewed. This study evaluated the length and timing of calls. A total of 4398 telephone calls were recorded of which 39% were inbound and 61% were outbound. This averaged to 86 calls per week. During the "Weekday Daytime" period, Eighty-five percent of the totals calls were made. There were 229 calls during the "Weekday Nights" period with 1.5 inbound calls per week. The "Total Weekend" calls were 10.2% of the total calls which equated to a weekly average of 8.8. Our experience is that direct, physician-patient telephone contact is feasible with a panel of around 100 HF patients for one provider. If the proper financial reimbursements are provided, physicians may be apt to participate in similar transitional care programs. Likewise, third party payers will benefit from the reduction in unnecessary emergency room visits and hospitalizations.

  13. Direct observation of key photoinduced dynamics in a potential nano-delivery vehicle of cancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Samim; Chaudhuri, Siddhi; Kar, Prasenjit; Sarkar, Soumik; Lemmens, Peter; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2015-01-07

    In recent times, significant achievements in the use of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) as delivery vehicles of cancer drugs have been made. The present study is an attempt to explore the key photoinduced dynamics in ZnO NPs upon complexation with a model cancer drug protoporphyrin IX (PP). The nanohybrid has been characterized by FTIR, Raman scattering and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. Picosecond-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the defect mediated emission of ZnO NPs to PP has been used to study the formation of the nanohybrid at the molecular level. Picosecond-resolved fluorescence studies of PP-ZnO nanohybrids reveal efficient electron migration from photoexcited PP to ZnO, eventually enhancing the ROS activity. The dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) oxidation and no oxidation of luminol in PP/PP-ZnO nanohybrids upon green light illumination unravel that the nature of ROS is essentially singlet oxygen rather than superoxide anions. Surface mediated photocatalysis of methylene blue (MB) in an aqueous solution of the nanohybrid has also been investigated. Direct evidence of the role of electron transfer as a key player in enhanced ROS generation from the nanohybrid is also clear from the photocurrent measurement studies. We have also used the nanohybrid in a model photodynamic therapy application in a light sensitized bacteriological culture experiment.

  14. Direct observation of local xylem embolisms induced by soil drying in intact Zea mays leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jeongeun; Hwang, Bae Geun; Kim, Yangmin X; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-04-01

    The vulnerability of vascular plants to xylem embolism is closely related to their stable long-distance water transport, growth, and survival. Direct measurements of xylem embolism are required to understand what causes embolism and what strategies plants employ against it. In this study, synchrotron X-ray microscopy was used to non-destructively investigate both the anatomical structures of xylem vessels and embolism occurrence in the leaves of intact Zea mays (maize) plants. Xylem embolism was induced by water stress at various soil drying periods and soil water contents. X-ray images of dehydrated maize leaves showed that the ratio of gas-filled vessels to all xylem vessels increased with decreased soil water content and reached approximately 30% under severe water stress. Embolism occurred in some but not all vessels. Embolism in maize leaves was not strongly correlated with xylem diameter but was more likely to occur in the peripheral veins. The rate of embolism formation in metaxylem vessels was higher than in protoxylem vessels. This work has demonstrated that xylem embolism remains low in maize leaves under water stress and that there xylem has characteristic spatial traits of vulnerability to embolism. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  15. Intermittent direction reversals of moving spatially localized turbulence observed in two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruta, Yoshiki; Toh, Sadayoshi

    2017-12-01

    We have found that in two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow a spatially localized turbulent state (SLT) exists stably and travels with a constant speed on average switching the moving direction randomly and intermittently for moderate values of the control parameters: Reynolds number and the flow rate. We define the coarse-grained position and velocity of an SLT and separate the motion of the SLT from its internal turbulent dynamics by introducing a co-moving frame. The switching process of an SLT represented by the coarse-grained velocity seems to be a random telegraph signal. Focusing on the asymmetry of the internal turbulence we introduce two coarse-grained variables characterizing the internal dynamics. These quantities follow the switching process reasonably. This suggests that the twin attracting invariant sets each of which corresponds to a one-way traveling SLT are embedded in the attractor of the moving SLT and the connection of the two sets is too complicated to be represented by a few degrees of freedom but the motion of an SLT is correlated with the internal turbulent dynamics.

  16. Direct observation of ultrafast long-range charge separation at polymer–fullerene heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Provencher, Françoise

    2014-07-01

    In polymeric semiconductors, charge carriers are polarons, which means that the excess charge deforms the molecular structure of the polymer chain that hosts it. This results in distinctive signatures in the vibrational modes of the polymer. Here, we probe polaron photogeneration dynamics at polymer:fullerene heterojunctions by monitoring its time-resolved resonance-Raman spectrum following ultrafast photoexcitation. We conclude that polarons emerge within 300 fs. Surprisingly, further structural evolution on ≤50-ps timescales is modest, indicating that the polymer conformation hosting nascent polarons is not significantly different from that near equilibrium. We interpret this as suggestive that charges are free from their mutual Coulomb potential because we would expect rich vibrational dynamics associated with charge-pair relaxation. We address current debates on the photocarrier generation mechanism at molecular heterojunctions, and our work is, to our knowledge, the first direct probe of molecular conformation dynamics during this fundamentally important process in these materials. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. Design of, and enrollment in, the palliative care communication research initiative: a direct-observation cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramling, Robert; Gajary-Coots, Elizabeth; Stanek, Susan; Dougoud, Nathalie; Pyke, Heather; Thomas, Marie; Cimino, Jenica; Sanders, Mechelle; Alexander, Stewart C; Epstein, Ronald; Fiscella, Kevin; Gramling, David; Ladwig, Susan; Anderson, Wendy; Pantilat, Stephen; Norton, Sally A

    2015-08-19

    Understanding the characteristics of communication that foster patient-centered outcomes amid serious illness are essential for the science of palliative care. However, epidemiological cohort studies that directly observe clinical conversations can be challenging to conduct in the natural setting. We describe the successful enrollment, observation and data collection methods of the ongoing Palliative Care Communication Research Initiative (PCCRI). The PCCRI is a multi-site cohort study of naturally occurring inpatient palliative care consultations. The 6-month cohort data includes directly observed and audio-recorded palliative care consultations (up to first 3 visits); patient/proxy/clinician self-report questionnaires both before and the day after consultation; post-consultation in-depth interviews; and medical/administrative records. One hundred fourteen patients or their proxies enrolled in PCCRI during Enrollment Year One (of Three). Seventy percent of eligible patients/proxies were invited to hear about a communication research study (188/269); 60% of them ultimately enrolled in the PCCRI (114/188), resulting in a 42% sampling proportion (114/269 eligible). All PC clinicians at study sites were invited to participate; all 45 participated. Epidemiologic study of patient-family-clinician communication in palliative care settings is feasible and acceptable to patients, proxies and clinicians. We detail the successful PCCRI methods for enrollment, direct observation and data collection for this complex "field" environment.

  18. Deformation Study of Papandayan Volcano using GPS Survey Method and Its Correlation with Seismic Data Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina A. Sarsito

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Papandayan volcano located in the southern part of Garut regency, around 70 km away from Bandung city, West Java. Many methods carried out to monitoring the activities of volcano, both continuously or periodically, one of the monitoring method is periodically GPS survey. Basically those surveys are carried out to understand the pattern and velocity of displacement which occurred in the volcano body, both horizontally and vertically, and also others deformation elements such as; translation, rotation and dilatation. The Mogi modeling was also used to determine the location and volume of the pressure source which caused deformation of volcano body. By comparing seismic activity and the deformation reveal from GPS measurement, before, during and after eruption, it could be understood there is a correlation between the seismicity and its deformation. These studies is hoping that GPS measurement in Papandayan volcano could be one of supported method to determine the volcano activities, at least in Papandayan volcano.

  19. Meteor Shower Forecast Improvements from a Survey of All-Sky Network Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Sugar, Glenn; Brown, Peter G.; Cooke, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Meteoroid impacts are capable of damaging spacecraft and potentially ending missions. In order to help spacecraft programs mitigate these risks, NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) monitors and predicts meteoroid activity. Temporal variations in near-Earth space are described by the MEO's annual meteor shower forecast, which is based on both past shower activity and model predictions. The MEO and the University of Western Ontario operate sister networks of all-sky meteor cameras. These networks have been in operation for more than 7 years and have computed more than 20,000 meteor orbits. Using these data, we conduct a survey of meteor shower activity in the "fireball" size regime using DBSCAN. For each shower detected in our survey, we compute the date of peak activity and characterize the growth and decay of the shower's activity before and after the peak. These parameters are then incorporated into the annual forecast for an improved treatment of annual activity.

  20. Direct observation of interface and nanoscale compositional modulation in ternary III-As heterostructure nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesan, Sriram; Scheu, Christina [Department of Chemistry and Center for NanoScience, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Butenandstr 5-13(E), 81377 München (Germany); Madsen, Morten H.; Krogstrup, Peter; Johnson, Erik [Nano-Science Center and Center for Quantum Devices, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Schmid, Herbert [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2013-08-05

    Straight, axial InAs nanowire with multiple segments of Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}As was grown. High resolution X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) mapping reveals the distribution of group III atoms at the axial interfaces and at the sidewalls. Significant Ga enrichment, accompanied by a structural change is observed at the Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}As/InAs interfaces and a higher Ga concentration for the early grown Ga{sub x}In{sub 1−x}As segments. The elemental map and EDS line profile infer Ga enrichment at the facet junctions between the sidewalls. The relative chemical potentials of ternary alloys and the thermodynamic driving force for liquid to solid transition explains the growth mechanisms behind the enrichment.

