WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey usgs implemented

  1. SURVEYS: Outlines of U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology Program (USGS/CMGP) seafloor mapping surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This is a polygon GIS data layer showing the location and extent of various sidescan, multibeam and swath bathymetry surveys conducted by the USGS, Coastal and...

  2. Public Land Survey System of Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, USGS (2003) [plss_la_usgs_2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — This data set portrays the Public Land Surveys of the United States, including areas of private survey, Donation Land Claims, and Land Grants and Civil Colonies....

  3. 2009 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Lidar: Umpqua River Study Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Umpqua River study site in collaboration with the...

  4. 2006 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Bare Earth Topographic LiDAR: North Puget Sound, Washington

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract Number: 01CRCN0014 In Spring, 2006 Sanborn was contracted by the USGS to survey aprocimately 1,735 square miles of western Whatcom and Skagit Counties...

  5. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center-fiscal year 2010 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Janice S.

    2011-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) facility focused on providing science and imagery to better understand our Earth. The work of the Center is shaped by the earth sciences, the missions of our stakeholders, and implemented through strong program and project management, and application of state-of-the-art information technologies. Fundamentally, EROS contributes to the understanding of a changing Earth through 'research to operations' activities that include developing, implementing, and operating remote-sensing-based terrestrial monitoring capabilities needed to address interdisciplinary science and applications objectives at all levels-both nationally and internationally. The Center's programs and projects continually strive to meet, and where possible exceed, the changing needs of the USGS, the Department of the Interior, our Nation, and international constituents. The Center's multidisciplinary staff uses their unique expertise in remote sensing science and technologies to conduct basic and applied research, data acquisition, systems engineering, information access and management, and archive preservation to address the Nation's most critical needs. Of particular note is the role of EROS as the primary provider of Landsat data, the longest comprehensive global land Earth observation record ever collected. This report is intended to provide an overview of the scientific and engineering achievements and illustrate the range and scope of the activities and accomplishments at EROS throughout fiscal year (FY) 2010. Additional information concerning the scientific, engineering, and operational achievements can be obtained from the scientific papers and other documents published by EROS staff or by visiting our web site at http://eros.usgs.gov. We welcome comments and follow-up questions on any aspect of this Annual Report and invite any of our customers or partners to contact us at their convenience. To

  6. SEABOSS Images from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2010-015-FA in JPEG Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Connecticut Department of Energy and...

  7. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center-Fiscal Year 2009 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Janice S.

    2010-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center is a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) facility focused on providing science and imagery to better understand our Earth. As part of the USGS Geography Discipline, EROS contributes to the Land Remote Sensing (LRS) Program, the Geographic Analysis and Monitoring (GAM) Program, and the National Geospatial Program (NGP), as well as our Federal partners and cooperators. The work of the Center is shaped by the Earth sciences, the missions of our stakeholders, and implemented through strong program and project management and application of state-of-the-art information technologies. Fundamentally, EROS contributes to the understanding of a changing Earth through 'research to operations' activities that include developing, implementing, and operating remote sensing based terrestrial monitoring capabilities needed to address interdisciplinary science and applications objectives at all levels-both nationally and internationally. The Center's programs and projects continually strive to meet and/or exceed the changing needs of the USGS, the Department of the Interior, our Nation, and international constituents. The Center's multidisciplinary staff uses their unique expertise in remote sensing science and technologies to conduct basic and applied research, data acquisition, systems engineering, information access and management, and archive preservation to address the Nation's most critical needs. Of particular note is the role of EROS as the primary provider of Landsat data, the longest comprehensive global land Earth observation record ever collected. This report is intended to provide an overview of the scientific and engineering achievements and illustrate the range and scope of the activities and accomplishments at EROS throughout fiscal year (FY) 2009. Additional information concerning the scientific, engineering, and operational achievements can be obtained from the scientific papers and other documents published by

  8. Raw navigation files logged with HYPACK Survey software during a geophysical survey conducted by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  9. USGS Publications Warehouse

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Publications Warehouse is a metadata clearinghouse of all USGS Series Publications produced by the bureau since 1879. It is managed and operated as part of...

  10. Coastal Bathymetry Data Collected in 2016 nearshore from West Ship Island to Horn Island, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey Saint Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (USGS SPCMSC), in cooperation with the United States Army Corps of Engineers...

  11. Survey lines along which interferometric sonar data were collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_BathyBackscatterTrackline.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  12. Location of Sea-Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) field activity 05007 (RAFA05007) from Quicks Hole, Massachusetts (RAF05007_BOTPHOTOS shapefile, Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  13. SEABOSS Images from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruises 2009-059-FA and 2010-010-FA in JPEG Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Connecticut Department of Energy and...

  14. Location of Sea Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2011-006-FA in Rhode Island Sound (2011-006_995BOTPHOTOS, Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  15. Implementation of unmanned aircraft systems by the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cress, J.J.; Sloan, J.L.; Hutt, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Project Office is leading the implementation of UAS technology in anticipation of transforming the research methods and management techniques employed across the Department of the Interior. UAS technology is being made available to monitor environmental conditions, analyse the impacts of climate change, respond to natural hazards, understand landscape change rates and consequences, conduct wildlife inventories and support related land management missions. USGS is teaming with the Department of the Interior Aviation Management Directorate (AMD) to lead the safe and cost-effective adoption of UAS technology by the Department of the Interior Agencies and USGS scientists.

  16. Digital Object Identifiers (DOI's) usage and adoption in U.S Geological Survey (USGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, M. T.; Palanisamy, G.

    2013-12-01

    Addressing grand environmental science challenges requires unprecedented access to easily understood data that cross the breadth of temporal, spatial, and thematic scales. From a scientist's perspective, the big challenges lie in discovering the relevant data, dealing with extreme data heterogeneity, large data volumes, and converting data to information and knowledge. Historical linkages between derived products, i.e. Publications, and associated datasets has not existed in the earth science community. The USGS Core Science Analytics and Synthesis, in collaboration with DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Mercury Consortium (funded by NASA, USGS and DOE), established a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) service for USGS data, metadata, and other media. This service is offered in partnership through the University of California Digital Library EZID service. USGS scientists, data managers, and other professionals can generate globally unique, persistent and resolvable identifiers for any kind of digital objects. Additional efforts to assign DOIs to historical data and publications have also been underway. These DOI identifiers are being used to cite data in journal articles, web-accessible datasets, and other media for distribution, integration, and in support of improved data management practices. The session will discuss the current DOI efforts within USGS, including a discussion on adoption, challenges, and future efforts necessary to improve access, reuse, sharing, and discoverability of USGS data and information.

  17. 2010 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) ARRA Topographic LiDAR: Coastal Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026 Task Order Number: G10PD02143 Task Order Number: G10PD01027 LiDAR was collected at a 2.0 meter nominal post spacing (2.0m GSD) for...

  18. 2010 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Topographic LiDAR: Mobile Bay, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026 Task Order Number: G10PD00578 LiDAR was collected at a nominal pulse spacing of 2.0 meters for a 700 square mile area to the east of Mobile...

  19. SEABOSS Images from Block Island Sound Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2011-006-FA in JPEG Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in cooperation with NOAA, is producing detailed maps of the seafloor off southern New England. The current phase of this cooperative research program is...

  20. USGS map quadrangles

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS map quandrangle boundaries with names and unique identifiers for the 1:24,000 (7.5 minute) quadrangles. Additional attributes provide unique identifiers and...

  1. Chan13_IFB_tracklines: Shapefile of the Interferometric Swath Bathymetry (IFB) tracklines from USGS FAN 13BIM02 surveyed in July 2013 and 13BIM07 surveyed in August 2013 around the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the Barrier Island Evolution Research Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC)...

  2. USGS Small-scale Dataset - Public Land Survey System of the United States 201011 Shapefile

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set portrays the Public Land Surveys of the United States, including areas of private survey, Donation Land Claims, and Land Grants and Civil Colonies....

  3. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region: Seabirds Coastal and Ocean Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsinger, Anne E.

    2009-01-01

    From the cold, high Arctic area of Alaska to the warm, tropical Pacific area of Hawai'i, a diverse array of seabird species numbering in the millions of individuals live off the bounty of the Pacific Ocean. Many come to land only to nest and raise their young - these are species supremely adapted for life on the water, whether it be near the coast or hundreds of miles at sea. Those seabirds that reside in the North Pacific year-round are joined each summer by millions of migrant birds that leave the southern hemisphere in winter for better feeding conditions in the north. Seabirds in the Pacific remain one of the great wildlife spectacles on the earth. Yet, seabirds face a number of threats such as oil spills, introduction of predators to their nesting islands, and conflicts with fisheries. State and Federal agencies require increasingly sophisticated information on population dynamics, breeding biology, and feeding ecology to successfully manage these species and their ecosystems. Within the Western Region of the USGS, scientists from the Alaska Science Center (ASC), Western Ecological Research Center (WERC), and Pacific Islands Ecosystems Research Center are leading the way in conducting research on many of these little known species. Their aim is to improve our understanding of seabirds in the Pacific and to provide information to support informed management of the birds and their ecosystems.

  4. 77 FR 11565 - Agency Information Collection: Comment Request AGENCY: United States Geological Survey (USGS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ....S. Geological Survey Agency Information Collection: Comment Request AGENCY: United States Geological... Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program (NCGMP)--EDMAP and STATEMAP. As required by the Paperwork Reduction Act... Information Collection Clearance Officer, U.S. Geological Survey, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS 807, Reston...

  5. USGS integrated drought science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostroff, Andrea C.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Lambert, Patrick M.; Booth, Nathaniel L.; Carter, Shawn L.; Stoker, Jason M.; Focazio, Michael J.

    2017-06-05

    Project Need and OverviewDrought poses a serious threat to the resilience of human communities and ecosystems in the United States (Easterling and others, 2000). Over the past several years, many regions have experienced extreme drought conditions, fueled by prolonged periods of reduced precipitation and exceptionally warm temperatures. Extreme drought has far-reaching impacts on water supplies, ecosystems, agricultural production, critical infrastructure, energy costs, human health, and local economies (Milly and others, 2005; Wihlite, 2005; Vörösmarty and others, 2010; Choat and others, 2012; Ledger and others, 2013). As global temperatures continue to increase, the frequency, severity, extent, and duration of droughts are expected to increase across North America, affecting both humans and natural ecosystems (Parry and others, 2007).The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long, proven history of delivering science and tools to help decision-makers manage and mitigate effects of drought. That said, there is substantial capacity for improved integration and coordination in the ways that the USGS provides drought science. A USGS Drought Team was formed in August 2016 to work across USGS Mission Areas to identify current USGS drought-related research and core capabilities. This information has been used to initiate the development of an integrated science effort that will bring the full USGS capacity to bear on this national crisis.

  6. USGS Scientific Visualization Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the National Center in Reston, Va., provides a central facility where USGS employees can use state-of-the-art equipment for projects ranging from presentation graphics preparation to complex visual representations of scientific data. Equipment including color printers, black-and-white and color scanners, film recorders, video equipment, and DOS, Apple Macintosh, and UNIX platforms with software are available for both technical and nontechnical users. The laboratory staff provides assistance and demonstrations in the use of the hardware and software products.

  7. Shot-Point Navigation for the Boomer High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Profiles Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) R/V Rafael Cruise 08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts (08034_BOOMERNAV.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  8. DH_USGS_backscatter1m: Composite sidescan-sonar mosaic collected by the U.S. Geological Survey offshore of Massachusetts between Duxbury and Hull (UTM Zone 19N GeoTIFF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  9. 2013-005_299SEDDATA.SHP: Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 2013-005-FA in H12299 Study Area in Block Island Sound (Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  10. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 2010-033 in Rhode Island Sound (2010-033_996SEDDATA.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  11. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 2012-002-FA in H12296 Study Area in Block Island Sound (2012-002_296SEDDATA.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  12. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 2013-005-FA in H12298 Study Area in Block Island Sound (2013-005_298SEDDATA.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  13. Location of Sea-Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 06005 (RAFA06005) in Great Round Shoal Channel, Offshore Massachusetts (RAF06005_BOTPHOTOS, Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  14. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 07034 in the Vicinity of Woods Hole, Offshore Massachusetts (RAFA07034_SEDIMENT.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  15. Location of Sea Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2010-010 in Long Island Sound, North of Orient Point, New York (2010-010_OPBOTPHOTOS, Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  16. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 08012 in the Vicinity of Edgartown Harbor, Offshore Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts (RAFA08012_SEDDATA.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  17. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 2011-006-FA in Rhode Island Sound (2011-006_995SEDDATA.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  18. Single-Beam Bathymetric Data Collected in 2013 from the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Field Activity Numbers (FAN) 13BIM03, 13BIM04, 13BIM08.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the Barrier Island Evolution Research Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC)...

  19. Locations of Sea-Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2011-006-FA in the Vicinity of Cross Rip Channel, Offshore Massachusetts (2011_006_CRBOTPHOTOS shapefile, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  20. Line Navigation for the Boomer High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Profiles Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) R/V Rafael Cruise 08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts (08034_BOOMERNAVLINE.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  1. Locations of Sea-Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2010-015-FA Offshore in Northeastern Long Island Sound (Geographic, WGS84, H12012_BOTPHOTOS.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Connecticut Department of Energy and...

  2. Shot-Point Navigation (500 Shot Interval) for the Chirp High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Profiles Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) R/V Rafael Cruise 08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts (08034_KELNAV500.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  3. Line Navigation for the Chirp High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection Profiles Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) R/V Rafael Cruise 08034 off Edgartown, Massachusetts (08034_KELNAVLINE.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone...

  4. Text Files of the DGPS Navigation Logged with HYPACK Software During SEABOSS Operations on U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2010-010-FA from April 17 to April 18, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Connecticut Department of Energy and...

  5. Location of Sea-Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2012-002-FA in Block Island Sound (2012-002_296BOTPHOTOS shapefile, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  6. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 2014-046-FA in H12324 Study Area in Block Island Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  7. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise R/V RAFAEL 2012-002-FA in H12023 Study Area in Block Island Sound (2012-002_023SEDDATA.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  8. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Contributions to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, L.

    2006-05-01

    As the lead Federal agency responsible for terrestrial observations of the Earth's natural systems, the USGS is uniquely poised to contribute critical data and observing systems, scientific interpretation, data archiving, standards, interoperability support, and education resources to GEOSS. In addition, USGS manages the current Landsat satellites and is working with NASA on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission, to launch the next generation of a Landsat-type Earth surface observing satellite. One of the largest imagery archives in the world is also served through the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center. USGS contributions to GEOSS include improvement of the global seismographic networks and 24/7 monitoring through the USGS National Earthquake Information Center. Additions to our seismic network are being installed in the Caribbean, telemetry and earthquake analysis being improved globally, and new products like the Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) are being developed. We are partnering with numerous agencies and institutions to provide a global tsunami warning system, as well as a more extensive warning system in the United States The USGS and its partners are developing, harmonizing, and analyzing a wide range of data that provide diverse social benefits including base maps, land use, land cover change, and terrestrial observations of ecologic, geologic, and hydrologic conditions to understand global issues such as water availability and quality, ecosystem health, the effects of drought, vulnerability to famine, and the spread of zoonotic and other diseases. USGS is a member of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites working with the earth satellite community to provide accessibility and coordination of Landsat data and other satellite assets.

  9. U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Activities in the Exploration of Antarctica: Introduction to Antarctica (Including USGS Field Personnel: 1946-59)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony K. Meunier Edited by Williams, Richard S.; Ferrigno, Jane G.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Antarctica is the planet's fifth largest continent [13.2 million km2 (5.1 million mi2)]; it contains the Earth's largest (of two) remaining ice sheets; it is considered to be one of the most important scientific laboratories on Earth. This report is the introduction to a series that covers 60 years of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientific activity in Antarctica. It will concentrate primarily on three major topics:

  10. USGS science in Menlo Park -- a science strategy for the U.S. Geological Survey Menlo Park Science Center, 2005-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Carr, Michael D.; Halsing, David L.; John, David A.; Langenheim, V.E.; Mangan, Margaret T.; Marvin-DiPasquale, Mark C.; Takekawa, John Y.; Tiedeman, Claire R.

    2006-01-01

    In the spring of 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Menlo Park Center Council commissioned an interdisciplinary working group to develop a forward-looking science strategy for the USGS Menlo Park Science Center in California (hereafter also referred to as "the Center"). The Center has been the flagship research center for the USGS in the western United States for more than 50 years, and the Council recognizes that science priorities must be the primary consideration guiding critical decisions made about the future evolution of the Center. In developing this strategy, the working group consulted widely within the USGS and with external clients and collaborators, so that most stakeholders had an opportunity to influence the science goals and operational objectives.The Science Goals are to: Natural Hazards: Conduct natural-hazard research and assessments critical to effective mitigation planning, short-term forecasting, and event response. Ecosystem Change: Develop a predictive understanding of ecosystem change that advances ecosystem restoration and adaptive management. Natural Resources: Advance the understanding of natural resources in a geologic, hydrologic, economic, environmental, and global context. Modeling Earth System Processes: Increase and improve capabilities for quantitative simulation, prediction, and assessment of Earth system processes.The strategy presents seven key Operational Objectives with specific actions to achieve the scientific goals. These Operational Objectives are to:Provide a hub for technology, laboratories, and library services to support science in the Western Region. Increase advanced computing capabilities and promote sharing of these resources. Enhance the intellectual diversity, vibrancy, and capacity of the work force through improved recruitment and retention. Strengthen client and collaborative relationships in the community at an institutional level.Expand monitoring capability by increasing density, sensitivity, and

  11. USGS Tracks Acid Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, John D.; Nilles, Mark A.; Schroder, LeRoy J.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been actively studying acid rain for the past 15 years. When scientists learned that acid rain could harm fish, fear of damage to our natural environment from acid rain concerned the American public. Research by USGS scientists and other groups began to show that the processes resulting in acid rain are very complex. Scientists were puzzled by the fact that in some cases it was difficult to demonstrate that the pollution from automobiles and factories was causing streams or lakes to become more acidic. Further experiments showed how the natural ability of many soils to neutralize acids would reduce the effects of acid rain in some locations--at least as long as the neutralizing ability lasted (Young, 1991). The USGS has played a key role in establishing and maintaining the only nationwide network of acid rain monitoring stations. This program is called the National Atmospheric Deposition Program/National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Each week, at approximately 220 NADP/NTN sites across the country, rain and snow samples are collected for analysis. NADP/NTN site in Montana. The USGS supports about 72 of these sites. The information gained from monitoring the chemistry of our nation's rain and snow is important for testing the results of pollution control laws on acid rain.

  12. 2011 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Alabama Topographic LiDAR: Baldwin County East and West

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Contract: G10PC00026 Task Order Number: G10PD02126 LiDAR was collected at a 2.0 meter nominal post spacing (2.0m GSD) for approximately 329 square miles of...

  13. Text Files of the DGPS Navigation Logged with HYPACK Software on U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2011-006-FA from June 13 to June 21, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in cooperation with NOAA, is producing detailed maps of the seafloor off southern New England. The current phase of this cooperative research program is...

  14. Surficial Sediment Data Collected During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) RV Rafael cruise 2011-006-FA in Block Island Sound off Southwestern Rhode Island (2011_006BISSEDDATA.SHP, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in cooperation with NOAA, is producing detailed maps of the seafloor off southern New England. The current phase of this cooperative research program is...

  15. Locations of Sea-Floor Photographs Acquired During U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2011-006-FA in Block Island Sound (2011_006_BISBOTPHOTOS.SHP, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in cooperation with NOAA, is producing detailed maps of the seafloor off southern New England. The current phase of this cooperative research program is...

  16. Geographic Information System (GIS) representation of historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC), 1979 (NODC Accession 0000605)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Historical seagrass coverage in Perdido Bay 1979 from United States Geological Survey/National Wetlands Research Center (USGS/NWRC).

  17. Aligning USGS senior leadership structure with the USGS science strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is realigning its management and budget structure to further enhance the work of its science programs and their interdisciplinary focus areas related to the USGS Science Strategy as outlined in 'Facing Tomorrow's Challenges-U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017' (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007). In 2007, the USGS developed this science strategy outlining major natural-science issues facing the Nation and focusing on areas where natural science can make a substantial contribution to the well being of the Nation and the world. These areas include global climate change, water resources, natural hazards, energy and minerals, ecosystems, and data integration.

  18. Scanning and georeferencing historical USGS quadrangles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishburn, Kristin A.; Davis, Larry R.; Allord, Gregory J.

    2017-06-23

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program is scanning published USGS 1:250,000-scale and larger topographic maps printed between 1884, the inception of the topographic mapping program, and 2006. The goal of this project, which began publishing the Historical Topographic Map Collection in 2011, is to provide access to a digital repository of USGS topographic maps that is available to the public at no cost. For more than 125 years, USGS topographic maps have accurately portrayed the complex geography of the Nation. The USGS is the Nation’s largest producer of traditional topographic maps, and, prior to 2006, USGS topographic maps were created using traditional cartographic methods and printed using a lithographic process. The next generation of topographic maps, US Topo, is being released by the USGS in digital form, and newer technologies make it possible to also deliver historical maps in the same electronic format that is more publicly accessible.

  19. USGS Streamgage NHDPlus Version 1 Basins 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset represents 19,031 basin boundaries and their streamgage locations for the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) active and historical streamgages from the...

  20. Index Grids - QUADRANGLES_24K_USGS_IN: Boundaries of 7.5-Minute Quadrangles in Indiana, (United States Geological Survey, 1:24,000 Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — QUADRANGLES_24K_USGS_IN is a polygon shapefile defining the boundaries of the USGS 7.5-minute (1:24,000-scale) quadrangles which cover the state of Indiana. Dates of...

  1. Geology for a changing world 2010-2020-Implementing the U.S. Geological Survey science strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Linda C.S.; Belnap, Jayne; Goldhaber, Martin; Goldstein, Arthur; Haeussler, Peter J.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Jones, John W.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Thieler, E. Robert; Thompson, Robert S.; Back, Judith M.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a science strategy for the geologic activities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the years 2010-2020. It presents six goals with accompanying strategic actions and products that implement the science directions of USGS Circular 1309, 'Facing Tomorrow's Challenges-U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017.' These six goals focus on providing the geologic underpinning needed to wisely use our natural resources, understand and mitigate hazards and environmental change, and understand the relationship between humans and the environment. The goals emphasize the critical role of the USGS in providing long-term research, monitoring, and assessments for the Nation and the world. Further, they describe measures that must be undertaken to ensure geologic expertise and knowledge for the future. The natural science issues facing today's world are complex and cut across many scientific disciplines. The Earth is a system in which atmosphere, oceans, land, and life are all connected. Rocks and soils contain the answers to important questions about the origin of energy and mineral resources, the evolution of life, climate change, natural hazards, ecosystem structures and functions, and the movements of nutrients and toxicants. The science of geology has the power to help us understand the processes that link the physical and biological world so that we can model and forecast changes in the system. Ensuring the success of this strategy will require integration of geological knowledge with the other natural sciences and extensive collaboration across USGS science centers and with partners in Federal, State, and local agencies, academia, industry, nongovernmental organizations and, most importantly, the American public. The first four goals of this report describe the scientific issues facing society in the next 10 years and the actions and products needed to respond to these issues. The final two goals focus on the expertise and

  2. USGS Arctic Science Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shasby, Mark; Smith, Durelle

    2015-07-17

    The United States is one of eight Arctic nations responsible for the stewardship of a polar region undergoing dramatic environmental, social, and economic changes. Although warming and cooling cycles have occurred over millennia in the Arctic region, the current warming trend is unlike anything recorded previously and is affecting the region faster than any other place on Earth, bringing dramatic reductions in sea ice extent, altered weather, and thawing permafrost. Implications of these changes include rapid coastal erosion threatening villages and critical infrastructure, potentially significant effects on subsistence activities and cultural resources, changes to wildlife habitat, increased greenhouse-gas emissions from thawing permafrost, threat of invasive species, and opening of the Arctic Ocean to oil and gas exploration and increased shipping. The Arctic science portfolio of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and its response to climate-related changes focuses on landscapescale ecosystem and natural resource issues and provides scientific underpinning for understanding the physical processes that shape the Arctic. The science conducted by the USGS informs the Nation's resource management policies and improves the stewardship of the Arctic Region.

  3. Interpretation of Bottom Features from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surveys H12009, h12010, H12011, H12015, H12033, H12137, and H12139 and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2011-006-FA in Block Island Sound (BISOUND_INTERP.SHP, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in cooperation with NOAA, is producing detailed maps of the seafloor off southern New England. The current phase of this cooperative research program is...

  4. USGS Seafloor Mapping ATSV 99044 Chirp Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS ATSV 99044 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of the northern South...

  5. 2012 USGS Lidar: Brooks Camp (AK)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) had a requirement for high resolution Lidar needed for mapping the Brooks Camp region of Katmai National Park in Alaska....

  6. USGS Science Data Life Cycle Tools - Lessons Learned in moving to the Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, M. T.; Mancuso, T.; Hutchison, V.; Zolly, L.; Wheeler, B.; Urbanowski, S.; Devarakonda, R.; Palanisamy, G.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Core Science Systems has been working for the past year to design, re-architect, and implement several key tools and systems within the USGS Cloud Hosting Service supported by Amazon Web Services (AWS). As a result of emerging USGS data management policies that align with federal Open Data mandates, and as part of a concerted effort to respond to potential increasing user demand due to these policies, the USGS strategically began migrating its core data management tools and services to the AWS environment in hopes of leveraging cloud capabilities (i.e. auto-scaling, replication, etc.). The specific tools included: USGS Online Metadata Editor (OME); USGS Digital Object Identifier (DOI) generation tool; USGS Science Data Catalog (SDC); USGS ScienceBase system; and an integrative tool, the USGS Data Release Workbench, which steps bureau personnel through the process of releasing data. All of these tools existed long before the Cloud was available and presented significant challenges in migrating, re-architecting, securing, and moving to a Cloud based environment. Initially, a `lift and shift' approach, essentially moving as is, was attempted and various lessons learned about that approach will be discussed, along with recommendations that resulted from the development and eventual operational implementation of these tools. The session will discuss lessons learned related to management of these tools in an AWS environment; re-architecture strategies utilized for the tools; time investments through sprint allocations; initial benefits observed from operating within a Cloud based environment; and initial costs to support these data management tools.

  7. Interpretation of Bottom Features from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Survey H12007 and USGS Cruise 2011-006-FA in the Vicinity of Cross Rip Channel in Nantucket Sound, Offshore Southeastern Massachusetts (H12007_INTERP.SHP, Geographic, WGS84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  8. Chandeleurs_2013_50_NAD83_NAVD88_GEOID09_DEM.tif: 50-Meter Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of Coastal Bathymetry Collected in 2013 from the Chandeleur Islands, Louisiana (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Field Activity Numbers (FAN) 13BIM02, 13BIM03, 13BIM04, 13BIM07, and 13BIM08.)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the Barrier Island Evolution Research Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC)...

  9. Operating a global seismic network - perspectives from the USGS GSN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, L. S.; Derr, J. S.; Hutt, C. R.; Bolton, H.; Ford, D.; Gyure, G. S.; Storm, T.; Leith, W.

    2007-05-01

    The Global Seismographic Network (GSN) is a permanent digital network of state-of-the-art seismological and geophysical sensors connected by a global telecommunications network, serving as a multi-use scientific facility used for seismic monitoring for response applications, basic and applied research in solid earthquake geophysics, and earth science education. A joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the National Science Foundation, and Incorporated Research Institutions in Seismology (IRIS), the GSN provides near- uniform, worldwide monitoring of the Earth through 144 modern, globally distributed seismic stations. The USGS currently operates 90 GSN or GSN-affiliate stations. As a US government program, the USGS GSN is evaluated on several performance measures including data availability, data latency, and cost effectiveness. The USGS-component of the GSN, like the GSN as a whole, is in transition from a period of rapid growth to steady- state operations. The program faces challenges of aging equipment and increased operating costs at the same time that national and international earthquake and tsunami monitoring agencies place an increased reliance on GSN data. Data acquisition of the USGS GSN is based on the Quanterra Q680 datalogger, a workhorse system that is approaching twenty years in the field, often in harsh environments. An IRIS instrumentation committee recently selected the Quanterra Q330 HR as the "next generation" GSN data acquisition system, and the USGS will begin deploying the new equipment in the middle of 2007. These new systems will address many of the issues associated with the ageing Q680 while providing a platform for interoperability across the GSN.. In order to address the challenge of increasing operational costs, the USGS employs several tools. First, the USGS benefits from the contributions of local host institutions. The station operators are the first line of defense when a station experiences problems, changing boards

  10. Pharmaceutical Care Implementation: A Survey of Attitude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the attitude, perception and practice of pharmacists in Ogun State towards pharmaceutical care implementation. Methods: Pre-tested and validated structured questionnaire was administered to selected 120 hospital and community pharmacists to determine their knowledge, attitude and practice of ...

  11. Watershed Boundaries - WATERSHEDS_HUC06_USGS_IN: 6-Digit Accounting Units, Hydrologic Units, in Indiana, (Derived from US Geological Survey, 1:24,000 Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — WATERSHEDS_HUC06_USGS_IN is a polygon shapefile showing the boundaries of accounting units (HUA) in Indiana. Accounting units are noted by a 6-digit hydrologic unit....

  12. Hydrography - HYDROGRAPHY_HIGHRES_WATERBODYDISCRETE_NHD_USGS: Lakes, Ponds, Reservoirs, Swamps, and Marshes in Watersheds of Indiana (U. S. Geological Survey, 1:24,000, Polygon Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — HYDROGRAPHY_HIGHRES_WATERBODYDISCRETE_NHD_USGS.SHP is a polygon shapefile that contains features of lakes, ponds, reservoirs, swamps and marshes in watersheds in and...

  13. Revised (v. 1.1) Interpretation of Sedimentary Environments Based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Surveys H12009, H12010, H12011, H12015, H12033, H12137, and H12139, the adjacent 2011 NOAA survey H12299, and Verification Data from U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cruise 2011-006-FA Offshore in Block Island Sound (BISOUND_SEDENV_v1.1.SHP, Geographic, WGS 84)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in cooperation with NOAA, is producing detailed maps of the seafloor off southern New England. The current phase of this cooperative research program is...

  14. U.S. Geological Survey Gap Analysis Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Gap Analysis Program (GAP) is an element of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). GAP helps to implement the Department of Interior?s goals of inventory,...

  15. Implementation of the Aarhus convention - A survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Malis Sazdovska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Legislation on global and regional level in the field of environmental protection is characterized by the adoption of international conventions and agreements that attempt to regulate this matter legally. As an extremely important area, which exceeds the boundaries of nation-state and as a global environmental problem, the issues of environmental protection are a major concern to international organizations. It is directly linked to reducing the jurisdiction of the States and transfer of competences to international organizations and institutions in order to solve the problems in a global experience. In order to overcome the problems regarding the implementation of international documents, the creation of certain policies by international organizations and institutions is required to promote the idea of environmental protection as a basic mo$ o of the global world. Taking into account the recommendations of Brundtland Commission, humanity has a moral obligation to preserve natural resources for future generations. Main objective of this article is the presentation of research on the implementation of the Aarhus Convention and the proposal of measures for the creation of ideas and policies on improving access to information in the field. The research is done with the students from the faculty of Security which accessed the information in environmental matters.

  16. Development and Implementation of Culturally Tailored Offline Mobile Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Scott; Pérez-Ramos, José; Demment, Margaret M; Vélez Vega, Carmen; Avendaño, Esteban; Ossip, Deborah J; Dye, Timothy D

    2016-06-02

    In low and middle income countries (LMICs), and other areas with low resources and unreliable access to the Internet, understanding the emerging best practices for the implementation of new mobile health (mHealth) technologies is needed for efficient and secure data management and for informing public health researchers. Innovations in mHealth technology can improve on previous methods, and dissemination of project development details and lessons learned during implementation are needed to provide lessons learned to stakeholders in both the United States and LMIC settings. The aims of this paper are to share implementation strategies and lessons learned from the development and implementation stages of two survey research projects using offline mobile technology, and to inform and prepare public health researchers and practitioners to implement new mobile technologies in survey research projects in LMICs. In 2015, two survey research projects were developed and piloted in Puerto Rico and pre-tested in Costa Rica to collect face-to-face data, get formative evaluation feedback, and to test the feasibility of an offline mobile data collection process. Fieldwork in each setting involved survey development, back translation with cultural tailoring, ethical review and approvals, data collector training, and piloting survey implementation on mobile tablets. Critical processes and workflows for survey research projects in low resource settings were identified and implemented. This included developing a secure mobile data platform tailored to each survey, establishing user accessibility, and training and eliciting feedback from data collectors and on-site LMIC project partners. Formative and process evaluation strategies are necessary and useful for the development and implementation of survey research projects using emerging mHealth technologies in LMICs and other low resource settings. Lessons learned include: (1) plan institutional review board (IRB) approvals in

  17. Improving open access to the results of USGS research (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, S.

    2013-12-01

    Since its establishment under the Organic Act of March 3, 1879, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been committed to classifying and characterizing 'the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain.' Over time, the pursuit of this mission and understanding the products of the national domain has involved a broad scientific pursuit to understand complex Earth system processes and includes topographic, geologic, biogeographic, and other types of mapping; chemical, physical, hydrological, and biological research; and the application of computer and data science. As science and technology have evolved, classification and characterization of the Nation's natural resources has come to be embodied in digital data of various structure and form. Fundamentally, scientific publications and data produced through research and monitoring form the core of the USGS mission. They are an organizational and national treasure held and provided in trust for the American people and for the global scientific community. The recent memo from the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) on 'Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Scientific Research' is part of an overall initiative toward open digital government that dovetails well with the USGS mission. The objectives outlined in the memo correspond directly to goals and objectives of the 2007 USGS Science Strategy ('Facing Tomorrow's Challenges--U.S. Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007-2017') and the recently released Science Strategy Plans across all USGS Mission Areas. The USGS response to the OSTP memo involves reinforcing aspects of the USGS commitment to open and free access to scholarly publications and data along with improvements to some of the underlying technological systems that facilitate search and discovery. These actions also align with the USGS response to the Executive Order on May 9, 2013, entitled 'Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for

  18. USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

    2007-01-01

    Many of the nation's estuaries have been environmentally stressed since the turn of the 20th century and will continue to be impacted in the future. Tampa Bay, one the Gulf of Mexico's largest estuaries, exemplifies the threats that our estuaries face (EPA Report 2001, Tampa Bay Estuary Program-Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (TBEP-CCMP)). More than 2 million people live in the Tampa Bay watershed, and the population constitutes to grow. Demand for freshwater resources, conversion of undeveloped areas to resident and industrial uses, increases in storm-water runoff, and increased air pollution from urban and industrial sources are some of the known human activities that impact Tampa Bay. Beginning on 2001, additional anthropogenic modifications began in Tampa Bat including construction of an underwater gas pipeline and a desalinization plant, expansion of existing ports, and increased freshwater withdrawal from three major tributaries to the bay. In January of 2001, the Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) and its partners identifies a critical need for participation from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in providing multidisciplinary expertise and a regional-scale, integrated science approach to address complex scientific research issue and critical scientific information gaps that are necessary for continued restoration and preservation of Tampa Bay. Tampa Bay stakeholders identified several critical science gaps for which USGS expertise was needed (Yates et al. 2001). These critical science gaps fall under four topical categories (or system components): 1) water and sediment quality, 2) hydrodynamics, 3) geology and geomorphology, and 4) ecosystem structure and function. Scientists and resource managers participating in Tampa Bay studies recognize that it is no longer sufficient to simply examine each of these estuarine system components individually, Rather, the interrelation among system components must be understood to develop conceptual and

  19. USGS Streamgages Linked to the Medium Resolution NHD

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The locations of approximately 23,000 current and historical U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamgages in the United States and Puerto Rico (with the exception of...

  20. USGS Core Research Center (CRC) Collection of Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Core Research Center (CRC) was established in 1974 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to preserve valuable rock cores for use by scientists and educators from...

  1. The Future of USGS Earthquake Geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudnut, K. W.; King, N. E.; Murray-Moraleda, J.; Roeloffs, E.; Zeng, Y.

    2008-05-01

    Earthquake Geodesy, an important third prong of USGS Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) along with seismology and geology, is at a crossroads. Initiatives by NASA and NSF have built global and national geodetic arrays that promise to contribute greatly to the EHP mission of helping to reduce the nation's loss of life and property from earthquakes. These geodetic arrays pose great opportunities and challenges for USGS scientists who now operate under tight constraints of either a flat or, at best, a moderately increasing budget. While availability of vast new data streams represents a great opportunity for USGS, the challenge is how to best exploit new data streams for risk mitigation and loss reduction. Geodetic data need to be fully embedded into the suite of USGS products, from the National Seismic Hazard Maps for long-term planning to ShakeMaps for rapid response. The USGS needs to be in a position to authoritatively review all geodetic data being collected nationwide (notably including those of the Plate Boundary Observatory) so that we can fulfill our Stafford Act responsibility of advising public officials on earthquake hazard issues in large urban areas and diverse geographic regions. Furthermore, USGS has the mandate and liability protection required to take the lead on Earthquake Early Warning (EEW) system development and implementation, in which geodesy may provide vital independent measurement methods in real-time so as to improve overall EEW system robustness.

