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Sample records for surveys assessing alcohol

  1. Comparison of assessment methods for self-reported alcohol consumption in health interview surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekholm, O; Strandberg-Larsen, K; Christensen, K

    2008-01-01

    To select a simple method for assessing alcohol consumption and to compare how different reference periods and response categories influence the self-reported frequency of binge drinking.......To select a simple method for assessing alcohol consumption and to compare how different reference periods and response categories influence the self-reported frequency of binge drinking....

  2. [Assessment of surveys of adolescents about smoking and the use of alcohol and cannabis in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalbí, Joan R; Suelves, Josep M; Saltó, Esteve; Cabezas, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring health-related behaviors in adolescence requires instruments capable of providing valid data The objective of this paper is to review and assess existing information sources on smoking and alcohol and cannabis use by age and sex among adolescents in Spain. A search was carried out for studies with repeated observations over time, and their methods and characteristics reviewed. For each study, the number of surveys, their frequency and their sample size are assessed, as well as the instrument used, the available indicators, and the availability, accessibility and comparability of the information. Five sources of information providing data over extended periods of time with accessible data are identified: the National survey on drug use in secondary-school children (Encuesta estatal sobre uso de drogas en estudiantes de secundaria; ESTUDES); the Health behavior in school-aged children study (ECERSHBSC); the Monitoring system for risk factors associated with non-transmissible diseases in young people (Sistema de Vigilancia de Factores de Riesgo Asociados a Enfermedades No Transmisibles dirigido a poblacion juvenil; SIVFRENT-J); the Study of risk factors in secondary school children (Estudio de factores de riesgo en estudiantes de secundaria; FRESC); and the Monitoring study of health behaviors in adolescents (Estudio de monitorizacion de las conductas de salud de los adolescents; EMCSAT). Two of the surveys cover the whole of Spain, one is regional, and two are city-specific. All use solid methods and representative sampling techniques. In some, changes have occurred that make comparison of the evolution of some indicators difficult. Report accessibility is variable; comparability is limited for some surveys. Some provide almost no stratified data. There are valuable sources of data, but all have shortcomings. Changing the measurement instrument in a survey for comparison with others raises dilemmas as to the internal comparability of series.

  3. The fundamental structure of axis II personality disorders assessed in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Brian J; Sareen, Jitender; Enns, Murray W; Clara, Ian; Grant, Bridget F

    2007-12-01

    Little is known about the fundamental structure of core personality disorder psychopathology in the general population. The current study employed confirmatory factor analysis to evaluate competing models of patterns of personality disorder diagnoses in a nationally representative sample. DSM-IV and alternate models of the structure of personality disorder psychopathology were evaluated using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions conducted between 2001 and 2002 (N = 43,093). Dimensional versus categorical representations of DSM-IV personality disorder structure were also tested. Face-to-face interviews were conducted in the United States. Participants were community-based respondents aged 18 years and older. Diagnoses and dimensional scores were made for antisocial, avoidant, dependent, histrionic, obsessive-compulsive, paranoid, and schizoid personality disorders. Multiple goodness-of-fit indicators provided support for a DSM-IV-based hierarchical model of personality disorders. In this model, the individual personality disorders were viewed as belonging to 1 of 3 latent factors or clusters (A, B, or C). In all of the models, the individual personality disorders were allowed to be an indicator for only a single latent cluster, and errors were not allowed to correlate with each other. In turn, these 3 clusters were viewed as comprising a single higher-order "Axis II personality disorder factor." The DSM-IV model was largely invariant across gender, Axis I comorbidity, and treatment-seeking status. A dimensionally based form of assessment of the DSM-IV personality disorders produced excellent goodness-of-fit indicators and produced low Akaike information criterion values (which are indicative of better-fitting models). The results from this confirmatory factor analysis in a large, nationally representative mental health survey supported the DSM-IV hierarchical organization of Axis II personality disorders. This model was

  4. Assessing restrictiveness of national alcohol marketing policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Marissa B; Jernigan, David H

    2014-01-01

    To develop an approach for monitoring national alcohol marketing policies globally, an area of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Global Alcohol Strategy. Data on restrictiveness of alcohol marketing policies came from the 2002 and 2008 WHO Global Surveys on Alcohol and Health. We included four scales in a sensitivity analysis to determine optimal weights to score countries on their marketing policies and applied the selected scale to assess national marketing policy restrictiveness. Nearly, 36% of countries had no marketing restrictions. The overall restrictiveness levels were not significantly different between 2002 and 2008. The number of countries with strict marketing regulations did not differ across years. This method of monitoring alcohol marketing restrictiveness helps track progress towards implementing WHO'S Global Alcohol Strategy. Findings indicate a consistent lack of restrictive policies over time, making this a priority area for national and global action. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. How Well Do Survey Studies Capture Alcohol's Harm to Others?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossow, Ingeborg

    2015-01-01

    Empirical studies assessing alcohol's harm to others very often rely on population survey data. This study addresses some of the problems and challenges in using survey data for this purpose. Such problems include the limited capacity of population surveys in identifying infrequent harm and long-term consequences of drinking. Moreover, the drinker may report the alcohol-related harm or the person being harmed may report the damage. However, irrespective of who reports the harm, causal attribution to drinking is problematic. Challenges for future population surveys to address alcohol's harm to others include the need for improved models and understanding of complex mechanisms to guide empirical studies within the broad range of harm. Study designs other than cross-sectional surveys, such as longitudinal study designs and combinations of population surveys and other data sources, are likely to overcome some of the identified problems in current population surveys of alcohol's harm to others.

  6. Ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages from Mexico (tequila, mezcal, bacanora, sotol) and Guatemala (cuxa): market survey and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kanteres, Fotis; Kuballa, Thomas; López, Mercedes G; Rehm, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a recognized genotoxic carcinogen, with widespread occurrence in fermented foods and beverages. No data on its occurrence in alcoholic beverages from Mexico or Central America is available. Samples of agave spirits including tequila, mezcal, bacanora and sotol (n=110), and of the sugarcane spirit cuxa (n=16) were purchased in Mexico and Guatemala, respectively, and analyzed for EC. The incidence of EC contamination was higher in Mexico than in Guatemala, however, concentrations were below international guideline levels (<0.15 mg/L). Risk assessment found the Margin of Exposure (MOE) in line with that of European spirits. It is therefore unlikely that EC plays a role in high rates of liver cirrhosis reported in Mexico.

  7. Ethyl Carbamate in Alcoholic Beverages from Mexico (Tequila, Mezcal, Bacanora, Sotol and Guatemala (Cuxa: Market Survey and Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Rehm

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl carbamate (EC is a recognized genotoxic carcinogen, with widespread occurrence in fermented foods and beverages. No data on its occurrence in alcoholic beverages from Mexico or Central America is available. Samples of agave spirits including tequila, mezcal, bacanora and sotol (n=110, and of the sugarcane spirit cuxa (n=16 were purchased in Mexico and Guatemala, respectively, and analyzed for EC. The incidence of EC contamination was higher in Mexico than in Guatemala, however, concentrations were below international guideline levels (<0.15 mg/L. Risk assessment found the Margin of Exposure (MOE in line with that of European spirits. It is therefore unlikely that EC plays a role in high rates of liver cirrhosis reported in Mexico.

  8. Greek Alcohol Survey: Results and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Wesley; And Others

    Alcohol use among 458 members of Greek fraternities and sororities at the University of North Dakota was surveyed. The survey instrument, which was an adaptation of a questionnaire developed by Michael A. Looney, was directed to frequency of use, amounts consumed, type of beverage, attitudes, and demographic information. It was found that…

  9. A UK student survey investigating the effects of consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related negative consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sean J; Alford, Chris; Stewart, Karina; Verster, Joris C

    2016-12-01

    Previous research reported positive associations between alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) consumption and overall alcohol consumption. However, results were largely based on between-subjects comparisons comparing AMED consumers with alcohol-only (AO) consumers, and therefore cannot sufficiently control for differences in personal characteristics between these groups. In order to determine whether AMED consumers drink more alcohol on occasions they consume AMED compared to those when they drink AO additional within-subjects comparisons are required. Therefore, this UK student survey assessed both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related negative consequences when consumed alone and when mixed with energy drinks, using a within-subject design. A total of 1873 students completed the survey, including 732 who consumed AMED. It was found that AMED consumers drank significantly less alcohol when they consumed AMED compared to when they drank AO (p energy drinks does not increase total alcohol consumption or alcohol-related negative consequences.

  10. Ethyl Carbamate in Alcoholic Beverages from Mexico (Tequila, Mezcal, Bacanora, Sotol) and Guatemala (Cuxa): Market Survey and Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W.; Kanteres, Fotis; Kuballa, Thomas; López, Mercedes G.; Rehm, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a recognized genotoxic carcinogen, with widespread occurrence in fermented foods and beverages. No data on its occurrence in alcoholic beverages from Mexico or Central America is available. Samples of agave spirits including tequila, mezcal, bacanora and sotol (n=110), and of the sugarcane spirit cuxa (n=16) were purchased in Mexico and Guatemala, respectively, and analyzed for EC. The incidence of EC contamination was higher in Mexico than in Guatemala, however, concentrations were below international guideline levels (Mexico. PMID:19440288

  11. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences. PMID:23118547

  12. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences.

  13. NEUROCOGNITIVE ASSESSMENT OF ALCOHOL INPATIENTSDURING RECOVERY FROM ALCOHOLISM*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilijana Šprah

    2008-05-01

    Our study demonstrated that some alcohol-related cognitive, emotional and motivationaldeficits can also persist to certain extent after several weeks of sobriety. Especially alcoholabstainers with suicidal history revealed a specific neuropsychological profile in this regard. Employed neurocognitive assessment proved as useful approach for clinical evaluation of alcohol abstainers functioning, since cognitive deficits have been also hypothesizedto affect the efficacy of alcoholism treatment

  14. Family Treatment Approaches to Alcoholism: Assessing the "Alcoholic Family."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, Christopher A.; Billings, Andrew G.

    Research and clinical support for the connections between alcohol abuse and the family milieu have generated increased interest in family treatment approaches to alcoholism. In assessing the "alcoholic family," the clinician must consider numerous aspects of family interaction which have been linked to abuse and to treatment outcomes.…

  15. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lydia de Haan,1 Hein A de Haan,2,3 Berend Olivier,1 Joris C Verster11Utrecht University, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Tactus Addiction Treatment, Deventer, The Netherlands; 3Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences.Keywords: energy drink, alcohol, alcohol related consequences, survey, methodology

  16. Innovative alcohol use: assessing the prevalence of alcohol without liquid and other non-oral routes of alcohol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogner, John M; Eassey, John M; Baldwin, Julie Marie; Miller, Bryan Lee

    2014-09-01

    Though case studies, media reports, and anecdotal evidence point to creative forms of alcohol use such as "eyeballing," inhalation through vaporizers and other "alcohol without liquid" (AWOL) devices, and "slimming" as a growing trend, no empirical study has assessed the veracity of these claims. The present study attempts to debunk, confirm, or alter the popular perception that young adults are administering alcohol in novel ways. A self-report paper survey was administered to 2349 young adults selected for inclusion using a stratified random sampling technique. Respondents were asked to indicate all of the ways in which they had administered alcohol and presented options ranging from traditional oral consumption from a cup, can, or bottle to innovative techniques referenced by medical reports and news outlets. The prevalence of each form of innovative use was reported and explored. Innovative alcohol use was very rare in the sample. Only 25 of 2349 participants (1.1%) had engaged in one or more of the creative methods of alcohol consumption. Among these individuals, most reported either using an AWOL device and/or administering alcohol anally. Vaginal administration and "eyeballing" were only reported by three and one respondents, respectively. It appears that innovative alcohol use is more than an urban legend but that innovative use, even among a population with high rates of alcohol and drug use, is rare. Regardless, physicians and emergency medical personnel need to be aware of and prepared for dealing with innovative alcohol use. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. 2007 national roadside survey of alcohol and drug use by drivers : alcohol results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This report presents the prevalence estimates for alcohol-involved driving derived from the recently completed U.S. : national field survey of alcohol- and drug-involved driving (primarily of nighttime weekend drivers, but also daytime : Friday drive...

  18. In Search of a Standard for Assessing the Crash Risk of Driving Under the Influence of Drugs Other Than Alcohol; Results of a Questionnaire Survey Among Researchers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, Sjoerd; Mathijssen, Rene; Brookhuis, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To find a gold standard for crash risk assessment studies in the field of driving under the influence of psychoactive substances. Methods: A questionnaire survey on methodological aspects concerning study designs was sent to researchers in the field of driving under the influence of

  19. A comparison between brand-specific and traditional alcohol surveillance methods to assess underage drinkers' reported alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Sarah P; Siegel, Michael B; DeJong, William; Jernigan, David H

    2014-11-01

    Adolescent alcohol consumption remains common and is associated with many negative health outcomes. Unfortunately, common alcohol surveillance methods often underestimate consumption. Improved alcohol use measures are needed to characterize the landscape of youth drinking. We aimed to compare a standard quantity-frequency measure of youth alcohol consumption to a novel brand-specific measure. We recruited a sample of 1031 respondents across the United States to complete an online survey. Analyses included 833 male and female underage drinkers ages 13-20. Respondents reported on how many of the past 30 days they consumed alcohol, and the number of drinks consumed on an average drinking day. Using our brand-specific measure, respondents identified which brands they consumed, how many days they consumed each brand, and how many drinks per brand they usually had. Youth reported consuming significantly more alcohol (on average, 11 drinks more per month) when responding to the brand-specific versus the standard measure (p alcohol and adolescent research first by investigating a potentially more accurate alcohol surveillance method, and secondly by promoting the assessment of alcohol use among adolescents vulnerable to risky alcohol use. Finally, our survey addresses the potential impact of alcohol marketing on youth and their subsequent alcohol brand preferences and consumption.

  20. Child physical and sexual abuse: a comprehensive look at alcohol consumption patterns, consequences, and dependence from the National Alcohol Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lown, E Anne; Nayak, Madhabika B; Korcha, Rachael A; Greenfield, Thomas K

    2011-02-01

    Previous research has documented a relationship between child sexual abuse and alcohol dependence. This paper extends that work by providing a comprehensive description of past year and lifetime alcohol consumption patterns, consequences, and dependence among women reporting either physical and sexual abuse in a national sample. This study used survey data from 3,680 women who participated in the 2005 U.S. National Alcohol Survey. Information on physical and sexual child abuse and its characteristics were assessed in relation to 8 past year and lifetime alcohol consumption measures. Child physical or sexual abuse was significantly associated with past year and lifetime alcohol consumption measures. In multivariate analyses, controlling for age, marital status, employment status, education, ethnicity, and parental alcoholism or problem drinking, women reporting child sexual abuse vs. no abuse were more likely to report past year heavy episodic drinking (OR(adj) = 1.7; 95% CI 1.0 to 2.9), alcohol dependence (OR(adj) = 7.2; 95% CI 3.2 to 16.5), and alcohol consequences (OR(adj) = 3.6; 95% CI 1.8 to 7.3). Sexual abuse (vs. no abuse) was associated with a greater number of past year drinks (124 vs. 74 drinks, respectively, p = 0.002). Sexual child abuse was also associated with lifetime alcohol-related consequences (OR(adj) = 3.5; 95% CI 2.6 to 4.8) and dependence (OR(adj) = 3.7; 95% CI 2.6 to 5.3). Physical child abuse was associated with 4 of 8 alcohol measures in multivariate models. Both physical and sexual child abuse were associated with getting into fights, health, legal, work, and family alcohol-related consequences. Alcohol-related consequences and dependence were more common for women reporting sexual abuse compared to physical abuse, 2 or more physical abuse perpetrators, nonparental and nonfamily physical abuse perpetrators, and women reporting injury related to the abuse. Both child physical and sexual abuse were associated with many alcohol outcomes in

  1. University of Texas Alcohol and Drug-related Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychological Association, Washington, DC. Journal Supplement Abstract Service.

    The University of Texas Alcohol and Drug Related Survey is an 82-item questionnaire designed to measure student responses in five areas of critical concern: (a) demographic information, (b) current drinking behaviors, (c) attitudes toward drinking, (d) general knowledge concerning excessive use of alcohol, and (e) knowledge of and willingness to…

  2. [Development of the Heterosexual Love Assessment Scale for Alcoholics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawarai, Tazuko; Morita, Noriaki; Nakatani, Youji

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a scale for assessing the attributes of the heterosexual love of alcoholics. Using the characteristics and categories related to the heterosexual love of alcoholics found in previous research, we created a "Heterosexual Love Assessment Scale for Alcoholics" and conducted a survey among 110 alcoholics (80 men and 30 women). The following three factors were extracted from the results: "mutual respect", "superficial intimacy", and "fear of being disliked", A high level of reliability was obtained on the scales indicated below (alpha = 63-82), and concurrent validity was confirmed between these and the Adult Attachment Scale (ECR: Experiences in Close Relationships inventory). Further, correlations were found between "mutual respect" and the benefit of heterosexual love in recovery, and between the other two factors and the impediment of heterosexual love, and between the Denial & Awareness Scale (for alcoholic). As this scale can be used to assess the type of heterosexual love of alcoholics, we predict that it will be useful in examining the effects of heterosexual love on recovery and as a tool for offering advice.

  3. A critical analysis of alcohol hangover research methodology for surveys or studies of effects on cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Richard; Grange, James A; Jones, Kate; Owen, Lauren

    2014-06-01

    Alcohol hangover may be defined as an adverse effect of heavy alcohol consumption present after sufficient time has elapsed for the alcohol to have been eliminated from the blood. Understanding how hangover may impair performance is important for public safety; yet, there is relatively little hangover research. This paper outlines good practice for future studies. This paper presents a critical analysis of hangover methodology for surveys or studies of effects on cognition with human subjects and provides suggestions for optimum research practice for laboratory-based and naturalistic alcohol hangover studies. Four hangover symptom scales have been developed and subjected to psychometric testing. For retrospective assessment, we recommend the Hangover Symptoms Scale (HSS) or the Alcohol Hangover Severity Scale (AHSS). For concurrent assessment of hangover symptoms, we recommend either the Acute Hangover Scale (AHS), the five-item version of the HSS, or the AHSS. In research aiming to assess the cognitive effects of alcohol hangover, we suggest focusing on the cognitive domains of attention, memory and executive function, and we specify a number of tests within these cognitive domains that are likely to be sensitive to any decrements due to hangover. Finally, we argue that naturalistic studies should assess biological markers to improve the accuracy of estimates of alcohol consumption. Specifically, we recommend the assessment of ethyl glucuronide (EtG) for this purpose. Recommendations are made with respect to assessing hangover symptoms, cognitive effects of hangover and biological markers of alcohol consumption.

  4. Refining measures of alcohol problems for general population surveys.

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    Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J; Witbrodt, Jane; Greenfield, Thomas K

    2015-02-01

    There is a need to improve classification of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in general population surveys. We developed and tested follow-up questions for 2 commonly reported symptom domains (withdrawal and larger/longer) to assess effects on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-5 AUD classification. Telephone interviews recontacted a selective follow-up sample of respondents under age 46 from the 2010 National Alcohol Survey with at least 1 lifetime AUD symptom (n = 244). Items included detailed questions about past-year AUD symptoms. Three items (vomiting, sweating, irritability) were recoded as acute intoxication rather than withdrawal if they most recently occurred within 8 hours of stopping drinking. The larger/longer criterion was recoded as socially motivated if respondents endorsed "got caught up in drinking with a group of friends" and not "feel compelled to drink and just can't stop" as a reason for drinking more than intended. Of 225 current drinkers, 11% reported past-year withdrawal, with 28% of those reporting acute intoxication instead of physical withdrawal. Adjusting past-year withdrawal classification reduced AUD prevalence by 6%. A minority (12%) reported the past-year larger/longer criterion. Of those, 50% indicated social reasons for drinking more than intended, rather than compulsion to drink. Adjusting the past-year larger/longer criterion reduced AUD prevalence by 8%. Accounting for both adjustments reduced AUD prevalence by 13%. Cases that met AUD criteria after both adjustments were substantially heavier drinkers than those that were reclassified. Follow-up items could be implemented in epidemiologic studies with minimal response burden and may help reduce misclassification of AUD. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  5. Women's knowledge and attitudes regarding alcohol consumption in pregnancy: a national survey

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    Peadon Elizabeth

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol exposure in pregnancy is a common and modifiable risk factor for poor pregnancy and child outcomes. Alcohol exposure in pregnancy can cause a range of physical and neurodevelopmental problems in the child including the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD. In order to improve prevention strategies, we sought to describe the knowledge and attitudes of women of childbearing age regarding alcohol consumption during pregnancy and its effects on the fetus. Methods We conducted a national cross-sectional survey via computer assisted telephone interview of 1103 Australian women aged 18 to 45 years. Participants were randomly selected from the Electronic White Pages. Pregnant women were not eligible to participate. Quotas were set for age groups and a minimum of 100 participants per state to ensure a national sample reflecting the population. The questionnaire was based on a Health Canada survey with additional questions constructed by the investigators. Descriptive statistics were calculated and logistic regression analyses were used to assess associations with participants' knowledge and attitudes. Results Of women surveyed, 61.5% had heard about effects of alcohol on the fetus and 55.3% had heard of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. Although 92.7% agreed alcohol can affect the unborn child, 16.2% did not agree that the disabilities could be lifelong. Most women agreed that pregnant women should not drink alcohol (80.2% and 79.2% reported having negative feelings towards pregnant women drinking alcohol. Women with higher education levels were more likely to know the effects of alcohol consumption in pregnancy (adjusted OR 5.62; 95% CI 3.20 to 9.87 but education level and knowledge were not associated with attitude. Conclusions There was a disjunction between knowledge and attitudes towards alcohol consumption in pregnancy. These findings will assist in developing effective health promotion campaigns to reduce fetal alcohol exposure

  6. Could a continuous measure of individual transmissible risk be useful in clinical assessment of substance use disorder? Findings from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridenour, Ty A; Kirisci, Levent; Tarter, Ralph E; Vanyukov, Michael M

    2011-12-01

    Toward meeting the need for a measure of individual differences in substance use disorder (SUD) liability that is grounded in the multifactorial model of SUD transmission, this investigation tested to what degree transmissible SUD risk is better measured using the continuous Transmissible Liability Index (TLI) (young adult version) compared to alternative contemporary clinical methods. Data from 9535 18- to 30-year-olds in the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a U.S. representative sample, were used to compute TLI scores and test hypotheses. Other variables were SUDs of each DSM-IV drug class, clinical predictors of SUD treatment outcomes, treatment seeking and usage, age of onset of SUDs and substance use (SU), and eligibility for SUD clinical trials. TLI scores account for variation in SUD risk over and above parental lifetime SUD, conduct and antisocial personality disorder criteria and frequency of SU. SUD risk increases two- to four-fold per standard deviation increment in TLI scores. The TLI is associated with SUD treatment seeking and usage, younger age of onset of SU and SUD, and exclusion from traditional clinical trials of SUD treatment. The TLI can identify persons with high versus low transmissible SUD risk, worse prognosis of SUD recovery and to whom extant SUD clinical trials results may not generalize. Recreating TLI scores in extant datasets facilitates etiology and applied research on the full range of transmissible SUD risk in development, treatment and recovery without obtaining new samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Alcohol's Harm to Children: Findings from the 2015 United States National Alcohol's Harm to Others Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Lauren M; Nayak, Madhabika B; Greenfield, Thomas K; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J

    2017-05-01

    To examine the prevalence and severity of alcohol's harm to children in the US and the relationship of the harmer to the child, and to examine caregivers' sociodemographic characteristics, alcohol use, and exposure to harm due to a drinking spouse/partner or other family member as risk factors for alcohol's harm to children. We report data on 764 caregivers (defined as persons with parental responsibility for at least 1 child aged ≤17 years) from the 2015 National Alcohol's Harm to Others Survey, a dual-frame national sample of US adults. Overall 7.4% of caregivers reported alcohol's harm to children in the past year. Risk factors for alcohol's harm to children included the caregiver's own experience of alcohol's harm from a spouse/partner or other family member. Caregivers with a heavy drinker in the household were significantly more likely to report harm to children. A caregiver's own heavy drinking was not a significant risk factor for children in his or her care. Alcohol places a substantial burden on children in the US. Although a caregiver's own drinking can harm children, other drinkers also increase the risk of alcohol's harm to children. Screening caregivers to determine whether there is a heavy drinker in the household may help reduce alcohol's harm in the family without stigmatizing caregivers, who themselves may not be heavy drinkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Externalities from Alcohol Consumption in the 2005 US National Alcohol Survey: Implications for Policy

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    Norman Giesbrecht

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A subsample (n = 2,550 of the 2005 US National Alcohol Survey of adults was used to estimate prevalence and correlates of six externalities from alcohol abuse—family problems, assaults, accompanying intoxicated driver, vehicular accident, financial problems and vandalized property—all from another‘s drinking. On a lifetime basis, 60% reported externalities, with a lower 12-month rate (9%. Women reported more family/marital and financial impacts and men more assaults, accompanying drunk drivers, and accidents. Being unmarried, older, white and ever having monthly heavy drinking or alcohol problems was associated with more alcohol externalities. Publicizing external costs of drinking could elevate political will for effective alcohol controls.

  9. Increases in Alcohol Intakes Are Concurrent with Higher Energy Intakes: Trends in Alcohol Consumption in Australian National Surveys from 1983, 1995 and 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Grech

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to provide the first assessment of the contribution of alcohol to Australian adults’ diets over time and determine if people reporting alcohol had higher total dietary energy intakes. Secondary analyses of cross-sectional national nutrition surveys from 1983, 1995, and 2011/12 for adults 18 years (n = 26,675 and over were conducted. Alcoholic beverage intake and diet were assessed using 24-h recalls. The proportion of participants reporting alcohol consumption declined over time and in 1983, 1995, and 2011/12 was 52.0%, 44.2%, and 39.8%, respectively, for men (p < 0.001 and 31.6%, 25.7%, and 25.7%, respectively, for women (p < 0.001. A decline in alcohol intake was seen between 1983 and 2012 for all subpopulations, except for women aged over 45 years, for whom alcohol intake increased. Energy intake was higher for participants reporting alcohol intake and the mean difference (SD in energy intake for those reporting alcohol versus non-consumers was +1514 kJ (462 for men and +1227 kJ (424 for women. Consistent with apparent consumption data, reported alcohol intake for the total population decreased over time. As those reporting alcohol had much higher energy intakes than non-consumers, promoting alcohol intakes consistent with national recommendations may have important implications for the prevention of obesity, particularly for middle-aged women.

  10. Appraisal of the Glasgow assessment and management of alcohol guideline: a comprehensive alcohol management protocol for use in general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, A; Benson, G; Forrest, E H

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines exist for the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) but few have been assessed as to their suitability for general hospitals. The Glasgow Assessment and Management guideline for alcohol has been specifically developed for use in this context. To determine if this alcohol assessment guideline aids the management of AWS in general hospitals. The four components of the Glasgow Assessment and Management of Alcohol guideline were evaluated. This included the use of the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) to identify at risk patients, a risk stratification strategy to indicate fixed dose or symptom-triggered benzodiazepine treatment, the Glasgow Modified Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (GMAWS) for symptom-triggered treatment and a clear recommendation for vitamin prophylaxis of Wernicke's encephalopathy. FAST scores were assessed along with the CAGE (cut down, annoyed, guilty and eye-opener) screening tool to ascertain if a single screening tool could identify hazardous and dependent drinking. The GMAWS and Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol (CIWA-Ar) were compared between two medical units. A staff survey of the two AWS tools was also carried out. FAST was able to identify both probable hazardous and dependent drinking. The GMAWS was reliable and gauged both physical and cognitive aspects of AWS. Staff generally preferred the GMAWS-based treatment as opposed to CIWA-Ar management and welcomed the Guideline as a whole. The Glasgow Guideline aids the management of patients with AWS in an acute hospital setting. It allows early identification of at risk patients and directs effective therapeutic intervention.

  11. The Alcoholic Elderly Client: Assessment of Policies and Practices of Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kola, Lenore A.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Surveyed 88 aging agencies serving approximately 11,000 clients to assess their capabilities for serving elderly with alcohol problems. Alcoholism was not viewed as a major problem by agency administrators, but few policies and procedures for dealing with this population were extant. Discussed implications for policy and program development.…

  12. The epidemiology of alcohol utilization during pregnancy: an analysis of the Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey (MES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Farah

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy may potentially constitute a major public health concern in Canada but despite this, the available epidemiological data on both rates and predictors of alcohol consumption during pregnancy is limited. The present study assessed the prevalence and predictors of maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy of women living in Canada from 2005-2006 who had a singleton live birth and whose child remained in their care 5-9 months following birth. Prevalence of maternal alcohol consumption was examined across the Canadian provinces. Methods The analysis was based on the Maternity Experience Survey (MES, a population-based survey that assessed pregnancy, delivery and postnatal experiences of mothers and their children between November 2005 and May 2006. The main outcome variable assessed was ever drinking alcohol during pregnancy. The sample of mothers who drank during pregnancy consisted mainly of low to moderate level-alcohol drinkers (95.8%, while only 1.7% of the sample were heavy drinkers (>1 drink per day. Socio-economic factors, demographic factors, maternal characteristics, and pregnancy related factors that proved to be significant at the bivariate level were considered for a logistic regression analysis. Bootstrapping was performed to account for the complex sampling design. Results Analysis of 5882 mothers, weighted to represent 72,767 Canadian women, found that 10.8% of women drank alcohol at some point during their pregnancies. This mainly reflects prevalence of low to moderate maternal alcohol consumption. Prevalence of drinking alcohol during pregnancy was 13.8% in Eastern-Central provinces, 7.8% in Western Provinces-British Columbia, 4.1% in Eastern-Atlantic provinces and 4.0% in Western-Prairie Provinces. Utilizing alcohol during gestation was significantly associated with several important factors including marital status, smoking status, reaction to the pregnancy and

  13. Validation of survey information on smoking and alcohol consumption against import statistics, Greenland 1993–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bjerregaard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Questionnaires are widely used to obtain information on health-related behaviour, and they are more often than not the only method that can be used to assess the distribution of behaviour in subgroups of the population. No validation studies of reported consumption of tobacco or alcohol have been published from circumpolar indigenous communities. Objective. The purpose of the study is to compare information on the consumption of tobacco and alcohol obtained from 3 population surveys in Greenland with import statistics. Design. Estimates of consumption of cigarettes and alcohol using several different survey instruments in cross-sectional population studies from 1993–1994, 1999–2001 and 2005–2010 were compared with import statistics from the same years. Results. For cigarettes, survey results accounted for virtually the total import. Alcohol consumption was significantly under-reported with reporting completeness ranging from 40% to 51% for different estimates of habitual weekly consumption in the 3 study periods. Including an estimate of binge drinking increased the estimated total consumption to 78% of the import. Conclusion. Compared with import statistics, questionnaire-based population surveys capture the consumption of cigarettes well in Greenland. Consumption of alcohol is under-reported, but asking about binge episodes in addition to the usual intake considerably increased the reported intake in this population and made it more in agreement with import statistics. It is unknown to what extent these findings at the population level can be inferred to population subgroups.

  14. Assessment of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Behaviors in Health Professions Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; Scott, David M.; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Bartek, Jean K.; Davis-Hall, R. Ellen; Reardon, Thomas P.; DeSimone, Edward M., II

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use behaviors of health professions students (HPS) were assessed by surveying both university-based HPS and other nursing programs in a Midwestern state in 1999. Response was 2,646 (56.4%) of surveyed students. Family history of alcohol-related and drug-related problems were reported by 39.8% and 13.9%, respectively,…

  15. Potential Impact of Minimum Unit Pricing for Alcohol in Ireland: Evidence from the National Alcohol Diary Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Gráinne; Mongan, Deirdre; Barry, Joe; Smyth, Bobby; Rackard, Marion; Long, Jean

    2016-11-01

    One of the main provisions of the Irish Public Health (Alcohol) Bill is the introduction of a minimum unit price (MUP) for alcohol in Ireland, set at €1.00/standard drink. We sought to identify who will be most affected by the introduction of a MUP, examining the relationship between harmful alcohol consumption, personal income, place of purchase and price paid for alcohol. A nationally representative survey of 3187 respondents aged 18-75 years, completing a diary of their previous week's alcohol consumption. The primary outcome was purchasing alcohol at alcohol at alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C > 5), low personal annual income (alcohol off-sales (OR 21.9, 95% CI 12.5-38.1) were most likely to report purchasing alcohol at alcohol consumed was purchased off-sales. Of those purchasing off-sales, 30% bought cheap alcohol. High-risk drinkers, men and those on low income were most likely to report paying alcohol. The introduction of a MUP in Ireland is likely to target those suffering the greatest harm, and reduce alcohol-attributable mortality in Ireland. Further prospective studies are needed to monitor consumption trends and associated harms following the introduction of minimum unit pricing of alcohol. © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  16. California Drug and Alcohol Treatment Assessment (CALDATA-1991-1993)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The California Drug and Alcohol Treatment Assessment (CALDATA) was designed to study the costs, benefits, and effectiveness of the state's alcohol and drug treatment...

  17. Iron stores assessment in alcoholic liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa Matos, Luís; Batista, Paulo; Monteiro, Nuno; Ribeiro, João; Cipriano, Maria A; Henriques, Pedro; Girão, Fernando; Carvalho, Armando

    2013-06-01

    The relation between alcoholic liver disease (ALD) and iron overload is well known. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for assessing iron stores. MRI is also validated for liver iron concentration (LIC) assessment. We aimed to assess the effect of active drinking in liver iron stores and the practicability of measuring LIC by MRI in ALD patients. We measured LIC by MRI in 58 ALD patients. We divided patients into two groups - with and without active alcoholism - and we compared several variables between them. We evaluated MRI-LIC, liver iron stores grade, ferritin and necroinflammatory activity grade for significant correlations. Significant necroinflammation (40.0% vs. 4.3%), LIC (40.1 vs. 24.3 µmol/g), and ferritin (1259.7 vs. 568.7 pmol/L) were significantly higher in drinkers. LIC values had a strong association with iron stores grade (r s = 0.706). Ferritin correlated with LIC (r s = 0.615), iron stores grade (r s = 0.546), and necroinflammation (r s = 0.313). The odds ratio for elevated serum ferritin when actively drinking was 7.32. Active alcoholism is associated with increased ALD activity. It is also the key factor in iron overload. Scheuers' semiquantitative score with Perls' staining gives a fairly accurate picture of liver iron overload. Serum ferritin also shows a good correlation with LIC values and biopsy iron stores grade. As most patients present only with mild iron overload, serum ferritin measurement and semiquantitative evaluation of iron stores are adequate, considering MRI high cost. However, if MRI is required to evaluate liver structure, LIC assessment could be performed without added cost.

  18. Alcohol withdrawal: a nationwide survey of inpatient treatment practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitz, R; Friedman, L S; Mayo-Smith, M F

    1995-09-01

    To describe current practices employed in the inpatient treatment for alcohol withdrawal. Survey. Inpatient alcoholism treatment programs in the United States. Medical directors of 176 (69%) of 257 eligible programs randomly selected from a national listing. The medical directors estimated that of all inpatients treated for alcohol withdrawal at the programs, 68% received one of the following medications. Benzodiazepines, including the long-acting chlordiazepoxide (33%) and diazepam (16%), and less frequently the short-acting oxazepam (7%) and lorazepam (4%), were the most commonly used agents. Barbiturates (11%), phenytoin (10%), clonidine (7%), beta-blockers (3%), carbamazepine (1%), and antipsychotics (1%) were less frequently given. Drug was most often given on a fixed dosing schedule with additional medication "as needed" (52% of the programs). Only 31% of the programs routinely used a standardized withdrawal severity scale to monitor patients. Mean duration of sedative treatment was three days; inpatient treatment, four days. Use of fixed-schedule regimens was associated with longer sedative treatment (mean four vs three days, p withdrawal included three days of long-acting benzodiazepines on a fixed schedule with additional medication "as needed." Standardized monitoring of the severity of withdrawal was not common practice. The directors reported using a variety of other regimens, some not known to prevent the major complications of withdrawal. Although geographic location and director specialty were significantly associated with treatment duration, much of the variation in treatment for alcohol withdrawal remains unexplained.

  19. Analytical Assessment of the Effects of Alcohol Consumption on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... Ifeanyi Reuben Nkechi Jecinta, Department of Computer Science, Rhema University, Aba Abia State. Abstract. Alcohol is ... involved conducting the clinical test to determine the independent assessment of impact of alcohol using ... Keywords: Alcohol consumption, software, disease, simulation, model ...

  20. Alcohol Use by Nepalese Women: Evidence from Non Communicable Disease Risk Factors STEPS Survey Nepal 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, K K; Thapa, P; Mehata, S; Vaidya, A; Pandey, A R; Bista, B; Pandit, A; Dhakal, P; Dhimal, M; Karki, K B

    2015-01-01

    Over the centuries, the world has witnessed alcohol use as a common phenomenon among the male population. Owing to the vulnerability of women towards alcohol and its possible consequences on women as well as children when pregnant or lactating mothers drink alcohol, there is utmost need to know the alcohol use among this population. The study sought to assess alcohol use among the Nepalese women aged 15-69 years. It was a sub-set analysis of 2807 women aged 15-69 years, extracted from a data of national cross-sectional study, NCD Risk Factors: STEPS Survey Nepal 2013 carried out among 4200 adults in 2013 using a multistage cluster sampling. Data collected in personal digital assistants using WHO NCD STEPS instrument version 2.2 were transferred to Microsoft Excel, cleaned in SPSS 16.0, and analyzed in STATA 13.0. We reported 11.7% (95% CI: 9.5-14.3) ever users of alcohol, 9.4% (95% CI: 7.4-11.7) last 12 months alcohol users, 7.1% (95% CI: 5.2-9.0) current drinkers, and 0.9% (95% CI: 0.5-1.6) with harmful use of alcohol. As compared to 15-29 years women, 30-44 and 45-69 years women were 1.61 (95% CI: 1.02-2.55) and 1.58 (95% CI: 1.03-2.43) times more likely to be drinkers in the last 12 months, respectively. Likewise, 45-69 years women were 2.84 (95% CI: 1.05-7.63) times more likely to indulge into harmful use of alcohol than their younger counterparts (15-29 years). Women from the Terai belt had lower odds of any drinking pattern than the women from hills: ever use (0.43, 95% CI: 0.27-0.70), alcohol use in the last 12 months (0.44, 95% CI: 0.26-0.75), current drinking (0.38, 95% CI: 0.22-0.65), and harmful use of alcohol (0.11, 95% CI: 0.03-0.37). Primary education holders were found to have 0.64 times (95% CI: 0.43-0.95) chances of current drinking than those without formal education. Women from upper age groups, hills, and with no formal education were found likely to be consuming alcohol. Contextual and culture friendly anti alcohol behaviour change

  1. Collegiate COAs and Alcohol Abuse: Problem Drinking in Relation to Assessments of Parent and Grandparent Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, H. Wesley; Berkowitz, Alan D.

    1991-01-01

    Surveyed 860 college students. Found significantly greater problem drinking indicated by students who reported having parent or grandparent diagnosed or treated for alcoholism; highest rates of problem drinking among students who reported both alcoholic parent and grandparent. Students who had experienced family discord from parental alcohol…

  2. Assessment of alcohol advertising practices in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    Perceptions of Media Alcohol Advertising in Ethiopia: Television was mentioned as the primary media for alcohol advertising, followed by radio, newspapers and magazines. Local beer brands are the most widely advertised followed by wine. Advertising for strong alcoholic drinks (e.g., spirits) were not observed by the.

  3. Tobacco and alcohol use among male dental and medical students studying in Davangere city: A cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    M G Inderjit; Karibasappa, G.N.; L Nagesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess and compare tobacco and alcohol usage among male medical and dental students among students belonging to dental and medical colleges in Davangere city. Materials and Methods: A self-designed questionnaire containing 20 close-ended questions was prepared to collect the required and relevant information pertaining to tobacco and alcohol consumption. The questionnaire was distributed among 400 students belonging to dental and medical...

  4. A comparison of results from an alcohol survey of a prerecruited Internet panel and the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeren, Timothy; Edwards, Erika M; Dennis, J Michael; Rodkin, Sergei; Hingson, Ralph W; Rosenbloom, David L

    2008-02-01

    Given today's telecommunications environment, random digit dial (RDD) telephone surveys face declining response rates and coverage, and increasing costs. As an alternative to RDD, we surveyed participants in a randomly recruited standing Internet panel supplemented with a randomly sampled telephone survey of nonpanel members for a study of associations between onset of alcohol use and later alcohol-related problems. The purpose of this paper was to compare results from our survey with results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a face-to-face probability sample survey of 43,093 adults, with a focus on associations between demographics, age of drinking onset, and alcohol dependence. Demographic and drinking characteristics from our survey of 4,021 ever-drinkers between the ages of 18 and 39 years were compared with the characteristics of 11,549 similarly aged ever-drinkers from the NESARC. Weighted analyses accounting for sampling design compared these 2 samples on drinking characteristics over the past year and during a respondent's heaviest period of drinking, and in multivariate models examining associations between demographics, age of drinking onset, and lifetime alcohol dependence. Participants in the supplemented Internet panel were similar to the national population of 18- to 39-year-old ever drinkers on gender, education, and race/ethnicity, while adults who were aged 18 to 25 years were under-represented in the Internet panel. The supplemented Internet panel reported higher rates of moderate risk drinking over the past 12 months, lifetime high-risk drinking, and lifetime (ever) alcohol dependence. Estimates of the associations between alcohol dependence and age of drinking onset, risky drinking, and family history of alcohol problems did not significantly differ between the supplemented Internet sample and the NESARC survey. Randomly recruited Internet-based panels may provide an alternative to random digit

  5. Relationship between price paid for off-trade alcohol, alcohol consumption and income in England: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Mike J; Parry, Alexander M H; Weston, Adam R W; Seretis, Dionysis; Zauter-Tutt, Maria; Hussain, Abrar; Mostajabi, Pardis; Sanatinia, Rahil; North, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    In order to examine the potential impact of an increase in the minimum price per unit of alcohol to 50 pence ($0.78), we examined drinking patterns and household incomes of people who purchase alcohol in England at above and below this price. Cross-sectional survey of 515 members of the public in seven towns and cities in the south of England. The primary outcome was whether the participant had purchased alcohol at alcohol consumption, measured using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test-Consumption (AUDIT-C). The median price paid per unit of alcohol was 53.1 pence (range 16.4-297.0 pence). Those buying alcohol at alcohol at above this price. The odds ratio (OR) of a person on low income with high-risk drinking purchasing alcohol at alcohol below this price was 0.51 (95% CI = 0.30-0.87) compared with all other participants. These data suggest that an increase in the minimum price of alcohol to 50 pence price per unit is only likely to disproportionately affect people on low incomes if their alcohol consumption is excessive.

  6. [Alcohol's impact on children and families. A population survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florenzano, Ramón; Echeverría, Ángela; Sieverson, Catalina; Barr, Michelle; Fernández, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol is widely used among young families, and leisure time is frequently family time. Heavy alcohol consumption can adversely affect children. The objective of this work is to measure the harm to others in Chile. This descriptive and probabilistic study forms part of a collaborative research funded by Thai Health and WHO. The survey was adapted by co-researchers and applied to a nationally representative sample of 1500 Chileans over 18years of age. A total of 408 respondents (27.2%) lived with children at home. Of this total, 10.5% felt that the use of alcohol by any member of the family had adversely affected a child. The most common adverse effects were verbal violence (29.7%), domestic violence (23.1%), unsupervised homes (18.7%), lack of money to provide basic needs of the child (14.3%), and physical violence (7.7%). Furthermore, in 6.6% of the cases child or family services agencies became involved. In almost half of the cases (46.3%), the drinker was the father, mother or step-parents. This was followed by other relatives (24.4%) and brothers (4.9%), or guardian of the child (2.4%). These data support the clinical observation that alcohol is common in Chilean homes. Its consumption not only damages the physical and mental health of the drinker but also those around him. Verbal violence and witnessing serious physical violence are frequent issues, as well as economic problems that end up with the inability to provide the child with its basic needs. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  7. A survey of alcohol and other drug use behaviors and risk factors in health profession students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, K A; Baldwin, J N; Scott, D M

    1994-05-01

    This survey assessed the alcohol and other drug (AOD) use habits and risk factors of health profession students at a midwestern university health science center. The authors administered a 75-item survey to 1,707 students in selected classrooms: 984 students responded for a return rate of 57.6%. In 1990, they found, alcohol use among the health profession students in the past year was comparable to that of undergraduate college students nationally (86%), although significantly fewer health profession students drank heavily (27% had five or more drinks in the past 2 weeks, compared with 41% of college students). The percentage of health profession students who reported using tobacco or illicit drugs was lower than the percentage of undergraduate students who used these substances. At the time of the study, 16% of the respondents may have had a potential current alcohol problem and 3.5% a potential drug problem. Pharmacy students most often reported negative consequences from their AOD use. Peer pressure influenced the drinking decisions of 55% of the respondents; students in dentistry and pharmacy experienced the least support from peers for their decisions to abstain from drinking. Family histories of alcohol problems were reported by 38% of the respondents, and family histories of drug use by 14.8%. Male health profession students, when compared with the female professional students, drank more and experienced more consequences of their drinking or drug use and were also more influenced by peers.

  8. Frequency, course and correlates of alcohol use from adolescence to young adulthood in a Swiss community survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heimgartner Annina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have analyzed the frequency of alcohol use across time from adolescence to young adulthood and its outcome in young adulthood. A Swiss longitudinal multilevel assessment project using various measures of psychopathology and psychosocial variables allowed for the study of the frequency and correlates of alcohol use so that this developmental trajectory may be better understood. Method Alcohol use was studied by a questionnaire in a cohort of N = 593 subjects who had been assessed at three times between adolescence and young adulthood within the Zurich Psychology and Psychopathology Study (ZAPPS. Other assessment included questionnaire data measuring emotional and behavioural problems, life events, coping style, self-related cognitions, perceived parenting style and school environment, and size and efficiency of the social network. Results The increase of alcohol use from early adolescence to young adulthood showed only a few sex-specific differences in terms of the amount of alcohol consumption and the motives to drink. In late adolescence and young adulthood, males had a higher amount of alcohol consumption and were more frequently looking for drunkenness and feeling high. Males also experienced more negative consequences of alcohol use. A subgroup of heavy or problem drinkers showed a large range of emotional and behavioural problems and further indicators of impaired psychosocial functioning both in late adolescence and young adulthood. Conclusion This Swiss community survey documents that alcohol use is problematic in a sizeable proportion of youth and goes hand in hand with a large number of psychosocial problems.

  9. Potential impact of minimum unit pricing for alcohol in Ireland: evidence from the National Alcohol Diary Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Cousins, Gráinne; Mongan, Deirdre; Barry, Joe; Smith, Bobby; Rackard, Marion; Long, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Aim One of the main provisions of the Irish Public Health (Alcohol) Bill is the introduction of a minimum unit price (MUP) for alcohol in Ireland, set at €1.00/standard drink. We sought to identify who will be most affected by the introduction of a MUP, examining the relationship between harmful alcohol consumption, personal income, place of purchase and price paid for alcohol. MethodA nationally representative survey of 3187 respondents aged 18–75 years, completing a diary of their previo...

  10. Alcohol Use among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men: An Epidemiological Survey and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The HIV/AIDS epidemic among Chinese men who have sex with men (MSM has become a significant public health concern. Knowledge of alcohol consumption in this population is limited. In this study, 1,155 Chinese MSM were surveyed to assess alcohol use and its correlates. A meta-analysis was also performed to aggregate pooled prevalence of current alcohol use. MSM who were unmarried (aOR: 1.87; 95% CI: 1.29–2.71 or unemployed/retired (aOR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.73–4.45 were more likely to drink alcohol more than once per week. MSM who consumed alcohol more than once per week were more likely to use drug (P<0.01, have sex with women (P<0.01, have unprotected insertive (P=0.04 or receptive (P=0.03 anal sex with men, have more than 10 lifetime male sex partners (P<0.01, predominantly practice insertive anal sex (P<0.01, and trade sex for money (P<0.01. Pooled overall alcohol use prevalence was 32%. Pooled prevalence for MSM who drank alcohol more than once per week and who drank alcohol before sex with male partners was 23%. Our findings provide the basis for further exploring the alcohol-HIV association and developing risk reduction interventions.

  11. The alcohol industry and trade agreements: a preliminary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Donald W

    2009-02-01

    To review trade agreements, their relation to alcohol control policy and examine the role of the alcohol industry in supporting and attempting to influence trade policy. Review of peer review, public health advocacy literature (both pro and con on free trade), business, press and government documents on trade agreements, assess current and potential challenges by trade agreements to alcohol control policy and investigate the means and extent of industry influence in trade agreements. 'Free' trade agreements reduce trade barriers, increase competition, lower prices and promote alcohol consumption. However, international treaties, negotiated by free trade experts in close consultation with corporate lobbyists and without significant, if any, public health input, governments and corporations contain significant provisions that will result in increased alcohol consumption and may challenge public health measures of other nations as constraints on trade. Conversely, alcohol control measures seek to reduce access and consumption, raise prices and restrict advertising and product promotion. The prospect is for increased alcohol consumption and concomitant problems throughout the world. Trade agreements challenge effective alcohol control policies. The alcohol industry seeks to influence agreements and can be expected to work through trade agreements to reduce tariffs, increase market access and seek to restrict effective domestic regulations. Further research is needed on the impact of trade agreements and the ongoing role of the industry. Advocates must recognize the inherent conflicts between unbridled free trade and public health, work to exclude alcohol from trade agreements, counter industry influence and protect alcohol control policies.

  12. Maine Student Athlete Alcohol and Other Drug Use Assessment, 1991. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primmerman, William

    This report presents findings from the Maine Student Athlete Alcohol and Other Drug Use Assessment conducted in 1991. It is noted that the survey instrument was comprised of 155 questions and was completed by 2,891 junior and senior high school student athletes in grades 7 through 12. Results are presented in these areas: (1) percent of athletes…

  13. Self-Reported Youth and Adult Exposure to Alcohol Marketing in Traditional and Digital Media: Results of a Pilot Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, David H; Padon, Alisa; Ross, Craig; Borzekowski, Dina

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol marketing is known to be a significant risk factor for underage drinking. However, little is known about youth and adult exposure to alcohol advertising in digital and social media. This study piloted a comparative assessment of youth and adult recall of exposure to online marketing of alcohol. From September to October 2013, a pilot survey of past 30-day exposure to alcohol advertising and promotional content in traditional and digital media was administered to a national sample of 1,192 youth (ages 13 to 20) and 1,124 adults (ages ≥21) using a prerecruited Internet panel maintained by GfK Custom Research. The weighted proportions of youth and adults who reported this exposure were compared by media type and by advertising and promotional content. Youth were more likely than adults to recall exposure to alcohol advertising on television (69.2% vs. 61.9%), radio (24.8% vs. 16.7%), billboards (54.8% vs. 35.4%), and the Internet (29.7% vs. 16.8%), but less likely to recall seeing advertising in magazines (35.7% vs. 36.4%). Youth were also more likely to recall seeing advertisements and pictures on the Internet of celebrities using alcohol (36.1% vs. 20.8%) or wearing clothing promoting alcohol (27.7% vs. 15.9%), and actively respond (i.e., like, share, or post) to alcohol-related content online. Youth report greater exposure to alcohol advertising and promotional content than adults in most media, including on the Internet. These findings emphasize the need to assure compliance with voluntary industry standards on the placement of alcohol advertising and the importance of developing better tools for monitoring youth exposure to alcohol marketing, particularly on the Internet. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. Assessment of the environmental risk of long chain alcohols (LCOH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belanger, Scott; Sanderson, Hans; Fisk, Peter

    2009-01-01

    An environmental assessment of long-chain alcohols (LCOH) has recently been conducted under the OECD SIDS High Production Volume (HPV) Program via the Global International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) Aliphatic Alcohols Consortium. LCOH are used primarily as intermediates, as a precurs...

  15. Do consumers 'Get the facts'? A survey of alcohol warning label recognition in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomber, Kerri; Martino, Florentine; Barbour, I Robert; Mayshak, Richelle; Miller, Peter G

    2015-08-22

    There is limited research on awareness of alcohol warning labels and their effects. The current study examined the awareness of the Australian voluntary warning labels, the 'Get the facts' logo (a component of current warning labels) that directs consumers to an industry-designed informational website, and whether alcohol consumers visited this website. Participants aged 18-45 (unweighted n = 561; mean age = 33.6 years) completed an online survey assessing alcohol consumption patterns, awareness of the 'Get the facts' logo and warning labels, and use of the website. No participants recalled the 'Get the facts' logo, and the recall rate of warning labels was 16% at best. A quarter of participants recognised the 'Get the facts' logo, and awareness of the warning labels ranged from 13.1-37.9%. Overall, only 7.3% of respondents had visited the website. Multivariable logistic regression models indicated that younger drinkers, increased frequency of binge drinking, consuming alcohol directly from the bottle or can, and support for warning labels were significantly, positively associated with awareness of the logo and warning labels. While an increased frequency of binge drinking, consuming alcohol directly from the container, support for warning labels, and recognition of the 'Get the facts' logo increased the odds of visiting the website. Within this sample, recall of the current, voluntary warning labels on Australian alcohol products was non-existent, overall awareness was low, and few people reported visiting the DrinkWise website. It appears that current warning labels fail to effectively transmit health messages to the general public.

  16. Reactivity to alcohol assessment measures: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Scott T; Vader, Amanda M; Harris, T Robert; Jouriles, Ernest N

    2009-08-01

    Previous research has suggested that alcohol screening and assessment may affect drinking. This study was a randomized test of reactivity to alcohol assessment questionnaires among a group of heavy drinking college students. A total of 147 university students completed a screening questionnaire and were randomized to either immediate assessment or delayed assessment. The immediate assessment group completed a set of drinking questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months, while the delayed assessment group completed questionnaires only at 12 months. Primary outcomes included overall volume of drinking, risky drinking and use of risk reduction behaviors. We found a significant effect of assessment on measures of risky drinking and risk reduction behaviors, but not on overall volume of drinking. Specifically, at 12 months, participants who had previously completed drinking assessments had a lower peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC) (d = -0.373), were more likely to report a low score on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT; odds ratio = 2.55) and tended to use more strategies to moderate their alcohol consumption (d = 0.352). Risk reduction behaviors that were affected tended to be those that limited alcohol consumption, rather than those that minimized consequences. These results may have implications for the development of brief interventions.

  17. Assessment reactivity: A randomized controlled trial of alcohol-specific measures on alcohol-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ellen; Miller, Mary Beth; Lombardi, Nate; Leffingwell, Thad

    2017-04-01

    Completion of alcohol assessments influences treatment outcomes, yet little is known about the aspects of assessment that may contribute to this response. The present study is a randomized controlled trial examining how the themes of alcohol assessments (e.g., assessment of alcohol-related consequences as opposed to drinking patterns) may affect drinking behaviors. Undergraduate students (N=290, Mage=19.97, SDage=1.81, 61.7% female), reporting at least one binge drinking episode during the past month, completed one of five baseline assessment batteries that varied thematically: (a) Control (e.g., minimal drinking quantity and frequency questions), (b) Consequences (e.g., College Alcohol Problems Scale; CAPS-r), (c) Norms (e.g., Drinking Norms Rating Form), (d) Diagnostic (e.g., Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test), and (e) Combined (all themes). Participants completed a one-month follow-up of drinking quantity/frequency and the CAPS-r. All groups decreased their self-reported peak drinks consumed (palcohol-related consequences (p=0.06, ηp(2)=0.03) from baseline to follow-up. Minimal assessment of drinking quantity and frequency may result in assessment reactivity. Reductions in markers of risky drinking behaviors did not differ as a function of the type of assessments completed (e.g., Consequences vs Diagnostic). Continued research is needed to determine what other important variables (e.g., treatment seeking) may affect assessment reactivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Caribbean Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in Caribbean waters conducted during 2000-2001. These surveys were...

  19. Alcohol drinking patterns and habits among a sample of PONS study subjects: preliminary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przewoźniak, Krzysztof; Łobaszewski, Jakub; Wojtyła, Andrzej; Bylina, Jerzy; Mańczuk, Marta; Zatoński, Witold A

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol drinking is a major contributing factor to death, disease, injury and social problems such as violence or child neglect and abuse, especially in Eastern Europe. To preliminary evaluate the prevalence and social and behavioural patterns of alcohol drinking in a pilot group of the Polish-Norwegian Study (PONS study) subjects. Open-ended prospective cohort study conducted in Świetokrzyskie province. A pilot group of subjects aged 45-64 years has been examined. Data on alcohol drinking were collected for 3,845 respondents with the use of the Health State Questionnaire administered by the CAPI method. In males, 72.3% drank alcohol currently, 22.7% were former drinkers, and only 5% never drinkers. Among females, the percentage of current alcohol drinkers was significantly lower than in males, while the percentages of former and never drinkers was higher (50.3%, 35.4% and 14.6%, respectively). 7.4% of males and 0.8% of females drank alcohol daily or almost daily, and weekly alcohol drinking was respectively at level of 32.2% and 15.7%. Males drank mainly vodka (or other spirits) and beer, females grape wine and vodka. PONS study includes interesting dataset for assessing prevalence and patterns of alcohol drinking at population level. Alcohol drinking seems to be common among PONS subjects. Comparison with nation-wide surveys shows on higher number of alcohol abstainers and lower number of binge drinkers among PONS study subjects. On the other hand, frequency and social patterns of alcohol drinking seem to be consistent with data found in national studies.

  20. Alcohol drinking patterns and prevalence of alcohol-abuse and dependence in the Israel National Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark, Yehuda D; Lopez-Quintero, Catalina; Grinshpoon, Alexander; Levinson, Daphna

    2007-01-01

    Coexistence of disparate religious/cultural mores with regard to alcohol drinking within the changing social milieu of Israel provides an informative environment for investigation of alcohol consumption patterns and alcohol-related mental disorders. A national population-based survey of Israeli adults was conducted as part of the WHO/World Mental Health Survey initiative. Logistic regression models accommodated the complex sampling design and accounted for potential confounders. Half of the 4,859 respondents reported any alcohol consumption in the year prior to interview; 5% drink 3 or more times weekly. DSM-IV criteria for alcohol-abuse or dependence (lifetime) were met by 4.3% of respondents. Significantly higher rates were found among males (AOR, adjusted odds ratio=7.3), younger adults (AOR=5.0), immigrants from the former Soviet Union (AOR=2.0), and those who were never married (AOR=1.6). Under-reporting remains a potential concern in health behavior surveys, particularly in the face of opposing religious norms. The lifetime prevalence of alcohol abuse in Israel is identical to other European countries while drinking levels are considerably lower, suggesting a biological sensitivity alongside socio-cultural factors.

  1. Use of fake identification to purchase alcohol amongst 15-16 year olds: a cross-sectional survey examining alcohol access, consumption and harm

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morleo, Michela; Cook, Penny A; Bellis, Mark A; Smallthwaite, Linda

    2010-01-01

    ... risk of alcohol-related harm. An opportunistic survey of 15-16 year olds (n = 9,833) across North West England was used to examine alcohol consumption, methods of access and related harms experienced...

  2. Assessment of alcohol advertising practices in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    majority of beer and wine advertising on TV targets young people. Participants rationalized depictions of dancing, clubbing, lively music and group activities are .... have a separate channel on the media” and having guidelines to “censor alcohol advertisements before transmission to the public” (youth expert]. In addition,.