  1. Pesticide residues in groundwater in The Netherlands: state of observations and future directions of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, J P; Verdam, B

    1989-01-01

    In the first stage of a programme of sampling and analysis for pesticide residues in groundwater in The Netherlands, the upper groundwater below four vulnerable soils was analysed for nearly 2,5 years in eight sampling rounds. Of 18 compounds analysed, including some metabolites, 1,3-dichloropropene, aldicarb, ethoprophos dinoseb, metamitron, atrazine, desethyl- and desisopropylatrazine, metolachlor and ethylenethioureum were repeatedly detected in the groundwater in concentrations above 0.1 micrograms.dm-3, the limit for pesticides in drinking water set by the EC. These observations were made below fields with potatoe-, maize- and bulb flower culture, all on low-humic to moderately humic sandy soils. No residues were found below a cracked light clay on a sandy subsoil. On the locations sampled evidence was found for complete in situ removal in the upper groundwater of 1,3-dichloropropene, high persistence of aldicarb residues and partial in situ degradation of dinoseb.

  2. Direct observation of the lattice sites of implanted manganese in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Daniel; Wahl, Ulrich; Martins Correia, Joao; Amorim, Lígia; Decoster, Stefan; Castro Ribeiro Da Silva, Manuel; Da Costa Pereira, Lino Miguel; Esteves De Araujo, Araujo Joao Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Mn-doped Si has attracted significant interest in the context of dilute magnetic semiconductors. We investigated the lattice location of implanted Mn in silicon of different doping types (n, n+ and p+) in the highly dilute regime. Three different lattice sites were identified by means of emission channeling experiments: ideal substitutional sites; sites displaced from bond-centered towards substitutional sites and sites displaced from anti-bonding towards tetrahedral interstitial sites. For all doping types investigated, the substitutional fraction remained below ∼ 30%. We discuss the origin of the observed lattice sites as well as the implications of such structures on the understanding of Mn-doped Si systems.

  3. Direct observation of strong ion coupling in laser-driven shock-compressed targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasio, A; Gregori, G; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A; Daligault, J; Delserieys, A; Faenov, A Ya; Loupias, B; Ozaki, N; Rabec le Gloahec, M; Pikuz, T A; Riley, D; Koenig, M

    2007-09-28

    In this Letter we report on a near collective x-ray scattering experiment on shock-compressed targets. A highly coupled Al plasma was generated and probed by spectrally resolving an x-ray source forward scattered by the sample. A significant reduction in the intensity of the elastic scatter was observed, which we attribute to the formation of an incipient long-range order. This speculation is confirmed by x-ray scattering calculations accounting for both electron degeneracy and strong coupling effects. Measurements from rear side visible diagnostics are consistent with the plasma parameters inferred from x-ray scattering data. These results give the experimental evidence of the strongly coupled ionic dynamics in dense plasmas.

  4. Direct observation of the layer-dependent electronic structure in phosphorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Likai; Kim, Jonghwan; Jin, Chenhao; Ye, Guo Jun; Qiu, Diana Y.; Jornada, Felipe H. Da; Shi, Zhiwen; Chen, Long; Zhang, Zuocheng; Yang, Fangyuan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ren, Wencai; Louie, Steven G.; Chen, Xian Hui; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng

    Phosphorene, a single atomic layer of black phosphorus, has recently emerged as a new two-dimensional (2D) material that holds promise for electronic and photonic technology. Here we experimentally demonstrate that the electronic structure of few-layer phosphorene varies significantly with number of layers, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. The interband optical transitions cover a wide, technologically important spectrum range from visible to mid-infrared. In addition, few-layer phosphorene is observed to photoluminesce at energies that correlate well with the layer-dependent bandgap transitions. The strongly layer-dependent electronic structure of phosphorene, in combination with its high electrical mobility, gives it distinct advantages over other two-dimensional materials in electronic and opto-electronic applications.

  5. Directional Limits on Persistent Gravitational Waves from Advanced LIGO's First Observing Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Belgin, M.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Biscoveanu, A. S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campbell, W.; Canepa, M.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H.-P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, E.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Da Silva Costa, C. F.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; Day, R.; De, S.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Dovale Álvarez, M.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernández Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fong, H.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J.-D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kéfélian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W.; Kim, Y.-M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Klein, B.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Krämer, C.; Kringel, V.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGrath, C.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perez, C. J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poe, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, J. D.; Romano, R.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schlassa, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Setyawati, Y.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stevenson, S. P.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tao, D.; Tápai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thrane, E.; Tippens, T.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, D. S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, S. J.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We employ gravitational-wave radiometry to map the stochastic gravitational wave background expected from a variety of contributing mechanisms and test the assumption of isotropy using data from the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory's (aLIGO) first observing run. We also search for persistent gravitational waves from point sources with only minimal assumptions over the 20-1726 Hz frequency band. Finding no evidence of gravitational waves from either point sources or a stochastic background, we set limits at 90% confidence. For broadband point sources, we report upper limits on the gravitational wave energy flux per unit frequency in the range Fα ,Θ(f )Supernova 1987 A, and the Galactic Center) yield median frequency-dependent limits on strain amplitude of h0mean improvement of a factor of 2 across the band compared to previous searches of this kind for these sky locations, considering the different quantities of strain constrained in each case.

  6. Direct observation of tunable surface structure and reactivity in TiO2 nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vykhodets, Vladimir B.; Johnson, Katherine Grace; Kurennykh, Tatiana E.; Beketov, Igor V.; Samatov, Oleg M.; Medvedev, Anatoly I.; Jarvis, Emily A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Surface structure and reactivity is of primary importance in numerous metal oxide applications. Nanopowders can offer advantages both in ease of preparation and in total surface area relative to monocrystals. Although monocrystal surfaces have been characterized using a variety of spectroscopy and microscopy techniques, key features of these surfaces may not translate to nanopowders. In previous studies of alumina and zirconia, we employed nuclear reaction analysis coupled with density functional calculations to show that the atomic and electronic structures of these nanopowder surfaces are distinct from those predicted thermodynamically for macroscopic crystals. Here, we report similar findings for the technologically important metal oxide TiO2. For the first time, we extend our studies to characterize these nanopowders' surface reactivity with oxygen and hydrogen. We observe reactivity indicative of surface states with metallic character distinct from the stoichiometric oxide. This notable behavior holds crucial implications for use of these powders as catalysts and catalyst supports.

  7. Direct observation of microcavitation in underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Heepe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on experiments aimed at testing the cavitation hypothesis [Varenberg, M.; Gorb, S. J. R. Soc., Interface 2008, 5, 383–385] proposed to explain the strong underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructures (MSAMSs. For this purpose, we measured the pull-off forces of individual MSAMSs by detaching them from a glass substrate under different wetting conditions and simultaneously video recording the detachment behavior at very high temporal resolution (54,000–100,000 fps. Although microcavitation was observed during the detachment of individual MSAMSs, which was a consequence of water inclusions present at the glass–MSAMS contact interface subjected to negative pressure (tension, the pull-off forces were consistently lower, around 50%, of those measured under ambient conditions. This result supports the assumption that the recently observed strong underwater adhesion of MSAMS is due to an air layer between individual MSAMSs [Kizilkan, E.; Heepe, L.; Gorb, S. N. Underwater adhesion of mushroom-shaped adhesive microstructure: An air-entrapment effect. In Biological and biomimetic adhesives: Challenges and opportunities; Santos, R.; Aldred, N.; Gorb, S. N.; Flammang, P., Eds.; The Royal Society of Chemistry: Cambridge, U.K., 2013; pp 65–71] rather than by cavitation. These results obtained due to the high-speed visualisation of the contact behavior at nanoscale-confined interfaces allow for a microscopic understanding of the underwater adhesion of MSAMSs and may aid in further development of artificial adhesive microstructures for applications in predominantly liquid environments.

  8. Direct observation of phase transition of GeSbTe thin films by Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Fei [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Xu Ling, E-mail: xuling@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang Rui; Geng Lei; Tong Liang; Xu Jun [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Su Weining; Yu Yao [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ma Zhongyuan; Chen Kunji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Photonic and Electronic Materials Sciences and Technology, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-10-01

    Graphical abstract: Nano-sized marks on GST thin film were fabricated using Conductive-AFM (Atomic Force Microscope). The AFM morphology images show that the marks are ablated at the center and a raised ring surrounding it. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure of GeSbTe thin films was characterized by XRD and AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Annealing and applying electrical field can induce crystallization on thin film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conductive-AFM was used to modify the surface of GeSbTe thin film. - Abstract: GeSbTe (GST) thin films were deposited on quartz substrates using electron beam evaporation system and then annealed in nitrogen atmosphere at different temperatures, ranging from 20 Degree-Sign C to 300 Degree-Sign C. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Atomic Force microscope (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the as-deposited and post-annealed thin films. Annealing treatment was found to induce changes on microstructure, surface roughness and grain size, indicating that with the increase of annealing temperature, the amorphous GST films first changed to face-centered-cubic (fcc) phase and then the stable hexagonal (hex) phase. Meanwhile, conductive-AFM (C-AFM) was used to produce crystallized GST dots on thin films. I-V spectroscopy results show that GST films can switch from amorphous state to crystalline state at threshold voltage. After switching, I-V curve exhibits ohmic characteristic, which is usually observed in crystallized GST films. By applying repeated I-V spectroscopies on the thin films, crystallized nuclei were observed. As the times of I-V spectroscopies increases, the area of written dots increases, and the center of the mark begin to ablate. The AFM images show that the shape of marks is an ablated center with a raised ring surrounding it.

  9. Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Observation of Direct Coronal Heating During a C-Class Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosius, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    With the Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer operating in rapid cadence (9.8 s) stare mode during a C6.6 flare on the solar disk, we observed a sudden brightening of Fe xix line emission (formed at temperature T ˜ 8 MK) above the pre-flare noise without a corresponding brightening of emission from ions formed at lower temperatures, including He i (0.01 MK), Ov (0.25 MK), and Si xii (2 MK). The sudden brightening persisted as a plateau of Fe xix intensity that endured more than 11 minutes. The Fe xix emission at the rise and during the life of the plateau showed no evidence of significant bulk velocity flows, and hence cannot be attributed to chromospheric evaporation. However, the line width showed a significant broadening at the rise of the plateau, corresponding to nonthermal velocities of at least 89 km s-1 due to reconnection outflows or turbulence. During the plateau He i, Ov, and Si xii brightened at successively later times starting about 3.5 minutes after Fe xix, which suggests that these brightenings were produced by thermal conduction from the plasma that produced the Fe xix line emission; however, we cannot rule out the possibility that they were produced by a weak beam of nonthermal particles. We interpret an observed shortening of the Ov wavelength for about 1.5 minutes toward the middle of the plateau to indicate new upward motions driven by the flare, as occurs during gentle chromospheric evaporation; relative to a quiescent interval shortly before the flare, the Ov upward velocity was around -10 km s-1.