  2. A Survey Of TQM Implementation In Nigerian Transport Organisations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated and assessed the critical resisting and driving factors related to TQM implementation in Nigerian transport organizations. Relevant literature in Total Quality Management were viewed to give relevance to the survey. Data for the study was collected via a well structured questionnaire and statistical ...

  3. Instrument and Survey Analysis Technical Report: Program Implementation Survey. Technical Report #1112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical document provides guidance to educators on the creation and interpretation of survey instruments, particularly as they relate to an analysis of program implementation. Illustrative examples are drawn from a survey of educators related to the use of the easyCBM learning system. This document includes specific sections on…

  4. The evolution, approval and implementation of the U.S. Geological Survey Science Data Lifecycle Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.; Hutchison, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    This paper details how the United States Geological Survey (USGS) Community for Data Integration (CDI) Data Management Working Group developed a Science Data Lifecycle Model, and the role the Model plays in shaping agency-wide policies. Starting with an extensive literature review of existing data Lifecycle models, representatives from various backgrounds in USGS attended a two-day meeting where the basic elements for the Science Data Lifecycle Model were determined. Refinements and reviews spanned two years, leading to finalization of the model and documentation in a formal agency publication . The Model serves as a critical framework for data management policy, instructional resources, and tools. The Model helps the USGS address both the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) for increased public access to federally funded research, and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 2013 Open Data directives, as the foundation for a series of agency policies related to data management planning, metadata development, data release procedures, and the long-term preservation of data. Additionally, the agency website devoted to data management instruction and best practices (www2.usgs.gov/datamanagement) is designed around the Model’s structure and concepts. This paper also illustrates how the Model is being used to develop tools for supporting USGS research and data management processes.

  5. USGS MODERATE RESOLUTION LAND IMAGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J. L.; Willems, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    For the past 37 years, the Landsat series of satellites has provided continuous data of the Earth’s land masses, coastal boundaries, and coral reefs creating an unprecedented comprehensive record of landscape dynamics. Landsat 5 and 7 continue to capture hundreds of images of the Earth’s surface each day. In mid-December 2008, the USGS made the entire Landsat archive available to everyone, anywhere, at anytime via the Internet at no cost to the user. The opening of the Landsat archive, the longest record of the terrestrial environment, is a revolution that will affect the future of moderate resolution Earth observations, enabling scientists to address research questions and develop operational applications that were previously cost prohibitive. In addition, the time-series data richness of the archive allows for the development of essential climate variables used to monitor the causes and consequences of lands cover change as a function of climate variability and anthropogenic influences. Landsat is unique as a single source of systematic, global land observations in terms of the number of spectral bands, global collection capacity, image quality, and the proven fidelity of its calibrated sensors. Through the Land Remote Sensing Policy Act of 1992 and the Presidential Decision Direct/NSTC-3 (1994), as amended on October 16, 2000, the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) is charged to ensure the continuity of Landsat data. To accomplish this, the USGS, in partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), is currently preparing for the launch of the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) in December 2012, the eighth satellite in the Landsat Program. The LDCM will ensure the continuation of the Landsat record and will consist of significant improvements in radiometric response and additional spectral bands, from which high quality data products will be generated and accessible to users at no cost.

  6. 75 FR 3753 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the USGS Mine, Development, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... paperwork requirements for the USGS Mine, Development, and Mineral Exploration Supplement. This collection... U.S. Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the USGS Mine, Development, and Mineral Exploration Supplement AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION...

  7. USGS Regional Monitoring Program Bird Egg Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — As part of the Regional Monitoring Program (RMP) and the USGS’s long-term Wildlife Contaminants Program, the USGS samples double-crested cormorant...

  8. 2011 USGS Topographic LiDAR: Suwannee River Expansion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — USGS Task Order No. G10PD00236 USGS Contract No. G10PC00093 The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Suwannee River Expansion in...

  9. The clinical implementation of pain neuroscience education: A survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Zimney, Kory; Cox, Terry; Rico, Debbie

    2017-11-01

    Pain neuroscience education (PNE) has gained considerable attention in research. Three systematic reviews have shown increasing efficacy of PNE decreasing pain, disability, pain catastrophization, movement restrictions, and healthcare utilization. In the development of any new therapeutic approach, it is proposed that there are three stages: development, validation, and implementation. To date, the development and validation of PNE have been well-established. The third stage, implementation, however, lacks when it comes to PNE. The purpose of this study was to survey physical therapists (PT) on their experience and implementation of PNE, following a 15-hour PNE class. Upon development and validation of a PT-PNE survey, a random sample of PTs was invited to take the online survey. Two hundred and eighty-six PTs (female 56%) completed the PNE questionnaire. Ninety-one percent of PTs reported not being taught PNE in PT school. PT's are applying PNE into clinical practice to a variety of patients, experience outcomes in line with the current best-evidence, but struggle establishing which patients are ideal for PNE. The same five patient characteristics associated with success were also associated with failure, albeit in a different ranking order. This finding highlight the need to further investigate the factors associated with success and failure of PNE.

  10. Innovative, Yet Familiar Tools to Access USGS Earth Science Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frame, M. T.; Serna, B.; Devarakonda, R.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S Geological Survey (USGS) Core Science Systems has been working for the past year to develop innovative and easy-to-use interfaces to access its diverse set of earth science data. As a result of Open Data Policies, the USGS Iin 2014 released the USGS Science Data Catalog (SDC) (data.usgs.gov) and with that several thousand metadata records with links to data were made available through a single search portal. Quickly, the development team realized additional user interfaces into the USGS Science Data Catalog were necessary in order to support easier access to multiple datasets, integration with existing tools/applications, and to eliminate for power users the traditional "go to a web browser, select a dataset, and select a file for download" function. To meet these needs, the USGS created the SDC Drive. SDC Drive is based on an initial prototype developed by the NSF Ssponsored DataONE and USGS several years ago. SDC Drive is a familiar user interface designed to create a virtual drive to USGS SDC Data holdings by simply navigating through Mac Finder to the virtual drive created. USGS created a replicated cache of datasets, due to the majority of datasets being remotely stored across the landscape, and being available through links in the FGDC CSDGM metadata. Users have the ability to mount, filter based on provider/subject, and navigate USGS Data holdings through a very familiar MAC Finder interface. Consequently, USGS data does not have to be downloaded through the browser and most importantly can easily be accessed by all local familiar applications (i.e. MS Excel, R, Matlab, ArcGIS, etc.) through a simple File, Open operation. The session will discuss the current development efforts, plans for gathering formal feedback from USGS scientists and data managers, the paradigm of exposing data to familiar tools for use by the research community, and future strategies by the USGS to continue to expose data through easy to use methods.

  11. USGS Releases New Digital Aerial Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) has initiated distribution of digital aerial photographic products produced by scanning or digitizing film from its historical aerial photography film archive. This archive, located in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, contains thousands of rolls of film that contain more than 8 million frames of historic aerial photographs. The largest portion of this archive consists of original film acquired by Federal agencies from the 1930s through the 1970s to produce 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic quadrangle maps. Most of this photography is reasonably large scale (USGS photography ranges from 1:8,000 to 1:80,000) to support the production of the maps. Two digital products are currently available for ordering: high-resolution scanned products and medium-resolution digitized products.

  12. A Coordinated USGS Science Response to Hurricane Sandy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.; Buxton, H. T.; Andersen, M.; Dean, T.; Focazio, M. J.; Haines, J.; Hainly, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy came ashore during a spring high tide on the New Jersey coastline, delivering hurricane-force winds, storm tides exceeding 19 feet, driving rain, and plummeting temperatures. Hurricane Sandy resulted in 72 direct fatalities in the mid-Atlantic and northeastern United States, and widespread and substantial physical, environmental, ecological, social, and economic impacts estimated at near $50 billion. Before the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, the USGS provided forecasts of potential coastal change; collected oblique aerial photography of pre-storm coastal morphology; deployed storm-surge sensors, rapid-deployment streamgages, wave sensors, and barometric pressure sensors; conducted Light Detection and Ranging (lidar) aerial topographic surveys of coastal areas; and issued a landslide alert for landslide prone areas. During the storm, Tidal Telemetry Networks provided real-time water-level information along the coast. Long-term networks and rapid-deployment real-time streamgages and water-quality monitors tracked river levels and changes in water quality. Immediately after the storm, the USGS serviced real-time instrumentation, retrieved data from over 140 storm-surge sensors, and collected other essential environmental data, including more than 830 high-water marks mapping the extent and elevation of the storm surge. Post-storm lidar surveys documented storm impacts to coastal barriers informing response and recovery and providing a new baseline to assess vulnerability of the reconfigured coast. The USGS Hazard Data Distribution System served storm-related information from many agencies on the Internet on a daily basis. Immediately following Hurricane Sandy the USGS developed a science plan, 'Meeting the Science Needs of the Nation in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy-A U.S. Geological Survey Science Plan for Support of Restoration and Recovery'. The plan will ensure continuing coordination of internal USGS activities as well as

  13. USGS NAIPPlus Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS NAIP Plus service from The National Map consists of National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) and high resolution orthoimagery (HRO) that combine the...

  14. USGS Map service: National Shoreline Change - Historic Shorelines by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — There are critical needs for a nationwide compilation of reliable shoreline data. To meet these needs, the USGS has produced a comprehensive database of digital...

  15. USGS Elevation Contours Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Elevation Contours service from The National Map (TNM) consists of contours generated for the conterminous United States from 1- and 1/3 arc-second...

  16. USGS Hill Shade Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Hill Shade (or Shaded Relief) is a tile cache base map created from the National Elevation Dataset (NED), a seamless dataset of best available raster elevation...

  17. USGS NAIP Imagery Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS NAIP Imagery service from The National Map (TNM) consists of high resolution images that combine the visual attributes of an aerial photograph with the...

  18. USGS Imagery Topo Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Imagery Topo is a topographic tile cache base map with orthoimagery as a backdrop, and combines the most current data (Boundaries, Names, Transportation,...

  19. USGS Topo Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Topo is a topographic tile cache base map that combines the most current data (Boundaries, Names, Transportation, Elevation, Hydrography, Land Cover, and other...

  20. USGS Seafloor Mapping ALPH 98013 Chirp Subbottom Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS ALPH 98013 cruise. The seismic-reflection data are stored as SEG-Y...

  1. USGS Seafloor Mapping ALPH 98013 Water Gun Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS ALPH 98013 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of the New York and...

  2. USGS Imagery Only Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Imagery Only is a tile cache base map of orthoimagery in The National Map visible to the 1:18,000 scale. Orthoimagery data are typically high resolution images...

  3. USGS Seafloor Mapping DIAN 97032 Chirp Subbottom Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS DIAN 97032 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of Long Island, NY in...

  4. TT detector description and implementation of the survey measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Salzmann, C

    2008-01-01

    The TT geometry in the software has been updated to comply with the latest technical drawings. The main difference is in the description of the beam pipe insulation, where the amount of material has increased from $7.5\\%$ to $15.4\\%$ of $X_0$. Mother volumes are added to decrease the CPU consumption and finally several scans are made to compare the material budget between the DC06 geometry and the new 2008 geometry. In addition, the survey measurements of the TT detector have been analysed. These measurements can be subdivided into surveys of the detector box, photogrammetry of the balconies and metrology of the half-modules. The offsets with the nominal geometry are implemented in the alignment condition database.

  5. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  6. USGS Structures Overlay Map Service from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) USGS National Structures Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS Structures from The National Map (TNM) consists of data to include the name, function, location, and other core information and characteristics of selected...

  7. USGS Urban Waters Portal Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation discusses urbanization and water quality trends, major stories on contaminants and biota, scientific and educational tools for watershed organizations, and the USGS Urban Waters Portal.

  8. USGS Photographic Library

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey Denver Library maintains a collection of over 400,000 photographs taken during geologic studies of the United States and its territories...

  9. Meeting the Challenge of Data Stewardship through Community Partnership and Practice: Examples from the USGS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    The collection and maintenance of long-term natural science data is a hallmark of the USGS mission that has become an increasingly complex challenge to meet. Several examples of different aspects of data stewardship illustrate issues and solutions that require community partnerships and agreement on standards and practices to meet the requirements of access, interoperability, and preservation. The USGS National Geologic and Geophysical Data Preservation Program, established 3 years ago, is making important strides in developing and implementing basic data preservation practices and tools across all the geological surveys in the U.S. including preserving data at risk, creating inventories of data, proper curation and cataloguing of data and materials, and creating a universal digital catalogue that will provide discovery and accessibility. For the past 10 years, the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program at the USGS has worked with geologic mappers from diverse organizations to establish use of a common map symbology and a community developed geologic map data model. Together these two practices can facilitate the interoperability of this most fundamental but highly individual representation of geologic science. Since 2007, a broad consortium of partners is working together to form the Geosciences Information Network, a virtual network that takes advantage of informatics tools, mark-up languages, web services, and open sources standards to create a potentially unlimited virtual network of information. Using the digital data assets of all the geological surveys across the US and comprising partnerships with ESRI, Microsoft, OneGeology, GEON, and numerous others, this effort strives to use community developed practices and tools and cutting edge technology to bring multi-disciplinary data together while preserving provanance. Finally, the USGS is in the process of developing an Integrated Science Data Environment to preserve and make accessible USGS

  10. USGS global change science strategy: A framework for understanding and responding to climate and land-use change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett, Virginia R.; Taylor, Ione L.; Belnap, Jayne; Cronin, Thomas M.; Dettinger, Michael D.; Frazier, Eldrich L.; Haines, John W.; Kirtland, David A.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Milly, Paul C.D.; O'Malley, Robin; Thompson, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Global Change Science Strategy expands on the Climate Variability and Change science component of the USGS 2007 Science Strategy, “Facing Tomorrow’s Challenges: USGS Science in the Coming Decade” (U.S. Geological Survey, 2007). Here we embrace the broad definition of global change provided in the U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 (Public Law 101–606,104 Stat. 3096–3104)—“Changes in the global environment (including alterations in climate, land productivity, oceans or other water resources, atmospheric chemistry, and ecological systems) that may alter the capacity of the Earth to sustain life”—with a focus on climate and land-use change.There are three major characteristics of this science strategy. First, it addresses the science required to broadly inform global change policy, while emphasizing the needs of natural-resource managers and reflecting the role of the USGS as the science provider for the Department of the Interior and other resource-management agencies. Second, the strategy identifies core competencies, noting 10 critical capabilities and strengths the USGS uses to overcome key problem areas. We highlight those areas in which the USGS is a science leader, recognizing the strong partnerships and effective collaboration that are essential to address complex global environmental challenges. Third, it uses a query-based approach listing key research questions that need to be addressed to create an agenda for hypothesis-driven global change science organized under six strategic goals. Overall, the strategy starts from where we are, provides a vision for where we want to go, and then describes high-priority strategic actions, including outcomes, products, and partnerships that can get us there. Global change science is a well-defined research field with strong linkages to the ecosystems, water, energy and minerals, natural hazards, and environmental health components of the USGS Science Strategy

  11. Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 140 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole USGS 141 was drilled and constructed as a monitor well without coring. Boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 are separated by about 375 feet (ft) and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geophysical and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 required 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel well screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed about 50 ft into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer, between 496 and 546 ft below land surface (BLS) at both sites. Following construction and data collection, dedicated pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Borehole USGS 140 was cored continuously, starting from land surface to a depth of 543 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole USGS 140 was about 98 and 65 percent, respectively. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, about 32 basalt flows and 4 sediment layers were collected from borehole USGS 140 between 34 and 543 ft BLS. Basalt texture for borehole USGS 140 generally was described as aphanitic, phaneritic, and porphyritic; rubble zones and flow mold structure also were described in recovered core material. Sediment layers, starting near 163 ft BLS, generally were composed of fine-grained sand and silt with a lesser amount of clay; however, between 223 and 228 ft BLS, silt

  12. USGS research on Florida's isolated freshwater wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Arturo E.; Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Metz, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has studied wetland hydrology and its effects on wetland health and ecology in Florida since the 1990s. USGS wetland studies in Florida and other parts of the Nation provide resource managers with tools to assess current conditions and regional trends in wetland resources. Wetland hydrologists in the USGS Florida Water Science Center (FLWSC) have completed a number of interdisciplinary studies assessing the hydrology, ecology, and water quality of wetlands. These studies have expanded the understanding of wetland hydrology, ecology, and related processes including: (1) the effects of cyclical changes in rainfall and the influence of evapotranspiration; (2) surface-water flow, infiltration, groundwater movement, and groundwater and surfacewater interactions; (3) the effects of water quality and soil type; (4) the unique biogeochemical components of wetlands required to maintain ecosystem functions; (5) the effects of land use and other human activities; (6) the influences of algae, plants, and invertebrates on environmental processes; and (7) the effects of seasonal variations in animal communities that inhabit or visit Florida wetlands and how wetland function responds to changes in the plant community.

  13. Metrically preserving the USGS aerial film archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Donald; Longhenry, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Since 1972, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has provided fi lm-based products to the public. EROS is home to an archive of 12 million frames of analog photography ranging from 1937 to the present. The archive contains collections from both aerial and satellite platforms including programs such as the National High Altitude Program (NHAP), National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP), U.S. Antarctic Resource Center (USARC), Declass 1(CORONA, ARGON, and LANYARD), Declass 2 (KH-7 and KH-9), and Landsat (1972 – 1992, Landsat 1–5).

  14. Defining a data management strategy for USGS Chesapeake Bay studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladino, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    manage data resources, work more efficiently with partners, and facilitate holistic watershed science. It is now the goal of the USGS Chesapeake Bay studies to implement an enhanced and all-encompassing approach to data management. This report discusses preliminary efforts to implement a physical data management system for program data that is not replicated nationally through other USGS databases.

  15. A Survey of E-Learning Implementation Best Practices in Jordanian Government Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tarawneh, Haroon Salem; Allahawiah, Sattam

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the research reported in this article is to understand the extent of e-learning implementation practices currently in use in Jordanian government universities. In order to achieve this objective, a survey of e-learning implementation practice in Jordanian universities was conducted. A detailed description of the survey procedures…

  16. Drilling, construction, geophysical log data, and lithologic log for boreholes USGS 142 and USGS 142A, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Schusler, Kyle; Mudge, Christopher

    2017-07-27

    Starting in 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes USGS 142 and USGS 142A for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole USGS 142 initially was cored to collect rock and sediment core, then re-drilled to complete construction as a screened water-level monitoring well. Borehole USGS 142A was drilled and constructed as a monitoring well after construction problems with borehole USGS 142 prevented access to upper 100 feet (ft) of the aquifer. Boreholes USGS 142 and USGS 142A are separated by about 30 ft and have similar geology and hydrologic characteristics. Groundwater was first measured near 530 feet below land surface (ft BLS) at both borehole locations. Water levels measured through piezometers, separated by almost 1,200 ft, in borehole USGS 142 indicate upward hydraulic gradients at this location. Following construction and data collection, screened water-level access lines were placed in boreholes USGS 142 and USGS 142A to allow for recurring water level measurements.Borehole USGS 142 was cored continuously, starting at the first basalt contact (about 4.9 ft BLS) to a depth of 1,880 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt, rhyolite, and sediment core at borehole USGS 142 was approximately 89 percent or 1,666 ft of total core recovered. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, material examined from 4.9 to 1,880 ft BLS in borehole USGS 142 consists of approximately 45 basalt flows, 16 significant sediment and (or) sedimentary rock layers, and rhyolite welded tuff. Rhyolite was encountered at approximately 1,396 ft BLS. Sediment layers comprise a large percentage of the borehole between 739 and 1,396 ft BLS with grain sizes ranging from clay and silt to cobble size. Sedimentary rock layers had calcite cement. Basalt flows

  17. USGS microbiome research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Christina A.; Hopkins, M. Camille

    2017-09-26

    Microbiomes are the communities of microorganisms (for example, bacteria, viruses, and fungi) that live on, in, and around people, plants, animals, soil, water, and the atmosphere. Microbiomes are active in the functioning of diverse ecosystems, for instance, by influencing water quality, nutrient acquisition 
and stress tolerance in plants, and stability of soil and aquatic environments. Microbiome research conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey spans many of our mission areas. Key research areas include water quality, understanding climate effects on soil and permafrost, ecosystem and wildlife health, invasive species, contaminated environments to improve bioremediation, and enhancing energy production. Microbiome research will fundamentally strengthen the ability to address the global challenges of maintaining clean water, ensuring adequate food supply, meeting energy needs, and preserving human and ecosystem health.

  18. USGS Water Use Data for the Nation - National Water Information System (NWIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Use Information Program is responsible for compiling and disseminating the nation's water-use data. The USGS works in...

  19. Sediment samples collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_SedimentSamples)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  20. JPEG bottom photos collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  1. Surveying the critical success factors of BPM-systems implementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ravesteyn, P.; Batenburg, R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore if there is a common ground for the definition of business process management (BPM) and BPM-systems, as well as the critical success factors (CSFs) for BPM-system implementation. A BPM-system implementation framework is validated that classifies the

  2. Grand challenges for integrated USGS science—A workshop report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, Karen E.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Baron, Jill S.; Bristol, R. Sky; Cantrill, Mary; Exter, Paul E.; Focazio, Michael J.; Haines, John W.; Hay, Lauren E.; Hsu, Leslie; Labson, Victor F.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Ludwig, Kristin A.; Milly, Paul C.; Morelli, Toni L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Nassar, Nedal T.; Newman, Timothy R.; Ostroff, Andrea C.; Read, Jordan S.; Reed, Sasha C.; Shapiro, Carl D.; Smith, Richard A.; Sanford, Ward E.; Sohl, Terry L.; Stets, Edward G.; Terando, Adam J.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Tischler, Michael A.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Wald, David J.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Wein, Anne; Weltzin, Jake F.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2017-06-30

    Executive SummaryThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long history of advancing the traditional Earth science disciplines and identifying opportunities to integrate USGS science across disciplines to address complex societal problems. The USGS science strategy for 2007–2017 laid out key challenges in disciplinary and interdisciplinary arenas, culminating in a call for increased focus on a number of crosscutting science directions. Ten years on, to further the goal of integrated science and at the request of the Executive Leadership Team (ELT), a workshop with three dozen invited scientists spanning different disciplines and career stages in the Bureau convened on February 7–10, 2017, at the USGS John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis in Fort Collins, Colorado.The workshop focused on identifying “grand challenges” for integrated USGS science. Individual participants identified nearly 70 potential grand challenges before the workshop and through workshop discussions. After discussion, four overarching grand challenges emerged:Natural resource security,Societal risk from existing and emerging threats,Smart infrastructure development, andAnticipatory science for changing landscapes.Participants also identified a “comprehensive science challenge” that highlights the development of integrative science, data, models, and tools—all interacting in a modular framework—that can be used to address these and other future grand challenges:Earth Monitoring, Analyses, and Projections (EarthMAP)EarthMAP is our long-term vision for an integrated scientific framework that spans traditional scientific boundaries and disciplines, and integrates the full portfolio of USGS science: research, monitoring, assessment, analysis, and information delivery.The Department of Interior, and the Nation in general, have a vast array of information needs. The USGS meets these needs by having a broadly trained and agile scientific workforce. Encouraging and supporting

  3. An international survey of building energy codes and their implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Meredydd; Roshchanka, Volha; Graham, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Buildings are key to low-carbon development everywhere, and many countries have introduced building energy codes to improve energy efficiency in buildings. Yet, building energy codes can only deliver results when the codes are implemented. For this reason, studies of building energy codes need to consider implementation of building energy codes in a consistent and comprehensive way. This research identifies elements and practices in implementing building energy codes, covering codes in 22 countries that account for 70% of global energy demand from buildings. Access to benefits of building energy codes depends on comprehensive coverage of buildings by type, age, size, and geographic location; an implementation framework that involves a certified agency to inspect construction at critical stages; and independently tested, rated, and labeled building energy materials. Training and supporting tools are another element of successful code implementation, and their role is growing in importance, given the increasing flexibility and complexity of building energy codes. Some countries have also introduced compliance evaluation and compliance checking protocols to improve implementation. This article provides examples of practices that countries have adopted to assist with implementation of building energy codes.

  4. USGS: Building on leadership in mapping oceans and coasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) offers continuously improving technologies for mapping oceans and coasts providing unique opportunity for characterizing the marine environment and to expand the understanding of coastal and ocean processes, resources, and hazards. USGS, which has been designated as a leader for mapping the Exclusive Economic Zone, has made an advanced strategic plan, Facing Tomorrow's Challenges- US Geological Survey Science in the Decade 2007 to 2017. This plan focuses on innovative and transformational themes that serve key clients and customers, expand partnerships, and have long-term national impact. The plan includes several key science directions, including Understanding Ecosystems and Predicting Ecosystem Change, Energy and Minerals for America's Future, and A National Hazards, Risk, and Resilience Assessment Program. USGS has also collaborated with diverse partners to incorporate mapping and monitoring within interdisciplinary research programs, addressing the system-scale response of coastal and marine ecosystems.

  5. USGS: Science at the intersection of land and ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, M.D.

    2009-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) conducts an ongoing national assessment of coastal change hazards in order to help protect lives and support management of coastal infrastructure and resources. The research group rapidly gathers to investigate coastal changes along the Gulf Coast's sandy beaches after each hurricane to examine the magnitude and variability of impacts. This investigation helps to protect the environment and the American people by preparing maps that show the extreme coastal change. It also posts online video and still photography and LIDAR (light detection and ranging) survey data after each storm, to provide a clear picture of the devastated area. The USGS provides data to understand changing coastal vulnerabilities so that informed decisions can be made to protect disaster affected areas and its resources. Earth scientists in the USGS are learning more about coastal dynamics, determining changes, and improving the ability to forecast how coastal environments will respond to the next storm.

  6. USGS VDP Infrasound Sensor Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slad, George William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Merchant, Bion J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated two infrasound sensors, the model VDP100 and VDP250, built in-house at the USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, self-noise, dynamic range and nominal transfer function. Notable features of the VDP sensors include novel and durable construction and compact size.

  7. Multinational surveys for monitoring eHealth policy implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilstad, Heidi; Faxvaag, Arild; Hyppönen, Hannele

    2014-01-01

    Development of multinational variables for monitoring eHealth policy implementations is a complex task and requires multidisciplinary, knowledgebased international collaboration. Experts in an interdisciplinary workshop identified useful data and pitfalls for comparative variable development...

  8. Remotely Sensed Imagery from USGS: Update on Products and Portals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, R.; Lemig, K.

    2016-12-01

    The USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center has recently implemented a number of additions and changes to its existing suite of products and user access systems. Together, these changes will enhance the accessibility, breadth, and usability of the remotely sensed image products and delivery mechanisms available from USGS. As of late 2016, several new image products are now available for public download at no charge from USGS/EROS Center. These new products include: (1) global Level 1T (precision terrain-corrected) products from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), provided via NASA's Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC); and (2) Sentinel-2 Multispectral Instrument (MSI) products, available through a collaborative effort with the European Space Agency (ESA). Other new products are also planned to become available soon. In an effort to enable future scientific analysis of the full 40+ year Landsat archive, the USGS also introduced a new "Collection Management" strategy for all Landsat Level 1 products. This new archive and access schema involves quality-based tier designations that will support future time series analysis of the historic Landsat archive at the pixel level. Along with the quality tier designations, the USGS has also implemented a number of other Level 1 product improvements to support Landsat science applications, including: enhanced metadata, improved geometric processing, refined quality assessment information, and angle coefficient files. The full USGS Landsat archive is now being reprocessed in accordance with the new `Collection 1' specifications. Several USGS data access and visualization systems have also seen major upgrades. These user interfaces include a new version of the USGS LandsatLook Viewer which was released in Fall 2017 to provide enhanced functionality and Sentinel-2 visualization and access support. A beta release of the USGS Global Visualization Tool ("Glo

  9. Data and software release in the USGS, assessing research output and impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, S.; Langseth, M. L.; Norkin, T.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently developed, tested and released new policies on data and software management, review, and release. Data and software have long been products of our research, and major data programs in the USGS publish high quality and crucial data assets for the Nation. New administration policy on open science along with legislation introduced on open science and open data have prompted a fresh look at our guiding policies, the USGS Fundamental Science Practices. New policies have been well exercised throughout our researcher community over the last couple of years and are now entering full implementation. As data and software become increasingly important and official parts of the overall record of accomplishment for scientific programs and individual researchers, specific methods for review and evaluation will evolve. Reviewer qualifications, the techniques and methods they employ, and the organizational framework within which research reviews are conducted are of particular import in the USGS and are rapidly developing and being tested in real time.

  10. USGS Map Indices Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Map Indices service from The National Map (TNM) consists of 1x1 Degree, 30x60 Minute (100K), 15 Minute (63K), 7.5 Minute (24K), and 3.75 Minute grid...

  11. USGS Transportation Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Transportation service from The National Map (TNM) is based on TIGER/Line data provided through U.S. Census Bureau and road data from U.S. Forest Service....

  12. Baseline survey for the implementation of insecticide treated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yemane Berhane

    1Malaria and Other Vector-borne Diseases Prevention and Control Team, Federal Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa,. P.O. Box 1234,Phone150993, E-mail: malaria@telecom.net.et, Ethiopia; 2Department of Community Health, Faculty of Medicine, Addis .... information is helpful for the further implementation and scaling-up of ...

  13. A survey to identify barriers of implementing an antibiotic checklist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Daalen, F. V.; Geerlings, S. E.; Prins, J. M.; Hulscher, M. E. J. L.

    2016-01-01

    A checklist is an effective implementation tool, but addressing barriers that might impact on the effectiveness of its use is crucial. In this paper, we explore barriers to the uptake of an antibiotic checklist that aims to improve antibiotic use in daily hospital care. We performed an online

  14. A Survey of Asthma Management Practices and Implementation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... and implementation of Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines among doctors in a resource-limited setting in Nigeria. Niger J Clin Pract. 2017;20:984-91. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows ...

  15. Data and spatial studies of the USGS Texas Water Science Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrologists, geographers, geophysicists, and geologists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center (TXWSC) work in the USGS Water Mission Area on a diverse range of projects built on a foundation of spatial data. The TXWSC has developed sophisticated data and spatial-studies-related capabilities that are an integral part of the projects undertaken by the Center.

  16. Implementing TQM/CQI at rehabilitation hospitals: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carefoote, R

    1994-01-01

    The quality movement in healthcare is here to stay. Total quality management (TQM) and continuous quality improvement (CQI) approaches are no longer considered fads or transitory trends; they are being woven into the very fabric of hospital operations. What has been unclear, however, is the extent to which the underlying TQM/CQI philosophy, tools, and techniques are being implemented and whether hospitals are noticeably changing as a result of TQM/CQI programs. The results of a study of 14 rehabilitation hospitals indicate that the rehabilitation setting is a natural one for TQM/CQI but that these settings are just beginning to implement the needed structures and processes and to use the relevant tools and techniques.

  17. A Survey on Hardware Implementations of Visual Object Trackers

    OpenAIRE

    El-Shafie, Al-Hussein A.; Habib, S. E. D.

    2017-01-01

    Visual object tracking is an active topic in the computer vision domain with applications extending over numerous fields. The main sub-tasks required to build an object tracker (e.g. object detection, feature extraction and object tracking) are computation-intensive. In addition, real-time operation of the tracker is indispensable for almost all of its applications. Therefore, complete hardware or hardware/software co-design approaches are pursued for better tracker implementations. This pape...

  18. BIM IMPLEMENTATION IN A NEW ZEALAND CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis Harrison

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available 5D BIM – generating cost data via the building information modelling (BIM process- has the potential to be used by quantity surveyors (QSs to streamline their workflows and increase their provision of quality service. Consultant QSs experienced in the use 5D BIM, from the New Zealand office of one large global practice, were interviewed on their perceptions of the benefits of, and barriers to, 5D BIM implementation within their firm. Findings suggest that 5D BIM has numerous benefits over traditional methods, chiefly through the increased efficiency and visualization that BIM provides, along with the rapid identification of design changes. However, realization of these perceived benefits limited to date, due to several barriers hindering 5D BIM implementation: incomplete design and insufficient model object data in the BIM model; a lack of standards to facilitate electronic measurement; legal issues, and a lack of government support. However, participants perceived that 5D BIM implementation will achieve these benefits to a far greater extent in the future. Further research is recommended to identify the BIM skills which QSs will need in the future to reach the full potential of 5D BIM

  19. USGS Environmental health science strategy: providing environmental health science for a changing world: public review release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Patricia R.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Balistrieri, Laurie S.; Barber, Larry B.; Chapelle, Francis H.; Cross, Paul C.; Krabbenhoft, David P.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    America has an abundance of natural resources. We have bountiful clean water, fertile soil, and unrivaled national parks, wildlife refuges, and public lands. These resources enrich our lives and preserve our health and wellbeing. These resources have been maintained because of our history of respect for their value and an enduring commitment to their vigilant protection. Awareness of the social, economic, and personal value of the health of our environment is increasing. The emergence of environmentally driven diseases caused by environmental exposure to contaminants and pathogens is a growing concern worldwide. New health threats and patterns of established threats are affected by both natural and anthropogenic changes to the environment. Human activities are key drivers of emerging (new and re-emerging) health threats. Societal demands for land and natural resources, a better quality of life, improved economic prosperity, and the environmental impacts associated with these demands will continue to increase. Natural earth processes, climate trends, and related climatic events will add to the environmental impact of human activities. These environmental drivers will influence exposure to disease agents, including viral, bacterial, prion, and fungal pathogens, parasites, natural earth materials, toxins and other biogenic compounds, and synthetic chemicals and substances. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) defines environmental health science broadly as the interdisciplinary study of relations among the quality of the physical environment, the health of the living environment, and human health. The interactions among these three spheres are driven by human activities, ecological processes, and natural earth processes; the interactions affect exposure to contaminants and pathogens and the severity of environmentally driven diseases in animals and people. This definition provides USGS with a framework for synthesizing natural science information from across the Bureau

  20. BIM IMPLEMENTATION IN A NEW ZEALAND CONSULTING QUANTITY SURVEYING PRACTICE

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis Harrison; Derek Thurnell

    2015-01-01

    5D BIM – generating cost data via the building information modelling (BIM) process- has the potential to be used by quantity surveyors (QSs) to streamline their workflows and increase their provision of quality service. Consultant QSs experienced in the use 5D BIM, from the New Zealand office of one large global practice, were interviewed on their perceptions of the benefits of, and barriers to, 5D BIM implementation within their firm. Findings suggest that 5D BIM has numerous benefits over t...

  1. Survey on the implementation and reliability of CubeSat electrical bus interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwmeester, J.; Langer, M; Gill, E.K.A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides results and conclusions on a survey on the implementation and reliability aspects of CubeSat bus interfaces, with an emphasis on the data bus and power distribution. It provides recommendations for a future CubeSat bus standard. The survey is based on a literature study and a

  2. [Design and implementation of information management system for Chinese materia medica resources survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Ge, Xiao-Guang; Jin, Yan; Jing, Zhi-Xian; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Yu-Ping; Guo, Lan-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2017-11-01

    By means of the established Information Management System for Chinese materia medica resources survey, the national, provincial and county level organization, personnel and the implementation of the program of Chinese materia medica resources survey, and the survey team of medicinal plant investigation, photos, Chinese herbal medicine market survey, the traditional Chinese materia medica resources knowledge survey, germplasm resources investigation and the data collation and summary specimen have been realised. Throughout the whole working process of the fourth national Chinese materia medica resources survey, it is ensured that all data were no missing, no repeat, and well stored and managed. The Information Management System can improve the standardization degree of Chinese materia medica resources survey, and maintain the continuity. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  3. USGS Water-Quality Data for the Nation - National Water Information System (NWIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS compiles online access to water-resources data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the...

  4. USGS Shaded Relief Large-scale Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Shaded Relief Large service from The National Map (TNM) was created from the National Elevation Dataset (NED), a seamless dataset of best available raster...

  5. USGS Imagery Only Large-scale Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Imagery Only Large service from The National Map (TNM) consists of National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) and high resolution orthoimagery (HRO) that...

  6. USGS Imagery Topo Large-scale Base Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Imagery Topo Large service from The National Map (TNM) is a dynamic topographic base map service that combines the best available data (Boundaries,...

  7. Hobbs, NM 1:250,000 Quad USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  8. Douglas, AZ 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  9. Aztec, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  10. COAWST Forecast System : USGS : US East Coast and Gulf of Mexico (Experimental)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Experimental forecast model product from the USGS Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Wave Sediment-Transport (COAWST) modeling system. Data required to drive the modeling...