  3. Second-hand drinking may increase support for alcohol policies: new results from the 2010 National Alcohol Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Thomas K; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J; Giesbrecht, Norman; Kerr, William C; Ye, Yu; Bond, Jason

    2014-05-01

    The harms of second-hand smoke motivated tobacco control legislation. Documenting the effects of harms from others' drinking might increase popular and political will for enacting alcohol policies. We investigated the individual-level relationship between having experienced such harms and favouring alcohol policy measures, adjusting for other influences. We used the landline sample (n = 6957) of the 2010 National Alcohol Survey, a computer-assisted telephone interview survey based on a random household sample in the USA. Multivariable regression models adjusted for personal characteristics, including drinking pattern (volume and heavy drinking), were used to investigate the ability of six harms from others' drinking to predict a three-item measure of favour for stronger alcohol policies. Adjusting for demographics and drinking pattern, number of harms from others' drinking predicted support for alcohol policies (P aggression-related harms, riding with a drink driver and being concerned about another's drinking all significantly influenced favour for stronger alcohol policy. Although cross-sectional data cannot prove a causal influence or directionality, the association found is consistent with the hypothesis that experiencing harms from others' drinking (experienced by a majority) makes one more likely to favour alcohol policies. Other things equal, women, racial/ethnic minorities, lower-income individuals and lighter drinkers tend to be more supportive of alcohol controls and policies. Studies that estimate the impact of harms from other drinkers on those victimised are important and now beginning. Next we need to learn how such information could affect decision makers and legislators. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  4. Social Anxiety Disorder and Alcohol Use Disorder Comorbidity in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneier, Franklin R.; Foose, Tracy E.; Hasin, Deborah S.; Heimberg, Richard G.; Liu, Shang-Min; Grant, Bridget F.; Blanco, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence and clinical impact of comorbid Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) and Alcohol Use Disorders (AUD, i.e., alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence) in a nationally representative sample of adults in the United States. Methods Data came from a large representative sample of the United States population. Face-to-face interviews of 43,093 adults residing in households were conducted during 2001–2002. Diagnoses of mood, anxiety, alcohol and drug use disorders, and personality disorders were based on the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule—DSM-IV Version. Results Lifetime prevalence of comorbid AUD and SAD in the general population was 2.4%. SAD was associated with significantly increased rates of alcohol dependence (OR=2.8) and alcohol abuse (OR=1.2). Among respondents with alcohol dependence, SAD was associated with significantly more mood, anxiety, psychotic, and personality disorders. Among respondents with SAD, alcohol dependence and abuse were most strongly associated with more substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and antisocial personality disorders. SAD occurred before alcohol dependence in 79.7% of comorbid cases, but comorbidity status did not influence age of onset for either disorder. Comorbid SAD was associated with increased severity of alcohol dependence and abuse. Respondents with comorbid SAD and alcohol dependence or abuse reported low rates of treatment-seeking. Conclusions Comorbid lifetime AUD and SAD is a prevalent dual diagnosis, associated with substantial rates of additional comorbidity, but remaining largely untreated. Future research should clarify the etiology of this comorbid presentation to better identify effective means of intervention. PMID:20441690

  5. Trends in social consequences and dependence symptoms in the United States: the National Alcohol Surveys, 1984-1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midanik, L T; Greenfield, T K

    2000-01-01

    Given the decline in alcohol use in the United States since the 1980s, the purpose of this study was to assess shifts in self-reported social consequences of alcohol use (and 5 consequences subscales) and dependence symptoms from 1984 to 1995. This study used data from 3 national alcohol surveys based on household probability samples of current drinkers (adults) in 1984, 1990, and 1995; samples sizes were 1503, 1338, and 1417, respectively. Overall, few changes in prevalence of social consequences or dependence symptoms were found. Significantly lower prevalence rates of 2 consequences subscales (accidents/legal problems and work problems) were reported between 1984 and 1990, but prevalence rates did not change for any of the scales from 1990 to 1995. This stability in alcohol-related outcomes despite reductions in alcohol consumption may be a result of cultural shifts in which problem amplification occurs in "drier" historical periods. Furthermore, rates of alcohol-related problems may be approaching their lowest limit and may not be readily influenced by any additional decreases in alcohol consumption.

  6. Tobacco and alcohol use among male dental and medical students studying in Davangere city: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M G Inderjit

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess and compare tobacco and alcohol usage among male medical and dental students among students belonging to dental and medical colleges in Davangere city. Materials and Methods: A self-designed questionnaire containing 20 close-ended questions was prepared to collect the required and relevant information pertaining to tobacco and alcohol consumption. The questionnaire was distributed among 400 students belonging to dental and medical colleges in Davangere city. Results: Among the 400 respondents, 48.5% were smokers and 45.75% of students were alcoholics. Among smokers, 55.70% were house surgeon students and 23.07% were 1 st year. Significant difference was found in the percentage of tobacco consumption among medical and dental house surgeon students. The main reason for smoking was examination preparation and workload. Among alcoholics, 51.67% were house surgeon students and 21.9% were 1 st year. The main reason for alcohol consumption was to get relief from tensions. Conclusions: Final year students and house surgeons had more influence of tobacco and alcohol consumption habits when compared to 1 st year students in both dental as well in medical college. Academic demand, work pressure, examination stress, and anxiety were found to be significantly influencing tobacco and alcohol habits among both medical and dental students.

  7. Alcohol intoxication at Swedish football matches: A study using biological sampling to assess blood alcohol concentration levels among spectators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbeej, Natalie; Elgán, Tobias H; Jalling, Camilla; Gripenberg, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol use and alcohol-related problems, including accidents, vandalism and violence, at sporting events are of increased concern in Sweden and other countries. The relationship between alcohol use and violence has been established and can be explained by the level of intoxication. Given the occurrence of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems at sporting events, research has assessed intoxication levels measured through biological sampling among spectators. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at football matches in the Swedish Premier Football League. Spectators were randomly selected and invited to participate in the study. Alcohol intoxication was measured with a breath analyser for Blood Alcohol Concentration levels, and data on gender, age, and recent alcohol use were gathered through a face-to-face interview. Blood Alcohol Concentration samples from 4420 spectators were collected. Almost half (46.8%) had a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration level, with a mean value of 0.063%, while 8.9% had a Blood Alcohol Concentration level ≥ 0.1%, with a mean value of 0.135%. Factors that predicted a higher Blood Alcohol Concentration level included male gender (p = 0.005), lower age (p football matches in the Swedish Premier Football League drink alcohol in conjunction with the match. Approximately one tenth have a high level of alcohol intoxication.

  8. Drug and Alcohol Use by Canadian University Athletes: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, John C.; Gauvin, Lise

    1996-01-01

    Using a stratified random sampling procedure, 754 student athletes were surveyed regarding drug and alcohol use in eight different sports from eight universities across Canada. Provides statistics of substances athletes reported using, including pain medications, weight loss products, anabolic steroids, smokeless tobacco products, alcohol,…

  9. Prevalence and correlates of binge drinking among young adults using alcohol: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Francesco; Carretta, Daniele; Crocamo, Cristina; Schivalocchi, Alessandro; Brambilla, Giulia; Clerici, Massimo; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Although binge drinking prevalence and correlates among young people have been extensively studied in the USA and Northern Europe, less is known for Southern Europe countries with relatively healthier drinking cultures. We aimed at analyzing prevalence and correlates of binge drinking in a representative sample of young adults in Italy. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among alcohol-consuming young adults. We carried out univariate and multivariate analyses to assess associations between recent binge drinking and candidate variables. We selected 654 subjects, with 590 (mean age: 20.65 ± 1.90) meeting inclusion criteria. Prevalence for recent binge drinking was 38.0%, significantly higher for females than males. Multivariate analysis showed that high alcohol expectancies, large amount of money available during the weekend, interest for parties and discos, female gender, cannabis use, influence by peers, and electronic cigarettes smoking all were significantly associated with recent binge drinking, whereas living with parents appeared a significant protective factor. More than a third of young adults using alcohol are binge drinkers, and, in contrast with findings from Anglo-Saxon countries, females show higher risk as compared with males. These data suggest the increasing importance of primary and secondary prevention programmes for binge drinking.

  10. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder: development of consensus referral criteria for specialist diagnostic assessment in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is known to be under-recognised in Australia. The use of standard methods to identify when to refer individuals who may have FASD for specialist assessment could help improve the identification of this disorder. The purpose of this study was to develop referral criteria for use in Australia. Method An online survey about FASD screening and diagnosis in Australia, which included 23 statements describing criteria for referral for fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and FASD based on published recommendations for referral in North America, was sent to 139 health professionals who had expertise or involvement in FASD screening or diagnosis. Survey findings and published criteria for referral were subsequently reviewed by a panel of 14 investigators at a consensus development workshop where criteria for referral were developed. Results Among the 139 health professionals who were sent the survey, 103 (74%) responded, and 90 (65%) responded to the statements on criteria for referral. Over 80% of respondents agreed that referral for specialist evaluation should occur when there is evidence of significant prenatal alcohol exposure, defined as 7 or more standard drinks per week and at least 3 standard drinks on any one day, and more than 70% agreed with 13 of the 16 statements that described criteria for referral other than prenatal alcohol exposure. Workshop participants recommended five independent criteria for referral: confirmed significant prenatal alcohol exposure; microcephaly and confirmed prenatal alcohol exposure; 2 or more significant central nervous system (CNS) abnormalities and confirmed prenatal alcohol exposure; 3 characteristic FAS facial anomalies; and 1 characteristic FAS facial anomaly, growth deficit and 1 or more CNS abnormalities. Conclusion Referral criteria recommended for use in Australia are similar to those recommended in North America. There is a need to develop resources to raise awareness of these

  11. Results of the 2007 national roadside survey of alcohol and drug use by drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    The 2007 NRS included, for the first time, measures to estimate the use of other potentially impairing drugs by drivers. Prior roadside surveys had collected breath samples to determine blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Due to developments in analyt...

  12. A National Survey of Alcohol Prevention Programs on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Kate L.

    2010-01-01

    As alcohol-related incidents and tragedies continue to be a major concern on college campuses, researchers and college counseling center directors struggle to find the most effective alcohol prevention programs Several theories have been adapted to form the foundation of prevention programs. These programs have then been evaluated to discover…

  13. [Alcohol Consumption in the Colombian Population, 2015 National Mental Health Survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Espriella Guerrero, Ricardo Andrés; Rodriguez, Viviana; Rincón, Carlos J; Morales, Diana Cabrera; Rodríguez, Sandy Johanna Pérez; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    National Survey of Mental Health (ENSM) in 2015 in Colombia asks, among other conditions, about alcohol consumption in people 12-17 years old, and 18 and older. Data were presented by age and region, with no cross-references to other categories of mental health problems, disorders, access to services, and health status. To assess alcohol consumption in Colombia, taking into account sociodemographic and clinical screening categories included. Secondary database analysis, sample size: 15,231 people from 13,200 households of five regions (Atlantic, Bogotá, Central, Eastern, and Pacific), with an age range from 12 to 96 years. AUDIT and AUDIT-C were used and stratified according to score and other variables included in the survey analysis. The high-risk drinking category was observed in 2.7% of children studied, with the highest percentage of drinking risk lying in the range of 18 to 44 years, with a clear majority of men. The study finds that a positive AUDIT-C in adults is associated with a higher percentage of non-anxiety, less anxiety problems, and traumatic events and traumatic events related to armed conflict. This requires further studies. Adults with positive AUDIT-C have a greater perception of well-being, but also a higher percentage of households in poverty. The study of individual, social, family and environmental factors in specific populations should be developed in order to make more appropriate interventions. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  14. Managing alcohol problems in general practice in Europe: results from the European ODHIN survey of general practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, P.; Wojnar, M.; Jakubczyk, A.; Gual, A.; Segura, L.; Sovinova, H.; Csemy, L.; Kaner, E.; Newbury-Birch, D.; Fornasin, A.; Struzzo, P.; Ronda, G.; Steenkiste, B. van; Keurhorst, M.; Laurant, M.G.; Ribeiro, C.; Rosario, F. do; Alves, I.; Scafato, E.; Gandin, C.; Kolsek, M.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To document the attitudes of general practitioners (GPs) from eight European countries to alcohol and alcohol problems and how these attitudes are associated with self-reported activity in managing patients with alcohol and alcohol problems. METHODS: A total of 2345 GPs were surveyed. The

  15. Assessment of source and type of alcohol consumed by high school students: analyses from four States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremeens, Jennifer L; Miller, Jacqueline W; Nelson, David E; Brewer, Robert D

    2009-12-01

    : This study provides population-based estimates of the source and type of alcohol usually consumed by high school students in 4 states and assessed their relationship to drinking patterns. : Pooled data were used from 4 states (Arkansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, and Wyoming) that included questions from the 2005 Youth Risk Behavior Survey for high school students (total N = 13,504). Logistic regression models were used to determine whether the drinking pattern for these students was independently associated with alcohol source or usual type of beverage. : Overall, 29.7% of high school students in these 4 states drank in a binge pattern, 13.2% were current drinkers who did not binge drink, and 57.1% were nondrinkers. Approximately one-third of the high school students who reported current alcohol use in these 4 states obtained their alcohol by giving money to someone else to purchase it. Liquor was the usual type of alcohol consumed by 38.7% of students who drank, followed by beer (21.3%), and malt beverages (21.1%). Youth who drank in a binge pattern were 3 times more likely to give someone money to buy alcohol for them and 2 times more likely to consume either liquor or beer as their usual alcoholic beverage compared with current drinkers who did not binge drink. : These findings emphasize that when implementing evidence-based strategies to prevent underage drinking, such as enforcement of underage drinking laws and increasing alcohol excise taxes, attention should be paid to the source of and the usual type of alcohol consumed, and how these vary by drinking pattern.

  16. Nepalese Homebrewed Alcoholic Beverages: Types, Ingredients, and Ethanol Concentration from a Nation Wide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, N; Aryal, K K; Paudel, M; Puri, R; Thapa, P; Shrestha, S; Shrestha, S; Stray-Pedersen, B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the enormous public health problems related to traditional alcohol consumption practice in Nepal, this area has been ignored and the information at the national level is limited. Thus this study is designed to explore the readily available commonly practiced Nepalese homebrewed alcoholic beverages, the ingredients used and alcohol strength (ethanol concentration). This study was carried out as a part of ongoing household survey on "Alcohol consumption practice among married women of reproductive age in Nepal". A total of 284 homebrewed alcoholic beverage (distilled 175, non-distilled:109) samples were collected from the 16 survey districts of Nepal during the period of April to August, 2013. Ethanol percentage was tested in research lab by using standard procedure. Readily available homebrewed alcoholic beverages in practice were mainly of two types "Distilled" (local Raksi) and "Non-distilled" (Jand, Chhyang, Tumba). Rice, wheat, barley, millet, maize, fruits, and pure sugar were the commonly used ingredients to prepare alcohol. Ethanol concentration in homebrewed alcohol was 14.0% (IQR: 10.0-19.0) ranging from 3% to 40% for distilled, and 5.2% (IQR: 3.5-9.8) ranging from 1% to 18.9% for nondistilled. A significant difference (Pbeverages in Nepal was more than the strength of factory produced beer. The alcohol strength varies across their types, ingredients used, residence and regions.

  17. The Anticipated Effects of Alcohol Scale: Development and Psychometric Evaluation of a Novel Assessment Tool for Measuring Alcohol Expectancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Meghan E.; Corbin, William R.; Treat, Teresa A.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol expectancy (AEs) research has enhanced our understanding of how anticipated alcohol effects confer risk for heavy drinking and alcohol-related problems. However, extant AE measures have limitations within 1 or more of the following areas: assessing a comprehensive range of effects, specifying the hypothetical number of drinks consumed,…

  18. National Alcohol Survey of households in Trinidad and Tobago (NASHTT: Alcohol use in households

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.G. Maharaj

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the patterns of alcohol use among households in Trinidad and Tobago (T&T and to estimate the association between alcohol use and negative psychological, social, or physical events experienced by the household. Methods A convenience sample of 1837 households across T&T. We identified bivariate correlates of alcohol use, and heavy episodic drinking using chi-square and t-test analyses and used multivariable logistic regression to estimate adjusted associations between household alcohol use and experiences within the past 12 months adjusted for sociodemographic covariates. Results One thousand five hundred two households had complete data for all variables (82% response rate. Nearly two thirds (64% of households included alcohol users; 57% of household that consumed alcohol also reported heavy episodic drinking. Households that reported alcohol consumption were significantly more likely to report illnesses within the households, relationship problems, and behavioral and antisocial problems with children. Among households where a member was employed, those who consumed alcohol were nearly twice as likely (OR = 1.98; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.03, 3.82 to have a household member call in sick to work and 2.9 times as likely (OR = 2.9; CI 1.19, 7.04 to have a household member suffer work related problems compared with households who reported not consuming alcohol. Conclusions Approximately two thirds of households in T&T reported using alcohol. These households were more likely to report psychological, physical, and social problems. These findings would support efforts to enforce current policies, laws, and regulations as well as new strategies to reduce the impact of harmful alcohol consumption on households in T&T.

  19. Screening and Treatment for Alcohol, Tobacco and Opioid Use Disorders: A Survey of Family Physicians across Ontario

    OpenAIRE

    Genane Loheswaran; Sophie Soklaridis; Peter Selby; Bernard Le Foll

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As a primary point of contact within the health care system, family physicians are able to play a vital role in identifying individuals with substance use disorders and connecting them to the appropriate treatment. However, there is very little data available on whether family physicians are actively screening for and treating substance use disorders. The objective of the current survey was to assess whether family physicians in Ontario are screening for alcohol, opioid and tobac...

  20. Psychometric Properties of the Adolescent Reinforcement Survey Schedule – Alcohol Use Version with College Student Drinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A.; Greenfield, Brenna L.; Ladd, Benjamin O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Behavioral economic theories of drinking posit that the reinforcing value of engaging in activities with versus without alcohol influences drinking behavior. Measures of the reinforcement value of drugs and alcohol have been used in previous research, but little work has examined the psychometric properties of these measures. Objectives The present study aims to evaluate the factor structure, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity of an alcohol-only version of the Adolescent Reinforcement Survey Schedule (ARSS-AUV). Methods A sample of 157 college student drinkers completed the ARSS-AUV at two time points 2–3 days apart. Test-retest reliability, hierarchical factor analysis, and correlations with other drinking measures were examined. Results Single, unidimensional general factors accounted for a majority of the variance in alcohol and alcohol-free reinforcement items. Residual factors emerged that typically represented alcohol or alcohol-free reinforcement while doing activities with friends, romantic or sexual partners, and family members. Individual ARSS-AUV items had fair-to-good test-retest reliability, while general and residual factors had excellent test-retest reliability. General alcohol reinforcement and alcohol reinforcement from friends and romantic partners were positively correlated with past-year alcohol consumption, heaviest drinking episode, and alcohol-related negative consequences. Alcohol-free reinforcement indices were unrelated to alcohol use or consequences. Conclusions/Importance The ARSS-AUV appears to demonstrate good reliability and mixed concurrent validity among college student drinkers. The instrument may provide useful information about alcohol reinforcement from various activities and people and could provide clinically-relevant information for prevention and treatment programs. PMID:27096713

  1. Psychometric Properties of the Adolescent Reinforcement Survey Schedule-Alcohol Use Version with College Student Drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A; Greenfield, Brenna L; Ladd, Benjamin O

    2016-06-06

    Behavioral economic theories of drinking posit that the reinforcing value of engaging in activities with versus without alcohol influences drinking behavior. Measures of the reinforcement value of drugs and alcohol have been used in previous research, but little work has examined the psychometric properties of these measures. The present study aims to evaluate the factor structure, test-retest reliability, and concurrent validity of an alcohol-only version of the Adolescent Reinforcement Survey Schedule (ARSS-AUV). A sample of 157 college student drinkers completed the ARSS-AUV at two time points 2-3 days apart. Test-retest reliability, hierarchical factor analysis, and correlations with other drinking measures were examined. Single, unidimensional general factors accounted for a majority of the variance in alcohol and alcohol-free reinforcement items. Residual factors emerged that typically represented alcohol or alcohol-free reinforcement while doing activities with friends, romantic or sexual partners, and family members. Individual ARSS-AUV items had fair-to-good test-retest reliability, while general and residual factors had excellent test-retest reliability. General alcohol reinforcement and alcohol reinforcement from friends and romantic partners were positively correlated with past-year alcohol consumption, heaviest drinking episode, and alcohol-related negative consequences. Alcohol-free reinforcement indices were unrelated to alcohol use or consequences. The ARSS-AUV appears to demonstrate good reliability and mixed concurrent validity among college student drinkers. The instrument may provide useful information about alcohol reinforcement from various activities and people and could provide clinically-relevant information for prevention and treatment programs.

  2. Victimization as a mediator of alcohol use disparities between sexual minority subgroups and sexual majority youth using the 2015 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gregory; Turner, Blair; Salamanca, Paul; Birkett, Michelle; Hatzenbuehler, Mark L; Newcomb, Michael E; Marro, Rachel; Mustanski, Brian

    2017-09-01

    Alcohol use among underage youth is a significant public health concern. According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, alcohol is the "drug of choice" among adolescents, meaning more youth use and abuse alcohol than any other substance. Prevalence of alcohol use is disproportionately higher among sexual minority youth (SMY) than among their heterosexual peers. We examined sexual identity and sexual behavior disparities in alcohol use, and the mediational role of bullying in a sample of high school students. Data from the 2015 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to assess the association between sexual minority status (identity and behavior) and alcohol use with weighted logistic regression. Due to well-documented differences between males and females, we stratified models by gender. Physical and cyberbullying were examined as mediators of the relationship between sexual minority status and alcohol use. We detected associations between certain subgroups of sexual minority youth and alcohol use across all four drinking variables (ever drank alcohol, age at first drink, current alcohol use, and binge drinking). Most of these associations were found among bisexual-identified youth and students with both male and female sexual partners; these individuals had up to twice the odds of engaging in alcohol use behaviors when compared with sexual majority students. Associations were strongest among females. Bullying mediated sexual minority status and alcohol use only among bisexual females. As disparities in alcohol use differ by gender, sexual identity, and sexual behavior, interventions should be targeted accordingly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Data (BASE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) study was a five year study to characterize determinants of indoor air quality and occupant perceptions in...

  4. Atlantic Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in South Atlantic (Florida to Maryland) waters from 1994 to the...

  5. Longitudinal alcohol consumption patterns and health-related quality of life: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Sameer; Loheswaran, Genane; Le Foll, Bernard; Rehm, Jürgen

    2017-03-14

    Given the limited nature of the evidence concerning longitudinal alcohol consumption patterns and health-related quality of life (HrQoL), this study examined these associations. Data were from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (waves 1 and 2). Multiple linear regression was used to assess the associations between longitudinal alcohol consumption patterns (abstainers, no consumption change, decreased consumption, increased consumption, ceased consumption and initiated consumption) and HrQoL (Short-Form 12-Item Health Survey). Increased consumption over follow up was related to non-significant reductions in mental HrQoL for moderate and heavy drinkers at wave 1, whereas decreased consumption coincided with improvements in mental HrQoL for heavy drinkers at wave 1 (β for Mental Health Summary Scale and Mental Health Subscale: 0.84 and 0.91; P-values significant for both scales). Similarly, initiation of consumption among lifetime abstainers at wave 1 was associated with reductions in mental HrQoL (β for Mental Health Summary Scale, Vitality Subscale, Social Functioning Subscale and Mental Health Subscale: -1.50, -1.89, -0.86 and -1.74; P-values significant for all scales). On the other hand, cessation of consumption was accompanied by reductions in physical HrQoL (β for Physical Health Summary Scale, Physical Functioning Subscale, Role Physical Subscale, Bodily Pain Subscale and General Health Subscale: -1.29, -1.11, -1.35, -0.87 and -0.88; P-values significant for all scales). Increased or decreased consumption were inversely associated with mental HrQoL, but decreased consumption was also associated with reductions in physical HrQoL. These findings were confirmed by the ceased consumption and initiated consumption patterns. [Imtiaz S, Loheswaran G, Le Foll B, Rehm J. Longitudinal alcohol consumption patterns and health-related quality of life: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Drug

  6. Alcohol consumption in Estonia and Finland: Finbalt survey 1994-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pärna, Kersti; Rahu, Kaja; Helakorpi, Satu; Tekkel, Mare

    2010-05-19

    Alcohol consumption has been regarded as an important contributor to the high premature mortality rates. The objective of this paper was to provide an overview and comparison of alcohol consumption and its socio-demographic determinants among adults in Estonia and Finland. The study was based on a 25-64-year-old subsample of nationally representative postal cross-sectional surveys conducted in Estonia (n = 10,340) and Finland (n = 19,672) during 1994-2006. Abstinence, frequency, and the amount of alcohol consumed were examined. Logistic regression models were used to test the socio-demographic differences in alcohol consumption at least once a week. The effect of socio-demographic factors on pure alcohol consumed per week was calculated using linear regression. The proportion of abstainers was 1.5 times higher among women than men in both countries. Throughout the study period, the amount of alcohol consumed per week increased for both genders in Estonia and for women in Finland, but was stable for men in Finland. In the final study year, medium risk amount of alcohol consumed per week was nearly 1.5 times higher among men in Estonia than in Finland, but about half that among women in Estonia than in Finland. Compared to ethnic majority in Estonia, alcohol consumption at least once a week was lower among men, but amount of pure alcohol drunk per week was higher among women of ethnic minority. In Finland, alcohol consumption at least once a week was more prevalent among women of ethnic minority, but the amount of pure alcohol drunk per week was lower for both gender groups of ethnic minority. Compared to married/cohabiting respondents, alcohol consumption at least once a week was less pronounced among single respondents in Finland, divorced or separated women in both countries, and widowed respondents in Estonia. Greater amount of alcohol consumed per week was more prevalent among single and divorced or separated respondents in Finland, but only among divorced or

  7. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to buy or use alcohol. By setting the drinking age at 21, they hope older people will be ... stop without help. A person who starts drinking alcohol at a young age is more likely to develop alcoholism. Alcoholism is ...

  8. Assessment of alcohol intake: Retrospective measures versus a smartphone application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Antoinette; Pan, Jason; Bruns, Loren Richard; Sinnott, Richard O; Hester, Robert

    2017-11-03

    Research investigating problem drinking often relies on retrospective measures to assess alcohol consumption behaviour. Limitations associated with such instruments can, however, distort actual consumption levels and patterns. We developed the smartphone application (app), CNLab-A, to assess alcohol intake behaviour in real-time. Healthy individuals (N=671, M age 23.12) completed demographic questions plus the Alcohol Use Questionnaire and a 21-day Timeline Followback before using CNLab-A for 21days. The app asked participants to record alcohol consumption details in real time. We compared data reported via retrospective measures with that captured using CNLab-A. On average, participants submitted data on 20.27days using CNLab-A. Compared to Timeline Followback, a significantly greater percentage of drinking days (24.79% vs. 26.44%) and significantly higher total intake (20.30 vs. 24.26 standard drinks) was recorded via the app. CNLab-A captured a substantially greater number of high intake occasions at all levels from 8 or more drinks than Timeline Followback. Additionally, relative to the Alcohol Use Questionnaire, a significantly faster rate of consumption was recorded via the app. CNLab-A provided more nuanced information regarding quantity and pattern of alcohol intake than the retrospective measures. In particular, it revealed higher levels of drinking than retrospective reporting. This will have implications for how particular at-risk alcohol consumption patterns are identified in future and might enable a more sophisticated exploration of the causes and consequences of drinking behaviour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of survey sampling frame on coverage: the level of and changes in alcohol-related mortality in Finland as a test case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Pia; Huhtanen, Petri

    2010-11-01

    Exclusion of, for example, the homeless and institutionalized from survey sampling frames has been suggested to be one important reason for low coverage rate of surveys. We assess this, using mortality data from Finland, where in 2004 alcohol taxes were lowered by one-third, and surveys were unable to capture the 10% increase in per capita consumption. We compared the level of and the change in alcohol-related mortality in 2001-03 and 2004-05 in (1) the whole population, (2) the population included in the sampling frame of many Finnish surveys and (3) the population excluded from the sampling frame. Finns aged 15 years and above, linked individually to cause of death data. The population outside survey sampling frames constituted 1.4% of the whole population and had a high rate of alcohol-related deaths. For example, among men the rate of directly alcohol-attributable causes was 3.7 times higher than in the survey population. Among women the rate ratio was 4.6. The exclusion of the non-survey population reduced the estimated level of alcohol-related mortality by 1-4%. Similarly, the non-survey population had only a marginal effect on the estimates of temporal change. Alcohol-related mortality, and hence probably also alcohol consumption, is on average much higher in the subgroups of populations excluded from survey sampling frames. Due to the small size of the excluded group in the Finnish context, this has only a small effect on population-level estimates. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Alcohol Advertising Exposure Among Middle School–Age Youth: An Assessment Across All Media and Venues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca L.; Martino, Steven C.; Kovalchik, Stephanie A.; Becker, Kirsten M.; Shadel, William G.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to quantify middle school youth’s exposure to alcohol advertisements across media and venues, determine venues of greatest exposure, and identify characteristics of youth who are most exposed. Method: Over a 10-month period in 2013, 589 Los Angeles–area youth ages 11–14 from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds completed a short paper-and-pencil survey assessing background characteristics and then participated in a 14-day ecological momentary assessment, logging all exposures to alcohol advertisements on handheld computers as they occurred. Results: African American and Hispanic youth were exposed to an average of 4.1 and 3.4 advertisements per day, respectively, nearly two times as many as non-Hispanic White youth, who were exposed to 2.0 advertisements per day. Girls were exposed to 30% more advertisements than boys. Most exposures were to outdoor advertisements, with television advertisements a close second. Conclusions: Exposure to alcohol advertising is frequent among middle school–age youth and may put them at risk for earlier or more frequent underage drinking. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising outdoors and on television should be considered by regulators and by the alcohol industry and should focus particularly on reducing exposure among minority youth. PMID:27172570

  11. Alcohol Advertising Exposure Among Middle School-Age Youth: An Assessment Across All Media and Venues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Rebecca L; Martino, Steven C; Kovalchik, Stephanie A; Becker, Kirsten M; Shadel, William G; D'Amico, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify middle school youth's exposure to alcohol advertisements across media and venues, determine venues of greatest exposure, and identify characteristics of youth who are most exposed. Over a 10-month period in 2013, 589 Los Angeles-area youth ages 11-14 from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds completed a short paper-and-pencil survey assessing background characteristics and then participated in a 14-day ecological momentary assessment, logging all exposures to alcohol advertisements on handheld computers as they occurred. African American and Hispanic youth were exposed to an average of 4.1 and 3.4 advertisements per day, respectively, nearly two times as many as non-Hispanic White youth, who were exposed to 2.0 advertisements per day. Girls were exposed to 30% more advertisements than boys. Most exposures were to outdoor advertisements, with television advertisements a close second. Exposure to alcohol advertising is frequent among middle school-age youth and may put them at risk for earlier or more frequent underage drinking. Greater restrictions on alcohol advertising outdoors and on television should be considered by regulators and by the alcohol industry and should focus particularly on reducing exposure among minority youth.

  12. [Alcohol consumption among adolescents in 3 municipalities. A survey of local variations in alcohol consumption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsmo, A; Storset, B; Odegaard, J A

    1995-09-20

    Drinking habits among 663 adolescents 14, 15, 17 and 18 years of age in three local communities were investigated by means of a questionnaire. Half had tasted alcohol already at the age of 14 years. The total amount consumed per person per year averaged 3.5 litres pure alcohol. Geographical variations in consumption were more than six-fold. At the age of 17 years, boys began to consume more than girls. In both sexes, home distilled spirits was the most common beverage obtained or provided illegally. The main reason for drinking alcohol seems to be to get drunk.

  13. Assessing personality risks using the Surps for alcohol and other ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Four personality traits are recognized risk factors for alcohol and drug-related problems: hopelessness, anxiety sensitivity, sensation seeking, and impulsivity. In this crosssectional study, the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) was applied to measure these traits and assess the questionnaire's reliability from a ...

  14. Methodological Considerations in the Assessment of Depression in Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbrock, Michie N.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Compared three instruments assessing depression in alcoholics: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-II), the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Depression scale (MMPI D), and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The number of subjects who were diagnosed as "depressed" varied considerably according to the…

  15. Alcohol intoxication at Swedish football matches: A study using biological sampling to assess blood alcohol concentration levels among spectators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Durbeej

    Full Text Available Alcohol use and alcohol-related problems, including accidents, vandalism and violence, at sporting events are of increased concern in Sweden and other countries. The relationship between alcohol use and violence has been established and can be explained by the level of intoxication. Given the occurrence of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems at sporting events, research has assessed intoxication levels measured through biological sampling among spectators. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the level of alcohol intoxication among spectators at football matches in the Swedish Premier Football League. Spectators were randomly selected and invited to participate in the study. Alcohol intoxication was measured with a breath analyser for Blood Alcohol Concentration levels, and data on gender, age, and recent alcohol use were gathered through a face-to-face interview. Blood Alcohol Concentration samples from 4420 spectators were collected. Almost half (46.8% had a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration level, with a mean value of 0.063%, while 8.9% had a Blood Alcohol Concentration level ≥ 0.1%, with a mean value of 0.135%. Factors that predicted a higher Blood Alcohol Concentration level included male gender (p = 0.005, lower age (p < 0.001, attending a local derby (p < 0.001, alcohol use prior to having entered the arena (p < 0.001, attending a weekend match (p < 0.001, and being a spectator at supporter sections (p < 0.001. About half of all spectators at football matches in the Swedish Premier Football League drink alcohol in conjunction with the match. Approximately one tenth have a high level of alcohol intoxication.

  16. Alcohol use in the first three years of bereavement: a national representative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilling János

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Earlier results concerning alcohol consumption of bereaved persons are contradictory. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between bereavement and alcohol consumption accounting for time and gender differences on a nationally representative sample from Hungary ("Hungarostudy Epidemiological Panel Survey", N = 4457 Methods Drinking characteristics of mourning persons (alcohol consumption, dependence symptoms, and harmful consequences of alcohol use in the first three years of grief were examined among persons between 18-75 years using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT. Results Men bereaved for one year scored higher on two dimensions of AUDIT (dependence symptoms and harmful alcohol use, while men bereaved for two years scored higher on all three dimensions of AUDIT compared to the non-bereaved. The rate of men clinically at-risk concerning alcohol consumption among the non-bereaved is 12.9%, and among men bereaved for one year is 18.4% (a non-significant difference, while 29.8% (p Conclusion Among bereaved men, the risk of alcohol related problems tends to be higher, which can be shown both among men bereaved for one year as well as men bereaved for two years. Considering the higher morbidity and mortality rates of bereaved men, alcohol consumption might play a mediator role. These facts draw attention to the importance of prevention, early recognition, and effective therapy of hazardous drinking in bereaved men.

  17. Use of tobacco and alcohol by Swiss primary care physicians: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Künzi Beat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health behaviours among doctors has been suggested to be an important marker of how harmful lifestyle behaviours are perceived. In several countries, decrease in smoking among physicians was spectacular, indicating that the hazard was well known. Historical data have shown that because of their higher socio-economical status physicians take up smoking earlier. When the dangers of smoking become better known, physicians began to give up smoking at a higher rate than the general population. For alcohol consumption, the situation is quite different: prevalence is still very high among physicians and the dangers are not so well perceived. To study the situation in Switzerland, data of a national survey were analysed to determine the prevalence of smoking and alcohol drinking among primary care physicians. Methods 2'756 randomly selected practitioners were surveyed to assess subjective mental and physical health and their determinants, including smoking and drinking behaviours. Physicians were categorised as never smokers, current smokers and former smokers, as well as non drinkers, drinkers (AUDIT-C Results 1'784 physicians (65% responded (men 84%, mean age 51 years. Twelve percent were current smokers and 22% former smokers. Sixty six percent were drinkers and 30% at risk drinkers. Only 4% were never smokers and non drinkers. Forty eight percent of current smokers were also at risk drinkers and 16% of at risk drinkers were also current smokers. Smoking and at risk drinking were more frequent among men, middle aged physicians and physicians living alone. When compared to a random sample of the Swiss population, primary care physicians were two to three times less likely to be active smokers (12% vs. 30%, but were more likely to be drinkers (96% vs. 78%, and twice more likely to be at risk drinkers (30% vs. 15%. Conclusion The prevalence of current smokers among Swiss primary care physicians was much lower than in the general

  18. Auditory P3a assessment of male alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M; Porjesz, B; Begleiter, H; Polich, J

    2000-08-15

    P3a amplitude differences between alcoholic and control groups have not been well defined. Because event-related potential (ERP) differences between these groups appear to be influenced by task difficulty, the present study employed a new auditory ERP paradigm, in which target/standard tone discriminability was difficult, with infrequent nontarget stimuli used to elicit the P3a. A total of n = 27 male alcoholics and n = 25 male controls were assessed using a three-tone discrimination paradigm, in which the discriminability between the target and standard was difficult, with easily discriminable infrequent nontarget tones also presented. A P3a component with a centro-frontal maximum to the rare nontargets and a P3b with a parietal maximum amplitude to the target stimulus were obtained. Current Source Density (CSD) maps were derived from the potential data and employed to assay topographical differences between subject groups. Alcoholics produced smaller P3a amplitudes than control subjects to the rare nontargets with no peak latency differences observed. The most prominent current sources are apparent more anteriorly for the nontarget compared to the target stimulus in both groups. There were more sources and sinks in the alcoholics than in the control subjects for P3a. A bootstrap analysis method showed that P3a CSD maps evinced distinct topographic distributions between alcoholics and control subjects in all brain regions. The lower P3a amplitude and weaker sources in alcoholics coupled with less topographic specificity in their CSD maps, suggests disorganized inefficient brain functioning. This global electrophysiological pattern suggests cortical disinhibition perhaps reflecting underlying CNS hyperexcitability in alcoholics.

  19. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) to Assess Situation-Level Predictors of Alcohol Use and Alcohol-Related Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Tyler B; Merrill, Jennifer E; Monti, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) has afforded several important advances in the field of alcohol research, including testing prominent models of alcohol abuse etiology in "high resolution." Using high-tech methods for signaling and/or assessment, such as mobile electronic diaries, personal data assistants, and smartphones, EMA approaches potentially can improve understanding of precipitants of drinking, drinking patterns, and consequences. For example, EMA has been used to study complex drinking patterns and dynamic predictors of drinking in near-real time. Compared with other methods, EMA can better sample and capture changes in these phenomena that occur in relatively short time frames. EMA also has several potential applications in studying the consequences of alcohol use, including physical, interpersonal, behavioral, and legal problems. However, even with all these potential capabilities, EMA research in the alcohol field still is associated with some limitations, including the potential for measurement reactivity and problems with acceptability and compliance. Despite these limitations, electronically based EMA methods are versatile and are capable of capturing data relevant to a variety of momentary influences on both alcohol use and consequences. Therefore, it will be exciting to fully realize the potential of future applications of EMA technologies, particularly if the associated costs can be reduced.

  20. Program Needs Assessment: The Telephone Survey Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishler, Carol

    This guidebook explains how to conduct a telephone survey that will gather the information necessary for new program needs assessment in the Wisconsin Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education system. The guidebook is based on pilot assessments conducted by Fox Valley Technical College. The guidebook contains five sections: (1) introduction--why…

  1. Factors Associated with Alcohol Consumption: A Survey of Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted to identify the factors associated with alcohol consumption in Ghanaian women of childbearing age. The sample consisted of 394 women of reproductive age, of which 234 were pregnant. Systematic random sampling was used to select respondents from the clinics of ...

  2. Alternative Definitions of Hispanics: Consequences in a Alcohol Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul

    1986-01-01

    Examines impact of different definitions of Hispanic ethnicity on sociodemographic characteristics, drinking patterns, and rate of alcohol problems among 1,453 Hispanic-American respondents. Defines Hispanic ethnicity by ethnicity of family of origin, national group, country most ancestors came from, and birthplace. Finds major differences between…

  3. Assessment of perception of medical students in regard to links between tobacco or alcohol use and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, Fawaz Dabea; Khalifa, Amany M; Kosba, Ayman Ahmed; Khalil, Nuhar A; Ali, Safia M; Hassouna, Mona M; Elawad, Gamal Mohamed; Ginaw, Ibrahim Abdelmajeed; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess cancer awareness among medical students in Saudi Arabia toward tobacco and alcohol use as risk factors. A cross-sectional survey from October to December 2014, covering 1200 medical students, was performed. Of the total, 975 (81.25%) responded. The male to female ratio was 1.00:7.125. 96/975 (9.8%) had smoked tobacco in their lifetime, and 51/975 (5.23%) were alcoholic beverage consumers. On asking them whether tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption can cause cancer, only 4/975 (0.4%) and 14/975 (1.43%) answered no for smoking and alcohol, respectively. The prevalence of smoking and alcohol use is very low among medical students, which might be due to high female contribution besides social stigma. The prevalence of second-hand smoke (SHS) was found to be very high in Hail region.

  4. Alcohol consumption moderates the link between cannabis use and cannabis dependence in an internet survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smucker Barnwell, Sara; Earleywine, Mitch; Gordis, Elana B

    2005-06-01

    The link between cannabis use and cannabis dependence remains poorly understood. Some people use cannabis regularly without signs of dependence; others show dependence despite using less. This study examined alcohol consumption as a moderator of this association. A sample of 476 people (primarily Caucasian men) who used cannabis at least once per week reported their alcohol consumption, cannabis use, and cannabis dependence symptoms in an Internet survey. Regressions revealed significant interactions between measures of cannabis use and alcohol consumption when predicting cannabis dependence. Cannabis use covaried with cannabis dependence, particularly in people who consumed alcohol frequently or in large amounts per week. Despite limitations, these data suggest that alcohol may decrease the safety of cannabis consumption. Copyright 2005 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. The ACID-survey: methodology and design of an online survey to access alcohol and recreational cocaine use and its consequences for traffic safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verster, J.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/241442702; Kuerten, Y.; Olivier, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073067199; van Laar, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    Studies report consistently that cocaine and alcohol is currently the most upcoming drug combination in Europe. The Alcohol and Cocaine Impaired Drivers (ACID)-survey was conducted among Dutch partygoers (18-30 years old) to establish who will drive a car after using alcohol and/or cocaine and why.

  6. Nosologic Comparisons of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Chou, S Patricia; Smith, Sharon M; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Saha, Tulshi D; Pickering, Roger P; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine prevalences and concordances between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), and Fifth Edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders (SUDs) in a newly completed U.S. epidemiologic survey. The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III surveyed 36,309 civilian, noninstitutionalized adults. SUDs were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5. Concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders were assessed using kappa statistics. Prevalences of past-year substance-specific DSM-5 disorders (2+ criteria) were modestly higher than those of DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined for alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers, opioids, and heroin, but lower for cannabis, cocaine, and stimulants. Lifetime prevalences were lower under DSM-5. Prevalences were similar between moderate to severe (4+ criteria) DSM-5 disorders and dependence, whereas prevalences of DSM-5 disorders at 3+ criteria (DSM-5 [3+]) were higher, particularly for cannabis. Past-year concordances were excellent for DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined versus any DSM-5 and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 moderate to severe disorders; lifetime concordances were fair to excellent. Past-year concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 (3+) were generally similar to or modestly higher than those with any DSM-5 disorder; lifetime concordances were mostly lower. Findings are consistent with those informing the development of DSM-5. Future research should examine differences in patterns between past-year and lifetime disorders, particularly for cannabis. Other questions warranting investigation include whether different combinations of the same numbers of criteria carry different clinical or nosologic implications, whether changes innosology yield changes in treatment demand, and whether changes in characteristics of individuals with DSM-5 SUDs dictate modifications to screening and

  7. Nosologic Comparisons of DSM-IV and DSM-5 Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Smith, Sharon M.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Saha, Tulshi D.; Pickering, Roger P.; June Ruan, W.; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine prevalences and concordances between Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV), and Fifth Edition (DSM-5) substance use disorders (SUDs) in a newly completed U.S. epidemiologic survey. Method: The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III surveyed 36,309 civilian, noninstitutionalized adults. SUDs were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule–5. Concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 disorders were assessed using kappa statistics. Results: Prevalences of past-year substance-specific DSM-5 disorders (2+ criteria) were modestly higher than those of DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined for alcohol, sedatives/tranquilizers, opioids, and heroin, but lower for cannabis, cocaine, and stimulants. Lifetime prevalences were lower under DSM-5. Prevalences were similar between moderate to severe (4+ criteria) DSM-5 disorders and dependence, whereas prevalences of DSM-5 disorders at 3+ criteria (DSM-5 [3+]) were higher, particularly for cannabis. Past-year concordances were excellent for DSM-IV dependence and abuse combined versus any DSM-5 and DSM-IV dependence versus DSM-5 moderate to severe disorders; lifetime concordances were fair to excellent. Past-year concordances between DSM-IV and DSM-5 (3+) were generally similar to or modestly higher than those with any DSM-5 disorder; lifetime concordances were mostly lower. Conclusions: Findings are consistent with those informing the development of DSM-5. Future research should examine differences in patterns between past-year and lifetime disorders, particularly for cannabis. Other questions warranting investigation include whether different combinations of the same numbers of criteria carry different clinical or nosologic implications, whether changes innosology yield changes in treatment demand, and whether changes in characteristics of individuals with DSM-5 SUDs

  8. Increasing accurate self-report in surveys of pregnancy alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggli, Evelyne; Cook, Brendan; O'Leary, Colleen; Forster, Della; Halliday, Jane

    2015-03-01

    pregnancy alcohol research relies on self-reports of alcohol consumption. Reporting bias may contribute to ambiguous and conflicting findings on fetal effects of low to moderate pregnancy alcohol exposure. this study aimed to identify the determinants which would enable women to provide accurate data in surveys of alcohol use in pregnancy. six focus groups were held with a total of 26 pregnant women and new mothers. Participants reviewed a set of alcohol survey questions followed by a guided discussion. Transcripts were analysed using inductive content analysis. public hospital antenatal clinics and Mother & Child Health Centres, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. women's emotional responses were generally favourable, although the potential for anxiety and fear of judgement was acknowledged. Barriers to accurate self-report were recall, complexity and use of subjective language. Facilitators were appropriate drink choices, occasional drinking options and contextualising of questions. Confidentiality and survey method, including a preference for methods other than face-to face, were also important factors. questions embedded in clear context may reduce anxiety around questions about alcohol use in pregnancy. Methods using shorter recall periods, a list of drinks choices, measures of special occasion drinking and minimising complex and subjective language will increase accurate self-report. A setting perceived as confidential and anonymous may reduce a desire to provide socially acceptable answers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Quality of life following remission of mental disorders: findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Jose M; Olfson, Mark; Villegas, Laura; Pérez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Although psychiatric disorders are associated with decreased health-related quality of life, it is unknown whether symptom remission is associated with its improvement or normalization. Data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a large national sample of the United States population. A total of 34,653 adults 18 years and older residing in households completed 2 waves (2001-2002 and 2004-2005) of face-to-face surveys. DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses of mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders were based on the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version. Health-related quality of life was assessed with the Short Form-12 Health Survey, Version 2 (SF-12). Remission from alcohol dependence, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, dysthymia, social anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder was associated with significant improvement in SF-12 scores compared to nonremission (ranging from β = 7.28 in dysthymia to β = 3.16 in social anxiety disorder, all P alcohol abuse, individuals who had remitted from all other disorders had lower SF-12 scores than individuals without lifetime history of the disorder. Furthermore, remission of alcohol abuse, cannabis use disorder, nicotine dependence, panic disorder, and specific phobia was not associated with significant improvement in SF-12 scores. The relationship between psychiatric disorders and health-related quality of life is complex and differs across disorders. Although remission of several psychiatric disorders was associated with significant improvements, remission was generally not associated with full restoration of health-related quality of life, even among those without comorbid disorders. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  10. Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour to examine enrolled nursing students' intention to care for patients with alcohol dependence: A survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Anna-Lisa; Dorrian, Jillian; Chapman, Janine

    2015-11-01

    Nurses are often the first point of contact for patients hospitalized due to alcohol-related causes. Alcohol dependence is highly stigmatized and as a result healthcare professionals often have low behavioural intentions, meaning low willingness to care for these patients. This can have a direct influence on quality of care. The purpose of this study was to explore enrolled nursing students' intention to care for patients with alcohol dependence and the antecedents, preliminary factors, that predict this within the Theory of Planned Behaviour; specifically attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and controllability. The study was a cross-sectional survey using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Two Technical and Further Education South Australia campuses across metropolitan Adelaide. n=86 enrolled nursing students completed the survey (62% response rate). Enrolled nursing students' intention, attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and controllability were measured using a Theory of Planned Behaviour Questionnaire. The Short Alcohol and Alcohol Problems Perception Questionnaire investigated attitudes in more detail and a short knowledge scale assessed alcohol-related knowledge. Subjective norms and attitudes had a significant, positive effect on intention to care within the final model, accounting for 22.6% of the variance, F2,83=12.12, penrolled nursing students' intention to care for alcohol dependent patients. These findings can assist in developing tailored alcohol training for students, to increase attitudes and foster behavioural change, in order to improve the quality of care for these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): is the "prevention paradox" applicable to alcohol problems across Hispanic national groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A

    2011-07-01

    The "prevention paradox," a notion that most alcohol-related problems are generated by nonheavy drinkers, has significant relevance to public health policy and prevention efforts. The extent of the paradox has driven debate over the type of balance that should be struck between alcohol policies targeting a select group of high-risk drinkers versus more global approaches that target the population at-large. This paper examines the notion that most alcohol problems among 4 Hispanic national groups in the United States are attributable to moderate drinkers. A general population survey employing a multistage cluster sample design, with face-to-face interviews in respondents' homes was conducted in 5 metropolitan areas of the United States. Study participants included a total of 2,773 current drinkers 18 years and older. Alcohol consumed in the past year (bottom 90% vs. top 10%), binge drinking (binge vs. no binge), and a 4-way grouping defined by volume and binge criteria were used. Alcohol-related harms included 14 social and dependence problems. Drinkers at the bottom 90% of the distribution are responsible for 56 to 73% of all social problems, and for 55 to 73% of all dependence-related problems reported, depending on Hispanic national group. Binge drinkers are responsible for the majority of the social problems (53 to 75%) and dependence-related problems (59 to 73%), also depending on Hispanic national group. Binge drinkers at the bottom 90% of the distribution are responsible for a larger proportion of all social and dependence-related problems reported than those at the top 10% of the volume distribution. Cuban Americans are an exception. The prevention paradox holds when using volume-based risk groupings and disappears when using a binge-drinking risk grouping. Binge drinkers who drink moderately on an average account for more harms than those who drink heavily across all groups, with exception of Cuban Americans. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on

  12. Biomarker-Based Approaches for Assessing Alcohol Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onni Niemelä

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although alcohol use disorders rank among the leading public health problems worldwide, hazardous drinking practices and associated morbidity continue to remain underdiagnosed. It is postulated here that a more systematic use of biomarkers improves the detection of the specific role of alcohol abuse behind poor health. Interventions should be initiated by obtaining information on the actual amounts of recent alcohol consumption through questionnaires and measurements of ethanol and its specific metabolites, such as ethyl glucuronide. Carbohydrate-deficient transferrin is a valuable tool for assessing chronic heavy drinking. Activities of common liver enzymes can be used for screening ethanol-induced liver dysfunction and to provide information on the risk of co-morbidities including insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and vascular diseases. Conventional biomarkers supplemented with indices of immune activation and fibrogenesis can help to assess the severity and prognosis of ethanol-induced tissue damage. Many ethanol-sensitive biomarkers respond to the status of oxidative stress, and their levels are modulated by factors of life style, including weight gain, physical exercise or coffee consumption in an age- and gender-dependent manner. Therefore, further attention should be paid to defining safe limits of ethanol intake in various demographic categories and establishing common reference intervals for biomarkers of alcohol use disorders.

  13. Recovery from alcohol problems with and without treatment: prevalence in two population surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, L C; Cunningham, J A; Sobell, M B

    1996-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of recovery from alcohol problems with and without treatment, including whether such recoveries involved abstinence or moderate drinking. Data from two surveys of randomly selected adults in the general population were analyzed. Random-digit dialing was used to conduct telephone interviews with 11,634 and 1034 respondents. Respondents 20 years of age or older were categorized on the basis of drinking status and history. Both surveys found that most individuals (77.5% and 77.7%) who had recovered from an alcohol problem for 1 year or more did so without help or treatment. A sizable percentage (38% and 63%) also reported drinking moderately after resolving their problem. These two surveys are among the first to report prevalence rates for recovery from alcohol problems for treated and untreated individuals and for moderation and abstinence outcomes.

  14. A LITERATURE REVIEW: MENTAL HEALTH EFFECTS AND ASSESSMENT TOOLS OF ALCOHOLISM AMONG THE ELDERLY

    OpenAIRE

    Muraguri, Marytriza; Mahat, Nirupa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of alcoholism on the mental health among the elderly. Different assessment tools were used in this study in order to assess alcoholism in the older adults. The goal of the study was to create awareness among nurses and health professionals about possible mental health effects of alcoholism among the elderly. In addition, the study provided knowledge regarding the assessment tools used in assessing alcoholism among the older adults. Studies ...

  15. Alcohol Use and STI among men in India: Evidences from a national household survey

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    Arvind Pandey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol use has been found to correlate with risky sexual behavior as well as with sexually transmitted infections (STI among populations with high-risk behavior in India. Objective: To examine the correlates of alcohol use and its association with STI among adult men in India. Materials and Methods: Data from a national representative large-scale household sample survey in the country were used. It included information on sociodemographic characteristics and alcohol use as a part of substance use. Clinical as well laboratory testing was done to ascertain the STI. Results: The overall STI prevalence among adult males was found to be 2.5% (95% confidence interval (CI: 1.9-3.1. Over 26% adult men were found to have been using alcohol in the study population. It was higher among men who were illiterate and unskilled industrial workers/drivers. The men who consumed alcohol had higher prevalence of STI (3.6%; 95% CI: 2.9-5.1 than those who did not consume alcohol (2.1%; 95% CI: 1.5-2.6. The degree of association between alcoholism and STI was slightly reduced after adjusting for various sociodemographic characteristics (adjusted odds ratio: 1.5; 95% CI: 0.9-2.3; P=0.06. Conclusions: The findings of present study suggest integrating alcohol risk reduction into STI/HIV prevention programmes.

  16. Gender and Social Pressure to Change Drinking Behavior: Results from the National Alcohol Surveys from 1984-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polcin, Douglas L; Korcha, Rachael A; Kerr, William C; Greenfield, Thomas K; Bond, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Research shows social and institutional pressure influences drinking, yet determinants of who receives pressure are understudied. This paper examines age, time period, and birth cohort (APC) effects on pressure to stop or reduce drinking among U.S. men and women. Data were drawn from six National Alcohol Surveys (NAS) conducted from 1984 to 2010 (N=32,534). Receipt of pressure during the past year to quit or change drinking from formal (police, doctor, work) and informal (spouse, family, friends) sources was assessed. Determinants of pressure were similar for men and women but varied in strength. They included younger age, less education, and younger cohort groups. Cohort effects were stronger for women than men. Cohort effects among women may be due to increased alcohol marketing to younger women and the changing social contexts of their drinking. Future studies should assess associations between drinking contexts, pressures, and outcomes.

  17. Screening and Treatment for Alcohol, Tobacco and Opioid Use Disorders: A Survey of Family Physicians across Ontario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genane Loheswaran

    Full Text Available As a primary point of contact within the health care system, family physicians are able to play a vital role in identifying individuals with substance use disorders and connecting them to the appropriate treatment. However, there is very little data available on whether family physicians are actively screening for and treating substance use disorders. The objective of the current survey was to assess whether family physicians in Ontario are screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco use disorders, using validated tools and providing treatment.An online survey consisting of a series of 38 primarily close-ended questions was circulated to family physicians in Ontario. Rates of screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco dependence, use of validated tools for screening, providing treatment for dependent individuals and the current barriers to the prescription of pharmacotherapies for these drug dependences were assessed.The use of validated screening tools was limited for all three substances. Screening by family physicians for the substance use disorders among adolescents was much lower than screening among adults. Pharmacotherapy was more commonly used as an intervention for tobacco dependence than for alcohol and opioid dependence. This was explained by the lack of knowledge among family physicians on the pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid dependence.Findings from the current study suggest there is a need for family physicians to integrate screening for substance use disorders using validated tools into their standard medical practice. Furthermore, there is a need for increased knowledge on pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid use disorders. It is important to note that the low response rate is a major limitation to this study. One possible reason for this low response rate may be a lack of interest and awareness among family physicians on the importance of screening and treatment of substance use disorders in Ontario.

  18. Screening and Treatment for Alcohol, Tobacco and Opioid Use Disorders: A Survey of Family Physicians across Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loheswaran, Genane; Soklaridis, Sophie; Selby, Peter; Le Foll, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    As a primary point of contact within the health care system, family physicians are able to play a vital role in identifying individuals with substance use disorders and connecting them to the appropriate treatment. However, there is very little data available on whether family physicians are actively screening for and treating substance use disorders. The objective of the current survey was to assess whether family physicians in Ontario are screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco use disorders, using validated tools and providing treatment. An online survey consisting of a series of 38 primarily close-ended questions was circulated to family physicians in Ontario. Rates of screening for alcohol, opioid and tobacco dependence, use of validated tools for screening, providing treatment for dependent individuals and the current barriers to the prescription of pharmacotherapies for these drug dependences were assessed. The use of validated screening tools was limited for all three substances. Screening by family physicians for the substance use disorders among adolescents was much lower than screening among adults. Pharmacotherapy was more commonly used as an intervention for tobacco dependence than for alcohol and opioid dependence. This was explained by the lack of knowledge among family physicians on the pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid dependence. Findings from the current study suggest there is a need for family physicians to integrate screening for substance use disorders using validated tools into their standard medical practice. Furthermore, there is a need for increased knowledge on pharmacotherapies for alcohol and opioid use disorders. It is important to note that the low response rate is a major limitation to this study. One possible reason for this low response rate may be a lack of interest and awareness among family physicians on the importance of screening and treatment of substance use disorders in Ontario.

  19. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  20. Alcoholic beverage preference and diet in a representative Dutch population: the Dutch national food consumption survey 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluik, D; van Lee, L; Geelen, A; Feskens, E J

    2014-03-01

    The habitual consumption of a specific type of alcoholic beverage may be related to the overall dietary pattern. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate associations between alcoholic beverage preference and dietary intake in The Netherlands. A total of 2100 men and women from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007-2010 were studied. A general questionnaire assessed alcoholic beverage preference and two non-consecutive 24-h dietary recalls assessed overall diet. Mean nutrient and food group intakes, and adherence to the 2006 Dutch dietary guidelines across categories of alcoholic beverage preference were compared and adjusted for age, sex, body mass index (BMI), education, smoking, physical activity, energy intake and frequency and absolute alcohol consumption. Largest differences in dietary habits were detected between persons who preferred wine and those who preferred beer. Persons with a beer preference had a higher absolute intake of meat, soft drinks, margarine and snacks. In contrast, persons with a wine preference had a higher absolute consumption of healthy foods. However, after multiple adjustments, wine consumers still consumed less energy and more vegetables and fruit juices compared with beer consumers. Adherence to the Dutch dietary guidelines did not differ between preference categories after multiple adjustments. In this cross-sectional analysis in a representative sample of the Dutch population, a beer preference was associated with less healthy dietary behaviour, especially compared with wine preference. However, these differences were largely explained by other socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. These results suggest that alcoholic beverage preference may not be independently related to diet.

  1. Maternal factors associated with heavy periconceptional alcohol intake and drinking following pregnancy recognition: a post-partum survey of New Zealand women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallard, Simonette R; Connor, Jennie L; Houghton, Lisa A

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy places the foetus at risk of Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. Little is known about the current prevalence and patterns of alcohol consumption before and following pregnancy recognition in New Zealand. A retrospective survey of 723 post-partum women resident in maternity wards located across New Zealand was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. Maternal sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics and alcohol intake before and after pregnancy recognition were assessed. Of the 968 women invited to participate, 78% agreed. Eighty-two percent of women reported consuming alcohol prior to pregnancy and 20% reported typically consuming >4 New Zealand standard drinks per occasion. Overall, 34% of women reported drinking at some time during pregnancy. Twelve percent of pregnancies were at high risk of heavy alcohol exposure in early gestation. In fully adjusted analysis, pregnancies most at risk were those of indigenous Māori women, Pacific women, smokers and drug users. Almost one-quarter (24%) of drinkers continued to drink following pregnancy recognition, and in fully adjusted analysis, continuing to drink was positively associated with frequency of alcohol consumption before pregnancy (P drinking' culture and the frequent consumption of lower levels of alcohol. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  2. Human Health Assessment of Alcohol To Jet (ATJ) Synthetic Kerosenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-30

    AFRL-RH-WP-TR-2017-0007 HUMAN HEALTH ASSESSMENT OF ALCOHOL -TO-JET (ATJ) SYNTHETIC KEROSENES Teresa R. Sterner Brian A. Wong Henry M...the high dose in the FT study were correlated with body weight decreases and not considered to be a direct effect from the fuel (Mattie et al., 2011a...Air Force Research Laboratory, 711th Human Performance Wing, Human Effectiveness Directorate, Bioeffects Division, Molecular Bioeffects Branch. AFRL

  3. Ecological Momentary Assessment and Alcohol Use Disorder Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Morgenstern, Jon; KUERBIS, ALEXIS; Muench, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    The ability to capture real-time data on human behavior inexpensively, efficiently, and accurately holds promise to transform and broaden our understanding of many areas of health science. One approach to acquiring this type of real-time data is ecological momentary assessment (EMA). This method has been used to collect data in many domains of addiction research, including research on the treatment of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Empirical evidence supports the hypothesis that use of EMA can...