  10. Direct observation of giant Pickering emulsion and colloidosome droplet interaction and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kate L; Giakoumatos, Emma C; Ata, Seher; Webber, Grant B; Armes, Steven P; Wanless, Erica J

    2012-12-04

    The interactions of two 2-mm pendant oil droplets grown in the presence of an aqueous solution of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)-stabilized polystyrene latex particles was observed using a high-speed video camera. The coalescence behavior was monitored as a function of oil type (n-dodecane versus sunflower oil) and particle size (135 versus 902 nm), as well as in the presence and absence of an oil-soluble cross-linker [tolylene 2,4-diisocyanate-terminated poly(propylene glycol)]. The damping coefficient of the coalescing n-dodecane droplets was found to increase in the presence of the latex, demonstrating particle adsorption. Coalescence times increased when the oil phase was changed from n-dodecane to sunflower oil, because of the much higher viscosity of the latter oil. In addition, increasing the adsorbed particle size from 135 to 902 nm led to longer coalescence times because of the greater distance separating the oil droplets. Coalescence times observed in the presence of the larger 902-nm particles indicated that two different modes of contact can occur prior to a coalescence event (bilayer or bridging monolayer of particles in the film). Addition of an oil-soluble surface-active cross-linker to the sunflower oil phase to react with the hydroxy groups of the particle stabilizer reduced the interfacial elasticity and ultimately prevented coalescence after cross-linking for 20 min at 25 °C. Such giant colloidosomes can remain in contact for several hours without undergoing coalescence, which demonstrates their high stability. Furthermore, coalescence is prevented even if the cross-linker is present in only one of the pendant droplets. Finally, evidence for cross-linker diffusion from one pendant droplet to another was indicated by a visible filament connecting the two droplets upon retraction.

  11. Phenology observations collected by citizen scientists directly support science and natural resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerst, K.; Crimmins, T. M.; Rosemartin, A.

    2016-12-01

    The USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN; www.usanpn.org) serves science and society by promoting a broad understanding of plant and animal phenology and the relationships among phenological patterns, climate, and environmental change. Data collected by citizen and professional scientists through Nature's Notebook - a national-scale, multi-taxa phenology observation program - serve USA-NPN strategic goals of advancing science and informing decisions. These phenology data and resultant products and maps are being used in a rapidly growing number of applications for science, conservation and resource management. Here we describe recent outcomes that have resulted from successful engagement with citizen scientists, with a focus on robust scientific products and results that would not have been possible without a coordinated national effort. Since 2009 over 7,500 Nature's Notebook participants have contributed over 7.8 million observation records of plants and animals across the United States. These data, and value-added data products developed and delivered by the USA-NPN, have been used in 24 peer-reviewed publications to date. In our presentation, we first highlight several recent published studies that demonstrate the value of data stored in the National Phenology Database (NPDb) to advance understanding of the ecological impacts of climate change. Second, we discuss local- to national-scale projects that capitalize on Nature's Notebook to inform management decisions, including scheduling street-sweeping to prevent leaves from entering inland lakes, setting the timing of herbicide treatments to maximize efficacy against invasive plants, and developing predictions of the emergence of forest pests. Finally, we present an overview of the framework we use to ensure data are of high quality. We invite researchers and partners to explore these data to address a wide range of science questions and management needs.

  12. Parameter estimation method that directly compares gravitational wave observations to numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, J.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Boyle, M.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Campanelli, M.; Chu, T.; Clark, J. A.; Demos, N.; Fong, H.; Healy, J.; Hemberger, D. A.; Hinder, I.; Jani, K.; Khamesra, B.; Kidder, L. E.; Kumar, P.; Laguna, P.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Ossokine, S.; Pfeiffer, H.; Scheel, M. A.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.

    2017-11-01

    We present and assess a Bayesian method to interpret gravitational wave signals from binary black holes. Our method directly compares gravitational wave data to numerical relativity (NR) simulations. In this study, we present a detailed investigation of the systematic and statistical parameter estimation errors of this method. This procedure bypasses approximations used in semianalytical models for compact binary coalescence. In this work, we use the full posterior parameter distribution for only generic nonprecessing binaries, drawing inferences away from the set of NR simulations used, via interpolation of a single scalar quantity (the marginalized log likelihood, ln L ) evaluated by comparing data to nonprecessing binary black hole simulations. We also compare the data to generic simulations, and discuss the effectiveness of this procedure for generic sources. We specifically assess the impact of higher order modes, repeating our interpretation with both l ≤2 as well as l ≤3 harmonic modes. Using the l ≤3 higher modes, we gain more information from the signal and can better constrain the parameters of the gravitational wave signal. We assess and quantify several sources of systematic error that our procedure could introduce, including simulation resolution and duration; most are negligible. We show through examples that our method can recover the parameters for equal mass, zero spin, GW150914-like, and unequal mass, precessing spin sources. Our study of this new parameter estimation method demonstrates that we can quantify and understand the systematic and statistical error. This method allows us to use higher order modes from numerical relativity simulations to better constrain the black hole binary parameters.

  13. Survey management in directional wells in Polvo Field - Campos Basin; Gerenciamento de 'surveys' em pocos direcionais no Campo de Polvo - Bacia de Campos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Fernando; Antunes, Francisco; Rafainer, Gilberto [HALLIBURTON, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Sperry Drilling Services; Ohara, Shiniti [Devon Energy do Brasil Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    Magnetic Surveying Techniques are fully used in order to control the well path in drilling operations, and electronic tools, known as Measure While Drilling (MWD), uses the intensity and inclination of Earth's magnetic field as a reference for its inputs. These tools have three magnetometers and three accelerometers spaced 90 degrees apart which measure the components of magnetic field and gravitational field to calculate the inclination, the direction of the well, and the tool face orientation. Erroneous readings can occur due to the magnetic interference since the Earth magnetic field can be affected by external sources such as, magnetized materials in the BHA (axial), casings strings or near by wells (cross axial), and these abnormal readings are enough to put the well bore far away from its desired location. In this paper we intend to show the methodology and software usage to allow magnetic field strength exam and identification of systematic failures in mechanization or calibration of the electronics tools. Moreover, the use of enhancements as In-Field Referencing (IFR) or Interpolated In Field Referencing (IIFR) in sensors calculation are described. Furthermore, the results obtained comparing the solutions with gyroscope survey data is shown. (author)

  14. Evaluation of the Horizontal and Vertical Accuracy of GNSS Survey Observations from a Real-Time Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahyari, M.; Olsen, M. J.; Gillins, D. T.; Dennis, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Many current surveying standards in the United States require several long-duration, static Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations to derive high-accuracy geodetic coordinates. However, over the past decade, many entities have established real-time GNSS networks (RTNs), which could reduce the field time for establishing geodetic control from hours to minutes. To evaluate the accuracy of RTN GNSS observations, data collected from two National Geodetic Survey (NGS) surveys in South Carolina and Oregon were studied. The objectives were to: 1) determine the accuracy of a real-time observation as a function of duration; 2) examine the influence of including GLONASS (Russia's version of GPS); 3) compare results using a single base to the full RTN network solution; and 4) assess the effect of baseline length on accuracy. In South Carolina, 360 observations ranging from 5 to 600 seconds were collected on 20 passive marks using RTN and single-base solutions, both with GPS+GLONASS and GPS-only. In Oregon, 18 passive marks were observed from 5 to 900 seconds using GPS-only with the RTN, and with GPS+GLONASS and GPS-only from a single-base. To develop "truth" coordinates, at least 30 hours of static GPS data were also collected on all marks. Each static survey session was post-processed in OPUS-Projects, and the resulting vectors were used to build survey networks that were least-squares adjusted using the NGS software ADJUST. The resulting coordinates provided the basis for evaluating the accuracy of the real-time observations. Results from this study indicate great potential in the use of RTNs for accurate derivation of geodetic coordinates. Both case studies showed an optimal observation duration of 180 seconds. RTN data tended to be more accurate and consistent than single-base data, and GLONASS slightly improved accuracy. A key benefit of GLONASS was the ability to obtain more fixed solutions at longer baseline lengths than single-base solutions.

  15. [The impact of goal directed analgesia on mechanical ventilated patients's outcomes in intensive care unit: a clinical observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q D; Wan, X Y; Zhang, Y L; Li, S W; Han, L L; Li, W W; Shi, H Y

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the impact of goal directed analgesia on the outcome of patients with mechanical ventilation in intensive care unit.A total of 126 patients who needed mechanical ventilation were recruited.With a method of before and after paired comparison, they were divided into two group: (1) analgesia with empirical administration or control group; (2) goal directed analgesia based on critical-care pain observation tool (CPOT). Compared with the control group, after goal directed analgesia was applied, the consumption of midazolam significantly dropped from (368.47±27.41) mg to (151.27±29.31) mg(Pventilator duration was significantly shortened from (168.49±11.41) h to (142.38±13.24) h(Pventilation time and shorter ICU length of stay, suggesting that the general outcome is improved.