  11. Clifton, AZ 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  12. Roswell, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  13. Shiprock, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  14. Socorro, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  15. Albuquerque, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  16. Raton, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  17. Carlsbad, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  18. Carlsbad, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  19. Socorro, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  20. Dalhart, TX 1:250,000 Quad USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  1. Clovis, NM 1:250,000 Quad USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  2. Raton, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  3. Tucumcari, NM 1:250,000 Quad USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  4. Tularosa, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  5. Brownfield, TX 1:250,000 Quad USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  6. Shiprock, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  7. Albuquerque, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  8. Roswell, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  9. Douglas, AZ 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  10. Aztec, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  11. Tularosa, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  12. Clifton, AZ 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  13. Gallup, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  14. Gallup, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  15. USGS US Topo Availability Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS US Topo Availability service from The National Map consists of footprints where US Topo products are currently available. Various green tints are used to...

  16. USGS Groundwater Data for the Nation - National Water Information System (NWIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS compiles online access to water-resources data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the...

  17. 2007 USGS/NPS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Naval Live Oaks Area, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz point cloud data were produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS),...

  18. USGS Surface-Water Data for the Nation - National Water Information System (NWIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS compiles online access to water-resources data collected at approximately 1.5 million sites in all 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the...

  19. USGS Governmental Unit Boundaries Overlay Map Service from The National Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Governmental Unit Boundaries service from The National Map (TNM) represents major civil areas for the Nation, including States or Territories, counties (or...

  20. U.S. Geological Survey Fundamental Science Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2011-01-01

    The USGS has a long and proud tradition of objective, unbiased science in service to the Nation. A reputation for impartiality and excellence is one of our most important assets. To help preserve this vital asset, in 2004 the Executive Leadership Team (ELT) of the USGS was charged by the Director to develop a set of fundamental science practices, philosophical premises, and operational principles as the foundation for all USGS research and monitoring activities. In a concept document, 'Fundamental Science Practices of the U.S. Geological Survey', the ELT proposed 'a set of fundamental principles to underlie USGS science practices.' The document noted that protecting the reputation of USGS science for quality and objectivity requires the following key elements: - Clearly articulated, Bureau-wide fundamental science practices. - A shared understanding at all levels of the organization that the health and future of the USGS depend on following these practices. - The investment of budget, time, and people to ensure that the USGS reputation and high-quality standards are maintained. The USGS Fundamental Science Practices (FSP) encompass all elements of research investigations, including data collection, experimentation, analysis, writing results, peer review, management review, and Bureau approval and publication of information products. The focus of FSP is on how science is carried out and how products are produced and disseminated. FSP is not designed to address the question of what work the USGS should do; that is addressed in USGS science planning handbooks and other documents. Building from longstanding existing USGS policies and the ELT concept document, in May 2006, FSP policies were developed with input from all parts of the organization and were subsequently incorporated into the Bureau's Survey Manual. In developing an implementation plan for FSP policy, the intent was to recognize and incorporate the best of USGS current practices to obtain the optimum

  1. Survey of Joint Implementation activities in China; Chugoku ni okeru kyodo jisshi katsudo kanren chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    It is a large task for Japan to positively promote the Joint Implementation activities related to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Rapid increase in the emission of greenhouse-effect gases, especially CO2, is predicted in China with remarkable economic growth and population of 1.2 billion. It is essential to promote the Joint Implementation activities in China. In this survey, framework, organization, problems and tasks were investigated to effectively promote the Joint Implementation activities in China. Construction of framework for the real Joint Implementation activities has been proposed. Current problems for promoting the Joint Implementation activities in China are that the distinct guideline for the Joint Implementation is not established in the government, that the receiving system including receiving, planning and arranging sections is not established, and that the burden problems for the costs of project evaluation, data acquisition, monitoring, and verification are not solved. 5 refs., 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  2. Documentation of methods and inventory of irrigation data collected for the 2000 and 2005 U.S. Geological Survey Estimated use of water in the United States, comparison of USGS-compiled irrigation data to other sources, and recommendations for future compilations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickens, Jade M.; Forbes, Brandon T.; Cobean, Dylan S.; Tadayon, Saeid

    2011-01-01

    Every five years since 1950, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Use Information Program (NWUIP) has compiled water-use information in the United States and published a circular report titled "Estimated use of water in the United States," which includes estimates of water withdrawals by State, sources of water withdrawals (groundwater or surface water), and water-use category (irrigation, public supply, industrial, thermoelectric, and so forth). This report discusses the impact of important considerations when estimating irrigated acreage and irrigation withdrawals, including estimates of conveyance loss, irrigation-system efficiencies, pasture, horticulture, golf courses, and double cropping.

  3. Seamless USGS Hydrography for the Grand Strand region of South Carolina (HSHYDD, 1:24000: Polygon shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, began a study to investigate processes affecting shoreline...

  4. Bathymetry within the inner shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina collected by the USGS, 1999-2003 (BATHY, Grid)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, began a study to investigate processes affecting shoreline...

  5. Surface water data for samples collected approximately hourly along the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  6. Autonomous Flow-Thru (AFT) pH data of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  7. Sonde data of continuous surface water flow-through system for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM03

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  8. Surface water data for samples collected approximately hourly along the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM03

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  9. Sonde data of continuous surface water flow-through system for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  10. Navigation and environmental data from R/V Weatherbird II for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  11. Water column sample data from predefined locations of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  12. Water column sample data from predefined locations of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11CEV02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  13. Navigation and environmental data from R/V Weatherbird II for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11CEV01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  14. Surface water data for samples collected approximately hourly along the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  15. Navigation and environmental data from R/V Weatherbird II for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  16. SEABOSS Images from USGS Cruises 2010-033-FA and 2010-005-FA in JPEG Format

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  17. Locations of sound velocity profiles collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_SVP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  18. Locations of bottom photographs collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_BottomPhotos)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  19. Water column sample data from predefined locations of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM04

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  20. Sonde data of continuous surface water flow-through system for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  1. Chandeleur Islands radiochemistry data from USGS field activities 12BIM01, 12BIM02, and 12BIM05

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) conducted a time-series collection of shallow sediment...

  2. Sonde data of continuous surface water flow-through system for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11CEV02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  3. Navigation and environmental data from R/V Weatherbird II for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM03

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  4. Surface water data for samples collected approximately hourly along the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  5. Surface water data for samples collected approximately hourly along the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11CEV01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  6. Navigation and environmental data from R/V Weatherbird II for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  7. Navigation and environmental data from R/V Weatherbird II for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11CEV02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  8. Sonde data of continuous surface water flow-through system for the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  9. Autonomous Flow-Thru (AFT) pH data of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  10. Autonomous Flow-Thru (AFT) CO2 data of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM01

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  11. Water column sample data from predefined locations of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM03

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  12. Water column sample data from predefined locations of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  13. Autonomous Flow-Thru (AFT) CO2 data of the West Florida Shelf: USGS Cruise 11BHM02

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The United States Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a study on the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the Gulf of Mexico; dealing...

  14. [Design and implementation of data reporting system for Chinese materia medica resources survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Ge, Xiao-Guang; Jing, Zhi-Xian; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Yu-Ping; Guo, Lan-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2017-11-01

    The collection, summary and sharing of all kinds of survey data are one of the main tasks and achievements in the national census of Chinese materia medica resources organized and implemented by the State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine. It is a key link in the implementation of the national census of Chinese materia medica resources. Based on the client / server architecture, the data reporting system for Chinese materia medica resources survey has been established for reporting system application model of geospatial data service based on Web implementation, through the SOA framework, to achieve the data collection summary of the seven aspects of the local data configuration, data reporting, data verification, data reporting, PDA data import and export, APP data import, track instrument data import. The system services include the general investigation, the focus of investigation, specimen information, herbs sample information, market research, germplasm survey, traditional knowledge survey of these seven aspects of the 312 indicators of the report, serving the Chinese materia medica resource survey of field survey data collection and internal data collation. The system provides the technical support for the national census of Chinese materia medica resources, improves the efficiency of the census of Chinese materia medica resources, and is conducive to the long-term preservation of the data of Chinese materia medica resources census, the transformation and sharing of the results. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  15. Criteria for selecting implementation science theories and frameworks: results from an international survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Birken

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Theories provide a synthesizing architecture for implementation science. The underuse, superficial use, and misuse of theories pose a substantial scientific challenge for implementation science and may relate to challenges in selecting from the many theories in the field. Implementation scientists may benefit from guidance for selecting a theory for a specific study or project. Understanding how implementation scientists select theories will help inform efforts to develop such guidance. Our objective was to identify which theories implementation scientists use, how they use theories, and the criteria used to select theories. Methods We identified initial lists of uses and criteria for selecting implementation theories based on seminal articles and an iterative consensus process. We incorporated these lists into a self-administered survey for completion by self-identified implementation scientists. We recruited potential respondents at the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health and via several international email lists. We used frequencies and percentages to report results. Results Two hundred twenty-three implementation scientists from 12 countries responded to the survey. They reported using more than 100 different theories spanning several disciplines. Respondents reported using theories primarily to identify implementation determinants, inform data collection, enhance conceptual clarity, and guide implementation planning. Of the 19 criteria presented in the survey, the criteria used by the most respondents to select theory included analytic level (58%, logical consistency/plausibility (56%, empirical support (53%, and description of a change process (54%. The criteria used by the fewest respondents included fecundity (10%, uniqueness (12%, and falsifiability (15%. Conclusions Implementation scientists use a large number of criteria to select theories, but there is little

  16. Criteria for selecting implementation science theories and frameworks: results from an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birken, Sarah A; Powell, Byron J; Shea, Christopher M; Haines, Emily R; Alexis Kirk, M; Leeman, Jennifer; Rohweder, Catherine; Damschroder, Laura; Presseau, Justin

    2017-10-30

    Theories provide a synthesizing architecture for implementation science. The underuse, superficial use, and misuse of theories pose a substantial scientific challenge for implementation science and may relate to challenges in selecting from the many theories in the field. Implementation scientists may benefit from guidance for selecting a theory for a specific study or project. Understanding how implementation scientists select theories will help inform efforts to develop such guidance. Our objective was to identify which theories implementation scientists use, how they use theories, and the criteria used to select theories. We identified initial lists of uses and criteria for selecting implementation theories based on seminal articles and an iterative consensus process. We incorporated these lists into a self-administered survey for completion by self-identified implementation scientists. We recruited potential respondents at the 8th Annual Conference on the Science of Dissemination and Implementation in Health and via several international email lists. We used frequencies and percentages to report results. Two hundred twenty-three implementation scientists from 12 countries responded to the survey. They reported using more than 100 different theories spanning several disciplines. Respondents reported using theories primarily to identify implementation determinants, inform data collection, enhance conceptual clarity, and guide implementation planning. Of the 19 criteria presented in the survey, the criteria used by the most respondents to select theory included analytic level (58%), logical consistency/plausibility (56%), empirical support (53%), and description of a change process (54%). The criteria used by the fewest respondents included fecundity (10%), uniqueness (12%), and falsifiability (15%). Implementation scientists use a large number of criteria to select theories, but there is little consensus on which are most important. Our results suggest that the

  17. USGS science and technology help managers battle invading Asian carp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Cynthia S.; Morrison, Sandra S.

    2016-09-28

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducts Asian carp research focused on early detection, risk assessment, and development of control tools and strategies. The goals are to prevent the establishment of invasive Asian carp in the Great Lakes and to reduce their impacts in the Ohio River and Mississippi River Basins and elsewhere. Managers can use the information, tools, and strategies for early detection of Asian carp and to control them when their presence is first evident. New detection and control tools are designed to accommodate expansion to other invasive species and application in geographically diverse areas.This USGS focus complements goals of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI), a multi-agency collaboration started in 2010 to protect and restore the Great Lakes. As a member of the Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee, which guides Asian carp efforts, the USGS works closely with Federal and State agencies, Canada, and others to address high-priority Asian carp issues and provide science to inform management decisions.The USGS has gained extensive knowledge of Asian carp biology and life history over the past 30 years. That knowledge guides the design, development, and application of control strategies, and is essential for developing approaches in line with modern principles and practices of integrated pest management (IPM). IPM is a process used to solve pest problems while minimizing risks to people and the environment.

  18. Making USGS Science Data more Open, Accessible, and Usable: Leveraging ScienceBase for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, M.; Ignizio, D.; Langseth, M. L.; Norkin, T.

    2016-12-01

    In 2013, the White House released initiatives requiring federally funded research to be made publicly available and machine readable. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has been developing a unified approach to make USGS data available and open. This effort has involved the establishment of internal policies and the release of a Public Access Plan, which outlines a strategy for the USGS to move forward into the modern era in scientific data management. Originally designed as a catalog and collaborative data management platform, ScienceBase (www.sciencebase.gov) is being leveraged to serve as a robust data hosting solution for USGS researchers to make scientific data accessible. With the goal of maintaining persistent access to formal data products and developing a management approach to facilitate stable data citation, the ScienceBase Data Release Team was established to ensure the quality, consistency, and meaningful organization of USGS data through standardized workflows and best practices. These practices include the creation and maintenance of persistent identifiers for data, improving the use of open data formats, establishing permissions for read/write access, validating the quality of standards compliant metadata, verifying that data have been reviewed and approved prior to release, and connecting to external search catalogs such as the USGS Science Data Catalog (data.usgs.gov) and data.gov. The ScienceBase team is actively building features to support this effort by automating steps to streamline the process, building metrics to track site visits and downloads, and connecting published digital resources in line with USGS and Federal policy. By utilizing ScienceBase to achieve stewardship quality and employing a dedicated team to help USGS scientists improve the quality of their data, the USGS is helping to meet today's data quality management challenges and ensure that reliable USGS data are available to and reusable for the public.

  19. USGS scientists study sediment deposited by 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    In January, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists traveled to countries on the Indian Ocean to study sediment deposited by the devastating tsunami of December 26, 2004. They hope to gain knowledge that will help them to identify ancient tsunami deposits in the geologic record—which extends much farther into the past than written records—and so compile a history of tsunamis that can be used to assess a region's future tsunami risk.

  20. USGS Integration of New Science and Technology, Appendix A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, Marybeth; Knights, Brent C.; Cupp, Aaron R.; Amberg, Jon; Chapman, Duane C.; Calfee, Robin D.; Duncker, James J.

    2017-01-01

    This product summarizes the USGS plans for integration of new science and technology into Asian Carp control efforts for 2017. This includes the 1) implementation and evaluation of new tactics and behavioral information for monitoring, surveillance, control and containment; 2) understanding behavior and reproduction of Asian carp in established and emerging populations to inform deterrent deployment, rapid response, and removal efforts; and 3) development and evaluation of databases, decision support tools and performance measures.

  1. Pan-European survey on the implementation of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery with emphasis on cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, Thijs; Besselink, Marc G.; Shamali, Awad; Butturini, Giovanni; Busch, Olivier R.; Edwin, Bjørn; Troisi, Roberto; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Dagher, Ibrahim; Bassi, Claudio; Abu Hilal, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive (MI) pancreatic surgery appears to be gaining popularity, but its implementation throughout Europe and the opinions regarding its use in pancreatic cancer patients are unknown. A 30-question survey was sent between June and December 2014 to pancreatic surgeons of the European

  2. Polling on a Budget: Implementing Telephone Surveys in Introductory and Advanced American Politics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that student learning is enhanced when students are engaged through active learning strategies. In studying public opinion and polling, challenges include the provision of meaningful active learning environments when resources are limited. In this article, I discuss the design and implementation of telephone surveys as a teaching…

  3. 75 FR 55598 - Proposed Information Collection; The State of Ecosystem Services Implementation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... that service. The objectives of this survey are to illustrate the various approaches that are being... successfully implemented ecosystem services concepts. II. Data OMB Control Number: 1028--NEW. Title: The State...: Individuals who are (currently or recently have been) engaged in conducting ecosystem services research...

  4. 2014 USGS/NRCS Lidar: Central MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: USGS-NRCS Laurel MS 0.7m NPS LIDAR Lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G13PD01086 Woolpert...

  5. The USGS Earthquake Scenario Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D. J.; Petersen, M. D.; Wald, L. A.; Frankel, A. D.; Quitoriano, V. R.; Lin, K.; Luco, N.; Mathias, S.; Bausch, D.

    2009-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Earthquake Hazards Program (EHP) is producing a comprehensive suite of earthquake scenarios for planning, mitigation, loss estimation, and scientific investigations. The Earthquake Scenario Project (ESP), though lacking clairvoyance, is a forward-looking project, estimating earthquake hazard and loss outcomes as they may occur one day. For each scenario event, fundamental input includes i) the magnitude and specified fault mechanism and dimensions, ii) regional Vs30 shear velocity values for site amplification, and iii) event metadata. A grid of standard ShakeMap ground motion parameters (PGA, PGV, and three spectral response periods) is then produced using the well-defined, regionally-specific approach developed by the USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project (NHSMP), including recent advances in empirical ground motion predictions (e.g., the NGA relations). The framework also allows for numerical (3D) ground motion computations for specific, detailed scenario analyses. Unlike NSHMP ground motions, for ESP scenarios, local rock and soil site conditions and commensurate shaking amplifications are applied based on detailed Vs30 maps where available or based on topographic slope as a proxy. The scenario event set is comprised primarily by selection from the NSHMP events, though custom events are also allowed based on coordination of the ESP team with regional coordinators, seismic hazard experts, seismic network operators, and response coordinators. The event set will be harmonized with existing and future scenario earthquake events produced regionally or by other researchers. The event list includes approximate 200 earthquakes in CA, 100 in NV, dozens in each of NM, UT, WY, and a smaller number in other regions. Systematic output will include all standard ShakeMap products, including HAZUS input, GIS, KML, and XML files used for visualization, loss estimation, ShakeCast, PAGER, and for other systems. All products will be

  6. USGS Spectral Library Version 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Pearson, Neil C.; Wise, Richard A.; Benzel, William M.; Lowers, Heather A.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Klein, Anna J.

    2017-04-10

    bandpasses, and resampled to selected broadband multispectral sensors. The native file format of the library is the SPECtrum Processing Routines (SPECPR) data format. This report describes how to access freely available software to read the SPECPR format. To facilitate broader access to the library, we produced generic formats of the spectra and metadata in text files. The library is provided on digital media and online at https://speclab.cr.usgs.gov/spectral-lib.html. A long-term archive of these data are stored on the USGS ScienceBase data server (https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7RR1WDJ).

  7. [Design and implementation of data checking system for Chinese materia medica resources survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Ge, Xiao-Guang; Jin, Yan; Jing, Zhi-Xian; Qi, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Yu-Ping; Wang, Wei; Guo, Lan-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2017-11-01

    The Chinese material medica resources (CMMR) national survey information management system has collected a large amount of data. To help dealing with data recheck, reduce the work of inside, improve the recheck of survey data from provincial and county level, National Resource Center for Chinese Materia Medical has designed a data checking system for Chinese material medica resources survey based on J2EE technology, Java language, Oracle data base in accordance with the SOA framework. It includes single data check, check score, content manage, check the survey data census data with manual checking and automatic checking about census implementation plan, key research information, general survey information, cultivation of medicinal materials information, germplasm resources information the medicine information, market research information, traditional knowledge information, specimen information of this 9 aspects 20 class 175 indicators in two aspects of the quantity and quality. The established system assists in the completion of the data consistency and accuracy, pushes the county survey team timely to complete the data entry arrangement work, so as to improve the integrity, consistency and accuracy of the survey data, and ensure effective and available data, which lay a foundation for providing accurate data support for national survey of the Chinese material medica resources (CMMR) results summary, and displaying results and sharing. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  8. Characterizing contaminant concentrations with depth by using the USGS well profiler in Oklahoma, 2003-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Becker, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Oklahoma Water Science Center has been using the USGS well profiler to characterize changes in water contribution and contaminant concentrations with depth in pumping public-supply wells in selected aquifers. The tools and methods associated with the well profiler, which were first developed by the USGS California Water Science Center, have been used to investigate common problems such as saline water intrusion in high-yield irrigation wells and metals contamination in high-yield public-supply wells.

  9. Eaton to be sworn in as USGS Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    On the eve of the U.S. Geological Survey's 115th anniversary, Gordon P. Eaton was confirmed as the survey's 12th director by unanimous consent of the U.S. Senate. His swearing-in ceremony is tentatively scheduled for March 14. Eaton, 64, is a distinguished Earth scientist, administrator, and former employee of USGS. His most recent post was director of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. He has been an AGU member since 1963. Eaton follows in the footsteps of Dallas Peck, who held the post from 1981 to 1993, and interim director Robert M. Hirsch, who followed Peck.

  10. Archive of Side Scan Sonar and Swath Bathymetry Data Collected During USGS Cruise 13CCT04 Offshore of Petit Bois Island, Gulf Islands National Seashore, Mississippi, August 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In August of 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys offshore of Petit Bois Island, Mississippi. These efforts are a continued part of...

  11. RES2DINV Format Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 6, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  12. ESRI Format Binary Grid of the Merged Bathymetry and Elevation Data from the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay Area For Use With USGS Cruise 06018 (POTO_AREA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  13. HYPACK NAVIGATION: Text Files of the DGPS Navigation Logged with HYPACK Software on USGS Cruise 06018 from Sept. 6 to Sept. 8, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  14. 10CCT03_ss_1m.tif: the 1-m resolution grid of the side scan sonar data from USGS Cruise 10cct03

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In April of 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a geophysical survey from the east end of West Ship Island, MSiss., extending to the middle of Dauphin...

  15. Organisational strategies to implement hospital pressure ulcer prevention programmes: findings from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soban, Lynn M; Kim, Linda; Yuan, Anita H; Miltner, Rebecca S

    2017-09-01

    To describe the presence and operationalisation of organisational strategies to support implementation of pressure ulcer prevention programmes across acute care hospitals in a large, integrated health-care system. Comprehensive pressure ulcer programmes include nursing interventions such as use of a risk assessment tool and organisational strategies such as policies and performance monitoring to embed these interventions into routine care. The current literature provides little detail about strategies used to implement pressure ulcer prevention programmes. Data were collected by an e-mail survey to all chief nursing officers in Veterans Health Administration acute care hospitals. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were used to summarise survey responses and evaluate relationships between some variables. Organisational strategies that support implementation of a pressure ulcer prevention programme (policy, committee, staff education, wound care specialists, and use of performance data) were reported at high levels. Considerable variations were noted in how these strategies were operationalised within individual hospitals. Organisational strategies to support implementation of pressure ulcer preventive programmes are often not optimally operationalised to achieve consistent, sustainable performance. The results of the present study highlight the role and influence of nurse leaders on pressure ulcer prevention program implementation. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. ENTREPRENEURIAL STRATEGIES AND USE OF STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION MECHANISMS: A SURVEY WITH MICRO AND SMALL ENTREPRENEURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Melo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to comprehend the mechanisms of strategic implementation used by entrepreneurs in the processes of establishing new functional strategies (production and marketing in their companies. A survey with 169 micro and small entrepreneurs was accomplished. The results showed that the relation between the use of strategic process by micro and small entrepreneurs is middling, but the use of implementation mechanisms, in general terms, is low and the correlation when the entrepreneurs strategies are adopted is weak. So, the possibility of justifying the use of these strategies is fragile whilst associated to a stronger holding of the strategic management techniques by the entrepreneurs.

  17. Methods for implementing a medicine outlet survey: lessons from the anti-malarial market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Kathryn A; Poyer, Stephen; Solomon, Tsione; Munroe, Erik; Patouillard, Edith; Njogu, Julius; Evance, Illah; Hanson, Kara; Shewchuk, Tanya; Goodman, Catherine

    2013-02-05

    In recent years an increasing number of public investments and policy changes have been made to improve the availability, affordability and quality of medicines available to consumers in developing countries, including anti-malarials. It is important to monitor the extent to which these interventions are successful in achieving their aims using quantitative data on the supply side of the market. There are a number of challenges related to studying supply, including outlet sampling, gaining provider cooperation and collecting accurate data on medicines. This paper provides guidance on key steps to address these issues when conducting a medicine outlet survey in a developing country context. While the basic principles of good survey design and implementation are important for all surveys, there are a set of specific issues that should be considered when conducting a medicine outlet survey. This paper draws on the authors' experience of designing and implementing outlet surveys, including the lessons learnt from ACTwatch outlet surveys on anti-malarial retail supply, and other key studies in the field. Key lessons and points of debate are distilled around the following areas: selecting a sample of outlets; techniques for collecting and analysing data on medicine availability, price and sales volumes; and methods for ensuring high quality data in general. The authors first consider the inclusion criteria for outlets, contrasting comprehensive versus more focused approaches. Methods for developing a reliable sampling frame of outlets are then presented, including use of existing lists, key informants and an outlet census. Specific issues in the collection of data on medicine prices and sales volumes are discussed; and approaches for generating comparable price and sales volume data across products using the adult equivalent treatment dose (AETD) are explored. The paper concludes with advice on practical considerations, including questionnaire design, field worker

  18. USGS Sea Ice Email Script

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Daily sea ice imagery and charting benefits logistics and navigational planning in the Alaskan Arctic waters, yet access to these data often requires high bandwidth...

  19. USGS Dynamical Downscaled Regional Climate

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — We have completed an array of high-resolution simulations of present and future climate over Western North America (WNA) and Eastern North America (ENA) by...

  20. USGS Northern California Shoreline Change

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey has generated a comprehensive data clearinghouse of digital vector shorelines and shoreline...

  1. 2010 USGS Lidar: Salton Sea (CA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The USGS Salton Sea project encompasses a 5-kilometer buffer around the Salton Sea, California. Dewberry classified LiDAR for a project boundary that touches 623...

  2. 2008 USGS New Jersey Lidar: Somerset County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data support the general geospatial needs of the USGS and other federal agencies. LiDAR data is remotely sensed high-resolution elevation data collected by an...

  3. USGS Digital Orthophoto Quad (DOQ) Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Metadata for the USGS DOQ Orthophoto Layer. Each orthophoto is represented by a Quarter 24k Quad tile polygon. The polygon attributes contain the quarter-quad tile...

  4. VT 100K DRG USGS Topographic Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Vermont Topographic Maps dataset (TOPOVT100K) is a raster image of a scanned USGS 1:100,000 scale topographic map excluding the collar...

  5. Survey on the implementation and reliability of CubeSat electrical bus interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwmeester, Jasper; Langer, Martin; Gill, Eberhard

    2017-06-01

    This paper provides results and conclusions on a survey on the implementation and reliability aspects of CubeSat bus interfaces, with an emphasis on the data bus and power distribution. It provides recommendations for a future CubeSat bus standard. The survey is based on a literature study and a questionnaire representing 60 launched CubeSats and 44 to be launched CubeSats. It is found that the bus interfaces are not the main driver for mission failures. However, it is concluded that the Inter Integrated Circuit (I2C) data bus, as implemented in a great majority of the CubeSats, caused some catastrophic satellite failures and a vast amount of bus lockups. The power distribution may lead to catastrophic failures if the power lines are not protected against overcurrent. A connector and wiring standard widely implemented in CubeSats is based on the PC/104 standard. Most participants find the 104 pin connector of this standard too large. For a future CubeSat bus interface standard, it is recommended to implement a reliable data bus, a power distribution with overcurrent protection and a wiring harness with smaller connectors compared with PC/104.

  6. Semi-automatic surface sediment sampling system - A prototype to be implemented in bivalve fishing surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufino, Marta M.; Baptista, Paulo; Pereira, Fábio; Gaspar, Miguel B.

    2018-01-01

    In the current work we propose a new method to sample surface sediment during bivalve fishing surveys. Fishing institutes all around the word carry out regular surveys with the aim of monitoring the stocks of commercial species. These surveys comprise often more than one hundred of sampling stations and cover large geographical areas. Although superficial sediment grain sizes are among the main drivers of benthic communities and provide crucial information for studies on coastal dynamics, overall there is a strong lack of this type of data, possibly, because traditional surface sediment sampling methods use grabs, that require considerable time and effort to be carried out on regular basis or on large areas. In face of these aspects, we developed an easy and un-expensive method to sample superficial sediments, during bivalve fisheries monitoring surveys, without increasing survey time or human resources. The method was successfully evaluated and validated during a typical bivalve survey carried out on the Northwest coast of Portugal, confirming that it had any interference with the survey objectives. Furthermore, the method was validated by collecting samples using a traditional Van Veen grabs (traditional method), which showed a similar grain size composition to the ones collected by the new method, on the same localities. We recommend that the procedure is implemented on regular bivalve fishing surveys, together with an image analysis system to analyse the collected samples. The new method will provide substantial quantity of data on surface sediment in coastal areas, using a non-expensive and efficient manner, with a high potential application in different fields of research.

  7. Recruiting and Surveying Catholic Parishes for Cancer Control Initiatives: Lessons Learned From the CRUZA Implementation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jennifer D; Tom, Laura S; Leyva, Bryan; Rustan, Sarah; Ospino, Hosffman; Negron, Rosalyn; Torres, Maria Idalí; Galeas, Ana V

    2015-09-01

    We describe activities undertaken to conduct organizational surveys among faith-based organizations in Massachusetts as part of a larger study designed to promote parish-based cancer control programs for Latinos. Catholic parishes located in Massachusetts that provided Spanish-language mass were eligible for study participation. Parishes were identified through diocesan records and online directories. Prior to parish recruitment, we implemented a variety of activities to gain support from Catholic leaders at the diocesan level. We then recruited individual parishes to complete a four-part organizational survey, which assessed (A) parish leadership, (B) financial resources, (C) involvement in Hispanic Ministry, and (D) health and social service offerings. Our goal was to administer each survey component to a parish representatives who could best provide an organizational perspective on the content of each component (e.g., A = pastors, B = business managers, C = Hispanic Ministry leaders, and D = parish nurse or health ministry leader). Here, we present descriptive statistics on recruitment and survey administration processes. Seventy-five percent of eligible parishes responded to the survey and of these, 92% completed all four components. Completed four-part surveys required an average of 16.6 contact attempts. There were an average of 2.1 respondents per site. Pastoral staff were the most frequent respondents (79%), but they also required the most contact attempts (M = 9.3, range = 1-27). While most interviews were completed by phone (71%), one quarter were completed during in-person site visits. We achieved a high survey completion rate among organizational representatives. Our lessons learned may inform efforts to engage and survey faith-based organizations for public health efforts. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  8. USGS remote sensing coordination for the 2010 Haiti earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Jones, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    In response to the devastating 12 January 2010, earthquake in Haiti, the US Geological Survey (USGS) provided essential coordinating services for remote sensing activities. Communication was rapidly established between the widely distributed response teams and data providers to define imaging requirements and sensor tasking opportunities. Data acquired from a variety of sources were received and archived by the USGS, and these products were subsequently distributed using the Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) and other mechanisms. Within six weeks after the earthquake, over 600,000 files representing 54 terabytes of data were provided to the response community. The USGS directly supported a wide variety of groups in their use of these data to characterize post-earthquake conditions and to make comparisons with pre-event imagery. The rapid and continuing response achieved was enabled by existing imaging and ground systems, and skilled personnel adept in all aspects of satellite data acquisition, processing, distribution and analysis. The information derived from image interpretation assisted senior planners and on-site teams to direct assistance where it was most needed.

  9. Joint USGS/USEPA Pathogens in Soils Geographic ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online interactive maps In order to protect the environment from current and potential threats posed by uncontrolled intentional releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, and contaminants, the biothreat research community recognizes the needs to be able to detect threats in the appropriate matrices and also consider whether a detected constituent is naturally occurring or a contaminant associated with an accidental or purposeful release. Therefore, sensitive and specific methods for processing and analyzing environmental samples as well as methods to determine the existing risk to the public from endemic microorganisms are needed. Background data is also an important variable for assessing and managing the risks posed by a contaminated site. The EPA has collaborated with the USGS to analyze over 4800 soil samples collected during the USGS North American Soil Geochemical Landscapes Project for the presence of Bacillus anthracis and a subset of those samples for the presence of Yersinia pestis, and Francisella tularensis. EPA and USGS scientists correlated occurrences with geochemical constituents (> 40 major and trace elements), historical outbreak data, and climate data by creating online interactive maps using a Geographic Information Systems (GIS) platform. This on-going nationwide survey can be used as an investigative tool by animal and public health scientists and emergency responders determine the potential for disease outbreaks and persistenc

  10. USGS Information Technology Strategic Plan: Fiscal Years 2007-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: The acquisition, management, communication, and long-term stewardship of natural science data, information, and knowledge are fundamental mission responsibilities of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). USGS scientists collect, maintain, and exchange raw scientific data and interpret and analyze it to produce a wide variety of science-based products. Managers throughout the Bureau access, summarize, and analyze administrative or business-related information to budget, plan, evaluate, and report on programs and projects. Information professionals manage the extensive and growing stores of irreplaceable scientific information and knowledge in numerous databases, archives, libraries, and other digital and nondigital holdings. Information is the primary currency of the USGS, and it flows to scientists, managers, partners, and a wide base of customers, including local, State, and Federal agencies, private sector organizations, and individual citizens. Supporting these information flows is an infrastructure of computer systems, telecommunications equipment, software applications, digital and nondigital data stores and archives, technical expertise, and information policies and procedures. This infrastructure has evolved over many years and consists of tools and technologies acquired or built to address the specific requirements of particular projects or programs. Developed independently, the elements of this infrastructure were typically not designed to facilitate the exchange of data and information across programs or disciplines, to allow for sharing of information resources or expertise, or to be combined into a Bureauwide and broader information infrastructure. The challenge to the Bureau is to wisely and effectively use its information resources to create a more Integrated Information Environment that can reduce costs, enhance the discovery and delivery of scientific products, and improve support for science. This Information Technology Strategic Plan

  11. Awareness and implementation of tobacco dependence treatment guidelines in Arizona: Healthcare Systems Survey 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menke J Michael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents findings from the Tobacco Control in Arizona Healthcare Systems Survey, conducted in 2000. The purpose of the survey was to assess the status of Arizona healthcare systems' awareness and implementation of tobacco cessation and prevention measures. Methods The 20-item survey was developed by The University of Arizona HealthCare Partnership in collaboration with the Arizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Tobacco Education and Prevention. It was mailed to representatives of Arizona's 40 healthcare systems, including commercial and Medicare managed care organizations, "managed Medicaid" organizations, Veterans Affairs Health Care Systems, and Indian Health Service Medical Centers. Thirty-three healthcare systems (83% completed the survey. Results The majority of healthcare systems reported awareness of at least one tobacco cessation and prevention clinical practice guideline, but only one third reported full guideline implementation. While a majority covered some form of behavioral therapy, less than half reported covering tobacco treatment medications. "Managed Medicaid" organizations administered through the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System were significantly less likely to offer coverage for behavioral therapy and less likely to cover pharmacotherapy than were their non-Medicaid counterparts in managed care, Veterans Affairs Health Care Systems and Indian Health Service Medical Centers. Conclusion Arizona healthcare system coverage for tobacco cessation in the year 2000 was comparable to national survey findings of the same year. The findings that only 10% of "Managed Medicaid" organizations covered tobacco treatment medication and were significantly less likely to cover behavioral therapy were important given the nearly double smoking prevalence among Medicaid patients. Throughout the years of the program, the strategic plan of the Arizona Department of Health Services Bureau of Tobacco

  12. Improving children's nutrition environments: A survey of adoption and implementation of nutrition guidelines in recreational facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Downs Shauna M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the mandate of recreational facilities is to enhance well-being, many offer foods inconsistent with recommendations for healthy eating. Little is known regarding recreational facility food environments and how they might be improved, as few studies exist. The Alberta Nutrition Guidelines for Children and Youth (ANGCY are intended to ensure access to healthy food choices in schools, childcare and recreational facilities. This study investigated awareness, adoption and implementation of the ANGCY among recreational facilities in Alberta, Canada, one year following their release. Methods A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted from June - December, 2009 (n = 151 with managers of publicly funded recreational facilities that served food. The questionnaire included 10 closed and 7 open ended questions to assess the organizational priority for healthy eating, awareness, adoption and implementation of the ANGCY. Chi-squared tests examined quantitative variables, while qualitative data were analysed using directed content analysis. Greenhalgh's model of diffusion of complex innovations within health service organizations constituted the theoretical framework for the study. Results One half of respondents had heard of the ANGCY, however their knowledge of them was limited. Although 51% of facilities had made changes to improve the nutritional quality of foods offered in the past year, only a small fraction (11% of these changes were motivated by the ANGCY. At the time of the survey, 14% of facilities had adopted the ANGCY and 6% had implemented them. Barriers to adoption and implementation were primarily related to perceived negative attributes of the ANGCY, the inner (organizational context, and negative feedback received during the implementation process. Managers strongly perceived that implementing nutrition guidelines would limit their profit-making ability. Conclusions If fully adopted and implemented, the ANGCY

  13. USGS Hydrography (NHD) Overlay Map Service from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) National Hydrography Dataset (NHD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) service from The National Map (TNM) is a comprehensive set of digital spatial data that encodes information about...