  4. Association between alcohol consumption and periodontal disease: the 2008 to 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Beom; Han, Kyungdo; Park, Yong-Gyu; Ko, Youngkyung

    2014-11-01

    A positive association has been reported between alcohol and periodontal disease. Therefore, this study is conducted to assess the relationship between alcohol intake and severity of periodontal disease in a large probability sample of the Korean population using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES). Data from KNHANES, conducted between 2008 and 2010 by the Division of Chronic Disease Surveillance under the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare, were used for this study. The presence of periodontal treatment needs according to demographic variables and anthropometric and hematologic characteristics of the participants are presented as means with their standard errors. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to assess the associations of periodontal treatment needs with the amount of alcohol intake and other variables including smoking and the number of times of toothbrushing per day. An association between drinking alcohol and periodontal treatment needs could be seen in men after adjustment for variables. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in males were 1.271 (1.030 to 1.568) for heavy drinkers after controlling for age, smoking, body mass index, exercise, education, income, white blood cell count, diabetes, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and number of toothbrushing episodes per day (model 3). Adjusted ORs and their 95% CIs in males were 1.569 (1.284 to 1.916) for alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) level ≥20 in model 3. ORs increased with the increase in alcohol consumption levels and AUDIT levels. Statistically significant correlations between drinking and periodontal treatment needs could not be seen in female heavy drinkers or female drinkers with AUDIT levels ≥20. Men with higher alcohol intake were more likely to have a higher prevalence of treatment needs regardless of their age, socioeconomic factors

  5. Patterns of sports sponsorship by gambling, alcohol and food companies: an Internet survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signal Louise

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sports sponsorship is a significant marketing tool. As such, it can promote products that pose risks to health (eg, high fat and high sugar foods or it can promote health-supporting products (eg, sporting equipment and services. However, there is a lack of data on the proportion of sponsorship associated with "unhealthy" and "healthy" products and no methodology for systematically assessing it. This research aimed to explore this proportion with an Internet survey of sports sponsorship in the New Zealand setting. Methods A search methodology was developed to identify Internet-based evidence of sports sponsorship at the national level and at the regional and club level in one specific region (Wellington. The top eight sports for 5-17-year-olds were selected and products and services of sponsors were classified in terms of potential public health impact (using a conservative approach. Results Sponsorship of these popular sports was common at the national, regional and club levels (640 sponsors listed on 107 websites overall. Sports sponsorship associated with sponsors' products classified as "unhealthy" (eg, food high in fat and sugar, gambling and alcohol were over twice as common as sponsorship associated with sponsors' products classified as "healthy" (32.7% (95% CI = 29.1, 36.5 versus 15.5% (95% CI = 12.8, 18.6 respectively. "Gambling" was the most common specific type of sponsorship (18.8% followed by alcohol (11.3%. There were significantly more "alcohol" sponsors for rugby, compared to all the other sports collectively (rate ratio (RR = 2.47; 95% CI = 1.60, 3.79, and for top male sports compared to female (RR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.05, 3.18. Also there was significantly more "unhealthy food" sponsorship for touch rugby and for "junior" teams/clubs compared to other sports collectively (RR = 6.54; 95% CI = 2.07, 20.69; and RR = 14.72, 95% CI = 6.22, 34.8; respectively. A validation study gave an inter-rater reliability for

  6. Assessment of alcohol use patterns among spanish-speaking patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfipour, Shahram; Cisneros, Victor; Anderson, Craig L; Roumani, Samer; Hoonpongsimanont, Wirachin; Weiss, Jie; Chakravarthy, Bharath; Dykzeul, Brad; Vaca, Federico

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess drinking patterns of Spanish-speaking patients using a bilingual computerized alcohol screening and brief intervention (CASI) tablet computer equipped with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). This retrospective study was conducted in a tertiary university hospital emergency department (ED) between 2006 and 2010. Data from 1816 Spanish-speaking ED patients were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the chi-square test for independence, and the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test for comparisons using quantitative variables. Overall, 15% of Spanish-speaking patients were at-risk drinkers, and 5% had an AUDIT score consistent with alcohol dependency (≥20). A higher percentage of Spanish-speaking males than females were at-risk drinkers or likely dependent. Spanish-speaking males exhibited higher frequency of drinking days per week and higher number of drinks per day compared with females. Among older patients, nondrinking behavior increased and at-risk drinkers decreased. The majority of males and females were ready to change their behavior after the CASI intervention; 61% and 69%, respectively, scored 8-10. This study indicated that CASI was an effective tool for detecting at-risk and likely dependent drinking behavior in Spanish-speaking ED patients. The majority of patients were ready to change their drinking behavior. More alcohol screening and brief intervention tools should be tested and become readily accessible for Spanish-speaking patients.

  7. Review of survey and experimental research that examines the relationship between alcohol consumption and men's sexual aggression perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Antonia; Wegner, Rhiana; Woerner, Jacqueline; Pegram, Sheri E; Pierce, Jennifer

    2014-10-01

    This article systematically reviews empirical studies that examine associations between alcohol consumption and men's sexual aggression with the goal of identifying major findings; gaps in current knowledge; and directions for future research, practice, and policy. We identified 25 cross-sectional surveys, 6 prospective studies, and 12 alcohol administration experiments published between 1993 and August 2013 with male college students and young adult (nonincarcerated) samples. Many cross-sectional surveys have demonstrated that distal and proximal measures of men's alcohol consumption are positively associated with sexual assault perpetration, although very few of these studies evaluated how alcohol interacts with other risk and protective factors to exacerbate or inhibit sexual aggression. There are surprisingly few surveys that examine alcohol's effects at the event level and over short-time intervals to identify how changes in alcohol consumption are associated with changes in perpetration status. Alcohol administration studies suggest some important mechanisms that warrant additional investigation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Review of Survey and Experimental Research That Examines the Relationship Between Alcohol Consumption and Men's Sexual Aggression Perpetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Antonia; Wegner, Rhiana; Woerner, Jacqueline; Pegram, Sheri E.; Pierce, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This article systematically reviews empirical studies that examine associations between alcohol consumption and men's sexual aggression with the goal of identifying major findings; gaps in current knowledge; and directions for future research, practice, and policy. We identified 25 cross-sectional surveys, 6 prospective studies, and 12 alcohol administration experiments published between 1993 and August 2013 with male college students and young adult (nonincarcerated) samples. Many cross-sectional surveys have demonstrated that distal and proximal measures of men's alcohol consumption are positively associated with sexual assault perpetration, although very few of these studies evaluated how alcohol interacts with other risk and protective factors to exacerbate or inhibit sexual aggression. There are surprisingly few surveys that examine alcohol's effects at the event level and over short-time intervals to identify how changes in alcohol consumption are associated with changes in perpetration status. Alcohol administration studies suggest some important mechanisms that warrant additional investigation. PMID:24776459

  9. [Nationwide survey on alcohol use among junior and senior high school students in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaki, Y; Minowa, M; Suzuki, K; Wada, K

    1999-10-01

    We conducted the first nationwide survey on alcohol use by Japanese junior and senior high school students using a representative sampling procedure. Sample schools were selected by stratified cluster sampling. Response rates for self-administered anonymous questionnaires sent to sample schools for all students to fill out were 65.6% for junior high schools and 67.0% for senior high schools. A total of 117,325 students responded and 115,814 questionnaires were subjected to analysis. The proportion of current alcohol use (drank alcohol on > = 1 of the 30 days preceding the survey) among seventh graders was 26.0% for boys and 22.2% for girls, and it increased with age to reach 54.9% for boys and 43.4% for girls in the twelfth grade. The experience rate of alcohol drinking on ceremonial occasions was much higher than for any other modes of drinking. However, the experience rates of drinking with peers at parties, in bars, and drinking alone increased with age. The proportion of heavy drinkers also increased with age. The cumulative experience rate of drinking with peers was dramatically increased in senior high school students. The most popular alcohol drink among boys was beer, whereas it was liquor with sweet taste among girls. Most important routes of purchase of alcohol were convenience stores, bars, liquor shops, and vending machines.

  10. High alcohol consumption in Germany: results of the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Martina; Mensink, Gert B M

    2004-10-01

    To analyse the alcohol consumption behaviour of the German adult population, with a focus on the characteristics of persons drinking more than the tolerable upper alcohol intake level (TUAL) of 10-12 g day(-1) for healthy adult women and 20-24 g day(-1) for healthy adult men. For the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998, a representative sample of free-living adults was drawn. A total of 7124 participants were interviewed comprehensively about their sociodemographic background, lifestyle and eating habits including alcohol consumption. A sub-sample of 4030 women and men, 18-79 years old, who were involved in the integrated German Nutrition Survey. About 16% of women and 31% of men had mean alcohol consumption above the TUAL. Among other factors, the inclination to exceed the TUAL was related to middle-age, high socio-economic status, smoking and use of soft drugs. Among both women and men, a high proportion of persons drinking above the TUAL was observed among those consuming low amounts of soft drinks, fruit, poultry, milk products, bread and cake/biscuits. Women preferred to drink wine, whereas men preferred to drink beer. Many Germans have an alcohol consumption level above the TUAL and thus are supposed to be at increased risk for alcohol-associated diseases.

  11. Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Data (BASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) study was a five year study to characterize determinants of indoor air quality and occupant perceptions in representative public and commercial office buildings across the U.S. This data source is the raw data from this study about the indoor air quality.

  12. A moderating role for gender in racial/ethnic disparities in alcohol services utilization: results from the 2000 to 2010 national alcohol surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemore, Sarah E; Murphy, Ryan D; Mulia, Nina; Gilbert, Paul A; Martinez, Priscilla; Bond, Jason; Polcin, Douglas L

    2014-08-01

    Few nationally representative studies have examined racial/ethnic disparities in alcohol services utilization. Further, little is known about whether racial/ethnic disparities generalize across genders, and what factors account for these disparities. Thus, we aimed to describe the combined impact of race/ethnicity and gender on alcohol services utilization, and to explore the roles for social influence factors in explaining racial/ethnic and gender disparities. Data were pooled across the 2000, 2005, and 2010 National Alcohol Surveys. Outcomes included lifetime utilization of any services, specialty alcohol treatment, and Alcoholics Anonymous. Social influence factors were assessed as lifetime social pressures (i.e., pressures from a partner, friends, and/or family), legal consequences, and work-related consequences. Core analyses included only those with a lifetime alcohol use disorder (AUD). Analyses revealed a pattern of lower services utilization among Latinos and Blacks (vs. Whites) and women (vs. men); further, race-by-gender interactions revealed that Black-White differences were limited to women, and provided some evidence of stronger Latino-White disparities among women (vs. men). Illustrating these patterns, among women, only 2.5% of Latinas and 3.4% of Blacks with a lifetime AUD accessed specialty treatment, versus 6.7% of Whites; among men, corresponding figures were 6.8% for Latinos, 12.2% for Blacks, and 10.1% for Whites. Racial/ethnic differences were typically robust (or stronger) when controlling for demographics and AUD severity. Evidence did not support a role for measured social influence factors in racial/ethnic disparities, but did suggest that these factors contribute to gender disparities, particularly among Whites and Blacks. Findings for substantial Latino-White and Black-White disparities, especially among women, highlight the need for continuing research on explanatory factors and the development of appropriate interventions. Meanwhile

  13. Services for prisoners with alcohol-related problems: a survey of U.K. prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurran, M; Baldwin, S

    1989-09-01

    Offenders have been identified as heavy drinkers who admit to a relationship between drinking and offending. Many prisoners express a desire to reduce their alcohol consumption. The extent of alcohol interventions in U.K. prisons was unknown and so a postal survey was conducted to gather basic information about current work. Of all responding establishments, 91% claimed to provide services for prisoners with alcohol-related problems and 58% gave details of these services. Services are provided mainly by probation officers/social workers, prison officers and Alcoholics Anonymous. Group and individual interventions are described. Service development has been haphazard, lacking central co-ordination. A case is made for appointment of a central facilitator responsible for staff training, establishing a communications network, encouraging new interventions to match clients' needs, encouraging closer links with community workers and guiding evaluative research.

  14. Gender-related influences of parental alcoholism on the prevalence of psychiatric illnesses: Analysis of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter T.; Desai, Rani A.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2010-01-01

    Background Offspring of individuals with alcoholism are at increased risk for psychiatric illness, but the effects of gender on this risk are not well known. In this study we tested the hypothesis that the gender of the parent with alcoholism and the gender of offspring affect the association between parental alcoholism and offspring psychiatric illness. Method We analyzed the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) data to examine the gender-specific prevalence of Axis I and Axis II disorders in 23,006 male and 17,368 female respondents with and without a history of paternal or maternal alcoholism. Adjusted odds-ratios were calculated for the disorders based on gender and presence of maternal or paternal alcoholism. Results Maternal or paternal alcoholism was associated with a higher prevalence of every disorder examined, regardless of the gender of offspring. Gender-related differences in prevalences were present in nearly all examined disorders and the association between parental alcoholism and offspring psychiatric disorders was significantly different in men and women. These differences included stronger associations in female offspring of men with alcoholism (alcohol abuse without dependence); in female offspring of women with alcoholism (mania, nicotine dependence, alcohol abuse, and schizoid personality disorder); in male offspring of men with alcoholism (mania); and in male offspring of women with alcoholism (panic disorder). Conclusions Interactions between gender and parental alcoholism were specific to certain disorders but varied in their effects, and in general female children of women with alcoholism appear at greatest risk for adult psychopathology. PMID:20645936

  15. A drunk and disorderly country: a nationwide cross-sectional survey of alcohol use and misuse in Great Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Craig, D. G.; Dakkak, M; Gilmore, I T; Hawkey, C.J.; Rhodes, J M; Sheron, N

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore current alcohol drinking patterns, behaviours and attitudes in Great Britain. Design and setting Independent online cross-sectional survey. Patients and interventions Survey of 2221 individuals from a representative panel. Main outcome measures and results Excessive alcohol consumption is a widespread problem across Great Britain. Binge-drinking is common among 18?24 year olds, with 19% reporting drinking 10+ drinks on the same drinking day. ?Pre-loading? with alcohol at...

  16. Estimating non-response bias in a survey on alcohol consumption: comparison of response waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M. Lahaut; H.A.M. Jansen (Harrie); H. van de Mheen (Dike); H.F.L. Garretsen (Henk); J.E. Verdurmen; A. van Dijk (Bram)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: According to 'the continuum of resistance model' late respondents can be used as a proxy for non-respondents in estimating non-response bias. In the present study, the validity of this model was explored and tested in three surveys on alcohol consumption. METHODS:

  17. Alcohol Consumption Practices among Married Women of Reproductive Age in Nepal: A Population Based Household Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Narbada; Aryal, Krishna Kumar; Puri, Rupendra; Shrestha, Saraswoti; Shrestha, Sheela; Thapa, Pukar; Mehata, Suresh; Thapa, Pushpa; Banjara, Megha Raj; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol chemically known as ethanol, causes several health, economic and social consequences across the world. Literatures suggest potential harm of alcohol drinking by pregnant women especially to the fetus and the mother. Despite anumber of significant public health problems related to alcohol consumption, this area has been ignored in Nepal and information at the national level is limited. Thus this study aimed at finding the prevalence of alcohol consumption among married women of reproductive age. Methods A nationally representative household survey was carried out from April to August 2013 by taking 16 districts across all 15 eco administrative regions. From the selected districts, 86 village development committees and 14 municipalities were selected as primary sampling units using probability proportionate to size, followed by random selection of 3 wards from each primary sampling unit. Finally, 30 households within each ward were selected using systematic random sampling, and one married women of reproductive age from each household. A total of 9000 married women of reproductive age were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire, on alcohol consumption practices including environmental factors and socio demographic characteristics and were included in the analysis. Results National prevalence of alcohol consumption ever among married women of reproductive age was 24.7% (95% CI:21.7–28.0), last 12 months 17.9% (95% CI:15.3–20.7) and last 30 days (current drinking) 11.8% (95% CI:9.8–14.1). There was substantial variation among the districts ranging from 2% to 60%. Multivariable analysis suggests women with no education or within formal education, dalit and janajatis ethnicity, whose husbands drink alcohol, who brew alcohol at home and women from mountains were significantly at higher risk of consuming alcohol. Among the women who drank alcohol in last 12 months, a substantial proportion of them drank home brewed alcoholic beverages

  18. Alcohol Consumption Practices among Married Women of Reproductive Age in Nepal: A Population Based Household Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narbada Thapa

    Full Text Available Alcohol chemically known as ethanol, causes several health, economic and social consequences across the world. Literatures suggest potential harm of alcohol drinking by pregnant women especially to the fetus and the mother. Despite a number of significant public health problems related to alcohol consumption, this area has been ignored in Nepal and information at the national level is limited. Thus this study aimed at finding the prevalence of alcohol consumption among married women of reproductive age.A nationally representative household survey was carried out from April to August 2013 by taking 16 districts across all 15 eco administrative regions. From the selected districts, 86 village development committees and 14 municipalities were selected as primary sampling units using probability proportionate to size, followed by random selection of 3 wards from each primary sampling unit. Finally, 30 households within each ward were selected using systematic random sampling, and one married women of reproductive age from each household. A total of 9000 married women of reproductive age were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire, on alcohol consumption practices including environmental factors and socio demographic characteristics and were included in the analysis.National prevalence of alcohol consumption ever among married women of reproductive age was 24.7% (95% CI:21.7-28.0, last 12 months 17.9% (95% CI:15.3-20.7 and last 30 days (current drinking 11.8% (95% CI:9.8-14.1. There was substantial variation among the districts ranging from 2% to 60%. Multivariable analysis suggests women with no education or within formal education, dalit and janajatis ethnicity, whose husbands drink alcohol, who brew alcohol at home and women from mountains were significantly at higher risk of consuming alcohol. Among the women who drank alcohol in last 12 months, a substantial proportion of them drank home brewed alcoholic beverages (95.9%, 95% CI:94

  19. Alcohol Consumption Practices among Married Women of Reproductive Age in Nepal: A Population Based Household Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Narbada; Aryal, Krishna Kumar; Puri, Rupendra; Shrestha, Saraswoti; Shrestha, Sheela; Thapa, Pukar; Mehata, Suresh; Thapa, Pushpa; Banjara, Megha Raj; Stray-Pedersen, Babill

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol chemically known as ethanol, causes several health, economic and social consequences across the world. Literatures suggest potential harm of alcohol drinking by pregnant women especially to the fetus and the mother. Despite a number of significant public health problems related to alcohol consumption, this area has been ignored in Nepal and information at the national level is limited. Thus this study aimed at finding the prevalence of alcohol consumption among married women of reproductive age. A nationally representative household survey was carried out from April to August 2013 by taking 16 districts across all 15 eco administrative regions. From the selected districts, 86 village development committees and 14 municipalities were selected as primary sampling units using probability proportionate to size, followed by random selection of 3 wards from each primary sampling unit. Finally, 30 households within each ward were selected using systematic random sampling, and one married women of reproductive age from each household. A total of 9000 married women of reproductive age were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire, on alcohol consumption practices including environmental factors and socio demographic characteristics and were included in the analysis. National prevalence of alcohol consumption ever among married women of reproductive age was 24.7% (95% CI:21.7-28.0), last 12 months 17.9% (95% CI:15.3-20.7) and last 30 days (current drinking) 11.8% (95% CI:9.8-14.1). There was substantial variation among the districts ranging from 2% to 60%. Multivariable analysis suggests women with no education or within formal education, dalit and janajatis ethnicity, whose husbands drink alcohol, who brew alcohol at home and women from mountains were significantly at higher risk of consuming alcohol. Among the women who drank alcohol in last 12 months, a substantial proportion of them drank home brewed alcoholic beverages (95.9%, 95% CI:94.3-97.4). Alcohol

  20. Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): effects of container size adjustments on estimates of alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A; Harris, T Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine discrepancies in alcohol consumption estimates between a self-reported standard quantity-frequency measure and an adjusted version based on respondents' typically used container size. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 Hispanic individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The survey-weighted response rate was 76%. Personal interviews lasting an average of 1 hour were conducted in respondents' homes in either English or Spanish. The overall effect of container adjustment was to increase estimates of ethanol consumption by 68% for women (range across Hispanic groups: 17%-99%) and 30% for men (range: 14%-42%). With the exception of female Cuban American, Mexican American, and South/Central American beer drinkers and male Cuban American wine drinkers, all percentage differences between unadjusted and container-adjusted estimates were positive. Second, container adjustments produced the largest change for volume of distilled spirits, followed by wine and beer. Container size adjustments generally produced larger percentage increases in consumption estimates for the higher volume drinkers, especially the upper tertile of female drinkers. Self-reported alcohol consumption based on standard drinks underreports consumption when compared with reports based on the amount of alcohol poured into commonly used containers.

  1. Assessing alcohol abstinence self-efficacy in undergraduate students: psychometric evaluation of the alcohol abstinence self-efficacy scale

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glozah, Franklin N; Adu, Nana Ama Takyibea; Komesuor, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    .... However, research on the assessment of self-efficacy to abstain from alcohol use among undergraduate students is almost non-existent in Ghana, apparently due to the unavailability of a standardised testing instrument...

  2. Treatment of Sleep Disturbance in Alcohol Recovery: A National Survey of Addiction Medicine Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Herman, Debra S.; Freedman, Shelby; Lemon, Stephenie C.; Ramsey, Susan; Stein, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common among patients in recovery from alcoholism and can precipitate relapse. Though sleep complaints are commonly managed with medication, little is known about their management among recovering alcoholic patients. We performed a postal survey of a self-weighted, random systematic sample of 503 members of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) to examine addiction medicine physicians’ medical management of sleep disturbance among patients in early recovery from alcoholism. After 3 mailings, 311 (62%) responded. Of responents, 64% have offered pharmacological treatment to an insomniac, alcoholic patient in the first 3 months after detoxification, but only 22% offered medication to more than half of such patients. Trazodone was the preferred therapy, chosen first by 38% of respondents, followed by other sedating antidepressants (12%), and antihistamines (12%). The mean duration of therapy for trazodone and other sedating antidepressants exceeded one month. Experts in addiction medicine appear reluctant to prescribe medication to sleep-disturbed patients in early recovery from alcoholism. When they do prescribe, trazodone, other sedating antidepressants and antihistamines are favored, despite limited evidence for or against this indication. Although the treatment of disordered sleep among alcoholic patients in early recovery may have merit to prevent relapse, controlled studies of these sleep agents are needed. PMID:12703672

  3. Ethnic drinking cultures and alcohol use among Asian American adults: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Won Kim; Mulia, Nina; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the influence of ethnic drinking cultures on alcohol use by Asian Americans and how this influence may be moderated by their level of integration into Asian ethnic cultures. A nationally representative sample of 952 Asian American adults extracted from the Wave 2 National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions data was used. Multiple logistic and linear regression models were fitted, some of which were stratified by nativity. Controlling for financial stress, discrimination and demographic variables, a hypothesized, positive relationship between ethnic drinking cultures and alcohol outcomes held for most drinking outcomes. A hypothesis on the moderating effect of integration into ethnic cultures indicated by ethnic language use was supported for US-born Asian Americans. Ethnic drinking cultures may significantly influence alcohol use by Asian Americans. The influence of ethnic drinking cultures may be conditioned by the degree of integration into the ethnic cultures. To inform alcohol interventions for reducing harmful and hazardous alcohol use among immigrants, future research needs to explore the cultural and social processes occurring in immigrant communities that might significantly influence drinking.

  4. Alcohol consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: effect modification by hypercholesterolemia: the Third Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyeongap; Jang, Won-Mo; Park, Jong-Heon; Oh, Juhwan; Oh, Mu-Kyung; Hwang, Soo-Hee; Kim, Yong-Ik; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2012-01-01

    While the protective nature of moderate alcohol consumption against diabetes mellitus is well known, inconsistent findings continue to be reported. The possibility of different mixes of effect modifiers has been raised as a reason for those inconsistent findings. Our study aim was to examine potential effect modifiers that can change the effect of alcohol consumption on type 2 diabetes. From data in the third Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 3,982 individuals over the age of 30 years who had not been diagnosed with diabetes were selected for inclusion in the study population. Breslow and Day's test and the Wald test between hypercholesterolemia and alcohol consumption in a multiple logistic regression model were used to assess effect modification. Odds ratios for diabetes stratified by alcohol consumption strata and assessed using Breslow and Day's tests for homogeneity indicated that hypercholesterolemia was not a significant confounding factor (p=0.01). However, the Wald test for interaction terms, which is a conservative method of effect modification, was significant (p=0.03). The results indicate that moderate alcohol consumption is not necessarily protective for type 2 diabetes mellitus, if a person has hypercholesterolemia. People who have hypercholesterolemia should be aware of the risk associated with alcohol consumption, a risk that contrasts with the reported protective effect of moderate alcohol consumption on diabetes.

  5. Alcohol use, alcohol-related aggression and intimate partner abuse: A cross-sectional survey of convicted versus general population men in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Elizabeth Allison; Ireland, Lana; Forsyth, Alasdair; Godwin, Jon; Laxton, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Scotland has a particular problem with alcohol, and the links between intimate partner abuse (IPA) and alcohol appear stronger here than elsewhere across Europe. This study explored differences in alcohol use, related aggression and relationship conflict across a number of groups: men convicted for intimate partner abuse, men convicted of general offences and men recruited from community sports teams. Participants (n = 64) completed three questionnaires exploring their experiences of alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, AUDIT); alcohol and aggression (Alcohol Related Aggression Questionnaire, ARAQ-28), and relationship conflict (Revised Conflict Tactics Scale, CTS-2). There were significant differences across the groups in terms of AUDIT and ARAQ-28 scores, IPA and general offenders scored higher than the community sample. CTS-2 scores showed significant differences: both offender groups reported more use of negotiation and psychological abuse, than the community men, and IPA offenders reported causing more physical harm than either general offenders or the community sample. ARAQ-28 scores correlated with psychological abuse for general offenders. Alcohol use was very high across all groups, but the community group did not endorse an aggression-precipitating view of alcohol and did not report high IPA. Discussed is the need for cross-cultural research to explore putative mediators and moderators in the relationship between alcohol, aggressiveness and IPA. [Gilchrist EA, Ireland L, Forsyth A, Godwin J, Laxton T. Alcohol use, alcohol-related aggression and intimate partner abuse: A cross-sectional survey of convicted versus general population men in Scotland. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;36:20-23]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  6. Public participation in local alcohol regulation: Findings from a survey of New Zealand communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypri, Kypros; Maclennan, Brett

    2014-01-01

    In many high-income countries, the responsibility for alcohol regulation is being devolved from central to local governments. Although seeking public input is typically required by law, there remains little empirical evidence on whether and how the public is involved. We investigated public participation in local liquor licensing and related regulation in New Zealand. In 2007, we randomly sampled 2337 residents from the national electoral roll in seven communities and invited them to complete a postal questionnaire assessing their level of general community engagement, whether they had taken action on alcohol issues, and barriers to participation they perceived or encountered. A total of 1372 individuals responded (59% response). Fifty-two percent were current members of community organisations, and 40% had ever taken action on a local issue. Respondents considered alcohol to be a major problem locally, but only 4% had been involved in action to address a problem, whereas 18% had considered taking action. In their communities, 12% and 24%, respectively, felt they could influence the number or location of alcohol outlets. There was little variation across communities. Despite high levels of general community engagement and alcohol being widely regarded as a local problem, few community members reported acting on alcohol issues, and their self-efficacy to effect change was low. © 2013 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  7. Prevalence of Alcohol Consumption among University Students in Baghdad: A Cross-section survey from Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawa Jaafar Kadhim Al-Ameri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol consumption is a well-known public health problem, especially among university students. It was poorly studied in Middle East, especially in Iraq, due to religious and social taboos. This study conducted to throw a light on the prevalence of Alcohol consumption among university students in Baghdad. Subjects and methods: A survey conducted in three universities (Baghdad, Al-Mustansiriyah and Al-Nahrain from Baghdad city, in the duration between January and May 2015. A semi-structured questionnaire form used to collect the data from 1435 university students. The sample selected by multistage random sampling technique with probability proportion to size. Results: The average age (range of the studied sample was 19.8 (18 - 24 years; more than a half of them were females 760 (53%. Alcohol consumption was reported by 9.7% (95%CI: 8.2% - 11.2% of the participants (19.7% males vs. 0.8% females. Heavy Alcohol consumption was reported by 12.2% of consumers. Male students living out of their families or relatives and those of medical group colleges found to be risk factors for Alcohol consumption (PR= 2.65, 95% CI: 1.72 - 4.1 and (PR= 2.72, 95%CI: 1.48 - 5.01 respectively. No significant relations showed between demographic characters of female students and Alcohol consumption. Conclusions: Usage of Alcohol was relatively prevalent among university students in Baghdad, in spite of religious and social barriers in Iraq. Family and college staff supervision and education of the students with meetings targeting health risks and sequels of Alcohol hazardous consumption are the effective ways to control this practice.

  8. Alcohol drinking patterns and diet quality: the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslow, Rosalind A; Guenther, Patricia M; Smothers, Barbara A

    2006-02-15

    Associations between alcohol drinking and cardiovascular disease mortality could be confounded by diet if alcohol drinking and diet are related. Depending on the alcohol measure, alcohol-diet relations may or may not be observed. The authors examined associations between alcohol and diet quality (Healthy Eating Index (HEI) scores) using cross-sectional, nationally representative data from the 1999-2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Weighted analyses included 3,729 participants aged > or =20 years. In adjusted analyses among current alcohol drinkers, as quantity increased from 1 to > or =3 drinks/drinking day, the mean HEI score decreased from 65.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 63.4, 67.1) to 61.9 (95% CI: 60.5, 63.2). As frequency increased from the lowest quartile to the highest, the mean HEI score increased from 60.9 (95% CI: 58.7, 63.2) to 64.9 (95% CI: 63.4, 66.4). As average volume ((quantity x frequency)/365.25) increased from or =3 drinks/day, the mean HEI score increased from 62.9 (95% CI: 61.2, 64.5) to 65.2 (95% CI: 62.7, 67.8). In stratified analyses, the lowest HEI score, 58.5 (95% CI: 55.5, 61.5), occurred among drinkers who consumed the highest quantity at the lowest frequency. Average volume of alcohol consumed is driven by and masks the contributions of its components. These results suggest the importance of measuring drinking patterns (quantity, frequency, and stratified combinations) in epidemiologic alcohol-diet studies.

  9. Sexual orientation identity and tobacco and hazardous alcohol use: findings from a cross-sectional English population survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Lion; Brown, Jamie; Hagger-Johnson, Gareth; Michie, Susan; Semlyen, Joanna; West, Robert; Meads, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the association between tobacco and hazardous alcohol use and sexual orientation and whether such an association could be explained by other sociodemographic characteristics. Design Cross-sectional household survey conducted in 2014–2016. Setting England, UK. Participants Representative English population sample (pooled n=43 866). Main outcomes Sexual orientation identity (lesbian/gay, bisexual, heterosexual, prefer-not-to-say); current tobacco and hazardous alcohol use (defined as Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Score ≥8). All outcomes were self-reported. Results Due to interactions between sexual orientation and gender for substance use, analyses were stratified by gender. Tobacco use prevalence was significantly higher among lesbian/gay (women: 24.9%, 95% CI 19.2% to 32.6%; men: 25.9%, 95% CI 21.3% to 31.0%) and bisexual participants (women: 32.4%, 95% CI 25.9% to 39.6%; men: 30.7%, 95% CI 23.7% to 30.7%) and significantly lower for prefer-not-to-say participants in women (15.5%, 95% CI 13.5% to 17.8%) but not men (22.7%, 95% CI 20.3% to 25.3%) compared with heterosexual participants (women: 17.5%, 95% CI 17.0% to 18.0%; men: 20.4%, 95% CI 19.9% to 21.0%; psexual orientation groups among both women and men. By contrast, sexual orientation differences in hazardous alcohol use remained even after adjustment among women but not for bisexual and gay men. Conclusions In England, higher rates of tobacco use among sexual minority men and women appear to be attributable to other sociodemographic factors. Higher rates of hazardous alcohol use among sexual minority men may also be attributable to these factors, whereas this is not the case for sexual minority women. PMID:29074508

  10. Assessing alcohol versus baclofen withdrawal syndrome in patients treated with baclofen for alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Benjamin; Jaillette, Emmanuelle; Carton, Louise; Bence, Camille; Deheul, Sylvie; Saulnier, Fabienne; Bordet, Régis; Cottencin, Olivier

    2014-02-01

    Baclofen is a γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABA-B) receptor agonist that is approved for spasticity. Recently, the off-label use of baclofen for alcohol use disorder (AUD) has increased. However, baclofen is known to induce a neuroadaptation process, which may be identified by the occurrence of a specific baclofen withdrawal syndrome (BWS), that is, confusion, agitation, seizures, and delirium. The same set of symptoms characterizes alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS), which could lead to mistaking BWS for AWS in some situations. We report the cases of 3 patients under a chronic baclofen treatment for AUD. The patients emergently presented with a clinical state of confusion that was initially diagnosed and treated as AWS, with limited effect of benzodiazepines. Retrospectively, using a validated algorithm for assessing drug-induced withdrawal, we determined that all of these clinical cases were consistent with BWS. Both AWS and BWS should be considered in the case of acute confusion or delirium occurring in patients treated with baclofen for AUD. Moreover, further research should investigate to what extent GABA-A and GABA-B induce shared or distinct neuroadaptation processes and withdrawal syndromes.

  11. International survey of diagnostic services for children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bower Carol

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early diagnosis and intervention for children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD reduces the risk of developing a range of secondary social, emotional and behavioural problems and provides an opportunity for prevention of further alcohol exposed pregnancies. The objective of this study was to describe specialist clinical service provision for the diagnosis and assessment of children exposed to alcohol in pregnancy. Methods Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD diagnostic clinics were identified through literature and internet searches. Clinics were sent a questionnaire asking for information on the clinic population, clinic staff, assessment process and other services provided. Results Questionnaires were completed for 34 clinics: 29 were in North America, 2 in Africa, 2 in Europe and 1 in South America. No clinics were identified in Asia or Australasia. There was a variety of funding sources, services offered, clinic populations, staff and methods of assessment. Thirty-three clinics had a multi-disciplinary team. In 32 clinics, at least one member of the team had specialist training in assessment of FASD. Neurobehavioural assessment was completed in 32 clinics. Eleven clinics used more than one set of diagnostic criteria or an adaptation of published criteria. Conclusion Diagnostic services are concentrated in North America. Most responding clinics are using a multidisciplinary approach with neurobehavioural assessment as recommended in published guidelines. Agreement on diagnostic criteria would enable comparison of clinical and research data, and enhance FASD research particularly for intervention trials.

  12. [Alcohol consumption in patients with psychiatric disorders: assessment and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, J-P; Bonnewitz, M-L; Kusterer, M; Lalanne-Tongio, L

    2014-09-01

    Alcohol consumption in France exceeds the European average (12.7L of pure alcohol/habitant/year in 2009 for an average of 12.5 L). This consumption has a major professional, social and health impact on the individuals and their families. The cost of such, estimated in Europe to be of 155.8 billion Euros in 2010, is the highest among the central nervous system diseases in Europe, far higher than that of depression or dementia. Patients suffering from psychiatric disorders are more frequently affected by problems related to alcohol use than the general population. They are also more vulnerable to the immediate and subsequent consequences of their consumption. The alcohol related disorders that are often accompanied by risk taking and other addictive behaviour require a global assessment of the addiction, with and without substance, and of the complications. These have a strong impact on risk taking, compliance with care, and the morbidity of somatic and psychiatric disorders, as well as access to optimal care and the life span of patients suffering from psychiatric disorders. The development of addictology care, with integrative treatment programs, is recommended in response to these public health issues. Nevertheless, specific addictology practices and partners with addictology care structures are still scarcely developed in psychiatry. Firstly, it would be necessary to set up such integrated treatments through the systematisation of an "addictology" checkup on admission, a global assessment of addictive behaviour and cognitive disorders, using pragmatic tools that are user-friendly for the care teams, maintain the reduction in risk taking, and apply prescriptions for addiction to psychotropic treatments, in liaison with the referring general practitioner. As early as possible, accompanied by specific training in addictology for the psychiatrists and the mental health nursing teams, such care could be enhanced by the development of liaison and advanced psychiatric

  13. Final report of the safety assessment of Alcohol Denat., including SD Alcohol 3-A, SD Alcohol 30, SD Alcohol 39, SD Alcohol 39-B, SD Alcohol 39-C, SD Alcohol 40, SD Alcohol 40-B, and SD Alcohol 40-C, and the denaturants, Quassin, Brucine Sulfate/Brucine, and Denatonium Benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    that the adverse effects known to be associated with Alcohol ingestion included in this safety assessment do not suggest a concern for Alcohol Denat. or SD Alcohols because of the presence of the denaturants, which are added for the express purpose of making the Alcohol unpotable. The CIR Expert Panel has previously conducted safety assessments of t-Butyl Alcohol, Diethyl Phthalate, Methyl Alcohol, Salicylic Acid, Sodium Salicylate, and Methyl Salicylate, in which each was affirmed safe or safe with qualifications. Given their use as denaturants are at low concentrations of use in Alcohol, the CIR Expert Panel determined that Alcohol Denat. denatured with t-Butyl Alcohol, Diethyl Phthalate, Methyl Alcohol, Salicylic Acid, Sodium Salicylate, and Methyl Salicylate is safe as used in cosmetic formulations with no qualifications. Likewise, because they are denatured with either t-Butyl Alcohol, Diethyl Phthalate, or Methyl Alcohol, SD Alcohols 3-A, 30, 39-B, 39-C, and 40-C all are considered safe as used. The Panel considered the available data for Denatonium Benzoate and SD Alcohol 40-B to be sufficient to support the safety of these ingredients in cosmetics. Denatonium Benzoate is sufficiently bitter that it is an effective denaturant at only 0.0006%. The Panel recognized that data on dermal penetration of Denatonium Benzoate were not available, but considered that the available data on lidocaine, a smaller structurally related chemical, indicates that dermal exposure does not result in measurable systemic exposure. The available data, however, were not sufficient to support the safety of Quassin, Brucine, and Brucine Sulfate, Alcohol Denat. denatured with those denaturants, or SD Alcohol 39 and SD Alcohol 40 (SD Alcohols denatured with Quassin, Brucine, and/or Brucine Sulfate), and in order for the Expert Panel to reach a conclusion for these denaturants, additional data are needed.

  14. Temporal patterns of alcohol consumption and attempts to reduce alcohol intake in England

    OpenAIRE

    de Vocht, F; Brown, J.; Beard, E; Angus, C; Brennan, A; Michie, S; Campbell, R.; Hickman, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Alcohol Toolkit Study (ATS) is a monthly survey of approximately 1700 adults per month aged 16 years of age or more in England. We aimed to explore patterns of alcohol consumption and motivation to reduce alcohol use in England throughout the year. Methods Data from 38,372 participants who answered questions about alcohol consumption (March 2014 to January 2016) were analysed using weighted regression using the R survey package. Questions assessed alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C) ...

  15. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Critically Ill Patients: Identification, Assessment, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Lynsey J; Jutel, Annemarie

    2016-02-01

    Management of alcohol withdrawal in critically ill patients is a challenge. The alcohol consumption histories of intensive care patients are often incomplete, limiting identification of patients with alcohol use disorders. Abrupt cessation of alcohol places these patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Typically benzodiazepines are used as first-line therapy to manage alcohol withdrawal. However, if patients progress to more severe withdrawal or delirium tremens, extra adjunctive medications in addition to benzodiazepines may be required. Sedation and mechanical ventilation may also be necessary. Withdrawal assessment scales such as the Clinical Institute of Withdrawal Assessment are of limited use in these patients. Instead, general sedation-agitation scales and delirium detection tools have been used. The important facets of care are the rapid identification of at-risk patients through histories of alcohol consumption, management with combination therapies, and ongoing diligent assessment and evaluation. (Critical Care Nurse. 2016;36[1]:28-39). ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Public awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer in England in 2015: a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buykx, Penny; Li, Jessica; Gavens, Lucy; Hooper, Lucie; Lovatt, Melanie; Gomes de Matos, Elena; Meier, Petra; Holmes, John

    2016-11-30

    Public knowledge of the association between alcohol and cancer is reported to be low. We aimed to provide up-to-date evidence for England regarding awareness of the link between alcohol and different cancers and to determine whether awareness differs by demographic characteristics, alcohol use, and geographic region. A representative sample of 2100 adults completed an online survey in July 2015. Respondents were asked to identify which health outcomes, including specific cancers, may be caused by alcohol consumption. Logistic regressions explored whether demographic, alcohol use, and geographic characteristics predicted correctly identifying alcohol-related cancer risk. Unprompted, 12.9% of respondents identified cancer as a potential health outcome of alcohol consumption. This rose to 47% when prompted (compared to 95% for liver disease and 73% for heart disease). Knowledge of the link between alcohol and specific cancers varied between 18% (breast) and 80% (liver). Respondents identified the following cancers as alcohol-related where no such evidence exists: bladder (54%), brain (32%), ovarian (17%). Significant predictors of awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer were being female, more highly educated, and living in North-East England. There is generally low awareness of the relationship between alcohol consumption and cancer, particularly breast cancer. Greater awareness of the relationship between alcohol and breast cancer in North-East England, where a mass media campaign highlighted this relationship, suggests that population awareness can be influenced by social marketing.

  17. Public awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer in England in 2015: a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny Buykx

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public knowledge of the association between alcohol and cancer is reported to be low. We aimed to provide up-to-date evidence for England regarding awareness of the link between alcohol and different cancers and to determine whether awareness differs by demographic characteristics, alcohol use, and geographic region. Methods A representative sample of 2100 adults completed an online survey in July 2015. Respondents were asked to identify which health outcomes, including specific cancers, may be caused by alcohol consumption. Logistic regressions explored whether demographic, alcohol use, and geographic characteristics predicted correctly identifying alcohol-related cancer risk. Results Unprompted, 12.9% of respondents identified cancer as a potential health outcome of alcohol consumption. This rose to 47% when prompted (compared to 95% for liver disease and 73% for heart disease. Knowledge of the link between alcohol and specific cancers varied between 18% (breast and 80% (liver. Respondents identified the following cancers as alcohol-related where no such evidence exists: bladder (54%, brain (32%, ovarian (17%. Significant predictors of awareness of the link between alcohol and cancer were being female, more highly educated, and living in North-East England. Conclusion There is generally low awareness of the relationship between alcohol consumption and cancer, particularly breast cancer. Greater awareness of the relationship between alcohol and breast cancer in North-East England, where a mass media campaign highlighted this relationship, suggests that population awareness can be influenced by social marketing.

  18. Association Between Young Australian's Drinking Behaviours and Their Interactions With Alcohol Brands on Facebook: Results of an Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra C; Robinson, Laura; Barrie, Lance; Francis, Kate; Lee, Jeong Kyu

    2016-07-01

    To examine the association of alcohol-brand social networking pages and Facebook users' drinking attitudes and behaviours. Cross-sectional, self-report data were obtained from a convenience sample of 283 Australian Facebook users aged 16-24 years via an online survey. More than half of the respondents reported using Facebook for more than an hour daily. While only 20% had actively interacted with an alcohol brand on Facebook, we found a significant association between this active interaction and alcohol consumption, and a strong association between engagement with alcohol brands on Facebook and problematic drinking. The findings of this study demonstrate the need for further research into the complex interaction between social networking and alcohol consumption, and add support to calls for effective regulation of alcohol marketing on social network platforms. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  19. A UK student survey investigating the effects of consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related negative consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Sean J; Alford, Chris; Stewart, Karina; Verster, Joris C

    2016-01-01

    Previous research reported positive associations between alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) consumption and overall alcohol consumption. However, results were largely based on between-subjects comparisons comparing AMED consumers with alcohol-only (AO) consumers, and therefore cannot

  20. Factors Predisposing, Enabling and Reinforcing Routine Screening of Patients for Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: A Survey of New Jersey Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Carole L.

    1991-01-01

    Survey of 58 physicians revealed that they did not routinely ask their pregnant patients about alcohol consumption for several reasons: physician bias resulting from own abuse, lack of training, poor awareness of problem and effects, denial that Fetal Alcohol Syndrome occurs in private practice, time limitations, disinterest, fear of offending…

  1. Intimate partner violence trends in Brazil: data from two waves of the Brazilian National Alcohol and Drugs Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Z. Ally

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare intimate partner violence (IPV prevalence rates in 2006 and 2012 in a nationally representative household sample in Brazil. The associations between IPV and substance use were also investigated. Methods: IPV was assessed using the Conflict Tactic Scale-R in two waves (2006/2012 of the Brazilian Alcohol and Drugs Survey. Weighted prevalence rates and adjusted logistic regression models were calculated. Results: Prevalence rates of IPV victimization decreased significantly, especially among women (8.8 to 6.3%. The rates of IPV perpetration also decreased significantly (10.6 to 8.4% for the overall sample and 9.2 to 6.1% in men, as well as the rates of bidirectional violence (by individuals who were simultaneously victims and perpetrators of violence (3.2 to 2.4% for the overall sample. Alcohol increased the likelihood of being a victim (odds ratio [OR] = 1.6 and perpetrator (OR = 2.4 of IPV. Use of illicit drugs increased up to 4.5 times the likelihood of being a perpetrator. Conclusions: In spite of the significant reduction in most types of IPV between 2006 and 2012, violence perpetrated by women was not significantly reduced, and the current national rates are still high. Further, this study suggests that use of alcohol and other psychoactive drugs plays a major role in IPV. Prevention initiatives must take drug misuse into consideration.

  2. Survey of Alcohol and Other Drug Use Attitudes and Behaviors in Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N.; Bartek, Jean K.; Scott, David M.; Davis-Hall, R. Ellen; DeSimone, Edward M., II

    2009-01-01

    Statewide nursing student alcohol and other drug (AOD) use attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Response was 929/2017 (46%) (practical nursing [n = 173/301] 57.3%; diploma and associate degree in nursing [n = 282/417] 67.6%; bachelor of science in nursing [n = 474/1299] 36.5%). Nearly 44% reported inadequate substance abuse education. Past-year…

  3. Validation of survey information on smoking and alcohol consumption against import statistics, Greenland 1993-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Peter; Becker, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaires are widely used to obtain information on health-related behaviour, and they are more often than not the only method that can be used to assess the distribution of behaviour in subgroups of the population. No validation studies of reported consumption of tobacco or alcohol have been...

  4. Assessment of alcohol advertising practices in Ethiopia | Negussie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Alcohol advertising should be prepared with an appropriate sense of responsibility to the consumer public. In Ethiopia, some aspects of alcohol advertising practices contravene with standards. Objectives: To document alcohol advertising practices and explore perceptions about them in Ethiopia. Methods: A ...

  5. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders in children residing in Russian orphanages: a phenotypic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurie C; Chan, Wilma; Litvinova, Aina; Rubin, Arkady; Comfort, Kathleen; Tirella, Linda; Cermak, Sharon; Morse, Barbara; Kovalev, Igor

    2006-03-01

    Alcohol use in Russia is among the highest in the world. Over 600,000 children reside in institutional care in Russia, most of them in baby homes and orphanages. The actual prevalence of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) among these children is unknown. Therefore, we performed a systematic survey of phenotypic features associated with prenatal alcohol exposure among institutionalized Russian children and related these findings to their growth, development, medical, and social histories. Phenotypic screening was conducted of all 234 baby home residents in the Murmansk region of Russia (mean age 21+12.6 months). Phenotypic expression scores were devised based on facial dysmorphology and other readily observable physical findings. Growth measurements from birth, time of placement in the baby home, and at present were analyzed. In addition, the charts of 64% of the children were randomly selected for retrospective review. Information collected included maternal, medical, developmental, and social histories. Thirteen percent of children had facial phenotype scores highly compatible with prenatal alcohol exposure and 45% had intermediate facial phenotype scores. These scores correlated with maternal gravidity and age. At least 40% of mothers in whom history was available ingested alcohol during pregnancy; some also used illicit drugs and tobacco. Z scores for growth measurements corresponded to phenotypic score, as did the degree of developmental delay. Children with no or mild delay had significantly lower phenotypic scores than those with moderate or severe delay (p = 0.04); more than 70% of children with high phenotypic scores were moderately or severely delayed. More than half of residents of the baby homes in Murmansk, Russia, have intermediate (45%) or high (13%) phenotypic expression scores suggesting prenatal exposure to alcohol. Despite good physical care, stable daily routine, availability of well-trained specialists, and access to medical care, these

  6. National Survey of Oral/Dental Conditions Related to Tobacco and Alcohol Use in Mexican Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Eduardo Medina-Solís

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral diseases are a major burden on individuals and health systems. The aim of this study was to determine whether consumption of tobacco and alcohol were associated with the prevalence of oral/dental problems in Mexican adults. Using data from the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2003, a cross-sectional study part of the World Health Survey, dental information from a representative sample of Mexico (n = 22,229, N = 51,155,740 was used to document self-reported oral/dental problems in the 12 months prior to the survey. Questionnaires were used to collect information related to sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and other risk factors. Three models were generated for each age group (18–30, 31–45 and 46–98 years. The prevalence of oral/dental conditions was 25.7%. Adjusting for sex, schooling, socioeconomic position, diabetes, and self-reported health, those who used tobacco (sometimes or daily (OR = 1.15, p = 0.070; OR = 1.24, p < 0.01; and OR = 1.16, p < 0.05, for each age group respectively or alcohol (moderate or high (OR = 1.26, p < 0.001; OR = 1.18, p < 0.01 and OR = 1.30, p < 0.001, for each age group respectively had a higher risk of reporting oral/dental problems. Because tobacco and alcohol use were associated with self-reported oral/dental problems in one out of four adults, it appears advisable to ascertain how direct is such link; more direct effects would lend greater weight to adopting measures to reduce consumption of tobacco and alcohol for the specific purpose of improving oral health.

  7. Assessment of the Average Price and Ethanol Content of Alcoholic Beverages by Brand – United States, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Joanna T.; Siegel, Michael; Hinchey, Danielle; Valerio, Heather; Kinzel, Kathryn; Lee, Stephanie; Chen, Kelsey; Shoaff, Jessica Ruhlman; Kenney, Jessica; Jernigan, David H.; DeJong, William

    2011-01-01

    Background There are no existing data on alcoholic beverage prices and ethanol content at the level of alcohol brand. A comprehensive understanding of alcohol prices and ethanol content at the brand level is essential for the development of effective public policy to reduce alcohol use among underage youth. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively assess alcoholic beverage prices and ethanol content at the brand level. Methods Using online alcohol price data from 15 control states and 164 online alcohol stores, we estimated the average alcohol price and percentage alcohol by volume for 900 brands of alcohol, across 17 different alcoholic beverage types, in the United States in 2011. Results There is considerable variation in both brand-specific alcohol prices and ethanol content within most alcoholic beverage types. For many types of alcohol, the within-category variation between brands exceeds the variation in average price and ethanol content among the several alcoholic beverage types. Despite differences in average prices between alcoholic beverage types, in 12 of the 16 alcoholic beverage types, customers can purchase at least one brand of alcohol that is under one dollar per ounce of ethanol. Conclusions Relying on data or assumptions about alcohol prices and ethanol content at the level of alcoholic beverage type is insufficient for understanding and influencing youth drinking behavior. Surveillance of alcohol prices and ethanol content at the brand level should become a standard part of alcohol research. PMID:22316218

  8. Alcohol and burden of disease in Australia: the challenge in assessing consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogeil, Rowan P; Room, Robin; Matthews, Sharon; Lloyd, Belinda

    2015-04-01

    Alcohol consumption is one of the major avoidable risk factors for disease, illness and injury in the Australian community. Population health scientists and economists use estimates of alcohol consumption in burden of disease frameworks to estimate the impact of alcohol on disease, illness and injury. This article highlights challenges associated with estimating alcohol consumption in these models and provides a series of recommendations to improve estimates. Key challenges in measuring alcohol consumption at the population level are identified and discussed with respect to how they apply to burden of disease frameworks. Methodological advances and limitations in the estimation of alcohol consumption are presented with respect to use of survey data, population distributions of alcohol consumption, consideration of 'patterns' of alcohol use including 'bingeing', and capping exposure. Key recommendations for overcoming these limitations are provided. Implications and conclusion: Alcohol-related burden has a significant impact on the health of the Australian population. Improving estimates of alcohol related consumption will enable more accurate estimates of this burden to be determined to inform future alcohol policy by legislators. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  9. Developing an alcohol policy assessment toolkit: application in the western Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Carragher, Natacha; Byrnes, Joshua; Doran, Christopher M; Shakeshaft, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To demonstrate the development and feasibility of a tool to assess the adequacy of national policies aimed at reducing alcohol consumption and related problems. Methods We developed a quantitative tool – the Toolkit for Evaluating Alcohol policy Stringency and Enforcement (TEASE-16) – to assess the level of stringency and enforcement of 16 alcohol control policies. TEASE-16 was applied to policy data from nine study areas in the western Pacific: Australia, China excluding H...

  10. Assessing and communicating the health and judicial impact of alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Mark A; Hughes, Karen; Tocque, Karen; Hennell, Tom; Humphrey, Gayl; Wyke, Sacha

    2005-04-01

    Alcohol consumption places an increasing burden on health services, criminal justice agencies and private industry throughout the UK. Despite a national strategy to tackle alcohol-related harm, there remains a lack of epidemiology on alcohol use and related harms at local levels. Utilising national data sources and existing research studies, Regional Public Health Observatories are appropriately placed to calculate such measures and examine their relationship with deprivation. For the North West of England, borough and health locality data were extracted from national sources. Alcohol consumption utilised lifestyle survey data and estimates of related harm were calculated by applying existing alcohol attributable fractions to deaths, hospital episodes and crime data. Contribution of alcohol to reduction in life expectancy was also calculated and all measures were correlated with deprivation. For the North West, the annual burden of alcohol was estimated at over 3700 deaths, 56,700 hospital episodes and 71,000 crimes. Annual alcohol-related death rates for men varied from 0.43 to 1.17 per 1000 between Local Authorities and there was a six-fold variation in alcohol-related crime rate between areas. For males, alcohol reduced life expectancy by more than five months in the area worst affected. For both sexes, more deprived areas had significantly higher levels of alcohol-related hospital episodes, crime, and contribution to reduced life expectancy. Alcohol-related harm requires urgent, multi-agency attention at local levels throughout the UK. Applying appropriate research methods to national data sources provides limited but valuable local measures of alcohol use and its impact on health and crime. Regional Public Health Observatories can facilitate partnership working through such provision of national intelligence tailored to support local and regional action. Application of these techniques also helps identify additional requirements for better local intelligence

  11. Reliability of a family tree questionnaire for assessing family history of alcohol problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, R E; Sobell, L C; Sobell, M B; Pavan, D

    1985-05-01

    The test-retest reliability of a brief, easily administered questionnaire to assess family history of drinking problems was studied. Twenty alcoholic and twenty non-alcoholic volunteers completed the questionnaire on each of two occasions separated by about 2 weeks. The reliability of classification of first- and second-degree relatives as problem drinkers or alcoholics was examined, using both liberal and conservative diagnostic criteria. In general, both sets of criteria produced satisfactory test-retest reliability; one possible exception occurred when alcoholics' second-degree relatives were classified using the conservative criteria. The liberal criteria seemed to provide a more sensitive index of familial alcoholism.

  12. Relationship between bone mineral density and alcohol intake: A nationwide health survey analysis of postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Dong Jang

    Full Text Available Among a variety of relevant factors of osteoporosis, the association between alcohol intake and postmenopausal women's bone mineral density (BMD by using data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was evaluated in this study.Among a total of 31,596 subjects, males, premenopausal women, participants without BMD data were excluded. Finally, a total number of subjects in the study was 3,312. The frequency and amount of alcohol intake were determined by self-reported questionnaires, and BMD was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry.Mean femoral BMD for light drinkers was statistically significantly greater than that for heavy drinkers and non-drinkers. We observed the characteristic trends for BMD by drinking frequency; the mean BMD gradually increased from non-drinkers to the participants who drank 2-3 times per week; these participants exhibited the highest BMD. Participants who drank alcohol greater than 4 times per week showed a lower BMD. In the risk factor analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for osteoporosis (at femoral neck was 1.68 in non-drinkers and 1.70 in heavy drinkers compared with light drinkers.Light alcohol intake (2-3 times per week and 1-2 or 5-6 glasses per occasion in South Korean postmenopausal women was related to high femoral BMD. Non-drinkers and heavy drinkers had approximately a 1.7-times greater risk for osteoporosis than light drinkers.

  13. Alcohol Use During Pregnancy or Breastfeeding: A National Survey in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Agnès; Toutain, Stéphanie; Simmat-Durand, Laurence

    2017-07-01

    Adverse effects are associated with alcohol drinking during pregnancy and breastfeeding. Data are lacking on the size of the population at risk and on the characteristics of women engaging in risky behaviors such as daily consumption or repeated binge drinking. A cross-sectional survey was carried out by telephone among a nationally representative sample of pregnant and postpartum women. Frequency of alcohol use and binge drinking was retrospectively measured according to distinct time periods. Multivariable regression models were used to identify the characteristics of women reporting risk-taking behaviors. A total of 3,603 women participated. Daily consumption was reported by 0.1% of pregnant women and by 0.4% of breastfeeding women. In early pregnancy, 8.0% of women reported binge drinking (≥1 episode) and 1.2% reported repeated binge drinking (≥3 episodes). Binge drinking was estimated at 1.1% in late pregnancy and at 6.8% during breastfeeding. Characteristics of drinkers varied across these different drinking patterns and subpopulations. Moderate drinking during pregnancy and breastfeeding was associated with higher educational level. Smoking increased with increased frequency of alcohol use. Repeated binge drinking in early pregnancy was associated with late recognition of the pregnancy, while binge drinking in late pregnancy was associated with smoking. Daily alcohol use during pregnancy or breastfeeding was limited, while binge drinking in early pregnancy was reported by a large proportion of women. Demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of drinkers varied across drinking patterns.

  14. A pilot survey of aquatic activities and related consumption of alcohol, with implications for drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, J; Mangione, T; Hingson, R; Levenson, S; Winter, M; Altwicker, A

    1990-01-01

    The investigators considered the relationship between participation in aquatic activities and the consumption of alcohol, with their implications for the risk of drowning. In a telephone survey with random-digit dialing, interviewers asked Massachusetts residents ages 20 years and older how often they engaged in various aquatic activities, in what settings, and how often they drank alcohol in connection with participation in aquatic activities. Of 294 respondents, 79 percent of the men and 72 percent of the women reported participating in aquatic activities during August 1988, the month prior to the interview. Respondents were asked to identify their most recent aquatic activity. The mean number of days of participation in the month was 13. The most frequently reported aquatic activities were swimming (76 percent), followed by sunbathing (74 percent), power boating (25 percent), and fishing from shore (15 percent). Among those persons reporting participation in aquatic activities, 55 percent had been at the ocean on the most recent occasion, 26 percent at lakes or ponds, 17 percent at pools, and 2 percent at rivers. Among those persons reporting aquatic activities, 36 percent of the men and 11 percent of the women reported having drunk alcohol on the most recent occasion. Those who reported drinking in aquatic settings were more likely to report driving after drinking than those who did not drive. Implementation of new Federal regulations and State laws concerning drinking and boating should be accompanied by public education on the risks of drowning if aquatic activities and alcohol consumption are combined.