  16. Extremely slow intramolecular vibrational redistribution: Direct observation by time-resolved raman spectroscopy in trifluoropropyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, A. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We have studied the dynamics of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) from the initially excited mode v1 ≈ 3330 cm-1 (acetylene-type H-C bond) in H-C≡C-CF3 molecules in the gaseous phase by means of anti-Stokes spontaneous Raman scattering. The time constant of this process is estimated as 2.3 ns—this is the slowest IVR time reported so far for the room-temperature gases. It is suggested that so long IVR time with respect to the other propyne derivatives can be explained by a larger defect, in this case, of the Fermi resonance of v1 with v2 + 2v7—the most probable doorway state leading to IVR from v1 to the bath of all vibrational-rotational states with the close energies. In addition, it is shown that the observed dynamics is in agreement with a theoretical model assuming strong vibrational-rotational mixing.

  17. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, Francesco Giancarlo; Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep Maria; Putnis, Christine V

    2014-01-01

    In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C). The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104) cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours.

  18. Direct observation of the photodegradation of anthracene and pyrene adsorbed onto mangrove leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    Full Text Available An established synchronous fluorimetry method was used for in situ investigation of the photodegradation of pyrene (PYR and anthracene (ANT adsorbed onto fresh leaves of the seedlings of two mangrove species, Aegiceras corniculatum (L. Blanco (Ac and Kandelia obovata (Ko in multicomponent mixtures (mixture of the ANT and PYR. Experimental results indicated that photodegradation was the main transformation pathway for both ANT and PYR in multicomponent mixtures. The amount of the PAHs volatilizing from the leaf surfaces and entering the inner leaf tissues was negligible. Over a certain period of irradiation time, the photodegradation of both PYR and ANT adsorbed onto the leaves of Ac and Ko followed first-order kinetics, with faster rates being observed on Ac leaves. In addition, the photodegradation rate of PYR on the leaves of the mangrove species in multicomponent mixtures was much slower than that of adsorbed ANT. Compared with the PAHs adsorbed as single component, the photodegradation rate of ANT adsorbed in multicomponent mixtures was slower, while that of PYR was faster. Moreover, the photodegradation of PYR and ANT dissolved in water in multicomponent mixtures was investigated for comparison. The photodegradation rate on leaves was much slower than in water. Therefore, the physical-chemical properties of the substrate may strongly influence the photodegradation rate of adsorbed PAHs.

  19. Some Structural Observations of Self-Assembling, Fibrillar Gels Composed of Two-Directional Bolaform Arborols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, J.

    2005-01-12

    Arborols are dumbbell shaped molecules (bolaform amphiphiles) in which a hydrophobic spacer separates two hydrophilic end groups. They are a valuable model for naturally occurring fibers, such as actin or amyloid. Applications to materials science can be envisioned. On cooling from warm aqueous or methanolic solutions, arborols spontaneously assemble into long fibers. When the solutions are above a certain concentration that depends on the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance, this leads to thermally reversible gels stabilized by a mechanism that is poorly understood. With the help of wide angle X-ray scattering, details of the arborol fiber and gel structure were obtained on wet gels. The characteristic dimensions of the fibers vary in a sensible fashion with the molecular specifics. Solvent character appears to affect the average domain length of arborols stacked into fibers. Fluorescently labeled arborols were prepared. The label does not prevent incorporation into the fibrillar structure, rendering fibril bundles visible in wet gels. Bundles are visible in concentrated gels, but not in less concentrated sols. These results are consistent with observations of dried arborols using atomic force microscopy and with previously published freeze-fracture electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering experiments on dried gels.

  20. Direct observation of two dimensional trace gas distributions with an airborne Imaging DOAS instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-P. Heue

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In many investigations of tropospheric chemistry information about the two dimensional distribution of trace gases on a small scale (e.g. tens to hundreds of metres is highly desirable. An airborne instrument based on imaging Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy has been built to map the two dimensional distribution of a series of relevant trace gases including NO2, HCHO, C2H2O2, H2O, O4, SO2, and BrO on a scale of 100 m.

    Here we report on the first tests of the novel aircraft instrument over the industrialised South African Highveld, where large variations in NO2 column densities in the immediate vicinity of several sources e.g. power plants or steel works, were measured. The observed patterns in the trace gas distribution are interpreted with respect to flux estimates, and it is seen that the fine resolution of the measurements allows separate sources in close proximity to one another to be distinguished.

  1. Direct observation of children's preferences and activity levels during interactive and online electronic games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cindy H P; Lam, Jessica W K; McKenzie, Thomas L

    2010-07-01

    Interactive electronic games have recently been popularized and are believed to help promote children's physical activity (PA). The purpose of the study was to examine preferences and PA levels during interactive and online electronic games among overweight and nonoverweight boys and girls. Using a modification of the SOFIT, we systematically observed 70 Hong Kong Chinese children (35 boys, 35 girls; 50 nonoverweight, 20 overweight), age 9 to 12 years, during 2 60-minute recreation sessions and recorded their game mode choices and PA levels. During Session One children could play either an interactive or an online electronic bowling game and during Session Two they could play an interactive or an online electronic running game. Children chose to play the games during 94% of session time and split this time between interactive (52%) and online (48%) versions. They engaged in significantly more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during interactive games than their online electronic versions (70% vs. 2% of game time). Boys and nonoverweight children expended relatively more energy during the interactive games than girls and overweight children, respectively. New-generation interactive games can facilitate physical activity in children, and given the opportunity children may select them over sedentary versions.

  2. Direct observations of formation and propagation of subpolar eddies into the subtropical North Atlantic

    CERN Document Server

    Bower, A S; Amrhein, D E; Lilly, J M

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface float and moored observations are presented to show for the first time the formation and propagation of anticyclonic submesoscale coherent vortices that transport relatively cold, fresh subpolar water to the interior subtropical North Atlantic. Acoustically tracked RAFOS floats released in the southward-flowing Western Boundary Current at the exit of the Labrador Sea reveal the formation of three of these eddies at the southern tip of the Grand Banks (42 N, 50 W). Using a recently developed method to detect eddies in float trajectories and estimate their kinematic properties, it was found that the eddies had average rotation periods of 5--7 days at radii of 1025 km, with mean rotation speeds of up to 0.3 m/s. One especially long-lived (5.1 months) eddy crossed under the Gulf Stream path and translated southwestward in the subtropical recirculation to at least 35 N, where it hit one of the Corner Rise Seamounts. Velocity, temperature and salinity measurements from a nine-month deployment of two moor...

  3. Direct spectroscopic observation of multiple-charged-ion acceleration by an intense femtosecond-pulse laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A G; Sasaki, A; Tajima, T; Auguste, T; D'Olivera, P; Hulin, S; Monot, P; Faenov, A Y; Pikuz, T A; Skobelev, I Y

    1999-09-01

    We have observed evidence of the emission of energetic He-and H-like ions of fluorine more than 1 MeV produced via the optical field ionization (OFI) from a solid target irradiated by an intense I=(2-4)x10(18) W/cm(2) (60 fs, lambda=800 nm), obliquely incident p-polarized pulse laser. The measured blue wing of He(alpha), He(beta), and Ly(alpha) lines of fluorine shows a feature of the Doppler-shifted spectrum due to the self-similar ion expansion dominated by superthermal electrons with the temperature T(h) approximately 100 keV. Using a collisional particle-in-cell simulation, which incorporates the nonlocal-thermodynamic-equilibrium ionization including OFI, we have obtained the plasma temperature, line shape, and maximal energy of accelerated ions, which agree well with those determined from the experimental spectra. The red wing of ion spectra gives the temperature of bulk plasma electrons.

  4. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco G. Offeddu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C. The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104 cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours.

  5. Direct observation and characterization of DMPC/DHPC aggregates under conditions relevant for biological solution NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Lorens; Karlsson, Göran; Edwards, Katarina

    2004-08-30

    We have used cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for inspection of aggregates formed by dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) in aqueous solution at total phospholipid concentrations cL DHPC ratios q < or = 4.0. In combination with ocular inspections, we are able to sketch out this part of phase-diagram at T = 14-80 degrees C. The temperature and the ratio q are the dominating variables for changing sample morphology, while cL to a lesser extent affects the aggregate structure. At q = 0.5, small, possibly disc-shaped, aggregates with a diameter of approximately 6 nm are formed. At higher q-values, distorted discoidal micelles that tend to short cylindrical micelles are observed. The more well-shaped discs have a diameter of around 20 nm. Upon increasing q or the temperature, long slightly flattened cylindrical micelles that eventually branch are formed. A holey lamellar phase finally appears upon further elevation of q or temperature. The implications for biological NMR work are two. First, discs prepared as membrane mimics are frequently much smaller than predicted by current "ideal bicelle" models. Second, the q approximately 3 preparations used for aligning water-soluble biomolecules in magnetic fields consist of perforated lamellar sheets. Furthermore, the discovered sequence of morphological transitions may have important implications for the development of bicelle-based membrane protein crystallization methods.

  6. Direct and array observations for near source dynamic strain during large earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bor-Shouh; Huang, Win-Gee; Lin, Chin-Jen

    2017-04-01

    The seismic ground motions from the 1999 Chi-Chi Taiwan earthquake (ML=7.6) and it large aftershocks were well recorded by a dense seismic array (named the Hualien Large Scale Seismic Test, HLSST) in near source distances. The HLSST site was situated in the the site of Hualien Veteran's Marble Plant. It included one scaled down reinforced concrete cylindrical containment model (1/4 scale). The radius of this cylindrical model is of about 5.4 meters. The instrumentation of this program consisted of forty-two stations. They were fifteen surface accelerometers, twelve downhole accelerometers and fifteen containment structure response accelerometers. The fifteen free-field stations were installed at three arms. The twelve downhole accelerometers were distributed beneath this array. One delta ground strain gauge was commonly installed in this site and well recorded those events. In this study, we inferred ground strains by a least-squares fit of array translational ground-motion data using the method proposed by Spudich et al. (1995) and Spudich and Fletcher (2008) and the same as from strain gauge records. We analyzed the main shock and November 1 offshore event for ground rotations and the same as ground strains. We will discuss the relationship of observed spatial ground deformations with source rupture processes and onsite ground translations. We hope to discuss its implications also about earthquake engineering applications.