  14. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Boomer Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise DIAN 97011 Long Island, NY Inner Shelf

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS DIAN 97011 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of Long Island, NY in...

  15. USGS Imagery Overlay Map Service from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) High Resolution Orthoimagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS_EROS_Ortho_SCALE service contains orthorectified digital aerial photographs and satellite imagery that are commonly referred to as orthoimagery. The imagery in...

  16. El Paso, TX 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  17. Santa Fe, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  18. BATHY - Bathymetry within the inner shelf of Long Bay, South Carolina collected by the USGS, 1999-2003 (Grid)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1999, the USGS, in partnership with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, began a study to investigate processes affecting shoreline change along the northern...

  19. Silver City, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  20. Saint Johns, AZ 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  1. El Paso, TX 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  2. Santa Fe, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  3. Silver City, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  4. Fort Sumner, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  5. Las Cruces, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  6. Las Cruces, NM 1:250,000 Quad East Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  7. Fort Sumner, NM 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  8. Saint Johns, AZ 1:250,000 Quad West Half USGS Land Use/Land Cover, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This land cover data set was produced as part of a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)...

  9. 2007 USGS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Northeast US (New York, New Jersey) Coastal Barrier Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz point cloud data were produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  10. 2007 USGS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Fire Island National Seashore, NY and Sandy Hook, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz point cloud data were produced from remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  11. Archive of Water Gun Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004, New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS SEAX 96004 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of the New York and...

  12. Archive of Boomer Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise SEAX 96004, New York Bight, 1 May - 9 June, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This DVD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS SEAX 96004 cruise.The coverage is the nearshore of the New York and...

  13. MODFLOW-USG model of groundwater flow in the Wood River Valley aquifer system in Blaine County, Idaho

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A three-dimensional numerical groundwater flow model (MODFLOW-USG) was developed for the Wood River Valley (WRV) aquifer system, south-central Idaho, to evaluate...

  14. Archive of Boomer Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise DIAN 96040, Fire Island, New York, 4-24 September 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS DIAN 97011 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of Long Island, NY in...

  15. 2004 USGS/NASA Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL): Northern Gulf of Mexico, Post-Hurricane Ivan

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ASCII xyz point cloud data were produced from remotely-sensed, geographically-referenced elevation measurements in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)...

  16. [Design and implementation of mobile terminal data acquisition for Chinese materia medica resources survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yuan-Hua; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Jin, Yan; Ge, Xiao-Guang; Jing, Zhi-Xian; Wang, Ling; Zhao, Yu-Ping; Guo, Lan-Ping; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a data acquisition system based on mobile terminal combining GPS, offset correction, automatic speech recognition and database networking technology was designed implemented with the function of locating the latitude and elevation information fast, taking conveniently various types of Chinese herbal plant photos, photos, samples habitat photos and so on. The mobile system realizes automatic association with Chinese medicine source information, through the voice recognition function it records the information of plant characteristics and environmental characteristics, and record relevant plant specimen information. The data processing platform based on Chinese medicine resources survey data reporting client can effectively assists in indoor data processing, derives the mobile terminal data to computer terminal. The established data acquisition system provides strong technical support for the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources (CMMR). Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the...

  18. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the Index...

  19. ASCII formatted file of the 4-m bathymetry from the northern half of USGS survey 98015 of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod (CAPENORTH_GEO4M_XYZ.TXT, Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes bathymetry of the sea floor offshore of eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor mapping system...

  20. ASCII formatted file of the 4-m bathymetry from the southern half of USGS Survey 98015 of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod (CAPESOUTH_GEO4M_XYZ.TXT, Geographic, NAD83)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes bathymetry of the sea floor offshore of eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor mapping system...

  1. CAPENORTH_GEO4M_XYZ.TXT: ASCII formatted file of the 4-m bathymetry from the northern half of USGS survey 98015 of the Sea Floor off Eastern Cape Cod (Geographic)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set includes bathymetry of the sea floor offshore of eastern Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The data were collected with a multibeam sea floor mapping system...

  2. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) Samples Repository

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center (SPCMSC) Samples Repository is a partner in the...

  3. Single-Beam Bathymetry Data Collected in 2015 nearshore Dauphin Island, Alabama, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). This metadata file is specific to the International Reference Frame 2000 (ITRF00) xyz point data.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dauphin Island, Alabama is a barrier island located in the Gulf of Mexico that supports local residence, tourism, commercial infrastructure, and the historical Fort...

  4. USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Research Presented at the NAAMLP Meeting in Billings, Mont., Sept. 25, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kate; Church, Stan

    2006-01-01

    The following talk was an invited presentation given at the National Association of Abandoned Mine Lands Programs meeting in Billings, Montana on Sept. 25, 2006. The objective of the talk was to outline the scope of the U.S. Geological Survey research, past, present and future, in the area of abandoned mine research. Two large Professional Papers have come out of our AML studies: Nimick, D.A., Church, S.E., and Finger, S.E., eds., 2004, Integrated investigations of environmental effects of historical mining in the Basin and Boulder mining districts, Boulder River watershed, Jefferson County, Montana: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1652, 524 p., 2 plates, 1 DVD, URL: http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/usgspubs/pp/pp1652 Church, S.E., von Guerard, Paul, and Finger, S.E., eds., 2006, Integrated Investigations of Environmental Effects of Historical Mining in the Animas River Watershed, San Juan County, Colorado: U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1651, 1,096 p., 6 plates, 1 DVD (in press). Additional publications and links can be found on the USGS AML website at URL: http://amli.usgs.gov/ or are accessible from the USGS Mineral Resource Program website at URL: http://minerals.usgs.gov/.

  5. [Design and Implementation of the Data Collection Tools for National Mental Health Survey of Colombia, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Viviana; Moreno, Socorro; Camacho, Jhon; Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; de Santacruz, Cecilia; Rodriguez, Maria Nelcy; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    Population surveys on mental health are performed as part of the inputs required for the creation, implementation and evaluation of policies related to mental health, worldwide, and as an initiative of the World Health Organisation (WHO). was held The fourth National Survey of Mental Health (ENSM 2015) was carried out during the first half of 2015 on a representative sample of 2,727 children between 7 and 11 years of age, 1,754 adolescents, and 10, 870 adults who were selected throughout the country. To describe the selection and definition of the tools used to measure mental health (including social cognition and violence), problems, mental disorders, and the evaluation of health states, as well as to describe the process used to develop the data collection tools finally used. The measurement of mental disorders in children was performed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC), and the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was used for adolescents and adults. For the remaining components evaluated in the survey, a search was conducted on the tools used at a national and international level. The selection of the toos used for the evaluation was based on the questions made by each tool, as well as the scientific validity that could be obtained from the results. In some cases the complete tool (as published) was used, in other cases the tools were constructed unifying parts of different ones, or questions were written based on the concepts or characteristics to be measured. Subsequently, a validation of content, concept and semantic of every tool was carried out, including the CIDI and DISC. The resulting tools were used on a group of people with different characteristics. It was noted that further clarification was necessary for some people to fully understand what was being asked. Because the collection of all the information in the survey would be computer assisted, a stream format was generated to guide the implementation in

  6. USGS releases Alaska oil assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    With the U.S. Congress gearing up for a House-Senate conference committee battle about whether to open the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) for oil drilling, a new assessment of the amount of oil in the federal portion of the U.S. National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NRPA) is influencing the debate.The U.S. Geological Survey has found that the NPRA holds "significantly greater" petroleum resources than had been estimated previously This finding was disclosed in a 16 May report. The assessment estimated that technically recoverable oil on NPRA federal lands are between 5.9 and 13.2 billion barrels of oil; a 1980 assessment estimated between 0.3 and 5.4 billion barrels.

  7. GeoTIFF image of interferometric backscatter data collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_Backscatter_5m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods...

  8. PNG formatted images of Knudsen 3202 chirp seismic-reflection profiles collected by the USGS within Buzzards Bay and sand shoals of Vineyard Sound, MA, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement between the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS),...

  9. Hillshade of Swath Bathymetry collected by the USGS offshore of the Grand Strand, South Carolina, 1999-2003 (BATHY_HILLSH, grid)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in partnership with the South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium, began a study to investigate processes affecting shoreline...

  10. GeoTIFF image of interferometric backscatter data collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_Backscatter_1m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods...

  11. Interpretation of depositional units on the SeaMARC 1A image of the Mississippi Fan, USGS Gulf of Mexico Cruise 90001 (INTERP.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Since 1982 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected a large amount of surficial and shallow subsurface geologic information in the deep parts of the Gulf of...

  12. Knudsen 3202 seismic-reflection data trackline navigation collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_SeismicTrackline)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  13. Static Oceanographic Observations made by the USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program at Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory, September and October 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) obtained oceanographic measurements as part of the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Optics Acoustics and Stress In Situ (OASIS)...

  14. Text Files of the DGPS Navigation Logged with HYPACK Software on USGS Cruise 2011-006-FA from June 13 to June 21, 2011 (HYPACK NAVIGATION)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  15. Text Files of the DGPS Navigation Logged with HYPACK Software on USGS Cruise 2011-006-FA from June 13 to June 21, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  16. Text Files of the DGPS Navigation Logged with HYPACK Software on USGS Cruise 09059 from Nov. 9 to Nov. 11, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  17. Text Files of the DGPS Navigation Logged with HYPACK Software on USGS Cruise 2010-033-FA from July 21 to July 23, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is producing detailed geologic maps of the coastal...

  18. Comma delimited text files and JPEG images of sound velocity profiles collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  19. Nutrient and pesticide data collected from the USGS National Water Quality Network and previous networks, 1980-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Jeffrey R.; Lee, Casey; Norman, Julia E.; Reutter, David C.

    2016-01-01

    The National Water Quality Network (NWQN) for Rivers and Streams includes 113 surface-water river and stream sites monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Program, National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project. The NWQN includes 19 large river coastal sites, 44 large river inland sites, 30 wadeable stream reference sites, 10 wadeable stream urban sites, and 10 wadeable stream agricultural sites. In addition to the 113 NWQN sites, 3 large inland river monitoring sites from the USGS Cooperative Water Program are also included in this annual water-quality reporting Web site to be consistent with previous USGS studies of nutrient transport in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin. This data release provides streamflow, nutrient, pesticide and sediment data collected and analyzed by NWQN and other historical water-quality networks from 1980-2015. Data from this release are presented at the USGS Tracking Water Quality page: http://cida.usgs.gov/quality/rivers/home.

  20. Third annual state of logistics survey for South Africa 2006: Implementing logistics strategies in a developing economy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ittmann, HW

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the focus is on the challenges of implementing logistics strategies in the macro-economic, industry and small business development contexts. The data contained in this survey represents the 2005 reporting year. The aim of the survey...

  1. Survey of US obstetrician opinions regarding NIPT use in general practice: implementation and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Justin; Demers, Lisa; Musci, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the knowledge and opinions of US obstetric providers who use noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) to understand current utilization and guide future best practices. A questionnaire was designed to assess the level of knowledge and attitudes of OBGYNs toward screening options for aneuploidy, with a focus on NIPT. Initial questions evaluated obstetrician demographics, practice type, and NIPT familiarity. Subsequent questions were designed to solicit current practices regarding aneuploidy screening as well as opinions, experiences, and implications of NIPT. Survey respondents identified NIPT as clinically superior to traditional screening methods and indicated that they would like ACOG to formally recommend NIPT for any pregnant woman. Insurance coverage, and therefore cost, was noted as the biggest barrier, and over 81% of surveyed providers would utilize NIPT as a first-line screening test if patients' insurance offered full coverage. The majority of providers who have implemented NIPT into clinical practice indicated improved patient care. While most providers demonstrated accurate understanding of the technology and its application, nearly 15% misunderstood NIPT as being a diagnostic test for fetal aneuploidy. The results of the survey suggest that there is a desire for changes to current practice guidelines and insurance coverage. Additionally, provider education remains paramount.

  2. Hotel smoking policies and their implementation: a survey of California hotel managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakarian, Joy M; Quintana, Penelope J E; Winston, Carl H; Matt, Georg E

    2017-01-01

    Most states in the U.S. permit hotels to allow smoking in some guest rooms, and only five (Indiana, Michigan, North Dakota, Vermont, and Wisconsin) require that all hotel and motel rooms be 100% smoke-free (State and local 100% smokefree hotel and motel guest room laws enacted as of July 3, 2017). Little is known, however, about how hotels' smoking policies have been implemented. This study examined hotels' smoking policies and their implementation. A telephone survey of a random sample of 383 California hotel managers was conducted. Overall, 60.6% of hotels reported that smoking was prohibited in all guest rooms, and 4.7% reported that smoking was prohibited everywhere on their property. While California law permitted smoking in up to 65% of guest rooms, only 6.9% of rooms were reported as smoking-permitted. Over 90% of hotels had smoking rooms scattered among nonsmoking rooms, and about half of the smoking hotels reported that guests requesting either smoking or nonsmoking rooms were sometimes assigned to the other room type. When guests smoked in nonsmoking rooms fees could be substantial, but were often uncollected. Hotel smoking policies and their implementation fall short of protecting nonsmoking guests and workers from exposure to secondhand and thirdhand smoke. Complete indoor smoking bans for all hotels are needed to close existing loopholes. Nonsmokers who wish to protect themselves from exposure to tobacco smoke should avoid hotels that permit smoking and instead stay in completely smoke-free hotels.

  3. VT 24K USGS Topographic Maps

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) TOPO24K includes a set of GeoTIFFs created from USGS's US Topo GeoPDF product. US Topo maps are a graphic synthesis of The National Map data files...

  4. 2012 USGS Lidar: Elwha River (WA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Elwha River, WA LiDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G11PD01088 Woolpert Order No....

  5. 2013 NRCS-USGS Lidar: Lauderdale (MS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME:NRCS LAUDERDALE MS 0.7M NPS LIDAR. LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task. USGS Contract No. G10PC00057. Task Order No. G12PD000125 Woolpert...

  6. Ciencia, Sociedad, Soluciones: Una Introduccion al USGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2001-01-01

    El USGS sirve a la nacion de los Estados Unidos proveyendo informacion fidedigna para ? Describir y comprender la Tierra; ? Minimizar la perdida de vidas y propiedades por desastres naturales; ? Manejar los recursos hidrologicos, biologicos, energeticos y minerales; y ? Mejorar y proteger nuestra calidad de vida.

  7. USGS River Ecosystem Modeling: Where Are We, How Did We Get Here, and Where Are We Going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Leanne; Schrock, Robin; Waddle, Terry; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Lellis, Bill

    2009-01-01

    This report developed as an outcome of the USGS River Ecosystem Modeling Work Group, convened on February 11, 2008 as a preconference session to the second USGS Modeling Conference in Orange Beach, Ala. Work Group participants gained an understanding of the types of models currently being applied to river ecosystem studies within the USGS, learned how model outputs are being used by a Federal land management agency, and developed recommendations for advancing the state of the art in river ecosystem modeling within the USGS. During a break-out session, participants restated many of the recommendations developed at the first USGS Modeling Conference in 2006 and in previous USGS needs assessments. All Work Group recommendations require organization and coordination across USGS disciplines and regions, and include (1) enhancing communications, (2) increasing efficiency through better use of current human and technologic resources, and (3) providing a national infrastructure for river ecosystem modeling resources, making it easier to integrate modeling efforts. By implementing these recommendations, the USGS will benefit from enhanced multi-disciplinary, integrated models for river ecosystems that provide valuable risk assessment and decision support tools for adaptive management of natural and managed riverine ecosystems. These tools generate key information that resource managers need and can use in making decisions about river ecosystem resources.

  8. The Foundation Supernova Survey: motivation, design, implementation, and first data release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Scolnic, Daniel; Rest, Armin; Jha, S. W.; Pan, Y.-C.; Riess, A. G.; Challis, P.; Chambers, K. C.; Coulter, D. A.; Dettman, K. G.; Foley, M. M.; Fox, O. D.; Huber, M. E.; Jones, D. O.; Kilpatrick, C. D.; Kirshner, R. P.; Schultz, A. S. B.; Siebert, M. R.; Flewelling, H. A.; Gibson, B.; Magnier, E. A.; Miller, J. A.; Primak, N.; Smartt, S. J.; Smith, K. W.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.; Willman, M.

    2018-03-01

    The Foundation Supernova Survey aims to provide a large, high-fidelity, homogeneous, and precisely calibrated low-redshift Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) sample for cosmology. The calibration of the current low-redshift SN sample is the largest component of systematic uncertainties for SN cosmology, and new data are necessary to make progress. We present the motivation, survey design, observation strategy, implementation, and first results for the Foundation Supernova Survey. We are using the Pan-STARRS telescope to obtain photometry for up to 800 SNe Ia at z ≲ 0.1. This strategy has several unique advantages: (1) the Pan-STARRS system is a superbly calibrated telescopic system, (2) Pan-STARRS has observed 3/4 of the sky in grizyP1 making future template observations unnecessary, (3) we have a well-tested data-reduction pipeline, and (4) we have observed ˜3000 high-redshift SNe Ia on this system. Here, we present our initial sample of 225 SN Ia grizP1 light curves, of which 180 pass all criteria for inclusion in a cosmological sample. The Foundation Supernova Survey already contains more cosmologically useful SNe Ia than all other published low-redshift SN Ia samples combined. We expect that the systematic uncertainties for the Foundation Supernova Sample will be two to three times smaller than other low-redshift samples. We find that our cosmologically useful sample has an intrinsic scatter of 0.111 mag, smaller than other low-redshift samples. We perform detailed simulations showing that simply replacing the current low-redshift SN Ia sample with an equally sized Foundation sample will improve the precision on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter by 35 per cent, and the dark energy figure of merit by 72 per cent.

  9. Barriers in the implementation of the Resuscitation Guidelines: European survey of defibrillation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Paweł; Kononowicz, Andrzej A; Andres, Janusz

    2016-03-11

    The European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines recommend providing chest compressions during defibrillator charging and using adhesive pads for defibrillation to increase the effectiveness of resuscitation. However, the most common defibrillation technique in each European country is unknown, as are the potential barriers in implementation of the guidelines. The aim of this study was to assess the techniques of defibrillation procedures performed by professional European healthcare providers and to estimate how frequently adhesive pads are used. We sent an online questionnaire to the ERC National Representatives that contained 12 questions regarding the techniques of defibrillation and monitoring heart rhythm during cardiac arrest. We also evaluated the frequency and indications of manual paddles use. We collected questionnaires from 27 out of 33 invited ERC member countries. The response rate was 82%. Seventeen (17/27; 63%) declared the use of adhesive pads. The leading cause for not using adhesive pads was economic reason (9/17; 53%). Some respondents declared resistance to using adhesive pads by healthcare providers or tradition connected with manual paddles use. We found three leading techniques of defibrillation with manual paddles: Charging paddles keeping them on the defibrillator during chest compressions being delivered (9/21; 43%), Charging paddles keeping them on the patient chest during chest compressions being delivered (6/21; 29 %), Charging paddles on the patient chest without chest compressions (5/21; 24%). Respondents from 11 countries declared the use of gel or electrode pastes during defibrillation with manual paddles. This study collected preliminary data showing how defibrillation is performed in Europe. It revealed the recommeded techniques underuse and identyfied barriers in the Resuscitation Guidelines implementation. The survey should be open to a wider group of respondents. in each country in future. There are limitations and barriers

  10. A Survey of Radiation Doses in CT Urography Before and After Implementation of Iterative Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Molen, Aart J; Miclea, Razvan L; Geleijns, Jacob; Joemai, Raoul M S

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey the radiation dose used in CT urography (CTU) in routine clinical practice, both before and after implementation of a scanning protocol that uses iterative reconstruction (Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D [AIDR 3D]). We retrospectively surveyed dose reports from consecutive CTU examinations performed in 2011 with the use of 64- and 320-MDCT scanners that were reconstructed with filtered back projection (FBP) and from CTU examinations performed from May 2012 through November 2013 that were reconstructed with the use of AIDR 3D. Findings from these dose reports were then correlated with such patient characteristics as weight and body mass index (BMI; weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters). Only dose reports from single-bolus three-phase CTU examinations were included in the study. The volume CT dose index, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose were surveyed both per examination and per phase by use of published effective dose DLP conversion factors. Image quality was evaluated subjectively for a subset of patients. The two study cohorts included 82 patients (median patient weight, 75.0 kg; median BMI, 25.3) who underwent CTU with FBP and 85 patients (median patient weight, 78.0 kg; median BMI, 24.5) who underwent CTU with AIDR 3D. The median total DLP and median effective dose were 924 mGy · cm and 13.0 mSv, respectively, in the CTU with the FBP cohort and 433 mGy · cm and 6.1 mSv, respectively, in the CTU with the AIDR 3D cohort. The median DLP in the unenhanced, nephrogenic, and excretory phases was 218, 300, and 441 mGy · cm, respectively, in patients undergoing CTU with FBP and 114, 121, and 190 mGy · cm, respectively, in patients undergoing CTU with AIDR 3D. Image quality was diagnostic in both groups, with relatively fewer artifacts noted on scans obtained using CTU with AIDR 3D. Our study presents detailed dose data from three-phase CTU examinations performed both before and after

  11. Making a World of Difference: Recent USGS Contributions to the Nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Nino months progressed, the outlook maps were revised to incorporate records of actual precipitation. Beyond the national hazard outlook, the USGS...Nacional de Estadistica Geografia e Informätica (INEGI) of Mexico, the Geographical Survey Institute (GSI) 27 ^^^^ 4JÜ IggjftS^gl.l^ajMfrM» A

  12. USGS Lake Erie East Harbor bottom trawl data series, 1961-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS Lake Erie Biological Station’s East Harbor sampling program began in 1961 with the commissioning of the research vessel Musky II. It is the longest known...

  13. Implementing school malaria surveys in Kenya: towards a national surveillance system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snow Robert W

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To design and implement surveys of malaria infection and coverage of malaria control interventions among school children in Kenya in order to contribute towards a nationwide assessment of malaria. Methods The country was stratified into distinct malaria transmission zones based on a malaria risk map and 480 schools were visited between October 2008 and March 2010. Surveys were conducted in two phases: an initial opportunistic phase whereby schools were selected for other research purposes; and a second phase whereby schools were purposively selected to provide adequate spatial representation across the country. Consent for participation was based on passive, opt-out consent rather than written, opt-in consent because of the routine, low-risk nature of the survey. All children were diagnosed for Plasmodium infection using rapid diagnostic tests, assessed for anaemia and were interviewed about mosquito net usage, recent history of illness, and socio-economic and household indicators. Children's responses were entered electronically in the school and data transmitted nightly to Nairobi using a mobile phone modem connection. RDT positive results were corrected by microscopy and all results were adjusted for clustering using random effect regression modelling. Results 49,975 children in 480 schools were sampled, at an estimated cost of US$ 1,116 per school. The overall prevalence of malaria and anaemia was 4.3% and 14.1%, respectively, and 19.0% of children reported using an insecticide-treated net (ITN. The prevalence of infection showed marked variation across the country, with prevalence being highest in Western and Nyanza provinces, and lowest in Central, North Eastern and Eastern provinces. Nationally, 2.3% of schools had reported ITN use >60%, and low reported ITN use was a particular problem in Western and Nyanza provinces. Few schools reported having malaria health education materials or ongoing malaria control activities

  14. [Asbestos clinics and asbestos health examinations--findings from a questionnaire survey of implementing organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Norihisa; Nishikawa, Kunihito; Kiyomoto, Yoshihumi; Todoroki, Miwako; Hoshuyama, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Ken

    2008-09-01

    In June 2005 the press reported that many former employees of a company which used asbestos, and individuals who lived near the company's factory, had been diagnosed with mesothelioma. This finding triggered concern and alarm in Japan. In response, many "asbestos clinics" were formed, and recognized medical institutions began to implement asbestos-related health examinations. We conducted a nationwide questionnaire survey to evaluate the activities in, and the challenges for, these medical institutions. We received 137 valid responses, more than half of which were from clinics and hospital-based "asbestos clinics" instigated after the "Kubota shock." Among the asbestos exposure history interviewing practices, job histories of the interviewee were prioritized, over place of residence, and possible exposure of family members. Standard questionnaires were utilized by over 70% of respondents. The practitioners reported problems with lack of manpower and evaluation of asbestos exposure. Examinees consulted attending physicians on a wide range of matters including asbestos-related diseases, asbestos exposure, and financial compensation. It is predicted that asbestos-related diseases in general, and mesothelioma in particular, will increase in the future. Accordingly, early detection and treatment should be accorded high priority. The organizations we surveyed have important roles to play. Although resources are limited, effective diagnosis and treatment are essential, and a system assisting organizations to make accurate and efficient identification of asbestos exposure hazards is imperative.

  15. USGS Earthquake Program GPS Use Case : Earthquake Early Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-12

    USGS GPS receiver use case. Item 1 - High Precision User (federal agency with Stafford Act hazard alert responsibilities for earthquakes, volcanoes and landslides nationwide). Item 2 - Description of Associated GPS Application(s): The USGS Eart...

  16. 2013-2014 USGS Lidar: Olympic Peninsula (WA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: USGS Olympic Peninsula Washington LIDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G13PD00849...

  17. Sensitive Questions in Online Surveys: An Experimental Evaluation of Different Implementations of the Randomized Response Technique and the Crosswise Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Höglinger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-administered online surveys may provide a higher level of privacy protection to respondents than surveys administered by an interviewer. Yet, studies indicate that asking sensitive questions is problematic also in self-administered surveys. Because respondents might not be willing to reveal the truth and provide answers that are subject to social desirability bias, the validity of prevalence estimates of sensitive behaviors from online surveys can be challenged. A well-known method to overcome these problems is the Randomized Response Technique (RRT. However, convincing evidence that the RRT provides more valid estimates than direct questioning in online surveys is still lacking. We therefore conducted an experimental study in which different implementations of the RRT, including two implementations of the so-called crosswise model, were tested and compared to direct questioning. Our study is an online survey (N = 6,037 on sensitive behaviors by students such as cheating in exams and plagiarism. Results vary considerably between different implementations, indicating that practical details have a strong effect on the performance of the RRT. Among all tested implementations, including direct questioning, the unrelated-question crosswise-model RRT yielded the highest estimates of student misconduct.

  18. Navigation, Bathymetry and Temperature Points at the Ship Position During Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collection in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 7, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (RESGPSPNTS_JD250.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  19. Ship Trackline along which Continuous Resistivity Profile Data was Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept., 6, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (RESGPSLNS_JD249.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  20. Processed Continuous Resistivity Profile (CRP) Data Below the Sediment Water Interface From the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay collected from Sept. 6, 2006 to Sept. 8, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (MRG2006_ALLZYZ.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  1. Navigation and Bathymetry Points of Ship Position During Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collection in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 6, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (RESGPSPNTS_JD249.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  2. Point Shapefile of All the Unique Seismic Shot Point Navigation Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay from Sept. 6, 2006 to Sept. 8, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (ALLSHOTS_GEOG.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  3. Point Shapefile of 500 Shot Interval Point Navigation For Seismic Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay from Sept. 6, 2006 to Sept. 8, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (SHOT500SORT_GEOG.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  4. Point Shapefile of 100 Shot Interval Point Navigation For Seismic Data Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay from Sept. 6, 2006 to Sept. 8, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (SHOT100SORT_GEOG.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  5. SHIP NAVIGATION: ANSI Text File of the Navigation and Bathymetry Recorded by the Ship's Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay from Sept. 6 to Sept. 8, 2006 - USGS Cruise 06018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  6. Navigation, Bathymetry and Temperature Point at the Ship Position During Continuous Resistivity Profile Data Collection in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 8, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (RESGPSPNTS_JD251.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  7. Ship Trackline Along Which Continuous Resistivity Profile (CRP) Data was Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay on Sept. 7, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018 (RESGPSLNS_JD250.SHP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  8. Seismic-Reflection Profile Data in JPEG Image Format Collected in the Potomac River/Chesapeake Bay from Sept. 6, 2006 to Sept. 8, 2006 on USGS Cruise 06018

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In order to test hypotheses about groundwater flow under and into Chesapeake Bay, geophysical surveys were conducted by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists on...

  9. USGS Science: Addressing Our Nation's Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Tania M.

    2009-01-01

    With 6.6 billion people already living on Earth, and that number increasing every day, human influence on our planet is ever more apparent. Changes to the natural world combined with increasing human demands threaten our health and safety, our national security, our economy, and our quality of life. As a planet and a Nation, we face unprecedented challenges: loss of critical and unique ecosystems, the effects of climate change, increasing demand for limited energy and mineral resources, increasing vulnerability to natural hazards, the effects of emerging diseases on wildlife and human health, and growing needs for clean water. The time to respond to these challenges is now, but policymakers and decisionmakers face difficult choices. With competing priorities to balance, and potentially serious - perhaps irreversible - consequences at stake, our leaders need reliable scientific information to guide their decisions. As the Nation's earth and natural science agency, the USGS monitors and conducts scientific research on natural hazards and resources and how these elements and human activities influence our environment. Because the challenges we face are complex, the science needed to better understand and deal with these challenges must reflect the complex interplay among natural and human systems. With world-class expertise in biology, geology, geography, hydrology, geospatial information, and remote sensing, the USGS is uniquely capable of conducting the comprehensive scientific research needed to better understand the interdependent interactions of Earth's systems. Every day, the USGS helps decisionmakers to minimize loss of life and property, manage our natural resources, and protect and enhance our quality of life. This brochure provides examples of the challenges we face and how USGS science helps decisionmakers to address these challenges.

  10. Mg Isotopes of USGS Igneous Rock Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Glessner, J. J.; Lundstrom, C. C.

    2008-12-01

    Magnesium has three stable isotopes, 24Mg, 25Mg, and 26Mg with abundances of 78.99%, 10.00%, and 11.01%, respectively. It is one of the most abundant elements in the crust and mantle. As advancements of analytical techniques using MC-ICP-MS have dramatically advanced our ability to measure isotope ratios of Mg with greater precision, Mg isotopes can now be applied to study a variety of fundamental geological processes, such as continental crust weathering, chemical diffusion, and chondrule formation. Therefore the need for well characterized Mg isotope ratios for geological materials is increasingly important. Routine measurement of readily-available USGS rock standards is a viable way for inter-lab comparison to show the quality of data. However, the Mg isotope data for USGS standards reported in the literature are limited and inconsistent. USGS standards reported by different MC-ICP-MS labs have a range of Mg isotopic data outside of the normal external error of 0.1‰ (2σ). Mg isotopes of USGS igneous rock standards (dunite, DTS-1; basalts, BCR-1, BCR-2, BHVO-1; and andesite, AGV-1) were measured by a sample-standard bracketing method using a low resolution MC-ICP- MS (Nu-Plasma HR). The method has a large tolerance of matrix bias with Na/Mg and Al/Mg > 100% only changing the δ26Mg by less than 0.1‰. Dilution effects do not cause significant error (99.5%) and acceptable concentrations of matrix (mainly Na, Al, Ca, and Fe) are included in these results. Duplicate analyses of independently processed standards yielded the following results (δ26MgDSM-3 (‰)): BCR-2 (-0.306±0.144, - 0.290±0.116, -0.283±0.048, -0.288±0.057), BCR-1 (-0.399±0.079, -0.346±0.046), AGV-1 (-0.295±0.110, -0.307±0.086, -0.339±0.068), BHVO-1 (-0.308±0.076, - 0.299±0.103), and DTS-1 (-0.299±0.163, -0.368±0.059). δ26MgDSM-3 of measured USGS standards are consistent within error (2σ).

  11. State of Texas - Highlighting low-lying areas derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of Texas and a grayscale relief of the surrounding areas. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. The NED source data for this map consists of a mixture of 30-meter- and 10-meter-resolution DEMs. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2002. Shaded relief over Mexico was obtained from the USGS National Atlas.

  12. Simulation platform for direct load control of household appliances. Literature survey and G2 implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolm, J.; Vlaheli, A.

    1996-10-01

    There is an incentive for the power utilities to look for other ways than building new power stations to satisfy increasing customer power needs. One way to fulfill this demand is by redistributing the available electric power between the different power consumers. This method can successfully be used during high peak hours. The utility is also able to make financial profits selling the redistributed electric power at a higher price to customers with temporary high power demands. Direct Load Control - DLC, a Demand Side Management - DSM tool, is one way to achieve a redistribution of electric power. This masters thesis project consisted in developing a user-friendly simulation platform for domestic appliances combined with an electric power control system to be employed for Direct Load Control. The platform contains the necessary facilities for designing an electrical distribution network model and is implemented in G2, an object-oriented real-time environment. The final application provides an on-line instrument for the utility to control the power consumption over the entire system in terms of dispensing power in an electrical network. The report consists of two main parts. The first part describes a literature survey we systematically compiled to gather literature sources. The second part outlines our design and implementation of the G2 simulation platform for a water-heater model with a Direct Load Control system. The entire simulation platform is designed to allow a flexible change and improvement of the different models. Consequently, our software is a powerful tool for studying a wide range of problems related to a Load Management program involving electrical household loads. 9 refs, 32 figs

  13. Survey and Explain the role of Sensemaking in Successful Strategy Implementation in Iran’s Automotive Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Farhad Hosseini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There is not a dominant model that could explain key factors of sensemaking of strategy implementation and interactions between them. The purpose of this study is designing and explaining the role of sensemaking in successful strategy implementation along with a combination of factors which influence implementation sensemaking. This study surveyed the factors influencing sensemaking of successful strategy implementation in top Iran’s automotive companies. This is a qualitative research that uses grounded theory to obtain insight about the role of sensemaking in successful implementation through in-depth interviews with 22 individuals (Managers, Assistant Directors and Academic Professors and used gathered data to design a model of sensemaking in successful strategy implementation. Based on open and axial coding, 21 effective variables were conceptualized and classified in seven major categories then final model was designed. This theory explains factors that affect the sensemaking of successful strategy implementation and how these factors interact with each other. Sensemaking in Successful implementation of strategies depends on Sensemaking Context, Key Executers, Discourse Context, Intervening Conditions and Collective Sensemaking. Sensemaking Context cause sensemaking and sensegiving of key executers and key executers itself along with Discourse Context and Intervening Conditions lead to collective sensemaking. The consequence of model is sensemaking of successful strategy implementation that consists of maintaining and recording the meaning and its strengthening, collective effort, continuous strategy implementation and operational excellence of the organization.

  14. USGS science for the Nation's changing coasts: shoreline change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Thieler, E. Robert

    2011-01-01

    The demands of increasing human population in the coastal zone create competition with coastal habitat preservation and with recreational and commercial uses of the coast and nearshore waters. As climate changes over the coming century, these problems facing coastal communities will likely worsen. Good management and policy decision-making require baseline information on the rates, trends, and scientific understanding of the processes of coastal change on a regional to national scale. To address this need, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is engaged in a research project of national scope to measure, report, and interpret historical shoreline change along open-ocean coasts of the United States. One of the primary goals of this project is to understand shoreline change hazards using methods that are comparable from one area of the country to another and that will allow for future, repeatable analyses of shoreline movement, coastal erosion, and land loss.

  15. A coastal and marine digital library at USGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightsom, Fran

    2003-01-01

    The Marine Realms Information Bank (MRIB) is a distributed geolibrary [NRC, 1999] from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), whose purpose is to classify, integrate, and facilitate access to Earth systems science information about ocean, lake, and coastal environments. Core MRIB services are: (1) the search and display of information holdings by place and subject, and (2) linking of information assets that exist in remote physical locations. The design of the MRIB features a classification system to integrate information from remotely maintained sources. This centralized catalogue organizes information using 12 criteria: locations, geologic time, physiographic features, biota, disciplines, research methods, hot topics, project names, agency names, authors, content type, and file type. For many of these fields, MRIB has developed classification hierarchies.

  16. A Survey on HTTPS Implementation by Android Apps: Issues and Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuetao Wei

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available As more and more sensitive data is transferred from mobile applications across unsecured channels, it seems imperative that transport layer encryption should be used in any non-trivial instance. Yet, research indicates that many Android developers do not use HTTPS or violate rules which protect user data from man-in-the-middle attacks. This paper seeks to find a root cause of the disparities between theoretical HTTPS usage and in-the-wild implementation of the protocol by looking into Android applications, online resources, and papers published by HTTPS and Android security researchers. From these resources, we extract a set of barrier categories that exist in the path of proper TLS use. These barriers not only include improper developer practices, but also server misconfiguration, lacking documentation, flaws in libraries, the fundamentally complex TLS PKI system, and a lack of consumer understanding of the importance of HTTPS. Following this discussion, we compile a set of potential solutions and patches to better secure Android HTTPS and the TLS/SSL protocol in general. We conclude our survey with gaps in current understanding of the environment and suggestions for further research.