  15. Demographic and Social Correlates of Tobacco, Alcohol and Cannabis Use Among 15-16-Year-Old Students in Albania: Results of the ESPAD Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toçi Ervin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AIMS – Our aim was to assess the demographic and social factors associated with lifetime use of tobacco, alcohol and cannabis among school students aged 15–16 in Albania in order to make information and knowledge available for health promotion specialists working on substance use prevention. DESIGN – This cross-sectional study was conducted in March–May 2011 in the framework of the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD. In total, 3189 students born in 1995 participated in the survey. The standardised ESPAD questionnaire was used to collect data about substance use. RESULTS – Our multivariable adjustment analysis showed that being a male and having easy access to cigarettes were the only universal factors significantly increasing the likelihood of ever using tobacco, alcohol or cannabis. Own smoking was strongly and significantly associated with alcohol and cannabis use. The associations of own substance use with peer substance consumption were weak to moderate. CONCLUSIONS – Own smoking seems to be the most important single independent risk factor which strongly and significantly predicted alcohol and cannabis use among Albanian school students. Policy makers need to strengthen the rule of law whereas health promotion professionals should firmly address smoking in adolescence through target interventions.

  16. A drunk and disorderly country: a nationwide cross-sectional survey of alcohol use and misuse in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, D G; Dakkak, M; Gilmore, I T; Hawkey, C J; Rhodes, J M; Sheron, N

    2012-01-01

    To explore current alcohol drinking patterns, behaviours and attitudes in Great Britain. Independent online cross-sectional survey. Survey of 2221 individuals from a representative panel. Excessive alcohol consumption is a widespread problem across Great Britain. Binge-drinking is common among 18-24 year olds, with 19% reporting drinking 10+ drinks on the same drinking day. 'Pre-loading' with alcohol at home before going out was reported by 30% of 18-24-year-old drinkers, of whom 36% get drunk twice or more a month, with 27% having injured themselves while drunk. Among older drinkers, 25% regularly drink to excess, 8% drink seven or more drinks on a typical drinking day and 9% self-reported drink-driving. Male gender was an independent risk factor for heavy (>40 units/week) alcohol abuse (odds ratio 3.05 (95% CI 1.82 to 5.10)). Men (19%) were more likely than women (8%, palcohol consumption (12% vs 7%, palcohol price and drink promotions. Increasing average weekly alcohol consumption, age alcohol-related self-harm. Alcohol abuse was not related to socioeconomic status. Alcohol abuse remains common across all socioeconomic strata and geographical areas of Great Britain. Minimum pricing strategies and interventions that target cheap on-trade alcohol products seem likely to bring major public health benefits.

  17. Alarmingly high level of alcohol use among fishermen: A community based survey from a coastal area of south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakali, Palanivel; Thekkur, Pruthu; Manoj Kumar, A; Ramaswamy, Gomathi; Bharadwaj, Balaji; Roy, Gautam

    2016-08-01

    Though studies from western world have reported high prevalence of alcohol use among fishermen, there is lack of information from developing world. Hence this study was carried out among fishermen in a coastal area of southern India to 1) determine the prevalence of alcohol use among fishermen 2) describe the pattern of alcohol use 3) identify factors associated with alcohol use. A community based cross-sectional study was carried out among fishermen in a coastal village of Puducherry, India. House to hose survey was conducted, fishermen aged above 18 years and involved in catching fish at least once in last three months, were included. Data on age, marital status, education, monthly income, duration in fishing occupation, owning a boat or wager, frequency of fishing per month/week, number of hours spent in sea, alcohol use in past one year, age at initiation, type of alcohol drink and presence of alcohol users in family. In total, 304 participants were interviewed. Mean (SD) age of the participants was 41 (11) and 82% were involved in fishing for more than 10 years. Of 304 participants, 241 (79%) reported alcohol use in past one year. Of 241 participants who used alcohol, 89% reported alcohol consumption during fishing activity. In multivariate analysis, alcohol use in other family members was independently associated with alcohol use (aRR 21.4; 95% CI 6.8-67.4). Very high prevalence of alcohol use is seen among fishermen. Of those who consume alcohol, nine out of ten use during fishing activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  18. Jet reliability study Survey and Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, G.

    2015-07-01

    Culham Center for Fusion Energy (CCFE) in UK has been contracted to undertake a second Deuterium-Tritium Experiment (DTE2) using Join European Torus (JET) in 2017, in support of technical developments for the ITER project. In order to manage risks of delay or early project termination CCFE has adopted a risk based inspection (RBI) process to identify the systems which could influence the successful delivery of DTE2 and in turn to identify by a basic risk assessment process those systems or components which require mitigating action in order to minimize risk. In this context, the primary purpose of the RBI is to address issues of reliability and satisfactory functionality in a similar way to that which a power plant operator would take to address its commercial risks in the event of loss of generating capacity. The objective of this presentation is describe the activities developed for Idom to deliver the survey, interviews and risk assessment of different systems of JET with the aim to identify the critical components and system that could affect the operation of JET during the DTE2 experiment. (Author)

  19. Correlates of problematic unrecorded alcohol consumption in Sikkim, Northeast India - Results from a cross-sectional pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Amit; Rai, Tekendra K; Sharma, Bijaya; Rai, Bhim Bahadur

    2015-01-01

    The magnitude and consequences of unrecorded alcohol consumption, defined as home brewed or clandestinely produced illicit liquor or surrogate alcoholic beverage has been little investigated in India. A significant portion of all alcohol consumed globally is unrecorded, therefore these consumers constitute a significant population. Sikkim, a province in Northeast India, lies in the foothills of the Himalayas. Unrecorded alcohol use is traditionally prevalent, with more than ten types available. This study investigated correlates of problematic unrecorded alcohol consumption in rural and urban communities of Sikkim. A cross-sectional, community-based pilot survey was conducted. Intensive case-finding recruited current heavy users (at least 3 days/week) of unrecorded alcohol of either sex above 16 years of age. On enrolment, participants responded to a socio-demographic instrument including 12 questions on their pattern of alcohol consumption and a 4-item CAGE questionnaire. Alcohol problems exist significantly among the young adult population. Although consumption of unrecorded alcohol is traditional in Sikkim, it has emerged as an important public health problem, with alarmingly high rates of problematic consumption. This is also expected to have significant economic costs. Therefore, prevention and treatment measures are an urgent need as well as policy decisions on production and sales of unrecorded alcohol.

  20. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... addicted, there are some downsides to drinking: The punishment is severe. Teens who drink put themselves at ... treatment centers help a person gradually overcome the physical and psychological dependence on alcohol. previous continue What ...

  1. Chemical analysis and risk assessment of diethyl phthalate in alcoholic beverages with special regard to unrecorded alcohol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Leitz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phthalates are synthetic compounds with a widespread field of applications. For example, they are used as plasticizers in PVC plastics and food packaging, or are added to personal care products. Diethyl phthalate (DEP may be used to denature alcohol, e.g., for cosmetic purposes. Public health concerns of phthalates include carcinogenic, teratogenic, hepatotoxic and endocrine effects. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a method for determining phthalates in alcohol samples and to provide a risk assessment for consumers of such products. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A liquid-liquid extraction procedure was optimized by varying the following parameters: type of extraction solvent (cyclohexane, n-hexane, 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, the ratio extraction solvent/sample volume (1 ratio 1 to 50 ratio 1 and the number of extraction repetitions (1-10. The best extraction yield (99.9% was achieved with the solvent 1,1,2-trichlorotrifluoroethane, an extraction solvent volume/sample volume ratio of 10 ratio 1 and a double extraction. For quantification, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with deuterated internal standards was used. The investigated samples were alcoholic beverages and unrecorded alcohol products from different countries (n = 257. Two unrecorded alcohol samples from Lithuania contained diethyl phthalate in concentrations of 608 mg/L and 210 mg/L. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The consumption of the phthalate-positive unrecorded alcohols would exceed tolerable daily intakes as derived from animal experiments. Both positive samples were labelled as cosmetic alcohol, but had clearly been offered for human consumption. DEP seems to be unsuitable as a denaturing agent as it has no effect on the organoleptic properties of ethanol. In light of our results that DEP might be consumed by humans in unrecorded alcohols, the prohibition of its use as a denaturing agent should be considered.

  2. Content and functionality of alcohol and other drug websites: results of an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Britt; White, Angela; Kavanagh, David; Shandley, Kerrie; Kay-Lambkin, Frances; Proudfoot, Judith; Drennan, Judy; Connor, Jason; Baker, Amanda; Young, Ross

    2010-12-19

    There is a growing trend for individuals to seek health information from online sources. Alcohol and other drug (AOD) use is a significant health problem worldwide, but access and use of AOD websites is poorly understood. To investigate content and functionality preferences for AOD and other health websites. An anonymous online survey examined general Internet and AOD-specific usage and search behaviors, valued features of AOD and health-related websites (general and interactive website features), indicators of website trustworthiness, valued AOD website tools or functions, and treatment modality preferences. Surveys were obtained from 1214 drug (n = 766) and alcohol website users (n = 448) (mean age 26.2 years, range 16-70). There were no significant differences between alcohol and drug groups on demographic variables, Internet usage, indicators of website trustworthiness, or on preferences for AOD website functionality. A robust website design/navigation, open access, and validated content provision were highly valued by both groups. While attractiveness and pictures or graphics were also valued, high-cost features (videos, animations, games) were minority preferences. Almost half of respondents in both groups were unable to readily access the information they sought. Alcohol website users placed greater importance on several AOD website tools and functions than did those accessing other drug websites: online screening tools (χ²(2) = 15.8, P online treatment option for both the user groups was an Internet site with email therapist support. Explorations of demographic differences were also performed. While gender did not affect survey responses, younger respondents were more likely to value interactive and social networking features, whereas downloading of credible information was most highly valued by older respondents. Significant deficiencies in the provision of accessible information on AOD websites were identified, an important problem since information

  3. Atlantic Protected Species Assessment Aerial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets include a compilation of aerial line-transect surveys conducted over continental shelf waters of the southeastern U.S. Surveys have been conducted...

  4. The role of alcohol in the management of hypertension in patients in European primary health care practices - a survey in the largest European Union countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Jürgen; Prieto, Jose Angel Arbesu; Beier, Markus; Duhot, Didier; Rossi, Alessandro; Schulte, Bernd; Zarco, José; Aubin, Henri-Jean; Bachmann, Michael; Grimm, Carsten; Kraus, Ludwig; Manthey, Jakob; Scafato, Emanuele; Gual, Antoni

    2016-09-08

    Even though addressing lifestyle problems is a major recommendation in most guidelines for the treatment of hypertension (HTN), alcohol problems are not routinely addressed in the management of hypertension in primary health care. Internet based survey of 3081 primary care physicians, recruited via the mailing lists of associations for general practitioners (GPs) in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the UK. Clinical practice, attitudes, knowledge, education and training were assessed. Logistic regression to predict screening, brief intervention and treatment for alcohol dependence in the management of hypertension were assessed. Overall, about one third of the interviewed GPs reported sufficient screening in cases with HTN (34.0 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI):32.1-35.8 %). One out of five GPs screened and delivered brief interventions in HTN patients with hazardous consumption (22.2 %, 95 % CI: 20.6-23.8 %) and about one in 13 GPs provided treatment for HTN patients with alcohol dependence other than advice or brief intervention (7.8 %, 95 % CI: 6.8-8.9 %). Post-graduate training and belief in their effectiveness predicted interventions. There were marked differences between countries. While current interventions were overall low, marked differences between countries indicate that current practices could be improved. Education and post-graduate training seems to be key in improving clinical practice of including interventions for problematic alcohol consumption and alcohol dependence in primary health care.

  5. A facebook survey to obtain alcohol-related information by young people and adolescents. An Italian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulli, C; Federico, A; Gaeta, L; Del Prete, A; Iadevaia, M; Gravina, A G; Romano, M; Loguercio, C

    2014-03-01

    Alcohol consumption by adolescents and young adults is an issue of significant public concern. Internet-based Social Networking sites, such as Facebook, are potential avenues to reach young people easily. to underline the innovation in proposing surveys to collect health-related information regarding young people alcohol consumption and other substances abuse by using Social Networking Websites, particularly Facebook. A questionnaire investigating modalities of alcohol consumption, drinking patterns' risk behaviors and other substances abuse was proposed through a "Facebook event" to young Italian Facebook users aged between 16 and 32. Each Facebook user invited to the event was free to participate, to answer to the questionnaire and to invite his "Facebook friends". During the 89 days of permanence on the Social Network, 1846 Facebook users participated the event and 732 of them decided spontaneously to answer the questionnaire. The frequency of answering was 8.2 people per day. About 200 users wrote a positive comment to the initiative on the wall of the event. Sixty% of subjects participating the survey were females. Ninety-one% of people answering the questionnaire were alcohol consumers. More than 50% of alcohol consumers were also smokers. Approximately 50% of subjects were binge drinkers. Illegal drugs were used by the 22.2% of the interviewed people. Facebook resulted an efficient and rapid tool to reach young people from all over Italy and to propose surveys in order to investigate alcohol consumption and alcohol-related health problems in the youth.

  6. Assessment of lexical semantic judgment abilities in alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neuropsychological studies have shown that alcohol dependence is associated with neurocognitive deficits in tasks requiring memory, perceptual motor skills, abstraction and problem solving, whereas language skills are relatively spared in alcoholics despite structural abnormalities in the language-related brain regions.

  7. Analytical assessment of the effects of alcohol consumption on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recognition of the consequences of alcohol and abuse on physical and mental health as well as socio-occupational life are necessary steps for initiating appropriate action to reduce the harm/dangers from alcohol consumption. This work was motivated by the observed and anticipated negative health burden with its ...

  8. Assessment of lexical semantic judgment abilities in alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-11-06

    Nov 6, 2013 ... Delhi. This group was composed of 18 healthy male individuals. (mean age 35.25±3.79 (SD) years), with no past history of alcohol dependence and any other type of drug abuse .The controls were matched with the alcoholics for age, sex, handedness and years of education were 10±1.85 (SD) years.

  9. Perceptions of Pakistani medical students about drugs and alcohol: a questionnaire-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Salahuddin Farah F; Shaikh Kashif S; Siddiqi Maham T; Saleem Ayesha; Shah Zaman; Shafiq Majid; Siwani Rizwan; Naqvi Haider

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Drug abuse is hazardous and known to be prevalent among young adults, warranting efforts to increase awareness about harmful effects and to change attitudes. This study was conducted to assess the perceptions of a group of medical students from Pakistan, a predominantly Muslim country, regarding four drugs namely heroin, charas, benzodiazepines and alcohol. Results In total, 174 self-reported questionnaires were received (87% response rate). The most commonly cited reasons...

  10. Awareness and treatment of alcohol dependence in Japan: results from internet-based surveys in persons, family, physicians and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Yurie; Takei, Yoshiyuki; Sasai, Ryoko; Murteira, Susana

    2014-01-01

    To understand current awareness of, and views on, treatment of alcohol dependence in Japan. (a) Nationwide internet-based survey of 520 individuals, consisting of 52 diagnosed alcohol-dependent (AD) persons, 154 potentially alcohol-dependent (ADP) persons, 104 family members and 106 friends/colleagues of AD persons, and 104 general individuals, derived from a consumer panel where the response rate was 64.3%. We enquired into awareness about the treatment of alcohol dependence and patient pathways through the healthcare network. (b) Nationwide internet-based survey of physicians (response rate 10.1% (2395/23,695) to ask 200 physicians about their management of alcohol use disorders). We deduced that 10% of alcohol-dependent Japanese persons had ever been diagnosed with alcohol dependence, with only 3% ever treated. Regarding putative treatment goals, 20-25% of the AD and ADP persons would prefer to attempt to abstain, while 60-75% preferred 'reduced drinking.' A half of the responding physicians considered abstinence as the primary treatment goal in alcohol dependence, while 76% considered reduced drinking as an acceptable goal. AD and ADP persons in Japan have low 'disease awareness' defined as 'understanding of signs, symptoms and consequences of alcohol use disorders,' which is in line with the overseas situation. The Japanese drinking culture and stigma toward alcohol dependence may contribute to such low disease awareness and current challenging treatment environment. While abstinence remains the preferred treatment goal among physicians, reduced drinking seems to be an acceptable alternative treatment goal to many persons and physicians in Japan. © The Author 2014. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press.

  11. A UK student survey investigating the effects of consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related negative consequences

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Sean J.; Alford, Chris; Stewart, Karina; Verster, Joris C

    2016-01-01

    Previous research reported positive associations between alcohol mixed with energy drink (AMED) consumption and overall alcohol consumption. However, results were largely based on between-subjects comparisons comparing AMED consumers with alcohol-only (AO) consumers, and therefore cannot sufficiently control for differences in personal characteristics between these groups. In order to determine whether AMED consumers drink more alcohol on occasions they consume AMED compared to those when the...

  12. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Rates and predictors of DUI across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines rates of self-reported driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, a total of 5224 individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the U.S.: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston and Los Angeles. The survey weighted response rate was 76%. Among men, 21% of Mexican Americans, 19.9% of South/Central Americans, 11.6% of Puerto Ricans and 6.9% of Cuban Americans reported DUI. Rates were lower among women, ranging from 9.7% for Mexican Americans to 1.3% for Cuban Americans. Mexican American men had the highest 12-month arrest rate (1.6%) and the highest lifetime arrest rate (11.2%). Drinkers who reported DUI were heavier drinkers than those not reporting DUI according to a variety of indicators. However, most DUI incidents involved non-alcohol-dependent drivers. Mexican Americans and South Central/Americans, men, younger drivers, those with less than high school education, those with higher income and higher alcohol consumption were more likely to report DUI and DUI arrests. These findings show that Hispanic national groups in the U.S. are diverse regarding drinking and DUI-related experiences.

  13. Motorcycle riding under the influence of alcohol: results from the SARTRE-4 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Eleonora; Theofilatos, Athanasios; Yannis, George; Cestac, Julien; Kraïem, Sami

    2014-09-01

    Riding a motorcycle under the influence of alcohol is a dangerous activity, especially considering the high vulnerability of motorcyclists. The present research investigates the factors that affect the declared frequency of drink-riding among motorcyclists in Europe and explores regional differences. Data were collected from the SARTRE-4 (Social Attitudes to Road Traffic Risk in Europe) survey, which was conducted in 19 countries. A total sample of 4483 motorcyclists was interviewed by using a face-to-face questionnaire. The data were analyzed by means of multilevel ordered logit models. The results revealed significant regional differences (between Northern, Eastern and Southern European countries) in drink-riding frequencies in Europe. In general, declared drinking and riding were positively associated with gender (males), increased exposure, underestimation of risk, friends' behaviour, past accidents and alcohol ticket experience. On the other hand, it was negatively associated with underestimation of the amount of alcohol allowed before driving, and support for more severe penalties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Do research assessments make college students more reactive to alcohol events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Molly; Kahler, Christopher W; Monti, Peter; Barnett, Nancy P

    2012-06-01

    This study examines possible synergistic effects of alcohol-related events and postevent assessments on changes in college student readiness to change alcohol use, frequency of alcohol use, and negative consequences. Students were participants in a longitudinal study of drinking behavior. A portion of those reporting negative alcohol events/consequences (e.g., injury, vomiting, memory loss) during the parent study were randomly selected to participate in the present study (n = 492) and randomized to a postevent assessment (n = 296) or a no-assessment control (n = 196). Participants in the postevent assessment group were interviewed soon after their event, and participants in both conditions were interviewed three months after their event. Linear regression models showed higher 3-month readiness to change alcohol use in participants who received a postevent assessment than those who did not. There were reductions in drinking days, heavy drinking days, and further consequences postevent, but no differences by assessment group. However, female participants showed greater reductions in drinking days and heavy drinking days if they were assigned to assessment compared to control. There also was greater postevent reduction in drinking days among assessment group participants with high precollege alcohol severity compared to low precollege alcohol severity. Conversely, participants who reported high aversiveness of their event and were in the control group showed greater reduction in heavy drinking days than those assigned to the assessment group. Findings suggest that college student heavy drinking is reactive to alcohol events, whereas reactivity to postevent assessments may depend on gender, alcohol severity, and event aversiveness. This work highlights the importance of considering possible interactions among extratherapeutic factors in clinical outcome research.

  15. Off-label baclofen prescribing practices among French alcohol specialists: results of a national online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Benjamin; Paille, François; Fleury, Benoit; Cottencin, Olivier; Benyamina, Amine; Aubin, Henri-Jean

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate, among alcohol specialists belonging to the Société Française d'Alcoologie (SFA), i.e., the French Alcohol Society, the proportion of physicians who prescribed off-label baclofen for alcohol use disorders (AUDs). The secondary objective was to depict the features of individual prescribing and monitoring practices. On-line survey among 484 French alcohol specialists. Physicians were asked whether they prescribed baclofen for AUDs. If they did not, the reasons for this choice were investigated. If they did, the features of the physician's prescribing practice were explored, including the number of patients treated, the mean and maximum doses, the monitoring precautions and the pharmacovigilance reporting. Participants were also asked about their empirical findings on HDB's efficacy and safety. In total, 302 physicians (response rate of 62.4%) participated in the survey. Data from 296 participants were analysed, representing 59.4% of all active prescribing physicians belonging to the SFA. HDB use was declared by 74.6% of participants (mean dose 109.5 ± 43.6 mg/d; maximum dose 188 ± 93.3 mg/d). However, 79.2% of prescribers had treated less than 30 patients, and 67.8% used HDB as a second-line medication. Although HDB was perceived as more efficacious than approved drugs by 54.3% of prescribers, it was also declared less safe by 62.8%. Nonetheless, 79.7% of prescribers had never filed any pharmacovigilance report. Non-prescribers (25.6%) were primarily deterred by the current lack of scientific data and official regulation. A majority of French alcohol specialists reported using HDB, although often on a limited number of their patients. HDB was considered efficacious but also potentially hazardous. Despite this, physicians reported minimal safety data to the health security system. While French health authorities are planning to draft a specific regulatory measure for framing off-label HDB prescribing practices, the sustained education of prescribers

  16. The Nature and Extent of Flavored Alcoholic Beverage Consumption among Underage Youth: Results of a National Brand-specific Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giga, Noreen M.; Binakonsky, Jane; Ross, Craig; Siegel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Flavored alcoholic beverages are popular among underage drinkers. Existing studies that assessed flavored alcoholic beverage use among youth relied upon respondents to correctly classify the beverages they consume, without defining what alcohol brands belong to this category. Objectives To demonstrate a new method for analyzing the consumption of flavored alcoholic beverages among youth on a brand-specific basis, without relying upon youth to correctly classify brands they consume. Methods Using a pre-recruited internet panel developed by Knowledge Networks, we measured the brands of alcohol consumed by a national sample of youth drinkers, ages 16-20 years, in the United States. The sample consisted of 108 youths who had consumed at least one drink of an alcoholic beverage in the past 30 days. We measured the brand-specific consumption of alcoholic beverages within the past 30 days, ascertaining the consumption of 380 alcohol brands, including 14 brands of flavored alcoholic beverages. Results Measuring the brand-specific consumption of flavored alcoholic beverages was feasible. Based on a brand-specific identification of flavored alcoholic beverages, nearly half of youth drinkers in the sample reported having consumed such beverages in the past 30 days. Flavored alcoholic beverage preference was concentrated among the top four brands, which accounted for nearly all of the consumption volume reported in our study. Conclusions and Scientific Significance These findings underscore the need to assess youth alcohol consumption at the brand level and the potential value of such data in better understanding underage youth drinking behavior and the factors that influence it. PMID:21517708

  17. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for the assessment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlides, Michael; Banerjee, Rajarshi; Tunnicliffe, Elizabeth M; Kelly, Catherine; Collier, Jane; Wang, Lai Mun; Fleming, Kenneth A; Cobbold, Jeremy F; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Barnes, Eleanor

    2017-07-01

    The diagnosis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis staging are central to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease assessment. We evaluated multiparametric magnetic resonance in the assessment of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and fibrosis using histology as standard in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Seventy-one patients with suspected non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were recruited within 1 month of liver biopsy. Magnetic resonance data were used to define the liver inflammation and fibrosis score (LIF 0-4). Biopsies were assessed for steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis and classified as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or simple steatosis, and mild or significant (Activity ≥2 and/or Fibrosis ≥2 as defined by the Fatty Liver Inhibition of Progression consortium) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Transient elastography was also performed. Magnetic resonance success rate was 95% vs 59% for transient elastography (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis (rs =.51, Pliver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of cirrhosis was 0.85. Liver inflammation and fibrosis score for ballooning grades 0, 1 and 2 was 1.2, 2.7 and 3.5 respectively (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis (1.3) compared to patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (3.0) (Palcoholic steatohepatitis was 0.80. Liver inflammation and fibrosis scores for patients with mild and significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease were 1.2 and 2.9 respectively (Pliver inflammation and fibrosis for the diagnosis of significant non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was 0.89. Multiparametric magnetic resonance is a promising technique with good diagnostic accuracy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease histological parameters, and can potentially identify patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. © 2017 The Authors Liver International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Pathological gambling in treatment-seeking alcoholics: a national survey in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalpas, Bertrand; Yguel, Jacques; Fleury, Benoît; Martin, Sandrine; Jarraud, Delphine; Craplet, Michel

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence of pathological gambling (pG) in people addicted to alcohol and drugs, particularly those with alcohol use disorders (AUDs), including new forms of gambling such as video and on-line games; and to update the socio-demographic profile of people suffering from both AUD and pG. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 1 week of 2009 in 55 French addiction treatment centres, including all consecutive patients attending that centre, using an anonymous questionnaire which included a tool specific for pG screening, the DEBA-jeu questionnaire (Détection et Besoin d'Aide en regard du Jeu Excessif). A total of 2790 patients entered the study. The most frequent reason for attending the Addiction Centres was AUD (77%). According to the DEBA test, 6.5% of the patients were pathological gamblers and 12% were subsyndromal gamblers. pG affected all age groups and did not decrease with abstinence from alcohol. pG was significantly associated with male sex [relative risk (RR) = 2.4; P < 0.001)] and, at a lower level of significance, with homelessness (RR = 1.52; P = 0.03) and unemployment (RR = 1.47; P = 0.04). pG appears to be a common feature of the French people with alcohol and drug disorders. Apart from male sex, no parameter had discriminatory power sufficient to target pG screening on a specific subgroup. Therefore, any patient attending a centre for drug or AUD should be asked about his gambling. Moreover, clinical teams should be trained to treat this addiction.

  19. The Role of Specific Alcohol-Related Problems in Predicting Depressive Experiences in a Cross-Sectional National Household Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Orla; Cheng, Hui G; Slade, Tim; Lynskey, Michael T

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the type of alcohol-related problems that commonly occur before the onset of depressive experiences to shed light on the mechanisms underlying the alcohol-depression comorbidity relationship. Data were from the 1992 USA National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey. Analytical sample comprised of drinkers with a prior to past year (PPY) history of alcohol-related problems with or without any experiences of depressed mood in the past year (PY). The prevalence of PPY alcohol-related problems was examined, as well as the ability of specific alcohol problems to predict PY experiences of depressed mood. The type of depressed mood experienced by drinkers with PPY history of alcohol-related problems was compared to those without. All but one alcohol-related problem PPY was more frequently endorsed among drinkers with PY experiences of depressed mood. Controlling for confounders, five alcohol-related problems experienced PPY were significantly predictive of depressed mood PY: tolerance, drinking longer than intended, inability to perform important social and occupational roles/obligations, as well as drinking in physically hazardous situations. Drinkers with alcohol-related problems PPY more frequently experienced difficulties with concentration, energy, and thoughts of death, than those without. Alcohol-related problems are likely associated with depressive experiences through a complex network, whereby experiences of physical dependence and negative consequences increase the likelihood of negative affect. Novel study designs are necessary to fully understand the complex mechanisms underlying this comorbidity. © The Author 2016. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of average daily alcohol consumption, binge drinking and alcohol-related social problems: results from the German Epidemiological Surveys of Substance Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Ludwig; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Pabst, Alexander; Orth, Boris

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the combined effect of average volume and binge drinking in predicting alcohol-related social problems and estimates the proportion of alcohol-related harms related to specific drinking patterns that could be prevented if transferred to a low-risk drinking group. Data came from the 1997 and 2000 German Epidemiological Survey of Substance Abuse (ESA) (age: 18-59 years; response rate: 65% and 51%, respectively). The pooled sample consisted of 12,668 current drinkers. By using nine categories of average daily intake and three groups of binge drinking, individuals were grouped into 22 mutual exclusive groups. Social problems were defined as the occurrence of 'repeated family quarrels', 'concern of family members or friends', 'loss of partner or friend' or 'physical fight or injury' in relation to alcohol. The effect of average daily intake is modified by binge drinking frequency such that the association was strongest in those with four or more binge drinking occasions during the last 30 days. Within each binge drinking group, adjusted relative risks (aRR) increased with alcohol intake up to a certain threshold and decreased thereafter. Overall, compared to the reference group (alcohol-related social problems than volume. Alcohol-related social harms especially among drinkers with moderate volume per day may be reduced by targeting prevention strategies towards episodic heavy drinkers.

  1. The use of caffeinated alcoholic beverages among underage drinkers: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kponee, Kalé Z; Siegel, Michael; Jernigan, David H

    2014-01-01

    The mixing of alcoholic beverages with caffeine has been identified as a public health problem among college students; however, little is known about the consumption of such drinks among younger adolescents. We estimated the prevalence of caffeinated alcoholic beverage (CAB) use among a wide age range of underage drinkers, examined differences in traditional (i.e. self-mixed alcoholic beverages with soda, coffee and tea) and non-traditional CAB use (pre-mixed caffeinated alcoholic beverages or self-mixed alcoholic beverages with energy drinks or energy shots) among underage drinkers by age and other demographic characteristics, and examined differences in hazardous drinking behavior between CAB and non-CAB users. We used an existing Internet panel maintained by Knowledge Networks, Inc. to assess the use of pre-mixed and self-mixed CABs in the past 30 days among a national sample of 1031 youth drinkers age 13-20. We conducted logistic regression analyses to estimate the relationship between traditional and non-traditional CAB use and risky drinking behavior as well as adverse outcomes of drinking, while controlling for age, gender, race/ethnicity, income, and general risk-taking (seat belt use). The overall prevalence of CAB use in the sample of underage drinkers was 52.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 47.4%-57.4%). CAB prevalence was 48.4% among 13-15 year-old drinkers, 45.3% among 16-18 year-old drinkers, and 58.4% among 19-20 year-old drinkers. After controlling for other variables, we found a continuum of risk with non-traditional CAB use most significantly associated with binge drinking (odds ratio [OR]=6.3), fighting (OR=4.4), and alcohol-related injuries (OR=5.6). The problem of caffeinated alcoholic beverage use is not restricted to college-aged youth. The prevalence of CAB use among underage drinkers is higher than previously thought and begins in early adolescence. Adolescents who consume CABs, and particularly non-traditional CABs, are at increased risk

  2. Assessing Adolescents' Anticipated Behavioral and Emotional Responses to Offers of Alcohol and Marijuana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pristas, Erica V.; Rosenberg, Harold

    2010-01-01

    The Adolescent Responses to Alcohol and Drug Offers Scale (ARADOS) is a self-report questionnaire designed to assess a respondent's anticipated emotional reactions and intended use of cognitive-behavioral refusal skills in response to an offer of alcohol or other drug. A sample of 267 students enrolled in the 11th and 12th grades of four public…

  3. Development of a Questionnaire to Assess University Students' Intentions to Use Behavioral Alcohol-Reduction Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Erin E.; Hoffmann, Erica; Rosenberg, Harold; Kryszak, Elizabeth; Young, Kathleen M.; Ashrafioun, Lisham; Kraus, Shane W.; Bannon, Erin E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of a new self-report questionnaire designed to assess college students' intentions to employ 31 specific alcohol-reduction strategies. Method: Students attending a large public university were recruited to complete alcohol-reduction, drinking history, and personality questionnaires online.…

  4. Development of an Instrument to Assess Parent-College Child Communication Regarding Alcohol Use Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Beth H.; Cremeens, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background: Past research suggests that parent-child communication can serve as protective factors to reduce alcohol misuse among college-aged children. Purpose: This article presents the methodology used and preliminary findings for developing and validating an instrument to assess parent-college student communication regarding alcohol use.…

  5. Review of Survey and Experimental Research That Examines the Relationship Between Alcohol Consumption and Men's Sexual Aggression Perpetration

    OpenAIRE

    ABBEY, ANTONIA; Wegner, Rhiana; Woerner, Jacqueline; Pegram, Sheri E.; Pierce, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    This article systematically reviews empirical studies that examine associations between alcohol consumption and men's sexual aggression with the goal of identifying major findings; gaps in current knowledge; and directions for future research, practice, and policy. We identified 25 cross-sectional surveys, 6 prospective studies, and 12 alcohol administration experiments published between 1993 and August 2013 with male college students and young adult (nonincarcerated) samples. Many cross-sect...

  6. Alcohol and youth mental health- The evidence base

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Amanda; Dooley, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    The My World Survey- Second Level (MWS-SL) assessed alcohol-related behaviours in 6,085 adolescents. Findings demonstrated a significant shift in the frequency, binge drinking and volume of alcohol consumed across the school year. Alcohol use in the Senior Cycle was a particular concern, with 35% outside the low risk category for alcohol behaviour. The MWS-SL found a strong relationship between alcohol use and mental health distress. Risky alcohol behaviour was associated with ...

  7. Motives for mixing alcohol with energy drinks and other non-alcoholic beverages and its effects on overall alcohol consumption among UK students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Sean J; Alford, Chris; Verster, Joris C; Stewart, Karina

    INTRODUCTION: A UK student survey examined the motivations for consuming energy drinks alone and mixed with alcohol, and aimed to determine whether the type of motive had a differential effect on overall alcohol consumption. METHODS: The online survey (N = 1873) assessed alcohol consumption and

  8. Executive Functioning in Alcohol Use Studies: A Brief Review of Findings and Challenges in Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Anne M; Kahler, Christopher W; Ahern, David C; Clark, Uraina S

    2015-01-01

    There is a wealth of research about the links between executive functioning (EF) and alcohol use. However, difficulty may arise in interpreting findings because of the variability between studies regarding the specific components of EF measured, as well as the variability of tasks used to examine each EF construct. The current article considers each of these problems within the context of a literature review that focuses on two topics: (1) the efficacy of EF in predicting alcohol use and alcohol-related consequences, and (2) the effect of acute alcohol intoxication on EF task performance. An additional goal was to identify and describe commonly used EF measures with the intention of providing alcohol researchers information on the assessment of different EF domains. Our findings indicate that there is strong evidence supporting a relation between EF difficulties (particularly response inhibition and information updating) and alcohol use, with additional evidence of a significant interaction between EF and implicit associations on alcohol use. In contrast, research supporting a link between set shifting abilities and later alcohol use is scarce. Additionally, this review found evidence of alcohol acutely affecting many EF processes (particularly response inhibition). Overall, there is a need to replicate these findings with commonly used EF tasks (versus developing numerous tasks within individual laboratories) to better advance our understanding of the relation between EF and alcohol use.

  9. Assessment and treatment of alcoholism and substance-related disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menninger, John A

    2002-01-01

    Substance-related disorders in the elderly remain overlooked and undertreated. Up to 16% of the elderly have alcohol use disorders. With Americans age 65 and older constituting the fastest growing segment of our population, this issue becomes increasingly important. The author reviews the prevalence of geriatric alcoholism, the two typical drinking patterns seen in the elderly, the acute and chronic consequences of alcohol consumption with particular relevance to older persons, barriers to proper assessment of alcoholism in this age group, usefulness of available screening tools, treatment of alcohol withdrawal in the elderly, treatment of alcohol dependence in the elderly with focus on brief intervention, and aspects of nonalcohol drug abuse in the elderly.

  10. [The characteristics of sexual offenders abusing alcohol in view of forensic-psychiatric assessments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, Dariusz; Korzeniewski, Krzysztof; Czupryńska, Katarzyna; Furs, Maciej

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between alcohol consumption and sexual crime appears to be unquestionable. However, the mechanisms that lead to violence and aggression under the influence of alcohol are not entirely understood in this group of offenders. The aim of this paper was to attempt answering the question: what are the features characterizing sexual offenders declaring alcohol abuse. The research material consisted of 180 forensic psychiatric- sexology assessments issued by experts from Outpatient Psychiatric Clinic in 10 Military Hospital Clinic in Bydgoszcz between 2004 to 2012. A specially designed questionnaire titled "Charter of Diagnosis of Factors Determining Criminal Sexual Activity" has been used. Relevant statistical dependences were observed. The obtained results show that, a alcohol abuse has a sexual criminogenic effect especially in the coincidence that there are sustainable personality abnormalities and organic CNS damage. The conducted study prove that the sexual perpetrators who abuse alcohol have a poor level of social functioning and brought up in dysfunction families having alcoholic problems. © 2015 MEDPRESS.

  11. Assessing the Impact of Stricter Alcohol Advertising Standards: The Case of Beam Global Spirits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Craig S.; Sparks, Alicia; Jernigan, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Reducing youth exposure to alcohol advertising is a global health priority. In most countries around the world, the alcohol industry is given the opportunity to regulate itself with respect to advertising practices. Generally, the alcohol industry self-regulations are lax, allowing youth to be disproportionately exposed to alcohol advertising. However, Beam Global Spirits and Wine (Beam) voluntarily adopted more restrictive advertising standards in the United States in 2007. This study assessed Beam's compliance with their new standard and estimates its effect on youth exposure and advertising costs. We found that Beam's compliance with its more restrictive standards was imperfect, but never-the-less, we estimated that youth exposure to alcohol advertising was reduced compared to other spirits brands. Beam's more restrictive standards did not increase their advertising costs and therefore other alcohol companies should consider adopting similar standards around the world. PMID:28042284

  12. Assessment of older driver performance under low level alcohol impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This report summarizes the outcomes, to date, of the work undertaken to examine : the effects of low level alcohol impairment, especially for older drivers, based on : on-road driving studies. Some of the questions the project initially sought answer...

  13. Cross-cultural evaluation of two drinking assessment instruments: alcohol timeline followback and inventory of drinking situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, L C; Agrawal, S; Annis, H; Ayala-Velazquez, H; Echeverria, L; Leo, G I; Rybakowski, J K; Sandahl, C; Saunders, B; Thomas, S; Zióikowski, M

    2001-02-01

    This article describes the psychometric characteristics of two major assessment instruments used in a World Health Organization (WHO) clinical trial: (a) Alcohol Timeline Followback (TLFB, which assesses daily drinking patterns), and (b) Inventory of Drinking Situations (IDS, which assesses antecedents to "heavy" drinking). Clients (N = 308) were outpatient alcohol abusers from four countries (Australia, Canada, Mexico, and Sweden). Generally, the Alcohol TLFB and IDS were shown to be reliable and valid with outpatient alcohol abusers in four countries, and in three languages. These results suggest that the Alcohol TLFB and the IDS can be used in clinical and research settings with Swedish-, Spanish-, and English-speaking alcohol abusers.

  14. Kona Integrated Ecosystem Assessment Survey (SE1606, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — During this cruise, small-boat surveys were conducted of surface slicks in order to assess their ecological relevance and underlying physical derivers. To assess the...

  15. A longitudinal assessment of alcohol intake and incident depression: the SUN project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Longitudinal studies assessing the long-term association between alcohol intake and depression are scarce. The type of beverage may also be important. Therefore we aimed to prospectively evaluate the influence of alcohol intake on incident depression in a Mediterranean cohort. Methods We assessed 13,619 university graduates (mean age: 38 years, 42% men) participating in a Spanish prospective epidemiological cohort (the SUN Project), initially free of depression. They were recruited between 1999–2008 and biennially followed-up during 2001–2010. At baseline, a 136-item validated food–frequency questionnaire was used to assess alcohol intake. Wine was the preferred beverage. Participants were classified as incident cases of depression if they reported a new clinical diagnosis of depression by a physician and/or initiated the use of antidepressant drugs. Cox regression and restricted cubic splines analyses were performed over 82,926 person-years. Results Only among women, an U-shaped relationship between total alcohol intake and depression risk was found (P=0.01). Moderate alcohol intake (5–15 g/day) was associated with lower risk (Hazard Ratio: 0.62; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.43-0.89). No association was apparent for higher intakes of alcohol or for any specific type of alcoholic beverage. Conclusions Moderate alcohol intake might protect against depression among women. Further confirmatory studies are needed. PMID:23134690

  16. Brief report: The Brief Alcohol Social Density Assessment (BASDA): convergent, criterion-related, and incremental validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKillop, James; Acker, John D; Bollinger, Jared; Clifton, Allan; Miller, Joshua D; Campbell, W Keith; Goodie, Adam S

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol misuse is substantially influenced by social factors, but systematic assessments of social network drinking are typically lengthy. The goal of the present study was to provide further validation of a brief measure of social network alcohol use, the Brief Alcohol Social Density Assessment (BASDA), in a sample of emerging adults. Specifically, the study sought to examine the BASDA's convergent, criterion, and incremental validity in relation to well-established measures of drinking motives and problematic drinking. Participants were 354 undergraduates who were assessed using the BASDA, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT), and the Drinking Motives Questionnaire. Significant associations were observed between the BASDA index of alcohol-related social density and alcohol misuse, social motives, and conformity motives, supporting convergent validity. Criterion-related validity was supported by evidence that significantly greater alcohol involvement was present in the social networks of individuals scoring at or above an AUDIT score of 8, a validated criterion for hazardous drinking. Finally, the BASDA index was significantly associated with alcohol misuse above and beyond drinking motives in relation to AUDIT scores, supporting incremental validity. Taken together, these findings provide further support for the BASDA as an efficient measure of drinking in an individual's social network. Methodological considerations as well as recommendations for future investigations in this area are discussed.

  17. A longitudinal assessment of alcohol intake and incident depression: the SUN project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Alfredo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Longitudinal studies assessing the long-term association between alcohol intake and depression are scarce. The type of beverage may also be important. Therefore we aimed to prospectively evaluate the influence of alcohol intake on incident depression in a Mediterranean cohort. Methods We assessed 13,619 university graduates (mean age: 38 years, 42% men participating in a Spanish prospective epidemiological cohort (the SUN Project, initially free of depression. They were recruited between 1999–2008 and biennially followed-up during 2001–2010. At baseline, a 136-item validated food–frequency questionnaire was used to assess alcohol intake. Wine was the preferred beverage. Participants were classified as incident cases of depression if they reported a new clinical diagnosis of depression by a physician and/or initiated the use of antidepressant drugs. Cox regression and restricted cubic splines analyses were performed over 82,926 person-years. Results Only among women, an U-shaped relationship between total alcohol intake and depression risk was found (P=0.01. Moderate alcohol intake (5–15 g/day was associated with lower risk (Hazard Ratio: 0.62; 95% Confidence Interval: 0.43-0.89. No association was apparent for higher intakes of alcohol or for any specific type of alcoholic beverage. Conclusions Moderate alcohol intake might protect against depression among women. Further confirmatory studies are needed.

  18. Cross sectional survey on association between alcohol, betel- nut, cigarette consumption and health promoting behavior of industrial workers in Ghaziabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Dimple; Marya, Charu Mohan; Menon, Ipseeta; Oberoi, Sukhvinder Singh; Dhingra, Chandan; Anand, Richa

    2015-01-01

    The work force in industries are at risk of developing unduly high rates of health and behaviour related problems including abuse of alcohol, betel nut and cigarette (alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption). This study describes the relationships between alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption and health promoting behaviour among industrial workers. A cross sectional survey was conducted on workers in various industries of Ghaziabad city with concerned authority permission. A sample size of 732 workers was calculated based on pilot study. Through Simple random sampling 732 workers in 20 to 50 years age group with informed consent were interviewed through structured, pretested, validated questionnaire in vernacular language by one calibrated investigator. Data on socio demography, alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption pattern and health behaviour were collected. The association between health promoting behaviour and alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption was analysed by Logistic regression and Chi-square test through SPSS 16 at pbetel nut and cigarette consumption in study population was 88%. The prevalence of individual alcohol, betel nut and cigarette consumption were 82%, 68% and 79% respectively. Combined alcohol, betel nut and cigarette prevalence in study population was 58%. Alcohol and cigarette users were significantly higher (pbetel nut and cigarette users.

  19. Evaluation of drinking patterns and their impact on alcohol-related aggression: a national survey of adolescent behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Valeria; Mezzasalma, Lorena; Lorenzoni, Valentina; Pieroni, Stefania; Molinaro, Sabrina

    2013-10-10

    Although there have been a wide range of epidemiological studies examining the impact of patterns of alcohol consumption among adolescents, there remains considerable variability in both defining these patterns and the ability to comprehensively evaluate their relationship to behavioural patterns. This study explores a new procedure for defining and evaluating drinking patterns and integrating well-established indicators. The composite measure is then used to estimate the impact of these patterns on alcohol-related aggressive behaviour among Italian adolescents. Data were collected as part of the 2011 European School Survey Project on Alcohol and other Drugs (ESPAD). A national sample of 14,199 students aged 15-19 years was collected using an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire completed in a classroom setting. Drinking patterns were established using principal component analysis. Alcohol-related aggression was analysed as to its relationship to patterns of drinking, behaviour of friends towards alcohol use, substance use/abuse, school performance, family relationships and leisure activities. Several specific drinking patterns were identified: "Drinking to Excess" (DE), "Drinking with Intoxication" (DI) and "Drinking but Not to Excess" (DNE). A higher percentage of males were involved in alcohol-related aggression compared with females. In males, the DE and DI patterns significantly increased the likelihood of alcohol-related aggression, whereas the DNE pattern was negatively associated. Similar results were found in females, although the DI pattern was not significantly associated with alcohol-related aggression. Overall, cigarette smoking, illegal drug use, truancy, limited parental monitoring, frequent evenings spent outside of the home and peer influence associated strongly with alcohol-related aggression. Our findings suggest that drinking patterns, as uniquely monitored with an integrated metric, can: 1) explain drinking habits better than commonly

  20. Gambling and physical intimate partner violence: Results from the national epidemiologic survey on alcohol and related conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Amanda; Landon, Jason; Sharman, Stephen; Hakes, Jahn; Suomi, Aino; Cowlishaw, Sean

    2018-01-01

    Links between intimate partner violence (IPV) and gambling problems are under researched in general population samples. Understanding these relationships will allow for improved identification and intervention. We investigated these relationships and sought to determine whether links were attenuated by axis I and II disorders. This study examined data from waves 1 and 2 (N = 25,631) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC); a nationally representative survey of U.S. adults. Gambling symptoms and other psychiatric disorders were measured at wave 1 by the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disability Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version (AUDADIS-IV). Physical IPV victimization and perpetration in the last 12 months were assessed 3 years later at wave 2 using items from the Conflict Tactics Scale-R. Binary logistic regression models were used to examine associations separately for males and females. Problem gambling was associated with increased odds of both IPV perpetration for males (OR = 2.62, 95%CI = 1.22-5.60) and females (OR = 2.87, 95%CI = 1.29-6.42), and with IPV victimization for females only (OR = 2.97, 95%CI = 1.31-6.74). Results were attenuated with inclusion of axis I and axis II disorders; links between gambling and IPV were weaker than those involving other mental health conditions. There are prospective associations with gambling problems and physical IPV which have implications for identification, spontaneous disclosure, and treatment seeking. The links between gambling problems and violence are complex and should not be considered independently of co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders. (Am J Addict 2018;27:7-14). © 2017 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  1. The Influence of Alcohol-Related Cognitions on Personality-Based Risk for Alcohol Use during Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekman, Nicole M.; Cummins, Kevin; Brown, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines whether expectancies about the impact of not drinking or reducing alcohol use and perceptions of peer alcohol use partially mediated risk incurred by sensation seeking for adolescent alcohol involvement. High school drinkers (N = 3,153) completed a survey assessing substance use, sensation seeking, perceived peer alcohol use,…

  2. Assessment of the average price and ethanol content of alcoholic beverages by brand--United States, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLoreto, Joanna T; Siegel, Michael; Hinchey, Danielle; Valerio, Heather; Kinzel, Kathryn; Lee, Stephanie; Chen, Kelsey; Shoaff, Jessica R; Kenney, Jessica; Jernigan, David H; DeJong, William

    2012-07-01

    There are no existing data on alcoholic beverage prices and ethanol (EtOH) content at the level of alcohol brand. A comprehensive understanding of alcohol prices and EtOH content at the brand level is essential for the development of effective public policy to reduce alcohol use among underage youth. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively assess alcoholic beverage prices and EtOH content at the brand level. Using online alcohol price data from 15 control states and 164 online alcohol stores, we estimated the average alcohol price and percent alcohol by volume for 900 brands of alcohol, across 17 different alcoholic beverage types, in the United States in 2011. There is considerable variation in both brand-specific alcohol prices and EtOH content within most alcoholic beverage types. For many types of alcohol, the within-category variation between brands exceeds the variation in average price and EtOH content among the several alcoholic beverage types. Despite differences in average prices between alcoholic beverage types, in 12 of the 16 alcoholic beverage types, customers can purchase at least 1 brand of alcohol that is under $1 per ounce of EtOH. Relying on data or assumptions about alcohol prices and EtOH content at the level of alcoholic beverage type is insufficient for understanding and influencing youth drinking behavior. Surveillance of alcohol prices and EtOH content at the brand level should become a standard part of alcohol research. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  3. Assessment methods for alcohol consumption, prevalence of high risk drinking and harm: a sensitivity analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rehm, J; Greenfield, T K; Walsh, G; Xie, X; Robson, L; Single, E

    1999-01-01

    .... The main objective of the present study was to compare three widely used methods for assessing alcohol consumption with respect to resulting prevalence estimates for high risk drinking and harm...

  4. Private peer group settings as an environmental determinant of alcohol use in Dutch adolescents: results from a representative survey in the region of Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, J.; Pieterse, Marcel E.; Postel, Marloes Gerda; van Hoof, Joris Jasper

    2012-01-01

    This study supports the hypothesis that the drinking setting can be an environmental risk factor for hazardous alcohol use. In a survey of Dutch adolescents (n=1516), alcohol consumption and participation in private peer group settings (PPSs), environments where adolescents meet and drink alcohol

  5. The Alcoholism Situation in a Northern City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, M. Iu.; Martynova, D. Iu.

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol abuse in Russia has been increasing in recent years, especially in northern regions, as has the incidence of alcohol-related disease rates. A survey was conducted in Surgut (the Khanty-Mansi autonomous okrug) that determined the factors lending to the prevalence of alcohol abuse among the population of the northern city and assessed the…

  6. Human health risk assessment of long chain alcohols (LCOH)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veenstra, Gauke; Sanderson, Hans; Webb, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    are considered to be mild irritants and chain lengths of C18 and above are considered non-irritants. These chemicals are broadly used across the consumer products industry with highest per person consumer exposures resulting from use in personal care products. Margins of exposure adequate for the protection......Representative chemicals from the long chain alcohols category have been extensively tested to define their toxicological hazard properties. These chemicals show low acute and repeat dose toxicity with high-dose effects (if any) related to minimal liver toxicity. These chemicals do not show...... evidence of activity in genetic toxicity tests or to the reproductive system or the developing organism. These chemicals also are not sensitizers. Irritation is dependant on chain length; generally, alcohols in the range C6-C11 are considered as irritant, intermediate chain lengths (C12-C16) alcohols...

  7. Comparison of brief interventions in primary care on smoking and excessive alcohol consumption: a population survey in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie; West, Robert; Angus, Colin; Beard, Emma; Brennan, Alan; Drummond, Colin; Hickman, Matthew; Holmes, John; Kaner, Eileen; Michie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Brief interventions have a modest but meaningful effect on promoting smoking cessation and reducing excessive alcohol consumption. Guidelines recommend offering such advice opportunistically and regularly but incentives vary between the two behaviours. To use representative data from the perspective of patients to compare the prevalence and characteristics of people who smoke or drink excessively and who receive a brief intervention. Data was from a representative sample of 15,252 adults from household surveys in England. Recall of brief interventions on smoking and alcohol use, sociodemographic information, and smoking and alcohol consumption patterns were assessed among smokers and those who drink excessively (AUDIT score of ≥8), who visited their GP surgery in the previous year. Of 1775 smokers, 50.4% recalled receiving brief advice on smoking in the previous year. Smokers receiving advice compared with those who did not were more likely to be older (odds ratio [OR] 17-year increments 1.19, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.06 to 1.34), female (OR 1.35, 95% CI =1.10 to 1.65), have a disability (OR 1.44, 95% CI = 1.11 to 1.88), have made more quit attempts in the previous year (compared with no attempts: one attempt, OR 1.65, 95% CI = 1.32 to 2.08; ≥2 attempts, OR 2.02, 95% CI =1.49 to 2.74), and have greater nicotine dependence (OR 1.17, 95% CI =1.05 to 1.31) but were less likely to have no post-16 qualifications (OR 0.81, 95% CI = 0.66 to 1.00). Of 1110 people drinking excessively, 6.5% recalled receiving advice in their GP surgery on their alcohol consumption in the previous year. Those receiving advice compared with those who did not had higher AUDIT scores (OR 1.17, 95% CI =1.12 to 1.23) and were less likely to be female (OR 0.44, 95% CI = 0.23 to 0.87). Whereas approximately half of smokers in England visiting their GP in the past year report having received advice on cessation, consumption. © British Journal of General Practice 2016.

  8. Prevalence of 12-Month Alcohol Use, High-Risk Drinking, and DSM-IV Alcohol Use Disorder in the United States, 2001-2002 to 2012-2013: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Bridget F; Chou, S Patricia; Saha, Tulshi D; Pickering, Roger P; Kerridge, Bradley T; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Fan, Amy; Hasin, Deborah S

    2017-09-01

    Lack of current and comprehensive trend data derived from a uniform, reliable, and valid source on alcohol use, high-risk drinking, and DSM-IV alcohol use disorder (AUD) represents a major gap in public health information. To present nationally representative data on changes in the prevalences of 12-month alcohol use, 12-month high-risk drinking, 12-month DSM-IV AUD, 12-month DSM-IV AUD among 12-month alcohol users, and 12-month DSM-IV AUD among 12-month high-risk drinkers between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013. The study data were derived from face-to-face interviews conducted in 2 nationally representative surveys of US adults: the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, with data collected from April 2001 to June 2002, and the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III, with data collected from April 2012 to June 2013. Data were analyzed in November and December 2016. Twelve-month alcohol use, high-risk drinking, and DSM-IV AUD. The study sample included 43 093 participants in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and 36 309 participants in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions III. Between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013, 12-month alcohol use, high-risk drinking, and DSM-IV AUD increased by 11.2%, 29.9%, and 49.4%, respectively, with alcohol use increasing from 65.4% (95% CI, 64.3%-66.6%) to 72.7% (95% CI, 71.4%-73.9%), high-risk drinking increasing from 9.7% (95% CI, 9.3%-10.2%) to 12.6% (95% CI, 12.0%-13.2%), and DSM-IV AUD increasing from 8.5% (95% CI, 8.0%-8.9%) to 12.7% (95% CI, 12.1%-13.3%). With few exceptions, increases in alcohol use, high-risk drinking, and DSM-IV AUD between 2001-2002 and 2012-2013 were also statistically significant across sociodemographic subgroups. Increases in all of these outcomes were greatest among women, older adults, racial/ethnic minorities, and individuals with lower educational level and family income. Increases were also

  9. The Effect of Perceived Risk on the Combined Used of Alcohol and Marijuana: Results from Daily Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans-Maldonado, Gloria; Patrick, Megan E

    2015-12-01

    Studies looking at the association between perceived risk and simultaneous use of alcohol and marijuana are scarce. The present study has three purposes: (1) To examine the association between alcohol and marijuana use at the daily level; (2) To document how this association varies by the perceived risk of using alcohol and marijuana simultaneously; (3) To test whether the association varies by college attendance. 89 young adults (Mean Age = 18.3 years, SD = 0.5) participated between October 2012 and May 2013. Participants completed a 30-minute survey followed by 14 brief daily surveys in each of three waves. Alcohol use on a given day was associated with increased odds of marijuana use that day, especially among young adults with lower perceived risk. For college students, the association between alcohol and marijuana was weaker than for non-students. Alcohol and marijuana use were associated at a daily level, especially among young adults with lower perceived risk and those who were not attending college.

  10. Out of sight, out of mind? A national survey of paediatricians in Ireland regarding Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gill, I

    2017-03-01

    Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs) are one of the major causes of preventable developmental delay. There is no register of children with FASDs in Ireland. Up to 81% of Irish women report drinking alcohol during the periconceptual period or pregnancy. We aimed to evaluate self-reported knowledge and practice of doctors working in paediatrics in Ireland with regards to FASDs and alcohol consumption during pregnancy. We circulated a survey to all paediatric doctors in Ireland, either enrolled in specialist training or registered as trainers. Fifty-six respondents (31.3%) were unaware of the existence of FASDs. Sixty-two (34.6%) believed most patients with FASDs have dysmorphic features. Seventy-three respondents (40.8%) routinely ask about maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy in the context of developmental delay. Thirty-one respondents (17.3%) stated that mild alcohol intake in the third trimester of pregnancy is safe. Our survey suggests prenatal alcohol exposure may not be routinely considered in the evaluation of children with developmental delay by paediatric doctors in Ireland.

  11. Do emotions related to alcohol consumption differ by alcohol type? An international cross-sectional survey of emotions associated with alcohol consumption and influence on drink choice in different settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Kathryn; Bellis, Mark A; Davies, Alisha R; Hughes, Karen; Winstock, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine the emotions associated with drinking different types of alcohol, explore whether these emotions differ by sociodemographics and alcohol dependency and whether the emotions associated with different drink types influence people’s choice of drinks in different settings. Design International cross-sectional opportunistic survey (Global Drug Survey) using an online anonymous questionnaire in 11 languages promoted through newspapers, magazines and social media from November 2015 to January 2016. Study population Individuals aged 18–34 years who reported consumption of beer, spirits, red and white wine in the previous 12 months and were resident in countries with more than 200 respondents (n=21 countries; 29 836 respondents). Main outcome measures Positive and negative emotions associated with consumption of different alcoholic beverages (energised, relaxed, sexy, confident, tired, aggressive, ill, restless and tearful) over the past 12 months in different settings. Results Alcoholic beverages vary in the types of emotions individuals report they elicit, with spirits more frequently eliciting emotional changes of all types. Overall 29.8% of respondents reported feeling aggressive when drinking spirits, compared with only 7.1% when drinking red wine (p<0.001). Women more frequently reported feeling all emotions when drinking alcohol, apart from feelings of aggression. Respondents’ level of alcohol dependency was strongly associated with feeling all emotions, with the likelihood of aggression being significantly higher in possible dependent versus low risk drinkers (adjusted OR 6.4; 95% CI 5.79 to 7.09; p<0.001). The odds of feeling the majority of positive and negative emotions also remained highest among dependent drinkers irrespective of setting. Conclusion Understanding emotions associated with alcohol consumption is imperative to addressing alcohol misuse, providing insight into what emotions influence drink choice between different groups

  12. Nutrient adequacy: assessment using food consumption surveys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    National Research Council (U.S.). Subcommittee on Criteria for Dietary Evaluation

    1986-01-01

    ... of Food Consumption Surveys Food and Nutrition Board Commission on Life Sciences National Research Council National Academy Press Washington, D.C. 1986 i Copyrightthe cannot be not from book, paper however, version for formatting, original authoritative the typesetting-specific the as from created publication files XML from other this ...

  13. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Auden C; Tanski, Susanne E; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D

    2016-02-01

    Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  14. Analytical Assessment of the Effects of Alcohol Consumption on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2014-06-01

    Jun 1, 2014 ... Chijioke Amaka, Immaculata, Department of Computer science, Federal Polytechnic Oko, Anambra State. 4. Ifeanyi Reuben Nkechi Jecinta, Department of Computer Science, Rhema University, Aba Abia State. Abstract. Alcohol is psychoactive drug found in beer, wine and hard liquor, whose effects, both.