  7. Direct Observation of Neutron Scattering in BC408 Scintillator for Comparison with SImulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W. F.; Boone, J. E.; Wantz, A.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Mosby, S.; Thoennessen, M.; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulation provides an important tool for the interpretation of neutron scattering data in the Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Large multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA), each located at the NSCL facility at MSU and consisting of 144 stacked 2-m long organic plastic scintillator bar detectors. Energy and trajectory for unbound state decay neutrons are determined by time of flight and location of first light produced in the array. While most neutrons scattering elastically from protons and inelastically from C nuclei produce light above detector threshold, those scattered elastically from C remain below threshold (``dark scatter''), altering neutron trajectories, thus decreasing energy and momentum resolution. To test the accuracy of our Geant4/MENATE_R simulations, we observed neutrons scattering from 16 MoNA bars arranged in two stack geometries at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Spallation neutrons ranging in energy from 0.5 to 800 MeV emerged from a 3 mm collimator in the 90m shed on WNR flight path 4FP15L and struck the array along a well defined path. Results for neutron hit multiplicity, scattering dynamics, and dark scatter redirection are compared with simulation. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1744043.

  8. Direct Observation of Neutron Scattering in MoNA Scintillator Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W. F.; Mosby, S.; Frank, N.; Kuchera, A. N.; Thoennessen, M.; MoNA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an important tool for the interpretation of neutron scattering data in the MoNA and LISA arrays at NSCL. Neutron energy and trajectory are determined by time of flight and position of first light produced in the array. Neutrons elastically scattered from H and inelastically from C typically produce light above detector threshold, while those elastically scattered from C produce light below threshold (``dark scattering'') and are redirected in flight, thus lowering energy and trajectory resolution. In order to test the effectiveness of our Geant4/MENATE_R simulations, we conducted an experiment at the LANSCE facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory to observe scattering of individual neutrons with well defined energy and trajectory in 16 MoNA detector bars arranged in two different stack geometries. Neutrons with energies ranging from 0.5 to 800 MeV emerged from a 3 mm collimator in the 90m shed on the WNR 4FP15L flight path to enter the array at a well defined point. Several features of neutron scattering are compared with simulation predictions, including hit multiplicity, scattering angle, mean distance between scatters, and the effect of dark scatter redirection. Results to date will be presented. Work supported by NSF Grant PHY-1506402.

  9. Direct observation of quantum confinement of Si nanocrystals in Si-rich nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, P. D.; Kepaptsoglou, D. M.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Olsen, A.

    2012-02-01

    The band gap of the active layers in stacked Si-based tandem solar cells can be fine tuned by changing the size of embedded silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs). Although SiO2 matrices have been predominantly used for such applications, nitride phases have recently emerged as a promising alternative. In this paper, we use high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy-loss spectroscopy to report on the electronic structure of individual Si NCs embedded in silicon nitride films. Si NCs were produced by rf sputtering and exhibited controllable crystallite size and quality via different thermal annealing conditions. Quantum confinement effects were observed through a blue shift in both conduction band edges and volume plasmon energies as a function of particle size and structure. We show that, in good agreement with theoretical models, the volume plasmon energy Ep (eV) is related to the size d (nm) of Si NCs by Ep = 16.89+ 23.90/d2. Lattice distortion in twinned Si NCs and dangling bonds at defect centers are shown to be the cause of a weakening in quantum size effects and a reduction in the light emission efficiency of the films. Both electron spectroscopy and optical results are consistent in explaining the correlation between structure and optoelectronic properties of Si NCs.

  10. An investigation of the dynamics of aggression: direct observations in ice hockey and basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirker, B; Tenenbaum, G; Mattson, J

    2000-12-01

    There have been significant problems in the study of sports aggression, and they are linked to how aggression has been defined, measured, and analyzed. Following a review of the whole domain, this study aimed to construct a theoretically coherent and ecologically valid framework for research on processes underlying sports aggression and to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the area. An exploratory method using computer observational analysis as the primary research method, along with complementary questionnaires and personal reflections, considered aggression in two comparison sports: ice hockey and basketball. Data were compiled and classified by involved and independent experts relative to factors and behaviors associated with sports aggression derived from a comprehensive review of the literature. Among the study's findings were that: (a) aggression was instrumental in nature two-thirds of the time; (b) aggressive acts typically occurred in clusters and varied in frequency according to game circumstances; and (c) multiple variables and aggression theories were related to severely aggressive acts. The complex dynamics of sports aggression via similar naturalistic methodologies is discussed.

  11. Direct observation of spatially heterogeneous single-layer graphene oxide reduction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Matthew P; Eltom, Ahmed; Vietmeyer, Felix; Thapa, Janak; Morozov, Yurii V; Sokolov, Denis A; Hodak, Jose H; Vinodgopal, Kizhanipuram; Kamat, Prashant V; Kuno, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an important precursor in the production of chemically derived graphene. During reduction, GO's electrical conductivity and band gap change gradually. Doping and chemical functionalization are also possible, illustrating GO's immense potential in creating functional devices through control of its local hybridization. Here we show that laser-induced photolysis controllably reduces individual single-layer GO sheets. The reaction can be followed in real time through sizable decreases in GO's photoluminescence efficiency along with spectral blueshifts. As-produced reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets undergo additional photolysis, characterized by dramatic emission enhancements and spectral redshifts. Both GO's reduction and subsequent conversion to photobrightened rGO are captured through movies of their photoluminescence kinetics. Rate maps illustrate sizable spatial and temporal heterogeneities in sp(2) domain growth and reveal how reduction "flows" across GO and rGO sheets. The observed heterogeneous reduction kinetics provides mechanistic insight into GO's conversion to chemically derived graphene and highlights opportunities for overcoming its dynamic, chemical disorder.

  12. Direct observation of weight counselling in primary care: alignment with clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antognoli, E L; Smith, K J; Mason, M J; Milliner, B R; Davis, E M; Harris-Haywood, S; Seeholzer, E; Smith, S; Flocke, S A

    2014-04-01

    Primary care physicians provide care to a disproportionate number of overweight and obese patients and are uniquely positioned to help patients manage their weight in the context of a continuity relationship. The US National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) developed evidence-based guidelines for the effective and efficient care of overweight/obese patients, but little is known about the use of these guidelines in practice. To determine the content of weight discussions and assess the elements of the NHLBI guidelines that were accomplished, office visits of 544 adult, overweight/obese patients to 28 primary care physicians were observed and audio recorded. Associations between type of weight management discussion and patient, physician and visit characteristics were examined. Fifty per cent (n = 270) of visits included weight discussions; 47% and 38% included use of at least one NHLBI assessment or treatment element during discussions about weight, respectively. Only 35% (n = 193) of discussions included an assessment and treatment strategy; none included all NHLBI-recommended elements. Overall, adherence to guidelines was poor, particularly with regard to reporting body mass index to the patient, measuring waist circumference and setting realistic weight loss goals. Weight discussions did not clearly vary by the patient, physician or visit characteristics examined. These findings suggest opportunities to develop and further tailor resources for improved physician training in patient weight management communication and treatment techniques that are both consistent with current standards for effective, evidence-based care and efficient enough for routine use during busy primary care visits. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical Obesity © 2014 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  13. Direct observation of specific messenger RNA in a single living cell under a fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, A; Koshimoto, H; Sato, Y; Hirano, M; Sei-Iida, Y; Kondo, S; Ishibashi, K

    2000-06-01

    We observed the expression of human c-fos mRNA in a living transfected Cos7 cell under a fluorescence microscope by detecting hybrid formed with two fluorescently labeled oligodeoxynucleotides (oligoDNAs) and c-fos mRNA in the cytoplasm. Two fluorescent oligoDNAs were prepared, each labeled with a fluorescence molecule different from the other. When two oligoDNAs hybridized to an adjacent sequence on the target mRNA, the distance between the two fluorophores became very close and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurred, resulting in changes in fluorescence spectra. To find sequences of high accessibility of c-fos RNA to oligoDNAs, several sites that included loop structures on the simulated secondary structure were selected. Each site was divided into two halves, and the pair of fluorescent oligoDNAs complementary to the sequence was synthesized. Each site was examined for the efficiency of hybridization to c-fos RNA by measuring changes in fluorescence spectra when c-fos RNA was added to the pair of oligoDNAs in solution. A 40 mer specific site was found, and the pair of oligoDNAs for the site were microinjected into Cos7 cells that expressed c-fos mRNA. To block oligoDNAs from accumulating in the nucleus, oligoDNA was bound to a macromolecule (streptavidin) to prevent passage of nuclear pores. Hybridization of the pair of oligoDNAs to c-fos mRNA in the cytoplasm was detected in fluorescence images indicating FRET.

  14. Standardizing the double-observer survey method for estimating mountain ungulate prey of the endangered snow leopard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryawanshi, Kulbhushansingh R; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer; Mishra, Charudutt

    2012-07-01

    Mountain ungulates around the world have been threatened by illegal hunting, habitat modification, increased livestock grazing, disease and development. Mountain ungulates play an important functional role in grasslands as primary consumers and as prey for wild carnivores, and monitoring of their populations is important for conservation purposes. However, most of the several currently available methods of estimating wild ungulate abundance are either difficult to implement or too expensive for mountainous terrain. A rigorous method of sampling ungulate abundance in mountainous areas that can allow for some measure of sampling error is therefore much needed. To this end, we used a combination of field data and computer simulations to test the critical assumptions associated with double-observer technique based on capture-recapture theory. The technique was modified and adapted to estimate the populations of bharal (Pseudois nayaur) and ibex (Capra sibirica) at five different sites. Conducting the two double-observer surveys simultaneously led to underestimation of the population by 15%. We therefore recommend separating the surveys in space or time. The overall detection probability for the two observers was 0.74 and 0.79. Our surveys estimated mountain ungulate populations (± 95% confidence interval) of 735 (± 44), 580 (± 46), 509 (± 53), 184 (± 40) and 30 (± 14) individuals at the five sites, respectively. A detection probability of 0.75 was found to be sufficient to detect a change of 20% in populations of >420 individuals. Based on these results, we believe that this method is sufficiently precise for scientific and conservation purposes and therefore recommend the use of the double-observer approach (with the two surveys separated in time or space) for the estimation and monitoring of mountain ungulate populations.