  17. Pan-European survey on the implementation of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery with emphasis on cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rooij, Thijs; Besselink, Marc G.; Shamali, Awad; Butturini, Giovanni; Busch, Olivier R.; Edwin, Bjørn; Troisi, Roberto; Fernández-Cruz, Laureano; Dagher, Ibrahim; Bassi, Claudio; Abu Hilal, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive (MI) pancreatic surgery appears to be gaining popularity, but its implementation throughout Europe and the opinions regarding its use in pancreatic cancer patients are unknown. Methods A 30-question survey was sent between June and December 2014 to pancreatic surgeons of the European Pancreatic Club, European-African Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association and 5 European national pancreatic societies. Incomplete responses were excluded. Results In total, 237 pancreatic surgeons responded. After excluding 34 incomplete responses, 203 responses from 27 European countries were included. 164 (81%) surgeons were employed at a university hospital, 184 (91%) performed advanced MI surgery and 148 (73%) performed MI distal pancreatectomy. MI pancreatoduodenectomy was performed by 42 (21%) surgeons, whereas 9 (4.4%) surgeons had performed more than 10 procedures. Robot-assisted MI pancreatic surgery was performed by 28 (14%) surgeons. 63 (31%) surgeons expected MI distal pancreatectomy for cancer to be inferior to open distal pancreatectomy concerning oncological outcomes. 151 (74%) surgeons expected to benefit from training in MI distal pancreatectomy and 149 (73%) were willing to participate in a randomized trial on this topic. Conclusions MI distal pancreatectomy is a common procedure, although its use for cancer is still disputed. MI pancreatoduodenectomy is still an uncommon procedure. Specific training and a randomized trial regarding MI pancreatic cancer surgery are welcomed. PMID:26902136

  18. Implementation of Advanced Access in general practice: postal survey of practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, Stephen; Montgomery, Alan; Banks, Jon; Salisbury, Chris; Sampson, Fiona; Pickin, Mark

    2006-12-01

    Advanced Access has been strongly promoted as a means of improving access to general practice. Key principles include measuring demand, matching capacity to demand, managing demand in different ways and having contingency plans. Although not advocated by Advanced Access, some practices have also restricted availability of pre-booked appointments. This study compares the strategies used to improve access by practices which do or do not operate Advanced Access. Postal survey of practices. Three hundred and ninety-one practices in 12 primary care trusts. Questionnaires were posted to practice managers to collect data on practice characteristics, supply and demand of appointments, strategies employed to manage demand, and use of Advanced Access. Two hundred and forty-five from 391 (63%) practices returned a questionnaire and 162/241(67%) claimed to be using Advanced Access. There were few differences between characteristics of practices operating Advanced Access or not. Both types of practice had introduced a wide range of measures to improve access. The proportion of doctors' appointments only available for booking on the same day was higher in Advanced Access practices (40 versus 16%, difference = 24%, 95% CI = 16% to 32%). Less than half the practices claiming to operate Advanced Access ((63/140; 45%) used all four of this model's key principles. The majority of practices in this sample claim to have introduced Advanced Access, but the degree of implementation is very variable. Advanced Access practices use more initiatives to measure and improve access than non-Advanced Access practices.

  19. Have renal dietitians successfully implemented evidence-based guidelines into practice? A survey of dietitians across Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-McMahon, Emma J; Campbell, Katrina L

    2012-11-01

    Successful implementation of evidence-based practice (EBP) guidelines has been shown to improve the nutrition status of dialysis patients. This study aimed to establish use of EBP guidelines and implementation of key recommendations for nutrition assessment of dialysis patients, as well as to identify barriers and enablers associated with EBP guideline adherence. A survey of nutrition assessment practices and barriers to implementation of EBP guidelines was developed and piloted. The survey measured implementation of guidelines regarding frequency of nutrition assessment and use of the subjective global assessment (SGA) to diagnose malnutrition. Barriers to guideline implementation were measured using agreement with statements rated on a Likert scale. Data were summarized as counts and percentages and analyzed using chi-squared tests of association, with P nutrition assessment of dialysis patients (n = 36 of 65) and use of the SGA (n = 43 of 65), respectively. Barriers related to time, skills/self-efficacy, and an inefficient referral system were related to lower rates of guideline implementation. These findings indicate an evidence-practice gap in the nutritional management of dialysis patients. A standardized approach to EBP guideline implementation including structured 6-monthly nutrition assessment of dialysis patients and group training for use of the SGA tool may assist in closing this evidence-practice gap. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Groundwater studies: principal aquifer surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burow, Karen R.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    In 1991, the U.S. Congress established the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to develop nationally consistent long-term datasets and provide information about the quality of the Nation’s streams and groundwater. The USGS uses objective and reliable data, water-quality models, and systematic scientific studies to assess current water-quality conditions, to identify changes in water quality over time, and to determine how natural factors and human activities affect the quality of streams and groundwater. NAWQA is the only non-regulatory Federal program to perform these types of studies; participation is voluntary. In the third decade (Cycle 3) of the NAWQA program (2013–2023), the USGS will evaluate the quality and availability of groundwater for drinking supply, improve our understanding of where and why water quality is degraded, and assess how groundwater quality could respond to changes in climate and land use. These goals will be addressed through the implementation of a new monitoring component in Cycle 3: Principal Aquifer Surveys.

  1. Understanding USGS user needs and Earth observing data use for decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.

    2016-12-01

    US Geological Survey (USGS) initiated the Requirements, Capabilities and Analysis for Earth Observations (RCA-EO) project in the Land Remote Sensing (LRS) program, collaborating with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to jointly develop the supporting information infrastructure - The Earth Observation Requirements Evaluation Systems (EORES). RCA-EO enables us to collect information on current data products and projects across the USGS and evaluate the impacts of Earth observation data from all sources, including spaceborne, airborne, and ground-based platforms. EORES allows users to query, filter, and analyze usage and impacts of Earth observation data at different organizational level within the bureau. We engaged over 500 subject matter experts and evaluated more than 1000 different Earth observing data sources and products. RCA-EO provides a comprehensive way to evaluate impacts of Earth observing data on USGS mission areas and programs through the survey of 345 key USGS products and services. We paid special attention to user feedback about Earth observing data to inform decision making on improving user satisfaction. We believe the approach and philosophy of RCA-EO can be applied in much broader scope to derive comprehensive knowledge of Earth observing systems impacts and usage and inform data products development and remote sensing technology innovation.

  2. Archive of Boomer and Sparker Data Collected During USGS Cruise DIAN 97032 Long Island, NY Inner Shelf -- Fire Island, 24 September - 19 October, 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS Diane G 97032 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of Long Island, NY...

  3. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise DIAN 96040 Long Island, NY Inner Shelf -- Fire Island, NY, 4-24 September, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS DIAN 96040 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of Long Island, NY in...

  4. Archive of Datasonics SIS-1000 Chirp Subbottom Data Collected During USGS Cruise MGNM 00014, Central South Carolina, 13-30 March 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This CD-ROM contains digital high resolution seismic reflection data collected during the USGS MGNM 00014 cruise. The coverage is the nearshore of central South...

  5. USGS Geographic Names (GNIS) Overlay Map Service from The National Map - National Geospatial Data Asset (NGDA) Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — USGS developed The National Map (TNM) Gazetteer as the Federal and national standard (ANSI INCITS 446-2008) for geographic nomenclature based on the Geographic Names...

  6. System-Wide Inpatient Portal
 Implementation: Survey of Health Care Team Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Sieck, Cynthia J; Walker, Daniel M; Huerta, Timothy R; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-09-14

    Inpatient portals, a new type of patient portal tailored specifically to the hospital setting, can allow patients to access up-to-date health information and exchange secure communications with their care team. As such, inpatient portals present an opportunity for patients to increase engagement in their care during a time of acute crisis that emphasizes focus on a patient's health. While there is a large body of research on patient portals in the outpatient setting, questions are being raised specifically about inpatient portals, such as how they will be incorporated into the flow of patient care in hectic, stressed, team-based hospital settings. Our aim is to improve understanding about hospital care team members' perceptions of the value of an interactive patient portal for admitted patients, as well as to ascertain staff orientation toward this new technology. Throughout the course of 2016, an inpatient portal, MyChart Bedside (MCB) was implemented across a five-hospital health system. The portal is a tablet-based app that includes a daily schedule, lab/test results, secure messaging with the care team, a place to take notes, and access to educational materials. Within a month of initial rollout, hospital care team members completed a 5-minute, anonymous online survey to assess attitudes and perceptions about MCB use and staff training for the new technology. Throughout the health system, 686 staff members completed the survey: 193 physicians (23.6%), 439 nurses (53.7%), and 186 support staff (22.7%). Questions about the importance of MCB, self-efficacy in using MCB with patients, and feelings about sufficient training and resources showed that an average of 40-60% of respondents in each group reported a positive orientation toward the MCB technology and training received. This positive orientation was highest among support staff, lower among nurses, and lowest for physicians (all differences by staff role were statistically significant at PMCB and its

  7. Evaluation of Daily Physical Activity (DPA) policy implementation in Ontario: surveys of elementary school administrators and teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kenneth R; Vu-Nguyen, Karen; Ng, Bessie; Schoueri-Mychasiw, Nour; Dwyer, John J M; Manson, Heather; Hobin, Erin; Manske, Steve; Robertson, Jennifer

    2016-08-08

    School-based structured opportunities for physical activity can provide health-related benefits to children and youth, and contribute to international guidelines recommending 60 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day. In 2005, the Ministry of Education in Ontario, Canada, released the Daily Physical Activity (DPA) policy requiring school boards to "ensure that all elementary students, including students with special needs, have a minimum of twenty minutes of sustained MVPA each school day during instructional time". This paper reports on the first provincial study evaluating implementation fidelity to the DPA policy in Ontario elementary schools and classrooms. Using an adapted conceptual framework, the study also examined associations between implementation of DPA and a number of predictors in each of these respective settings. Separate cross-sectional online surveys were conducted in 2014 with Ontario elementary school administrators and classroom teachers, based on a representative random sample of schools and classrooms. An implementation fidelity score was developed based on six required components of the DPA policy. Other survey items measured potential predictors of implementation at the school and classroom levels. Descriptive analyses included frequency distributions of implementation fidelity and predictor variables. Bivariate analyses examining associations between implementation and predictors included binary logistic regression for school level data and generalized linear mixed models for classroom level data, in order to adjust for school-level clustering effects. Among administrators, 61.4 % reported implementation fidelity to the policy at the school level, while 50.0 % of teachers reported fidelity at the classroom level. Several factors were found to be significantly associated with implementation fidelity in both school and classroom settings including: awareness of policy requirements; scheduling; monitoring; use of

  8. Evaluation of Daily Physical Activity (DPA policy implementation in Ontario: surveys of elementary school administrators and teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R. Allison

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School-based structured opportunities for physical activity can provide health-related benefits to children and youth, and contribute to international guidelines recommending 60 min of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA per day. In 2005, the Ministry of Education in Ontario, Canada, released the Daily Physical Activity (DPA policy requiring school boards to “ensure that all elementary students, including students with special needs, have a minimum of twenty minutes of sustained MVPA each school day during instructional time”. This paper reports on the first provincial study evaluating implementation fidelity to the DPA policy in Ontario elementary schools and classrooms. Using an adapted conceptual framework, the study also examined associations between implementation of DPA and a number of predictors in each of these respective settings. Methods Separate cross-sectional online surveys were conducted in 2014 with Ontario elementary school administrators and classroom teachers, based on a representative random sample of schools and classrooms. An implementation fidelity score was developed based on six required components of the DPA policy. Other survey items measured potential predictors of implementation at the school and classroom levels. Descriptive analyses included frequency distributions of implementation fidelity and predictor variables. Bivariate analyses examining associations between implementation and predictors included binary logistic regression for school level data and generalized linear mixed models for classroom level data, in order to adjust for school-level clustering effects. Results Among administrators, 61.4 % reported implementation fidelity to the policy at the school level, while 50.0 % of teachers reported fidelity at the classroom level. Several factors were found to be significantly associated with implementation fidelity in both school and classroom settings including: awareness

  9. USGS42 and USGS43: Human-hair stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic reference materials and analytical methods for forensic science and implications for published measurement results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T.B.; Qi, H.

    2012-01-01

    Because there are no internationally distributed stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic reference materials of human hair, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has prepared two such materials, USGS42 and USGS43. These reference materials span values commonly encountered in human hair stable isotope analysis and are isotopically homogeneous at sample sizes larger than 0.2 mg. USGS42 and USGS43 human-hair isotopic reference materials are intended for calibration of δ(2)H and δ(18)O measurements of unknown human hair by quantifying (1) drift with time, (2) mass-dependent isotopic fractionation, and (3) isotope-ratio-scale contraction. While they are intended for measurements of the stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen, they also are suitable for measurements of the stable isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur in human and mammalian hair. Preliminary isotopic compositions of the non-exchangeable fractions of these materials are USGS42(Tibetan hair)δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) = -78.5 ± 2.3‰ (n = 62) and δ(18)O(VSMOW-SLAP) = +8.56 ± 0.10‰ (n = 18) USGS42(Indian hair)δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) = -50.3 ± 2.8‰ (n = 64) and δ(18)O(VSMOW-SLAP) = +14.11 ± 0.10‰ (n = 18). Using recommended analytical protocols presented herein for δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) and δ(18)O(VSMOW-SLAP) measurements, the least squares fit regression of 11 human hair reference materials is δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) = 6.085δ(2)O(VSMOW-SLAP) - 136.0‰ with an R-square value of 0.95. The δ(2)H difference between the calibrated results of human hair in this investigation and a commonly accepted human-hair relationship is a remarkable 34‰. It is critical that readers pay attention to the δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) and δ(18)O(VSMOW-SLAP) of isotopic reference materials in publications, and they need to adjust the δ(2)H(VSMOW-SLAP) and δ(18)O(VSMOW-SLAP) measurement results of human hair in previous publications, as needed, to ensure all results on are on the same scales.

  10. Healthcare professional surveys to investigate the implementation of the isotretinoin Pregnancy Prevention Programme : a descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, Ineke; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje; Bloemberg, Rudi; Pinas, Eldridge; Straus, Sabine; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje

    Objective: Three online surveys explored compliance with the PPP by pharmacists and dermatologists, in the Netherlands. In 2007 and 2011, two pharmacist surveys were conducted to assess improvement over time. Methods: In 2007, survey was sent to members of the Utrecht Pharmacy Panel for Education &

  11. A proposed mother-friendly childbirth model for Taiwanese women, the implementation and satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi-Ping; Yeh, Chih-Hsin; Lin, Shin-Yu; Chen, Tai-Chang; Yang, Ya-Ling; Lee, Chien-Nan; Kuo, Su-Chen

    2015-12-01

    Pleasant and humane childbirth is every mother's wish. We established one practicable and tailored Taiwanese mother-friendly childbirth model, and the objective of this study was to investigate the implementation, pregnancy outcomes, and women's satisfaction. We used the Taiwanese mother-friendly childbirth model. Women from eight hospitals were divided into an experimental group and control group. The experimental group received prenatal care modified by the Taiwanese mother-friendly childbirth model and the control group received routine prenatal care according to their hospital. We performed a quasi-experimental study of women's satisfaction toward this mother-friendly childbirth model by questionnaires and surveyed the practicality and effectiveness of this model. Seven hundred and fifty-one women from eight hospitals, including three medical centers and five regional hospitals were included. There was significantly different practices between the two groups, such as: (1) intermittent fetal monitoring for low-risk pregnancy; (2) no routine enema; (3) no perineal shaving; (4) less routine parenteral fluid support; (5) using an upright position; and (6) restrictive episiotomy. The mean maternal height, body weight gain, gestational age, birth weight, and episiotomy wound infection rate were indifferent. The epidural anesthesia rate and induction medication use were significantly lower in the experimental group. The self-reported pain score was higher in the experimental group and the self-reported satisfactory score was also higher in the experimental group, without statistical significance. Women receiving standardized prenatal care modified by the woman-friendly childbirth model of prenatal care had less epidural anesthesia, less induction medication, higher self-reported satisfaction score, and indifferent pregnancy outcomes such as gestational age, birth weight, and wound infection rate. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. 2012 NRCS-USGS Tupelo, MS Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LiDAR data is a remotely sensed high resolution elevation data collected by an airborne platform. The LiDAR sensor uses a combination of laser range finding, GPS...

  13. USGS science for the Nation's changing coasts; shoreline change assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieler, E. Robert; Hapke, Cheryl J.

    2011-01-01

    The coastline of the United States features some of the most popular tourist and recreational destinations in the world and is the site of intense residential, commercial, and industrial development. The coastal zone also has extensive and pristine natural areas, with diverse ecosystems providing essential habitat and resources that support wildlife, fish, and human use. Coastal erosion is a widespread process along most open-ocean shores of the United States that affects both developed and natural coastlines. As the coast changes, there are a wide range of ways that change can affect coastal communities, habitats, and the physical characteristics of the coast?including beach erosion, shoreline retreat, land loss, and damage to infrastructure. Global climate change will likely increase the rate of coastal change. A recent study of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic coast, for example, found that it is virtually certain that sandy beaches will erode faster in the future as sea level rises because of climate change. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for conducting research on coastal change hazards, understanding the processes that cause coastal change, and developing models to predict future change. To understand and adapt to shoreline change, accurate information regarding the past and present configurations of the shoreline is essential. A comprehensive, nationally consistent analysis of shoreline movement is needed. To meet this national need, the USGS is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean coasts of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii, as well as the coasts of the Great Lakes.

  14. USGS Training in Afghanistan: Modern Earthquake Hazards Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, J. D.; Garthwaite, M.; Holzer, T.; McGarr, A.; Bohannon, R.; Bergen, K.; Vincent, T.

    2007-05-01

    Afghanistan is located in a tectonically active region where ongoing deformation has generated rugged mountainous terrain, and where large earthquakes occur frequently. These earthquakes can present a significant hazard, not only from strong ground shaking, but also from liquefaction and extensive land sliding. The magnitude 6.1 earthquake of March 25, 2002 highlighted the vulnerability of Afghanistan to such hazards, and resulted in over 1000 fatalities. The USGS has provided the first of a series of Earth Science training courses to the Afghan Geological Survey (AGS). This course was concerned with modern earthquake hazard assessments, and is an integral part of a larger USGS effort to provide a comprehensive seismic-hazard assessment for Afghanistan. Funding for these courses is provided by the US Agency for International Development Afghanistan Reconstruction Program. The particular focus of this training course, held December 2-6, 2006 in Kabul, was on providing a background in the seismological and geological methods relevant to preparing for future earthquakes. Topics included identifying active faults, modern tectonic theory, geotechnical measurements of near-surface materials, and strong-motion seismology. With this background, participants may now be expected to educate other members of the community and be actively involved in earthquake hazard assessments themselves. The December, 2006, training course was taught by four lecturers, with all lectures and slides being presented in English and translated into Dari. Copies of the lectures were provided to the students in both hardcopy and digital formats. Class participants included many of the section leaders from within the AGS who have backgrounds in geology, geophysics, and engineering. Two additional training sessions are planned for 2007, the first entitled "Modern Concepts in Geology and Mineral Resource Assessments," and the second entitled "Applied Geophysics for Mineral Resource Assessments."

  15. U.S. Geological Survey spatial data access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faundeen, John L.; Kanengieter, Ronald L.; Buswell, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has done a progress review on improving access to its spatial data holdings over the Web. The USGS EROS Data Center has created three major Web-based interfaces to deliver spatial data to the general public; they are Earth Explorer, the Seamless Data Distribution System (SDDS), and the USGS Web Mapping Portal. Lessons were learned in developing these systems, and various resources were needed for their implementation. The USGS serves as a fact-finding agency in the U.S. Government that collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides scientific information about natural resource conditions and issues. To carry out its mission, the USGS has created and managed spatial data since its inception. Originally relying on paper maps, the USGS now uses advanced technology to produce digital representations of the Earth’s features. The spatial products of the USGS include both source and derivative data. Derivative datasets include Digital Orthophoto Quadrangles (DOQ), Digital Elevation Models, Digital Line Graphs, land-cover Digital Raster Graphics, and the seamless National Elevation Dataset. These products, created with automated processes, use aerial photographs, satellite images, or other cartographic information such as scanned paper maps as source data. With Earth Explorer, users can search multiple inventories through metadata queries and can browse satellite and DOQ imagery. They can place orders and make payment through secure credit card transactions. Some USGS spatial data can be accessed with SDDS. The SDDS uses an ArcIMS map service interface to identify the user’s areas of interest and determine the output format; it allows the user to either download the actual spatial data directly for small areas or place orders for larger areas to be delivered on media. The USGS Web Mapping Portal provides views of national and international datasets through an ArcIMS map service interface. In addition, the map portal posts news about new

  16. Inclusion survey contractor implementation plan for fiscal years 1986-1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espegren, M.L.; Carter, T.E.; Little, C.A.; Ramos, S.J.

    1987-03-01

    The Radiological Surveys Activities Group (RASA) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory acts as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC) to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The ISC investigates properties to determine whether the properties qualify for remedial action according to the standards set forth for the UMTRA Project by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The major work elements making up the ISC's activities are: consent form acquisition, land survey/drawing, inclusion survey, post-survey activities, survey report, file transmittal, and recommendation for a vicinity property to be included into or excluded from UMTRAP. The ISC will produce 2960 recommendations in FY 1988 for $3.98M.

  17. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Zane Hills, Hughes and Shungnak quadrangles, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential.The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska.For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 105 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Zane Hills area in the Hughes and Shungnak quadrangles, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be incorporated into the statewide geochemical databases of both agencies.

  18. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Tonsina area, Valdez Quadrangle, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 128 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Tonsina area in the Chugach Mountains, Valdez quadrangle, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be incorporated into the statewide geochemical databases of both agencies

  19. Color-shaded relief GeoTIFF image of interferometric sonar data collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_BathyShadedRelief_5m, 5-meter cell size)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods...

  20. Esri Binary floating point GRID containing bathymetry from interferometric sonar data collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (rb_bathy_5m, 5-meter cell size)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods...

  1. Esri Binary floating point GRID containing bathymetry from interferometric sonar data collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (rb_bathy_1m, 1-meter cell size)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods...

  2. Color-shaded relief GeoTIFF image of interferometric sonar data collected by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009 (RB_BathyShadedRelief_1m, 1-meter cell size)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods...

  3. Evaluation of current care effectiveness: a survey of hypertension guideline implementation in Finnish health centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanen, Seija I; Johannala-Kemppainen, Riitta; Ijäs, Jarja J

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the extent and style of implementation of the Hypertension Guideline (HT Guideline) in Finnish primary health centres, and to identify a scale of contrasting implementation styles in the health centres (with the two ends of the scale being referred to as information...... implementers or disseminators respectively). DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. Development of a questionnaire and criteria for assessing the extent and style of implementation of the HT Guideline. SETTING: Primary healthcare. SUBJECTS: All head physicians and senior nursing officers in Finnish health centres (n...

  4. Implementation of an FPGA based system survey and diagnostic reader with the aim to increase system dependability

    CERN Document Server

    Alsdorf, M; Kwiatkowski, M; Vigano, W; Zamantzas, C

    2012-01-01

    The operation and machine protection of accelerators practically rely on their underlying instrumentation systems and a failure of any of those systems could pose a significant impact on the overall reliability and availability. In order to improve the detection and in some cases the prevention of failures, a survey mechanism could be integrated to the system that collects crucial information about the current system status through a number of acquisition modules. The implementation and integration of such a method is presented with the aim to standardize the implementation, where the acquisition modules share a common build and are connected through a standardized interface to a survey reader. The reader collects regularly data and controls the readout intervals. The information collected from these modules is used locally in the FPGA device to identify critical system failures and results in an immediate failsafe reaction with the data also transmitted and stored in external databases for offline analysis.

  5. Part A. The effect of the dimensions of learning model on the epistemological beliefs of students enrolled in general chemistry laboratory for post-baccalaureate pre-medical students, and, Part B. Environmental quality survey utilizing TRI Explorer and USGS water data and the analysis and characterization of particulate matter using scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Darcie

    The first part of this dissertation deals with the dimension of learning model was developed by Robert Marzano in response to a comprehensive research and theory based framework on cognition and learning. The strategy forms a background that can be used in instruction, curriculum, and assessment. The experimental group was exposed to the model and the control group was exposed to normal instruction for three lab activities in a summer general chemistry laboratory. The students were assessed for content knowledge via review of pre-laboratory and post-laboratory questions and for attitudinal changes via the Epistemological Beliefs Assessment for Physical Science Students. The study indicates that there were no attitudinal changes between the two groups. On the other hand, the instructional model is a variable technique, and the experimental group performed better on the post laboratory questions. The second part of this dissertation presents the results of an environmental quality survey utilizing the Environmental Protection Agency's TRI Explorer database as well as the United States Geological Survey water quality database could provide a valuable tool for the assessment of land, air, and water contamination. The top three air, water, and land releases will be obtained from 1988 to 2002 for counties surrounding major cities in Tennessee. There was found to be a poor correlation between the TRI Explorer and USGS data for the counties in this study. This poor correlation may be due to the degradation pathways of the chemicals released. It should be noted that there has been a decrease in many of the compounds, such as chlorofluorocarbons, which have been addressed in legislation. Air samples were collected on mixed cellulose ester filters and silver membrane using a GS Cyclone particle size selector and analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis. Unlike quartz filters, sample loss and change was minimal with the use of the mixed

  6. Development, Implementation, and Analysis of a National Survey of Faculty Goals for Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Aaron D.; Towns, Marcy

    2013-01-01

    This work reports the development of a survey for laboratory goals in undergraduate chemistry, the analysis of reliable and valid data collected from a national survey of college chemistry faculty, and a synthesis of the findings. The study used a sequential exploratory mixed-methods design. Faculty goals for laboratory emerged across seven…

  7. A qualitative assessment of implementing a cross-cultural survey on cancer wards in Denmark--a description of barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Maria; Hassani, Amani; Krasnik, Allan

    2010-01-01

    Research into migration and health is often confronted with methodological challenges related to the identification of migrants in various settings. Furthermore, it is often difficult to reach an acceptable level of participation among migrant groups in quantitative research. The aim of this stud...... is to conduct a qualitative assessment of the barriers encountered during the implementation of a cross-cultural survey on cancer wards in Copenhagen, Denmark....

  8. Implementation of the Harmonized EU Isotretinoin Pregnancy Prevention Programme A Questionnaire Survey among European Regulatory Agencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crijns, Ineke; Straus, Sabine; Luteijn, Michiel; Gispen-de Wied, Christine; Raine, June; de Jong-van den Berg, Lolkje

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is little information on the status of the implementation of the isotretinoin Pregnancy Prevention Programme (PPP) in the EU, and on compliance with this programme by the regulatory agencies. Objective: The aim of the study was to obtain information on implementation of the

  9. Archive of digital Chirp subbottom profile data collected during USGS cruise 08CCT01, Mississippi Gulf Islands, July 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Flocks, James G.; Worley, Charles R.

    2011-01-01

    In July of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the geologic controls on island framework from Ship Island to Horn Island, Mississippi, for the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility project. Funding was provided through the Geologic Framework and Holocene Coastal Evolution of the Mississippi-Alabama Region Subtask (http://ngom.er.usgs.gov/task2_2/index.php); this project is also part of a broader USGS study on Coastal Change and Transport (CCT). This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital Chirp seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observer's logbook, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report.

  10. USGS Atchafalaya 2 LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) dataset is a survey of the Atchafalaya Basin project area. The entire survey area for Atchafalaya encompasses approximately...

  11. Small Rov Marine Boat for Bathymetry Surveys of Shallow Waters - Potential Implementation in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhari, K. T.; Karim, H.; Gunawan, P. H.; Purwanto, H.

    2017-10-01

    Current practices in bathymetry survey (available method) are indeed having some limitations. New technologies for bathymetry survey such as using unmanned boat has becoming popular in developed countries - filled in and served those limitations of existing survey methods. Malaysia as one of tropical country has it own river/water body characteristics and suitable approaches in conducting bathymetry survey. Thus, a study on this emerging technology should be conducted using enhanced version of small ROV boat with Malaysian rivers and best approaches so that the surveyors get benefits from the innovative surveying product. Among the available ROV boat for bathymetry surveying in the market, an Indonesian product called SHUMOO is among the promising products - economically and practically proven using a few sample areas in Indonesia. The boat was equipped and integrated with systems of remote sensing technology, GNSS, echo sounder and navigational engine. It was designed for riverbed surveys on shallow area such as small /medium river, lakes, reservoirs, oxidation/detention pond and other water bodies. This paper tries to highlight the needs and enhancement offered to Malaysian' bathymetry surveyors/practitioners on the new ROV boat which make their task easier, faster, safer, economically effective and better riverbed modelling results. The discussion continues with a sample of Indonesia river (data collection and modelling) since it is mostly similar to Malaysia's river characteristics and suggests some improvement for Malaysia best practice.

  12. SMALL ROV MARINE BOAT FOR BATHYMETRY SURVEYS OF SHALLOW WATERS – POTENTIAL IMPLEMENTATION IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. T. Suhari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Current practices in bathymetry survey (available method are indeed having some limitations. New technologies for bathymetry survey such as using unmanned boat has becoming popular in developed countries - filled in and served those limitations of existing survey methods. Malaysia as one of tropical country has it own river/water body characteristics and suitable approaches in conducting bathymetry survey. Thus, a study on this emerging technology should be conducted using enhanced version of small ROV boat with Malaysian rivers and best approaches so that the surveyors get benefits from the innovative surveying product. Among the available ROV boat for bathymetry surveying in the market, an Indonesian product called SHUMOO is among the promising products – economically and practically proven using a few sample areas in Indonesia. The boat was equipped and integrated with systems of remote sensing technology, GNSS, echo sounder and navigational engine. It was designed for riverbed surveys on shallow area such as small /medium river, lakes, reservoirs, oxidation/detention pond and other water bodies. This paper tries to highlight the needs and enhancement offered to Malaysian’ bathymetry surveyors/practitioners on the new ROV boat which make their task easier, faster, safer, economically effective and better riverbed modelling results. The discussion continues with a sample of Indonesia river (data collection and modelling since it is mostly similar to Malaysia’s river characteristics and suggests some improvement for Malaysia best practice.

  13. Implementation of nutritional guidelines in a university hospital monitored by repeated point prevalence surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Tangvik, Randi Julie; Guttormsen, Anne Berit; Tell, Grethe Seppola; Ranhoff, Anette Hylen

    2012-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Malnutrition is present in 20–50% of hospitalized patients, and nutritional care is a challenge. The aim was to evaluate whether the implementation of a nutritional strategy would influence nutritional care performance in a university hospital.Subjects/Methods: This was a prospective quality improvement program implementing guidelines for nutritional care, with the aim of improving nutritional practice. The Nutrition Risk Screening (NRS) 2002 was used. Point pr...

  14. Real-time implementations of image segmentation algorithms on shared memory multicore architecture: a survey (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    The real-time processing is getting more and more important in many image processing applications. Image segmentation is one of the most fundamental tasks image analysis. As a consequence, many different approaches for image segmentation have been proposed. The watershed transform is a well-known image segmentation tool. The watershed transform is a very data intensive task. To achieve acceleration and obtain real-time processing of watershed algorithms, parallel architectures and programming models for multicore computing have been developed. This paper focuses on the survey of the approaches for parallel implementation of sequential watershed algorithms on multicore general purpose CPUs: homogeneous multicore processor with shared memory. To achieve an efficient parallel implementation, it's necessary to explore different strategies (parallelization/distribution/distributed scheduling) combined with different acceleration and optimization techniques to enhance parallelism. In this paper, we give a comparison of various parallelization of sequential watershed algorithms on shared memory multicore architecture. We analyze the performance measurements of each parallel implementation and the impact of the different sources of overhead on the performance of the parallel implementations. In this comparison study, we also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the parallel programming models. Thus, we compare the OpenMP (an application programming interface for multi-Processing) with Ptheads (POSIX Threads) to illustrate the impact of each parallel programming model on the performance of the parallel implementations.

  15. Partnering for science: proceedings of the USGS Workshop on Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Megan; Benson, Abigail; Govoni, David; Masaki, Derek; Poore, Barbara; Simpson, Annie; Tessler, Steven

    2013-01-01

    What U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) programs use citizen science? How can projects be best designed while meeting policy requirements? What are the most effective volunteer recruitment methods? What data should be collected to ensure validation and how should data be stored? What standard protocols are most easily used by volunteers? Can data from multiple projects be integrated to support new research or existing science questions? To help answer these and other questions, the USGS Community of Data Integration (CDI) supported the development of the Citizen Science Working Group (CSWG) in August 2011 and funded the working group’s proposal to hold a USGS Citizen Science Workshop in fiscal year 2012. The stated goals for our workshop were: raise awareness of programs and projects in the USGS that incorporate citizen science, create a community of practice for the sharing of knowledge and experiences, provide a forum to discuss the challenges of—and opportunities for—incorporating citizen science into USGS projects, and educate and support scientists and managers whose projects may benefit from public participation in science.To meet these goals, the workshop brought together 50 attendees (see appendix A for participant details) representing the USGS, partners, and external citizen science practitioners from diverse backgrounds (including scientists, managers, project coordinators, and technical developers, for example) to discuss these topics at the Denver Federal Center in Colorado on September 11–12, 2012. Over two and a half days, attendees participated in four major plenary sessions (Citizen Science Policy and Challenges, Engaging the Public in Scientific Research, Data Collection and Management, and Technology and Tools) comprised of 25 invited presentations and followed by structured discussions for each session designed to address both prepared and ad hoc "big questions." A number of important community support and infrastructure needs were identified

  16. Professional Development for Graduate Students through Internships at Federal Labs: an NSF/USGS Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, E.; Jones, E.; Patino, L. C.; Wasserman, E.; Isern, A. R.; Davies, T.

    2016-12-01

    In 2013 the White House initiated an effort to coordinate STEM education initiatives across federal agencies. This idea spawned several important collaborations, one of which is a set of National Science Foundation programs designed to place graduate students in federal labs for 2-12 months of their Ph.D. training. The Graduate Research Internship Program (GRIP) and the Graduate Student Preparedness program (GSP) each have the goal of exposing PhD students to the federal work environment while expanding their research tools and mentoring networks. Students apply for supplementary support to their Graduate Research Fellowship (GRIP) or their advisor's NSF award (GSP). These programs are available at several federal agencies; the USGS is one partner. At the U.S. Geological Survey, scientists propose projects, which students can find online by searching USGS GRIP, or students and USGS scientists can work together to develop a research project. At NSF, projects are evaluated on both the scientific merit and the professional development opportunities they afford the student. The career development extends beyond the science (new techniques, data, mentors) into the professional activity of writing the proposal, managing the budget, and working in a new and different environment. The USGS currently has 18 GRIP scholars, including Madeline Foster-Martinez, a UC Berkeley student who spent her summer as a GRIP fellow at the USGS Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center working with USGS scientist Jessica Lacy. Madeline's Ph.D. work is on salt marshes and she has studied geomorphology, accretion, and gas transport using a variety of research methods. Her GRIP fellowship allowed her to apply new data-gathering tools to the question of sediment delivery to the marsh, and build and test a model for sediment delivery along marsh edges. In addition, she gained professional skills by collaborating with a new team of scientists, running a large-scale field deployment, and

  17. Barriers to the implementation of competency-based education and assessment: a survey of otolaryngology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeq, Kulsoom; Weatherly, Robert A; Masood, Hamid; Thompson, Richard E; Brown, David J; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2010-06-01

    To identify the barriers faced by otolaryngology program directors as they implement competency-based education and assessment and to identify preferred approaches to meet these challenges as suggested by program directors. A national survey of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery program directors. We developed a 20-item questionnaire that was distributed to 102 otolaryngology program directors through SurveyMonkey. Nonrespondents were reminded by follow-up email and phone calls. Results were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. A total of 88 (86%) program directors responded to the survey. There was a marked discrepancy between the income received and time spent performing the duties of the program director. Program director workload was recognized as the most important barrier to the implementation of competency-based education. Creating a practical clearinghouse of existing and emerging assessment tools was given the highest rating among the approaches to meet the challenges faced by program directors. Program directors in otolaryngology do not have sufficient financial support, protected time, and personnel to fulfill their administrative and educational responsibilities. They should be provided with additional institutional assistance to help them achieve the goals of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education outcome project.