  15. Nutrition and Drug/Alcohol Rehabilitation: A Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Judith; McIntosh, Elaine

    1987-01-01

    Diet histories of clients entering a drug/alcohol treatment facility showed need for improved eating habits. At least 50% had customarily low intakes of several nutrients plus calories. Nutritional adequacy improved during treatment, as did caloric excesses. Clients needed nutrition education. (Author/NB)

  16. Collateral Informant Assessment in Alcohol Use Research Involving College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagman, Brett T.; Cohn, Amy M.; Noel, Nora E.; Clifford, Patrick R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study examined the associations between college students' self-reported alcohol use and corresponding collateral reports and identified factors that influence agreement between both sets of reports. Participants/Methods: Subject-collateral pairs (N = 300) were recruited from undergraduate psychology courses. Results: Data yielded…

  17. Use of aids for smoking cessation and alcohol reduction: A population survey of adults in England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Beard

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important for policy planning to chart the methods smokers and high-risk drinkers use to help them change their behaviour. This study assessed prevalence of use, and characteristics of users, of support for smoking cessation and alcohol reduction in England. Methods Data were used from the Smoking and Alcohol Toolkit Studies, which involve monthly face-to-face computer-assisted interviews of adults aged 16+ in England. We included data collected between June 2014 and July 2015 on 1600 smokers who had made at least one quit attempt and 911 high-risk drinkers (defined as scores >8+ on the full AUDIT or 5+ on questions 1–3 of the AUDIT-C who had made an attempt to cut down in the past 12 months. Participants provided information on their socio-demographic characteristics and use of aids during their most recent quit attempt including pharmacotherapy, face-to-face counselling, telephone support, self-help materials (digital and printed, and complementary medicine. Results A total of 60.3% of smokers used aids in the past year, compared with just 14.9% of high-risk drinkers. Use of pharmacotherapy was high among smokers and very low among drinkers (56.0%versus1.2%. Use of other aids was low for both behaviours: face-to-face counselling (2.6%versus4.8%, self-help materials (1.4%versus4.1% and complementary medicine (1.0%versus0.5%. Use of aids was more common among smokers aged 25–54 compared with 16–24 year olds (25–34,ORadj1.49,p = 0.012; 35–44,ORadj1.93,p 10 relative to 20,ORadj4.23,p = 0.001, and less common among ethnic minorities (ORadj0.69,p = 0.026. For alcohol reduction, use of aids was higher among ethnic minority groups (ORadj2.41;p = 0.015, and those of social-grade D/E relative to AB (ORadj2.29,p = 0.012&ORadj3.13,p < 0.001. Conclusion In England, the use of pharmacotherapy is prevalent for smoking cessation but not alcohol reduction. Other aids are used at a low rate, with

  18. Where, with whom, and how much alcohol is consumed on drinking events involving aggression? Event-level associations in a Canadian national survey of university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Samantha; Mihic, Ljiljana; Tremblay, Paul F; Graham, Kathryn; Demers, Andrée

    2008-03-01

    Epidemiological research using event-level data can provide a better understanding of the association between alcohol consumption, characteristics of drinking contexts, and the likelihood of aggressive behavior. The present research assessed whether alcohol intake and characteristics of the drinking context were associated with the likelihood of aggression within individuals across 3 drinking events based on a national sample of university students, taking into account individual characteristics and university level variables. Additionally, we determined whether individual characteristics, particularly drinking pattern, were associated with alcohol-related aggression controlling for drinking event characteristics, and whether relations of aggression to alcohol and drinking contexts differed by gender. Secondary analyses of the 2004 Canadian Campus Survey (CCS), a national survey of 6,282 university students (41% response rate) at 40 Canadian universities, were conducted. Respondents were asked about their three most recent drinking events, including whether they were in an argument or fight with someone, number of drinks consumed, and characteristics of the drinking context as well as their usual drinking frequency and heavy episodic drinking. We used multi-level analyses to account for the nested structure of the data (i.e., drinking events nested within individuals who were nested within universities). The number of drinks consumed was positively associated with aggression. Drinking contexts found to be positively associated with aggression included being at a party, at a fraternity/sorority and/or residence, at three or more drinking places (versus 1 or 2), and having a partner present whereas having a meal reduced the likelihood of aggression. A significant interaction was found between gender and being at a party, with a significant effect found for women but not for men. These results support experimental evidence indicating a direct role of alcohol in

  19. Alcohol consumption among patients with diabetes: a survey-based cross-sectional study of Danish adults with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Mathilde L; Larsen, Julie R; Glümer, Charlotte; Juel, Knud; Ekholm, Ola; Vilsbøll, Tina; Becker, Ulrik; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2016-07-01

    To estimate alcohol consumption among Danish adults with diabetes and to investigate whether certain comorbidities are related to a high alcohol intake. A total of 162,283 participants responded to the Danish National Health Survey 2013 (questionnaire study, response rate 54.0%). Variables on the participants were extracted from the survey and 6.5% of respondents reported having diabetes. High alcohol consumption was defined as >21 (men) or >14 (women) standard drinks per week. High alcohol consumption was reported by 11.2 % of men and 4.3% of women with diabetes. In the women, this was fewer than among women without diabetes (odds ratio (OR) 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.56-0.77, pdiabetes had lower ORs for binge drinking (men OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.84-0.97, p=0.0039; women OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.70-0.89, palcohol intake (men OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.75-0.86, pdiabetes. A larger proportion of participants with diabetes had not consumed alcohol within the last year (men 13.5%; women 28.2%) compared with participants without diabetes (men 6.0%; women 11.2%). Men with diabetes and a high consumption of alcohol had significantly lower ORs for myocardial infarction (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.40-0.76, p =0.0003) and stroke (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.49-1.00, p=0.0498). CONCLUSIONS THIS STUDY SUGGESTS THAT DANISH PATIENTS WITH DIABETES ARE LESS PRONE TO EXHIBIT ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOUR AND MANY ABSTAIN FROM ALCOHOL FEWER WOMEN WITH DIABETES THAN WITHOUT DIABETES HAVE AN EXCESSIVE DRINKING PATTERN HIGH ALCOHOL CONSUMPTION IN MEN WITH DIABETES CORRELATES TO A LOWER OCCURRENCE OF CARDIOVASCULAR EVENTS. © 2016 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  20. Does alcohol advertising promote adolescent drinking? Results from a longitudinal assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellickson, Phyllis L; Collins, Rebecca L; Hambarsoomians, Katrin; McCaffrey, Daniel F

    2005-02-01

    To examine the relationship between exposure to different forms of alcohol advertising and subsequent drinking among US adolescents and assess whether exposure to an alcohol and drug prevention program mitigates any such relationship. Regression models with multiple control variables examined the relationship between exposure to alcohol advertising in grade 8 and grade 9 drinking for two groups of South Dakotan adolescents: (1) seventh-grade non-drinkers (n = 1206) and (2) seventh-grade drinkers (n = 1905). Interactions between the intervention program and the significant advertising predictors were tested. Forty-one middle schools in South Dakota, USA. A total of 3111 seventh-graders followed through grade 9. Advertising variables were constructed for four types of alcohol advertising-television, in-store displays, magazines and concession stands. Other predictors tested included measures tapping social influences, social bonds, problem behavior, alcohol beliefs, television exposure and demographics. For seventh-grade non-drinkers, exposure to in-store beer displays predicted drinking onset by grade 9; for seventh-grade drinkers, exposure to magazines with alcohol advertisements and to beer concession stands at sports or music events predicted frequency of grade 9 drinking. Although exposure to television beer advertising had a significant bivariate relationship with alcohol use for grade 7 non-drinkers, it was not a significant predictor of drinking for either group in multivariate analyses. Participation in the prevention program, ALERT Plus, reduced future drinking for both groups and counteracted the effect of in-store beer displays. Several forms of alcohol advertising predict adolescent drinking; which sources dominate depends on the child's prior experience with alcohol. Alcohol prevention programs and policies should help children counter alcohol advertising from multiple sources and limit exposure to these sources.

  1. Carcinogenicity of acetaldehyde in alcoholic beverages: risk assessment outside ethanol metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Kanteres, Fotis; Rehm, Jürgen

    2009-04-01

    In addition to being produced in ethanol metabolism, acetaldehyde occurs naturally in alcoholic beverages. Limited epidemiological evidence points to acetaldehyde as an independent risk factor for cancer during alcohol consumption, in addition to the effects of ethanol. This study aims to estimate human exposure to acetaldehyde from alcoholic beverages and provide a quantitative risk assessment. The human dietary intake of acetaldehyde via alcoholic beverages was estimated based on World Health Organization (WHO) consumption data and literature on the acetaldehyde contents of different beverage groups (beer, wine, spirits and unrecorded alcohol). The risk assessment was conducted using the European Food Safety Authority's margin of exposure (MOE) approach with benchmark doses obtained from dose-response modelling of animal experiments. Life-time cancer risk was calculated using the T25 dose descriptor. The average exposure to acetaldehyde from alcoholic beverages was estimated at 0.112 mg/kg body weight/day. The MOE was calculated to be 498, and the life-time cancer risk at 7.6 in 10,000. Higher risk may exist for people exposed to high acetaldehyde contaminations, as we have found in certain unrecorded alcohol beverages in Guatemala and Russia, for which we have demonstrated possible exposure scenarios, with risks in the range of 1 in 1000. The life-time cancer risks for acetaldehyde from alcoholic beverages greatly exceed the usual limits for cancer risks from the environment set between 1 : 10,000 and 1 : 1,000,000. Alcohol consumption has thus been identified as a direct source of acetaldehyde exposure, which in conjunction with other sources (food flavourings, tobacco) results in a magnitude of risk requiring intervention. An initial public health measure could be to reduce the acetaldehyde content in alcoholic beverages as low as technologically possible, and to restrict its use as a food flavour additive.

  2. Toward a global view of alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, and cocaine use : Findings from the WHO World Mental Health Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degenhardt, Louisa; Chiu, Wai-Tat; Sampson, Nancy; Kessler, Ronald C.; Anthony, James C.; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bruffaerts, Ronny; de Girolamo, Giovanni; Gureje, Oye; Huang, Yueqin; Karam, Aimee; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Lepine, Jean Pierre; Mora, Maria Elena Medina; Neumark, Yehuda; Ormel, J. Hans; Pinto-Meza, Alejandra; Posada-Villa, Jose; Stein, Dan J.; Takeshima, Tadashi; Wells, J. Elisabeth

    Background Alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drug use cause considerable morbidity and mortality, but good cross-national epidemiological data are limited. This paper describes such data from the first 17 countries participating in the World Health Organization's (WHO's) World Mental Health (WMH) Survey

  3. Survey of Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices of Fifth and Eighth Grade Students Regarding Alcoholic Beverages in Urban Parochial Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Essie E.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of fifth- and eighth-grade urban parochial school students (N=3,785) regarding alcoholic beverages. Survey results showed a religiously oriented school environment had little influence on drinking behavior. Family, friends, and cultural norms were strong influences. Sixth and seventh grades appear…

  4. Relationship between abdominal obesity and alcohol drinking pattern in normal-weight, middle-aged adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kye-Yeung; Park, Hoon-Ki; Hwang, Hwan-Sik

    2017-08-01

    Abdominal obesity is associated with obesity-related health risks regardless of body weight. The present study aimed to determine whether alcohol drinking pattern is associated with abdominal obesity in normal-weight, middle-aged adults. Cross-sectional study using complex sampling design analyses. The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which was conducted from 2008 to 2013. Normal-weight participants aged 40-69 years with BMI of 18·5-25·0 kg/m2 (n 11 289, 4491 men and 6798 women) were included. Abdominal obesity was defined as waist circumference ≥90 cm for men or ≥85 cm for women. Alcohol drinking pattern was assessed by self-report on questionnaires. Among 11 289 normal-weight participants, 7·9 % (n 379) of men and 7·6 % (n 609) of women had abdominal obesity. Both men and women who consumed a higher quantity of alcohol per drinking occasion had higher odds (OR; 95 % CI) for abdominal obesity compared with individuals who consumed fewer than 2 drinks (1·86; 1·04, 3·32 for ≥10 drinks/typical occasion in men; and 3·28; 1·13, 9·46 in women). Men who binge drink every day had higher odds for abdominal obesity (2·10; 1·21, 3·63). In both sexes, frequency of alcohol drinking was not associated with normal-weight abdominal obesity. Our study showed that the amount of alcohol drinking per occasion influenced abdominal obesity in normal-weight, middle-aged individuals that may have impacted obesity-related health risks. Healthy alcohol drinking habits need to be controlled for prevention of abdominal obesity even among persons with normal weight.

  5. Use of fake identification to purchase alcohol amongst 15-16 year olds: a cross-sectional survey examining alcohol access, consumption and harm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smallthwaite Linda

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite legislation and enforcement activities to prevent underage access to alcohol, underage individuals continue to be able to access alcohol and to do so at levels which put them at significant risk of alcohol-related harm. Methods An opportunistic survey of 15-16 year olds (n = 9,833 across North West England was used to examine alcohol consumption, methods of access and related harms experienced (such as regretted sex. Associations between these were analysed using chi square and logistic regression techniques. Results Over a quarter (28.3% of 15-16 year old participants who drank reported having bought their own alcohol. One seventh (14.9% of these owned at least one form of fake identification for which by far the most common purchase method was online. Logistic regression analyses showed that those who owned fake identification were significantly more likely to be male (AOR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.7-2.5; P £30 with those who received ≤ £10: AOR = 3.7; 95% CI = 2.9-4.9; P Conclusions Young people (aged 15-16 years who have access to fake identification are at a particularly high risk of reporting hazardous alcohol consumption patterns and related harm. Owning fake identification should be considered a risk factor for involvement in risky drinking behaviours. Information on these hazards should be made available to schools and professionals in health, social and judicial services, along with advice on how to best to work with those involved.

  6. Alcohol-drinking patterns and metabolic syndrome risk: the 2007 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyu-Won; Park, Byoung-Jin; Kang, Hee-Taik; Lee, Yong-Jae

    2011-08-01

    Alcohol consumption has been known to be related to the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS). Although some studies have revealed that mild to moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of MS, most of these studies have focused the effect of alcohol consumption amount on MS. We examined the association between alcohol-drinking patterns and MS by using the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) questionnaire to study 1,768 alcohol drinkers (847 men, 921 women) aged 20-75 years from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2007. When compared with the subjects in the reference group (AUDIT score ≤ 7), the odds ratios (ORs, 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for MS of subjects in the highest group (AUDIT score ≥ 16) were 3.92 (2.40-6.22) in men and 2.27 (0.87-5.89) in women after adjusting for confounding variables. Among the items of the AUDIT score, several alcohol-drinking patterns, including "drinking frequency," "usual drinking quantity," "frequency of high-risk drinking," "frequency of inability to stop drinking," "frequency of feeling guilty after drinking," and "frequency of inability to remember after drinking" were strongly associated with the prevalence of MS in men. In women, there were significant relationships between MS and "usual drinking quantity," "frequency of feeling guilty after drinking," and "frequency of inability to stop drinking." In summary, AUDIT score was strongly associated with MS in Korean adults, particularly in men. Accordingly, in addition to the amount of daily alcohol consumption, alcohol-drinking patterns should be addressed in the prevention and treatment of MS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Developing an International Survey of Teachers' Assessment Capabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renken, Maggie; Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Cowie, Bronwen

    Professional standards require teachers to be assessment literate - to construct, administer, and score reliable, valid assessments, communicate interpretations and use evidence to adjust teaching to support students. This project investigates student-teachers’ assessment literacy throughout...... teacher education into the first years as teachers across six countries. We target the nature of programmes and changes in understanding assessment purposes, practices, principles and policy. This project builds on the ACT survey of student-teacher understandings of assessment conducted over three years...

  8. The effects of alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) on traffic behaviors among Brazilian college students: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckschmidt, Frederico; de Andrade, Arthur Guerra; dos Santos, Bernardo; de Oliveira, Lúcio Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Drinking alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) may be contributing to hazardous drinking practices and risk-taking behaviors among college students. In this regard, this study aimed to assess the frequency of AmED consumption in a national sample of Brazilian college students and to estimate the risk that energy drinks pose on drinking and traffic behaviors. A sample of 12,711 college students from across the country was asked to complete a research questionnaire on the use of drugs and other behaviors. Students who reported drinking in the previous 12 months (N = 8672) were divided into 2 groups: (a) those who reported drinking only alcohol (N = 4192) and (b) those who reported drinking AmED (N = 1119). The college students who reported the use of at least one illicit drug were excluded from data analysis. Descriptive and inferential analyses were subsequently carried out using the R library survey software 2.15.0. The null hypothesis was rejected at the level of P alcohol only users (AUs). The current findings are consistent with the results of previous studies. Drinking AmED may make college students more vulnerable to the occurrence of risky drinking and traffic behaviors. Educational campaigns targeted to young people should be developed warning them about the potential risks of mixing alcohol with energy drinks.

  9. Multimethod Personality Profile Assessment Methodology: Alcohol Abusers versus Nonalcoholic Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    multiple statistical tests of significance, some significant differences are to be expected due to chance alone.) Although the psychopathic / sociopathic model...which were based primarily on a 2 psychopathic / sociopathic model suggested by the *IPI/Pd literature. The results are discussed also as possibly... psychopathic versus neurotic types, which were found by Whitelock et al. (194) to differ in self-reported degree of alcohol abuse. Such findings of appar

  10. Craving sensation in the assessment of alcohol-dependent persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Juczyński

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The approach to the problems of the occurrence of and coping with alcohol craving in the course of the therapy should be similar in men and women. However, there should be more focus on the working out of coping strategies, especially in the younger patients, because of the more frequent and intensive craving they experience, which poses a greater risk of relapse and recurrence of the problem.

  11. Results Of The Needs Assessment Survey Of Lecturers For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The College of Medicine University of Nigeria as a first step in establishing an Office of Medical Education carried out a survey of the faculty members to determine their need for an office of medical education. This paper analysis the result of the survey. Method: A questionnaire to assess the faculty needs for establishing an ...

  12. Using Online Surveys to Promote and Assess Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Laura; Doehler, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the use of online survey software to collect data from students during class to efficiently use class time. Several example activities for an introductory statistics classroom are considered. We also discuss utilization of online survey software for other purposes such as collecting assessment information and student…

  13. Electronic Survey Administration: Assessment in the Twenty-First Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Danny R.; Wygant, Steven A.; Brown, Bruce L.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in electronic data collection have opened broad new possibilities for educational assessment. Potentially significant savings in time, money, and effort make Web-based and e-mail-based surveys more and more attractive as alternatives to mail surveys and face-to-face interviews. Yet, as with any major change, questions and obstacles…

  14. Alcohol abuse in developed and developing countries in the World Mental Health Surveys: Socially defined consequences or psychiatric disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz, Meyer D; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Petukhova, Maria; Andrade, Laura Helena; Anthony, James C; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Degenhardt, Louisa; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia; Gureje, Oye; Haro, Josep Maria; Horiguchi, Itsuko; Karam, Elie G; Kostyuchenko, Stanislav; Lee, Sing; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Matschinger, Herbert; Neumark, Yehuda; Posada-Villa, Jose; Sagar, Rajesh; Stein, Dan J; Tomov, Toma; Wells, J Elisabeth; Chatterji, Somnath; Kessler, Ronald C

    2014-01-01

    Previous single country research has raised concerns that: (1) the DSM-IV diagnosis of alcohol abuse (AA) is met primarily through the hazardous use criterion related to drinking and driving and (2) that the hazardous use and social consequences AA criteria primarily reflect varying socioeconomic and cultural factors rather than psychiatric disorder. Using representative cross-national data from the 21 countries in the World Mental Health surveys, adults meeting DSM-IV lifetime criteria for AA but not dependence from 10 developed (n=46,071) and 11 developing (n=49,761) countries were assessed as meeting AA with the hazardous use or the social consequences criteria. Between 29.3% (developed) and 16.2% (developing) of respondents with AA met only the hazardous use criterion. AA cases with and without hazardous use were similar in age-of-onset, course, predictors, and psychopathological consequences in both developed and developing countries. Despite some associations of the AA criteria with socioeconomic factors, the hazardous use and social consequences criteria were significantly associated with psychiatric predictors and sequelae. The findings indicate that these criteria reflect psychiatric disorder and are appropriate for inclusion as DSM-5 Alcohol Use Disorder criteria. These findings support a psychiatric rather than a sociocultural view of the hazardous use and social consequences symptoms and provide evidence that they are appropriate diagnostic criteria cross-nationally with utility in a wide range of socioeconomic environments. This suggests consideration for their adoption by ICD-11. Further research is needed on the implications of these results for prevention and treatment. Copyright © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. Gulf of Mexico Marine Mammal Assessment Aerial Surveys - NRDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys were conducted during the spring-summer of 2010 and seasonally during 2011-2012 to assess the abundance and spatial distribution of marine mammals and...

  16. Overview of the Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) study was conducted over a five-year period from 1994-1998, to characterize determinants of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant perceptions in representative public and commercial office buildings.

  17. Gulf of Mexico Marine Mammal Assessment Vessel Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets are a compilation of large vessel surveys for marine mammal stock assessments in the Gulf of Mexico from 1991 to the present. These are designed as...

  18. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Acculturation, Birthplace and Alcohol-Related Social Problems across Hispanic National Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Vaeth, Patrice A. C.; Rodriguez, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between acculturation, birthplace, and alcohol-related social problems across Hispanic national groups. A total of 5,224 Hispanic adults (18+ years) were interviewed using a multistage cluster sample design in Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Multivariate analysis…

  19. 75 FR 63490 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; National... relationships between alcohol use patterns and alcohol use disorders and their related psychological and medical..., mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of information technology. FOR...

  20. A Survey of Alcohol Law Instructors' and Students' Perceptions on Social Learning and Training Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Jesus Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholic beverages in the State of Arizona are regulated by the Arizona Department of Liquor Licenses and Control (ADLLC). Education programs in the alcohol industry must align with the needs of students working in the industry and with the criteria set forth by the ADLLC. Prior research has concentrated on irresponsible alcohol consumption…

  1. Game-Day Survey Results: Looking at Football Fan Alcohol-Related Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie; Glassman, Tavis; Dodd, Virginia J.; Young, Gail C. Dale

    2007-01-01

    On college campuses, alcohol abuse is a challenge particularly on football game days. From previous research, it is known that fans drink more and are more affected by excessive alcohol consumption than non-fans. This study explored age and gender issues regarding behaviors and consequences of typical game-day alcohol consumption. A…

  2. A survey of levels of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages in 2009-2012, Hebei Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinping; Wang, Shuhui; Hu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Results of a survey of levels of ethyl carbamate (EC) (urethane) in alcoholic beverages carried out in four successive years from 2009 to 2012 by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) are presented. The beverages were purchased for sampling from Hebei Province of China, including eight main areas of production. The samples comprised wines (n = 212), grain spirits (n = 143) and wine sauces (n = 164). The data show that the average EC content in these kinds of alcoholic beverages remains nearly constant over the years. The results provide valuable data for food authorities to establish maximum limits for EC in China.

  3. Adjustment for survey non‐representativeness using record‐linkage: refined estimates of alcohol consumption by deprivation in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, Emma; Leyland, Alastair H.; McCartney, Gerry; Katikireddi, Srinivasa Vittal; Rutherford, Lisa; Graham, Lesley; Robinson, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and aims Analytical approaches to addressing survey non‐participation bias typically use only demographic information to improve estimates. We applied a novel methodology which uses health information from data linkage to adjust for non‐representativeness. We illustrate the method by presenting adjusted alcohol consumption estimates for Scotland. Design Data on consenting respondents to the Scottish Health Surveys (SHeSs) 1995–2010 were linked confidentially to routinely collected hospital admission and mortality records. Synthetic observations representing non‐respondents were created using general population data. Multiple imputation was performed to compute adjusted alcohol estimates given a range of assumptions about the missing data. Adjusted estimates of mean weekly consumption were additionally calibrated to per‐capita alcohol sales data. Setting Scotland. Participants 13 936 male and 18 021 female respondents to the SHeSs 1995–2010, aged 20–64 years. Measurements Weekly alcohol consumption, non‐, binge‐ and problem‐drinking. Findings Initial adjustment for non‐response resulted in estimates of mean weekly consumption that were elevated by up to 17.8% [26.5 units (18.6–34.4)] compared with corrections based solely on socio‐demographic data [22.5 (17.7–27.3)]; other drinking behaviour estimates were little changed. Under more extreme assumptions the overall difference was up to 53%, and calibrating to sales estimates resulted in up to 88% difference. Increases were especially pronounced among males in deprived areas. Conclusions The use of routinely collected health data to reduce bias arising from survey non‐response resulted in higher alcohol consumption estimates among working‐age males in Scotland, with less impact for females. This new method of bias reduction can be generalized to other surveys to improve estimates of alternative harmful behaviours. PMID:28276110

  4. [Assessment and clinical aspects of community professional care of elderly with alcohol misuse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscato, Alba; Varescon, Isabelle

    2011-12-01

    For elderly living in the community, alcohol misuse is not uncommon. Experience of professionals of social care services to face alcoholism misuse has rarely been assessed. The work of these professionals is to allow aged people to stay at home in spite of impaired physical and/or mental age-related abilities. We studied the experienced difficulties and feelings of professional caregivers for ten aged subjects with alcohol misuse compared to ten aged subjects without, to identify their needs in terms of training for the home care service associations. The participants took part in an interview and completed a research questionnaire concerning their reactions to alcohol misuse in elderly subjects. No significant difference was found between the responses from the two groups. All participants felt powerless in front of the denial of the alcohol misuse by the patients and experienced difficulties with the behavior of some family members. They reported that they would be comforted by the opportunity to share their experiences with colleagues and people in charge. They hoped to meet specialized teams in the field of addictions to develop skills for supporting elderly people with regard of alcohol misuse. Presently, the services in charge of the aged people should review the interventions and training of their employees, especially of those caring for subjects with alcohol misuse, to improve the quality of their actions in an evolving environment.

  5. Assessing the Alcohol-BMI Relationship in a US National Sample of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Adam E.; Piazza-Gardner, Anna K.; Holton, M. Kim

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to assess the body mass index (BMI)-alcohol relationship among a US national sample of college students. Design: Secondary data analysis using the Fall 2011 National College Health Assessment (NCHA). Setting: A total of 44 US higher education institutions. Methods: Participants included a national sample of college…

  6. Higher Education in Africa : Survey and assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wolhuter, C.C.; Kangumu, B.; Mungongi, F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to examine and assess Africa’s higher education effort. The theoretical framework employed distinguishes between three dimensions of the higher education project: the quantitative dimension (measured in terms of higher education enrollments and enrollment ratios), the qualitative dimension, and the equality dimension. After the political and economic context of Africa as well as the historical evolution of higher education in Africa are sketched, higher education in...

  7. Assessing the dimensionality of lifetime DSM-IV alcohol use disorders and a quantity-frequency alcohol use criterion in the Australian population: a factor mixture modelling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Orla; Teesson, Maree; Baillie, Andrew; Slade, Tim

    2011-01-01

    With the revision of the DSM-IV underway, two important research issues currently dominate the addiction literature: (a) how can the dimensionality of DSM-IV alcohol use disorders (AUD) diagnostic criteria best be described? and (ii) should a quantity-frequency alcohol use (QF) criterion be added to the existing diagnostic criteria set in the DSM-V? The current study addressed these aims by analysing lifetime data from a recent Australian population survey. Data from adults screened for lifetime DSM-IV AUD in the 2007 National Survey on Mental Health and Wellbeing (NSMHWB) were analysed (n = 5409). A series of alternative factor analytic, latent class and factor mixture or 'hybrid' models were used to assess the dimensionality of lifetime DSM-IV AUD diagnostic criteria and a lifetime QF criterion. Examination of the goodness-of-fit indices revealed that a one-factor or a two-factor model, a three-class latent class model or a two-factor zero-class hybrid model, were all acceptable models for the data. A simple structure one-factor model was considered to be the most parsimonious and theoretically meaningful model, given the high correlation between the abuse and dependence factors (0.874) in the two-factor model. The inclusion of the QF criterion did not enhance the fit of the one-factor model. Incorporating both dimensional and categorical conceptions of lifetime AUD did not provide substantial gains over a simple structure unidimensional model of AUD severity. The utility of a QF use criterion in helping to diagnose AUD is questionable. These findings should be of relevance to the DSM-5 substance use disorder workgroup.

  8. Assessing Treatment Integrity in Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kevin A; Crotwell, Shirley M; Muñoz, Rosa E; Gius, Becky K; McCrady, Barbara S; Ladd, Benjamin O; Epstein, Elizabeth E

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol Behavioral Couple Therapy (ABCT) is an efficacious treatment for alcohol use disorders. Coding treatment integrity can shed light on the active ingredients of ABCT, but there are no published studies of treatment integrity instruments for ABCT. The present study describes the development and initial reliability of the Treatment Integrity Rating System - Couples Version (C-TIRS) for ABCT. The C-TIRS was used to rate 284 first- and mid-treatment ABCT sessions of 188 couples in four randomized clinical trials. Average inter-rater reliability for distinguishing ratings between C-TIRS items was fair-to-good for quantity items (intraclass correlation [ICC] = 0.64) and poor-to-fair for quality items (ICC = 0.41). Five C-TIRS subscales were defined a priori to measure treatment components involving cognitive-behavioral therapy, spouse involvement, couple therapy, common therapeutic factors, and overall adherence to the treatment protocol and had adequate internal reliability (α = 0.74-0.89). Inter-rater reliability was fair to good on seven of ten scales but poor on three scales (ICC range = 0.17-0.72). The C-TIRS was designed to provide information about quantity and quality of the delivery of ABCT components; however, further refinement of the C-TIRS is warranted before it should be used in frontline practice. Clinical implications and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  9. Development of a Virtual Approach-Avoidance Task to Assess Alcohol Cravings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deok-Yong; Lee, Jang-Han

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a new approach-avoidance task in a virtual environment that could be used to assess the response to virtual alcohol-related situations by heavy social drinkers (HSDs) and light social drinkers (LSDs). Thirty-six male undergraduates (18 HSDs, 18 LSDs) responded to signals when they pulled or pushed a joystick after watching scenes of alcohol- or nonalcohol-related situations in a virtual environment. The HSD group spent more time on moving away from alcohol-related situations than nonalcohol-related situations. We found that the HSD group had difficulty in avoiding alcohol-related situations in the virtual environment. The Virtual Approach-Avoidance Task might more accurately measure the levels of social drinkers' craving to drink as it provides realistic situations and allows individuals to be immersed in virtual environments.

  10. Assessing drinking outcomes in alcohol treatment efficacy studies: selecting a yardstick of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Linda Carter; Sobell, Mark B; Connors, Gerard J; Agrawal, Sangeeta

    2003-10-01

    Although the number of alcohol treatment efficacy trials has mushroomed, there is no consensus on how best to measure outcomes. To advance the goal of establishing cross-trial consistency in measuring outcomes in clinical efficacy studies, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism convened a panel of experts and charged them with exploring, debating, and, ultimately, selecting a "sentinel" or "optimal" outcome measure to be used in future alcohol treatment studies. The goal of this article, one in a series of several presented at the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism conference, is to discuss (1) the rationale underlying selection of an optimal outcome measure, (2) the necessary characteristics of an optimal outcome measure, (3) the utility of selecting an optimal measure, and (4) which drinking assessment methods could be used to collect data to portray the optimal outcome measure. At a minimum, the criteria for an "optimal" measure include that it be psychometrically sound. In addition, it should have considerable currency in the field, thereby increasing its prospects for adoption. The measure should also be consistent with the concepts of greatest interest and relevance to the field (e.g., directly reflect the fundamental goal of alcohol treatment). In light of these highly desired features, percent of days heavy drinking was chosen at the conference as a practical and relevant measure of alcohol treatment outcome. Percent of days heavy drinking should be the optimal measure of alcohol treatment outcome. Currently, daily drinking estimation methods are the most useful for gathering data that can reflect the optimal measure. In addition, data gathered by daily drinking estimation methods can be used to study a variety of other outcome variables of interest to clinical researchers.

  11. Alcohol use of diabetes patients: the need for assessment and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, Patricia A; Ramsey, Susan E; Smith, Robert J

    2013-04-01

    It is well known that diabetes self-care behaviors are critical to disease progression. Unfortunately, many patients do not adhere to diabetes self-care recommendations despite their importance. Alcohol use has been identified as a barrier to diabetes self-care adherence. Excessive alcohol consumption not only negatively impacts diabetes self-care adherence but also affects the course of diabetes. Diabetes patients who are at-risk drinkers are likely to have poor diabetes treatment adherence, leading to increased morbidity and mortality. Alcohol consumption by diabetes patients is often inadequately assessed and addressed in their medical care. Brief interventions to reduce at-risk drinking have been well validated in a variety of patient populations and offer the potential to improve diabetes treatment adherence and outcome. Assessment and treatment of at-risk drinking could be readily incorporated into routine diabetes care. Strategies for brief assessment of and intervention for at-risk drinking are offered.

  12. Risks of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders among Thais with alcohol use disorders and illicit drug use: findings from the 2008 Thai National Mental Health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttajit, Sirijit; Kittirattanapaiboon, Phunnapa; Junsirimongkol, Boonsiri; Likhitsathian, Surinporn; Srisurapanont, Manit

    2012-12-01

    Little is known about the risks of mood and anxiety disorders among Asians with alcohol use disorders and the effect of illicit drug use in this population. All participants from the 2008 Thai National Mental Health survey (N=17,140) were assessed for current major depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, and alcohol use disorders by using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and were interviewed for illicit drug use within one year prior to their assessment. Logistic regression modeling was used to determine (a) whether alcohol use disorders were associated with major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders and (b) whether the use of illicit drugs increased these associations. Sex, age, marital status, region, and educational level were found to be significantly associated with major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders and were taken into account in the regression analysis. Compared with the general population, individuals with alcohol use disorders alone had significantly increased risks of major depressive disorder (OR 2.49, 95%CI 1.76-3.53 in men and OR 4.09, 95%CI 2.31-7.26 in women) and anxiety disorders (OR 2.21, 95%CI 1.46-3.36 in men and OR 4.34, 95%CI 2.35-8.03 in women). The risks became higher among individuals with both alcohol use disorders and illicit drug use (OR 3.62, 95% CI 1.64-8.01 in men and OR 11.53, 95%CI 1.32-100.65 in women for major depressive disorder, and OR 3.20, 95%CI 1.36-7.51 in men and OR 13.10, 95%CI 1.48-115.60 in women for anxiety disorders). In conclusion, alcohol use disorders were significantly associated with major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders. Illicit drug use was an important factor in increasing these associations, especially in women. Screening for depression, anxiety, and illicit drug use should be done in individuals with alcohol use disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cigarette smoking among intimate partner violence perpetrators and victims: findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Cory A; Pilver, Corey E; Weinberger, Andrea H

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking and intimate partner violence (IPV) are preventable, major public health issues that result in severe physical and psychological consequences. The primary aim of the current study was to examine the consistency and strength of the association between these highly variable behaviors using a nationally representative sample. Self-reported IPV perpetration, victimization, and smoking data were collected from 25,515 adults (54% female) through the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. Multinomial logistic regression models were constructed to determine the relationships among smoking status (current daily, intermittent, former, and never smoker) and IPV (minor and sever victimization as well as perpetration). Results indicated a robust relationship between IPV and smoking among both victims and perpetrators. The odds for current daily and intermittent smoking were significantly elevated among those who reported both minor and severe IPV relative to their non-violent counterparts. Mood and anxiety disorders were significant comorbid conditions in the interpretation of the relationship between severe IPV and smoking. The current study provides strong evidence for a robust relationship between IPV and smoking across current smoking patterns, IPV severity levels, and IPV experience patterns. Findings emphasize the need to better understand the mechanisms by which smoking and IPV are associated and how this interdependence may impact approaches to treatment. Specifically, research is required to assess the efficacy of integrated smoking cessation and IPV treatment or recovery programs over more traditional, exclusive approaches. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  14. Exposure to alcohol advertisements and teenage alcohol-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenard, Jerry L; Dent, Clyde W; Stacy, Alan W

    2013-02-01

    This study used prospective data to test the hypothesis that exposure to alcohol advertising contributes to an increase in underage drinking and that an increase in underage drinking then leads to problems associated with drinking alcohol. A total of 3890 students were surveyed once per year across 4 years from the 7th through the 10th grades. Assessments included several measures of exposure to alcohol advertising, alcohol use, problems related to alcohol use, and a range of covariates, such as age, drinking by peers, drinking by close adults, playing sports, general TV watching, acculturation, parents' jobs, and parents' education. Structural equation modeling of alcohol consumption showed that exposure to alcohol ads and/or liking of those ads in seventh grade were predictive of the latent growth factors for alcohol use (past 30 days and past 6 months) after controlling for covariates. In addition, there was a significant total effect for boys and a significant mediated effect for girls of exposure to alcohol ads and liking of those ads in 7th grade through latent growth factors for alcohol use on alcohol-related problems in 10th grade. Younger adolescents appear to be susceptible to the persuasive messages contained in alcohol commercials broadcast on TV, which sometimes results in a positive affective reaction to the ads. Alcohol ad exposure and the affective reaction to those ads influence some youth to drink more and experience drinking-related problems later in adolescence.

  15. Cognitive Assessment Practices: A Survey of School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotelo-Dynega, Marlene; Dixon, Shauna G.

    2014-01-01

    The present article describes an exploratory study regarding the preferred cognitive assessment practices of current school psychologists. Three hundred and twenty-three school psychologists participated in the survey. The results suggest that the majority of school psychologists endorsed that they base their assessment practices on an underlying…

  16. Quality of malnutrition assessment surveys conducted during famine in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Paul B; Salama, Peter; Maloney, Susan; van der Veen, Albertien

    2004-08-04

    During 1999 and 2000, approximately 10 million people were affected by famine in Ethiopia. Results of nutrition assessments and surveys conducted by humanitarian organizations were used by donors and government agencies to determine needs for food aid and to make other decisions on geographic allocation of limited resources; however, accurate results might have been hampered by methodological errors. To identify common methodological errors in nutrition assessments and surveys and to provide practical recommendations for improvement. Nutrition assessments and surveys (n = 125) conducted by 14 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in 54 woredas (districts) in Ethiopia from May 1, 1999, through July 31, 2000. Surveys were ranked as valid and precise according to 5 criteria: use of population proportional to size sampling, sample size, number of clusters, number of children per cluster, and use of weight-for-height index. Number and proportion of surveys that used standard, internationally accepted methods and reported valid and precise results. Fifty-eight of the 125 surveys (46%) were not intended to be standard 30 x 30 cluster surveys. Of the remaining 67 surveys, 6 (9%) met predetermined criteria for validity and precision. All 67 used the anthropometric index of weight-for-height, with 58 (87%) reporting z scores. Fifty-four (81%) used nonrandom sampling without consideration of population size and 6 (9%) had sample sizes of fewer than 500 persons. Major methodological errors were identified among 30 x 30 cluster surveys designed to measure acute malnutrition prevalence in Ethiopia during the famine of 1999-2000. Donor agencies and NGOs should be educated about the need for improved quality of nutrition assessments and their essential role in directing allocation of scarce food resources.

  17. Risk assessment for the Italian population of acetaldehyde in alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiano, Viviana; Bianchi, Giancarlo; Davoli, Enrico; Negri, Eva; Fanelli, Roberto; Fattore, Elena

    2014-07-01

    Acetaldehyde is a naturally-occurring carcinogenic compound, present in different food items, especially in alcoholic beverages. The aims of this study were to measure acetaldehyde concentration in different beverages consumed in Italy and to estimate the potential cancer risk. The analytical procedure was based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), using the isotopic dilution method. The margin of exposure (MOE) approach of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) was used for risk characterisation. The highest concentrations (median, min-max) were detected in grappa samples (499, 23.4-1850mg/l), followed by fruit-based liqueurs and spirits (62.0, 5.23-483mg/l) and wine (68.0, 18.1-477mg/l); the lowest were detected in gin (0.91, 0.78-1.90mg/l). The lowest MOE was estimated for high wine consumers (69). These results suggest that regulatory measures and consumer guidance may be necessary for acetaldehyde in beverages. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P

    2008-11-01

    This survey of biomass resource assessments and assessment capabilities in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies considered various sources: academic and government publications, media reports, and personal communication with contacts in member economies.

  19. Alcohol and marijuana use while driving--an unexpected crash risk in Pakistani commercial drivers: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Mohammed

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant proportion of road traffic crashes are attributable to alcohol and marijuana use while driving globally. Sale and use of both substances is illegal in Pakistan and is not considered a threat for road traffic injuries. However literature hints that this may not be the case. We did this study to assess usage of alcohol and marijuana in Pakistani commercial drivers. Methods A sample of 857 commercial bus and truck drivers was interviewed in October 2008 at the largest commercial vehicle station in Rawalpindi and Islamabad, Pakistan. Time location cluster sampling was used to select the subjects and a structured questionnaire was used to assess the basic demographic profile, substance abuse habits of the drivers while on the road, and reasons for usage of illicit substances while driving were recorded. Self reported information was collected after obtaining informed consent. Chi square and fisher exact tests were used to assess differences between groups and logistic regression was used to identify significant associations between driver characteristics and alcohol and marijuana use. Results Almost 10% of truck drivers use alcohol while driving on Pakistani roads. Marijuana use is almost 30% in some groups. Statistically different patterns of usage are seen between population subgroups based on age, ethnicity, education, and marital status. Regression analysis shows association of alcohol and marijuana use with road rage and error behaviours, and also with an increased risk of being involved in road crashes. The reported reasons for using alcohol or marijuana show a general lack of awareness of the hazardous nature of this practice among the commercial driver population. Conclusion Alcohol and marijuana use is highly prevalent in Pakistani commercial drivers. The issue needs to be recognized by concerned authorities and methods such as random breath tests and sobriety check points need to be employed for proper law

  20. Patterns of Alcohol Consumption and Related Behaviors in Brazil: Evidence from the 2013 National Health Survey (PNS 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Macinko

    Full Text Available This study uses data from a nationally representative household survey (the 2013 National Health Survey, n = 62,986 to describe patterns of alcohol consumption and related behaviors among Brazilian adults. Analyses include descriptive and multivariable Poisson regression for self-reports in the past 30 days of: drinking any alcohol, binge drinking, binge drinking 4 or more times, and driving after drinking (DD; as well as age of alcohol consumption initiation. Results show that current drinking prevalence was 26%, with an average age of initiation of 18.7 years. Binge drinking was reported by 51% of drinkers, 43% of whom reported binge drinking 4 or more times. Drinking and driving was reported by nearly one quarter of those who drive a car/motorcycle. Current drinking was more likely among males, ages 25-34, single, urban, and those with more education. Binge drinking was more likely among males, older age groups, and people who started drinking before 18. Drinking and driving was higher among males, those with more education, and rural residents. Those who binge-drink were nearly 70% more likely to report DD. All behaviors varied significantly among Brazilian states. Given their potential health consequences, the levels of injurious alcohol behaviors observed here warrant increased attention from Brazilian policymakers and civil society.

  1. Factors associated with alcohol drinking behavior of cancer survivors: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyeonyoung; Song, Yun-Mi; Shin, Jin-Young

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the factors associated with drinking behavior of cancer survivors after cancer diagnosis. The study subjects were 906 adult cancer survivors who had reportedly drunk alcohol before cancer diagnosis and participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted from 2007 to 2013. Among them, 360 abstained from alcohol drinking after cancer diagnosis. We categorized remaining 546 persistent drinkers into high-risk drinker (consuming≥7 glasses of alcohol for men and≥5 glasses of alcohol for women at one sitting at the frequency of at least once a month) or moderate drinker. We used multiple logistic regression analysis to evaluate risk factors associated with drinking behavior. The high-risk drinkers occupied 27.1% (148 survivors) of the persistent alcohol drinking survivors. Age increase (OR=0.96; 95% CI 0.93-0.99), female sex (OR=0.15; 95% CI 0.08-0.28), and increase of time lapse (by 1-year) after cancer diagnosis (OR=0.94; 95% CI 0.92-0.97) were associated with a lower risk of high-risk drinking as compared with moderate drinking. Meanwhile,≤9years of education (OR=1.99; 95% CI 1.10-3.60), alcohol-related cancer (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.23-3.56), and current smoking (OR=1.92; 95% CI 1.03-3.59) were associated with increased risk of high-risk drinking of cancer survivors. These findings suggest that greater efforts for preventing high-risk drinking should be laid on the cancer survivors, with consideration of individual sociodemographic characteristics, especially when the survivors had been diagnosed with alcohol-related cancer. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Development of an Australian version of the Alcohol-Related Problems Survey: a comprehensive computerised screening tool for older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Stephen J; Fink, Arlene; Beck, John C; Gabriel, Jim; Singh, Dhiren

    2015-03-01

    The Alcohol-Related Problems Survey (ARPS) reliably classifies drinking as non-hazardous, hazardous or harmful using scoring algorithms that consider quantity and frequency of alcohol use alone and in combination with health conditions, medication-use and functional status. Because it has been developed using a 14-g US standard drink, it is not valid in Australia where a standard drink contains 10 g of ethanol. We recalibrated the ARPS scoring algorithms for a 10-g Australian standard drink and updated the list of medications. The Australian ARPS (A-ARPS) was then administered to 50 non-treatment-seeking participants in waves of five. The A-ARPS recalibrated scoring algorithms reliably classified all 50 individuals. Sixty-six per cent were classified as hazardous or harmful drinkers. Many were taking medications that interact with alcohol or had medical conditions that can be exacerbated by alcohol consumption. The A-ARPS is available for use in Australia. Its utilisation could reduce the incidence of alcohol-related harms. © 2013 ACOTA.

  3. Alcohol problems and all-cause mortality in men and women: predictive capacity of a clinical screening tool in a 21-year follow-up of a large, UK-wide, general population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, G David; Hunt, Kate; Emslie, Carol; Lewars, Heather; Gale, Catharine R

    2009-04-01

    While the relation between alcohol consumption and mortality has been well explored, little is known about the link between alcohol problems and mortality in general population-based studies, particularly among women. This was the objective of the present study In this prospective cohort study, 5333 non-abstaining individuals (2539 women) from the UK-wide Health and Lifestyle Survey (aged 42.9 years at study induction) completed the CAGE questionnaire of alcohol problems and participated in a medical examination in 1984/1985; they were then followed up for mortality experience until 2005. Alcohol problems at baseline were less common in women (2.4%) than in men (7.8%). A total of 21 years of follow-up gave rise to 1201 deaths. Elevated rates of mortality were evident in persons reporting symptoms of alcohol problems in comparison to those who did not. In gender-stratified analyses, alcohol problems were more strongly associated with mortality risk in women (age-adjusted hazards ratio: 2.25; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-4.12) than in men (1.49; 1.12-1.99), although this effect modification was not statistically significant (P value for interaction=0.125). Controlling for a range of covariates--including socioeconomic position, co-morbidity (somatic and psychiatric), and alcohol intake--had essentially no impact on these associations. The CAGE questionnaire may have some utility in routine health assessments in the general population.

  4. Do emotions related to alcohol consumption differ by alcohol type? An international cross-sectional survey of emotions associated with alcohol consumption and influence on drink choice in different settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Kathryn; Bellis, Mark A; Davies, Alisha R; Hughes, Karen; Winstock, Adam

    2017-11-20

    To examine the emotions associated with drinking different types of alcohol, explore whether these emotions differ by sociodemographics and alcohol dependency and whether the emotions associated with different drink types influence people's choice of drinks in different settings. International cross-sectional opportunistic survey (Global Drug Survey) using an online anonymous questionnaire in 11 languages promoted through newspapers, magazines and social media from November 2015 to January 2016. Individuals aged 18-34 years who reported consumption of beer, spirits, red and white wine in the previous 12 months and were resident in countries with more than 200 respondents (n=21 countries; 29 836 respondents). Positive and negative emotions associated with consumption of different alcoholic beverages (energised, relaxed, sexy, confident, tired, aggressive, ill, restless and tearful) over the past 12 months in different settings. Alcoholic beverages vary in the types of emotions individuals report they elicit, with spirits more frequently eliciting emotional changes of all types. Overall 29.8% of respondents reported feeling aggressive when drinking spirits, compared with only 7.1% when drinking red wine (pfeeling all emotions when drinking alcohol, apart from feelings of aggression. Respondents' level of alcohol dependency was strongly associated with feeling all emotions, with the likelihood of aggression being significantly higher in possible dependent versus low risk drinkers (adjusted OR 6.4; 95% CI 5.79 to 7.09; pfeeling the majority of positive and negative emotions also remained highest among dependent drinkers irrespective of setting. Understanding emotions associated with alcohol consumption is imperative to addressing alcohol misuse, providing insight into what emotions influence drink choice between different groups in the population. The differences identified between sociodemographic groups and influences on drink choice within different settings will

  5. Assessing sexual motives for drinking alcohol among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahler, Christopher W; Wray, Tyler B; Pantalone, David W; Mastroleo, Nadine R; Kruis, Ryan D; Mayer, Kenneth H; Monti, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Individuals who drink alcohol for the explicit motive of facilitating or enhancing sex may be more likely to engage in risky sexual behavior, including having sex under the influence of alcohol. However, efforts to assess sexual motives for drinking (SMDs) have been very limited to date. We examined the psychometric properties of a 5-item measure of SMDs in a sample of HIV-positive heavy drinking men who have sex with men. Findings provided excellent support for the scale's internal consistency and concurrent validity with a well-established measure of sexual alcohol expectancies (SAEs). Good discriminant validity was also established, as SMDs were correlated with other drinking motives but uniquely predicted the proportion of sex acts occurring under the influence of alcohol and other drugs, over and above other drinking motives and SAEs. SMDs were not significantly associated with unprotected anal intercourse. Adjusting for alcohol problem severity, higher SMDs were associated with lower willingness to consider changing drinking. Results suggest this measure of SMDs exhibits sound psychometric properties and may be useful in studies examining the association between alcohol use and sexual behavior. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Reef Fish Survey Techniques: Assessing the Potential for Standardizing Methodologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary R Caldwell

    Full Text Available Dramatic changes in populations of fishes living on coral reefs have been documented globally and, in response, the research community has initiated efforts to assess and monitor reef fish assemblages. A variety of visual census techniques are employed, however results are often incomparable due to differential methodological performance. Although comparability of data may promote improved assessment of fish populations, and thus management of often critically important nearshore fisheries, to date no standardized and agreed-upon survey method has emerged. This study describes the use of methods across the research community and identifies potential drivers of method selection. An online survey was distributed to researchers from academic, governmental, and non-governmental organizations internationally. Although many methods were identified, 89% of survey-based projects employed one of three methods-belt transect, stationary point count, and some variation of the timed swim method. The selection of survey method was independent of the research design (i.e., assessment goal and region of study, but was related to the researcher's home institution. While some researchers expressed willingness to modify their current survey protocols to more standardized protocols (76%, their willingness decreased when methodologies were tied to long-term datasets spanning five or more years. Willingness to modify current methodologies was also less common among academic researchers than resource managers. By understanding both the current application of methods and the reported motivations for method selection, we hope to focus discussions towards increasing the comparability of quantitative reef fish survey data.

  7. Alcohol marketing and drunkenness among students in the Philippines: findings from the nationally representative Global School-based Student Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahn, Monica H; Palmier, Jane B; Benegas-Segarra, Agnes; Sinson, Fe A

    2013-12-10

    A largely unaddressed issue in lower income countries and the Philippines, in particular, is the role of alcohol marketing and its potential link to early alcohol use among youth. This study examines the associations between exposures to alcohol marketing and Filipino youths' drinking prevalence and drunkenness. Cross-sectional analyses were used to examine the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) conducted in Philippines (2011). The self-administered questionnaires were completed by students primarily 13 to 16 years of age (N = 5,290). Three statistical models were computed to test the associations between alcohol marketing and alcohol use, while controlling for possible confounding factors. Alcohol marketing, specifically through providing free alcohol through a company representative, was associated with drunkenness (AOR: 1.84; 95% CI=1.06-3.21) among youths after controlling for demographic and psychosocial characteristics, peer environment, and risky behaviors. In addition, seeing alcohol ads in newspapers and magazines (AOR: 1.65, 95% CI=1.05-2.58) and seeing ads at sports events, concerts or fairs (AOR: 1.50, 95% CI =1.06-2.12) were significantly associated with increased reports of drunkenness. There are significant associations between alcohol marketing exposure and increased alcohol use and drunkenness among youth in the Philippines. These findings highlight the need to put policies into effect that restrict alcohol marketing practices as an important prevention strategy for reducing alcohol use and its dire consequences among vulnerable youth.

  8. Trends in Alcohol's Harms to Others (AHTO and Co-occurrence of Family-Related AHTO: The Four US National Alcohol Surveys, 2000–2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Greenfield

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various harms from others’ drinking have been studied individually and at single points in time. We conducted a US population 15-year trend analysis and extend prior research by studying associations of depression with combinations of four harms – family/marriage difficulties, financial troubles, assault, and vandalism – attributed to partners or family members. Data come from four National Alcohol Surveys conducted by telephone in 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015 (analytic sample = 21,184. Weighted logistic regression models estimated time trends adjusting for victim characteristics (gender, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, poverty, employment, family history of alcohol problems, and drinking maximum. The 2015 survey asked the source of the harm; we used similar models to examine characteristics, including anxiety and depression, associated with various combinations of family/marriage, financial, and assault harms due to partner's/spouse's/family members’ drinking. A significant upward trend ( P < 0.001 from 2000 to 2015 was seen for financial troubles but not for other harms due to someone else's drinking. In 2015, depression and/or anxiety were strongly associated with exposures to harms and combinations of harms identified as stemming from drinking spouse/partner and/or family members. The results shed new light on 15-year trends and associations of harms with personal characteristics. A replicated finding is how the victim's own heavy drinking pattern is implicated in risks for exposures to harms from someone else's drinking. Documenting risk factors for and mental health impacts is important for interventions to reduce alcohol's harm to others.

  9. Context and culture associated with alcohol use amongst youth in major urban cities: A cross-country population based survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne W Taylor

    consumption in these four cities does not increase with age as found in most high income countries. The alcohol consumption patterns during this stage of the life cycle are important to assess so that high level, as well as country-specific, planning and interventions can be implemented.

  10. Temperament and character traits associated with the use of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens: evidence from a large Brazilian web survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Schneider Jr.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate how personality traits are associated with occasional use, abuse, and dependence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens in a large availability sample of adults via online questionnaires. Methods: The sample consisted of 8,646 individuals (24.7% men and 75.3% women who completed an anonymous web survey. Involvement with drugs and temperament/character traits were assessed through the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST and the Temperament and Character Inventory - Revised (TCI-R, respectively. Interactions among variables were analyzed using MANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment. Results: Novelty seeking was the trait most associated with increased involvement with alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine. There was a significant association between harm avoidance and benzodiazepine use. Persistence was lower in cannabis-, benzodiazepine-, and cocaine-dependent subjects, as well as in hallucinogen abusers. Self-directedness was reduced in dependents of all drug classes. No strong relationships were found between other temperament or character dimensions and the severity of drug use. Conclusions: Novelty seeking was associated with increased involvement with all drugs studied in this sample, although to a lesser extent with benzodiazepines and hallucinogens. The temperament and character profile for benzodiazepine use was different from that of other drugs due to the relationship with higher harm avoidance and self-transcendence and lower self-directedness.

  11. Temperament and character traits associated with the use of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens: evidence from a large Brazilian web survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Ricardo; Ottoni, Gustavo L; de Carvalho, Hudson W; Elisabetsky, Elaine; Lara, Diogo R

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate how personality traits are associated with occasional use, abuse, and dependence of alcohol, cannabis, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and hallucinogens in a large availability sample of adults via online questionnaires. The sample consisted of 8,646 individuals (24.7% men and 75.3% women) who completed an anonymous web survey. Involvement with drugs and temperament/character traits were assessed through the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST) and the Temperament and Character Inventory - Revised (TCI-R), respectively. Interactions among variables were analyzed using MANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment. Novelty seeking was the trait most associated with increased involvement with alcohol, cannabis, and cocaine. There was a significant association between harm avoidance and benzodiazepine use. Persistence was lower in cannabis-, benzodiazepine-, and cocaine-dependent subjects, as well as in hallucinogen abusers. Self-directedness was reduced in dependents of all drug classes. No strong relationships were found between other temperament or character dimensions and the severity of drug use. Novelty seeking was associated with increased involvement with all drugs studied in this sample, although to a lesser extent with benzodiazepines and hallucinogens. The temperament and character profile for benzodiazepine use was different from that of other drugs due to the relationship with higher harm avoidance and self-transcendence and lower self-directedness.

  12. Experienced drug users assess the relative harms and benefits of drugs: a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart-Harris, Robin Lester; Nutt, David John

    2013-01-01

    A web-based survey was used to consult the opinions of experienced drug users on matters related to drug harms. We identified a rare sample of 93 drug users with personal experience with 11 different illicit drugs that are widely used in the UK. Asked to assess the relative harms of these drugs, they ranked alcohol and tobacco as the most harmful, and three "Class A" drugs (MDMA, LSD, and psilocybin) and one class B (cannabis) were ranked as the four least harmful drugs. When asked to assess the relative potential for benefit of the 11 drugs, MDMA, LSD, psilocybin, and cannabis were ranked in the top four; and when asked why these drugs are beneficial, rather than simply report hedonic properties, they referred to potential therapeutic applications (e.g., as tools to assist psychotherapy). These results provide a useful insight into the opinions of experienced drug users on a subject about which they have a rare and intimate knowledge.

  13. The Big Drink Debate: perceptions of the impact of price on alcohol consumption from a large scale cross-sectional convenience survey in north west England

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cook, Penny A; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A; Morleo, Michela; Harkins, Corinne; Briant, Linford; Bellis, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    .... A convenience survey of residents (≥ 18 years) of north west England measured demographics, income, alcohol consumption in previous week, and opinions on drinking behaviour under two pricing conditions...

  14. Correlates of Harmful Alcohol Consumption in Six Countries: Development of an International Screening and Assessment Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow; and Others

    The aim of this study was to develop tools for screening and assessment of socio-medical effects of alcohol use which are simple and inexpensive enough to be used in any primary health care setting. A test protocol was prepared by a group of investigators from Australia, Bulgaria, Kenya, Mexico, Norway, and the United States. Based on a number of…

  15. A survey of alcohol vulnerability of male prison inmates in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alcohol and substance abuse has been linked with criminal behavior particularly recidivism.. Criminal recidivism is the act of re-offending or persistent involvement in criminal activities. The study investigated the effect of alcohol abuse on the recidivism risk levels, number of times convicted/imprisoned and nature of offence ...