  15. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  16. Scrutinizing a Survey-Based Measure of Science and Mathematics Teacher Knowledge: Relationship to Observations of Teaching Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Robert M.

    2017-12-01

    There is a clear need for valid and reliable instrumentation that measures teacher knowledge. However, the process of investigating and making a case for instrument validity is not a simple undertaking; rather, it is a complex endeavor. This paper presents the empirical case of one aspect of such an instrument validation effort. The particular instrument under scrutiny was developed in order to determine the effect of a teacher education program on novice science and mathematics teachers' strategic knowledge (SK). The relationship between novice science and mathematics teachers' SK as measured by a survey and their SK as inferred from observations of practice using a widely used observation protocol is the subject of this paper. Moderate correlations between parts of the observation-based construct and the SK construct were observed. However, the main finding of this work is that the context in which the measurement is made (in situ observations vs. ex situ survey) is an essential factor in establishing the validity of the measurement itself.

  17. Artificial Neural Network Application for Partial Discharge Recognition: Survey and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Abubakar Mas’ud

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate how artificial neural networks (ANNs have been applied for partial discharge (PD pattern recognition, this paper reviews recent progress made on ANN development for PD classification by a literature survey. Contributions from several authors have been presented and discussed. High recognition rate has been recorded for several PD faults, but there are still many factors that hinder correct recognition of PD by the ANN, such as high-amplitude noise or wide spectral content typical from industrial environments, trial and error approaches in determining an optimum ANN, multiple PD sources acting simultaneously, lack of comprehensive and up to date databank of PD faults, and the appropriate selection of the characteristics that allow a correct recognition of the type of source which are currently being addressed by researchers. Several suggestions for improvement are proposed by the authors include: (1 determining the optimum weights in training the ANN; (2 using PD data captured over long stressing period in training the ANN; (3 ANN recognizing different PD degradation levels; (4 using the same resolution sizes of the PD patterns when training and testing the ANN with different PD dataset; (5 understanding the characteristics of multiple concurrent PD faults and effectively recognizing them; and (6 developing techniques in order to shorten the training time for the ANN as applied for PD recognition Finally, this paper critically assesses the suitability of ANNs for both online and offline PD detections outlining the advantages to the practitioners in the field. It is possible for the ANNs to determine the stage of degradation of the PD, thereby giving an indication of the seriousness of the fault.

  18. 76 FR 18042 - Uniform Criteria for State Observational Surveys of Seat Belt Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... programs and activities. In addition, seat belt use is difficult to reliably observe in the dark, even in..., vehicular trail, service drive, and traffic circle comes from the TIGER/Line files. The TIGER/Line files are...

  19. Religious Observance and Well-Being among Israeli Jewish Adults: Findings from the Israel Social Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeff Levin

    2013-01-01

    ...., secular, traditional, religious, ultra-Orthodox), two findings stand out. First, greater Jewish religious observance is significantly associated with higher scores on indicators of self-rated health, functional health, and life satisfaction...

  20. ARCADO - Adding random case analysis to direct observation in workplace-based formative assessment of general practice registrars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Gerard; Fry, Jennifer; Morgan, Simon; Ward, Bernadette

    2015-12-10

    Workplace-based formative assessments using consultation observation are currently conducted during the Australian general practice training program. Assessment reliability is improved by using multiple assessment methods. The aim of this study was to explore experiences of general practice medical educator assessors and registrars (trainees) when adding random case analysis to direct observation (ARCADO) during formative workplace-based assessments. A sample of general practice medical educators and matched registrars were recruited. Following the ARCADO workplace assessment, semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted. The data was analysed thematically. Ten registrars and eight medical educators participated. Four major themes emerged - formative versus summative assessment; strengths (acceptability, flexibility, time efficiency, complementarity and authenticity); weaknesses (reduced observation and integrity risks); and contextual factors (variation in assessment content, assessment timing, registrar-medical educator relationship, medical educator's approach and registrar ability). ARCADO is a well-accepted workplace-based formative assessment perceived by registrars and assessors to be valid and flexible. The use of ARCADO enabled complementary insights that would not have been achieved with direct observation alone. Whilst there are some contextual factors to be considered in its implementation, ARCADO appears to have utility as formative assessment and, subject to further evaluation, high-stakes assessment.

  1. Non-directional wave gauge data taken by the U.S. Geological Survey in nearshore waters south of Molokai, Hawaii during 2001 - 2002 (NODC Accession 0011265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region Coastal and Marine Geology Team deployed six NIWA Dobie-A non-directional wave gauges at five nearshore stations...

  2. Direct observation of the microstructure in cluster glass compound U{sub 2}IrSi{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yubuta, K [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yamamura, T [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Shiokawa, Y [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2006-07-05

    We have examined the structure of a U{sub 2}IrSi{sub 3} compound exhibiting ferromagnetic cluster glass behaviour by means of electron diffraction observation and high-resolution electron microscopy. The structure of U{sub 2}IrSi{sub 3} has been proposed as a new one of the U{sub 2}RuSi{sub 3}-type with a short-range ordered double stacking sequence of the U{sub 2}RuSi{sub 3}-type structure along the c-axis, and long-range ordered atomic arrangements in the a-b plane. The calculated patterns reproduce the characteristic features of observed electron patterns well. The Fourier-filtered high-resolution image clearly exhibits a micro-domain structure, which is considered to relate directly to the origin of the observed cluster glass behaviour in U{sub 2}IrSi{sub 3}.

  3. [OssERvare Project: direct observation of use of the Safety Surgery CheckList in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentivegna, Roberto; Caminati, Annita; Agnoletti, Vanni; Bonilauri, Stefano; Buonaccorso, Stefania; Campaniello, Giovanna; Dovani, Antonella; Lanciotti, Giuseppina; Maselli, Vania; Mastrangelo, Stefano; Montella, Maria Teresa; Palladino, Teresa; Pelati, Cristiano; Sciolino, Lorenzo; Zoni, Evita; Porcu, Elisa; Campagna, Anselmo; Nicastro, Ottavio

    2017-11-01

    Safety Surgery CheckList (SSCL) is a support tool for operating teams, used to carry out safety checks while also encouraging compliance with the implementation of recommended quality and safety standards. In Emilia-Romagna it was deemed appropriate to check actual surgical team compliance with correct checklist application in the operating theatre, through a project called "OssERvare". Direct observation was identified as the preferred inspection method. With the use of special report sheets, observers proceeded with the guided observation of behaviour in the operating room, recording any inconsistencies with correct SSCL use methods. The project began in January 2017 and all observations were carried out from 1st January-15th April 2017. In 43% of observed operation sign in, all three team members were not present, whereas in 7% of observed cases, sign out was not carried out. All three team members were present in 88% of observed operation time out. There are two evidently critical phases: sign in and sign out. Results obtained for time out were better. Compliance data collected from observations differed markedly from reported compliance in administrative flow records. The results of the observational study indicate that the SSCL is not properly filled in many times; there is also a great possibility to improve the correct use of this tool. In conclusion, we think that the combined approach of use of administrative data and assessing compliance appeared to be a useful instrument to investigate the implementation and to promote the real utilization of safety tools such as the SSCL.

  4. The role of advance directives in end-of-life decisions in Austria: survey of intensive care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schopper Andrea

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, intensive care medicine strives to define a generally accepted way of dealing with end-of-life decisions, therapy limitation and therapy discontinuation. In 2006 a new advance directive legislation was enacted in Austria. Patients may now document their personal views regarding extension of treatment. The aim of this survey was to explore Austrian intensive care physicians' experiences with and their acceptance of the new advance directive legislation two years after enactment (2008. Methods Under the aegis of the OEGARI (Austrian Society of Anaesthesiology, Resuscitation and Intensive Care an anonymised questionnaire was sent to the medical directors of all intensive care units in Austria. The questions focused on the physicians' experiences regarding advance directives and their level of knowledge about the underlying legislation. Results There were 241 questionnaires sent and 139 were turned, which was a response rate of 58%. About one third of the responders reported having had no experience with advance directives and only 9 directors of intensive care units had dealt with more than 10 advance directives in the previous two years. Life-supporting measures, resuscitation, and mechanical ventilation were the predominantly refused therapies, wishes were mainly expressed concerning pain therapy. Conclusion A response rate of almost 60% proves the great interest of intensive care professionals in making patient-oriented end-of-life decisions. However, as long as patients do not make use of their right of co-determination, the enactment of the new law can be considered only a first important step forward.

  5. Direct and Indirect Costs of Chronic and Episodic Migraine in the United States: A Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messali, Andrew; Sanderson, Joanna C; Blumenfeld, Andrew M; Goadsby, Peter J; Buse, Dawn C; Varon, Sepideh F; Stokes, Michael; Lipton, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the societal direct and indirect costs of chronic and episodic migraine in the United States. Episodic and chronic migraine are distinguished by the frequency of headache-days. Chronic migraine has a greater overall impact on quality of life than does episodic migraine. Individuals with chronic migraine also use more healthcare resources (resulting in higher direct costs) and experience greater decreases in productivity (resulting in higher indirect costs) than those with episodic migraine as shown in the American Migraine Prevalence and Prevention (AMPP) Study. The International Burden of Migraine Study utilized a web-based questionnaire to elicit data on several topics related to the burden of migraine illness, including health resource utilization and productivity losses. Potential survey participants were identified by Synovate Healthcare (Chicago, IL, USA) from a pool of registered panelists from various countries. The panelists were screened online to determine eligibility and to identify individuals with migraine (episodic or chronic), based on reported symptoms. Participants from the United States were divided into episodic and chronic migraine groups, based on reported headache-day per month frequency. Direct and indirect costs were estimated by applying estimated unit costs to reported headache-related productivity losses and resource use. Costs were compared between participants with episodic and chronic migraine. Mean [standard deviation] total annual cost of headache among people with chronic migraine ($8243 [$10,646]) was over three times that of episodic migraine ($2649 [$4634], P < .001). Participants with chronic migraine had significantly greater direct medical costs ($4943 [$6382]) and indirect (lost productivity) costs ($3300 [$6907]) than did participants with episodic migraine (direct, $1705 [$3591]; indirect, $943 [$2084]) (P < .001 for each). Unlike previous findings, direct medical costs

  6. Direct Observation Through In Situ Transmission Electron Microscope of Early States of Crystallization in Nanoscale Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Y.; Sohn, S.; Schroers, J.; Cha, J. J.