  18. Implementation of the Surgical Safety Checklist in Switzerland and Perceptions of Its Benefits: Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Patricia; Degiorgi, Adriana; Bezzola, Paula; Courvoisier, Delphine S.; Chopard, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the implementation of the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC) among surgeons and anaesthetists working in Swiss hospitals and clinics and their perceptions of the SSC. Methods Cross-sectional survey at the 97th Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society of Surgery, Switzerland, 2010. Opinions of the SSC were assessed with a 6-item questionnaire. Results 152 respondents answered the questionnaire (participation rate 35.1%). 64.7% respondents acknowledged having a checklist in their hospital or their clinic. Median implementation year was 2009. More than 8 out of 10 respondents reported their team applied the Sign In and the Time Out very often or quasi systematically, whereas almost half of respondents acknowledged the Sign Out was applied never or rarely. The majority of respondents agreed that the checklist improves safety and team communication, and helps to develop a safety culture. However, they were less supportive about the opinion that the checklist facilitates teamwork and eliminates social hierarchy between caregivers. Conclusions This survey indicates that the SSC has been largely implemented in many Swiss hospitals and clinics. Both surgeons and anaesthetists perceived the SSC as a valuable tool in improving intraoperative patient safety and communication among health care professionals, with lesser importance in facilitating teamwork (and eliminating hierarchical categories). PMID:25036453

  19. Implementation of the surgical safety checklist in Switzerland and perceptions of its benefits: cross-sectional survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Cullati

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the implementation of the Surgical Safety Checklist (SSC among surgeons and anaesthetists working in Swiss hospitals and clinics and their perceptions of the SSC. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey at the 97th Annual Meeting of the Swiss Society of Surgery, Switzerland, 2010. Opinions of the SSC were assessed with a 6-item questionnaire. RESULTS: 152 respondents answered the questionnaire (participation rate 35.1%. 64.7% respondents acknowledged having a checklist in their hospital or their clinic. Median implementation year was 2009. More than 8 out of 10 respondents reported their team applied the Sign In and the Time Out very often or quasi systematically, whereas almost half of respondents acknowledged the Sign Out was applied never or rarely. The majority of respondents agreed that the checklist improves safety and team communication, and helps to develop a safety culture. However, they were less supportive about the opinion that the checklist facilitates teamwork and eliminates social hierarchy between caregivers. CONCLUSIONS: This survey indicates that the SSC has been largely implemented in many Swiss hospitals and clinics. Both surgeons and anaesthetists perceived the SSC as a valuable tool in improving intraoperative patient safety and communication among health care professionals, with lesser importance in facilitating teamwork (and eliminating hierarchical categories.

  20. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the northeastern Alaska Range, Healy, Mount Hayes, Nabesna, and Tanacross quadrangles, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 670 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the northeastern Alaska Range, in the Healy, Mount Hayes, Nabesna, and Tanacross quadrangles, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be incorporated into the statewide geochemical

  1. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Kougarok area, Bendeleben and Teller quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 302 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Kougarok River drainage as well as smaller adjacent drainages in the Bendeleben and Teller quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be incorporated

  2. Developing Culturally Responsive Surveys: Lessons in Development, Implementation, and Analysis from Brazil's African Descent Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Merle L.; Tillman, Ayesha S.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable empirical research, along with a growing body of conceptual and theoretical literature, exists on the role of culture and context in evaluation. Less scholarship has examined culturally responsive surveys in the context of international evaluation. In this article, the authors present lessons learned from the development,…

  3. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  4. Design, implementation, and analysis methods for the National Woodland Owner Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Earl C. Leatherberry; Michael S. Williams; Michael S. Williams

    2005-01-01

    The National Woodland Owner Survey (NWOS) is conducted by the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program to increase our understanding of private forest-land owners in the United States. The information is intended to help policy makers, resource managers, and others interested in the forest resources of the United States better understand the social...

  5. USDA Forest Service National Woodland Owner Survey, 2011-2013: design, implementation, and estimation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett J. Butler; Brenton J. Dickinson; Jaketon H. Hewes; Sarah M. Butler; Kyle Andrejczyk; Marla. Markowski-Lindsay

    2016-01-01

    The National Woodland Owner Survey (NWOS) is conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program to increase the understanding of the attitudes, behaviors, and demographics of private forest and woodland ownerships across the United States. The information is intended to help policy makers, resource managers, educators, service providers, and...

  6. Secondary Science Teachers' Implementation of CCSS and NGSS Literacy Practices: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Sally Valentino; Thomas, Jeffrey

    2018-01-01

    Most middle and high school students struggle with reading and writing in science. This may be because science teachers are reluctant to teach literacy in science class. New standards now require a shift in the way science teachers develop students' literacy in science. This survey study examined the extent to which science teachers report…

  7. Modernization of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Seismic Processing Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antolik, L.; Shiro, B.; Friberg, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) operates a Tier 1 Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) seismic network to monitor, characterize, and report on volcanic and earthquake activity in the State of Hawaii. Upgrades at the observatory since 2009 have improved the digital telemetry network, computing resources, and seismic data processing with the adoption of the ANSS Quake Management System (AQMS) system. HVO aims to build on these efforts by further modernizing its seismic processing infrastructure and strengthen its ability to meet ANSS performance standards. Most notably, this will also allow HVO to support redundant systems, both onsite and offsite, in order to provide better continuity of operation during intermittent power and network outages. We are in the process of implementing a number of upgrades and improvements on HVO's seismic processing infrastructure, including: 1) Virtualization of AQMS physical servers; 2) Migration of server operating systems from Solaris to Linux; 3) Consolidation of AQMS real-time and post-processing services to a single server; 4) Upgrading database from Oracle 10 to Oracle 12; and 5) Upgrading to the latest Earthworm and AQMS software. These improvements will make server administration more efficient, minimize hardware resources required by AQMS, simplify the Oracle replication setup, and provide better integration with HVO's existing state of health monitoring tools and backup system. Ultimately, it will provide HVO with the latest and most secure software available while making the software easier to deploy and support.

  8. Challenges in implementing uncomplicated malaria treatment in children: a health facility survey in rural Malawi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabaghe, Alinune N.; Phiri, Mphatso D.; Phiri, Kamija S.; van Vugt, Michèle

    2017-01-01

    Prompt and effective malaria treatment are key in reducing transmission, disease severity and mortality. With the current scale-up of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) coverage, there is need to focus on challenges affecting implementation of the intervention. Routine indicators focus on

  9. Differentiated Instruction: A Survey Study of Teacher Understanding and Implementation in a Southeast Massachusetts School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Kerri Ann

    2012-01-01

    Given the implementation of the federal initiative Response to Intervention (RtI) many districts are exploring teaching philosophies and strategies to help close the achievement gap. Differentiated instruction is a teaching philosophy that has been known to help teachers assist students in reaching their highest academic potential. The purpose of…

  10. Strategic Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation Processes in Hospital Systems: A Survey From Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Jafari, Mehdi; Tofighi, Shahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aim & Background: Strategic planning has been presented as an important management practice. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study investigated the strategic management process in Iranian hospitals. Methods: The present study was accomplished in 24 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran from September 2012 to March 2013. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including 130 items. This questionnaire measured the situation of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategic plan as well as the requirements, facilitators, and its benefits in the studied hospitals. Results: All the investigated hospitals had a strategic plan. The obtained percentages for the items “the rate of the compliance to requirements” and “the quantity of planning facilitators” (68.75%), attention to the stakeholder participation in the planning (55.74%), attention to the planning components (62.22%), the status of evaluating strategic plan (59.94%) and the benefits of strategic planning for hospitals (65.15%) were in the medium limit. However, the status of implementation of the strategic plan (53.71%) was found to be weak. Significant statistical correlations were observed between the incentive for developing strategic plan and status of evaluating phase (P=0.04), and between status of implementation phase and having a documented strategic plan (P=0.03). Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that absence of appropriate internal incentive for formulating and implementing strategies led more hospitals to start formulation strategic planning in accordance with the legal requirements of Ministry of Health. Consequently, even though all the investigated hospital had the documented strategic plan, the plan has not been implemented efficiently and valid evaluation of results is yet to be achieved. PMID:25716385

  11. Strategic planning, implementation, and evaluation processes in hospital systems: a survey from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Jafari, Mehdi; Tofighi, Shahram; Ravaghi, Hamid; Maleki, Mohammad Reza

    2014-09-28

    Strategic planning has been presented as an important management practice. However, evidence of its deployment in healthcare systems in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) is limited. This study investigated the strategic management process in Iranian hospitals. The present study was accomplished in 24 teaching hospitals in Tehran, Iran from September 2012 to March 2013. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire including 130 items. This questionnaire measured the situation of formulation, implementation, and evaluation of strategic plan as well as the requirements, facilitators, and its benefits in the studied hospitals. All the investigated hospitals had a strategic plan. The obtained percentages for the items "the rate of the compliance to requirements" and "the quantity of planning facilitators" (68.75%), attention to the stakeholder participation in the planning (55.74%), attention to the planning components (62.22%), the status of evaluating strategic plan (59.94%) and the benefits of strategic planning for hospitals (65.15%) were in the medium limit. However, the status of implementation of the strategic plan (53.71%) was found to be weak. Significant statistical correlations were observed between the incentive for developing strategic plan and status of evaluating phase (P=0.04), and between status of implementation phase and having a documented strategic plan (P=0.03). According to the results, it seems that absence of appropriate internal incentive for formulating and implementing strategies led more hospitals to start formulation strategic planning in accordance with the legal requirements of Ministry of Health. Consequently, even though all the investigated hospital had the documented strategic plan, the plan has not been implemented efficiently and valid evaluation of results is yet to be achieved.

  12. NASA and USGS invest in invasive species modeling to evaluate habitat for Africanized Honey Bees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Invasive non-native species, such as plants, animals, and pathogens, have long been an interest to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and NASA. Invasive species cause harm to our economy (around $120 B/year), the environment (e.g., replacing native biodiversity, forest pathogens negatively affecting carbon storage), and human health (e.g., plague, West Nile virus). Five years ago, the USGS and NASA formed a partnership to improve ecological forecasting capabilities for the early detection and containment of the highest priority invasive species. Scientists from NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) and the Fort Collins Science Center developed a longterm strategy to integrate remote sensing capabilities, high-performance computing capabilities and new spatial modeling techniques to advance the science of ecological invasions [Schnase et al., 2002].

  13. USGS ecosystem research for the next decade: advancing discovery and application in parks and protected areas through collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riper, Charles; Nichols, James D.; Wingard, G. Lynn; Kershner, Jeffrey L.; Cloern, James E.; Jacobson, Robert B.; White, Robin P.; McGuire, Anthony David; Williams, Byron K.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Shapiro, Carl D.

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems within parks and protected areas in the United States and throughout the world are being transformed at an unprecedented rate. Changes associated with natural hazards, greenhouse gas emissions, and increasing demands for water, food, land, energy and mineral resources are placing urgency on sound decision making that will help sustain our Nation’s economic and environmental well-being (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2005). In recognition of the importance of science in making these decisions, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 2007 identified ecosystem science as one of six science directions included in a comprehensive decadal strategy (USGS 2007). The Ecosystems Mission Area was identified as essential for integrating activity within the USGS and as a key to enhanced integration with other Federal and private sector research and management organizations (Myers at al., 2007). This paper focuses on benefits to parks and protected areas from the USGS Ecosystems Mission Area plan that expanded the scope of the original 2007 science strategy, to identify the Bureau’s work in ecosystem science over the next decade (Williams et al., 2013). The plan describes a framework that encompasses both basic and applied science and allows the USGS to continue to contribute meaningfully to conservation and management issues related to the Nation’s parks and ecological resources. This framework relies on maintaining long-standing, collaborative relationships with partners in both conducting science and applying scientific results. Here we summarize the major components of the USGS Ecosystems Science Strategy, articulating the vision, goals and strategic approaches, then outlining some of the proposed actions that will ultimately prove useful to those managing parks and protected areas. We end with a discussion on the future of ecosystem science for the USGS and how it can be used to evaluate ecosystem change and the associated consequences to management of our

  14. Agricultural pesticide use estimates for the USGS National Water Quality Network, 1992-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Nancy T.

    2016-01-01

    The National Water Quality Network (NWQN) for Rivers and Streams includes 113 surface-water river and stream sites monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Quality Program (NWQP). The NWQN represents the consolidation of four historical national networks: the USGS National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Project, the USGS National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN), the National Monitoring Network (NMN), and the Hydrologic Benchmark Network (HBN). The NWQN includes 22 large river coastal sites, 41 large river inland sites, 30 wadeable stream reference sites, 10 wadeable stream urban sites, and 10 wadeable stream agricultural sites. In addition to the 113 NWQN sites, 3 large inland river monitoring sites from the USGS Cooperative Matching Funds program are also included in this annual water-quality reporting Web site to be consistent with previous USGS studies of nutrient transport in the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin. This data release provides estimated agricultural pesticide use for 83 NWQN watersheds for 110 pesticide compounds from 1992-2014. Pesticide use was not estimated for the 30 wadeable stream reference sites, or from 3 large river coastal sites (07381590, "Wax Lake Outlet at Calumet, LA3"; 07381600, "Lower Atchafalaya River at Morgan City, LA2"; or 15565477, "Yukon River at Pilot Station, AK"). Use was not estimated for reference sites because pesticides are not monitored at reference water-quality sampling sites. Pesticide use data are not available for Alaska and thus no data is available for the Yukon River site. The other two coastal sites (07381590 and 07381600) where use was not estimated are outflow distributaries into the Gulf of Mexico. This data release provides use estimates for the same pesticide parent compounds sampled in water and analyzed by USGS, National Water Quality Laboratory (NWQL), Schedule 2437: http://wwwnwql.cr.usgs.gov/USGS/catalog/index.cfm. Pesticide use data are not available for

  15. A Survey of Logistics Support Analysis of Implementation within Aeronautical Systems Division System Program Offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    questionnaire 2 d. None of the above 0 "am and Gbf 5 *a* and cO 2 Obw and NCO 1 *a" "b", and ECU 4 Observations: This survey question determined whether...of Technology. Copendium of Authenticated Sys- tems and Logistics Terms, Definitions and Acronyms. AU-AFIT-LS-3-81, Wright-Patterson AFB OH, 1 April

  16. VT USGS NED DEM (30 meter) - statewide

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a National Elevation Database (NED). VCGI has extracted a portion of the NED for Vermont and re-projected...

  17. USGS Global Fiducials Library: 1999-2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A Fiducial site is a geographic location that is used as a benchmark for the long-term monitoring of processes, both natural and anthropogenic, associated with the...

  18. USGS BOEM PaCSEA GPS Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — To ensure comparable spatial and temporal coverage with similar historic datasets, we flew 32 east-west-oriented uniform transects (spaced at 15' latitude [27.8-km]...

  19. Climate Change Science Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, Robert M.

    2016-03-23

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has actively pursued research in the effects of climate change on the hydrology of New England. Ongoing focus areas of climate change science activities of the USGS in New England include the following:

  20. VT USGS Digital Line Graph Surface Waters - area polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The WaterHydro_DLGSW layer represents surface waters (hydrography) at a scale of RF 100000. WaterHydro_DLGSW was derived from RF100000 USGS...

  1. USGS 24k Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) Metadata

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Metadata for the scanned USGS 24k Topograpic Map Series (also known as 24k Digital Raster Graphic). Each scanned map is represented by a polygon in the layer and the...

  2. 2009 PSLC-USGS Topographic LiDAR: Wenatchee

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Wenatchee USGS area of interest (AOI) east of Wenatchee, WA on May 1nd ? May...

  3. 2009 PSLC-USGS Topographic LiDAR: Wenatchee

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Watershed Sciences, Inc. (WS) collected Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data of the Wenatchee USGS area of interest (AOI) east of Wenatchee, WA on May 1nd - May...

  4. Topographic Digital Raster Graphics - USGS DIGITAL RASTER GRAPHICS

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — USGS Topographic Digital Raster Graphics downloaded from LABINS (http://data.labins.org/2003/MappingData/drg/drg_stpl83.cfm). A digital raster graphic (DRG) is a...

  5. 2007 USGS Topographic LiDAR: Valdez, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project was completed by Aerometric, Inc. under USGS Contract No. 07CRCN0002, Task Order No. 070020009. This delivery contains point cloud data in LAS 1.1...

  6. 2010 USGS Lidar: Southeastern Michigan (Hillsdale, Jackson, Lenawee Counties)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Lake Erie LiDAR Priority Area 1 LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task- Jackson, Hillsdale, and Lenawee Counties USGS Contract No....

  7. 2014 USGS CMGP Lidar: Post Sandy (Long Island, NY)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: Long Island New York Sandy LIDAR lidar Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G14PD00296 Woolpert...

  8. [Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; de Bouchony, E Tron; Moll, M-C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-07-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) des Pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional blood transfusion institution) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immuno-hematological tests and labile blood products. The polling tool selected by agreement between the hospital management and quality assurance department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immuno-hematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed a 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving labile blood product distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  9. Satisfaction survey in general hospital personnel involved in blood transfusion: implementation of the ISO 9001: 2000 standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chord-Auger, S; Tron de Bouchony, E; Moll, M C; Boudart, D; Folléa, G

    2004-10-01

    As part of its policy of constant quality improvement, Etablissement francais du sang (EFS) des pays de la Loire (Pays de la Loire Regional Blood Transfusion Centre) carried out a satisfaction survey among the hospital personnel involved in prescribing and using immunohaematological tests and labile blood products (LBP). The polling tool selected by agreement between the Saint Nazaire's hospital management and Quality Assurance (QA) Department was a questionnaire that permitted item rating and free commentary. It addressed the personnel's perception of the quality of erythrocyte immunohaematological (EIH) testing and of the products administered, as well as their perception of the quality of communications with the local EFS. The questionnaire was sent to 26 physicians and 32 senior nurses in 15 hospital departments. The reply rate was 60% and expressed an 85% overall satisfaction level. Dissatisfaction causes were more specifically analysed, the main one involving LBP distribution in emergency situations. A joint undertaking by the EFS and the hospital led to the implementation of corrective measures, including the writing and implementation of a common standard operating procedure for emergency transfusion management. The results obtained demonstrated the feasibility of this type of survey and the interest, to a blood transfusion centre and the hospital personnel involved in transfusion, of assessing their very own perception of service quality.

  10. EFSUMB COMPASS for Rheumatologists dissemination and implementation--an international survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janta, Iustina; Terslev, Lene; Ammitzbøll-Danielsen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) competency assessment (COMPASS) for rheumatologists performing musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) was developed and published 2 years ago. It consists of a 3 level competency system. The objective of this study...... that the EFSUMB COMPASS is useful for training MSUS. The majority of them (17; 85%) had informed their colleagues or national rheumatology societies about the EFSUMB COMPASS. The most common obstacle encountered for the implementation of the COMPASS was the lack of time for supervision of the trainees (9; 45...

  11. Barriers to implementing evidence-based clinical guidelines: A survey of early adopters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spallek, Heiko; Song, Mei; Polk, Deborah E; Bekhuis, Tanja; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Aravamudhan, Krishna

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to identify barriers that early-adopting dentists perceive as common and challenging when implementing recommendations from evidence-based (EB) clinical guidelines. Method This is a cross-sectional study. Dentists who attended the 2008 Evidence-based Dentistry Champion Conference were eligible for inclusion. Forty-three dentists (34%) responded to a 22-item questionnaire administered online. Two investigators independently coded and categorized responses to open-ended items. Descriptive statistics were computed to assess the frequency of barriers and perceived challenges. Results The most common barriers to implementation are difficulty in changing current practice model, resistance and criticism from colleagues, and lack of trust in evidence or research. Barriers perceived as serious problems have to do with lack of up-to-date evidence, lack of clear answers to clinical questions, and contradictory information in the scientific literature. Conclusions Knowledge of barriers will help improve translation of biomedical research for dentists. Information in guidelines needs to be current, clear, and simplified for use at chairside; dentists’ fears need to be addressed. PMID:21093800

  12. An empirical survey of the benefits of implementing pay for safety scheme (PFSS) in the Hong Kong construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Daniel W M; Chan, Albert P C; Choi, Tracy N Y

    2010-10-01

    The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) has implemented different safety initiatives to improve the safety performance of the construction industry over the past decades. The Pay for Safety Scheme (PFSS), which is one of the effective safety measures launched by the government in 1996, has been widely adopted in the public works contracts. Both the accident rate and fatality rate of public sector projects have decreased noticeably over this period. This paper aims to review the current state of application of PFSS in Hong Kong, and attempts to identify and analyze the perceived benefits of PFSS in construction via an industry-wide empirical questionnaire survey. A total of 145 project participants who have gained abundant hands-on experience with the PFSS construction projects were requested to complete a survey questionnaire to indicate the relative importance of those benefits identified in relation to PFSS. The perceived benefits were measured and ranked from the perspectives of the client and contractor for crosscomparison. The survey findings suggested the most significant benefits derived from adopting PFSS were: (a) Increased safety training; (b) Enhanced safety awareness; (c) Encouragement of developing safety management system; and (d) Improved safety commitment. A wider application of PFSS should be advocated so as to achieve better safety performance within the construction industry. It is recommended that a similar scheme to the PFSS currently adopted in Hong Kong may be developed for implementation in other regions or countries for international comparisons. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  13. Implementation of online opioid overdose prevention, recognition and response trainings for professional first responders: Year 1 survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Janie; Rajan, Sonali; Goldsamt, Lloyd; Elliott, Luther

    2016-12-01

    This article reports on the first web-based implementation of an opioid-overdose prevention, recognition and response training for professional first responders. The training was disseminated nationally over one listserv in November 2014. The same year, following Act 139, which mandated the provision of an online training for police officers in Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania Department of Health approved the training. It was subsequently adopted as the primary training tool for police and other first responders in Pennsylvania and has been used as a training tool by first responders nationally. Analyses employed descriptive statistics to report characteristics of a sample of 387 professional first responders who completed a survey about their experience with the online training. Z-ratios were used to compare independent proportions related to overdose, naloxone, and satisfaction with the training between key subgroups, and paired t-tests were used to compare participant responses to a range of items pre- and post-participation in the training. Between January-October 2015, 4804 first responders took the training; 1697 (35.3%) agreed to be contacted; of these, 387 (22.8%) completed a survey about the training and subsequent overdose response experiences. The majority (86.4%) were from Pennsylvania, with police representing over half of the sample. Analysis of the post-training survey indicates high satisfaction with content, format and mode of delivery, and high satisfaction with items related to confidence and overdose reversal preparedness. This study demonstrates the feasibility and acceptability of implementing online training for first responders in overdose prevention, recognition and response. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Internationalization of the animal science undergraduate curriculum: a survey of its current status, barriers to its implementation and its value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, N E; Taur, J S; Xiao, Y; Chesbrough, H

    2003-04-01

    The goal of this project was to identify the current level at which internationalization has been adopted as a theme in the North American animal science curriculum and to identify its value and the barriers to its implementation. We surveyed animal, dairy, and poultry science departments across Canada and the United States. One hundred twenty-four surveys were mailed and 60% were returned. Associations between aspects of internationalization and student outcomes (admission to veterinary and graduate schools and starting salaries) were examined. Although administrators strongly believed internationalization had value, implementation was limited. The most common practices included international content in core animal science classes, advising, international internships, and participation of faculty in international scholarly activities. Few departments have incorporated internationalization into their mission statements or developed a specific international-themed class, scholarships devoted to international activities, or roles for international students. Few departments reported participation of students in international programs. Barriers included finances and limited commitment from higher administration. Student outcomes were positively associated with faculty size, percentage of international faculty, the ratio of international students to the total student population, international content in core animal science classes, a specific international-themed class, availability of international internships, and exchange of class material internationally via the Internet. Departments that did not offer international opportunities had a negative association (r = -0.79) with starting salary, but these relationships may not be causal. Alternatively, progressive departments may attract and retain exceptional students. The analysis indicated an awareness of the value of international programs, positive impacts in student outcomes, and financial barriers to implementation.

  15. Total Quality Management in Higher Education: Clearing the Hurdles. A Survey on Strategies for Implementing Quality Management Practices in Higher Education. A GOAL/QPC Application Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Daniel

    Based on a survey of Quality Management (QM) practitioners at 21 colleges, this study presents the 10 most difficult implementation hurdles to QM in higher education and a set of hurdle-clearing strategies. The hurdles are: (1) lack of time to implement QM; (2) perception that QM is something for janitorial and housing staffs but not applicable to…

  16. Implementing medical revalidation in the United Kingdom: Findings about organisational changes and impacts from a survey of Responsible Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, Kieran; Boyd, Alan; Bryce, Marie; Luscombe, Kayleigh; Tazzyman, Abigail; Tredinnick-Rowe, John; Archer, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Objective To describe the implementation of medical revalidation in healthcare organisations in the United Kingdom and to examine reported changes and impacts on the quality of care. Design A cross-sectional online survey gathering both quantitative and qualitative data about structures and processes for medical revalidation and wider quality management in the organisations which employ or contract with doctors (termed 'designated bodies') from the senior doctor in each organisation with statutory responsibility for medical revalidation (termed the 'Responsible Officer'). Setting United Kingdom Participants Responsible Officers in designated bodies in the United Kingdom. Five hundred and ninety-five survey invitations were sent and 374 completed surveys were returned (63%). Main outcome measures The role of Responsible Officers, the development of organisational mechanisms for quality assurance or improvement, decision-making on revalidation recommendations, impact of revalidation and mechanisms for quality assurance or improvement on clinical practice and suggested improvements to revalidation arrangements. Results Responsible Officers report that revalidation has had some impacts on the way medical performance is assured and improved, particularly strengthening appraisal and oversight of quality within organisations and having some impact on clinical practice. They suggest changes to make revalidation less 'one size fits all' and more responsive to individual, organisational and professional contexts. Conclusions Revalidation appears primarily to have improved systems for quality improvement and the management of poor performance to date. There is more to be done to ensure it produces wider benefits, particularly in relation to doctors who already perform well.

  17. Implementation of curriculum guidelines for pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics in FNP graduate programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N S; Possidente, C J; Muskus, C

    2001-01-01

    Model Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics Curriculum Guidelines were developed by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties and published in 1998. To date, no publication of evaluation of adoption or adherence to these guidelines is available. The purpose of this survey was to determine how family nurse practitioner programs incorporate the guidelines into their curriculum. A mailed self-report questionnaire to 193 schools yielded a 41% response rate. Eighty-five percent (n = 68) of the programs have not yet fully integrated the guidelines into their curriculum. Difficulties addressing the extensive content within a 3-credit course and the challenges of teaching students with varied clinical backgrounds and knowledge levels were frequently cited. Although further study of achievement of the guidelines is necessary, an increase in credit allocation, consideration of a conceptual approach to the topic, and use of varied teaching strategies may make achievement of the guidelines more realistic.

  18. Application of QMC methods to PDEs with random coefficients : a survey of analysis and implementation

    KAUST Repository

    Kuo, Frances

    2016-01-05

    In this talk I will provide a survey of recent research efforts on the application of quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) methods to PDEs with random coefficients. Such PDE problems occur in the area of uncertainty quantification. In recent years many papers have been written on this topic using a variety of methods. QMC methods are relatively new to this application area. I will consider different models for the randomness (uniform versus lognormal) and contrast different QMC algorithms (single-level versus multilevel, first order versus higher order, deterministic versus randomized). I will give a summary of the QMC error analysis and proof techniques in a unified view, and provide a practical guide to the software for constructing QMC points tailored to the PDE problems.

  19. Reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples for geochemical data from the western part of the Wrangellia terrane, Anchorage, Gulkana, Healy, Mt. Hayes, Nabesna, and Talkeetna Mountains quadrangles, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Azain, Jaime S.; Granitto, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. For the geochemical part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 1,682 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from an area covering the western half of the Wrangellia Terrane in the Anchorage, Gulkana, Healy, Mt. Hayes, Nabesna, and Talkeetna Mountains quadrangles of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the Denver warehouse through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract lab. The new geochemical data are published in this report as a coauthored DGGS report, and will be

  20. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Inmachuk, Kugruk, Kiwalik, and Koyuk River drainages, Granite Mountain, and the northern Darby Mountains, Bendeleben, Candle, Kotzebue, and Solomon quadrangles, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 653 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from an area covering portions of the Inmachuk, Kugruk, Kiwalik, and Koyuk river drainages, Granite Mountain, and the northern Darby Mountains, located in the Bendeleben, Candle, Kotzebue, and Solomon quadrangles of eastern Seward Peninsula, Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical analyses obtained through the USGS contract

  1. ViSIT: Visitor Survey Information Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The national survey was...

  2. The National Geochemical Survey - database and documentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in collaboration with other federal and state government agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting the National Geochemical Survey (NGS) to produce a...

  3. Gulf of Mexico region - Highlighting low-lying areas derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of the area surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s data) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of 10-meter contour-derived DEM data or higher-resolution LIDAR data. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2005.

  4. State of Louisiana - Highlighting low-lying areas derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation highlighting the State of Louisiana and depicts the surrounding areas using muted elevation colors. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data are a mixture of data and were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of mostly 10-meter contour-derived DEM data and some small areas of higher-resolution LIght Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) data along parts of the coastline. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and parish boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2007.

  5. A Polar Rover for Large-Scale Scientific Surveys: Design, Implementation and Field Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing He

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of polar regions is of great importance to scientific research. Unfortunately, due to the harsh environment, most of the regions on the Antarctic continent are still unreachable for humankind. Therefore, in 2011, the Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE launched a project to design a rover to conduct large-scale scientific surveys on the Antarctic. The main challenges for the rover are twofold: one is the mobility, i.e., how to make a rover that could survive the harsh environment and safely move on the uneven, icy and snowy terrain; the other is the autonomy, in that the robot should be able to move at a relatively high speed with little or no human intervention so that it can explore a large region in a limit time interval under the communication constraints. In this paper, the corresponding techniques, especially the polar rover's design and autonomous navigation algorithms, are introduced in detail. Subsequently, an experimental report of the fields tests on the Antarctic is given to show some preliminary evaluation of the rover. Finally, experiences and existing challenging problems are summarized.

  6. A survey on existing challenges of BSC implementation for performance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behdad Gitinejad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The balanced scorecard (BSC is a strategic oriented tool used comprehensively in profit and nonprofit organizations all over the world to synchronize routine processes of organizations to the mission and strategy, improve inner and outter communications, control organization performance toward strategic targets. BSC has emerged from a simple performance measurement framework to a comprehensive strategic management system. It changes an organization’s strategic plan from a passive document to an active guideline for the organization on a daily basis and provides a helpful assistance that not only enables performance measurements, but also helps planners identify what should be accomplished and measured. This study focuses on how BSC is adopted as a tool for measuring effectiveness of strategy implementation in these organizations. This study adapts the BSC as a powerful tool for reaching an organization’s performance in four significant areas: Financial perspective, Customer-Market perspective, Internal Processes perspective and Learning & Growth perspective. The results suggest that governmental organizations are somehow successful in achieving their objectives in various degrees.

  7. Level of implementation of guidelines on screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintaudi, Basilio; Fresa, Raffaella; Dalfrà, Mariagrazia; Marcone, Teresa; Dodesini, Alessandro Roberto; Napoli, Angela; Bonomo, Matteo

    2016-03-01

    To describe the degree of diffusion and acceptance of national guideline on screening and diagnosis of gestational diabetes (GDM) among Italian diabetes centers and to detect possible areas for benchmarking. In 2013 the Italian Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group structured a national survey, focused on GDM screening and diagnostic procedures, that was administered to diabetologists. Overall, 122 diabetologists of 122 different diabetes centers (21.7% territorial, 78.3% hospital/University) completed the questionnaire. All respondents declared to execute a 75 g-oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as diagnostic test. Almost one in five centers preferred a universal screening procedure, the others executing a selective risk factors-based screening. In patients at high risk for GDM the OGTT was performed at 16-18 weeks' gestation in 84.0% of the cases; only 6.5% of respondents preferred to execute it as soon as possible; and 9.5% used to wait until 24-28 weeks' gestation. In the case of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 5.1 mmol/l (92 mg/dl), two third of respondents used to proceed with the execution of the complete diagnostic OGTT, the others considering sufficient the FPG value for the diagnosis. Good level of reception of national recommendations was documented. The diagnostic procedure was generally accepted and applied. Some criticisms were specifically linked to the choice of universal or risk factor-based screening procedure, and to the right time for executing the OGTT in women at high risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chapter 12: Survey Design and Implementation for Estimating Gross Savings Cross-Cutting Protocol. The Uniform Methods Project: Methods for Determining Energy Efficiency Savings for Specific Measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, Charles W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Baumgartner, Robert [Tetra Tech, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-10-05

    This chapter presents an overview of best practices for designing and executing survey research to estimate gross energy savings in energy efficiency evaluations. A detailed description of the specific techniques and strategies for designing questions, implementing a survey, and analyzing and reporting the survey procedures and results is beyond the scope of this chapter. So for each topic covered below, readers are encouraged to consult articles and books cited in References, as well as other sources that cover the specific topics in greater depth. This chapter focuses on the use of survey methods to collect data for estimating gross savings from energy efficiency programs.

  9. Making USGS information effective in the electronic age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Debbie R.; Sanders, Rex; Faust, T.

    2003-01-01

    Executive Summary -- The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) held a workshop on 'Making USGS Information Effective in the Electronic Age' in Woods Hole, MA, on 6-8 February 2001. The workshop was designed to address broad issues of knowledge and communication, and to help develop the mission, vision, and goals of the National Knowledge Bank called for in the 1999 NRC review of the CMGP. Presentations led by historians and philosophers yield to a wide-ranging review and discussion of the role of USGS science in society: USGS science is important to government to understand certain complicated public policy issues (such as the environment), but we must participate in two-way public dialogs to increase our relevance and usefulness. Presentations led by USGS communications experts reviewed the principles of audience analysis and effective communications: this focused look at audiences, markets, and products provided an introduction to the behaviors, the tools, and the terminology that might be applied to public discourse. Presentations by several information technology experts showed the potential - and pitfalls - of current schemes for Web-based information access. Finally, several brainstorming sessions developed action items, vision, and characteristics of a knowledge bank. Based on the workshop discussions and results, the authors developed the National Knowledge Bank Mission, Vision, and Goals statements.

  10. USGS Colorado Water Science Center bookmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2016-12-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey Colorado Water Science Center conducts its water-resources activities primarily in Colorado in cooperation with more than 125 different entities. These activities include extensive data-collection efforts and studies of streamflow, water quality, and groundwater to address many specific issues of concern to Colorado water-management entities and citizens. The collected data are provided in the National Water Information System, and study results are documented in reports and information served on the Internet.

  11. The benefits of, and barriers to, implementation of 5D BIM for quantity surveying in New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Stanley

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Building Information Modelling (BIM models are relational and parametric in nature, and 5D BIM is where model objects include specification data and other properties which can be directly used for pricing construction work. There is huge potential for its use by quantity surveyors (QSs for such tasks as quantity take-offs, estimation and cost management, in a collaborative project environment. Perceptions regarding the benefits of, and barriers to, the implementation of 5D BIM by quantity surveyors in Auckland are presented, based on structured interviews with 8 QSs. Results suggest that 5D BIM may provide advantages over traditional forms of quantity surveying in Auckland by increasing efficiency, improving visualization of construction details, and earlier risk identification. However there are perceived barriers to 5D BIM implementation within the construction industry: a lack of software compatibility; prohibitive set-up costs; a lack of protocols for coding objects within building information models; lack of an electronic standard for coding BIM software, and the lack of integrated models, which are an essential pre-requisite for full inter-operability, and hence collaborative working, in the industry. Further research is recommended, to find solutions to overcome these barriers to inter-operability between 3D and 5D BIM, in order to facilitate the cost modelling process.