  16. Assessing the Usability of Web-Based Alcohol Education for Older Adults: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Arlene; Kwan, Lorna; Osterweil, Dan; Van Draanen, Jenna; Cooke, Alexis; Beck, John C

    2016-02-01

    Older adults can experience unfavorable health effects from drinking at relatively low consumption levels because of age-related physiological changes and alcohol's potentially adverse interactions with declining health, increased medication-use and diminishing functional status. At the same time, alcohol use in older adults may be protective against heart disease, stroke, and other disorders associated with aging. We developed "A Toast to Health in Later Life! Wise Drinking as We Age," a web-based educational intervention to teach older adults to balance drinking risks and benefits. To examine the intervention's feasibility in a sample of community-dwelling current drinkers ≥55 years of age and examine its effects on their quantity and frequency of alcohol use, adherence to standard drinking guidelines, and alcohol-related risks. Participants were recruited in person, by mail and by telephone between September and October 2014 from a community-based social services organization serving Los Angeles County. Once enrolled, participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or to a control group. The conceptual frameworks for the intervention were the Health Belief Model, models of adult learning, and the US Department of Health and Human Services guidelines for designing easy-to-use websites. The intervention's content focuses on the relationship between drinking and its effects on older adults' medical conditions, use of medications, and ability to perform daily activities. It also addresses quantity and frequency of alcohol use, drinking and driving and binge drinking. The control group did not receive any special intervention. Data on alcohol use and risks for both groups came from the online version of the Alcohol-Related Problems Survey and were collected at baseline and four weeks later. Data on usability were collected online from the intervention group immediately after it completed its review of the website. The 49 intervention and 47 control

  17. Assessment of alcohol consumption in liver transplant candidates and recipients: the best combination of the tools available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Salvatore; Marchioro, Lucio; Gola, Elisabetta; Rosi, Silvia; Morando, Filippo; Cavallin, Marta; Sticca, Antonietta; Fasolato, Silvano; Forza, Giovanni; Chiara Frigo, Anna; Plebani, Mario; Zanus, Giacomo; Cillo, Umberto; Gatta, Angelo; Angeli, Paolo

    2014-07-01

    The detection of alcohol consumption in liver transplant candidates (LTCs) and liver transplant recipients (LTRs) is required to enable a proper assessment of transplant eligibility and early management of alcohol relapse, respectively. In this clinical setting, urinary ethyl glucuronide (uEtG), the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test for Alcohol Consumption (AUDIT-c), serum ethanol, urinary ethanol, carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), and other indirect markers of alcohol consumption were evaluated and compared prospectively in 121 LTCs and LTRs. Alcohol consumption was diagnosed when AUDIT-c results were positive or it was confirmed by a patient's history in response to abnormal results. Alcohol consumption was found in 30.6% of the patients. uEtG was found to be the strongest marker of alcohol consumption (odds ratio = 414.5, P alcohol consumption [area under receiving operating characteristic (ROC) curve = 0.94] than CDT (area under ROC curve = 0.63, P alcohol consumption in comparison with the combination of CDT and AUDIT-c (area under ROC curve = 0.98 versus 0.80, P alcohol consumption in patients with negative AUDIT-c results. In conclusion, the combination of AUDIT-c and uEtG improves the detection of alcohol consumption in LTCs and LTRs. Therefore, they should be used routinely for these patients. © 2014 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Alcohol consumption in patients with cardiovascular diseases (results of the survey of cardiac patients in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the frequency and characteristics of alcohol use in outpatients with cardiovascular diseases and to determine their preferences regarding the help in limiting alcohol consumption.Material and methods. Voluntary and anonymous survey using AUDIT-C and CAGE questionnaires was conducted in 199 patients. The data of 182 patients (82 women and 100 men, mean age 56.4±5.8 years was included in the analysis.Results. Arterial hypertension (70%, heart rhythm disorders (25%, ischemic heart disease (20%, functional class I-II chronic heart failure (21% predominated among all clinical entities. Positive AUDIT-C test was found in 30% of men and 7.3% of women. 17% of men and 23.2% of women did not use alcohol at all. Positive responses to all 4 questions of the CAGE test were given by 3% of men and none of women, positive answers to 3 questions – by 15% of men and none of women, to 2 questions - by 17% of men and 11% of women. Positive answer to the question about the need to reduce alcohol consumption was given by 36% of men and 13.4% of women.Conclusion. Simultaneous testing using AUDIT-C and CAGE questionnaires in outpatients with cardiovascular diseases allows identifying a subgroup of patients (more in men who have a potential problem with an excessive alcohol consumption and need to reduce the intake of alcoholic beverages.

  19. Enforcement of alcohol-impaired driving laws in the United States: a national survey of state and local agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Darin J; Farbakhsh, Kian; Toomey, Traci L; Lenk, Kathleen M; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Nelson, Toben F

    2015-01-01

    Enforcement of alcohol-impaired driving laws is an important component of efforts to prevent alcohol-involved motor vehicle fatalities. Little is known about the use of drinking-driving enforcement strategies by state and local law enforcement agencies or whether the use of strategies differs by agency and jurisdiction characteristics. We conducted two national surveys, with state patrol agencies (n = 48) and with a sample of local law enforcement agencies (n = 1,082) selected according to state and jurisdiction population size. We examined 3 primary enforcement strategies (sobriety checkpoints, saturation patrols, and enforcement of open container laws) and tested whether use of these strategies differed by jurisdiction and agency characteristics across state and local law enforcement agencies Most state patrol agencies reported conducting sobriety checkpoints (72.9%) and saturation patrols (95.8%), whereas less than half (43.8%) reported enforcing open container laws. In contrast, a lower proportion of local law enforcement agencies reported using these alcohol-impaired driving enforcement strategies (41.5, 62.7, and 41.1%, respectively). Sobriety checkpoint enforcement was more common in states in the dry South region (vs. wet and moderate regions). Among local law enforcement agencies, agencies with a full-time alcohol enforcement officer and agencies located in areas where drinking-driving was perceived to be very common (vs. not/somewhat common) were more likely to conduct multiple types of impaired driving enforcement. Recommended enforcement strategies to detect and prevent alcohol-impaired driving are employed in some jurisdictions and underutilized in others. Future research should explore the relationship of enforcement with drinking and driving behavior and alcohol-involved motor vehicle fatalities.

  20. Surveying Assessment in Experiential Learning: A Single Campus Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Yates

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the methods of experiential assessment in use at a Canadian university and the extent to which they are used. Exploring experiential assessment will allow identification of commonly used methods and facilitate the development of best practices of assessment in the context of experiential learning (EL at an institutional level. The origins of EL are found in the work of Dewey (1938, later modified by Kolb and Fry (1975. Experiential methods include: experiential education, service learning problem-based learning and others such as action learning, enquiry-based learning, and case studies. Faculty currently involved in EL at the participating university were invited to complete an online survey about their teaching and assessment methods. This paper will share the results and analysis of the EL inventory survey.

  1. Lifetime major depression is associated with coronary heart disease in older adults: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Sarah; Pietrzak, Robert H; Wagner, Julie; White, William B; Petry, Nancy M

    2007-11-01

    To examine the association between mood and anxiety disorders and coronary heart disease (CHD) in a nationally representative sample of older adults. Data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions were analyzed with 10,573 adults aged > or = 60 years surveyed. A total of 13.30% of older adults reported diagnoses of CHD. Age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.04), morbid obesity (OR = 1.60), hypertension (OR = 2.29), lifetime nicotine dependence (OR = 1.41), and lifetime drug use disorders (OR = 2.19) were all significantly related to CHD. Being female (OR = 0.73) relative to male and a lifetime social drinker (OR = 0.71) compared with alcohol abstainers decreased the odds of CHD. After controlling for these characteristics, the presence of a lifetime major depressive episode was significantly associated with increased risk of CHD (OR = 2.05), but the lifetime anxiety disorders assessed were not. The association between lifetime mood disorders and CHD was similar for both genders, and single versus multiple depressive episodes conferred equal risk of CHD. These data demonstrate that a lifetime major depressive episode increases the risk of CHD in older adults.

  2. Research Note Pilot survey to assess sample size for herbaceous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot survey to determine sub-sample size (number of point observations per plot) for herbaceous species composition assessments, using a wheel-point apparatus applying the nearest-plant method, was conducted. Three plots differing in species composition on the Zululand coastal plain were selected, and on each plot ...

  3. Effectiveness, Teaching, and Assessments: Survey Evidence from Finance Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming Ming; Kwan, Jing Hui; Kadir, Hazlina Abdul; Abdullah, Mahdhir; Yap, Voon Choong

    2010-01-01

    The present article examines the effectiveness, teaching, assessment methods, and the importance of finance concepts in three undergraduate finance courses in a private university in Malaysia. Approximately 224 undergraduates (finance majors) were surveyed and demonstrated positive attitudes toward the effectiveness of the finance subjects. The…

  4. DC resistivity survey for the assessment of groundwater potential in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DC resistivity survey for the assessment of groundwater potential in Oba Akoko, Southwestern, Nigeria. ... maps of the weathered layer and overburden showed spatial distribution of the thickness with a relatively thick weathered/fractured basement not less than 10 m as basement depressions or pockets of closures.

  5. Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation Study Summarized Data - HVAC Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study Information on the characteristics of the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) system(s) in the entire BASE building including types of ventilation, equipment configurations, and operation and maintenance issues was acquired by examining the building plans, conducting a building walk-through, and speaking with the building owner, manager, and/or operator.

  6. Assessing competence: The European survey on aging protocol (ESAP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ballesteros, R.; Zamarron, M.D.; Rudinger, G.; Schroots, J.J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: The main goal of this research project was to translate and adapt the European Survey on Ageing Protocol (ESAP) to 7 European countries/cultures. This article presents preliminary results from the ESAP, the basic assessment instrument of EXCELSA (European Longitudinal Study of Aging).

  7. The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) Waves 1 and 2: Review and summary of findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Deborah S.; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The NESARC, a “third generation” psychiatric epidemiologic survey that integrated detailed measures of alcohol and drug use and problems, has been the data source for over >850 publications. A comprehensive review of NESARC findings and their implications is lacking. Method NESARC was a survey of 43,093 participants that covered alcohol, drug and psychiatric disorders, risk factors, and consequences. Wave 1 of the NESARC was conducted in 2001-2002. Three years later, Wave 2 follow-up re-interviews were conducted with 34,653 of the original participants. Scopus and Pubmed were used to search for NESARC papers, which were sorted into topic areas and summarized. Result The most common disorders were alcohol and post-traumatic stress disorders, and major depression. Females had more internalizing disorders and males had more externalizing disorders, although the preponderance of males with alcohol disorders (the “gender gap”) is less pronounced than it was in previous decades. A race/ethnic “paradox” (lower risk among disadvantaged minorities than whites) remains unexplained. Younger participants had higher risk for substance and personality disorders, but not unipolar depressive or anxiety disorders. Psychiatric comorbidity was extensive and often formed latent trans-diagnostic domains. Since 1991-1992, risk for marijuana and prescription drug disorders increased, while smoking decreased, although smoking decreases were less pronounced among those with comorbidity. A nexus of comorbidity, social support, and stress predicted transitions in diagnostic status between Waves 1 and 2. Childhood maltreatment predicted psychopathology. Alcohol and drug use disorders were seldom treated; attitudinal barriers (little perceived need, perceived alcoholism stigma, pessimism about efficacy) were more important in predicting non-treatment than financial barriers. Conclusions Understanding comorbidity and the effects of early stressors will require research

  8. Gender differences in stressful life events, social support, perceived stress, and alcohol use among older adults: results from a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Paul; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Harrington, Donna

    2014-03-01

    Stressful life events, perceived stress, and social support relationships with consumption, at-risk drinking, and alcohol use disorder (AUD) were studied in a population-based sample of current drinkers age 60+ in the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (Wave 2; 2004-2005; n = 4,360). Stressful life events were associated with AUD among men and women, and crime victimization among men only. However, greater perceived stress was associated with lower consumption among women and greater odds of AUD in men, highlighting differences in the relationship between stress and alcohol use by gender that may be the result of the stress alcohol link.

  9. Motives for mixing alcohol with energy drinks and other nonalcoholic beverages, and consequences for overall alcohol consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verster, Joris C; Benson, Sarah; Scholey, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of this survey was to assess the motives for energy drink consumption, both alone and mixed with alcohol, and to determine whether negative or neutral motives for consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AMED) have a differential effect on overall alcohol consumption.

  10. A Cross-National Examination of Differences in Classification of Lifetime Alcohol Use Disorder Between DSM-IV and DSM-5: Findings from the World Mental Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Tim; Chiu, Wai-Tat; Glantz, Meyer; Kessler, Ronald C; Lago, Luise; Sampson, Nancy; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Florescu, Silvia; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Murphy, Sam; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Torres de Galvis, Yolanda; Viana, Maria Carmen; Xavier, Miguel; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-08-01

    The current study sought to examine the diagnostic overlap in DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD) and determine the clinical correlates of changing diagnostic status across the 2 classification systems. DSM-IV and DSM-5 definitions of AUD were compared using cross-national community survey data in 9 low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Participants were 31,367 respondents to surveys in the World Health Organization's World Mental Health Survey Initiative. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview, version 3.0, was used to derive DSM-IV and DSM-5 lifetime diagnoses of AUD. Clinical characteristics, also assessed in the surveys, included lifetime DSM-IV anxiety; mood and drug use disorders; lifetime suicidal ideation, plan, and attempt; general functional impairment; and psychological distress. Compared with DSM-IV AUD (12.3%, SE = 0.3%), the DSM-5 definition yielded slightly lower prevalence estimates (10.8%, SE = 0.2%). Almost one-third (n = 802) of all DSM-IV abuse cases switched to subthreshold according to DSM-5 and one-quarter (n = 467) of all DSM-IV diagnostic orphans switched to mild AUD according to DSM-5. New cases of DSM-5 AUD were largely similar to those who maintained their AUD across both classifications. Similarly, new DSM-5 noncases were similar to those who were subthreshold across both classifications. The exception to this was with regard to the prevalence of any lifetime drug use disorder. In this large cross-national community sample, the prevalence of DSM-5 lifetime AUD was only slightly lower than the prevalence of DSM-IV lifetime AUD. Nonetheless, there was considerable diagnostic switching, with a large number of people inconsistently identified across the 2 DSM classifications. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Alcohol Use and Transactional Sex among Women in South Africa: Results from a Nationally Representative Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Magni

    Full Text Available Transactional sex is a risk factor for HIV infection. Alcohol use may increase the risk of transactional sex. No nationally-representative studies have examined the relationship between multiple dimensions of alcohol use and transactional sex in women in South Africa. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between alcohol dependence, binge drinking and frequency of drinking in the past month and transactional sex in adult women in South Africa.A cross-sectional study using multi-stage, cluster sampling collected data from a nationally representative sample of 5,969 women aged 16-55 years in 2012. The analysis conducted for this paper was restricted to women reporting sexual activity in the past 12 months (n = 3,594. Transactional sex was defined as having received money/gifts in exchange for sex with any sex partner in the past year. Alcohol use measures included: alcohol dependence (≥2 positive responses to the CAGE questionnaire; binge drinking (≥4 drinks for women on one occasion; and drinking frequency in the previous month. Logistic regression models were built to test the hypotheses that each dimension of alcohol use was associated with transactional sex.About 6.3% (n = 225 of sexually active women reported transactional sex. Almost a third (30.6% of sexually active women had ever drunk alcohol, and 19.2% were current (past month drinkers. Among lifetime drinkers, 28.0% were alcohol dependent and 56.6% were binge drinkers. Alcohol dependent women were twice as likely to report transactional sex (AOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-4.3, p<0.05 than those not alcohol dependent. Binge drinkers were 3.1 times more likely to have had transactional sex (95% CI 1.5-6.6, p<0.01 than non-binge drinkers. There was no significant relationship between frequency of drinking in the past month and transactional sex.Alcohol dependency and binge drinking are significantly associated with transactional sex in South African women. HIV prevention programmes

  12. Sexual behaviour, drugs and alcohol use of international students at a British university: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, R; Abubakar, I; Hunter, P R

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether international students have greater risk-taking behaviours that could lead to importing novel and resistant strains of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We conducted a cross-sectional web-based survey of university students' sexual behaviour, alcohol and drug use, and self-reported diagnosis of STIs and compared these between British and international students. In all, 827 students completed the survey, of whom 123 (15%) were international students. International students were less likely to have ever drunk alcohol (95.4% versus 87.8%, P = 0.002) and used drugs (56.4% versus 41.5%, P = 0.002). International students were on average almost two years older at first intercourse (18.7 versus 17 years; P international students. On a discriminant analysis model, international students were characterized by being older and from a non-white background, less likely to use cocaine, they drank alcohol less frequently and were more likely to have had unprotected intercourse with two or more partners in the previous year. In conclusion, international students tend to drink more moderately and use fewer recreational drugs than British students. However, they exhibit higher sexual risk behaviours that could lead to importing novel and resistant strains of STIs.

  13. Violence Risk Assessment Practices in Denmark: A Multidisciplinary National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Louise Hjort

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available With a quadrupling of forensic psychiatric patients in Denmark over the past 20 years, focus on violence risk assessment practices across the country has increased. However, information is lacking regarding Danish risk assessment practice across professional disciplines and clinical settings; little is known about how violence risk assessments are conducted, which instruments are used for what purposes, and how mental health professionals rate their utility and costs. As part of a global survey exploring the application of violence risk assessment across 44 countries, the current study investigated Danish practice across several professional disciplines and settings in which forensic and high-risk mental health patients are assessed and treated. In total, 125 mental health professionals across the country completed the survey. The five instruments that respondents reported most commonly using for risk assessment, risk management planning and risk monitoring were Broset, HCR-20, the START, the PCL-R, and the PCL:SV. Whereas the HCR-20 was rated highest in usefulness for risk assessment, the START was rated most useful for risk management and risk monitoring. No significant differences in utility were observed across professional groups. Unstructured clinical judgments were reported to be faster but more expensive to conduct than using a risk assessment instrument. Implications for clinical practice are discussed.

  14. Prevalence and patterns of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption assessed using the AUDIT among Bhutanese refugees in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luitel, Nagendra P; Jordans, Mark; Murphy, Adrianna; Roberts, Bayard; McCambridge, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to ascertain the prevalence of hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption among Bhutanese refugees in Nepal and to identify predictors of elevated risk in order to better understand intervention need. Hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption was assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) administered in a face-to-face interview in a census of two camps comprising ∼8000 refugees. Approximately 1/5 men and 1/14 women drank alcohol and prevalence of hazardous drinking among current drinkers was high and comparable to that seen in Western countries with longstanding alcohol cultures. Harmful drinking was particularly associated with the use of other substances including tobacco. Assessment of the alcohol-related needs of Bhutanese refugees has permitted the design of interventions. This study adds to the small international literature on substance use in forced migration populations, about which there is growing concern.

  15. The Epidemiology of Antisocial Behavioral Syndromes in Adulthood: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Chou, S Patricia; Saha, Tulshi D; Smith, Sharon M; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Pickering, Roger P; Ruan, W June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F

    2017-01-01

    To present current, nationally representative US findings on prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability, and treatment of DSM-5 antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and adulthood antisocial behavioral syndrome without conduct disorder before 15 years of age (AABS). Face-to-face interviews were conducted with respondents (N = 36,309) in the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III. DSM-5 alcohol, nicotine, and specific drug use disorders and selected mood, anxiety, trauma-related, eating, and personality disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5. Prevalences of ASPD and AABS were 4.3% and 20.3%, respectively, and were highest among male, white, Native American, younger, and unmarried respondents, those with high school or less education, lower incomes, and Western residence. Both antisocial syndromes were significantly associated with 12-month and lifetime substance use, dysthymia/persistent depressive, bipolar I, posttraumatic stress, and borderline and schizotypal personality disorders (odds ratios [ORs] = 1.2-7.0). ASPD was additionally associated with 12-month agoraphobia and lifetime generalized anxiety disorder (ORs = 1.3-1.6); AABS, with 12-month and lifetime major depressive and 12-month generalized anxiety disorders (ORs = 1.2-1.3). Both were associated with significant disability (P < .001 to .01). Most antisocial survey respondents were untreated. One in 4 US adults exhibits syndromal antisocial behavior, with similar sociodemographic and psychiatric correlates and disability regardless of whether onset occurred before 15 years of age, illustrating the clinical and public health significance of both ASPD and AABS. In addition to laying groundwork for estimates of social and economic costs, and further etiologic and nosologic research, these findings highlight the urgency of effectively preventing and treating antisocial syndromes

  16. Prevalence of Alcohol Consumption among University Students in Baghdad: A Cross-section survey from Iraq

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rawa Jaafar Kadhim Al-Ameri; Husham J. Abd Al-Badri; Riyadh K Lafta

    2016-01-01

    .... It was poorly studied in Middle East, especially in Iraq, due to religious and social taboos. This study conducted to throw a light on the prevalence of Alcohol consumption among university students in Baghdad...

  17. 75 FR 79385 - Submission for OMB; Comment Request; National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ...(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and... psychological and medical disabilities with a view toward designing more effective treatment, prevention and...

  18. Assessing self-assessment practices: A survey of U.S. colleges and schools of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, James S; McDonough, Sharon L K; Hagemann, Tracy M

    2017-11-01

    This study quantifies and describes student self-assessment approaches in colleges of pharmacy across the United States. Faculty members identified as assessment directors from college websites at U.S. colleges of pharmacy were electronically surveyed. Prior to distribution, feedback and question validation was sought from select assessment directors. Surveys were distributed and recorded, via Qualtrics® survey software and analyzed in Microsoft Excel®. Responses were received from 49 colleges of pharmacy (n = 49/134, 37% response rate). The most commonly used strategies were reflective essays (n = 44/49, 90%), portfolios (n = 40/49, 82%), student self-evaluations (n = 35/49, 71%) and questionnaires/surveys/checklists (n = 29/49, 59%). Out of 49 submitted surveys, 35 programs noted students received feedback on self-assessment. Feedback came most commonly from faculty (n = 31/35, 88%). Thirty-four programs responded regarding self-assessment integration including fifteen colleges (n = 15/34, 44%) that integrated self-assessment both into the curriculum and co-curricular activities, while 14 (n = 14/34, 41%) integrated self-assessment exclusively into the curriculum, and five (n = 5/34, 15%) used self-assessment exclusively in co-curricular activities. Student self-assessment is a critical first step of the Continuing Professional Development (CPD) process. Colleges and schools of pharmacy use a wide variety of methods to develop this skill in preparing future practitioners. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A Survey on the Methanol Content of Home Distilled Alcoholic Beverages in Transylvania (Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Croitoru

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Methanol appears in relatively high concentrations in alcoholic beverages obtained from fermented fruits distillates. These products are traditionally home made in many regions in Romania and other EU countries. The chronic use of products with high methanol concentration can be considered a health risk. The purpose of this work was to measure methanol concentration in a Romanian region where brandy-type alcoholic products are made from different fruits (plum, apple, pear, grapes, and to observe if there is a type of product that contains more methanol than the others. Methods: The content of methanol in the tested alcoholic beverages was determined using a gas chromatographic method. Results: Only 18% of the tested 56 samples met UE regulation regarding methanol content of alcoholic beverages (0.4% in alcoholic drinks containing 40% ethanol. The highest concentration of 2.39% was found in a plum brandy. Plum brandies contained significantly higher amounts of methanol than brandies made from other fruits (0.91 vs 0.52%, p = 0.01. Conclusions: Home distilled alcoholic beverages obtained from fruits are a health threat due to their high methanol content. Strict regulations and tests should be introduced for such products

  20. Cancer risk assessment of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages from Brazil with special consideration to the spirits cachaça and tiquira

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Ethyl carbamate (EC) is a multi-site carcinogen in experimental animals and probably carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 2A). Traces of EC below health-relevant ranges naturally occur in several fermented foods and beverages, while higher concentrations above 1 mg/l are regularly detected in only certain spirits derived from cyanogenic plants. In Brazil this concerns the sugarcane spirit cachaça and the manioc (cassava) spirit tiquira, which both regularly exceed the national EC limit of 0.15 mg/l. This study aims to estimate human exposure in Brazil and provide a quantitative risk assessment. Methods The human dietary intake of EC via alcoholic beverages was estimated based on WHO alcohol consumption data in combination with own surveys and literature data. This data comprises the EC contents of the different beverage groups cachaça, tiquira, other spirits, beer, wine, and unrecorded alcohol (as defined by the WHO; including alcohol which is not captured in routine government statistics nor taxed). The risk assessment was conducted using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach with benchmark doses obtained from dose-response modelling of animal experiments. Lifetime cancer risk was calculated using the T25 dose descriptor. Results Considering differences between pot-still and column-still cachaça, its average EC content would be 0.38 mg/l. Tiquira contained a considerably higher average EC content of 2.34 mg/l. The whole population exposure from all alcoholic beverages was calculated to be around 100 to 200 ng/kg bw/day, with cachaça and unrecorded alcohol as the major contributing factors. The MOE was calculated to range between 400 and 2,466, with the lifetime cancer risk at approximately 3 cases in 10,000. An even higher risk may exist for binge-drinkers of cachaça and tiquira with MOEs of up to 80 and 15, respectively. Conclusions According to our risk assessment, EC poses a significant cancer risk for the alcohol-drinking population in Brazil, in

  1. Cancer risk assessment of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages from Brazil with special consideration to the spirits cachaça and tiquira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanteres Fotis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethyl carbamate (EC is a multi-site carcinogen in experimental animals and probably carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 2A. Traces of EC below health-relevant ranges naturally occur in several fermented foods and beverages, while higher concentrations above 1 mg/l are regularly detected in only certain spirits derived from cyanogenic plants. In Brazil this concerns the sugarcane spirit cachaça and the manioc (cassava spirit tiquira, which both regularly exceed the national EC limit of 0.15 mg/l. This study aims to estimate human exposure in Brazil and provide a quantitative risk assessment. Methods The human dietary intake of EC via alcoholic beverages was estimated based on WHO alcohol consumption data in combination with own surveys and literature data. This data comprises the EC contents of the different beverage groups cachaça, tiquira, other spirits, beer, wine, and unrecorded alcohol (as defined by the WHO; including alcohol which is not captured in routine government statistics nor taxed. The risk assessment was conducted using the margin of exposure (MOE approach with benchmark doses obtained from dose-response modelling of animal experiments. Lifetime cancer risk was calculated using the T25 dose descriptor. Results Considering differences between pot-still and column-still cachaça, its average EC content would be 0.38 mg/l. Tiquira contained a considerably higher average EC content of 2.34 mg/l. The whole population exposure from all alcoholic beverages was calculated to be around 100 to 200 ng/kg bw/day, with cachaça and unrecorded alcohol as the major contributing factors. The MOE was calculated to range between 400 and 2,466, with the lifetime cancer risk at approximately 3 cases in 10,000. An even higher risk may exist for binge-drinkers of cachaça and tiquira with MOEs of up to 80 and 15, respectively. Conclusions According to our risk assessment, EC poses a significant cancer risk for the alcohol

  2. Perceptions of Pakistani medical students about drugs and alcohol: a questionnaire-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Majid; Shah, Zaman; Saleem, Ayesha; Siddiqi, Maham T; Shaikh, Kashif S; Salahuddin, Farah F; Siwani, Rizwan; Naqvi, Haider

    2006-10-25

    Drug abuse is hazardous and known to be prevalent among young adults, warranting efforts to increase awareness about harmful effects and to change attitudes. This study was conducted to assess the perceptions of a group of medical students from Pakistan, a predominantly Muslim country, regarding four drugs namely heroin, charas, benzodiazepines and alcohol. In total, 174 self-reported questionnaires were received (87% response rate). The most commonly cited reasons for why some students take these drugs were peer pressure (96%), academic stress (90%) and curiosity (88%). The most commonly cited justifiable reason was to go to sleep (34%). According to 77%, living in the college male hostel predisposed one to using these drugs. Sixty percent of students said that the drugs did not improve exam performance, while 54% said they alleviated stress. Seventy-eight percent said they did not intend to ever take drugs in the future. Females and day-scholars were more willing to discourage a friend who took drugs. Morality (78%), religion (76%) and harmful effects of drugs (57%) were the most common deterrents against drug intake. Five suggestions to decrease drug abuse included better counseling facilities (78%) and more recreational facilities (60%). Efforts need to be made to increase student awareness regarding effects and side effects of drugs. Our findings suggest that educating students about the adverse effects as well as the moral and religious implications of drug abuse is more likely to have a positive impact than increased policing. Proper student-counseling facilities and healthier avenues for recreation are also required.

  3. Perceptions of Pakistani medical students about drugs and alcohol: a questionnaire-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salahuddin Farah F

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug abuse is hazardous and known to be prevalent among young adults, warranting efforts to increase awareness about harmful effects and to change attitudes. This study was conducted to assess the perceptions of a group of medical students from Pakistan, a predominantly Muslim country, regarding four drugs namely heroin, charas, benzodiazepines and alcohol. Results In total, 174 self-reported questionnaires were received (87% response rate. The most commonly cited reasons for why some students take these drugs were peer pressure (96%, academic stress (90% and curiosity (88%. The most commonly cited justifiable reason was to go to sleep (34%. According to 77%, living in the college male hostel predisposed one to using these drugs. Sixty percent of students said that the drugs did not improve exam performance, while 54% said they alleviated stress. Seventy-eight percent said they did not intend to ever take drugs in the future. Females and day-scholars were more willing to discourage a friend who took drugs. Morality (78%, religion (76% and harmful effects of drugs (57% were the most common deterrents against drug intake. Five suggestions to decrease drug abuse included better counseling facilities (78% and more recreational facilities (60%. Conclusion Efforts need to be made to increase student awareness regarding effects and side effects of drugs. Our findings suggest that educating students about the adverse effects as well as the moral and religious implications of drug abuse is more likely to have a positive impact than increased policing. Proper student-counseling facilities and healthier avenues for recreation are also required.

  4. Impact of alcohol use motives and internalizing symptoms on mood changes in response to drinking: An ecological momentary assessment investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorka, Stephanie M; Hedeker, Donald; Piasecki, Thomas M; Mermelstein, Robin

    2017-04-01

    Theory implies that individuals who use alcohol to cope with negative emotions experience the acute mood-altering effects they desire. However, no study to date has directly tested whether alcohol coping motives map onto alcohol-induced changes in mood in real-time or how co-occurring internalizing symptoms (i.e., depression and anxiety) impact the relation between coping motives and alcohol-induced changes in mood. The current study tested the unique and interactive effects of alcohol coping motives and internalizing symptoms on mood changes during drinking using ecological momentary assessment (EMA) in a sample of young adults (n=257). Participants completed a battery of questionnaires and a 7-day EMA assessment protocol. In general, alcohol use was associated with greater positive mood and reduced negative mood while drinking. However, individuals who reported that they use alcohol to cope with anxiety, but not depression, experienced less mood benefits from alcohol relative to those without mood coping motives. In contrast, individuals with high internalizing symptoms experienced greater mood benefits while drinking relative to those with low levels of internalizing symptoms; and at high levels of anxiety, alcohol consumption was reinforcing for everyone regardless of coping motives. Only at low levels of anxiety symptoms, did coping with anxiety motives attenuate alcohol's acute reinforcing effects. These results together confirm that alcohol has a robust impact on real-time mood in young adults and sheds light on the processes that may contribute to repeated alcohol use within individuals who do, and do not, use alcohol as a means of coping. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Technology assessments in transportation: survey of recent literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBelle, S.J.

    1980-03-01

    A survey and an evaluation of recent studies of transportation systems done in a technology-assessment framework were undertaken as the basis for a detailed statement of work for a US Department of Energy technology assessment of transportation energy-conservation strategies. Several bibliographies were searched and numerous professionals in the field of technology assessment were contacted regarding current work. Detailed abstracts were prepared for studies judged to be sufficiently broad in coverage of impacts assessed, yet detailed in coverage of all or part of the nation's transportation systems. Some studies were rich in data but not comprehensive in their analytical approach; brief abstracts were prepared for these. An explanation of the criteria used to screen the studies, as well as abstracts of 37 reports, are provided in this compendium of transportation-technology-assessment literature.

  6. Comparative risk assessment of carcinogens in alcoholic beverages using the margin of exposure approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenmeier, Dirk W; Przybylski, Maria C; Rehm, Jürgen

    2012-09-15

    Alcoholic beverages have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. As alcoholic beverages are multicomponent mixtures containing several carcinogenic compounds, a quantitative approach is necessary to compare the risks. Fifteen known and suspected human carcinogens (acetaldehyde, acrylamide, aflatoxins, arsenic, benzene, cadmium, ethanol, ethyl carbamate, formaldehyde, furan, lead, 4-methylimidazole, N-nitrosodimethylamine, ochratoxin A and safrole) occurring in alcoholic beverages were identified based on monograph reviews by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The margin of exposure (MOE) approach was used for comparative risk assessment. MOE compares a toxicological threshold with the exposure. MOEs above 10,000 are judged as low priority for risk management action. MOEs were calculated for different drinking scenarios (low risk and heavy drinking) and different levels of contamination for four beverage groups (beer, wine, spirits and unrecorded alcohol). The lowest MOEs were found for ethanol (3.1 for low risk and 0.8 for heavy drinking). Inorganic lead and arsenic have average MOEs between 10 and 300, followed by acetaldehyde, cadmium and ethyl carbamate between 1,000 and 10,000. All other compounds had average MOEs above 10,000 independent of beverage type. Ethanol was identified as the most important carcinogen in alcoholic beverages, with clear dose response. Some other compounds (lead, arsenic, ethyl carbamate, acetaldehyde) may pose risks below thresholds normally tolerated for food contaminants, but from a cost-effectiveness point of view, the focus should be on reducing alcohol consumption in general rather than on mitigative measures for some contaminants that contribute only to a limited extent (if at all) to the total health risk. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  7. Health Risk Factors Associated with Lifetime Abstinence from Alcohol in the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, William C; Lui, Camillia K; Williams, Edwina; Ye, Yu; Greenfield, Thomas K; Lown, E Anne

    2017-02-01

    The choice and definition of a comparison group in alcohol-related health studies remains a prominent issue in alcohol epidemiology due to potential biases in the risk estimates. The most commonly used comparison group has been current abstainers; however, this includes former drinkers who may have quit drinking due to health problems. Lifetime abstention could be the best option, but measurement issues, selection biases due to health and other risk factors, and small numbers in populations are important concerns. This study examines characteristics of lifetime abstention and occasional drinking that are relevant for alcohol-related health studies. This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort of 14 to 21 year olds followed through 2012 (n = 7,515). Definitions of abstinence and occasional drinking were constructed based on multiple measurements. Descriptive analyses were used to compare the definitions, and in further analysis, lifetime abstainers (n = 718) and lifetime minimal drinkers (n = 1,027) were compared with drinkers across demographics and early-life characteristics (i.e., religion, poverty, parental education, and family alcohol problems) in logistic regression models. Using a strict measurement of zero drinks from adolescence to the 50s, only 1.7% of the sample was defined as lifetime abstainer compared to a broader definition allowing a total of 1 drink over the lifetime that included 9.5% and to lifetime minimal drinking (a total of 3 drinks or less a month), which accounted for 13.7%. Factors significantly associated with lifetime abstention and lifetime minimal drinking included religion, poverty, having no family alcohol problems, Hispanic ethnicity, foreign-born, and female gender. Importantly, work-related health limitations in early life were significantly associated, but not childhood physical and mental health problems. Alcohol-related health studies should utilize lifetime classifications of drinkers

  8. An Analysis Report of 2014 CALA Self-Assessment Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Anna Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available On the occasion of CALA’s 40th anniversary in 2014, the 2013 Board of Directors appointed a Self-Assessment Task Force to conduct an assessment survey with special focuses on members’ awareness of CALA’s organizational structure and policies, its services to members, the extent of participation in events sponsored by CALA, and the level of satisfaction with CALA leadership. Although only one-fifth of the active members responded to the survey, the answers and feedback have identified areas for organizational improvement and have shown how active members view the current state of CALA. Some essential findings from the survey include: 1 the growth of overseas membership as a demographic trend, 2 a need to recruit student members, 3 a high percentage of CALA members not aware of CALA’s Mission/Vision/Goal, 4 conflicting data on CALA’s leadership, 5 discovery of low ratings (10-30% of respondents on eleven out of twelve rating questions, and 6 strong support for CALA as a representative organization of Chinese American librarians in North America. The findings of the survey will serve as a valuable reference for future strategic planning and for carrying out CALA’s long term goals.

  9. How does alcohol contribute to sexual assault? Explanations from laboratory and survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Antonia; Zawacki, Tina; Buck, Philip O; Testa, Maria; Parks, Kathleen; Norris, Jeanette; Martin, Susan E; Livingston, Jennifer A; McAuslan, Pam; Clinton, A Monique; Kennedy, Cheryl L; George, William H; Davis, Kelly Cue; Martell, Joel

    2002-04-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium of the 2001 RSA Meeting in Montreal, Canada. The chair was Antonia Abbey and the organizers were Tina Zawacki and Philip O. Buck. There were four presentations and a discussant. The first presentation was made by Maria Testa whose interviews with sexual assault victims suggest that there may be differences in the characteristics of sexual assaults in which both the victim and perpetrator were using substances as compared to when only the perpetrator was using substances. The second presentation was made by Tina Zawacki whose research found that perpetrators of sexual assaults that involved alcohol were in most ways similar to perpetrators of sexual assaults that did not involve alcohol, although they differed on impulsivity and several alcohol measures. The third presentation was made by Kathleen Parks who described how alcohol consumption affected women's responses to a male confederate's behavior in a simulated bar setting. The fourth presentation was made by Jeanette Norris who found that alcohol and expectancies affected men's self-reported likelihood of acting like a hypothetical sexually aggressive man. Susan E. Martin discussed the implications of these studies and made suggestions for future research.

  10. An experimental test of assessment reactivity within a web-based brief alcohol intervention study for college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzino, Tera L; Rose, Gail L; Helzer, John E

    2016-01-01

    Web-based brief alcohol intervention (WBI) programs have efficacy in a wide range of college students and have been widely disseminated to universities to address heavy alcohol use. In the majority of efficacy studies, web-based research assessments were conducted before the intervention. Web-based research assessments may elicit reactivity, which could inflate estimates of WBI efficacy. The current study tested whether web-based research assessments conducted in combination with a WBI had additive effects on alcohol use outcomes, compared to a WBI only. Undergraduate students (n=856) from universities in the United States and Canada participated in this online study. Eligible individuals were randomized to complete 1) research assessments+WBI or 2) WBI-only. Alcohol consumption, alcohol-related problems, and protective behaviors were assessed at one-month follow up. Multiple regression using 20 multiply imputed datasets indicated that there were no significant differences at follow up in alcohol use, alcohol-related problems, or protective behaviors used when controlling for variables with theoretical and statistical relevance. A repeated measures analysis of covariance revealed a significant decrease in peak estimated blood alcohol concentration in both groups, but no differential effects by randomized group. There were no significant moderating effects from gender, hazardous alcohol use, or motivation to change drinking. Web-based research assessments combined with a web-based alcohol intervention did not inflate estimates of intervention efficacy when measured within-subjects. Our findings suggest universities may be observing intervention effects similar to those cited in efficacy studies, although effectiveness trials are needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-injury and suicide behavior among young people with perceived parental alcohol problems in Denmark: a school-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisinger, Veronica S C; Hawton, Keith; Tolstrup, Janne S

    2017-08-04

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that young people who perceive their parents to have alcohol problems are more likely to self-injure, have suicide ideation, and to attempt suicide than young people without parental alcohol problems. We also tested whether the association between parental alcohol problems and self-injury, suicide ideation, and suicide attempt among young people differed depending on the gender of the child and the parent. Data came from the Danish National Youth Study 2014, a web-based national survey. A total of 75,853 high school and vocational school students participated. Self-injury, suicidal ideation, and suicide attempts were outcomes and the main exposure variables were perceived parental alcohol problems, gender of the parent with alcohol problems, cohabitation with a parent with alcohol problems, and severity of the parents' alcohol problems. Young people with parental alcohol problems had higher odds of self-injury [boys: OR = 1.59 (95% CI 1.40-1.82); girls: OR = 1.84 (95% CI 1.69-1.99)], suicidal ideation [boys: OR = 1.81 (95% CI 1.59-2.06); girls: OR 1.74 (95% CI 1.59-1.89)], and suicide attempt [boys: OR = 2.10 (95% CI 1.63-2.71); girls: OR = 2.09 (95% CI 1.80-2.42)] compared to young people without parental alcohol problems. Girls with parental alcohol problems had higher odds of self-injury than boys with parental alcohol problems, whereas no gender differences were found for suicidal ideation and suicide attempts. Also no differences were found depending on the gender of the parent with alcohol problems. This study shows that young people with parental alcohol problems have higher odds of self-injury, suicide ideation, and suicide attempts.

  12. Pre-teen alcohol use initiation and suicide attempts among middle and high school students: findings from the 2006 Georgia Student Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahn, Monica H; Bossarte, Robert M; Ashby, Jeffrey S; Meyers, Joel

    2010-05-01

    Early alcohol use initiation has been linked to suicide attempts among youth. However, very little is known about the potential impact of alcohol-related norms and beliefs and how these may impact the association between alcohol use and suicide attempt. This study examines the associations between early alcohol use and suicide attempts while controlling for demographic characteristics, and alcohol-related beliefs and norms (e.g., believing alcohol causes harm to health or that adults or friends disapprove of alcohol use) and potential confounders. Analyses were based on the 2006 Georgia Student Health Survey (N=175,311) of students in grades 6, 8, 10 and 12. The current analyses were limited to students in grades 8, 10 and 12, who either began drinking prior to age 13 or who were non drinkers (n=87,349). Pre-teen alcohol use initiation was associated with suicide attempts (Adj.OR=1.51; 95%CI:1.38-1.66) relative to not drinking with similar associations for boys (Adj.OR=1.72; 95%CI:1.52-1.94) and girls (Adj.OR=1.26; 95%CI:1.08-1.45). Students who believed that alcohol was harmful to their health, or that friends or adults disapproved of their alcohol use, or who had been taught about substance use in school were less likely to make a suicide attempt, although findings differed for boys and girls. Pre-teen alcohol use initiation is an important risk factor for suicide attempts among boys and girls in Georgia. Increased efforts to delay and reduce early alcohol use through clinical interventions, education, and policies that impact norms and knowledge related to alcohol use are needed and may in turn reduce suicide attempts. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuropsychological Assessment of Executive Function in Adolescents with Different Alcohol Consumption Patterns

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    Laura M. V. Manoiloff

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The principal goal of this study was to evaluate the neuropsychological performance in Executive Function (EF tasks in adolescents with different patterns of alcohol use. An ex – post facto simple prospective design was used and three groups were identified in regard to alcohol drinking patterns (DP: light drinkers, moderate drinkers, and Binge drinkers. No differences were found in neuropsychological performance in EF tasks related to DP. Results of the present work highlights relevant issues that need to be considered in future works, like the importance of a better assessment of DP among Argentinean adolescents and the implementation of neuropsychological tasks developed to assess emotional aspects of EF, such us the decision making tasks.

  14. Assessing the Validity of On-Premise Alcohol License Data in Six Communities in California: Operating Characteristics and Outlet Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponicki, William R.; Gruenewald, Paul J.; Remer, Lillian G.; Martin, Scott E.; Treno, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated State of California alcohol license records as a measure of businesses selling alcohol for consumption on premise. In 2008, researchers attempted to visit all 799 licensed restaurants, bars, and pubs in six medium-sized cities near San Francisco. Surveys collected detailed business characteristics for a subsample of 151 bars or restaurants that included a separate bar area. Results suggest inaccuracies of official records regarding license locations and types (bar/pub vs. restaurant). Analyses also indicate that establishment characteristics are related to local alcohol outlet densities. Study implications and limitations are discussed. PMID:23905583

  15. A survey of physicians knowledge regarding awareness of maternal alcohol use and the diagnosis of FAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koren Gideon

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol is the most widely used drug in the world that is a human teratogen whose use among women of childbearing age has been steadily increasing. It is also probable that Fetal Alcohol Syndrome is under diagnosed by physicians. The objectives of this study were twofold: 1 to evaluate the experience, knowledge and confidence of family physicians with respect to the diagnosis of FAS and 2 to evaluate physicians awareness of maternal drinking patterns. Methods and Participants A multiple choice anonymous questionnaire was sent to a randomly selected group of family physicians in the Metropolitan Toronto area. Results There was a 73% (75/103 total response rate; Overall, 6/75 (8% of family physicians reported that they had actually diagnosed a child with FAS. 17.9% had suspicions but did not make a diagnosis and 12.7% reported making a referral to confirm the diagnosis. Physician rated confidence in the ability to diagnosis FAS was low, with 49% feeling they had very little confidence. 75% reported counselling pregnant women and 60.8% reported counselling childbearing women in general on the use of alcohol. When asked what screening test they used to detect the use of alcohol, 75% described frequency/quantity. Not a single respondent identified using the current accepted screening method for alcohol use (TWEAK which is recommended by The Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. Conclusions Family physicians do not feel confident about diagnosing FAS. None of the physicians were aware of the current screening methods to accurately gage alcohol use in pregnant and childbearing women

  16. A survey of metal profiles in some traditional alcoholic beverages in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwegbue, Chukwujindu M A; Ojelum, Anwuli L; Bassey, Francisca I

    2014-11-01

    The concentrations of Cd, Pb, Ni, Cr, Cu, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, Mg, Ca, K, and Na were determined in some traditional alcoholic beverages (oil palm wine, raphia palm wine, burukutu, pito, ogogoro) consumed in southern Nigeria, with a view to providing information on the dietary intakes of essential metals and exposure of humans to toxic metals. The concentrations of these 13 elements were determined by atomic spectrometry after nitric acid/hydrogen peroxide digestion. The mean concentrations of the metals (mg/L) in the samples ranged from 0.02 to 0.05 for Cd; 0.01 to 0.19 for Pb; nd to 0.11 for Ni, nd to 0.15 for Cr; 0.09 to 0.60 for Cu; 0.01-0.08 for Co; 0.30 to 10.3 for Fe; 0.02 to 3.97 for Mn; 0.12 to 3.84 for Zn; 2.08 to 301.3 for Mg; 2.21 to 49.2 for Ca; 35.05 to 926.1 for K; 6.30-58.1 for Na. The mean concentrations of metals in these alcoholic beverages were below statutory limits for the metals in alcoholic beverages and were similar to concentrations found in other alcoholic beverages in the literature. The estimated daily intakes of metals from the consumption of these alcoholic beverages were less than 2% of the recommended dietary allowance values except for Cd and Pb. The individual and combined metals target hazard quotient values were less than 1 except for raphia palm wine and burukutu. From the estimated target hazard, no long life health concerns of metals are associated with the consumption of these alcoholic beverages.

  17. Brief report of a test of differential alcohol risk using sibling attributions of paternal alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, Marcella H; Arkes, Jeremy; Hoyle, Rick H

    2011-11-01

    Parental alcoholism is generally found to be a strong predictor of alcohol misuse. Although the majority of siblings agree on the presence of parental alcohol issues, there is a significant minority who do not. The current study analyzed sibling data from the 1979 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth using multilevel modeling, which accounts for the nested structure of the data. These analyses permitted a test of whether (a) identifying one's father as an alcoholic predicted greater risk of alcohol problems, (b) being from a family whose siblings did not all agree on the presence of paternal alcoholism increased the likelihood of alcohol problems, and (c) risk of alcohol misuse significantly differed among individuals from families in which there was familial disagreement about paternal alcoholism. Results show that individuals who identified their father as an alcoholic were themselves more likely to have alcohol issues as compared with individuals both within and between families who did not identify their father as an alcoholic. Risk was similar for individuals in families in which there was disagreement about paternal alcoholism compared with individuals from families in which everyone agreed on the presence of paternal alcoholism. Moreover, there was not a significant interaction between paternal alcoholism attributions and familial disagreement. Findings indicate that in the case of child reports of paternal alcoholism, the increased risk of alcohol problems holds true regardless of the accuracy of an individual's assessment. These results may be not only because of the impact of paternal alcoholism on a person's alcohol misuse but also because of a person's alcohol problems potentially influencing his or her perceptions of familial alcohol-related behaviors.

  18. Age, period and cohort influences on beer, wine and spirits consumption trends in the US National Alcohol Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, William C; Greenfield, Thomas K; Bond, Jason; Ye, Yu; Rehm, Jürgen

    2004-09-01

    To estimate the separate influences of age, period and cohort on the consumption of beer wine and spirits in the United States. Linear age-period-cohort models controlling for demographic change with extensive specification testing. Setting US general population 1979-2000. Monthly average of past-year consumption of beer, wine and spirits in five National Alcohol Surveys. Findings The strongest cohort effects are found for spirits; cohorts born before 1940 are found to have significantly higher consumption than those born after 1946, with especially high spirits consumption for men in the pre-1930s cohorts. Significant cohort effects are also found for beer with elevated consumption in the 1946-65 cohorts for men but in the pre-1940 cohorts for women. Significant negative effects of age are found for beer and spirits consumption, although not for wine. Significant period effects are found for men's beer and wine consumption and for women's spirits consumption. Increased educational attainment in the population over time is associated with reduced beer consumption and increased wine consumption. Changing cohort demographics are found to have significant effects on beverage-specific consumption, indicating the importance of controlling for these effects in the evaluation of alcohol policy effectiveness and the potential for substantial improvement in the forecasting of future beverage-specific consumption trends, alcohol dependence treatment demand and morbidity and mortality outcomes.

  19. 2016 Survey of Non-Starch Alcohol and Renewable Hydrocarbon Biofuels Producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Ethan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schwab, Amy [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bacovsky, Dina [Bioenergy 2020+ GmbH (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    In order to understand the anticipated status of the industry for non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels as of the end of calendar year 2015, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated its annual survey of U.S. non-starch ethanol and renewable hydrocarbon biofuels producers. This report presents the results of this survey update, describes the survey methodology, and documents important changes since the 2015 survey published at the end of 2015 (Schwab et al. 2015).

  20. Results from a National Needs Assessment Survey: A View of Assessment Efforts within Chemistry Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emenike, Mary Elizabeth; Schroeder, Jacob; Murphy, Kristen; Holme, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    As is true for virtually all of higher education, chemistry departments are often required to provide evidence of student learning at both course and curricular levels through evaluation and assessment. The ACS Exams Institute conducted a needs assessment survey of 1500 chemistry faculty members from across the country to investigate motivation,…

  1. A National Survey of State-Sponsored Programs to Prevent Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Alfred A.; Hamlett, Carol L.

    1986-01-01

    Results of questionnaires and follow-up interviews with public health departments in each state and the District of Columbia revealed that, as a whole, state governments have not made a sustained commitment to the prevention of fetal alcohol syndrome. Several states have initiated programs that could serve as a model for national effort.…

  2. Assessment and treatment of insomnia in adult patients with alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, Kirk J

    2015-06-01

    Insomnia in patients with alcohol dependence has increasingly become a target of treatment due to its prevalence, persistence, and associations with relapse and suicidal thoughts, as well as randomized controlled studies demonstrating efficacy with behavior therapies and non-addictive medications. This article focuses on assessing and treating insomnia that persists despite 4 or more weeks of sobriety in alcohol-dependent adults. Selecting among the various options for treatment follows a comprehensive assessment of insomnia and its multifactorial causes. In addition to chronic, heavy alcohol consumption and its effects on sleep regulatory systems, contributing factors include premorbid insomnia; co-occurring medical, psychiatric, and other sleep disorders; use of other substances and medications; stress; environmental factors; and inadequate sleep hygiene. The assessment makes use of history, rating scales, and sleep diaries as well as physical, mental status, and laboratory examinations to rule out these factors. Polysomnography is indicated when another sleep disorder is suspected, such as sleep apnea or periodic limb movement disorder, or when insomnia is resistant to treatment. Sobriety remains a necessary, first-line treatment for insomnia, and most patients will have some improvement. If insomnia-specific treatment is needed, then brief behavioral therapies are the treatment of choice, because they have shown long-lasting benefit without worsening of drinking outcomes. Medications work faster, but they generally work only as long as they are taken. Melatonin agonists; sedating antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics; and benzodiazepine receptor agonists each have their benefits and risks, which must be weighed and monitored to optimize outcomes. Some relapse prevention medications may also have sleep-promoting activity. Although it is assumed that treatment for insomnia will help prevent relapse, this has not been firmly established. Therefore

  3. Health impact assessment – A survey on quantifying tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehr, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.fehr@uni-bielefeld.de [Fakultaet fuer Gesundheitswissenschaften, Universitaet Bielefeld, Universitaetsstr. 25, 33615 Bielefeld (Germany); Mekel, Odile C.L., E-mail: odile.mekel@lzg.nrw.de [Gesundheitsdaten und analysen, Versorgungsstrukturen, Landeszentrum Gesundheit Nordrhein-Westfalen (LZG.NRW), Westerfeldstr. 35-37, 33611 Bielefeld (Germany); Fintan Hurley, J., E-mail: fintan.hurley@iom-world.org [Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM), Research Avenue North, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AP, Scotland (United Kingdom); Mackenbach, Johan P., E-mail: j.mackenbach@erasmusmc.nl [Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, P.O. Box 2040, 3000 CA Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-02-15

    Integrating human health into prospective impact assessments is known to be challenging. This is true for both approaches: dedicated health impact assessments (HIA) as well as inclusion of health into more general impact assessments. Acknowledging the full range of participatory, qualitative, and quantitative approaches, this study focuses on the latter, especially on computational tools for quantitative health modelling. We conducted a survey among tool developers concerning the status quo of development and availability of such tools; experiences made with model usage in real-life situations; and priorities for further development. Responding toolmaker groups described 17 such tools, most of them being maintained and reported as ready for use and covering a wide range of topics, including risk & protective factors, exposures, policies, and health outcomes. In recent years, existing models have been improved and were applied in new ways, and completely new models emerged. There was high agreement among respondents on the need to further develop methods for assessment of inequalities and uncertainty. The contribution of quantitative modeling to health foresight would benefit from building joint strategies of further tool development, improving the visibility of quantitative tools and methods, and engaging continuously with actual and potential users. - Highlights: • A survey investigated computational tools for health impact quantification. • Formal evaluation of such tools has been rare. • Handling inequalities and uncertainties are priority areas for further development. • Health foresight would benefit from tool developers and users forming a community. • Joint development strategies across computational tools are needed.

  4. Alcohol marketing and drunkenness among students in the Philippines: findings from the nationally representative Global School-based Student Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background A largely unaddressed issue in lower income countries and the Philippines, in particular, is the role of alcohol marketing and its potential link to early alcohol use among youth. This study examines the associations between exposures to alcohol marketing and Filipino youths’ drinking prevalence and drunkenness. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were used to examine the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) conducted in Philippines (2011). The self-administered questionnaires were completed by students primarily 13 to 16 years of age (N = 5290). Three statistical models were computed to test the associations between alcohol marketing and alcohol use, while controlling for possible confounding factors. Results Alcohol marketing, specifically through providing free alcohol through a company representative, was associated with drunkenness (AOR: 1.84; 95% CI = 1.06–3.21) among youths after controlling for demographic and psychosocial characteristics, peer environment, and risky behaviors. In addition, seeing alcohol ads in newspapers and magazines (AOR: 1.65, 95% CI = 1.05–2.58) and seeing ads at sports events, concerts or fairs (AOR: 1.50, 95% CI = 1.06–2.12) were significantly associated with increased reports of drunkenness. Conclusions There are significant associations between alcohol marketing exposure and increased alcohol use and drunkenness among youth in the Philippines. These findings highlight the need to put policies into effect that restrict alcohol marketing practices as an important prevention strategy for reducing alcohol use and its dire consequences among vulnerable youth. PMID:24325264

  5. Alcoolismo e problemas relacionados: dificuldades na implementação de estudos de prevalência Prevalence of alcoholism and related problems: some difficulties in conducting surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro da S. F. Coutinho

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available No artigo, são apresentadas algumas dificuldades metodológicas no estudo da prevalência do alcoolismo e dos problemas relacionados com o consumo abusivo de bebidas alcoólicas. Abordam-se questões como a definição de alcoolista e os obstáculos para a sua identificação através de instrumentos utilizados em estudos populacionais. Discutem-se ainda as vantagens e desvantagens dos diferentes deliamentos de pesquisa para estimar a prevalência do alcoolismo e dos problemas associados ao álcool.This paper presents some methodological difficulties in studying the prevalence of alcoholism and alcohol abuse. It discusses the definition of alcoholic and his identification by instruments used in surveys. The advantages and disadvantages of different types of research desings for estimating the prevalence of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems are also discussed.

  6. The intricate link between violence and mental disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbogen, Eric B; Johnson, Sally C

    2009-02-01

    The relationship between mental illness and violence has a significant effect on mental health policy, clinical practice, and public opinion about the dangerousness of people with psychiatric disorders. To use a longitudinal data set representative of the US population to clarify whether or how severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression lead to violent behavior. Data on mental disorder and violence were collected as part of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), a 2-wave face-to-face survey conducted by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. A total of 34 653 subjects completed NESARC waves 1 (2001-2003) and 2 (2004-2005) interviews. Wave 1 data on severe mental illness and risk factors were analyzed to predict wave 2 data on violent behavior. Reported violent acts committed between waves 1 and 2. Bivariate analyses showed that the incidence of violence was higher for people with severe mental illness, but only significantly so for those with co-occurring substance abuse and/or dependence. Multivariate analyses revealed that severe mental illness alone did not predict future violence; it was associated instead with historical (past violence, juvenile detention, physical abuse, parental arrest record), clinical (substance abuse, perceived threats), dispositional (age, sex, income), and contextual (recent divorce, unemployment, victimization) factors. Most of these factors were endorsed more often by subjects with severe mental illness. Because severe mental illness did not independently predict future violent behavior, these findings challenge perceptions that mental illness is a leading cause of violence in the general population. Still, people with mental illness did report violence more often, largely because they showed other factors associated with violence. Consequently, understanding the link between violent acts and mental disorder requires consideration of its

  7. Effects of Survey Mode on Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Hospice Survey Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parast, Layla; Elliott, Marc N; Hambarsoomian, Katrin; Teno, Joan; Anhang Price, Rebecca

    2018-01-23

    To examine the effect of mode of survey administration on response rates and response tendencies for the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) Hospice Survey and develop appropriate adjustments. Survey response data were obtained after sampling and fielding of the CAHPS Hospice Survey in 2015. Sampled caregivers and decedents were randomized to one of three modes: mail only, telephone only, and mixed mode (mail with telephone follow-up). Linear regression analysis was used to examine the effect of mode on individual responses to questions (6 composite measures and 2 global measures that examine hospice quality). U.S. hospice programs (N = 57). Primary caregivers of individuals who died in hospice (N = 7,349). Outcomes were 8 hospice quality measures (6 composite measures, 2 global measures). Analyses were adjusted for differences in case-mix (e.g., decedent age, payer for hospice care, primary diagnosis, length of final episode of hospice care, respondent age, respondent education, relationship of decedent to caregiver, survey language, and language spoken at home) between hospices. Response rates were 42.6% for those randomized to mail only, 37.9%, for those randomized to telephone only, and 52.6% for those randomized to mixed mode (P mode effects (P mode experiments for hospital CAHPS, hospice primary caregivers tend to respond more negatively by telephone than by mail. Valid comparisons of hospice performance require that reported hospice scores be adjusted for survey mode. © 2018, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2018, The American Geriatrics Society.

  8. Noninvasive assessment of alcoholic liver disease using unidimensional transient elastography (Fibroscan®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupsor-Platon, Monica; Badea, Radu

    2015-01-01

    Unidimensional transient elastography (TE) is a noninvasive technique, which has been increasingly used in the assessment of diffuse liver diseases. This paper focuses on reviewing the existing data on the use of TE in the diagnosis of fibrosis and in monitoring disease progression in alcoholic liver disease, on the factors that may influence the result of fibrosis prediction, and last but not least, on its potential use in assessing the steatosis degree. Therefore, this field is far from being exhausted and deserves more attention. Further studies are required, on large groups of biopsied patients, in order to find answers to all the remaining questions in this field. PMID:26576080

  9. Gender Differences in Stressful Life Events, Social Support, Perceived Stress, and Alcohol Use Among Older Adults: Results From a National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Sacco, Paul; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Harrington, Donna

    2013-01-01

    Stressful life events, perceived stress, and social support relationships with consumption, at-risk drinking, and alcohol use disorder (AUD) were studied in a population-based sample of current drinkers age 60+ in the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (Wave 2; 2004–2005; n = 4,360). Stressful life events were associated with AUD among men and women, and crime victimization among men only. However, greater perceived stress was associated with lower consumption amo...