    2017-11-01

    Crystallization is a complex process that involves multiscale physics such as diffusion of atomic species over multiple length scales, thermodynamic energy considerations, and multiple possible intermediate states. In situ crystallization experiments inside a transmission electron microscope (TEM) using nanostructured metallic glasses (MGs) provide a unique platform to study directly crystallization kinetics and pathways. Here, we study the embryonic state of eutectic growth using Pt-Ni-Cu-P MG nanorods under in situ TEM. We directly observe the nucleation and growth of a Ni-rich polymorphic phase, followed by the nucleation and slower growth of a Cu-rich phase. The suppressed growth kinetics of the Cu-rich phase is attributed to locally changing chemical compositions. In addition, we show that growth can be controlled by incorporation of an entire nucleus instead of individual atoms. Such a nucleus has to align with the crystallographic orientation of a larger grain before it can be incorporated into the crystal. By directly observing the crystallization processes, particularly the early stages of non-polymorphic growth, in situ TEM crystallization studies of MG nanostructures provide a wealth of information, some of which can be applied to typical bulk crystallization.

  7. Dissociating Indifferent, Directional, and Extreme Responding in Personality Data: Applying the Three-Process Model to Self- and Observer Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettler, Ingo; Lang, Jonas W B; Hülsheger, Ute R; Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2016-08-01

    Research suggests that respondents vary in their tendency to use the response scale of typical (Likert-style) questionnaires. We study the nature of the response process by applying a recently introduced item response theory modeling procedure, the three-process model, to data of self- and observer reports of personality traits. The three-process model captures indifferent, directional, and extreme responding. Substantively, we hypothesize that, and test whether, trait Honesty-Humility is negatively linked to extreme responding. We applied the three-process model to personality data of 577 dyads (self- and observer reports of the HEXACO Personality Inventory-Revised; Lee & Ashton, ) of Dutch and German undergraduate respondents. First, we provide evidence that indifferent, directional, and extreme responding can be separated from each other in personality data through the use of the three-process model. Second, we show that the various response processes show a pattern of correlations across traits and rating sources which is in line with the idea that indifferent and extreme responding are person-specific tendencies, whereas directional responding is content-specific. Third, we report findings supporting the hypothesis that Honesty-Humility is negatively linked to extreme responding. In Likert-based personality data, applying the three-process model can unveil individual differences in the response process. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. TIMASSS: the IRAS 16293-2422 millimeter and submillimeter spectral survey. I. Observations, calibration, and analysis of the line kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caux, E.; Kahane, C.; Castets, A.; Coutens, A.; Ceccarelli, C.; Bacmann, A.; Bisschop, S.; Bottinelli, S.; Comito, C.; Helmich, F. P.; Lefloch, B.; Parise, B.; Schilke, P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; van Dishoeck, E.; Vastel, C.; Wakelam, V.; Walters, A.

    2011-08-01

    Context. Unbiased spectral surveys are powerful tools to study the chemistry and the physics of star forming regions, because they can provide a complete census of the molecular content and the observed lines probe the physical structure of the source. Aims: While unbiased surveys at the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths observable from ground-based telescopes have previously been performed towards several high mass protostars, very little exists on low mass protostars, which are believed to resemble our own Sun's progenitor. To help fill up this gap in our understanding, we carried out a complete spectral survey of the bands at 3, 2, 1, and 0.9 mm towards the solar type protostar IRAS 16293-2422. Methods: The observations covered a range of about 200 GHz and were obtained with the IRAM-30 m and JCMT-15 m telescopes during about 300 h of observations. Particular attention was devoted to the inter-calibration of the acquired spectra with previous observations. All the lines detected with more than 3σ confidence-interval certainty and free from obvious blending effects were fitted with Gaussians to estimate their basic kinematic properties. Results: More than 4000 lines were detected (with σ ≥ 3) and identified, yielding a line density of approximatively 20 lines per GHz, comparable to previous surveys in massive hot cores. The vast majority (about two-thirds) of the lines are weak and produced by complex organic molecules. The analysis of the profiles of more than 1000 lines belonging to 70 species firmly establishes the presence of two distinct velocity components associated with the two objects, A and B, forming the IRAS 16293-2422 binary system. In the source A, the line widths of several species increase with the upper level energy of the transition, a behavior compatible with gas infalling towards a ~1 M⊙ object. The source B, which does not show this effect, might have a much lower central mass of ~0.1 M⊙. The difference in the rest velocities

  9. Effective leader behaviors in regularly held staff meetings: Surveyed vs. Videotaped and Video-Coded Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, Marcella; Hoogeboom, Marcella; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.; Allen, Joseph A.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Rogelberg, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we report on two studies that took an exploratory behavioral approach to leaders in regular staff meetings. The goal of both studies, which used a still rarely deployed observation method, was to identify effective behavioral repertoires of leaders in staff meetings; we specifically

  10. 75 FR 4509 - Uniform Criteria for State Observational Surveys of Seat Belt Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-28

    ..., service drive, traffic circle, unnamed road, vehicular trail) and ``passenger motor vehicle'' which are..., cul-de-sacs, traffic circles and service drives. The agency believes that exclusion of these road... because seat belt use is not as easy to observe in the dark, even in the most well lit sites. Nighttime...

  11. The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) - A Nuclear Astrophysics All-Sky Survey Mission Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R. S.; Bonamente, M.; Burgess, J. M.; Harmon, B. A.; Jenke, P.; Lawrence, D. J.; O'Brien, S.; Orr, M. R.; Paciesas, W. S.; Young, C. A.

    2008-07-01

    The Lunar Occultation Observer (LOCO) is a new lunar-based concept to probe the nuclear astrophysics regime. It will be a pioneering mission in high-energy astrophysics: the first to employ occultation as the principle detection and imaging method.

  12. Directional topographic site response at Tarzana observed in aftershocks of the 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake: Implications for mainshock motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudich, P.; Hellweg, M.; Lee, W.H.K.

    1996-01-01

    The Northridge earthquake caused 1.78 g acceleration in the east-west direction at a site in Tarzana, California, located about 6 km south of the mainshock epicenter. The accelerograph was located atop a hill about 15-m high, 500-m long, and 130-m wide, striking about N78??E. During the aftershock sequence, a temporary array of 21 three-component geophones was deployed in six radial lines centered on the accelerograph, with an average sensor spacing of 35 m. Station COO was located about 2 m from the accelerograph. We inverted aftershock spectra to obtain average relative site response at each station as a function of direction of ground motion. We identified a 3.2-Hz resonance that is a transverse oscillation of the hill (a directional topographic effect). The top/base amplification ratio at 3.2 Hz is about 4.5 for horizontal ground motions oriented approximately perpendicular to the long axis of the hill and about 2 for motions parallel to the hill. This resonance is seen most strongly within 50 m of COO. Other resonant frequencies were also observed. A strong lateral variation in attenuation, probably associated with a fault, caused substantially lower motion at frequencies above 6 Hz at the east end of the hill. There may be some additional scattered waves associated with the fault zone and seen at both the base and top of the hill, causing particle motions (not spectral ratios) at the top of the hill to be rotated about 20?? away from the direction transverse to the hill. The resonant frequency, but not the amplitude, of our observed topographic resonance agrees well with theory, even for such a low hill. Comparisons of our observations with theoretical results indicate that the 3D shape of the hill and its internal structure are important factors affecting its response. The strong transverse resonance of the hill does not account for the large east-west mainshock motions. Assuming linear soil response, mainshock east-west motions at the Tarzana accelerograph

  13. Participation in introductory biology laboratories: An integrated assessment based on surveys, behavioral observations, and qualitative interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Connie Adelle

    Scope and method of study. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of gender, major, and prior knowledge of and attitude toward biology on participation in introductory biology laboratories. Subjects for this study were 3,527 students enrolled in college-level introductory biology courses. During the study, three introductory courses were replaced with one mixed-majors course. The new course adopted a different pedagological approach from the previous courses in that an inquiry-based approach was used in lectures and laboratories. All subjects completed a survey that measured content knowledge using the NABT/NSTA High School Biology Examination Version 1990 and attitude using Russell and Hollander's Biology Attitude Scale. I used and discuss the merits of using ethological methods and data collection software, EthoScribeTM (Tima Scientific) to collect behavioral data from 145 students. I also evaluated participation using qualitative interviews of 30 students. I analyzed content knowledge and attitude data using ANOVA and Pearson correlation, and behavioral data using Contingency Table Analysis. I analyzed interviews following methods outlined by Rubin and Rubin. Findings. Course style and gender were the most useful variables in distinguishing differences among groups of students with regard to attitude, content knowledge, and participation in laboratories. Attitude toward biology and achievement measured by the surveys were found to be positively correlated; however, gender, major, class standing, course style and interactions between these variables also had effects on these variables. I found a positive association among attitude, achievement and participation in hands-on activities in laboratories. Differences in participation also were associated group type. In a traditional introductory biology course, females in single-gender groups, gender-equal, or groups in which females were the majority spent more time performing hands-on science

  14. Survey of Capabilities and Applications of Accurate Clocks: Directions for Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehant, Véronique; Park, Ryan; Dirkx, Dominic; Iess, Luciano; Neumann, Gregory; Turyshev, Slava; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2017-11-01

    For planetary science, accurate clocks are mainly used as part of an onboard radioscience transponder. In the case of two-way radio data, the dominating data type for planetary radioscience, an accurate spacecraft clock is not necessary since the measurements can be calibrated using high-precision clocks on Earth. In the case of one-way radio data, however, an accurate clock can make the precision of one-way radio data be comparable to the two-way data, and possibly better since only one leg of radio path would be affected by the media. This article addresses several ways to improve observations for planetary science, either by improving the onboard clock or by using further variants of the classical radioscience methods, e.g., Same Beam Interferometry (SBI). For a clock to be useful for planetary science, we conclude that it must have at least a short-time stability (<1{,}000 s) better than 10^{-13} and its size be substantially miniaturized. A special case of using laser ranging to the Moon and the implication of having an accurate clock is shown as an example.