  12. United States-Mexican Borderlands: Facing tomorrow's challenges through USGS science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Randall G.; Ellis, Eugene G.; Page, William R.; Parker, Melanie J.; Hestbeck, Jay B.; Horak, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Along the nearly 3,200 kilometers (almost 2,000 miles) of the United States–Mexican border, in an area known as the Borderlands, we are witnessing the expression of the challenges of the 21st century. This circular identifies several challenge themes and issues associated with life and the environment in the Borderlands, listed below. The challenges are not one-sided; they do not originate in one country only to become problems for the other. The issues and concerns of each challenge theme flow in both directions across the border, and both nations feel their effects throughout the Borderlands and beyond. The clear message is that our two nations, the United States and Mexico, face the issues in these challenge themes together, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) understands it must work with its counterparts, partners, and customers in both countries.Though the mission of the USGS is not to serve as land manager, law enforcer, or code regulator, its innovation and creativity and the scientific and technical depth of its capabilities can be directly applied to monitoring the conditions of the landscape. The ability of USGS scientists to critically analyze the monitored data in search of signals and trends, whether they lead to negative or positive results, allows us to reach significant conclusions—from providing factual conclusions to decisionmakers, to estimating how much of a natural resource exists in a particular locale, to predicting how a natural hazard phenomenon will unfold, to forecasting on a scale from hours to millennia how ecosystems will behave.None of these challenge themes can be addressed strictly by one or two science disciplines; all require well-integrated, cross-discipline thinking, data collection, and analyses. The multidisciplinary science themes that have become the focus of the USGS mission parallel the major challenges in the border region between Mexico and the United States. Because of this multidisciplinary approach, the USGS

  13. USGS-NPS Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) workshop report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Christopher S.; Nayagandhi, Amar; Brock, John; Beavers, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program recently allocated funds to initiate a benthic mapping program in ocean and Great Lakes parks in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. Seventy-four (ocean and Great Lakes) parks, spanning more than 5,000 miles of coastline, many affected by increasing coastal storms and other natural and anthropogenic processes, make the development of a Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) timely. The resulting maps and associated reports will be provided to NPS managers in a consistent servicewide format to help park managers protect and manage the 3 million acres of submerged National Park System natural and cultural resources. Of the 74 ocean and Great Lakes park units, the 40 parks with submerged acreage will be the focus in the early years of the SBMP. The NPS and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop (June 3-5, 2008) in Lakewood, CO. The assembly of experts from the NPS and other Federal and non-Federal agencies clarified the needs and goals of the NPS SBMP and was one of the key first steps in designing the benthic mapping program. The central needs for individual parks, park networks, and regions identified by workshop participants were maps including bathymetry, bottom type, geology, and biology. This workshop, although not an exhaustive survey of data-acquisition technologies, highlighted the more promising technologies being used, existing sources of data, and the need for partnerships to leverage resources. Workshop products include recommended classification schemes and management approaches for consistent application and products similar to other long-term NPS benthic mapping efforts. As part of the SBMP, recommendations from this workshop, including application of an improved version of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), will be tested in several pilot parks. In 2008, in conjunction with the findings of this workshop

  14. Barriers and facilitators to the implementation of clinical practice guidelines: A cross-sectional survey among physicians in Estonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taba Pille

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an era when an increasing amount of clinical information is available to health care professionals, the effective implementation of clinical practice guidelines requires the development of strategies to facilitate the use of these guidelines. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes towards clinical practice guidelines, as well as the barriers and facilitators to their use, among Estonian physicians. The study was conducted to inform the revision of the clinical practice guideline development process and can provide inspiration to other countries considering the increasing use of evidence-based medicine. Methods We conducted an online survey of physicians to assess resource, system, and attitudinal barriers. We also asked a set of questions related to improving the use of clinical practice guidelines and collected free-text comments. We hypothesized that attitudes concerning guidelines may differ by gender, years of experience and practice setting. The study population consisted of physicians from the database of the Department of Continuing Medical Education of the University of Tartu. Differences between groups were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis non-parametric test. Results 41% (497/1212 of physicians in the database completed the questionnaire, comprising more than 10% of physicians in the country. Most respondents (79% used treatment guidelines in their daily clinical practice. Lack of time was the barrier identified by the most physicians (42%, followed by lack of medical resources for implementation (32%. The majority of physicians disagreed with the statement that guidelines were not accessible (73% or too complicated (70%. Physicians practicing in outpatient settings or for more than 25 years were the most likely to experience difficulties in guideline use. 95% of respondents agreed that an easy-to-find online database of guidelines would facilitate use. Conclusions Use of updated evidence

  15. The role of the U.S. Geological Survey in Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting in Illinois, 1984-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.; Jackson, P. Ryan

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawl from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago area waterway system (CAWS) as part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting (LMDA) overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every five years, the USGS streamgage practices in the CAWS are reviewed by a committee of practicing engineers and academics to ensure that the best engineering practices are implemented in accordance with the U.S. Supreme Court decree and as part of LMDA. This report provides a perspective on the role of the USGS in LMDA from 1984 to 2010 including the responses to the review committees. Six technical review committees have been convened by the U.S. Corps of Engineers to evaluate the key components of LMDA especially the USGS streamgages within the CAWS. Any changes in streamgaging practices at CAWS gaging stations require detailed analysis to ensure the change will not adversely affect the ability of the USGS to accurately monitor flows.

  16. Navy's "Full Ship Shock Trials" as Opportunities for USGS/CTBTO Seismic System Evaluation and Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jih, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Navy conducts "full ship shock trials" (FSST) on new construction ships to validate the ability the ship to carry out assigned missions in the combat shock environment. The shock trial attempts to simulate the effects of a near-miss underwater explosion by detonating 10,000 pound high explosive charges near the ship. On June 10, June 23, and July 16, 2016, respectively, the Navy carried out three FSSTs on the Littoral Combat Ship USS Jackson (LCS-6) off Florida coast. The three events were well recorded in eastern United States, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reported the events as "experimental explosions", with magnitudes in 3.7-3.8; and 78, 82, and 114 associated/picked phases, respectively. The CTBTO's seismic bulletin has the first and third FSSTs reported, but not the second. CTBTO's International Monitoring Systems (IMS) stations in the United States (Tuckaleechee of TN, Lajitas of TX, Mina of NV, Eilson of AK), Canada (Lac du Bonnet), Turkey (Belbashi), Finland (Lahti), and Australia (Warramunga, Alice Springs) saw some of these events. In addition, five hydrophone channels at Ascension Island hydroacoustic array detected two events. IDC did not "screen out" the detected FSSTs as earthquakes. Both USGS and IDC locations are fairly reasonable. In the case of USGS, the events are off shore, while most of the reporting seismic stations are on land, on one side. The test area selected by the Navy for FSSTs is a narrow hexagon, bounded by two arcs: the 600-ft depth bathymetry on the west, and an arc of radius 120 nautical miles centered at Mayport Naval Station (Florida). The seismic solutions determined by USGS and IDC lie inside the hexagon, using the standard single-event location algorithm. In the seismic monitoring mission area, it has been well known that the best calibration data points are those well-recorded, controlled active-source experiments for which the Ground Truth (of the event size, origin time, and coordinates) are known - such

  17. Caring for people with dementia in hospital: findings from a survey to identify barriers and facilitators to implementing best practice dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tropea, Joanne; LoGiudice, Dina; Liew, Danny; Roberts, Carol; Brand, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Best practice dementia care is not always provided in the hospital setting. Knowledge, attitudes and motivation, practitioner behavior, and external factors can influence uptake of best practice and quality care. The aim of this study was to determine hospital staff perceived barriers and enablers to implementing best practice dementia care. A 17-item survey was administered at two Australian hospitals between July and September 2014. Multidisciplinary staff working in the emergency departments and general medical wards were invited to participate in the survey. The survey collected data about the respondents' current role, work area, and years of experience, their perceived level of confidence and knowledge in dementia care and common symptoms of dementia, barriers and enablers to implementing best practice dementia care, job satisfaction in caring for people with dementia, and to rate the hospital's capacity and available resources to support best practice dementia care. A total of 112 survey responses were received. The environment, inadequate staffing levels and workload, time, and staff knowledge and skills were identified as barriers to implementing best practice dementia care. Most respondents rated their knowledge of dementia care and common symptoms of dementia, and confidence in recognizing whether a person has dementia, as moderate or high dementia. Approximately, half the respondents rated access to training and equipment as low or very low. The survey findings highlighted hospital staff perceived barriers to implementing best practice dementia care that can be used to inform locally tailored improvement interventions.

  18. Barriers to implementing protocols for kidney paired donation and desensitization: survey of U.S. transplant programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Emma; Hanto, Ruthanne; Rodrigue, James R

    2010-12-01

    Special types of kidney transplant exist for patients who have willing but incompatible donors. Two types of transplants that circumvent donor-recipient incompatibility are "kidney paired donation" and "desensitization." Lack of access to these protocols limits living donations and shortens the life span of patients with willing but incompatible donors. To understand potential barriers to implementing kidney paired donation and desensitization, as well as attitudes toward nondirected donation and compatible type O donation, which would maximize the number of kidney paired donation transplants performed via chains. We created a 56-question Web-based survey to elicit information from US transplant program directors about 24 potential barriers to implementing these protocols. Of 166 programs contacted, 96 responded, including 88 complete and 8 partial responses. After pediatric-only programs and multiple responses from the same program were removed, 84 total (78 complete) remained. Respondents were asked to designate each barrier as "major," "minor," or "not a barrier". Availability of dedicated nurse coordinators and the United Network for Organ Sharing's variance request process (although kidney paired donation does not actually require a variance) were significant barriers to kidney paired donation. Most respondents (54%, 42/78) would prefer to participate in a regional rather than a national protocol for kidney paired donation. Risk of complications was the most significant barrier to desensitization. University affiliation, region, and training (nephrologist vs surgeon) had little effect on perception of barriers. Most (92%, 71/78) would evaluate nondirected donations; 53% (41/78) would encourage compatible type O donors to enter kidney paired donation.

  19. Engineering and Economics of the USGS Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal (CARA) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K.; White, Loring P.; Gautier, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    This Open-File report contains illustrative materials, in the form of PowerPoint slides, used for an oral presentation given at the Fourth U.S. Geological Survey Workshop on Reserve Growth of petroleum resources held on March 10-11, 2008. The presentation focused on engineering and economic aspects of the Circum-Arctic Oil and Gas Resource Appraisal (CARA) project, with a special emphasis on the costs related to the development of hypothetical oil and gas fields of different sizes and reservoir characteristics in the North Danmarkshavn Basin off the northeast coast of Greenland. The individual PowerPoint slides highlight the topics being addressed in an abbreviated format; they are discussed below, and are amplified with additional text as appropriate. Also included in this report are the summary results of a typical ?run? to generate the necessary capital and operating costs for the development of an offshore oil field off the northeast coast of Greenland; the data are displayed in MS Excel format generated using Questor software (IHS Energy, Inc.). U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) acknowledges that this report includes data supplied by IHS Energy, Inc.; Copyright (2008) all rights reserved. IHS Energy has granted USGS the permission to publish this report.

  20. 2013 USGS-NRCS Lidar: Maine (Cumberland, Kennebec and York)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — TASK NAME: NRCS Maine 0.7M NPS LIDAR LiDAR Data Acquisition and Processing Production Task USGS Contract No. G10PC00057 Task Order No. G13PD00954 Woolpert Order No....

  1. The SCEC/USGS dynamic earthquake rupture code verification exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, R.A.; Barall, M.; Archuleta, R.; Dunham, E.; Aagaard, Brad T.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Bhat, H.; Cruz-Atienza, Victor M.; Dalguer, L.; Dawson, P.; Day, S.; Duan, B.; Ely, G.; Kaneko, Y.; Kase, Y.; Lapusta, N.; Liu, Yajing; Ma, S.; Oglesby, D.; Olsen, K.; Pitarka, A.; Song, S.; Templeton, E.

    2009-01-01

    Numerical simulations of earthquake rupture dynamics are now common, yet it has been difficult to test the validity of these simulations because there have been few field observations and no analytic solutions with which to compare the results. This paper describes the Southern California Earthquake Center/U.S. Geological Survey (SCEC/USGS) Dynamic Earthquake Rupture Code Verification Exercise, where codes that simulate spontaneous rupture dynamics in three dimensions are evaluated and the results produced by these codes are compared using Web-based tools. This is the first time that a broad and rigorous examination of numerous spontaneous rupture codes has been performed—a significant advance in this science. The automated process developed to attain this achievement provides for a future where testing of codes is easily accomplished.Scientists who use computer simulations to understand earthquakes utilize a range of techniques. Most of these assume that earthquakes are caused by slip at depth on faults in the Earth, but hereafter the strategies vary. Among the methods used in earthquake mechanics studies are kinematic approaches and dynamic approaches.The kinematic approach uses a computer code that prescribes the spatial and temporal evolution of slip on the causative fault (or faults). These types of simulations are very helpful, especially since they can be used in seismic data inversions to relate the ground motions recorded in the field to slip on the fault(s) at depth. However, these kinematic solutions generally provide no insight into the physics driving the fault slip or information about why the involved fault(s) slipped that much (or that little). In other words, these kinematic solutions may lack information about the physical dynamics of earthquake rupture that will be most helpful in forecasting future events.To help address this issue, some researchers use computer codes to numerically simulate earthquakes and construct dynamic, spontaneous

  2. The Anyang Esophageal Cancer Cohort Study: study design, implementation of fieldwork, and use of computer-aided survey system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV has been observed repeatedly in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC tissues. However, the causal relationship between HPV infection and the onset of ESCC remains unknown. A large cohort study focusing on this topic is being carried out in rural Anyang, China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The Anyang Esophageal Cancer Cohort Study (AECCS is a population-based prospective endoscopic cohort study designed to investigate the association of HPV infection and ESCC. This paper provides information regarding the design and implementation of this study. In particular we describe the recruitment strategies and quality control procedures which have been put into place, and the custom designed computer-aided survey system (CASS used for this project. This system integrates barcode technology and unique identification numbers, and has been developed to facilitate real-time data management throughout the workflow using a wireless local area network. A total of 8,112 (75.3% of invited subjects participated in the baseline endoscopic examination; of those invited two years later to take part in the first cycle of follow-up, 91.9% have complied. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The AECCS study has high potential for evaluating the causal relationship between HPV infection and the occurrence of ESCC. The experience in setting up the AECCS may be beneficial for others planning to initiate similar epidemiological studies in developing countries.

  3. USGS science for a changing world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deborah R. Hutchinson

    2006-04-01

    This final report to the Department of Energy for Task DE-AT26-97FT34343 covers the period from 1997 to April, 2005 and summarizes the larger research accomplishments, which can be divided in field and laboratory experiments. The geophysical and sampling field programs include 5 experiments conducted between 1998 and 2003 in the Gulf of Mexico (four cruises) and on the Blake Ridge (one cruise). Significant results from the Gulf of Mexico include advancing knowledge of gas hydrate as a potential hazard to drilling at a time when petroleum exploration and production move into deeper water on the continental slope. Anomalous bright reflections called high-reflectivity zones (HRZ's) were identified as possible seismic indicators of gas hydrate. Subsequent sampling through coring identified how methane flux changes from vent regions into mini-basins, and could explain the lack of a known Bottom Simulating Reflection (BSR) in much of the Gulf. In conjunction with the Chevron Gulf of Mexico JIP project, two site surveys were run to characterize gas hydrate prior to drilling in 2005, including detailed analysis of a BSR reflection at one of the sites. The one cruise to the Blake Ridge collected core samples to test the origin and age of the Blake Ridge collapse feature. While the cruise results were equivocal, they results raised new questions about the timing of methane release from hydrate in this well-studied natural laboratory field site. These field programs, particularly in the Gulf of Mexico, helped further DOE goals of understanding gas hydrates in areas where deep-water drilling and production were likely to penetrate the gas hydrate stability zone. Laboratory experiments were generally integrated with field studies but addressed specific questions about methane hydrate behavior and properties. Studies in the Gas Hydrate and Sediment Testing Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI) performed some of the first physical property measurements on hydrate-sediment mixtures

  4. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib06a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction We have assembled a digital reflectance spectral library that covers the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to far infrared along with sample documentation. The library includes samples of minerals, rocks, soils, physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures, plants, vegetation communities, microorganisms, and man-made materials. The samples and spectra collected were assembled for the purpose of using spectral features for the remote detection of these and similar materials. Analysis of spectroscopic data from laboratory, aircraft, and spacecraft instrumentation requires a knowledge base. The spectral library discussed here forms a knowledge base for the spectroscopy of minerals and related materials of importance to a variety of research programs being conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey. Much of this library grew out of the need for spectra to support imaging spectroscopy studies of the Earth and planets. Imaging spectrometers, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Visible/Infra Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) or the NASA Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) which is currently orbiting Saturn, have narrow bandwidths in many contiguous spectral channels that permit accurate definition of absorption features in spectra from a variety of materials. Identification of materials from such data requires a comprehensive spectral library of minerals, vegetation, man-made materials, and other subjects in the scene. Our research involves the use of the spectral library to identify the components in a spectrum of an unknown. Therefore, the quality of the library must be very good. However, the quality required in a spectral library to successfully perform an investigation depends on the scientific questions to be answered and the type of algorithms to be used. For example, to map a mineral using imaging spectroscopy and the mapping algorithm of Clark and others (1990a, 2003b

  5. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  6. New biotite and muscovite isotopic reference materials, USGS57 and USGS58, for δ2H measurements–A replacement for NBS 30

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Gehre, Matthias; Vennemann, Torsten W.; Brand, Willi A.; Geilmann, Heike; Olack, Gerard; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Palandri, Jim; Huang, Li; Longstaffe, Fred J.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of continuous-flow isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) coupled with a high temperature conversion (HTC) system enabled faster, more cost effective, and more precise δ2H analysis of hydrogen-bearing solids. Accurate hydrogen isotopic analysis by on-line or off-line techniques requires appropriate isotopic reference materials (RMs). A strategy of two-point calibrations spanning δ2H range of the unknowns using two RMs is recommended. Unfortunately, the supply of the previously widely used isotopic RM, NBS 30 biotite, is exhausted. In addition, recent measurements have shown that the determination of δ2H values of NBS 30 biotite on the VSMOW-SLAP isotope-delta scale by on-line HTC systems with CF-IRMS may be unreliable because hydrogen in this biotite may not be converted quantitatively to molecular hydrogen. The δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values of NBS 30 biotite analyzed by on-line HTC systems can be as much as 21 mUr (or ‰) too positive compared to the accepted value of − 65.7 mUr, determined by only a few conventional off-line measurements. To ensure accurate and traceable on-line hydrogen isotope-ratio determinations in mineral samples, we here propose two isotopically homogeneous, hydrous mineral RMs with well-characterized isotope-ratio values, which are urgently needed. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has prepared two such RMs, USGS57 biotite and USGS58 muscovite. The δ2H values were determined by both glassy carbon-based on-line conversion and chromium-based on-line conversion, and results were confirmed by off-line conversion. The quantitative conversion of hydrogen from the two RMs using the on-line HTC method was carefully evaluated in this study. The isotopic compositions of these new RMs with 1-σ uncertainties and mass fractions of hydrogen are:USGS57 (biotite)δ2HVSMOW-SLAP = − 91.5 ± 2.4 mUr (n = 24)Mass fraction hydrogen = 0.416 ± 0.002% (n = 4)Mass fraction water = 3.74 ± 0.02% (n = 4)USGS58 (muscovite

  7. Earth Science and Public Health: Proceedings of the Second National Conference on USGS Health-Related Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Herbert T.; Griffin, Dale W.; Pierce, Brenda S.

    2007-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to serve the Nation by providing reliable scientific information to describe and understand the earth; minimize loss of life and property from natural disasters; manage water, biological, energy, and mineral resources; and enhance and protect our quality of life. As the Nation?s largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the USGS can play a significant role in providing scientific knowledge and information that will improve our understanding of the relations of environment and wildlife to human health and disease. USGS human health-related research is unique in the Federal government because it brings together a broad spectrum of natural science expertise and information, including extensive data collection and monitoring on varied landscapes and ecosystems across the Nation. USGS can provide a great service to the public health community by synthesizing the scientific information and knowledge on our natural and living resources that influence human health, and by bringing this science to the public health community in a manner that is most useful. Partnerships with health scientists and managers are essential to the success of these efforts. USGS scientists already are working closely with the public health community to pursue rigorous inquiries into the connections between natural science and public health. Partnering agencies include the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Food and Drug Administration, Mine Safety and Health Administration, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. Public Health Service, and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. Collaborations between public

  8. Archive of side scan sonar and bathymetry data collected during USGS cruise 06FSH01 offshore of Siesta Key, Florida, May 2006.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains swath bathymetric data collected during USGS cruise 06FSH01 aboard the R/V G.K. Gilbert. A side scan sonar, bathymetric, and high-resolution...

  9. Implementation of guidelines on oxytocin use at caesarean section: a survey of practice in Great Britain and Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sheehan, Sharon R

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: Caesarean section is one of the most commonly performed major operations on women worldwide. Operative morbidity includes haemorrhage, anaemia, blood transfusion and in severe cases, maternal death. Various clinical guidelines address oxytocin use at the time of caesarean section. We previously reported wide variation in practice amongst clinicians in the United Kingdom in the use of oxytocin at caesarean section. The aim of this current study was to determine whether the variation in approach is universal across the individual countries of Great Britain and Ireland and whether this reflects differences in interpretation and implementation of clinical practice guidelines. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a survey of practice in the five individual countries of Great Britain and Ireland. A postal questionnaire was sent to all lead consultant obstetricians and anaesthetists with responsibility for the labour ward. We explored the use of oxytocin bolus and infusion, the measurement of blood loss at caesarean section and the rates of major haemorrhage. Existing clinical guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE), the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG) and ALSO (Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics) were used to benchmark reported practice against recommended practice for the management of blood loss at caesarean section. RESULTS: The response rate was 82% (391 respondents). Use of a 5 IU oxytocin bolus was reported by 346 respondents (85-95% for individual countries). In some countries, up to 14% used a 10 IU oxytocin bolus despite recommendations against this. Routine use of an oxytocin infusion varied greatly between countries (11% lowest-55% highest). Marked variations in choice of oxytocin regimens were noted with inconsistencies in the country-specific recommendations, e.g. NICE (which covers England and Wales) recommends a 30 IU oxytocin infusion over 4h, but only 122 clinicians (40%) used this. CONCLUSIONS

  10. Three whole-wood isotopic reference materials, USGS54, USGS55, and USGS56, for δ2H, δ13C, δ15N, and δ18O measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Jordan, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Comparative measurements of stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopes in wood are hampered by the lack of proper reference materials (RMs). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has prepared three powdered, whole-wood RMs, USGS54 (Pinus contorta, Canadian lodgepole pine), USGS55 (Cordia cf. dodecandra, Mexican ziricote), and USGS56 (Berchemia cf. zeyheri, South African red ivorywood). The stable isotopes of hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen in these RMs span ranges as δ2HVSMOW from –150.4 to –28.2 mUr or ‰, as δ18OVSMOW from + 17.79 to + 27.23 mUr, as δ13CVPDB from –27.13 to –24.34 mUr, and as δ15N AIR-N2 from –2.42 to + 1.8 mUr. These RMs will enable users to normalize measurements of wood samples to isotope–delta scales, and they are intended primarily for the normalization of δ2H and δ18O measurements of unknown wood samples. However, they also are suitable for normalization of stable isotope measurements of carbon and nitrogen in wood samples. In addition, these RMs are suitable for inter-laboratory calibration for the dual-water suilibration procedure for the measurements of δ2HVSMOW values of non-exchangeable hydrogen. The isotopic compositions with 1-σ uncertainties, mass fractions of each element, and fractions of exchangeable hydrogen of these materials are:USGS54 (Pinus contorta, Canadian Lodgepole pine)δ2HVSMOW = –150.4 ± 1.1 mUr (n = 29), hydrogen mass fraction = 6.00 ± 0.04 % (n = 10)Fraction of exchangeable hydrogen = 5.4 ± 0.6 % (n = 29)δ18OVSMOW = + 17.79 ± 0.15 mUr (n = 18), oxygen mass fraction = 40.4 ± 0.2 % (n = 6)δ13CVPDB = –24.43 ± 0.02 mUr (n = 18), carbon mass fraction = 48.3 ± 0.4 % (n = 12)δ15NAIR-N2 = –2.42 ± 0.32 mUr (n = 17), nitrogen mass fraction = 0.05 % (n = 4)USGS55 (Cordia cf. dodecandra, Mexican ziricote)δ2HVSMOW = –28.2 ± 1.7 mUr (n = 30), hydrogen mass fraction = 5.65 ± 0.06 % (n = 10)Fraction of exchangeable

  11. VT 100 ft Contour Lines generated from USGS 30 meter NED DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This data layers consists of 100 foot contours intervals interpolated from the USGS NED. USGS NED (National Elevation Dataset) data are described...

  12. A framework of the desirable features of guideline implementation tools (GItools): Delphi survey and assessment of GItools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagliardi, A.R.; Brouwers, M.C.; Bhattacharyya, O.K.; Wees, P.J. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines are the foundation for healthcare planning, delivery and quality improvement but are not consistently implemented. Few guidelines are accompanied by guideline implementation tools (GItools). Users have requested GItools, and developers have requested guidance on how to develop

  13. Teaching implementation science in a new Master of Science Program in Germany: a survey of stakeholder expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ullrich, C.; Mahler, C.; Forstner, J.; Szecsenyi, J.; Wensing, M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Implementation science in healthcare is an evolving discipline in German-speaking countries. In 2015, the Medical Faculty of the University of Heidelberg, Germany, implemented a two-year full-time Master of Science program Health Services Research and Implementation Science. The

  14. Connecting the dots: a collaborative USGS-NPS effort to expand the utility of monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, James B.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Schweiger, E. William; Mitchell, Brian R.; Miller, Kathryn; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Resource Challenge (National Park Service 1999) was a call to action. It constituted a mandate for monitoring based on the twin premises that (1) natural resources in national parks require active management and stewardship if we are to protect them from gradual degradation, and (2) we cannot protect what we do not understand. The intent of the challenge was embodied in its original description: We must expand existing inventory programs and develop efficient ways to monitor the vital signs of natural systems. We must enlist others in the scientific community to help, and also facilitate their inquiry. Managers must have and apply this information to preserve our natural resources. In this article, we report on ongoing collaborative work between the National Park Service (NPS) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) that seeks to add to our scientific understanding of the ecological processes operating behind vital signs monitoring data. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide insights that can facilitate an understanding of the systems and identify potential opportunities for active stewardship by NPS managers (Bennetts et al. 2007; Mitchell et al. 2014). The bulk of the work thus far has involved Acadia and Rocky Mountain national parks, but there are plans for extending the work to additional parks. Our story stats with work designed to consider ways of assessing the status and condition of natural resources and the potential for historical or ongoing influences of human activities. In the 1990s, the concept of "biotic integrity" began to take hold as an aspiration for developing quantitative indices describing how closely the conditions at a site resemble those found at pristine, unimpacted sites. Quantitative methods for developing indices of biotic integrity (IBIs) and elaborations of that idea (e.g., ecological integrity) have received considerable attention and application of these methods to natural resources has become widespread (Karr 1991

  15. USGS Tweet Earthquake Dispatch (@USGSted): Using Twitter for Earthquake Detection and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S. B.; Bouchard, B.; Bowden, D. C.; Guy, M.; Earle, P.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how online social networking services like Twitter—a microblogging service for sending and reading public text-based messages of up to 140 characters—can augment USGS earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The USGS Tweet Earthquake Dispatch (TED) system is using Twitter not only to broadcast seismically-verified earthquake alerts via the @USGSted and @USGSbigquakes Twitter accounts, but also to rapidly detect widely felt seismic events through a real-time detection system. The detector algorithm scans for significant increases in tweets containing the word "earthquake" or its equivalent in other languages and sends internal alerts with the detection time, tweet text, and the location of the city where most of the tweets originated. It has been running in real-time for 7 months and finds, on average, two or three felt events per day with a false detection rate of less than 10%. The detections have reasonable coverage of populated areas globally. The number of detections is small compared to the number of earthquakes detected seismically, and only a rough location and qualitative assessment of shaking can be determined based on Tweet data alone. However, the Twitter detections are generally caused by widely felt events that are of more immediate interest than those with no human impact. The main benefit of the tweet-based detections is speed, with most detections occurring between 19 seconds and 2 minutes from the origin time. This is considerably faster than seismic detections in poorly instrumented regions of the world. Going beyond the initial detection, the USGS is developing data mining techniques to continuously archive and analyze relevant tweets for additional details about the detected events. The information generated about an event is displayed on a web-based map designed using HTML5 for the mobile environment, which can be valuable when the user is not able to access a

  16. USGS exploration geochemistry studies at the Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit, Alaska-pdf of presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppinger, Robert G.; Kelley, Karen D.; Fey, David L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Minsley, Burke J.; Smith, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    From 2007 through 2010, scientists in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have been conducting exploration-oriented geochemical and geophysical studies in the region surrounding the giant Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit in southwestern Alaska. The Cretaceous Pebble deposit is concealed under tundra, glacial till, and Tertiary cover rocks, and is undisturbed except for numerous exploration drill holes. These USGS studies are part of a nation-wide research project on evaluating and detecting concealed mineral resources. This report focuses on exploration geochemistry and comprises illustrations and associated notes that were presented as a case study in a workshop on this topic. The workshop, organized by L.G. Closs and R. Glanzman, is called 'Geochemistry in Mineral Exploration and Development,' presented by the Society of Economic Geologists at a technical conference entitled 'The Challenge of Finding New Mineral Resources: Global Metallogeny, Integrative Exploration and New Discoveries,' held at Keystone, Colorado, October 2-5, 2010.

  17. Streamstats: U.S. Geological Survey Web Application for Streamflow Statistics for Connecticut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahearn, Elizabeth A.; Ries, Kernell G.; Steeves, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction An important mission of the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) is to provide information on streamflow in the Nation's rivers. Streamflow statistics are used by water managers, engineers, scientists, and others to protect people and property during floods and droughts, and to manage land, water, and biological resources. Common uses for streamflow statistics include dam, bridge, and culvert design; water-supply planning and management; water-use appropriations and permitting; wastewater and industrial discharge permitting; hydropower-facility design and regulation; and flood-plain mapping for establishing flood-insurance rates and land-use zones. In an effort to improve access to published streamflow statistics, and to make the process of computing streamflow statistics for ungaged stream sites easier, more accurate, and more consistent, the USGS and the Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) developed StreamStats (Ries and others, 2004). StreamStats is a Geographic Information System (GIS)-based Web application for serving previously published streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for USGS data-collection stations, and computing streamflow statistics and basin characteristics for ungaged stream sites. The USGS, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection and the Connecticut Department of Transportation, has implemented StreamStats for Connecticut.

  18. USGS "Did You Feel It?" internet-based macroseismic intensity maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, D.J.; Quitoriano, V.; Worden, B.; Hopper, M.; Dewey, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) system is an automated approach for rapidly collecting macroseismic intensity data from Internet users' shaking and damage reports and generating intensity maps immediately following earthquakes; it has been operating for over a decade (1999-2011). DYFI-based intensity maps made rapidly available through the DYFI system fundamentally depart from more traditional maps made available in the past. The maps are made more quickly, provide more complete coverage and higher resolution, provide for citizen input and interaction, and allow data collection at rates and quantities never before considered. These aspects of Internet data collection, in turn, allow for data analyses, graphics, and ways to communicate with the public, opportunities not possible with traditional data-collection approaches. Yet web-based contributions also pose considerable challenges, as discussed herein. After a decade of operational experience with the DYFI system and users, we document refinements to the processing and algorithmic procedures since DYFI was first conceived. We also describe a number of automatic post-processing tools, operations, applications, and research directions, all of which utilize the extensive DYFI intensity datasets now gathered in near-real time. DYFI can be found online at the website http://earthquake.usgs.gov/dyfi/. ?? 2011 by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia.

  19. 76 FR 31357 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Ferrous Metals Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... Metals Surveys AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of a revision of a... requirements for the Ferrous Metals Surveys. This collection consists of 17 forms. This notice provides the... these forms to supply the USGS with domestic consumption data of 13 ores, concentrates, metals, and...

  20. End-of-life perceptions among physicians in intensive care units managed by anesthesiologists in Germany: a survey about structure, current implementation and deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Manfred; Michalsen, Andrej; Toenjes, Anke; Porzsolt, Franz; Bein, Thomas; Theisen, Marc; Brinkmann, Alexander; Groesdonk, Heinrich; Putensen, Christian; Bach, Friedhelm; Henzler, Dietrich

    2017-07-11

    Structural aspects and current practice about end-of-life (EOL) decisions in German intensive care units (ICUs) managed by anesthesiologists are unknown. A survey among intensive care anesthesiologists has been conducted to explore current practice, barriers and opinions on EOL decisions in ICU. In November 2015, all members of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI) and the Association of German Anesthesiologists (BDA) were asked to participate in an online survey to rate the presence or absence and the importance of 50 items. Answers were grouped into three categories considering implementation and relevance: Category 1 reflects high implementation and high relevance, Category 2 low and low, and Category 3 low and high. Five-hundred and forty-one anesthesiologists responded. Only four items reached ≥90% agreement as being performed "yes, always" or "mostly", and 29 items were rated "very" or "more important". A profound discrepancy between current practice and attributed importance was revealed. Twenty-eight items attributed to Category 1, six to Category 2 and sixteen to Category 3. Items characterizing the most urgent need for improvement (Category 3) referred to patient outcome data, preparation of health care directives and interdisciplinary discussion, standard operating procedures, implementation of practical instructions and inclusion of nursing staff and families in the process. The present survey affirms an urgent need for improvement in EOL practice in German ICUs focusing on advanced care planning, distinct aspects of changing goals of care, implementation of standard operating procedures, continuing education and reporting of outcome data.

  1. USGS Dasymetric Mapping Tool Applied to the Conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeter, R.; Gould, M.

    2012-12-01

    Decadal demographics are a common variable used to study natural hazards and social vulnerability. The U.S. Census uses enumeration units, an aggregated delineation of how many people live in an area. These units may not reflect the underlying population variations within a given census unit. Dasymetric mapping is a technique that disaggregates census data to new zones based on ancillary data on residential density characteristics. The USGS Dasymetric Mapping tool provides with a simple solution for spatially re-distributing census data to the appropriate urban zones. This tool is available for download (compatible with an ArcGIS 10 platform) at http://geography.wr.usgs.gov/science/dasymetric/data.htm. A wide range of spatial data can be used with the tool, increasing interoperability and confirming that geographic scale is a fundamental aspect of the dasymetric mapping process. In recent efforts, the USGS combined urban land cover classifications from the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) with 2000 and 2010 U.S. Census county-level data to produce population-density maps of the conterminous United States (CONUS). Results from the tool show CONUS-scale population at a 250-meter resolution, distributed to residential zones, correctly excluding those areas that are known to be uninhabited. The national results have been integrated with other spatial layers on a web mapping service. Users can locate any site within the CONUS and view population estimates for 2000 and 2010, as well as past dasymetric mapping research conducted at finer scales for smaller areas.

  2. Meeting the Needs of USGS's Science Application for Risk Reduction Group through Evaluation Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, L.; Campbell, N. M.; Vickery, J.; Madera, A.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Science Application for Risk Reduction (SAFRR) group aims to support innovative collaborations in hazard science by uniting a broad range of stakeholders to produce and disseminate knowledge in ways that are useful for decision-making in hazard mitigation, planning, and preparedness. Since 2013, an evaluation team at the Natural Hazards Center (NHC) has worked closely with the SAFRR group to assess these collaborations and communication efforts. In contributing to the nexus between academia and practice, or "pracademia," we use evaluation research to provide the USGS with useful feedback for crafting relevant information for practitioners and decision-makers. This presentation will highlight how the NHC team has varied our methodological and information design approaches according to the needs of each project, which in turn assist the SAFRR group in meeting the needs of practitioners and decision-makers. As the foci of our evaluation activities with SAFRR have evolved, so have our efforts to ensure that our work appropriately matches the information needs of each scenario project. We draw upon multiple projects, including evaluation work on the SAFRR Tsunami Scenario, "The First Sue Nami" tsunami awareness messaging, and their most recent project concerning a hypothetical M7 earthquake on the Hayward fault in the Bay Area (HayWired scenario). We have utilized various qualitative and quantitative methodologies—including telephone interviews, focus groups, online surveys, nonparticipant observation, and in-person survey distribution. The findings generated from these series of evaluations highlight the ways in which evaluation research can be used by researchers and academics to more appropriately address the needs of practitioners. Moreover, they contribute to knowledge enhancement surrounding disaster preparedness and risk communication, and, more generally, the limited body of knowledge about evaluation-focused disaster

  3. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vijay; Noronha, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Parikh, Purvish; Bhattacharjee, Atanu; Chakraborty, Santam; Jandyal, Sunny; Muddu, Vamshi; Ramaswamy, Anant; Babu, K. Govinda; Lokeshwar, Nilesh; Hingmire, Sachin; Ghadyalpatil, Nikhil; Banavali, Shripad

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results Sixty-six (62.9%) of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5%) were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8%) than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%). The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%), lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%), and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%). Conclusion Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice. PMID:28831443

  4. Survey of Implementation of Antiemetic Prescription Standards in Indian Oncology Practices and Its Adherence to the American Society of Clinical Oncology Antiemetic Clinical Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Patil

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adherence to international antiemetic prophylaxis guidelines like those of ASCO can result in better control of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting; however, the extent of implementation of such guidelines in India is unknown. Therefore, this survey was planned. Methods: This study was an anonymized cross-sectional survey approved by the ethics committee. Survey items were generated from the clinical questions given in the ASCO guidelines. The survey was disseminated through personal contacts at an oncology conference and via e-mail to various community oncology centers across India. The B1, B2, and B3 domains included questions regarding the optimal antiemetic prophylaxis for high, moderate, and low-minimal emetogenic regimens. Results: Sixty-six (62.9% of 105 responded and 65 centers (98.5% were aware of the published guidelines. The partial, full, and no implementation scores were 92.5%, 4.5%, and 3.0%, respectively. Full implementation was better for the low-minimal emetogenic regimens (34.8% than the highly emetogenic regimens (6.1%. The three most frequent reasons for hampered implementation of ASCO guidelines in routine chemotherapy practice cited by centers were a lack of sensitization (26 centers; 39.4%, lack of national guidelines (12 centers; 18.2%, and lack of administrative support (10 centers; 15.2%. Conclusion: Awareness regarding ASCO antiemetic guidelines is satisfactory in Indian oncology practices; however, there is a need for sensitization of oncologists toward complete implementation of these guidelines in their clinical practice.