  10. The Epidemiology of Antisocial Behavioral Syndromes in Adulthood: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B.; Chou, S. Patricia; Saha, Tulshi D.; Smith, Sharon M.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Pickering, Roger P.; Ruan, W. June; Huang, Boji; Grant, Bridget F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present current, nationally representative U.S. findings on prevalence, correlates, psychiatric comorbidity, disability and treatment of DSM-5 antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and syndromal adult antisocial behavior without conduct disorder before age 15 (AABS). Method Face-to-face interviews with respondents (n=36,309) in the 2012-2013 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions–III. DSM-5 alcohol, nicotine, specific drug use disorders, and selected mood, anxiety, trauma-related, eating, and personality disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule–5. Results Prevalences of ASPD and AABS were 4.3% and 20.3%, highest among male, white, Native American, younger, and unmarried respondents, those with high school or less education, lower incomes, and Western residence. Both antisocial syndromes were significantly associated with 12-month and lifetime substance use, dysthymia/persistent depressive, bipolar I, posttraumatic stress and borderline and schizotypal personality disorders (ORs=1.2-7.0). ASPD was additionally associated with 12-month agoraphobia and lifetime generalized anxiety disorder; AABS, with 12-month and lifetime major depressive and 12-month generalized anxiety disorders. Both were associated with significant disability (pantisocial respondents were untreated. Conclusions One in 4 U.S. adults exhibits syndromal antisocial behavior, with similar sociodemographic and psychiatric correlates and disability regardless of whether onset occurred before age 15, illustrating the clinical and public health significance of both ASPD and AABS. In addition to laying groundwork for estimates of social and economic costs, and further etiologic and nosologic research, these findings highlight the urgency of effectively preventing and treating antisocial syndromes, including investigation of whether treatment for comorbidity hastens symptomatic remission and improves

  11. Smoking and suicidality in subjects with major depressive disorder: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Hyun; Eisner, Lori R; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2013-09-25

    Detailed characteristics of depressive smokers and its association with suicidality were still less investigated. The aim of this study was to delineate characteristics of smokers with major depressive disorder (MDD) and examine the relationship between these characteristics and suicidality using an epidemiologic database, the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). A total of 5695 subjects with MDD, defined by the DSM-IV criteria, were included in our analysis. Current smokers, former smokers, and lifetime nonsmokers were compared in terms of demographic, clinical characteristics, and functional level. Suicidality, evaluated by history of suicide ideation and attempts while in a low mood was evaluated and compared among the groups. Current smokers with MDD showed a greater number of DSM-IV symptoms while in acute episodes, a higher rate of alcohol and drug-use disorders, and poorer functional levels than nonsmokers. Previous smokers displayed intermediate characteristics between current smokers and nonsmokers. The logistic regression analysis revealed that both current and former smoking status predicted the risk of having a history of attempted suicide (current smokers: odds ratio 1.62, 95% C.I. 1.42-1.86; former smokers: odds ratio 1.37, 95% C.I. 1.13-1.66) after adjusting for demographic data, a history of subthreshold hypomania, and a lifetime axis II/anxiety/alcohol use/substance-use disorder. Retrospective, cross-sectional evaluation; suicidality assessed only in the most severe depressive episode. The present study corroborates that smokers with MDD showed distinct clinical characteristics, and cigarette smoking can predict attempted suicide in a community representative sample of people with MDD. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Association Between Body Image and Behavioral Misperception (BIBM) and Alcohol Use Among High School Girls: Results From the 2013 Youth Risk Behavioral Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlissel, Anna C; Schwartz, Taylort T; Skeer, Margie R

    2017-01-01

    The need to be thin is pervasive in adolescent culture and is associated with increased risk outcomes among adolescent girls. Body image and behavioral misperception (BIBM) exists when there is a disconnect between body weight perception and actions taken related to perceived weight status. To understand this further, we examined the relationship between BIBM and alcohol use among high school girls in the United States. Using 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data, we ran survey-weighted multivariable logistic regression analyses to examine BIBM and (a) lifetime alcohol use, (b) current alcohol use, and (c) current heavy episodic drinking (≥5 drinks in a few hours) among female high school students (N = 6,579). A total of 37.5% of high school females screened positive for BIBM, and 67.7%, 32.9%, and 17.8% reported lifetime alcohol use, current alcohol use, and heavy episodic drinking, respectively. In the final model, controlling for demographics, reporting a BIBM was associated with a 1.29 (95% CI [1.10, 1.51], p = .002) greater odds of lifetime alcohol use compared with those who did not; however, reporting BIBM was not significantly associated with current alcohol use. BIBM was also associated with a 1.22 (95% CI [1.02, 1.47], p = .03) greater odds of heavy episodic drinking compared with those without BIBM. The phenomenon of BIBM was associated with lifetime and heavy episodic drinking, but not current alcohol use, indicating that timing of alcohol use and onset of BIBM may be related. Potential explanations include shared underlying risk factors and using alcohol excessively as a coping mechanism, weight-gain strategy, or weight-loss strategy.

  13. Relationship between Controlled Attenuation Parameter and Hepatic Steatosis as Assessed by Ultrasound in Alcoholic or Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jem Ma; Paik, Yong-Han; Min, Sin Yeong; Cho, Ju Yeon; Sohn, Won; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and hepatic steatosis, as assessed by ultrasound (US) in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Methods Patients with either ALD or NAFLD who were diagnosed with fatty liver with US and whose CAP scores were measured, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. The degree of hepatic steatosis assessed by US was categorized in...

  14. Quality of life and risk of psychiatric disorders among regular users of alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis: An analysis of the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cougle, Jesse R; Hakes, Jahn K; Macatee, Richard J; Chavarria, Jesus; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Research is limited on the effects of regular substance use on mental health-related outcomes. We used a large nationally representative survey to examine current and future quality of life and risk of psychiatric disorders among past-year regular (weekly) users of alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis. Data on psychiatric disorders and quality of life from two waves (Wave 1 N = 43,093, Wave 2 N = 34,653) of the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) were used to test study aims. In cross-sectional analyses, regular nicotine and cannabis use were associated with higher rates of psychiatric disorder, though regular alcohol use was associated with lower rates of disorders. Prospective analyses found that regular nicotine use predicted onset of anxiety, depressive, and bipolar disorders. Regular alcohol use predicted lower risk of these disorders. Regular cannabis use uniquely predicted the development of bipolar disorder, panic disorder with agoraphobia, and social phobia. Lastly, regular alcohol use predicted improvements in physical and mental health-related quality of life, whereas nicotine predicted deterioration in these outcomes. Regular cannabis use predicted declines in mental, but not physical health. These data add to the literature on the relations between substance use and mental and physical health and suggest increased risk of mental health problems among regular nicotine and cannabis users and better mental and physical health among regular alcohol users. Examination of mechanisms underlying these relationships is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that ... more alcohol to feel the same effect With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still ...

  16. Disclosure and Exposure of Alcohol on Social Media and Later Alcohol Use: A Large-Scale Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eilin K. Erevik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to investigate whether alcohol-related disclosure and exposure on social media can predict later alcohol use, and to identify covariates in these relationships. Data were collected by online surveys (two waves among students in Bergen, Norway. The first survey was administered in fall 2015. The follow-up took place during fall 2016. A total of 5,217 students participated in both waves. The surveys included questions about demographics, personality, alcohol use, alcohol-related cognitions (e.g., attitudes and norms, social media use, and disclosure and exposure of alcohol on social media. Bivariate comparisons were conducted to assess differences in alcohol use between the frequent (i.e., monthly or more often disclosure and exposure groups and low-frequent disclosure and exposure groups. Crude and adjusted linear regressions were employed to investigate if disclosure and exposure of alcohol could predict later alcohol use, when controlling for a range of covariates. Compared to the low-frequent disclosure and exposure groups, participants which frequently disclosed or were frequently exposed to alcohol-related content had higher alcohol use at baseline and 1 year later (p < 0.001, when no covariates were controlled for. Frequent disclosure of content reflecting positive aspects of alcohol predicted stable or slightly increased alcohol use at Time 2 (p < 0.01, even when all covariates (i.e., demographics, personality, alcohol use, alcohol-related cognitions, and social media use were controlled for. In conclusion, frequent disclosure and/or exposure to alcohol-related content predicted alcohol use over time. Alcohol disclosure/exposure on social media could for the most part not predict later alcohol use when baseline alcohol use was controlled for. High alcohol use and alcohol disclosure/exposure on social media appear to be strongly intertwined, which hampers identification of directionality between alcohol use and disclosure

  17. Disclosure and Exposure of Alcohol on Social Media and Later Alcohol Use: A Large-Scale Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erevik, Eilin K.; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Andreassen, Cecilie S.; Vedaa, Øystein; Pallesen, Ståle

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to investigate whether alcohol-related disclosure and exposure on social media can predict later alcohol use, and to identify covariates in these relationships. Data were collected by online surveys (two waves) among students in Bergen, Norway. The first survey was administered in fall 2015. The follow-up took place during fall 2016. A total of 5,217 students participated in both waves. The surveys included questions about demographics, personality, alcohol use, alcohol-related cognitions (e.g., attitudes and norms), social media use, and disclosure and exposure of alcohol on social media. Bivariate comparisons were conducted to assess differences in alcohol use between the frequent (i.e., monthly or more often) disclosure and exposure groups and low-frequent disclosure and exposure groups. Crude and adjusted linear regressions were employed to investigate if disclosure and exposure of alcohol could predict later alcohol use, when controlling for a range of covariates. Compared to the low-frequent disclosure and exposure groups, participants which frequently disclosed or were frequently exposed to alcohol-related content had higher alcohol use at baseline and 1 year later (p alcohol predicted stable or slightly increased alcohol use at Time 2 (p alcohol use, alcohol-related cognitions, and social media use) were controlled for. In conclusion, frequent disclosure and/or exposure to alcohol-related content predicted alcohol use over time. Alcohol disclosure/exposure on social media could for the most part not predict later alcohol use when baseline alcohol use was controlled for. High alcohol use and alcohol disclosure/exposure on social media appear to be strongly intertwined, which hampers identification of directionality between alcohol use and disclosure/exposure. Disclosing content reflecting positive aspects of alcohol was the only independent variable that could predict further alcohol use when other factors, like baseline alcohol use, were

  18. Education in Nephrology Fellowship: A Survey-Based Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rope, Robert W; Pivert, Kurtis A; Parker, Mark G; Sozio, Stephen M; Merell, Sylvia Bereknyei

    2017-07-01

    Educational needs assessments for nephrology fellowship training are limited. This study assessed fellows' perceptions of current educational needs and interest in novel modalities that may improve their educational experience and quantified educational resources used by programs and fellows. We distributed a seven-question electronic survey to all United States-based fellows receiving complimentary American Society of Nephrology (ASN) membership at the end of the 2015-2016 academic year in conjunction with the ASN Nephrology Fellows Survey. One third (320 of 863; 37%) of fellows in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited positions responded. Most respondents rated overall quality of teaching in fellowship as either "good" (37%) or "excellent" (44%), and most (55%) second-year fellows felt "fully prepared" for independent practice. Common educational resources used by fellows included UpToDate, Journal of the American Society of Nephrology/Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology , and Nephrology Self-Assessment Program ; others-including ASN's online curricula-were used less often. Fellows indicated interest in additional instruction in several core topics, including home dialysis modalities, ultrasonography, and pathology. Respondents strongly supported interventions to improve pathology instruction and increase time for physiology and clinical review. In conclusion, current nephrology fellows perceive several gaps in training. Innovation in education and training is needed to better prepare future nephrologists for the growing challenges of kidney care. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. Interrelationship between family history of alcoholism and generational status in the prediction of alcohol dependence in US Hispanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, K G; Thomas, N S; Kendler, K S

    2017-01-01

    Both a family history of alcoholism and migration-related factors like US v. foreign nativity increase the risk for developing alcohol use disorders in Hispanic Americans. For this study, we integrated these two lines of research to test whether the relationship between familial alcoholism and alcohol dependence changes with successive generations in the United States. Data were from the waves 1 and 2 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Subjects self-identified Hispanic ethnicity (N = 4122; n = 1784 first, n = 1169 second, and n = 1169 third or later generation) and reported ever consuming ⩾12 drinks in a 1-year period. A family history of alcoholism was assessed in first- and second-degree relatives. Analyses predicting the number of alcohol dependence symptoms were path models. Alcohol dependence symptoms were associated with a stronger family history of alcoholism and later generational status. There was a significant interaction effect between familial alcoholism and generational status; the relationship of familial alcoholism with alcohol dependence symptoms increased significantly with successive generations in the United States, more strongly in women than men. Acculturation partially mediated the interaction effect between familial alcoholism and generational status on alcohol dependence, although not in the expected direction. Familial alcoholism interacted with generational status in predicting alcohol dependence symptoms in US Hispanic drinkers. This relationship suggests that heritability for alcoholism is influenced by a higher-order environmental factor, likely characterized by a relaxing of social restrictions on drinking.

  20. Parental and offspring assessment of driving capability under the influence of drugs or alcohol: gender and inter-generational differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Tova; Beigel, Ariela; Perlman, Amotz; Eldror, Ehud

    2010-11-01

    The current study set to examine whether there are inter-generational and gender-based differences between family members self-assessing their ability to drive under normal conditions and while under the influence of either alcohol or drugs. Participants were 135 young-adults and both their parents, consisting 45 family triads, who received self-assessment questionnaires relating to their driving skills in various road scenarios. Each family triad was randomly assigned to one of three groups: either requested to base the assessments on normal driving conditions, or under the influence of either drugs or alcohol, thus forming a control group, and two experimental groups (alcohol and drugs), respectively. The findings indicate the assessments of both the alcohol and drugs groups were more severe than those of the control group. The alcohol group assessments were less strict than the drug group assessment (non-significantly). Inter-generational differences indicated that the parents' driving-skills assessments were lower than those of their offspring, corresponding with previous findings (Elkind, 1967; Finn and Bragg, 1986). A significant within-subject interaction has been found between the respondent's gender and familial relations regarding the self-assessment of driving skills: male respondents assessed better driving skills compared to the self estimates of both parents (which did not significantly differ). In contrast, female respondents' estimates did not differ from their fathers' and both fathers' and daughters' estimates were significantly higher than that of the mothers in each family. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Suicidal ideation among the United States drinking population: results from the National Longitudinal Alcohol Epidemiologic Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, B F; Hasin, D S

    1999-05-01

    Data from a national representative sample of adults was used to identify major risk factors of suicidal ideation among the U.S. drinking population. Data from a sample of 18,352 current drinkers, 18 years of age and older, were analyzed by means of multiple logistic regression analysis. In these analyses, multivariate associations were examined between risk factors for suicidal ideation and the occurrence of suicidal ideation. For men and women, past year major depression and alcohol dependence were identified as risk factors of suicidal ideation, with major depression having the more sizable impact. Suicidal ideation was increased among men with a past alcohol use disorder, and elevated among women who had used drugs nonmedically and developed a drug use disorder during the past year. The occurrence of a recent physical illness and lifetime treatment for major depression among men and women increased the risk of suicidal ideation, while marriage was protective against ideation for both sexes. Unemployment and having a family history of alcoholism increased the risk of suicidal ideation among men, but not women. Major findings are discussed in terms of the impact of severity versus chronicity of psychopathology on suicidal ideation, gender roles and differential engagement in suicidal ideation, and the recognition and treatment of major depression as the single most important intervention in reducing suicidal behavior.

  2. Alcohol Use Among Active Duty Women: Analysis AUDIT Scores From the 2011 Health-Related Behavior Survey of Active Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Diana D; Mattiko, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies document higher substance use among military men after deployment; similar studies focused on military women are limited. This study examines alcohol use of active duty women and deployment factors, social/environmental/attitudinal factors, and psychological/intrapersonal factors. Secondary data analysis of the 2011 Survey of Health-Related Behavior of active duty military personnel was conducted using bivariate statistics and multiple regression analyses with Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores as the dependent variable. Nearly 94% had low risk for alcohol use disorders. Length of combat experience and extent of combat exposure were unrelated to Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test scores; noncombat deployment was unrelated after controlling for marital status, age of first drink, pay grade, and branch of service. Significant motivators (p problems," and significant deterrents were "cost of alcohol" and "fear of upsetting family/friends if used alcohol." Anger propensity, risk propensity, lifetime prevalence of suicidal ideation, and depressed mood were significant predictors in the regression model after controlling for covariates. Findings suggest that some active duty women use alcohol to cope with adverse emotional states, whereas others use alcohol consistent with propensity for high-risk behaviors. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  3. Life course socioeconomic position, alcohol drinking patterns in midlife, and cardiovascular mortality: Analysis of Norwegian population-based health surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirik Degerud

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Socioeconomically disadvantaged groups tend to experience more harm from the same level of exposure to alcohol as advantaged groups. Alcohol has multiple biological effects on the cardiovascular system, both potentially harmful and protective. We investigated whether the diverging relationships between alcohol drinking patterns and cardiovascular disease (CVD mortality differed by life course socioeconomic position (SEP.From 3 cohorts (the Counties Studies, the Cohort of Norway, and the Age 40 Program, 1987-2003 containing data from population-based cardiovascular health surveys in Norway, we included participants with self-reported information on alcohol consumption frequency (n = 207,394 and binge drinking episodes (≥5 units per occasion, n = 32,616. We also used data from national registries obtained by linkage. Hazard ratio (HR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for CVD mortality was estimated using Cox models, including alcohol, life course SEP, age, gender, smoking, physical activity, body mass index (BMI, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, diabetes, history of CVD, and family history of coronary heart disease (CHD. Analyses were performed in the overall sample and stratified by high, middle, and low strata of life course SEP. A total of 8,435 CVD deaths occurred during the mean 17 years of follow-up. Compared to infrequent consumption (

  4. Life course socioeconomic position, alcohol drinking patterns in midlife, and cardiovascular mortality: Analysis of Norwegian population-based health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degerud, Eirik; Ariansen, Inger; Ystrom, Eivind; Graff-Iversen, Sidsel; Høiseth, Gudrun; Mørland, Jørg; Davey Smith, George; Næss, Øyvind

    2018-01-01

    Socioeconomically disadvantaged groups tend to experience more harm from the same level of exposure to alcohol as advantaged groups. Alcohol has multiple biological effects on the cardiovascular system, both potentially harmful and protective. We investigated whether the diverging relationships between alcohol drinking patterns and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality differed by life course socioeconomic position (SEP). From 3 cohorts (the Counties Studies, the Cohort of Norway, and the Age 40 Program, 1987-2003) containing data from population-based cardiovascular health surveys in Norway, we included participants with self-reported information on alcohol consumption frequency (n = 207,394) and binge drinking episodes (≥5 units per occasion, n = 32,616). We also used data from national registries obtained by linkage. Hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for CVD mortality was estimated using Cox models, including alcohol, life course SEP, age, gender, smoking, physical activity, body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, diabetes, history of CVD, and family history of coronary heart disease (CHD). Analyses were performed in the overall sample and stratified by high, middle, and low strata of life course SEP. A total of 8,435 CVD deaths occurred during the mean 17 years of follow-up. Compared to infrequent consumption (

  5. SWFSC/MMTD/PI: Hawaiian Islands Cetacean and Ecosystem Assessment Survey (HICEAS) 2002, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Hawaiian Islands Cetacean and Ecosystem Assessment Survey, called HICEAS, is a marine mammal assessment survey of the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of Hawaiian...

  6. ‘The missing drink’: Nonresponse and data quality in mail surveys on alcohol consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M.H.C.J. Lahaut

    2006-01-01

    textabstractSurvey research is often used by Dutch authorities and community health services to gain insight in the population’s general health situation. In survey research a random sample of the population is requested to answer a questionnaire, often sent by post. This kind of research is a

  7. The impact of alcohol consumption on patterns of union formation in Russia 1998–2010: An assessment using longitudinal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Katherine; Kenward, Michael G.; Grundy, Emily; Leon, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, 1998–2010, we investigated the extent to which patterns of alcohol consumption in Russia are associated with the subsequent likelihood of entry into cohabitation and marriage. Using discrete-time event history analysis we estimated for 16–50 year olds the extent to which the probabilities of entry into the two types of union were affected by the amount of alcohol drunk and the pattern of drinking, adjusted to allow for social and demographic factors including income, employment, and health. The results show that individuals who did not drink alcohol were less likely to embark on either cohabitation or marriage, that frequent consumption of alcohol was associated with a greater chance of entering unmarried cohabitation than of entering into a marriage, and that heavy drinkers were less likely to convert their relationship from cohabitation to marriage. PMID:25320843

  8. The impact of alcohol consumption on patterns of union formation in Russia 1998-2010: an assessment using longitudinal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Katherine; Kenward, Michael G; Grundy, Emily; Leon, David A

    2014-01-01

    Using data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey, 1998-2010, we investigated the extent to which patterns of alcohol consumption in Russia are associated with the subsequent likelihood of entry into cohabitation and marriage. Using discrete-time event history analysis we estimated for 16-50 year olds the extent to which the probabilities of entry into the two types of union were affected by the amount of alcohol drunk and the pattern of drinking, adjusted to allow for social and demographic factors including income, employment, and health. The results show that individuals who did not drink alcohol were less likely to embark on either cohabitation or marriage, that frequent consumption of alcohol was associated with a greater chance of entering unmarried cohabitation than of entering into a marriage, and that heavy drinkers were less likely to convert their relationship from cohabitation to marriage.

  9. Preventing Alcohol Abuse Through Social Networking Sites: A First Assessment of a Two-Year Ecological Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaudias, Valentin; de Chazeron, Ingrid; Zerhouni, Oulmann; Boudesseul, Jordane; Begue, Laurent; Bouthier, Renaud; Lévrier, Christel; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Brousse, Georges

    2015-12-10

    Prevention strategies to reduce alcohol use/consumption among young people are crucial to reducing alcohol-related deaths and preventing disease. This paper focuses on the effectiveness of a social networking site (SNS) alcohol prevention program targeted toward young people. We hypothesized that the program would diminish the relation made by participants between alcohol and festive moments, and would result in a reduction of their declared consumption of alcohol at festive moments during the program. We also explored the interaction with the prevention program that was the most efficient. The prevention program took the form of 3 lotteries over 2 years. The participants periodically received prevention messages, particularly on alcohol and festive moments (eg, videos on Facebook and short message service [SMS] text messages on their mobile phones). For the 3 periods, the participants had to answer questions exploring the level of their belief that alcohol consumption and festive moments are highly associated. A control group that did not participate in the prevention program was asked the same questions over the same number of days for the first 2 periods. During the second period, the participants were asked to answer questions about their alcohol consumption during parties. During the third period, we explored the interaction with the prevention program on the reduction of their belief that alcohol consumption and festive moments are associated. A total of 651 participants (age: mean 22.24, SD 4.10 years; women: n=430) during the first period, 301 participants (age: mean 21.27, SD 3.07 years; women n=199) during the second period, and 305 (age: mean 22.41, SD 4.65 years; women: n=190) during the third period correctly completed the survey. For the control group, 69 students completed the survey during the first period (age: mean 18.93, SD 1.14 years; women: n=59) and 50 during the second (age: mean 20.78, SD 1.94 years; women: n=45). We observed a significant

  10. Association Between Alcohol-Impaired Driving Enforcement-Related Strategies and Alcohol-Impaired Driving

    OpenAIRE

    Sanem, Julia R.; Erickson, Darin J.; Rutledge, Patricia C.; Lenk, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Toben F.; Jones-Webb, Rhonda; Toomey, Traci L.

    2015-01-01

    All states in the U.S. prohibit alcohol-impaired driving but active law enforcement is necessary for effectively reducing this behavior. Sobriety checkpoints, saturation patrols, open container laws, and media campaigns related to enforcement efforts are all enforcement-related strategies for reducing alcohol-impaired driving. We conducted surveys of all state patrol agencies and a representative sample of local law enforcement agencies to assess their use of alcohol-impaired driving enforcem...

  11. Assessment of the effectiveness of yoga therapy as an adjunct in patients with alcohol dependence syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipesh Bhagabati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Substance use disorders, alcohol use in particular, are among the leading disorders in psychiatry in terms of prevalence. They put a lot of burden on health as well as family, society, and economic status of the patient. What more challenging is that such patients often suffer from comorbid anxiety and depression, which has the potential to perpetuate the alcohol use. Yoga is an alternative and complementary therapy which is widely practiced by people in India. However, its effectiveness in alcohol use disorders is not tested systematically. Aims and objectives: To study the effectiveness of yoga as an adjunctive therapy in patients of alcohol use disorders and to evaluate its ability to reduce comorbid depression, anxiety, and craving. Materials and methods: Hundred patients of alcohol use disorders as per the tenth revision of the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10 were selected and were divided into two groups each containing 50 patients. The case group received structured yoga session in addition to standard pharmacotherapy while the control group received only pharmacotherapy. Assessment of depression (Hamilton depression rating scale [HAM-D], anxiety (Hamilton anxiety rating scale [HAM-A], and craving (Obsessive-compulsive drinking scale [OCDS] was done at baseline, two weeks, and at one month. Results were compared between the two groups and statistical analysis was done. Results: Both the case and control groups were similar in HAM-D (p=0.9634, HAM-A (p=0.7744, and OCDS (p= 0.8626 scores at baseline. There was significant reduction in HAM-A score at one month (p=0.0091, and OCDS score at two weeks (p=0.0428 and one month (p<0.0001 respectively in yoga group as compared to control group. Within case group, only reduction in HAM-A (p<0.001 and p<0.01 and OCDS (p<0.0001 and p<0.0001 scores were progressively better statistically at two weeks and one month while reduction in HAM-D score

  12. The Big Drink Debate: perceptions of the impact of price on alcohol consumption from a large scale cross-sectional convenience survey in north west England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Penny A; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A; Morleo, Michela; Harkins, Corinne; Briant, Linford; Bellis, Mark A

    2011-08-23

    A large-scale survey was conducted in 2008 in north west England, a region with high levels of alcohol-related harm, during a regional 'Big Drink Debate' campaign. The aim of this paper is to explore perceptions of how alcohol consumption would change if alcohol prices were to increase or decrease. A convenience survey of residents (≥ 18 years) of north west England measured demographics, income, alcohol consumption in previous week, and opinions on drinking behaviour under two pricing conditions: low prices and discounts and increased alcohol prices (either 'decrease', 'no change' or 'increase'). Multinomial logistic regression used three outcomes: 'completely elastic' (consider that lower prices increase drinking and higher prices decrease drinking); 'lower price elastic' (lower prices increase drinking, higher prices have no effect); and 'price inelastic' (no change for either). Of 22,780 drinkers surveyed, 80.3% considered lower alcohol prices and discounts would increase alcohol consumption, while 22.1% thought raising prices would decrease consumption, making lower price elasticity only (i.e. lower prices increase drinking, higher prices have no effect) the most common outcome (62%). Compared to a high income/high drinking category, the lightest drinkers with a low income (adjusted odds ratio AOR = 1.78, 95% confidence intervals CI 1.38-2.30) or medium income (AOR = 1.88, CI 1.47-2.41) were most likely to be lower price elastic. Females were more likely than males to be lower price elastic (65% vs 57%) while the reverse was true for complete elasticity (20% vs 26%, P alcohol consumption, and the alcohol industry's continued focus on discounting sales encourages higher drinking levels. International evidence suggests increasing the price of alcohol reduces consumption, and one in five of the surveyed population agreed; more work is required to increase this agreement to achieve public support for policy change. Such policy should also recognise that alcohol

  13. The Big Drink Debate: perceptions of the impact of price on alcohol consumption from a large scale cross-sectional convenience survey in north west England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Briant Linford

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large-scale survey was conducted in 2008 in north west England, a region with high levels of alcohol-related harm, during a regional 'Big Drink Debate' campaign. The aim of this paper is to explore perceptions of how alcohol consumption would change if alcohol prices were to increase or decrease. Methods A convenience survey of residents (≥ 18 years of north west England measured demographics, income, alcohol consumption in previous week, and opinions on drinking behaviour under two pricing conditions: low prices and discounts and increased alcohol prices (either 'decrease', 'no change' or 'increase'. Multinomial logistic regression used three outcomes: 'completely elastic' (consider that lower prices increase drinking and higher prices decrease drinking; 'lower price elastic' (lower prices increase drinking, higher prices have no effect; and 'price inelastic' (no change for either. Results Of 22,780 drinkers surveyed, 80.3% considered lower alcohol prices and discounts would increase alcohol consumption, while 22.1% thought raising prices would decrease consumption, making lower price elasticity only (i.e. lower prices increase drinking, higher prices have no effect the most common outcome (62%. Compared to a high income/high drinking category, the lightest drinkers with a low income (adjusted odds ratio AOR = 1.78, 95% confidence intervals CI 1.38-2.30 or medium income (AOR = 1.88, CI 1.47-2.41 were most likely to be lower price elastic. Females were more likely than males to be lower price elastic (65% vs 57% while the reverse was true for complete elasticity (20% vs 26%, P Conclusions Lower pricing increases alcohol consumption, and the alcohol industry's continued focus on discounting sales encourages higher drinking levels. International evidence suggests increasing the price of alcohol reduces consumption, and one in five of the surveyed population agreed; more work is required to increase this agreement to achieve

  14. Awareness of legal blood alcohol concentration limits amongst respondents of a national roadside survey for alcohol and traffic behaviours in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Conceição, Tatiana Valverde; De Boni, Raquel; Duarte, Paulina do Carmo Arruda Vieira; Pechansky, Flávio

    2012-03-01

    In Brazil the legal blood alcohol content (BAC) allowed for driving was changed to zero in 2008. If the BAC found is above 0.6g/L, drivers may be arrested. However, there are limited data on drivers' awareness of such limits. Drivers from 27 major metropolitan areas (n=3397) were randomly asked to participate in roadside survey from 12 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. They were breathalized by highway patrol officers, and after consent interviewers collected data on drinking behaviours, knowledge about the law, and breath tests results. The mean age was 37.3±11.3 years; 94.3% were male and 26.5% had some college education. When asked about the BAC that could result in arrest, 34.5% of the subjects claimed to know it. However, only 23.5% (8.1% of the total sample) provided correct answers. Factors associated with the right answers were: male gender (p=0.04; OR=2.08; CI=1.01-4.27); higher education (pAge was not statistically different between groups. After multivariate analysis, male gender (p=0.002), higher education (pdrink and drive. Educational programmes targeted at those specific groups may be necessary in order to increase awareness about the legal BAC limit and its consequences. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current “gold standard” for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence. PMID:26494961

  16. [An intercept survey on the status of driving after alcohol drinking among motor vehicle drivers in 6 counties of Zhejiang, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Xin-wei; Song, Xiao-chun; Bao, Ping; Zhou, Peng; Zou, Yun

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the status of driving after drinking alcohol among motor vehicle drivers and to provide evidence for the development of specific interventions. A 7-day intercept survey on driving after alcohol drinking, having drinking habit or driving after getting drunk, among motor vehicle drivers, was conducted in 6 counties of Zhejiang province, 2010. 16 467 motor vehicle drivers were included in the survey. Rates of driving after drinking alcohol [blood alcohol concentration (BAC) > 0 mg/100 ml], having habit of drinking alcohol (20 mg/100 ml ≤ BAC driving after being drunk (BAC ≥ 80 mg/100 ml), were 1.82%, 1.03% and 0.27% respectively. Rates of driving after drinking alcohol, having habit of drink alcohol and driving and drunk-driving among the drivers from urban areas were significantly higher than those of drivers from rural areas, and those rates of male drivers were significantly higher than female drivers as well. 60.20% of drivers after drinking alcohol, were 35 to 49 year-olds, and the three above said rates all increased along with age. The highest above said three rates were observed at 23:00 PM and 1:00 AM. Compared with other motor vehicle drivers, motorcyclists possessed the highest rates of the three items, as 9.27%, 5.01% and 1.57% respectively. Driving after drinking alcohol among motor vehicle drivers still prevailed in Zhejiang, especially between 23:00 PM and 1:00 AM. Drivers from the cities, being male or motorcyclists were among the high-risk populations that called for special attention to be paid in the future, including law enforcement and health promotion to fight against the problem.

  17. Alcohol industry sponsorship and alcohol-related harms in Australian university sportspeople/athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kerry S; Lynott, Dermot; Miller, Peter G

    2013-05-01

    Although there is evidence that alcohol sponsorship in sport is related to greater drinking, there is no empirical research on whether alcohol sponsorship is associated with alcohol-related harms. We examined whether there is an association between receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship, and attendance at alcohol sponsor's drinking establishments (e.g. bars), and alcohol-related aggression and antisocial behaviour in university students who play sport. University sportspeople (n = 652) completed surveys (response rate >80%) assessing receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship, attendance at sponsor's establishments and confounders [i.e. age, gender, sport type, location and alcohol consumption measured by Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test--alcohol consumption (AUDIT-C) scores]. Participants also completed measures assessing displays and receipt of aggressive and antisocial behaviours (e.g. assaults, unwanted sexual advance, vandalism). Logistic regression models including confounders and reported attendance at alcohol sponsor's establishments showed that sportspeople receiving alcohol industry sponsorship were more likely to have been the victim of aggression (adjusted odds ratio 2.62, 95% confidence interval 1.22-5.64). Attending an alcohol sponsor's establishment was not associated with higher rates of other aggressive or antisocial behaviour. However, significant associations where found between AUDIT-C scores and having displayed and received aggression, and having damaged or had property damaged. Male sportspeople were more likely to have displayed and received aggressive and antisocial behaviour. Higher AUDIT-C scores, gender and receipt of alcohol industry sponsorship were associated with alcohol-related aggression/antisocial behaviours in university sportspeople. Sport administrators should consider action to reduce the harms associated with excessive alcohol consumption and alcohol industry sponsorship in sport. © 2012 Australasian Professional

  18. What Campuses Assess When They Assess Their Learning Community Programs: Selected Findings from a National Survey of Learning Community Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardner, Emily

    2014-01-01

    In spring 2013, the Washington Center administered a national survey to find what campuses assessed when they assessed their learning community programs, how they assessed those outcomes, and what they did with the results. Sixty-six campuses responded to the survey. Most campuses assess at least one measure of student success (pass rates, course…

  19. The role of caffeine in the alcohol consumption behaviors of college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Caroline O; Nasim, Aashir; Jentink, Kade; Blank, Melissa D

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that alcohol mixed with caffeine in any form may spur risky drinking behavior among young adults; however, most studies have only examined drinking behavior related to alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmEDs) compared with alcohol alone. This survey assessed the consumption patterns and reasons for use of alcohol mixed with any caffeinated beverages (alcohol-caffeine) versus alcohol-only beverages among current users. Students (N = 1174) at a large, urban university completed a Web-based survey in October-December of 2010. Predictors of alcohol-caffeine use versus alcohol-only use were examined, as were drinking characteristics and reasons for alcohol-caffeine consumption as a function of type of alcohol-caffeine beverage usually consumed. Past-30-day prevalence was 34% for any alcohol-caffeine beverages and 36% for alcohol-only. The most frequent alcohol-caffeine beverages usually consumed were manufactured ready-to-drink AmED products (no longer sold in the United States; 50.3%), followed by self-mixed alcoholic beverages containing caffeinated sodas (26.4%) and energy drinks (18.5%). Users of alcohol-caffeine displayed a riskier drinking profile than alcohol-only users; however, there were few differences in overall alcohol drinking behaviors between consumers of AmEDs (manufactured or self-mixed) versus other caffeinated alcoholic beverages (e.g., alcohol mixed with caffeinated sodas). Although alcohol-caffeine consumption was associated with heavier drinking characteristics compared with alcohol-only consumption, overall alcohol consumption patterns were similar between users of various alcohol-caffeine combinations. Future examinations should assess alcohol in combination with a variety of caffeine sources to determine whether energy drinks present a unique risk.

  20. A synthesis of mathematics writing: Assessments, interventions, and surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R. Powell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics standards in the United States describe communication as an essential part of mathematics. One outlet for communication is writing. To understand the mathematics writing of students, we conducted a synthesis to evaluate empirical research about mathematics writing. We identified 29 studies that included a mathematics-writing assessment, intervention, or survey for students in 1st through 12th grade. All studies were published between 1991 and 2015. The majority of assessments required students to write explanations to mathematical problems, and fewer than half scored student responses according to a rubric. Approximately half of the interventions involved the use of mathematics journals as an outlet for mathematics writing. Few intervention studies provided explicit direction on how to write in mathematics, and a small number of investigations provided statistical evidence of intervention efficacy. From the surveys, the majority of students expressed enjoyment when writing in mathematics settings but teachers reported using mathematics writing rarely. Across studies, findings indicate mathematics writing is used for a variety of purposes, but the quality of the studies is variable and more empirical research is needed.

  1. Survey of attitudes and behaviors toward alcohol and other drug use in allied health and physician assistant students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Jeffrey N; Davis-Hall, R Ellen; DeSimone, Edward M; Scott, David M; Agrawal, Sangeeta; Reardon, Thomas P

    2008-01-01

    Attitudes and behaviors toward alcohol and other drug (AOD) use were assessed among a subgroup of allied health (AH) and physician assistant (PA) students within two university-based health professions educational institutions in a midwestern state in 1999. AH/PA student response was 423 (77.5%); this included occupational therapy (n = 81; 60.4%), physical therapy [PT] (n = 222; 98.7%), PA (n = 68; 85.0%), and other AH programs (n = 52; 48.1%). In this AH/PA group, a family history of alcohol-related problems was reported by 40.1% and drug-related problems by 11.3%, with 42.5% of respondents reporting one or both. Such histories of family alcohol and drug problems were reported by 47.8% or 18.5% of PA students, respectively. Past-year alcohol, tobacco, and marijuana use were reported, respectively, by 88.1%, 26.1%, and 6.7%. The highest percentage use of marijuana was reported by PT students (9.0%). Past-year blackouts were reported by 21.9%, driving after three or more drinks or any drug use by 49.3%, attendance at class or work under the influence of AOD by 7.8%, patient care under the influence of AOD by 3.3%, lowered grades or job evaluations from AOD use by 5.0%, and AOD-related legal charges by 4.5%. "Heavy drinking" (defined as consumption of five or more drinks per occasion during the past 2 weeks) was reported by 33.2%. Inadequate AOD education was reported by 55.1%, with 63.6% of PT respondents so reporting. AH and PA educational systems should proactively address student AOD prevention, education, and assistance needs.

  2. Historical overview of diet assessment and food consumption surveys in Spain: assessment methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morán Fagúndez, Luis Juan; Rivera Torres, Alejandra; González Sánchez, María Eugenia; de Torres Aured, Mari Lourdes; López-Pardo Martínez, Mercedes; Irles Rocamora, José Antonio

    2015-02-26

    The food consumption assessment methods are used in nutrition and health population surveys and are the basis for the development of guidelines, nutritional recommendations and health plans, The study of these issues is one of the major tasks of the research and health policy in developed countries. Major advances nationally in this area have been made since 1940, both in the reliability of the data and in the standardization of studies, which is a necessary condition to compare changes over time. In this article the history and application of different dietary surveys, dietary history and food frequency records are analyzed. Besides information from surveys conducted at a national level, the main data currently available for public health planning in nutrition comes from nutritional analysis of household budget surveys and food balance sheets, based on data provided by the Ministry of Agriculture. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2015. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. Gender differences in response to emotional stress: an assessment across subjective, behavioral, and physiological domains and relations to alcohol craving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Tara M; Hong, Kwangik; Bergquist, Keri; Sinha, Rajita

    2008-07-01

    Women and men are at risk for different types of stress-related disorders, with women at greater risk for depression and anxiety and men at greater risk for alcohol-use disorders. The present study examines gender differences in emotional and alcohol craving responses to stress that may relate to this gender divergence in disorders. Healthy adult social drinkers (27 men, 27 women) were exposed to individually developed and calibrated stressful, alcohol-related, and neutral-relaxing imagery, 1 imagery per session, on separate days and in random order. Subjective emotions, behavioral/bodily responses, cardiovascular arousal [heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP)], and self-reported alcohol craving were assessed. Women reported and displayed greater sadness and anxiety following stress than men and men had greater diastolic BP response than women. No gender differences in alcohol craving, systolic BP or HR were observed. Subjective, behavioral, and cardiovascular measures were correlated in both genders. However, for men, but not women, alcohol craving was associated with greater subjective emotion and behavioral arousal following stress and alcohol cues. These data suggest that men and women respond to stress differently, with women experiencing greater sadness and anxiety, while men show a greater integration of reward motivation (craving) and emotional stress systems. These findings have implications for the gender-related divergence in vulnerability for stress-related disorders, with women at greater risk for anxiety and depression than men, and men at greater risk for alcohol-use disorders than women.

  4. A cross-national examination of differences in classification of lifetime alcohol use disorder between DSM-IV and DSM-5: Findings from the World Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Tim; Chiu, Wai-Tat; Glantz, Meyer; Kessler, Ronald C.; Lago, Luise; Sampson, Nancy; Al-Hamzawi, Ali; Florescu, Silvia; Moskalewicz, Jacek; Murphy, Sam; Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; de Galvis, Yolanda Torres; Viana, Maria Carmen; Xavier, Miguel; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    Aims To examine the diagnostic overlap in DSM-IV and DSM-5 alcohol use disorder (AUD) and determine the clinical correlates of changing diagnostic status across the two classification systems. Design DSM-IV and DSM-5 definitions of AUD were compared using cross-national community survey data. Setting Nine low-, middle- and high-income countries. Participants/Cases 31,367 respondents to surveys in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Survey Initiative. Measures Composite International Diagnostic Interview, version 3.0 was used to derive DSM-IV and DSM-5 lifetime diagnoses of AUD. Clinical characteristics, also assessed in the surveys, included lifetime DSM-IV anxiety, mood and drug use disorders, lifetime suicidal ideation, plan and attempt, general functional impairment and psychological distress. Findings Compared to DSM-IV AUD (12.3%, SE=0.3%), the DSM-5 definition yielded slightly lower prevalence estimates (10.8%, SE=0.2%). Almost one third (n=802) of all DSM-IV Abuse cases switched to sub-threshold according to DSM-5 and one quarter (n=467) of all DSM-IV diagnostic orphans switched to mild AUD according to DSM-5. New cases of DSM-5 AUD were largely similar to those who maintained their AUD across both classifications. Similarly, new DSM-5 non-cases were similar to those who were sub-threshold across both classifications. The exception to this was with regards to the prevalence of any lifetime drug use disorder. Conclusions In this large cross-national community sample, the prevalence of DSM-5 lifetime AUD was only slightly lower than the prevalence of DSM-IV lifetime AUD. Nonetheless there was considerable diagnostic switching, with a large number of people inconsistently identified across the two DSM classifications. PMID:27426631

  5. Intervention recommendations and subsequent access to services following clinical assessment for fetal alcohol spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jacqueline; Baugh, Lauren; Andrew, Gail; Rasmussen, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) experience multiple difficulties requiring various interventions. Researchers have called for investigation into service use with respect to clinically recommended interventions. To examine intervention recommendations for children with FASD/PAE and subsequent access to these recommended interventions. Intervention recommendations following FASD assessment were examined for children (1-17 years). Recommendations were compared according to diagnostic status and demographic and environmental variables. Subsequent access to several interventions was examined for 45 participants. A variety of recommendations were given. Children with FASD received more recommendations overall and received more education, anticipatory guidance, family support, and safety recommendations than undiagnosed children with PAE. Undiagnosed children received more mental health and reassessment recommendations. Older children received fewer family support and developmental therapy recommendations but more mental health recommendations than younger age groups. Many families accessed modified school programming, developmental therapy, psychiatry, child counseling, and parent support as recommended. Children with FASD and PAE have extensive needs and should receive individualized recommendations. An assessment is valuable even without an FASD diagnosis. Areas of high/low service access may provide insight into accessibility and perceived importance of interventions. This study responds to important research questions regarding the intervention needs of individuals with FASD. It is novel in its exploration of intervention recommendations given to children prenatally exposed to alcohol without an FASD diagnosis (rather than only children with FASD) and in its examination of post-assessment service use patterns specifically in relation to clinical recommendations. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier

  6. Alcohol consumption and household expenditure on alcohol in a rural district in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giang, Kim Bao; Van Minh, Hoang; Allebeck, Peter

    2013-01-28

    Alcohol use and alcohol-related problems are on the rise in low- and middle-income countries. Expenditure on alcohol is an important problem for families and communities and needs to be assessed. This study examines level of alcohol consumption and expenditure on alcohol in a district in Vietnam. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a rural district in northern Vietnam. Multi-stage sampling was employed to randomly select participants from 20 communities and a town in the same district. One thousand five hundred and sixty-four adults (765 males and 799 females) aged 18-60 years were interviewed. Information about alcohol use as well as expenditure on alcohol consumption four weeks prior to the interview was gathered. Non-parametric tests and log-linear regression were employed to compare expenditure on alcohol consumption across socioeconomic groups. The prevalence of alcohol use one month prior to interview was 35% (66% among men and 5% among women). The median alcohol consumption among those who reported use of alcohol in the week prior to the interview was 7.9 standard drinks. Excessive drinking (more than 14 standard drinks per week for men and more than seven standard drinks per week for women) occurred among 35% of those who used alcohol. Median expenditure for alcohol consumption during one month by those who drank alcohol was USD 3.5, accounting for 4.6% of household food expenditure, 2.7% of total household expenditure, and 1.8% of household income. The differences in alcohol consumption and expenditure between sexes and between socioeconomic groups are also presented. Our study confirms that alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems are common among men in Vietnam. The share of alcohol expenditure in total household expenditure is substantial, especially among poor households. This should be considered an important public health issue, which needs to be taken into account in the alcohol policy debate.

  7. Alcohol drinking patterns in young people: A survey-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinotti, Giovanni; Lupi, Matteo; Carlucci, Leonardo; Santacroce, Rita; Cinosi, Eduardo; Acciavatti, Tiziano; Sarchione, Fabiola; Verrastro, Valeria; Diotaiuti, Pierluigi; Petruccelli, Irene; Ferrari, Silvia; Nanni, Maria G; Pinna, Federica; Volpe, Umberto; Saggino, Aristide; Janiri, Luigi; Leggio, Lorenzo; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2017-12-01

    Binge drinking represents a major clinical and public health concern. Here, we investigated the prevalence of binge drinking and its related consequences, in a population of young adults. A questionnaire was administered to a sample of 4275 healthy subjects. In the overall sample, the percentage of binge drinkers was 67.6 per cent; among regular alcohol users, 79.5 per cent reported episodes of binge drinking. Among binge drinkers, several serious consequences were identified (staggering and stuttering, amnesia, loss of control, aggressiveness, sexual disinhibition). Raising awareness about the seriousness of binge drinking may help health care providers to identify cases early on and provide appropriate treatments.

  8. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    Lydia de Haan,1 Hein A de Haan,2,3 Berend Olivier,1 Joris C Verster11Utrecht University, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Tactus Addiction Treatment, Deventer, The Netherlands; 3Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Ne...

  9. CTD data - Pre-recruit surveys to aid stock assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Annual surveys of juvenile fish and ecosystem status have been conducted since 2011 surveying the entire coast of Oregon and southern Washington. Trawl surveys are...

  10. Assessing Whether Religious Behaviors and Positive and Negative Affect are Associated with Alcohol Use and Abuse Among a Sample of College Students Living in the Midwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, Chakema C; Lewis, Rhonda K

    2016-06-01

    Alcohol use and abuse are a problem on college campuses. Religious behaviors (religious attendance, prayer, and importance) have been shown to be a protective factor against alcohol use among college students. This study examined the role religious behaviors and positive and negative affect had on drinking (alcohol use and alcohol to intoxication). College students (765) completed an online survey. The results showed that college students who attended religious services were less likely to use alcohol than those who did not attend religious services. The results have important implications for college administrators and policy makers. Limitations and future research will be discussed.

  11. Screening, testing, and reporting for drug and alcohol use on labor and delivery: a survey of Maryland birthing hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Catherine; Lanham, Amy; Welsh, Christopher; Ramanadhan, Shaalini; Terplan, Mishka

    2014-01-01

    Recent amendments to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act tie the receipt of federal block grants to mandatory reporting of substance-exposed newborns. To determine rates of screening, testing, and reporting of drug and alcohol use at the time of delivery, we administered a telephone survey of nursing managers and perinatal social workers at Maryland birthing hospitals. Of the 34 hospitals, 31 responded (response rate 91%). Although 97% of hospitals reported universal screening, only 6% used a validated instrument. Testing was reported by 94% with 45% reporting universal maternal testing and 7% universal newborn testing. Only 32% reported obtaining maternal consent prior to testing. There is significant heterogeneity in screening and testing for substance use in birthing hospitals. Given federal reporting mandates, state-level practices need to be standardized.

  12. Comorbidity of social anxiety disorder and antisocial personality disorder in the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Todd; Heimberg, Richard G; Wang, Shuai; Schneier, Franklin R; Blanco, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are not often thought of as being comorbid. However, recent research suggests the existence of a SAD subtype with characteristics atypical of SAD but common to ASPD. Thus, we explored two competing hypotheses: (1) SAD and ASPD represent opposite ends of a single dimension, or (2) SAD and ASPD exist on two separate dimensions that may be positively correlated. Data were obtained from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. SAD-ASPD was related to greater impairment and psychiatric comorbidity than either disorder alone. The SAD-ASPD group was also more likely to seek treatment for their SAD symptoms and to drink before/during antisocial acts than the SAD only group. The presence of SAD for individuals with ASPD (and vice versa) does not appear to provide any "protective benefits." SAD and ASPD appear to be two separate but correlated disorders. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comparison of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) in General Population Surveys in nine European Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloomfield, Kim; Knibbe, Ronald; Derickx, Mieke

    2006-01-01

    Aims: This study explored the suitability of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT) for cross-national comparable estimates of problem drinking in general populations. On the item level the focus is on responsiveness to cross-national and gender differences. For the set of items...... the focus is on intercorrelations between items, indicating to what extent the AUDIT constitutes a scale. Methods: General population surveys from nine European countries were included. Cross-tabulations were used to analyse cross-national and gender differences in scores on the items. Reliability analysis......'. The reliability analysis shows that in eight of the nine countries frequency of drinking lowers the alpha. Injury and concern of others lead to a lower internal consistency in three countries. Conclusions: There was sufficient variation between countries in the pattern of responses and variation in gender...

  14. Precast concrete unit assessment through GPR survey and FDTD modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Davide

    2017-04-01

    Precast concrete elements are widely used within United Kingdom house building offering ease in assembly and added values as structural integrity, sound and thermal insulation; most common concrete components include walls, beams, floors, panels, lintels, stairs, etc. The lack of respect of the manufacturer instruction during assembling, however, may induce cracking and short/long term loss of bearing capacity. GPR is a well-established not destructive technique employed in the assessment of structural elements because of real-time imaging, quickness of data collecting and ability to discriminate finest structural details. In this work, GPR has been used to investigate two different precast elements: precast reinforced concrete planks constituting the roof slab of a school and precast wood-cement blocks with insulation material pre-fitted used to build a perimeter wall of a private building. Visible cracks affected both constructions. For the assessment surveys, a GSSI 2.0 GHz GPR antenna has been used because of the high resolution required and the small size of the antenna case (155 by 90 by 105mm) enabling scanning up to 45mm from any obstruction. Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) numerical modelling was also performed to build a scenario of the expected GPR signal response for a preliminary real-time interpretation and to help solve uncertainties due to complex reflection patterns: simulated radargrams were built using Reflex Software v. 8.2, reproducing the same GPR pulse used for the surveys in terms of wavelet, nominal frequency, sample frequency and time window. Model geometries were derived from the design projects available both for the planks and the blocks; the electromagnetic properties of the materials (concrete, reinforcing bars, air-filled void, insulation and wooden concrete) were inferred from both values reported in literature and a preliminary interpretation of radargrams where internal layer interfaces were clearly recognizable and

  15. Six rapid assessments of alcohol and other substance use in populations displaced by conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelekan Moruf

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Substance use among populations displaced by conflict is a neglected area of public health. Alcohol, khat, benzodiazepine, opiate, and other substance use have been documented among a range of displaced populations, with wide-reaching health and social impacts. Changing agendas in humanitarian response-including increased prominence of mental health and chronic illness-have so far failed to be translated into meaningful interventions for substance use. Methods Studies were conducted from 2006 to 2008 in six different settings of protracted displacement, three in Africa (Kenya, Liberia, northern Uganda and three in Asia (Iran, Pakistan, and Thailand. We used intervention-oriented qualitative Rapid Assessment and Response methods, adapted from two decades of experience among non-displaced populations. The main sources of data were individual and group interviews conducted with a culturally representative (non-probabilistic sample of community members and service providers. Results Widespread use of alcohol, particularly artisanally-produced alcohol, in Kenya, Liberia, Uganda, and Thailand, and opiates in Iran and Pakistan was believed by participants to be linked to a range of health, social and protection problems, including illness, injury (intentional and unintentional, gender-based violence, risky behaviour for HIV and other sexually transmitted infection and blood-borne virus transmission, as well as detrimental effects to household economy. Displacement experiences, including dispossession, livelihood restriction, hopelessness and uncertain future may make communities particularly vulnerable to substance use and its impact, and changing social norms and networks (including the surrounding population may result in changed - and potentially more harmful-patterns of use. Limited access to services, including health services, and exclusion from relevant host population programmes, may exacerbate the harmful consequences

  16. Assessing the delivery of alcohol screening and brief intervention in sexual health clinics in the north east of England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sullivan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Risky drinking is associated with risky sexual experiences, however the relationship between alcohol and sex is complex. The aim of the study was to assess the feasibility of delivering alcohol screening and brief interventions in genitourinary medicine (GUM clinics. The objectives were to; understand the levels of alcohol use amongst patients; report on the number of alcohol interventions delivered; and to analyse the relationship between alcohol use with demographic data as well as diagnosed sexually transmitted infections (STIs to see if there were any associations. Methods All new patients attending GUM between April 2012 and March 2013 self-completed the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT prior to their clinical consultation. Where appropriate (scoring 8+ on AUDIT the clinician would deliver up to 2–3 min of alcohol brief intervention. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, ANOVA and logistic regression were carried out as appropriate. Results AUDIT scores were available for 90% of all new patients (3058/3390 with an average mean score of 7.75. Of those who drank alcohol, 44% were categorised as being AUDIT positive, including 2% who had a score indicative of probable alcohol dependence (20+. 55 % (n = 638 of patients who screened positive on the AUDIT received a brief intervention whilst 24% (n = 674 of drinkers were diagnosed with a STI. Logistic regression modelling revealed that males, younger age groups and those of ‘white’ ethnicity were more likely to score positive on AUDIT. Patients classified as non-students, living in deprivation quintiles one to four and categorised as probable alcohol dependence on the AUDIT were more likely to be diagnosed with an STI. Conclusion It is possible to embed alcohol screening into routine practice within sexual health services however further work is required to embed brief interventions particularly amongst increasing risk drinkers. If resources are limited

  17. Drinking and alcohol-related harm among New Zealand university students: findings from a national Web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kypri, Kypros; Paschall, Mallie J; Langley, John; Baxter, Joanne; Cashell-Smith, Martine; Bourdeau, Beth

    2009-02-01

    Alcohol-related harm is pervasive among college students in the United States of America and Canada, where a third to half of undergraduates binge drink at least fortnightly. There have been no national studies outside North America. We estimated the prevalence of binge drinking, related harms, and individual risk factors among undergraduates in New Zealand. A web survey was completed by 2,548 undergraduates (63% response) at 5 of New Zealand's 8 universities. Drinking patterns and alcohol-related problems in the preceding 4 weeks were measured. Drinking diaries for the preceding 7 days were completed. Multivariate analyses were used to identify individual risk factors. A total of 81% of both women and men drank in the previous 4 weeks, 37% reported 1 or more binge episodes in the last week, 14% of women and 15% of men reported 2+ binge episodes in the last week, and 68% scored in the hazardous range (4+) on the AUDIT consumption subscale. A mean of 1.8 (95% confidence interval 1.4, 2.3) distinct alcohol-related risk behaviors or harmful consequences were reported, e.g., 33% had a blackout, 6% had unprotected sex, and 5% said they were physically aggressive toward someone, in the preceding 4 weeks. Drink-driving or being the passenger of a drink-driver in the last 4 weeks was reported by 9% of women and 11% of men. Risk factors for frequent binge drinking included: lower age, earlier age of drinking onset, monthly or more frequent binge drinking in high school, and living in a residential hall or a shared house (relative to living with parents). These correlates were similar to those identified in U.S. and Canadian studies. Strategies are needed to reduce the availability and promotion of alcohol on and around university campuses in New Zealand. Given the high prevalence of binge drinking in high school and its strong association with later binge drinking, strategies aimed at youth drinking are also a priority. In universities, high-risk drinkers should be

  18. Predictors of and reasons for attempts to reduce alcohol intake: A population survey of adults in England.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Beard

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the predictors among high-risk drinkers in England of attempts to reduce alcohol consumption, the reasons given for these attempts and the association between the various reasons and alcohol consumption.Data came from 2,800 high-risk drinkers taking part in the Alcohol Toolkit Study (ATS between March 2014 and November 2016 who were attempting to reduce their alcohol consumption. Participants completed the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT and were asked questions regarding their socio-demographic characteristics, attempts to cut down and reasons for doing so.Those cutting down were significantly older (OR 1.01, p<0.001, were more likely to be female (OR 1.32, p<0.05, had higher AUDIT-C scores (OR 1.12, p<0. 001, were less likely to be of white ethnicity (OR 0.64, p<0. 001, and were more likely to reside in the South of England (OR 1.34, p<0. 001. They were also more likely to be of higher occupationally-based social-grades (p<0. 001. The main reported reasons for reducing consumption were: fitness (22.5%, weight loss (20.4%, future health (20.4%, advice from a health-care professional (7.9% and cost (7.6%. Those reporting the followings reasons for cutting down had higher AUDIT-C scores than those who did not report these reasons: a concern about further health problems (β 0.20, p<0.05, advice from a doctor/health worker (β 0.38, p<0.05, that drinking was too expensive (β 0.42, p<0.01 and detoxification (β 0.42, p<0.01. Lower AUDIT-C scores were noted among those who reported that they knew someone who was cutting down (β -0.67, p<0.05, that there was no reason (β -0.36, p<0.05, or they didn't know why they were cutting down (β -0.25, p<0.05.Around a fifth of high-risk drinkers in England report trying to reduce their drinking, particularly older, high-socioeconomic female drinkers from the south of England. Attempts to cut down appear to be driven by a desire to improve health, advice from

  19. Assessment of residency program outcomes via alumni surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lüer S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Sonja Lüer, Christoph Aebi Department of Pediatrics, Bern University Hospital, Inselspital, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland Background: One trend in medical education is outcomes-oriented training. Outcomes usually refer to individuals’ acquisition of competencies, for example, during training in residency programs. However, little is known about outcomes of these programs. In order to fill this gap, human resource (HR data were analyzed and alumni of a pediatric residency program were surveyed at the Department of Pediatrics, Bern University Hospital, Switzerland.Methods: Residency program outcomes (demographics, career choices, part-time or full-time work status, competencies, feedback were assessed through in-house HR databases, publicly available data on the Internet (physician directory and practice homepages, and 2 alumni surveys (S1, S2. Results: In all, 109 alumni met the inclusion criteria. Retention rate at the hospital was low (14%. Forty-six alumni (42% in private practice were eligible for alumni surveys. Response rates were 87% (S1 and 61% (S2. Time intervals between 2 career decisions (selecting specialty of pediatrics vs selecting setting of private practice varied widely (late-training decision to enter private practice. Mean employment level in private practice was 60% (range 20%–100%. Most valued rotation was emergency medicine; most desired competencies in future colleagues were the ability to work in a team, proficiency in pediatrics, and working economically.Conclusion: A broadened view on outcomes – beyond individuals’ competency acquisition – provides informative insights into a training program, can allow for informed program updates, and guide future program development. Keywords: medical education, career choice, pediatrics, private practice

  20. Survey of Ambient Air Pollution Health Risk Assessment Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anenberg, Susan C; Belova, Anna; Brandt, Jørgen; Fann, Neal; Greco, Sue; Guttikunda, Sarath; Heroux, Marie-Eve; Hurley, Fintan; Krzyzanowski, Michal; Medina, Sylvia; Miller, Brian; Pandey, Kiran; Roos, Joachim; Van Dingenen, Rita

    2016-09-01

    Designing air quality policies that improve public health can benefit from information about air pollution health risks and impacts, which include respiratory and cardiovascular diseases and premature death. Several computer-based tools help automate air pollution health impact assessments and are being used for a variety of contexts. Expanding information gathered for a May 2014 World Health Organization expert meeting, we survey 12 multinational air pollution health impact assessment tools, categorize them according to key technical and operational characteristics, and identify limitations and challenges. Key characteristics include spatial resolution, pollutants and health effect outcomes evaluated, and method for characterizing population exposure, as well as tool format, accessibility, complexity, and degree of peer review and application in policy contexts. While many of the tools use common data sources for concentration-response associations, population, and baseline mortality rates, they vary in the exposure information source, format, and degree of technical complexity. We find that there is an important tradeoff between technical refinement and accessibility for a broad range of applications. Analysts should apply tools that provide the appropriate geographic scope, resolution, and maximum degree of technical rigor for the intended assessment, within resources constraints. A systematic intercomparison of the tools' inputs, assumptions, calculations, and results would be helpful to determine the appropriateness of each for different types of assessment. Future work would benefit from accounting for multiple uncertainty sources and integrating ambient air pollution health impact assessment tools with those addressing other related health risks (e.g., smoking, indoor pollution, climate change, vehicle accidents, physical activity). © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Socio-demographic correlates of six indicators of alcohol consumption: survey findings of students across seven universities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background This study assessed the prevalence of six alcohol consumption indicators in a sample of university students. We also examined whether students’ sociodemographic and educational characteristics were associated with any of the six alcohol consumption indicators; and whether associations between students’ sociodemographic and educational characteristics and the six alcohol consumption indicators differed by gender. Methods A cross-sectional study of 3706 students enrolled at 7 universities in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. A self-administered questionnaire assessed six alcohol consumption measures: length of time of last (most recent) drinking occasion; amount consumed during last drinking occasion; frequency of alcohol consumption; heavy episodic drinking (≥ 5 drinks in a row); problem drinking; and possible alcohol dependence as measured by CAGE. The questionnaire also collected information on seven relevant student sociodemographic characteristics (age, gender, academic year of study, current living circumstances - accommodation with parents, whether student was in intimate relationship, socioeconomic status of parents - parental education, income sufficiency) and two academic achievement variables (importance of achieving good grades at university, and one’s academic performance in comparison with one’s peers). Results The majority of students (65% of females, 76% of males) reported heavy episodic drinking at least once within the last 2 weeks, and problem drinking was prevalent in 20% of females and 29% of males. Factors consistently positively associated with all six indicators of alcohol consumption were male gender and perceived insufficient income. Other factors such as living away from home, being in 1st or 2nd year of studies, having no intimate partner, and lower academic achievement were associated with some, but not all indicators of alcohol consumption. Conclusions The high level of alcohol consumption calls for regular

  2. Residence Hall Room Type and Alcohol Use among College Students Living on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Jennifer E.; Zimmerman, Don; O'Grady, Megan A.

    2009-01-01

    The objectives were to explore the relation between the built environment of residence halls and the alcohol use of college students living on campus from the perspective of the theory of routine activity. This exploratory study examined data from two samples on one college campus. Online surveys assessed alcohol use, attitudes toward alcohol use,…

  3. Correlates of cruelty to animals in the United States: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Michael G; Fu, Qiang; DeLisi, Matt; Beaver, Kevin M; Perron, Brian E; Terrell, Katie; Howard, Matthew O

    2009-10-01

    To examine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and psychiatric correlates of cruelty to animals in the US. Data were derived from a nationally representative sample of adults residing in the US Structured psychiatric interviews (N=43,093) were completed by trained lay interviewers between 2001 and 2002. Personality, substance use, mood, and anxiety disorders and cruelty to animals were assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule (DSM-IV) version. The lifetime prevalence of animal cruelty in US adults was 1.8%. Men, African-Americans, Native-Americans/Asians, native-born Americans, persons with lower levels of income and education and adults living the western region of the US reported comparatively high levels of cruelty to animals, whereas Hispanics reported comparatively low levels of such behavior. Cruelty to animals was significantly associated with all assessed antisocial behaviors. Adjusted analyses revealed strong associations between lifetime alcohol use disorders, conduct disorder, antisocial, obsessive-compulsive, and histrionic personality disorders, pathological gambling, family history of antisocial behavior, and cruelty to animals. Cruelty to animals is associated with elevated rates observed in young, poor, men with family histories of antisocial behavior and personal histories of conduct disorder in childhood, and antisocial, obsessive-compulsive and histrionic personality disorders, and pathological gambling in adulthood. Given these associations, and the widespread ownership of pets and animals, effective screening of children, adolescents and adults for animal cruelty and appropriate mental health interventions should be deployed.

  4. Perception of alcohol availability, promotion and policy by Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MAMPA) project conducted in Nigeria and three other countries in Africa, a survey of Nigerian students was conducted to assess their perceptions of alcohol promotion and policy in the country. Nearly five hundred students drawn from five faculties ...

  5. What is the latent structure of alcohol use disorders? A taxometric analysis of the Personality Assessment Inventory Alcohol Problems Scale in male and female prison inmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Glenn D; Diamond, Pamela M; Magaletta, Philip R

    2010-03-01

    Three indicators derived from the Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI) Alcohol Problems scale (ALC)-tolerance/high consumption, loss of control, and negative social and psychological consequences-were subjected to taxometric analysis-mean above minus below a cut (MAMBAC), maximum covariance (MAXCOV), and latent mode factor analysis (L-Mode)-in 1,374 federal prison inmates (905 males, 469 females). Whereas the total sample yielded ambiguous results, the male subsample produced dimensional results, and the female subsample produced taxonic results. Interpreting these findings in light of previous taxometric research on alcohol abuse and dependence it is speculated that while alcohol use disorders may be taxonic in female offenders, they are probably both taxonic and dimensional in male offenders. Two models of male alcohol use disorder in males are considered, one in which the diagnostic features are categorical and the severity of symptomatology is dimensional, and one in which some diagnostic features (e.g., withdrawal) are taxonic and other features (e.g., social problems) are dimensional.

  6. Internet Gambling, Health, Smoking and Alcohol Use: Findings from the 2007 British Gambling Prevalence Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Mark; Wardle, Heather; Orford, Jim; Sproston, Kerry; Erens, Bob

    2011-01-01

    This study provides analysis of a representative national sample of Internet gamblers. Using participant data from the 2007 British Gambling Prevalence Survey (n = 9003 adults aged 16 years and over), all participants who had gambled online, bet online, and/or who had used a betting exchange in the last 12 months (6% of the total sample) were…

  7. Perceptions of Powdered Alcohol and Intentions to Use: An Exploratory Qualitative Assessment of Potential Palcohol Use by Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Stogner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While there seems to be growing media intrigue over atypical forms of alcohol use, the utilization of the majority of novel consumption methods (e.g., eyeballing, slimming, alcohol without liquid (AWOL seems minimal. In 2014, however, several outlets suggested that powdered alcohol would soon surface as a threat to public safety. The impetus of these fears was the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau’s approval for Lipsmark LLC to package a powdered alcohol product named “Palcohol”. Palcohol has yet to reach store shelves, but public outcry has been intense. Despite this reaction, little is known about whether the population will consider Palcohol a suitable alternative to traditional alcohol, particularly given its excessive predicted cost. In an exploratory effort to assess perceptions, use intentions, and fears related to Palcohol, 31 young adults were asked to view a 16-minute video about Palcohol and answer a series of questions about Palcohol, including whether and how they intend to use it. Results suggest that young adults intend to experiment with Palcohol following its release, but they have a number of concerns. While few expect to become habitual users of the product, many believe it will enable people to utilize alcohol in settings where its consumption is prohibited.

  8. Assessment of alcohol use among methadone maintenance patients by direct ethanol metabolites and self-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Dürsteler-MacFarland, Kenneth M; Auwaerter, Volker; Ergovic, Sonja; Thon, Natasha; Yegles, Michel; Halter, Claudia; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A

    2008-09-01

    Heavy alcohol consumption may accelerate the progression of hepatitis C (HCV)-related liver disease and/or limit efforts at antiviral treatment. As most of the patients in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) suffer from hepatitis C infection, this study was conducted to identify the alcohol intake among these patients at a Swiss Psychiatric University Clinic by self-reports and direct ethanol metabolites as biomarkers of ethanol consumption. A convenience sample of 40 MMT patients (15 women, 25 men; median age 39 years) of the total 124 patients was asked and consented to participate in this study. This sample was not different in age, gender distribution, and rate of hepatitis C infection from the total sample. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) and self-reported ethanol intake during the previous 7 days were assessed. In addition, ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in urine, and fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) and EtG in hair were determined using LC-MS/MS and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer. The limit of quantitation for UEtG, HEtG, and FAEEs were 0.1 mg/l, 2.3 pg/mg, and 0.1 ng/mg, respectively. Fourteen participants reported abstinence from alcohol for the previous 7 days. AUDIT scores were > or =8 in 15 male and >5 in 5 female participants. Direct ethanol metabolites were as follows (median, min, max, standard deviation): UEtG (19 positives; 9.91, 1.38 to 251, 62.39 mg/l); the values of HEtG were 17.65, 0 to 513, 105.62 pg/mg [in 2 cases no material, 8 abstinent (up to 7 pg/mg), 15 social drinkers (up to 50 g per day), and 15 excessive users (>50/60 g/d)]. For the 13 cases, where enough material for additional determination of HFAEEs was available, the values were 0.32, 0 to 1.32, 0.44 ng/mg. Among the 30 HEtG-positive participants, 20 had not reported the corresponding ethanol intake using question 1 (frequency) and 2 (quantity) of the AUDIT. Of the 14 participants reporting no alcohol intake during the previous 7 days, 4 were UEt

  9. Pesquisa de compra de bebidas alcoólicas por adolescentes em duas cidades do Estado de São Paulo Alcohol purchase survey by adolescents in two cities of State of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Romano

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O consumo de álcool é um problema de saúde pública. A disponibilidade comercial é um importante fator no estímulo ao consumo de álcool por adolescentes. O objetivo do estudo foi verificar com que freqüência menores de 18 anos conseguem comprar bebidas alcoólicas em estabelecimentos comerciais. MÉTODOS: Adolescentes com idades entre 13 e 17 anos tentaram comprar bebidas alcoólicas em uma amostra aleatória de estabelecimentos comerciais em Paulínia (N=108 e Diadema (N=426, no Estado de São Paulo. O estudo foi realizado em novembro e dezembro de 2003 em Paulínia e de julho de 2004 a agosto de 2005 em Diadema. Eles foram orientados a não mentir sobre sua idade quando questionados e a dizer que a bebida era para consumo próprio. Os testes estatísticos realizados foram bi-caudais e o nível de significância considerado foi de pOBJECTIVE: Alcohol use is a public health problem. Commercial availability is an important factor that encourages the use of alcohol by young people. The aim of the study was to assess how often young people under 18 could buy alcohol in shops METHODS: Adolescents from 13 to 17 attempted to purchase alcoholic beverages at a random sample of shops in the cities of Paulinia (n=108 and Diadema (n=426, Southeastern Brazil. The study was conducted from November to December 2003 in Paulínia, and July 2004 to August 2005 in Diadema. They were told not to lie about their ages when asked and to say that the beverage was for themselves. Statistical tests performed were two-tailed and the significance level considered was p<0.05. RESULTS: Adolescents, under the minimum legal age, were successful in purchasing alcoholic beverages in the first attempt in 85.2% of the surveyed outlets in Paulinia, and 82.4% in Diadema. The adolescents bought alcoholic beverages just as easy in all shops researched. CONCLUSIONS: The data showed almost unanimous easiness of teenagers to obtain alcoholic beverages, suggesting the

  10. Alcohol education and training in pre-registration nursing: a national survey to determine curriculum content in the United Kingdom (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Aisha S; Webster, Brian J

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol-related harm impacts significantly on the health of the population. Nurses are often among the first health professionals that many patients with alcohol-related problems come into contact with and have been identified as playing a key role but may be ill-prepared to respond. Future nurses need to have the skills, knowledge and clinical confidence to respond to patients suffering from alcohol-related harm. A pre-registration curriculum that ensures a nursing workforce fit for practice in responding to alcohol-related harm is necessary. To determine the level of alcohol education and training content in the pre-registration curriculum for nursing in the United Kingdom (UK). To establish whether there are variations in the pre-registration curriculum content across the UK. A descriptive study. All 68 UK Higher Education Institutions offering a total of 111 pre-registration courses for nurses were invited to participate in the study. Twenty nine completed questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 26%. The largest number of identified responders were from England (n=15), with 3 from Scotland and 1 each from Wales and Northern Ireland. Nine Universities chose not to identify themselves. An online semi-structured questionnaire survey was used to collect the study data. Teaching of alcohol and alcohol related harm was mainly delivered during the second year of a pre-registration nursing programme provided mainly to adult and mental health students. Overall, the majority of alcohol related content that is provided within the responding pre-registration nursing courses relates to biophysiology, aetiology, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. This study highlights the need for a greater and more relevant focus of alcohol education to pre-registration nursing students of all fields of practice incorporating an integrated approach across all years of study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DSM-IV personality disorders and associations with externalizing and internalizing disorders: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, Thomas C; Chen, Chiung M; Saha, Tulshi D; Smith, Sharon M; Ruan, W June; Grant, Bridget F

    2013-11-01

    Although associations between personality disorders and psychiatric disorders are well established in general population studies, their association with liability dimensions for externalizing and internalizing disorders has not been fully assessed. The purpose of this study is to examine associations between personality disorders (PDs) and lifetime externalizing and internalizing Axis I disorders. Data were obtained from the total sample of 34,653 respondents from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Drawing on the literature, a 3-factor exploratory structural equation model was selected to simultaneously assess the measurement relations among DSM-IV Axis I substance use and mood and anxiety disorders and the structural relations between the latent internalizing-externalizing dimensions and DSM-IV PDs, adjusting for gender, age, race/ethnicity, and marital status. Antisocial, histrionic, and borderline PDs were strong predictors for the externalizing factor, while schizotypal, borderline, avoidant, and obsessive-compulsive PDs had significantly larger effects on the internalizing fear factor when compared to the internalizing misery factor. Paranoid, schizoid, narcissistic, and dependent PDs provided limited discrimination between and among the three factors. An overarching latent factor representing general personality dysfunction was significantly greater on the internalizing fear factor followed by the externalizing factor, and weakest for the internalizing misery factor. Personality disorders offer important opportunities for studies on the externalizing-internalizing spectrum of common psychiatric disorders. Future studies based on panic, anxiety, and depressive symptoms may elucidate PD associations with the internalizing spectrum of disorders. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Psychiatric correlates of past year adult bullying behaviors: Findings from the National Epidemiology Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Katherine A; Thorisdottir, Audur S; Asmundson, Gordon J G

    2016-12-30

    Previous research on bully perpetration and psychiatric outcomes has been limited to examination of lifetime associations and has not included evaluation of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), despite previously reported correlations between PTSD and anger and aggression. The purpose of the present study was to provide a comprehensive evaluation of the association between bullying behaviour and mental disorders within a past-year framework. Data was obtained from Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC; n=34,653), a nationally-representative survey of American adults. Cross-tabulations and logistic regression analyses were conducted to evaluate the relationship between bullying behaviour and psychiatric diagnosis. A total of 239 individuals (138 males, 101 females) reported engaging in bullying behaviour within the past-year. Mood, anxiety, substance use, and personality disorders were all more common among bully perpetrators compared to others. Of note, strong associations were found between PTSD and bully perpetration. Findings from the current study demonstrate strong associations between bullying perpetration and mental health concerns. The proximity of bullying behaviors and mental health concerns may be important, suggesting avenues for efforts at intervention and bullying prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. National Wetland Condition Assessment 2011: A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Wetland Condition Assessment 2011: A Collaborative Survey presents the results of an unprecedented assessment of the nation’s wetlands. This report is part of the National Aquatic Resource Surveys, a series of statistically based surveys designed to provide the publi...

  14. Prevalence and Correlates of DSM-5 Cannabis Use Disorder, 2012–2013: Findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions – III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasin, Deborah S.; Kerridge, Bradley T.; Saha, Tulshi D.; Huang, Boji; Pickering, Roger; Smith, Sharon M.; Jung, Jeesun; Zhang, Haitao; Grant, Bridget F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Attitudes towards marijuana are changing, the prevalence of DSM-IV cannabis use disorder has increased, and DSM-5 modified the diagnostic criteria for cannabis use disorders. Therefore, updated information is needed on the prevalence, demographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidity, disability and treatment for DSM-5 cannabis use disorders in the US adult population. Method In 2012–2013, a nationally representative sample of 36,309 participants ≥18 years were interviewed in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III (NESARC-III). Psychiatric and substance use disorders were assessed using the Alcohol Use Disorders and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-5. Results Prevalence of 12-month and lifetime marijuana use disorder was 2.5% and 6.3%. Among those with 12-month and lifetime marijuana use disorder, marijuana use was frequent; mean days used per year was 225.3 (SE=5.69) and 274.2 (SE=3.76). Odds of 12-month and lifetime marijuana use disorder were higher for men, Native Americans, those unmarried, with low incomes, and young adults, (e.g., OR=7.2, 95% CI 5.5–9.5 for 12-month disorder among those 18–24 years compared to those ≥45 years). Marijuana use disorder was associated with other substance disorders, affective, anxiety and personality disorders. Twelve-month marijuana use disorder was associated with disability. As disorder severity increased, virtually all associations became stronger. Only 24.3% with lifetime marijuana use disorder participated in 12-step programs or professional treatment. Conclusions DSM-5 marijuana use disorder is prevalent, associated with comorbidity and disability, and often untreated. Findings suggest the need to improve prevention methods, and educate the public, professionals and policy makers about the harms associated with marijuana use disorders and available interventions. PMID:26940807

  15. Probability and predictors of first treatment contact for anxiety disorders in the United States: analysis of data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iza, Miren; Olfson, Mark; Vermes, Donna; Hoffer, Marcela; Wang, Shuai; Blanco, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Despite the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and the demonstrated efficacy of their treatment, most individuals with anxiety disorders never utilize mental health services. To identify predictors of treatment-seeking for DSM-IV anxiety disorders from a range of sociodemographic factors and comorbid mental disorders. Survival analysis with time-varying covariates was performed using data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Face-to-face interviews conducted in the United States. 34,653 respondents, aged 18 years and older, from the 2004-2005 Wave 2 NESARC. The cumulative probability of treatment-seeking (assessed by the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version, Wave 2 version) across the anxiety disorders in 1 year, 10 years, and lifetime and the median delay to the first treatment contact. Most individuals with panic disorder sought treatment within the same year of disorder onset, whereas the median delays to first treatment contact for generalized anxiety disorder, specific phobia, and social anxiety disorder were 1 year, 13 years, and 16 years, respectively. Several personality disorders and earlier age at anxiety disorder onset decreased the probability of treatment contact. By contrast, younger cohort membership, a recent change in marital status, treatment for a psychiatric disorder other than substance use disorder, and comorbid anxiety disorders increased the lifetime probability of treatment contact. Treatment-seeking rates for most anxiety disorders are low, are associated with long delays, and sometimes are hindered by co-occurrence of other psychopathology. These patterns highlight the complex interplay of personal characteristics, individual psychopathology, and social variables in the treatment-seeking process. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. An exploratory study assessing reasons behind initiation, continuation or stoppage of alcohol after first use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B S Chavan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Few studies have investigated the reasons for alcohol initiation and continuation. The present study examined reasons for trying alcohol for the first time and its subsequent use. Furthermore, the study attempted to discover the possible predictors that make an individual vulnerable to alcohol use. Methodology: A total of 280 first-year college students from six different colleges were contacted. Using the method of equal probability, every third subject from each class was selected. All the selected subjects were interviewed and administered semi-structured questionnaire for gathering information regarding their experience with alcohol. Results: In our study, experimentation and peer pressure were found to be the main reasons for both alcohol use and its re-use. The first time drinkers differed a lot from those with multiple users in terms of reasons for trying alcohol, the effect of alcohol, family history of alcohol use, and self-view about alcohol use. The results depicted that the gender, educational stream, and family history of alcohol use are the factors that make an individual vulnerable to alcohol use. Conclusion: First-year of college is a unique transitional period. First-year students with high levels of sensation seeking may be especially at high-risk to begin or escalate heavy drinking. Studying the nature of alcohol initiation may not only be helpful in planning awareness programs but also in preventing underage drinking and alcohol abuse.

  17. Sociodemographic Correlates of Transitions from Alcohol Use to Disorders and Remission in the São Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Camila Magalhães; Viana, Maria Carmen; Siu, Erica Rosanna; Guerra de Andrade, Arthur; Anthony, James C.; Andrade, Laura Helena

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate sociodemographic correlates associated with transitions from alcohol use to disorders and remission in a Brazilian population. Methods: Data are from a probabilistic, multi-stage clustered sample of adult household residents in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area. Alcohol use, regular use (at least 12 drinks/year), DSM-IV abuse and dependence and remission from alcohol use disorders (AUDs) were assessed with the World Mental Health version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Age of onset (AOO) distributions of the cumulative lifetime probability of each alcohol use stage were prepared with data obtained from 5037 subjects. Correlates of transitions were obtained from a subsample of 2942 respondents, whose time-dependent sociodemographic data were available. Results: Lifetime prevalences were 85.8% for alcohol use, 56.2% for regular use, 10.6% for abuse and 3.6% for dependence; 73.4 and 58.8% of respondents with lifetime abuse and dependence, respectively, had remitted. The number of sociodemographic correlates decreased from alcohol use to disorders. All transitions across alcohol use stages up to abuse were consistently associated with male gender, younger cohorts and lower education. Importantly, low education was a correlate for developing AUD and not remitting from dependence. Early AOO of first alcohol use was associated with the transition of regular use to abuse. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that specific correlates differently contribute throughout alcohol use trajectory in a Brazilian population. It also reinforces the need of preventive programs focused on early initiation of alcohol use and high-risk individuals, in order to minimize the progression to dependence and improve remission from AUD. PMID:21414952

  18. The Hispanic Americans baseline alcohol survey (HABLAS): DUI rates, birthplace, and acculturation across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2008-03-01

    This article examines the association between birthplace, acculturation, and self-reported driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed from households in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Birthplace was not associated with DUI, 12-month DUI arrest rates, or lifetime DUI arrest rates. Mexican Americans in the medium- and high-acculturation groups were more likely to engage in DUI. A higher proportion of U.S.-born than foreign-born respondents as well as those in the high-acculturation group, irrespective of national origin, reported having been stopped by police when driving. U.S.-born Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans thought they could consume a higher mean number of drinks before their driving is impaired compared with those who are foreign born. There are considerable differences in DUI-related behavior across Hispanic national groups. U.S.-born Hispanics and those born abroad, but not those at different levels of acculturation, have equal risk of involvement with DUI.

  19. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): DUI Rates, Birthplace, and Acculturation Across Hispanic National Groups*

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAETANO, RAUL; RAMISETTY-MIKLER, SUHASINI; RODRIGUEZ, LORI A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This article examines the association between birthplace, acculturation, and self-reported driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Method Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed from households in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Results Birthplace was not associated with DUI, 12-month DUI arrest rates, or lifetime DUI arrest rates. Mexican Americans in the medium- and high-acculturation groups were more likely to engage in DUI. A higher proportion of U.S.-born than foreign-born respondents as well as those in the high-acculturation group, irrespective of national origin, reported having been stopped by police when driving. U.S.-born Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans thought they could consume a higher mean number of drinks before their driving is impaired compared with those who are foreign born. Conclusions There are considerable differences in DUI-related behavior across Hispanic national groups. U.S.-born Hispanics and those born abroad, but not those at different levels of acculturation, have equal risk of involvement with DUI. PMID:18299767

  20. Precision in systematic trawl surveys as assessed from replicate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local variability was analysed as random noise, modelled and later reapplied on single vessel data series to evaluate the effect of sample size and replicates on the survey mean. In a survey with 200 stations, local sample noise accounted for about 4% of the variability in the survey mean. Alternatively, running series of ...

  1. Gambling problems in treatment for affective disorders: Results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowlishaw, S; Hakes, J K; Dowling, N A

    2016-09-15

    Gambling problems co-occur frequently with other psychiatric difficulties and may complicate treatment for affective disorders. This study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of gambling problems in a U. S. representative sample reporting treatment for mood problems or anxiety. n=3007 respondents indicating past-year treatment for affective disorders were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Weighted prevalence estimates were produced and regression analyses examined correlates of gambling problems. Rates of lifetime and past-year problem gambling (3+DSM-IV symptoms) were 3.1% (95% CI=2.4-4.0%) and 1.4% (95% CI=0.9-2.1%), respectively, in treatment for any disorder. Rates of lifetime problem gambling ranged from 3.1% (95% CI=2.3-4.3%) for depression to 5.4% (95% CI=3.2-9.0%) for social phobia. Past-year conditions ranged from 0.9% (95% CI=0.4-2.1%) in dysthymia to 2.4% (95% CI=1.1-5.3%) in social phobia. Higher levels were observed when considering a spectrum of severity (including 'at-risk' gambling), with 8.9% (95% CI=7.7-10.2%) of respondents indicating a history of any gambling problems (1+ DSM-IV symptoms). Lifetime gambling problems predicted interpersonal problems and financial difficulties, and marijuana use, but not alcohol use, mental or physical health, and healthcare utilisation. Data were collected in 2001-02 and were cross-sectional. Gambling problems occur at non-trivial rates in treatment for affective disorders and have mainly psychosocial implications. The findings indicate scope for initiatives to identify and respond to gambling problems across a continuum of severity in treatment for affective disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Alcohol use in high school: predicting students' alcohol use and alcohol problems in four-year colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Shacket, R W

    2001-11-01

    This research examined the effect of students' drinking behaviors in high school on their alcohol use and alcohol problems in college. Five colleges in New York State were randomly selected for the study. The telephone interview method was employed to survey college students during the spring semester of 1998. Within each participating college, students were randomly selected through the use of complete student telephone directories provided by the college administration. A total of 813 students were interviewed. Alcohol problems were measured with items from DSM-IV. Results indicate that both frequency and quantity of alcohol use in high school significantly affect students' alcohol consumption in college. Furthermore, the impact of alcohol use in high school on alcohol problems in college tends to be composed of a moderate direct effect and a relatively strong indirect effect via its impact on current alcohol consumption in college. Prevention efforts for drinking in college may need to start in high school to reduce or delay alcohol use by high school students. Additional assessment services and more readily available treatment services may be required to address potential alcohol problems among college students. Future research should examine the effect and longevity of students' alcohol problem symptoms after they graduate from college.

  3. Survey of attitudes and practices of Irish nursing students towards hand hygiene, including handrubbing with alcohol-based hand rub.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, Liz M; O'Connell, Nuala H; Dunne, Colum P

    2017-05-01

    Hand hygiene is widely recognised as the most important measure a healthcare worker can take in preventing the spread of healthcare associated infections. As a member of the healthcare team, nursing students have direct patient contact during clinical practice; hence, good hand hygiene practice among nursing students is essential. Low to moderate levels of hand hygiene knowledge and poor attitudes and practices are reported among nursing students. However, less is known about their attitudes and practices of handrubbing with ABHR, even though handrubbing is the recommended optimum practice in most situations. The aim of this study was to explore attitudes and practices of hand hygiene, in particular handrubbing with alcohol-based hand rub, among nursing students in Ireland. This survey employed a descriptive, self-report design using a questionnaire to gather data. It was administered electronically to all undergraduate nursing students (n=342) in the Department of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Limerick, Ireland in March and April 2015. Response rate was 66%. Attitudes towards hand hygiene were generally positive. Compliance with hand hygiene after contact with body fluid was high (99.5%) and before a clean or aseptic procedure (98.5%). However, suboptimal practices emerged, before touching a patient (85%), after touching a patient (87%) and after touching patients' surroundings (61%), with first year students more compliant than fourth year students. 16% of students were not aware of the clinical contraindications for using alcohol-based hand rub and 9% did not know when to use soap and water and when to use alcohol-based hand rub. Educators and practitioners play an important role in ensuring that nursing students develop appropriate attitudes towards hand hygiene and engage in optimal handrubbing practices. Raising awareness among nursing students of their responsibility in preventing the occurrence and reducing the transmission of HCAI as an on

  4. Disclosure and Exposure of Alcohol on Social Media and Later Alcohol Use: A Large-Scale Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erevik, Eilin K; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Andreassen, Cecilie S; Vedaa, Øystein; Pallesen, Ståle

    2017-01-01

    This article aims to investigate whether alcohol-related disclosure and exposure on social media can predict later alcohol use, and to identify covariates in these relationships. Data were collected by online surveys (two waves) among students in Bergen, Norway. The first survey was administered in fall 2015. The follow-up took place during fall 2016. A total of 5,217 students participated in both waves. The surveys included questions about demographics, personality, alcohol use, alcohol-related cognitions (e.g., attitudes and norms), social media use, and disclosure and exposure of alcohol on social media. Bivariate comparisons were conducted to assess differences in alcohol use between the frequent (i.e., monthly or more often) disclosure and exposure groups and low-frequent disclosure and exposure groups. Crude and adjusted linear regressions were employed to investigate if disclosure and exposure of alcohol could predict later alcohol use, when controlling for a range of covariates. Compared to the low-frequent disclosure and exposure groups, participants which frequently disclosed or were frequently exposed to alcohol-related content had higher alcohol use at baseline and 1 year later (p social media use) were controlled for. In conclusion, frequent disclosure and/or exposure to alcohol-related content predicted alcohol use over time. Alcohol disclosure/exposure on social media could for the most part not predict later alcohol use when baseline alcohol use was controlled for. High alcohol use and alcohol disclosure/exposure on social media appear to be strongly intertwined, which hampers identification of directionality between alcohol use and disclosure/exposure. Disclosing content reflecting positive aspects of alcohol was the only independent variable that could predict further alcohol use when other factors, like baseline alcohol use, were held constant. This finding suggests that disclosure of alcohol content reflecting positive aspects of alcohol might

  5. Assessment of alcohol problems using AUDIT in a prison setting: more than an 'aye or no' question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacAskill Susan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol problems are a major UK and international public health issue. The prevalence of alcohol problems is markedly higher among prisoners than the general population. However, studies suggest alcohol problems among prisoners are under-detected, under-recorded and under-treated. Identifying offenders with alcohol problems is fundamental to providing high quality healthcare. This paper reports use of the AUDIT screening tool to assess alcohol problems among prisoners. Methods Universal screening was undertaken over ten weeks with all entrants to one male Scottish prison using the AUDIT standardised screening tool and supplementary contextual questions. The questionnaire was administered by trained prison officers during routine admission procedures. Overall 259 anonymised completed questionnaires were analysed. Results AUDIT scores showed a high prevalence of alcohol problems with 73% of prisoner scores indicating an alcohol use disorder (8+, including 36% having scores indicating 'possible dependence' (20-40. AUDIT scores indicating 'possible dependence' were most apparent among 18-24 and 40-64 year-olds (40% and 56% respectively. However, individual questions showed important differences, with younger drinkers less likely to demonstrate habitual and addictive behaviours than the older age group. Disparity between high levels of harmful/hazardous/dependent drinking and low levels of 'treatment' emerged (only 27% of prisoners with scores indicating 'possible dependence' reported being 'in treatment'. Self-reported associations between drinking alcohol and the index crime were identified among two-fifths of respondents, rising to half of those reporting violent crimes. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to identify differing behaviours and needs among prisoners with high AUDIT score ranges, through additional analysis of individual questions. The study has identified high prevalence of alcohol use, varied

  6. A survey of energy drink and alcohol mixed with energy drink consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnezi, Racheli; Bergman, Lisa Carroll; Grinvald-Fogel, Haya; Cohen, Herman Avner

    2015-01-01

    Energy drink consumption among youth is increasing despite recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics to eliminate consumption by youth. This study provides information on consumption of energy drinks and alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AmED) in a sample of Israeli youth and how consumer knowledge about the risks affects consumption rates. The study was conducted in three Tel Aviv public schools, with a total enrollment of 1,253 students in grades 8 through 12. Among them, 802 students completed a 49-item questionnaire about energy drink and AmED consumption, for a 64 % response rate Non-responders included 451 students who were absent or refused to participate. All students in the same school were administered the questionnaire on the same day. Energy drinks are popular among youth (84.2 % have ever drunk). More tenth through twelfth grade students consumed energy drinks than eighth and ninth grade students. Students who began drinking in elementary school (36.8 %) are at elevated risk for current energy drink (P drinking ED at a young age is important. Boys and those who start drinking early have a greater risk of both ED and AmED consumption. The characteristics of early drinkers can help increase awareness of potential at-risk youth, such as junior and senior high school students with less educated or single parents. Risks posed by early use on later energy drink and AmED consumption are concerning. We suggest that parents should limit accessibility. Increased knowledge about acceptable and actual amounts of caffeine in a single product might decrease consumption.

  7. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Lisianski, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  8. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Tau, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  9. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Farallon de Pajaros, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  10. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Rose, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  11. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Alamagan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  12. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  13. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at French Frigate, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  14. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Asuncion, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  15. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Pagan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  16. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Ofu & Olosega, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  17. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Molokai, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  18. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Maug, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  19. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Kingman, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  20. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Tutuila, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  1. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Wake, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  2. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Agrihan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  3. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Lanai, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  4. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Kure, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  5. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Rota, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  6. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Hawaii, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  7. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Kauai, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  8. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Swains, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  9. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Guguan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  10. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Sarigan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  11. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Johnston, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  12. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Aguijan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  13. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Palmyra, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  14. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Tinian, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  15. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Pearl & Hermes, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  16. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  17. CRED Rapid Ecological Assessment Line Point Intercept Survey of Benthic Parameter Assessments at Guam, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Line point intercept (LPI) surveys and benthic composition assessments were conducted during Rapid Ecological Assessments (REA) as part of the Pacific Reef...

  18. Effectiveness of a proactive mail-based alcohol Internet intervention for university students: dismantling the assessment and feedback components in a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendtsen, Preben; McCambridge, Jim; Bendtsen, Marcus; Karlsson, Nadine; Nilsen, Per

    2012-10-31

    University students in Sweden routinely receive proactive mail-based alcohol Internet interventions sent from student health services. This intervention provides personalized normative feedback on alcohol consumption with suggestions on how to decrease drinking. Earlier feasibility trials by our group and others have examined effectiveness in simple parallel-groups designs. To evaluate the effectiveness of electronic screening and brief intervention, using a randomized controlled trial design that takes account of baseline assessment reactivity (and other possible effects of the research process) due to the similarity between the intervention and assessment content. The design of the study allowed for exploration of the magnitude of the assessment effects per se. This trial used a dismantling design and randomly assigned 5227 students to 3 groups: (1) routine practice assessment and feedback, (2) assessment-only without feedback, and (3) neither assessment nor feedback. At baseline all participants were blinded to study participation, with no contact being made with group 3. We approached students 2 months later to participate in a cross-sectional alcohol survey. All interventions were fully automated and did not have any human involvement. All data used in the analysis were based on self-assessment using questionnaires. The participants were unaware that they were participating in a trial and thus were also blinded to which group they were randomly assigned. Overall, 44.69% (n = 2336) of those targeted for study completed follow-up. Attrition was similar in groups 1 (697/1742, 40.01%) and 2 (737/1742, 42.31% retained) and lower in group 3 (902/1743, 51.75% retained). Intention-to-treat analyses among all participants regardless of their baseline drinking status revealed no differences between groups in all alcohol parameters at the 2-month follow-up. Per-protocol analyses of groups 1 and 2 among those who accepted the email intervention (36.2% of the students who

  19. Clinical assessment of hepatic de novo lipogenesis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglialunga, Sabina; Dehn, Clayton A

    2016-09-17

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is heralded as the next big global epidemic. Hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL), the synthesis of new fatty acids from non-lipid sources, is thought to play a pivotal role in the development of NAFLD. While there is currently no NAFLD-specific therapeutic agent available, pharmaceutical drugs aimed at reducing hepatic fat accretion may prove to be a powerful ally in the treatment and management of this disease. With a focus on NAFLD, the present review summarizes current techniques examining DNL from a clinical perspective, and describes the merits and limitations of three commonly used assays; stable-label isotope tracer studies, fatty acid indexes and indirect calorimetry as non-invasive measures of hepatic DNL. Finally, the application of DNL assessments in the pharmacological and nutraceutical treatment of NAFLD/NASH is summarized. In a clinical research setting, measures of DNL are an important marker in the development of anti-NAFLD treatments.

  20. Screening for Alcohol Problems among 4-Year Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Ken C.; Toomey, Traci; Nelson, Toben F.; Erickson, Darin; Lenk, Kathleen; Miazga, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the use of alcohol screening tools across US colleges. Participants: Directors of health services at 333 four-year colleges. Methods: An online survey was conducted regarding the use of alcohol screening tools. Schools reporting use of formal tools were further described in terms of 4 tools (AUDIT, CUGE, CAPS, and RAPS) that…

  1. Assessing Patterns of Alcohol Taxes Produced by Various Types of Excise Tax Methods--A Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sornpaisarn, Bundit; Kaewmungkun, Chuthaporn; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    To examine patterns of tax burdens produced by specific, ad valorem, and various types of combination taxations. One hundred unique hypothetical alcoholic beverages were mathematically simulated based on the amount of ethanol and perceived-qualities contained. Second, beverages were assigned values of various costs and tax rates, and third, patterns of tax burden were assessed per unit of ethanol produced by each type of tax method. Different tax methods produced different tax burdens per unit of ethanol for different alcoholic beverages. The tax burden produced by the ad valorem tax resulted in a lower tax burden for low perceived-quality alcoholic beverages. The specific tax method showed the same tax burden for both low and high perceived-quality alcoholic beverages. However, high perceived-quality beverages benefited from a lower tax burden per beverage price. Lastly, the combination tax method resulted in a lower tax burden for medium perceived-quality alcoholic beverages. Under the oligopoly market, ad valorem taxation encourages consumption of low perceived-quality beverages; specific taxation encourages consumption of high perceived-quality beverages; and combination tax methods encourage consumption of medium perceived-quality beverages. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  2. Peer Assessment for Construction Management and Quantity Surveying Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McLaughlin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Students undertaking the Bachelor of ConstructionManagement degree course at RMIT University, Melbourne,qualify for registration with the Australian Institute ofQuantity Surveyors (AIQS and the Australian Institute ofBuilding (AIB upon graduation. Over the past decade thedegree course has been constantly upgraded and altered inline with recommendations from professional bodies such asthese and other industry partners. In 1994 the Departmentof Building and Construction Economics re-assesseda range of subjects including the first year technologysubjects. Out of the review a problem-based integratedlearning unit was developed and tested. This unit has nowbeen in place for ten years.Quantity surveying and construction management likemost other professions in the construction industryrequire teamwork and advanced consultation skills. Theseskills may be learnt through experience but there isconsiderable evidence that these skills can be taught in theundergraduate years. Therefore in line with team-basedapproaches used in industry and professional constructionsettings, this year a new assessment model - peerassessment - will be applied to the problem-based learningunit. This paper describes the procedures and processesused to introduce the change and examines the theoreticalbase upon which the model was developed.

  3. The prevalence of and factors associated with high-risk alcohol consumption in Korean adults: The 2009-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Hong

    Full Text Available The consequences of alcohol consumption on health outcomes are largely determined by two separate, but related, dimensions of drinking: the total volume of alcohol consumed and the pattern of drinking. Most epidemiological studies focus on the amount of alcohol consumed and do not consider the pattern of drinking.This study evaluated the prevalence of and factors associated with high-risk and heavy alcohol drinking in Korean adults.This study analyzed 15,215 of the 28,009 participants in the 2009-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES. High-risk alcohol drinking was defined as Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT scores ≥16, which provides a framework for intervention to identify hazardous and harmful drinking patterns as the cause of alcohol-use disorders, according to World Health Organization guidelines.The prevalence of high-risk drinking was 15.1%, with the highest prevalence of 17.2% in middle-aged adults (45-64 years. In men, the prevalence of high-risk alcohol drinking was 23.7%, with the highest prevalence found in middle-aged adults. In women, the prevalence of high-risk alcohol drinking was 4.2%, with the highest prevalence found in younger adults. Men had higher weighted mean AUDIT scores than women (10.0 vs. 4.0, P<0.001, and age was negatively associated with the AUDIT score (P<0.001. Elementary school graduates had higher mean AUDIT scores than senior high school (P = 0.003 or college (P<0.001 graduates. Regarding occupation, clerical support workers (P = 0.002 and service and sales workers (P<0.001 had higher mean AUDIT scores than managers and professionals. Logistic regression analyses of high-risk alcohol drinking using sex, age, education level, number of family members, household income, and occupation as covariates was performed. Women had a lower risk of high-risk alcohol drinking (odds ratio (OR 0.14, 95% CI: 0.13-0.16, P<0.001 than men. Regarding age, compared to control

  4. The Relationship of Perceptions of Alcohol Promotion and Peer Drinking Norms to Alcohol Problems Reported by College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, John D.; McDonnell, Anita Lyn

    2000-01-01

    Four-hundred three randomly selected college students were interviewed using a modified version of the Core Survey to assess alcohol consumption and its related problems. Path analysis supported the viability of two models. When controlling for individual characteristics, perceptions of peer drinking predicted alcohol use, which predicted alcohol…

  5. Symptoms of Alcohol Dependence Predict Suicide Ideation Among Alaskan Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCou, Christopher R; Skewes, Monica C

    2016-05-01

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between alcohol-related problems and suicidal ideation (SI). The present study evaluated, simultaneously, alcohol consequences and symptoms of alcohol dependence as predictors of SI after adjusting for depressive symptoms and alcohol consumption. A sample of 298 Alaskan undergraduates completed survey measures, including the Young Adult Alcohol Consequences Questionnaire, the Short Alcohol Dependence Data Questionnaire, and the Beck Depression Inventory - II. The association between alcohol problems and SI status was evaluated using sequential logistic regression. Symptoms of alcohol dependence (OR = 1.88, p < .05), but not alcohol-related consequences (OR = 1.01, p = .95), emerged as an independent predictor of SI status above and beyond depressive symptoms (OR = 2.39, p < .001) and alcohol consumption (OR = 1.08, p = .39). Alcohol dependence symptoms represented a unique risk for SI relative to alcohol-related consequences and alcohol consumption. Future research should examine the causal mechanism behind the relationship between alcohol dependence and suicidality among university students. Assessing the presence of dependence symptoms may improve the accuracy of identifying students at risk of SI.

  6. Development of a brief, self-administered instrument for assessing sleep knowledge in medical education: "the ASKME Survey".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zozula, R; Bodow, M; Yatcilla, D; Cody, R; Rosen, R C

    2001-03-15

    This report describes the construction and validation of a brief self-administered scale to assess sleep knowledge in medical education ("ASKME Survey"). Few measures of this type have been developed previously; none have been validated or widely adopted. The current instrument was designed as a standardized assessment measure for use in medical education in sleep. Instrument was developed in four phases: initial item selection, expert panel review, reliability and construct validity assessment, and final item selection. Content validity was assessed in six general domains: basic sleep principles; circadian sleep/wake regulation; normal sleep architecture; sleep disorders; effects of drugs and alcohol on sleep; and sleep in medical disorders. N/A. Medical students at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School (RWJMS) and University of Kentucky College of Medicine; students in clinical psychology, nursing and other health-related professions at Rutgers University; school nurses at Texas Christian University; practicing physicians; accredited sleep specialists. N/A. Individual item analysis of 30-item survey demonstrated a high degree of discriminant validity. Internal consistency for test items was relatively high (KR-20=0.89). Overall mean percentage correct was highest for accredited sleep specialists (85.3%+/-10.8%) and lowest for school nurses (53.1%+/-13.7%). Significant group differences were observed across all question categories (p students scored significantly higher than the nurses on questions related to sleep architecture (59.5% vs. 42.5%) and narcolepsy (36.4% vs. 21.3%). "ASKME" demonstrates a high degree of internal consistency and reliability among survey items. It discriminates between samples with varied levels of education, experience, and specialty training. The survey is currently available via the American Academy of Sleep Medicine website (http://www.aasmnet.org).

  7. The Use of Trace Eyeblink Classical Conditioning to Assess Hippocampal Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tuan D; Amin, Aenia; Jones, Keith G; Sheffer, Ellen M; Ortega, Lidia; Dolman, Keith

    2017-08-05

    Neonatal rats were administered a relatively high concentration of ethyl alcohol (11.9% v/v) during postnatal days 4-9, a time when the fetal brain undergoes rapid organizational change and is similar to accelerated brain changes that occur during the third trimester in humans. This model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) produces severe brain damage, mimicking the amount and pattern of binge-drinking that occurs in some pregnant alcoholic mothers. We describe the use of trace eyeblink classical conditioning (ECC), a higher-order variant of associative learning, to assess long-term hippocampal dysfunction that is typically seen in alcohol-exposed adult offspring. At 90 days of age, rodents were surgically prepared with recording and stimulating electrodes, which measured electromyographic (EMG) blink activity from the left eyelid muscle and delivered mild shock posterior to the left eye, respectively. After a 5 day recovery period, they underwent 6 sessions of trace ECC to determine associative learning differences between alcohol-exposed and control rats. Trace ECC is one of many possible ECC procedures that can be easily modified using the same equipment and software, so that different neural systems can be assessed. ECC procedures in general, can be used as diagnostic tools for detecting neural pathology in different brain systems and different conditions that insult the brain.

  8. Sexual orientation differences in the relationship between victimization and hazardous drinking among women in the National Alcohol Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drabble, Laurie; Trocki, Karen F; Hughes, Tonda L; Korcha, Rachael A; Lown, Anne E

    2013-09-01

    This study examined relationships between past experiences of victimization (sexual abuse and physical abuse in childhood, sexual abuse and physical abuse in adulthood, and lifetime victimization) and hazardous drinking among sexual minority women compared to exclusively heterosexual women. Data were from 11,169 women responding to sexual identity and sexual behavior questions from three National Alcohol Survey waves: 2000 (n = 3,880), 2005 (n = 3,464), and 2010 (n = 3,825). A hazardous drinking index was constructed from five dichotomous variables (5+ drinking in the past year, drinking two or more drinks daily, drinking to intoxication in the past year, two or more lifetime dependence symptoms, and two or more lifetime drinking-related negative consequences). Exclusively heterosexual women were compared with three groups of sexual minority women: lesbian, bisexual, and women who identified as heterosexual but reported same-sex partners. Each of the sexual minority groups reported significantly higher rates of lifetime victimization (59.1% lesbians, 76% bisexuals, and 64.4% heterosexual women reporting same-sex partners) than exclusively heterosexual women (42.3%). Odds for hazardous drinking among sexual minority women were attenuated when measures of victimization were included in the regression models. Sexual minority groups had significantly higher odds of hazardous drinking, even after controlling for demographic and victimization variables: lesbian (ORadj = 2.0, CI = 1.1-3.9, p sexual minority women. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Sex differences in antisocial personality disorder: results from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria, Analucia A; Blanco, Carlos; Petry, Nancy M; Skodol, Andrew E; Liu, Shang-Min; Grant, Bridget; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-07-01

    Despite the 3:1 prevalence ratio of men versus women with Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), research on sex differences on correlates of ASPD in the general population is scarce. The purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in childhood and adult adverse events, lifetime psychiatric comorbidity, and clinical correlates of DSM-IV ASPD. The sample included 819 men and 407 women with DSM-IV ASPD diagnosis. Data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) (N = 43,093). Compared to men, women with ASPD reported more frequent childhood emotional neglect (AOR = 2.25; 95% CI: 1.52-3.34) and sexual abuse (AOR = 4.20; 95% CI: 2.78-6.35), any parent-related adverse event during childhood (e.g., parental substance use disorder) (AOR = 2.47; 95% CI: 1.60-3.82), and adverse events during adulthood (AOR = 4.20; 95% CI: 2.78-6.35). Although women with ASPD present less violent antisocial behaviors and higher rates of aggressiveness and irritability (OR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.31-0.67), they have higher rates of victimization, greater impairment, and lower social support. Our findings suggest increased mental health needs in women with ASPD, meriting development of different treatment programs for women and men.

  10. Formaldehyde in Alcoholic Beverages: Large Chemical Survey Using Purpald Screening Followed by Chromotropic Acid Spectrophotometry with Multivariate Curve Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien A. Jendral

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A strategy for analyzing formaldehyde in beer, wine, spirits, and unrecorded alcohol was developed, and 508 samples from worldwide origin were analyzed. In the first step, samples are qualitatively screened using a simple colorimetric test with the purpald reagent, which is extremely sensitive for formaldehyde (detection limit 0.1 mg/L. 210 samples (41% gave a positive purpald reaction. In the second step, formaldehyde in positive samples is confirmed by quantitative spectrophotometry of the chromotropic acid-formaldehyde derivative combined with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS. Calculation of UV-VIS and 13C NMR spectra confirmed the monocationic dibenzoxanthylium structure as the product of the reaction and disproved the widely cited para,para-quinoidal structure. Method validation for the spectrophotometric procedure showed a detection limit of 0.09 mg/L and a precision of 4.2–8.2% CV. In total, 132 samples (26% contained formaldehyde with an average of 0.27 mg/L (range 0–14.4 mg/L. The highest incidence occurred in tequila (83%, Asian spirits (59%, grape marc (54%, and brandy (50%. Our survey showed that only 9 samples (1.8% had formaldehyde levels above the WHO IPCS tolerable concentration of 2.6 mg/L.

  11. Formaldehyde in Alcoholic Beverages: Large Chemical Survey Using Purpald Screening Followed by Chromotropic Acid Spectrophotometry with Multivariate Curve Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendral, Julien A.; Monakhova, Yulia B.; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2011-01-01

    A strategy for analyzing formaldehyde in beer, wine, spirits, and unrecorded alcohol was developed, and 508 samples from worldwide origin were analyzed. In the first step, samples are qualitatively screened using a simple colorimetric test with the purpald reagent, which is extremely sensitive for formaldehyde (detection limit 0.1 mg/L). 210 samples (41%) gave a positive purpald reaction. In the second step, formaldehyde in positive samples is confirmed by quantitative spectrophotometry of the chromotropic acid-formaldehyde derivative combined with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS). Calculation of UV-VIS and 13C NMR spectra confirmed the monocationic dibenzoxanthylium structure as the product of the reaction and disproved the widely cited para,para-quinoidal structure. Method validation for the spectrophotometric procedure showed a detection limit of 0.09 mg/L and a precision of 4.2–8.2% CV. In total, 132 samples (26%) contained formaldehyde with an average of 0.27 mg/L (range 0–14.4 mg/L). The highest incidence occurred in tequila (83%), Asian spirits (59%), grape marc (54%), and brandy (50%). Our survey showed that only 9 samples (1.8%) had formaldehyde levels above the WHO IPCS tolerable concentration of 2.6 mg/L. PMID:21760790

  12. Longitudinal course of panic disorder with and without agoraphobia using the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, William; Brown, Ruth; Roberson-Nay, Roxann

    2013-06-30

    Few naturalistic, longitudinal studies of panic disorder with and without agoraphobia (PD/PDA) exist, limiting our knowledge of the temporal rates of incidence, relapse, and chronicity, or the factors that predict category transition. Data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) wave 1 (n=43,093) and wave 2 (n=34,653) were utilized to determine transitional rates, and predictors of category transitions, over a 3-year period. Analyses revealed very high 3-year remission rates for PD and PDA (75% and 67%, respectively), although relapse also was relatively frequent (PD=12%; PDA=21%). Logistic regression revealed previous history of panic attacks, generalized anxiety disorder/major depression (GAD/MDD), nicotine dependence, female sex, younger age, and major financial crises to be reliable predictors of incidence and relapse. The direction and magnitude of association of many predictor variables were similar for PD and PDA, with notable exceptions for social anxiety and romantic relationship factors. Clinicians should be aware of the relapsing-remitting nature of PD and PDA and, thus, take caution to not reduce or eliminate effective treatments prematurely. Similarly, the current study suggests clinicians pay particular attention to concurrent factors relevant to relapse in PD/PDA that may also be clinically addressed (e.g., co-morbid MDD/GAD and nicotine dependence). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Sex Differences in Antisocial Personality Disorder: Results From the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegria, Analucia A.; Petry, Nancy M.; Liu, Shang-Min; Blanco, Carlos; Skodol, Andrew E.; Grant, Bridget; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Despite the 3:1 prevalence ratio of men versus women with Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), research on sex differences on correlates of ASPD in the general population is scarce. The purpose of this study was to examine sex differences in childhood and adult adverse events, lifetime psychiatric comorbidity, and clinical correlates of DSM–IV ASPD. The sample included 819 men and 407 women with DSM-IV ASPD diagnosis. Data were derived from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) (N = 43,093). Compared to men, women with ASPD reported more frequent childhood emotional neglect (AOR = 2.25; 95% CI: 1.52–3.34) and sexual abuse (AOR = 4.20; 95% CI: 2.78–6.35), any parent-related adverse event during childhood (e.g., parental substance use disorder) (AOR = 2.47; 95% CI: 1.60–3.82), and adverse events during adulthood (AOR = 4.20; 95% CI: 2.78–6.35). Although women with ASPD present less violent antisocial behaviors and higher rates of aggressiveness and irritability (OR = 0.46; 95% CI: 0.31–0.67), they have higher rates of victimization, greater impairment, and lower social support. Our findings suggest increased mental health needs in women with ASPD, meriting development of different treatment programs for women and men. PMID:23544428

  14. Formaldehyde in alcoholic beverages: large chemical survey using purpald screening followed by chromotropic Acid spectrophotometry with multivariate curve resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendral, Julien A; Monakhova, Yulia B; Lachenmeier, Dirk W

    2011-01-01

    A strategy for analyzing formaldehyde in beer, wine, spirits, and unrecorded alcohol was developed, and 508 samples from worldwide origin were analyzed. In the first step, samples are qualitatively screened using a simple colorimetric test with the purpald reagent, which is extremely sensitive for formaldehyde (detection limit 0.1 mg/L). 210 samples (41%) gave a positive purpald reaction. In the second step, formaldehyde in positive samples is confirmed by quantitative spectrophotometry of the chromotropic acid-formaldehyde derivative combined with Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS). Calculation of UV-VIS and (13)C NMR spectra confirmed the monocationic dibenzoxanthylium structure as the product of the reaction and disproved the widely cited para,para-quinoidal structure. Method validation for the spectrophotometric procedure showed a detection limit of 0.09 mg/L and a precision of 4.2-8.2% CV. In total, 132 samples (26%) contained formaldehyde with an average of 0.27 mg/L (range 0-14.4 mg/L). The highest incidence occurred in tequila (83%), Asian spirits (59%), grape marc (54%), and brandy (50%). Our survey showed that only 9 samples (1.8%) had formaldehyde levels above the WHO IPCS tolerable concentration of 2.6 mg/L.

  15. Testing the Assumption of Measurement Invariance in the SAMHSA Mental Health and Alcohol Abuse Stigma Assessment in Older Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    King-Kallimanis, B.L.; Oort, F.J.; Lynn, N.; Schonfeld, L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the assumption of measurement invariance of the SAMSHA Mental Health and Alcohol Abuse Stigma Assessment. This is necessary to make valid comparisons across time and groups. The data come from the Primary Care Research in Substance Abuse and Mental Health for Elderly trial, a

  16. Neurocognitive parameters should be incorporated in the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 assessment of patients with alcohol use disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walvoort, S.J.W.; Wester, A.J.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Treatment planning for alcohol use disorder (AUD) patients is often preceded by the assessment of psychopathology and personality with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2). However, during periods of abstinence, cognitive impairments (e.g. attention,

  17. Relevance of Campus Climate for Alcohol and Other Drug Use among LGBTQ Community College Students: A Statewide Qualitative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Patricia; Pring, Lauren; Glider, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    Literature suggests that individuals who identify as LGBTQ may engage in more alcohol and other drug (AOD) use/abuse than others. Little data is available about these populations on college campuses where AOD use may be seen as part of the general campus climate and culture. This article will describe a qualitative needs assessment conducted on 10…

  18. Adjusting for unrecorded consumption in survey and per capita sales data: quantification of impact on gender- and age-specific alcohol-attributable fractions for oral and pharyngeal cancers in Great Britain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Petra Sylvia; Meng, Yang; Holmes, John; Baumberg, Ben; Purshouse, Robin; Hill-McManus, Daniel; Brennan, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Large discrepancies are typically found between per capita alcohol consumption estimated via survey data compared with sales, excise or production figures. This may lead to significant inaccuracies when calculating levels of alcohol-attributable harms. Using British data, we demonstrate an approach to adjusting survey data to give more accurate estimates of per capita alcohol consumption. First, sales and survey data are adjusted to account for potential biases (e.g. self-pouring, under-sampled populations) using evidence from external data sources. Secondly, survey and sales data are aligned using different implementations of Rehm et al.'s method [in (2010) Statistical modeling of volume of alcohol exposure for epidemiological studies of population health: the US example. Pop Health Metrics 8, 1-12]. Thirdly, the impact of our approaches is tested by using our revised survey dataset to calculate alcohol-attributable fractions (AAFs) for oral and pharyngeal cancers. British sales data under-estimate per capita consumption by 8%, primarily due to illicit alcohol. Adjustments to survey data increase per capita consumption estimates by 35%, primarily due to under-sampling of dependent drinkers and under-estimation of home-poured spirits volumes. Before aligning sales and survey data, the revised survey estimate remains 22% lower than the revised sales estimate. Revised AAFs for oral and pharyngeal cancers are substantially larger with our preferred method for aligning data sources, yielding increases in an AAF from the original survey dataset of 0.47-0.60 (males) and 0.28-0.35 (females). It is possible to use external data sources to adjust survey data to reduce the under-estimation of alcohol consumption and then account for residual under-estimation using a statistical calibration technique. These revisions lead to markedly higher estimated levels of alcohol-attributable harm.

  19. A "parliamentary inquiry" into alcohol and drugs: a survey of psychoactive substance use and gambling among members of the Dutch parliament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, V M; Garretsen, H F; van de Goor, L A

    1997-05-01

    In the fall of 1994 a survey was conducted on the use of alcohol and drugs and on gambling among members of the Dutch parliament. The survey indicated that almost two-thirds of the representatives sampled supported legalization of marijuana. A smaller majority (57%) was in favor of reducing the number of coffee shops selling marijuana. At least a quarter of the members of parliament had used marijuana themselves at one time or other. Alcohol consumption could be said to be "excessive" or "very excessive" for nearly 10% of the members of parliament. In general, the nature and extent of the parliamentarians' substance use was comparable to that in the Dutch general population.

  20. The economic costs of alcohol abuse: an assessment of current methods and estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heien, D M; Pittman, D J

    1989-11-01

    This article provides an exposition and critical review of the methods and assumptions used by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism to estimate the economic costs of alcohol abuse. Particular attention is paid to the methods used to estimate productivity loss which comprises over half of total abuse costs. This study concludes that these estimates are inaccurate and that they continually overstate actual costs. The main reasons for this overstatement are the attribution of causality to alcohol abuse where none has been shown to exist and improper methodology with regard to productivity impairment measures. In addition to being inaccurate at any point in time, the estimates are not a valid measure of the costs over time due to changing definitions of what constitutes alcohol abuse and lack of correction for inflation. Also, the method used implies cost comparisons with a society with no alcohol abuse. As a result of these considerations the estimates lack policy relevance.

  1. A systematic review of childhood maltreatment assessments in population-representative surveys since 1990.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Hovdestad

    Full Text Available Population-representative surveys that assess childhood maltreatment and health are a valuable resource to explore the implications of child maltreatment for population health. Systematic identification and evaluation of such surveys is needed to facilitate optimal use of their data and to inform future research.To inform researchers of the existence and nature of population-representative surveys relevant to understanding links between childhood maltreatment and health; to evaluate the assessment of childhood maltreatment in this body of work.We included surveys that: 1 were representative of the non-institutionalized population of any size nation or of any geopolitical region ≥ 10 million people; 2 included a broad age range (≥ 40 years; 3 measured health; 4 assessed childhood maltreatment retrospectively; and 5 were conducted since 1990. We used Internet and database searching (including CINAHL, Embase, ERIC, Global Health, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Scopus, Social Policy and Practice: January 1990 to March 2014, expert consultation, and other means to identify surveys and associated documentation. Translations of non-English survey content were verified by fluent readers of survey languages. We developed checklists to abstract and evaluate childhood maltreatment content.Fifty-four surveys from 39 countries met inclusion criteria. Sample sizes ranged from 1,287-51,945 and response rates from 15%-96%. Thirteen surveys assessed neglect, 15 emotional abuse; 18 exposure to family violence; 26 physical abuse; 48 sexual abuse. Fourteen surveys assessed more than three types; six of these were conducted since 2010. In nine surveys childhood maltreatment assessments were detailed (+10 items for at least one type of maltreatment. Seven surveys' assessments had known reliability and/or validity.Data from 54 surveys can be used to explore the population health relevance of child maltreatment. Assessment of childhood maltreatment is not comprehensive but

  2. Survey of mental health nurses' attitudes towards risk assessment, risk assessment tools and positive risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, C; Gill, A; Doyle, L; Morrissey, J; Higgins, A

    2016-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Risk assessment and safety planning are a core aspect of the role of the mental health nurse. Conflicting views exist on the value of risk assessment tools. Few studies have examined mental health nurses' attitudes towards risk, including use of tools and the role of positive risk in recovery. WHAT THE PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Mental health nurses view risk assessment as a core dimension of their role and not merely an exercise to fulfil organizational clinical safety and governance obligations. The majority of nurses hold positive attitudes towards therapeutic or positive risk, and consider creative risk taking as vital to people's recovery. The majority of nurses believe that risk assessment tools facilitate professional decision making, however, some are concerned that tools may negatively impact upon therapeutic relationships. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Ongoing education on the use of risk assessment tools is required to minimize views that their use is incompatible with therapeutic engagement, and to enable nurses to develop confidence to engage with positive risk and to allow service users make decisions and take responsibility. Introduction Risk assessment and safety planning are considered core components of the role of the mental heal