  15. Implementation of directly observed patient hand hygiene for hospitalized patients by hand hygiene ambassadors in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Vincent C C; Tai, Josepha W M; Li, W S; Chau, P H; So, Simon Y C; Wong, Lisa M W; Ching, Radley H C; Ng, Modissa M L; Ho, Sara K Y; Lee, Doris W Y; Lee, W M; Wong, Sally C Y; Yuen, K Y

    2016-06-01

    The importance of compliance with hand hygiene by patients is increasingly recognized to prevent health care-associated infections. This descriptive study observed the effects of an education campaign, targeted to increase patients' self-initiated hand hygiene, and a hand hygiene ambassador-initiated directly observed hand hygiene program on patients' hand hygiene compliance in a university-affiliated hospital. The overall audited compliance of patients' self-initiated hand hygiene was only 37.5%, with a rate of 26.9% (112/416 episodes) before meals and medications, 27.5% (19/69 episodes) after using a urinal or bedpan, and 89.7% (87/97 episodes) after attending toilet facilities. Patients referred from a residential care home for older adults had significantly lower hand hygiene compliance (P = .007). Comparatively, the overall audited compliance of ambassador-initiated directly observed hand hygiene was 97.3% (428/440 episodes), which was significantly higher than patients' self-initiated hand hygiene via a patient education program (37.5%, 218/582 episodes, P hand hygiene can play an important role in improving compliance with hand hygiene by hospitalized patients. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. First direct observation of two protons in the decay of 45Fe with a time-projection chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovinazzo, J; Blank, B; Borcea, C; Canchel, G; Dalouzy, J-C; Demonchy, C E; de Oliveira Santos, F; Dossat, C; Grévy, S; Hay, L; Huikari, J; Leblanc, S; Matea, I; Pedroza, J-L; Perrot, L; Pibernat, J; Serani, L; Stodel, C; Thomas, J-C

    2007-09-07

    The decay of the ground-state two-proton emitter 45Fe was studied with a time-projection chamber and the emission of two protons was unambiguously identified. The total decay energy and the half-life measured in this work agree with the results from previous experiments. The present result constitutes the first direct observation of the individual protons in the two-proton decay of a long-lived ground-state emitter. In parallel, we identified for the first time directly two-proton emission from 43Cr, a known beta-delayed two-proton emitter. The technique developed in the present work opens the way to a detailed study of the mechanism of ground state as well as beta-delayed two-proton radioactivity.

  17. Electron-hole droplet formation in direct-gap semiconductors observed by mid-infrared pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, M; Shimano, R; Kuwata-Gonokami, M

    2001-06-18

    Mid-infrared pump-probe measurements with subpicosecond time resolution reveal the existence of a metastable condensed phase of the electron-hole ensemble in a direct-gap semiconductor CuCl. High-density electrons and holes are directly created in a low-temperature state by the resonant femtosecond excitation of excitons above the Mott transition density. Strong metallic reflection with a plasma frequency Planck's over 2pi(omega)p approximately 0.5 eV builds up within 0.3 ps. Within a few picoseconds, the mid-infrared reflection spectrum is transformed from metalliclike into colloidlike. The observed resonance feature at Planck's over 2pi(omega)p/sqrt[3] allows us to obtain the carrier density in the metastable electron-hole droplets of 2x10(20) cm(-3).

  18. Campaign 9 of the K2 Mission: Observational Parameters, Scientific Drivers, and Community Involvement for a Simultaneous Space- and Ground-based Microlensing Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Calen B.; Poleski, Radoslaw; Penny, Matthew; Street, Rachel A.; Bennett, David P.; Hogg, David W.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Zhu, W.; Barclay, T.; Barentsen, G.; hide

    2016-01-01

    K2's Campaign 9 (K2C9) will conduct a approximately 3.7 sq. deg survey toward the Galactic bulge from 2016 April 22 through July 2 that will leverage the spatial separation between K2 and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax Pi(sub E) for approximately greater than 170 microlensing events. These will include several that are planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this article we provide an overview of the K2C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of K2C9, and the array of resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in K2C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of WFIRST.

  19. Three years of Swift/BAT Survey of AGN: Reconciling Theory and Observations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlon, D.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Ajello, M.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Greiner, J.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE; Comastri, A.; /Muenchen, Tech. U. Universe; Merloni, A.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /Muenchen, Tech. U. Universe; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard

    2011-02-07

    It is well accepted that unabsorbed as well as absorbed AGN are needed to explain the nature and the shape of the Cosmic X-ray background, even if the fraction of highly absorbed objects (dubbed Compton-thick sources) substantially still escapes detection. We derive and analyze the absorption distribution using a complete sample of AGN detected by Swift-BAT in the first three years of the survey. The fraction of Compton-thick AGN represents only 4.6% of the total AGN population detected by Swift-BAT. However, we show that once corrected for the bias against the detection of very absorbed sources the real intrinsic fraction of Compton-thick AGN is 20{sub -6}{sup +9}%. We proved for the first time (also in the BAT band) that the anti-correlation of the fraction of absorbed AGN and luminosity it tightly connected to the different behavior of the luminosity functions (XLFs) of absorbed and unabsorbed AGN. This points towards a difference between the two subsamples of objects with absorbed AGN being, on average, intrinsically less luminous than unobscured ones. Moreover the XLFs show that the fraction of obscured AGN might also decrease at very low luminosity. This can be successfully interpreted in the framework of a disk cloud outflow scenario as the disappearance of the obscuring region below a critical luminosity. Our results are discussed in the framework of population synthesis models and the origin of the Cosmic X-ray Background.

  20. Accuracy and reliability of direct observations of home-packed lunches in elementary schools by trained nutrition students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Shannon L; Vandervet, Laura M; Macaskill, Lesley A; Salvadori, Marina I; Seabrook, Jamie A; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2012-10-01

    Increased attention has been directed toward the school food environment because children consume important contributions toward their daily food intake while at school. In Canada, most elementary school students bring a lunch to school and there are minimal data on the composition and consumption of these lunches. Dietary assessment of home-packed lunches is challenging compared with assessment of standardized school meals due to greater diversity of items, nonstandard portions, and opaque containers. We assessed accuracy and reliability of a food observation method whereby upper-year nutrition students (n=15) were trained to assess packed lunch contents and intake in elementary schools. Accuracy and reliability was assessed during 2010-2011 in three observational phases: sample lunches, volunteer-consumed lunches, and elementary school students' lunches (n=32). Observers accurately identified 96% and 95% of items in the sample and volunteer lunches, respectively. Similarly, they accurately reported portion sizes for 86% and 94% of the items in the sample and volunteer lunches, thus showing improvements in successive phases. Interobserver reliability for amount consumed, by portion size and macronutrient content, ranged from 0.79 to 0.88 in the volunteer-consumed lunches and 0.78 to 0.86 in the students' lunches, with a majority ≥0.80. It is noteworthy that the analyses for the amount consumed were conducted as absolute amounts with no allowances for discrepancies, which differs from other interobserver reliability assessments where as much as 25% discrepancy is considered agreement. Observers with prior nutrition knowledge assessed packed lunch contents and intake accurately and reliably by direct observation in an elementary school setting. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Spacewatch Observations of Asteroids and Comets Supporting the Large-Scale Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Robert S.; Bressi, Terrence H.; Scotti, James V.; Larsen, Jeffrey A.; Mastaler, Ronald A.

    2014-11-01

    We specialize in followup astrometry of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) of high priority while they are faint, including recently discovered objects on the MPC's Confirmation Page, objects with potential close encounters with Earth, NEOs for which NEOWISE determined albedos and diameters, targets of radar, potential destinations for spacecraft, and special requests by the MPC or JPL. The present era of Spacewatch observations began on 2011 Oct 15 with a new imaging camera on our 1.8-meter telescope. From then, the MPC has been accepting an annual average of 8,492 lines of astrometry of 1,018 different NEOs from Spacewatch, including 177 different PHAs per year. Thus we observe half of all such objects that are observed by anyone in the same interval. We make twice as many measurements of PHAs while they are fainter than V=22 than the next most productive astrometry group. We have contributed to the removal of half of the objects that were retired from JPL's impact risk list. Per year we observe about 35 radar targets, 50 NEOs that were measured by NEOWISE, and 100 potential rendezvous destinations. We also average 400 observations of comets per year. Since 2004 we have increased our efficiency by a factor of six in terms of observations per unit personnel work year by means of new hardware, software, and the automation of the 0.9-m telescope. Last year we received a grant to upgrade our 0.9-m telescope and develop a public archive of image data dating back to 1990. New grants from the NEOO Program now support our use of telescopes larger than the 1.8-meter of Spacewatch and improvement of the efficiency of the Spacewatch 1.8-m. Support of Spacewatch was/is from JPL subcontract 100319 (2010-2011), NASA/NEOO grants NNG06GJ42G, NNX11AB52G, NNX12AG11G, NNX13AP99G, NNX14AL13G, and NNX14AL14G, the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Steward Observatory, the Brinson Foundation of Chicago, IL, the estates of R. S. Vail and R. L. Waland, and other private donors. We are also indebted

  2. A