  5. Tracklines of Sidescan-Sonar Survey conducted within Gulf of Farallones, 1989, by the U.S. Geological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a major geologic and oceanographic investigation of the Gulf of the Farallones continental shelf system, designed to...

  6. myScience—Engaging the public in U.S. Geological Survey science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Sally

    2015-10-19

    myScience (http://txpub.usgs.gov/myscience/) is a Web application developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Texas Water Science Center through a partnership with the USGS Community for Data Integration to address the need for increasing public awareness and participation in existing USGS citizen science projects. The myScience application contains data for 20 projects available for public participation representing all USGS mission areas. A visitor to the USGS education Web site (http://education.usgs.gov/) can click on the Citizen Science link to search for citizen science projects by topic or location, select a project of interest, and click “Get Involved.” Within the USGS, an internal version of myScience serves to build a community of practice and knowledge sharing among scientists who lead or would like to lead a crowdsourcing project.

  7. Section Level Public Land Survey - lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Public Land Survey line delineations to the section level. Developed from manually digitized section corners captured from paper USGS seven and one-half map sources.

  8. USGS assessment of water and proppant requirements and water production associated with undiscovered petroleum in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Varela, Brian; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Gianoutsos, Nicholas J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has conducted an assessment of water and proppant requirements, and water production volumes, associated with possible future production of undiscovered petroleum resources in the Bakken and Three Forks Formations, Williston Basin, USA. This water and proppant assessment builds directly from the 2013 USGS petroleum assessment for the Bakken and Three Forks Formations, and it has been conducted using a new water and proppant assessment methodology that builds from the established USGS methodology for assessment of undiscovered petroleum in continuous reservoirs. We determined the assessment input values through extensive analysis of available data on per-well water and proppant use for hydraulic fracturing, including trends over time and space. We determined other assessment inputs through analysis of regional water-production trends.

  9. Survey on Industry Requirements and Drivers for the Development of a Process-Related Certification Scheme for Ecodesign Implementation and Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pigosso, Daniela Cristina Antelmi; Jakobsen, Maja; McAloone, Tim C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of a large amount of eco-labels and eco-standards for product declaration, there is still limited research for the development of process-related certification schemes dealing with ecodesign implementation and management. In order to identify companies’ drivers, barriers...... and expected benefits in regards to the development and application of process-related ecodesign certification schemes, a survey was carried out inthis research. This paper presents and discusses the main results obtained in the survey, which comprised the participation of more than 100 professionals from more...

  10. USGS Field Activities 11CEV01 and 11CEV02 on the West Florida Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, in January and February 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Lisa L.; Knorr, Paul O.; Daly, Kendra L.; Taylor, Carl A.

    2014-01-01

    During January and February 2011 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the University of South Florida (USF), conducted geochemical surveys on the west Florida Shelf. Data collected will allow USGS and USF scientists to investigate the effects of climate change on ocean acidification within the northern Gulf of Mexico, specifically, the effect of ocean acidification on marine organisms and habitats. This work is part of a larger USGS study on Climate and Environmental Variability (CEV). The first cruise was conducted from January 3 – 7 (11CEV01) and the second from February 17 - 27 (11CEV02). To view each cruise's survey lines, please see the Trackline page. Both cruises took place aboard the R/V Weatherbird II, a ship of opportunity led by Dr. Kendra Daly (USF), which departed and returned from Saint Petersburg, Florida. Data collection included sampling of the surface and water column (referred to as station samples) with lab analysis of pH, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), and total alkalinity. Augmenting the lab analysis was a continuous flow-through system with a Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensor, which also recorded salinity, and pH. Corroborating the USGS data are the vertical CTD profiles collected by USF. The CTD casts measured continuous vertical profiles of oxygen, chlorophyll fluorescence, optical backscatter, and transmissometer. Discrete samples for nutrients, chlorophyll, and particulate organic carbon/nitrogen were also collected during the CTD casts.

  11. Digital signal processing and interpretation of full waveform sonic log for well BP-3-USGS, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, Alamosa County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lauri

    2011-01-01

    Along the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve boundary (fig. 1), 10 monitoring wells were drilled by the National Park Service in order to monitor water flow in an unconfined aquifer spanning the park boundary. Adjacent to the National Park Service monitoring well named Boundary Piezometer Well No. 3, or BP-3, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) drilled the BP-3-USGS well. This well was drilled from September 14 through 17, 2009, to a total depth of 99.4 meters (m) in order to acquire additional subsurface information. The BP-3-USGS well is located at lat 37 degrees 43'18.06' and long -105 degrees 43'39.30' at a surface elevation of 2,301 m. Approximately 23 m of core was recovered beginning at a depth of 18 m. Drill cuttings were also recovered. The wireline geophysical logs acquired in the well include natural gamma ray, borehole caliper, temperature, full waveform sonic, density, neutron, resistivity, and induction logs. The BP-3-USGS well is now plugged and abandoned. This report details the full waveform digital signal processing methodology and the formation compressional-wave velocities determined for the BP-3-USGS well. These velocity results are compared to several velocities that are commonly encountered in the subsurface. The density log is also discussed in context of these formation velocities.

  12. Global Land Survey; Landsat 7 ETM+ - Landsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica (1999-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), with funding from the National...

  13. Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN): Infrastructure upgrade to support Earthquake Early Warning (EEW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadha, R. J.; Hauksson, E.; Boese, M.; Felizardo, C.; Thomas, V. I.; Yu, E.; Given, D. D.; Heaton, T. H.; Hudnut, K. W.

    2013-12-01

    The SCSN is the modern digital ground motion seismic network in Southern California and performs the following tasks: 1) Operates remote seismic stations and the central data processing systems in Pasadena; 2) Generates and reports real-time products including location, magnitude, ShakeMap, aftershock probabilities and others; 3) Responds to FEMA, CalOES, media, and public inquiries about earthquakes; 4) Manages the production, archival, and distribution of waveforms, phase picks, and other data at the SCEDC; 5) Contributes to development and implementation of the demonstration EEW system called CISN ShakeAlert. Initially, the ShakeAlert project was funded through the US Geological Survey (USGS) and in early 2012, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation provided three years of new funding for EEW research and development for the US west coast. Recently, we have also received some Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) funding to enhance the EEW capabilities for the local UASI region by making our system overall faster, more reliable and redundant than the existing system. The additional and upgraded stations will be capable of decreasing latency and ensuring data delivery by using more reliable and redundant telemetry pathways. Overall, this will enhance the reliability of the earthquake early warnings by providing denser station coverage and more resilient data centers than before. * Seismic Datalogger upgrade: replaces existing dataloggers with modern equipment capable of sending one-second uncompressed packets and utilizing redundant Ethernet telemetry. * GPS upgrade: replaces the existing GPS receivers and antennas, especially at "zipper array" sites near the major faults, with receivers that perform on-board precise point positioning to calculate position and velocity in real time and stream continuous data for use in EEW calculations. * New co-located seismic/GPS stations: increases station density and reduces early warning delays that are incurred by travel

  14. USGS Science for Restoration of South Florida: The South Florida Ecosystem Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Benjamin F.; Gerould, Sarah; Higer, Aaron L.

    1999-01-01

    As land and resource managers see the value of their resources diminish, and the public watches the environments they knew as children become degraded, there are increasing calls to restore what has been lost, or to build productive ecosystems that will be healthy and sustainable under the conditions of human use. The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Placed-Based Studies Program was established to provide sound science for resource managers in critical ecosystems such as South Florida (fig. 1). The program, which began in south Florida in 1995, provides relevant information, high-quality data, and models to support decisions for ecosystem restoration and management. The program applies multi- and interdisciplinary science to address regional and subregional environmental resources issues.

  15. USGS science in the gulf oil spill: Novel science applications in a crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, M.

    2011-01-01

    Marcia McNutt reflects on the role of the US Geological Survey (USGS) team following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Secretary Salazar asked Marcia McNutt to lead the Flow Rate Technical Group, a team charged by National Incident Commander Adm. Thad Allen with improving estimates of the oil discharge rate from the Macondo well as quickly as possible. Given the unprecedented nature of this spill, the team moved rapidly to deploy every reasonable approach. The team estimated the plume velocity from deep-sea video and from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's acoustic Doppler current profiler. The team calculated the total volume of the spill using aircraft remote sensing. After the unsuccessful top kill attempt in late May, during which large volumes of mud were pumped down the flowing well, an important part of understanding the failure of the procedure was answering the question.

  16. Current state of musculoskeletal ultrasound training and implementation in Europe: results of a survey of experts and scientific societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naredo, Esperanza; D'Agostino, Maria A; Conaghan, Philip G

    2010-01-01

    To document the current state of musculoskeletal US (MSUS) training and extent of implementation among rheumatologists in the member countries of EULAR.......To document the current state of musculoskeletal US (MSUS) training and extent of implementation among rheumatologists in the member countries of EULAR....

  17. Preliminary Physical Stratigraphy and Geophysical Data From the USGS Dixon Core, Onslow County, North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefelt, Ellen L.; Gonzalez, Wilma Aleman B.; Self-Trail, Jean M.; Weems, Robert E.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Pierce, Herbert A.; Durand, Colleen T.

    2009-01-01

    In October through November 2006, scientists from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) Eastern Region Earth Surface Processes Team (EESPT) and the Raleigh (N.C.) Water Science Center (WSC), in cooperation with the North Carolina Geological Survey (NCGS) and the Onslow County Water and Sewer Authority (ONWASA), drilled a stratigraphic test hole and well in Onslow County, N.C. The Dixon corehole was cored on ONWASA water utility property north of the town of Dixon, N.C., in the Sneads Ferry 7.5-minute quadrangle at latitude 34deg33'35' N, longitude 77deg26'54' W (decimal degrees 34.559722 and -77.448333). The site elevation is 66.0 feet (ft) above mean sea level as determined using a Paulin precision altimeter. The corehole attained a total depth of 1,010 ft and was continuously cored by the USGS EESPT drilling crew. A groundwater monitoring well was installed in the screened interval between 234 and 254 ft below land surface. The section cored at this site includes Upper Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene sediments. The Dixon core is stored at the NCGS Coastal Plain core storage facility in Raleigh. The Dixon corehole is the fourth and last in a series of planned North Carolina benchmark coreholes drilled by the USGS Coastal Carolina Project. These coreholes explore the physical stratigraphy, facies, and thickness of Cretaceous, Paleogene, and Neogene Coastal Plain sediments in North Carolina. Correlations of lithologies, facies, and sequence stratigraphy can be made with the Hope Plantation corehole, N.C., near Windsor in Bertie County (Weems and others, 2007); the Elizabethtown corehole, near Elizabethtown, N.C., in Bladen County (Self-Trail and others, 2004b); the Smith Elementary School corehole, near Cove City, N.C., in Craven County (Harris and Self-Trail, 2006; Crocetti, 2007); the Kure Beach corehole, near Wilmington, N.C., in New Hanover County (Self-Trail and others, 2004a); the Esso#1, Esso #2, Mobil #1, and Mobil #2 cores in Albermarle and Pamlico Sounds

  18. PLSS Townships and Sections, The PLSS vector data provides value added, vector representations of the United States Public Land Survey System for Louisiana as depicted on the USGS 1:24,000 DRGs., Published in 2004, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Louisiana State University (LSU).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — PLSS Townships and Sections dataset current as of 2004. The PLSS vector data provides value added, vector representations of the United States Public Land Survey...

  19. Single-Beam Bathymetry Data Collected in 2015 nearshore Dauphin Island, Alabama, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These data are in the North American Datum 1983 (NAD83) for horizontal component, and the North American Vertical Datum 1988 (NAVD88) with respect to GEOID12A, and Mean Low or Lower Water (MLLW) for the vertical components.

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Dauphin Island, Alabama is a barrier island located in the Gulf of Mexico that supports local residence, tourism, commercial infrastructure, and the historical Fort...

  20. Social Acceptance of Smoking Restrictions During 10 Years of Policy Implementation, Reversal, and Reenactment in the Netherlands: Findings From a National Population Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, Karin; Willemsen, Marc C; de Vries, Hein; Monshouwer, Karin; Nagelhout, Gera E

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the extent to which smoking restrictions are socially accepted in a country such as the Netherlands where smoking restrictions have been implemented and reversed several times. The current study assessed trends as well as factors associated with two indicators of social acceptance of smoking restrictions in the Netherlands: acceptance of smoking in public places and implementation of home smoking bans. We used data from the Dutch Continuous Survey of Smoking Habits (DCSSH) between 2005 and 2014 (n = 182826). The DCSSH is a national population survey with a cross-sectional design in which respondents aged 15 years and older are surveyed weekly. Acceptance of smoking in public places decreased for six out of eight included venues, with the largest decrease for smoking in restaurants. The decrease in acceptance was larger among younger respondents and smokers. Smoking on terraces was an exception: decrease in acceptance there was larger among older respondents and ex-smokers. Implementation of home smoking bans increased over time. Having implemented a home smoking ban was associated with being male, being younger, having a high socioeconomic status, and being ex- or never smoker. Social acceptance of smoking restrictions has increased in the Netherlands, despite a suboptimal implementation process of smoking restrictions. However, there is still potential for improvement as acceptance of smoking is still quite high for some public venues like bars. It is important to strengthen smoking restrictions in order to further denormalize smoking in the Netherlands. We examined the extent to which smoking restrictions are socially accepted in the Netherlands where smoking restrictions have been implemented and reversed several times. Acceptance of smoking in public places decreased and implementation of home smoking bans increased between 2005 and 2014. Social acceptance of smoking restrictions increased in the Netherlands despite a suboptimal

  1. Reformatted data sets used in the Cooperative LACSD/USGS Palos Verdes Flow Study, 2000--2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Todd; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Gartner, Anne L.

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defined a contaminated section of the Palos Verdes shelf in southern California as a Superfund site, initiating a continuing investigation of this area. A number of agencies, including the EPA, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), conducted two oceanographic measurement programs in 2004 and 2007-2008 (SAIC, 2004, 2005; Rosenberger and others, 2010; Sherwood and others, unpublished data) to improve our understanding of the natural processes that resuspend and transport sediment in the area, especially in the region southeast of the Whites Point ocean outfall where earlier measurements were thought to be deficient. Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts (LACSD) deployed a simpler but much broader array of instruments on the Palos Verdes shelf and within the northern reaches of San Pedro Bay from 2000 to 2008 in order to characterize the current and temperature patterns within these regions. This program overlapped the two programs run by USGS and other agencies in 2004 and 2007. The LACSD data were made available to the USGS and the EPA in order to support their joint efforts to model the transport of the contaminated sediments in the region. This report describes the LACSD data sets, the instruments and data-processing procedures used, and the archive that contains the data sets that have passed our quality-assurance procedures.

  2. SAFRR Tsunami Scenarios and USGS-NTHMP Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, S.; Wood, N. J.; Cox, D. A.; Jones, L.; Cheung, K. F.; Chock, G.; Gately, K.; Jones, J. L.; Lynett, P. J.; Miller, K.; Nicolsky, D.; Richards, K.; Wein, A. M.; Wilson, R. I.

    2015-12-01

    Hazard scenarios provide emergency managers and others with information to help them prepare for future disasters. The SAFRR Tsunami Scenario, published in 2013, modeled a hypothetical but plausible tsunami, created by an Mw9.1 earthquake occurring offshore from the Alaskan peninsula, and its impacts on the California coast. It presented the modeled inundation areas, current velocities in key ports and harbors, physical damage and repair costs, economic consequences, environmental impacts, social vulnerability, emergency management, and policy implications for California associated with the scenario tsunami. The intended users were those responsible for making mitigation decisions before and those who need to make rapid decisions during future tsunamis. It provided the basis for many exercises involving, among others, NOAA, the State of Washington, several counties in California, and the National Institutes of Health. The scenario led to improvements in the warning protocol for southern California and highlighted issues that led to ongoing work on harbor and marina safety. Building on the lessons learned in the SAFRR Tsunami Scenario, another tsunami scenario is being developed with impacts to Hawaii and to the source region in Alaska, focusing on the evacuation issues of remote communities with primarily shore parallel roads, and also on the effects of port closures. Community exposure studies in Hawaii (Ratliff et al., USGS-SIR, 2015) provided background for selecting these foci. One complicated and important aspect of any hazard scenario is defining the source event. The USGS is building collaborations with the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) to consider issues involved in developing a standardized set of tsunami sources to support hazard mitigation work. Other key USGS-NTHMP collaborations involve population vulnerability and evacuation modeling.

  3. Archive of digital chirp subbottom profile data collected during USGS Cruise 13CCT04 offshore of Petit Bois Island, Mississippi, August 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Arnell S.; Flocks, James G.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2015-01-01

    From August 13-23, 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) conducted geophysical surveys to investigate the geologic controls on barrier island framework and long-term sediment transport offshore of Petit Bois Island, Mississippi. This investigation is part of a broader USGS study on Coastal Change and Transport (CCT). These surveys were funded through the Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) with partial funding provided by the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital chirp subbottom data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Gained-showing a relative increase in signal amplitude-digital images of the seismic profiles are provided.

  4. An assessment of the feasibility of developing and implementing an automated pavement distress survey system incorporating digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The rational allocation of pavement maintenance resources requires the periodic assessment of the condition of all pavements. Traditional manual pavement distress surveys, which are based on visual inspection, are labor intensive, slow, and expensive...

  5. America's Changing Energy Landscape - USGS National Coal Resources Data System Changes to National Energy Resources Data System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, J. A., II

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Eastern Energy Resources Science Center (EERSC) has an ongoing project which has mapped coal chemistry and stratigraphy since 1977. Over the years, the USGS has collected various forms of coal data and archived that data into the National Coal Resources Data System (NCRDS) database. NCRDS is a repository that houses data from the major coal basins in the United States and includes information on location, seam thickness, coal rank, geologic age, geographic region, geologic province, coalfield, and characteristics of the coal or lithology for that data point. These data points can be linked to the US Coal Quality Database (COALQUAL) to include ultimate, proximate, major, minor and trace-element data. Although coal is an inexpensive energy provider, the United States has shifted away from coal usage recently and branched out into other forms of non-renewable and renewable energy because of environmental concerns. NCRDS's primary method of data capture has been USGS field work coupled with cooperative agreements with state geological agencies and universities doing coal-related research. These agreements are on competitive five-year cycles that have evolved into larger scope research efforts including solid fuel resources such as coal-bed methane, shale gas and oil. Recently these efforts have expanded to include environmental impacts of the use of fossil fuels, which has allowed the USGS to enter into agreements with states for the Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Assessment as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act. In 2016 they expanded into research areas to include geothermal, conventional and unconventional oil and gas. The NCRDS and COALQUAL databases are now online for the public to use, and are in the process of being updated to include new data for other energy resources. Along with this expansion of scope, the database name will change to the National Energy Resources Data System (NERDS) in FY 2017.

  6. The Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) network of the U.S. Geological Survey—Past and future implementation of storm-response monitoring, data collection, and data delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Richard J.; Lotspeich, R. Russell; Robbins, Jeanne C.; Busciolano, Ronald J.; Mullaney, John R.; Massey, Andrew J.; Banks, William S.; Roland, Mark A.; Jenter, Harry L.; Peppler, Marie C.; Suro, Thomas P.; Schubert, Christopher E.; Nardi, Mark R.

    2017-06-20

    After Hurricane Sandy made landfall along the northeastern Atlantic coast of the United States on October 29, 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) carried out scientific investigations to assist with protecting coastal communities and resources from future flooding. The work included development and implementation of the Surge, Wave, and Tide Hydrodynamics (SWaTH) network consisting of more than 900 monitoring stations. The SWaTH network was designed to greatly improve the collection and timely dissemination of information related to storm surge and coastal flooding. The network provides a significant enhancement to USGS data-collection capabilities in the region impacted by Hurricane Sandy and represents a new strategy for observing and monitoring coastal storms, which should result in improved understanding, prediction, and warning of storm-surge impacts and lead to more resilient coastal communities.As innovative as it is, SWaTH evolved from previous USGS efforts to collect storm-surge data needed by others to improve storm-surge modeling, warning, and mitigation. This report discusses the development and implementation of the SWaTH network, and some of the regional stories associated with the landfall of Hurricane Sandy, as well as some previous events that informed the SWaTH development effort. Additional discussions on the mechanics of inundation and how the USGS is working with partners to help protect coastal communities from future storm impacts are also included.

  7. U.S. Geological Survey Community for Data Integration-NWIS Web Services Snapshot Tool for ArcGIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Sally

    2011-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data resources are so vast that many scientists are unaware of data holdings that may be directly relevant to their research. Data are also difficult to access and large corporate databases, such as the National Water Information System (NWIS) that houses hydrologic data for the Nation, are challenging to use without considerable expertise and investment of time. The USGS Community for Data Integration (CDI) was established in 2009 to address data and information management issues affecting the proficiency of earth science research. A CDI workshop convened in 2009 identified common data integration needs of USGS scientists and targeted high value opportunities that might address these needs by leveraging existing projects in USGS science centers, in-kind contributions, and supplemental funding. To implement this strategy, CDI sponsored a software development project in 2010 to facilitate access and use of NWIS data with ArcGIS, a widely used Geographic Information System. The resulting software product, the NWIS Web Services Snapshot Tool for ArcGIS, is presented here.

  8. DIAGNOSTIC UTILITY OF USG-GUIDED FNAC IN HEPATIC LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha P. Meena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC is an easy, rapid, minimally invasive and a cost effective diagnostic method for detecting benign and malignant lesions of liver. AIM The main aim of the present study was to establish the incidence of various hepatic lesions and to find out adequacy and utility of the procedure. MATERIAL AND METHOD A total of 174 cases were included in the study from Government Medical College, Kota and associated hospitals. All cases diagnosed to have single or multiple hepatic mass lesions on USG were included in the study. RESULTS Most common age group affected by hepatic lesion was 51-60 years (34.0%. 91.4% cases were having adequate aspirates. 95.6% of the total diagnosed cases were malignant and among malignant cases majority were metastatic. CONCLUSION USG-guided FNAC is a very useful procedure in the diagnosis of hepatic lesions as the procedure is simple and safe. Thus, FNAC is a simple and effective diagnostic tool in our hand.

  9. Development and implementation of a local government survey to measure community supports for healthy eating and active living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Latetia V; Carlson, Susan A; Onufrak, Stephen; Carroll, Dianna D; Galuska, Deborah

    2017-06-01

    The ability to make healthy choices is influenced by where one lives, works, shops, and plays. Locally enacted policies and standards can influence these surroundings but little is known about the prevalence of such policies and standards that support healthier behaviors. In this paper, we describe the development of a survey questionnaire designed to capture local level policy supports for healthy eating and active living and findings and lessons learned from a 2012 pilot in two states, Minnesota and California, including respondent burden, survey sampling and administration methods, and survey item feasibility issues. A 38-item, web-based, self-administered survey and sampling frame were developed to assess the prevalence of 22 types of healthy eating and active living policies in a representative sample of local governments in the two states. The majority of respondents indicated the survey required minimal effort to complete with half taking plan including emails and phone calls was required to achieve a 68% response rate (versus a 37% response rate for email only reminders). Local governments with larger residential populations reported having healthy eating and active living policies and standards more often than smaller governments. Policies that support active living were more common than those that support healthy eating and varied within the two states. The methods we developed are a feasible data collection tool for estimating the prevalence of municipal healthy eating and active living policies and standards at the state and national level.

  10. Organizational context associated with time spent evaluating language and cognitive-communicative impairments in skilled nursing facilities: Survey results within an implementation science framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Natalie F

    2016-01-01

    The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was developed to merge research and practice in healthcare by accounting for the many elements that influence evidence-based treatment implementation. These include characteristics of the individuals involved, features of the treatment itself, and aspects of the organizational culture where the treatment is being provided. The purpose of this study was to apply the CFIR to a measurement of current practice patterns of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working in the skilled nursing facility (SNF) environment. In an effort to inform future evidence-based practice implementation interventions, research questions addressed current practice patterns, clinician treatment use and preferences, and perceptions of the organizational context including leadership, resources, and other staff. Surveys were mailed to each SLP working in a SNF in the state of Michigan. Participants (N=77, 19% response rate) completed a survey mapping on to CFIR components impacting evidence-based practice implementation. Quantitative descriptive and nonparametric correlational analyses were completed. Use of evidence-based treatments by SLPs in SNFs was highly variable. Negative correlations between treating speech and voice disorders and treating swallowing disorders (rs=-.35, pcognitive-communicative disorders and treating swallowing disorders (rs=-.30, pcognitive-communicative disorders and treating swallowing disorders (rs=-.67, pcognitive-communicative disorders (rs=-.37, pcognitive-communicative disorders (rs=.27, pcognitive-communicative disorders. Further, SLPs in this sample spent more time evaluating language and cognitive-communicative impairments if they perceived their organizational context in a more positive way. The CFIR may guide treatment and implementation research to increase the uptake of evidence-based practices for SLPs working in the SNF setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical education in pharmacogenomics-results from a survey on pharmacogenetic knowledge in healthcare professionals within the European pharmacogenomics clinical implementation project Ubiquitous Pharmacogenomics (U-PGx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Katja Susanne; Steffens, Michael; Swen, Jesse Joachim; Patrinos, George P; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Stingl, Julia Carolin

    2017-10-01

    Due to the diversity within Europe, the implementation of pharmacogenomic testing in clinical practice faces specific challenges. In the context of the European pharmacogenomics implementation project "Ubiquitous Pharmacogenomics" (U-PGx; funded by the European Commission), we studied the current educational background. We developed a questionnaire including 29 questions. It was spread out to healthcare professionals working at the future implementation sites (in Austria, Greece, Italy, Netherlands, Slovenia, Spain and Great Britain) of the U-PGx project in preparation of an educational programme. Aim of the survey was to analyse the current educational situation at the implementation sites. In total, 70 healthcare professionals participated in the survey. Of participants, 84.3% found pharmacogenomics relevant to their current practice, but experience was still rare. More than two-thirds (65.7%) did not order nor recommend a pharmacogenomic test in the past year. This was mainly attributed to not having enough knowledge on pharmacogenomics (40.0%). Needs were identified in application of pharmacogenomics (identifying drugs 41.4%, interpreting test results 37.2%) as well as in underlining mechanisms (better knowledge on drug metabolism 67.1%, better knowledge on basic principles of pharmacogenomics 60.0%). This study analysed the specific attitudes, experience and education on pharmacogenomics of future users. There was a general positive attitude and interest towards pharmacogenomic testing. However, the grade of own experience, and knowledge about application and interpretation of pharmacogenomics caused uncertainty. Thus, education and training programmes may be helpful for implementation of pharmacogenomics at a homogenous level within Europe.

  12. Development and implementation of a local government survey to measure community supports for healthy eating and active living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latetia V Moore

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to make healthy choices is influenced by where one lives, works, shops, and plays. Locally enacted policies and standards can influence these surroundings but little is known about the prevalence of such policies and standards that support healthier behaviors. In this paper, we describe the development of a survey questionnaire designed to capture local level policy supports for healthy eating and active living and findings and lessons learned from a 2012 pilot in two states, Minnesota and California, including respondent burden, survey sampling and administration methods, and survey item feasibility issues. A 38-item, web-based, self-administered survey and sampling frame were developed to assess the prevalence of 22 types of healthy eating and active living policies in a representative sample of local governments in the two states. The majority of respondents indicated the survey required minimal effort to complete with half taking <20 min to complete the survey. A non-response follow-up plan including emails and phone calls was required to achieve a 68% response rate (versus a 37% response rate for email only reminders. Local governments with larger residential populations reported having healthy eating and active living policies and standards more often than smaller governments. Policies that support active living were more common than those that support healthy eating and varied within the two states. The methods we developed are a feasible data collection tool for estimating the prevalence of municipal healthy eating and active living policies and standards at the state and national level.

  13. Experiences and Lessons From Implementing Cohort Event Monitoring Programmes for Antimalarials in Four African Countries: Results of a Questionnaire-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suku, Comfort Kunak; Hill, Geraldine; Sabblah, George; Darko, Mimi; Muthuri, George; Abwao, Edward; Pandit, Jayesh; Osakwe, Adeline Ijeoma; Elagbaje, Cassandra; Nyambayo, Priscilla; Khoza, Star; Dodoo, Alexander N; Pal, Shanthi Narayan

    2015-11-01

    Cohort event monitoring (CEM) is an intensive method of post-marketing surveillance for medicines safety. The method is based on prescription event monitoring, which began in the 1970s, and has since been adapted by WHO for monitoring the safety of medicines used in Public Health Programmes. CEM aims to capture all adverse events that occur in a defined group of patients after starting treatment with a specific medicine during the course of routine clinical practice. The aims of this study were to describe the experiences of National Pharmacovigilance Centres (NCs) that have used CEM to monitor artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) for uncomplicated malaria in the African setting, to raise awareness of some of the challenges encountered during implementation and to highlight aspects of the method that require further consideration. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted to capture the experiences of NCs that have implemented CEM for active post-marketing surveillance of antimalarial medicines in sub-Saharan Africa. Six NCs were identified as having implemented CEM programmes and were invited to participate in the survey; five NCs indicated willingness to participate and were sent the questionnaire to complete. Four NCs responded to the survey-Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria and Zimbabwe-providing information on the implementation of a total of six CEM programmes. Their experiences indicate that CEM has helped to build pharmacovigilance capacity within the participating NCs and at the monitoring sites, and that healthcare providers (HCPs) are generally willing to participate in implementing the CEM method. All of the programmes took longer than expected to complete: contributing factors included a prolonged enrolment period and unexpectedly slow data entry. All of the programmes exceeded their budget by 11.1-63.2 %. Data management was identified as a challenge for all participating NCs. The reported experiences of four NCs that have undertaken CEM studies on ACTs

  14. Survey lines along which SEABed Observation and Sampling System (SEABOSS) data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey within the Northern Cape Cod Bay survey area (CCB_SeabossTrackline Esri shapefile, Geographic, WGS84).

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  15. Swath bathymetry gridded data (survey 2) collected by the U.S. Geological Survey surrounding Muskeget Channel, MA, November 2010 (Esri grid, UTM Zone 19N, WGS 84, 2-m resolution, survey2_2m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected in a collaboration between the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The primary objective of this...

  16. Swath bathymetry gridded data (survey 1) collected by the U.S. Geological Survey surrounding Muskeget Channel, MA, October 2010 (Esri grid, UTM Zone 19N, WGS 84, 2-m resolution, survey1_2m)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected in a collaboration between the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The primary objective of this...

  17. Geochemical reanalysis of historical U.S. Geological Survey sediment samples from the Haines area, Juneau and Skagway quadrangles, southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werdon, Melanie B.; Granitto, Matthew; Azain, Jaime S.

    2015-01-01

    The State of Alaska’s Strategic and Critical Minerals (SCM) Assessment project, a State-funded Capital Improvement Project (CIP), is designed to evaluate Alaska’s statewide potential for SCM resources. The SCM Assessment is being implemented by the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), and involves obtaining new airborne-geophysical, geological, and geochemical data. As part of the SCM Assessment, thousands of historical geochemical samples from DGGS, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and U.S. Bureau of Mines archives are being reanalyzed by DGGS using modern, quantitative, geochemical-analytical methods. The objective is to update the statewide geochemical database to more clearly identify areas in Alaska with SCM potential. The USGS is also undertaking SCM-related geologic studies in Alaska through the federally funded Alaska Critical Minerals cooperative project. DGGS and USGS share the goal of evaluating Alaska’s strategic and critical minerals potential and together created a Letter of Agreement (signed December 2012) and a supplementary Technical Assistance Agreement (#14CMTAA143458) to facilitate the two agencies’ cooperative work. Under these agreements, DGGS contracted the USGS in Denver to reanalyze historical USGS sediment samples from Alaska. For this report, DGGS funded reanalysis of 212 historical USGS sediment samples from the statewide Alaska Geochemical Database Version 2.0 (AGDB2; Granitto and others, 2013). Samples were chosen from the Chilkat, Klehini, Tsirku, and Takhin river drainages, as well as smaller drainages flowing into Chilkat and Chilkoot Inlets near Haines, Skagway Quadrangle, Southeast Alaska. Additionally some samples were also chosen from the Juneau gold belt, Juneau Quadrangle, Southeast Alaska (fig. 1). The USGS was responsible for sample retrieval from the National Geochemical Sample Archive (NGSA) in Denver, Colorado through the final quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) of the geochemical

  18. Essential literature for the chiropractic profession: Results and implementation challenges from a survey of international chiropractic faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansholt, Barbara A.; Salsbury, Stacie A.; Corber, Lance G.; Stites, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Scientific literature applicable to chiropractic practice proliferates in quantity, quality, and source. Chiropractic is a worldwide profession and varies in scope between states or provinces and from country to country. It is logical to consider that the focus and emphasis of chiropractic education varies between programs as well. This original research study endeavored to determine “essential literature” recommended by chiropractic faculty. The purpose of this article is (1) to share our results and (2) to promote discussion and explore means for future collaboration of chiropractic faculty through a worldwide platform. Methods: A 2-phase recruitment occurred initially at the institutional level and subsequently at the faculty level. A Web-based survey used qualitative data collection methods to gather bibliographic citations. Descriptive statistics were calculated for demographics, and citation responses were ranked per number of recommendations, grouped into categories, and tabulated per journal source and publication date. Results: Forty-one chiropractic programs were contacted, resulting in 30 participating chiropractic programs (16 US and 14 international). Forty-five faculty members completed the entire survey, submitting 126 peer-reviewed publications and 25 additional citations. Readings emphasized clinical management of spine pain, the science of spinal manipulation, effectiveness of manual therapies, teaching of chiropractic techniques, outcomes assessments, and professional issues. Conclusion: A systematic approach to surveying educators in international chiropractic institutions was accomplished. The results of the survey provide a list of essential literature for the chiropractic profession. We recommend establishing a chiropractic faculty registry for improved communication and collaboration. PMID:28768114

  19. Exploring the gap between the practical and theoretical world of ERP implementations: results of a global survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catersels, R.; Helms, R.W.; Batenburg, R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the differences between the theoretical world of ERP researchers and the practical world of ERP consultants. A survey was held among 129 ERP consultants to explore their opinion and experience with regard to a number of subjects that have been researched in many papers, such as

  20. German health interview and examination survey for adults (DEGS) - design, objectives and implementation of the first data collection wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheidt-Nave, Christa; Kamtsiuris, Panagiotis; Gößwald, Antje; Hölling, Heike; Lange, Michael; Busch, Markus A; Dahm, Stefan; Dölle, Rüdiger; Ellert, Ute; Fuchs, Judith; Hapke, Ulfert; Heidemann, Christin; Knopf, Hildtraud; Laussmann, Detlef; Mensink, Gert B M; Neuhauser, Hannelore; Richter, Almut; Sass, Anke-Christine; Rosario, Angelika Schaffrath; Stolzenberg, Heribert; Thamm, Michael; Kurth, Bärbel-Maria

    2012-09-01

    The German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS) is part of the recently established national health monitoring conducted by the Robert Koch Institute. DEGS combines a nationally representative periodic health survey and a longitudinal study based on follow-up of survey participants. Funding is provided by the German Ministry of Health and supplemented for specific research topics from other sources. The first DEGS wave of data collection (DEGS1) extended from November 2008 to December 2011. Overall, 8152 men and women participated. Of these, 3959 persons already participated in the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey 1998 (GNHIES98) at which time they were 18-79 years of age. Another 4193 persons 18-79 years of age were recruited for DEGS1 in 2008-2011 based on two-stage stratified random sampling from local population registries. Health data and context variables were collected using standardized computer assisted personal interviews, self-administered questionnaires, and standardized measurements and tests. In order to keep survey results representative for the population aged 18-79 years, results will be weighted by survey-specific weighting factors considering sampling and drop-out probabilities as well as deviations between the design-weighted net sample and German population statistics 2010. DEGS aims to establish a nationally representative data base on health of adults in Germany. This health data platform will be used for continuous health reporting and health care research. The results will help to support health policy planning and evaluation. Repeated cross-sectional surveys will permit analyses of time trends in morbidity, functional capacity levels, disability, and health risks and resources. Follow-up of study participants will provide the opportunity to study trajectories of health and disability. A special focus lies on chronic diseases including asthma, allergies, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes