WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey treasury vi

  1. The Mega-MUSCLES HST Treasury Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, Cynthia S.; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Youngblood, Allison; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, Christian; Berta-Thompson, Zachory; Kowalski, Adam

    2018-01-01

    JWST will be able to observe the atmospheres of rocky planets transiting nearby M dwarfs. A few such planets are already known (around GJ1132, Proxima Cen, and Trappist-1) and TESS is predicted to find many more, including ~14 habitable zone planets. To interpret observations of these exoplanets' atmospheres, we must understand the high-energy SED of their host stars: X-ray/EUV irradiation can erode a planet's gaseous envelope and FUV/NUV-driven photochemistry shapes an atmosphere's molecular abundances, including potential biomarkers like O2, O3, and CH4. Our MUSCLES Treasury Survey (Cycles 19+22) used Hubble/COS+STIS UV observations with contemporaneous X-ray and ground-based data to construct complete SEDs for 11 low-mass exoplanet hosts. MUSCLES is the most widely used database for early-M and K dwarf (>0.3 M_sun) irradiance spectra and has supported a wide range of atmospheric stability and biomarker modeling work. However, TESS will find most of its habitable planets transiting stars less massive than this, and these will be the planets to characterize with JWST. Here, we introduce the Mega-MUSCLES project, an approved HST Cycle 25 Treasury program. Following on the successful MUSCLES survey, Mega-MUSCLES will expand our target list to focus on: (a) new M dwarf exoplanet hosts with varying properties; (b) reference M dwarfs below 0.3 solar masses that may be used as proxies for M dwarf planet hosts discovered after HST's lifetime; and (c) more rapidly rotating stars of GJ1132's mass to probe XUV evolution over gigayear timescales. We will also gather the first panchromatic SEDs of rocky planet hosts GJ1132 and Trappist-1. Here, we present an overview of the Mega-MUSCLES motivation, targets list, and status of the survey and show how it extends proven methods to a key new sample of stars, upon which critically depends the long-term goal of studying habitable planet atmospheres with JWST and beyond.

  2. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosema, Keith; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Christensen, Charlotte; Gilbert, Karoline; Hodge, Paul; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Holtzman, Jon; Skillman, Evan D.; Weisz, Daniel; Cole, Andrew; Girardi, Leo; Karachentsev, Igor D.; Olsen, Knut; Freeman, Ken; Gallart, Carme; Harris, Jason; De Jong, Roelof S.

    2009-01-01

    The ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST) is a systematic survey to establish a legacy of uniform multi-color photometry of resolved stars for a volume-limited sample of nearby galaxies (D 4 in luminosity and star formation rate. The survey data consist of images taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), supplemented with archival data and new Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) imaging taken after the failure of ACS. Survey images include wide field tilings covering the full radial extent of each galaxy, and single deep pointings in uncrowded regions of the most massive galaxies in the volume. The new wide field imaging in ANGST reaches median 50% completenesses of m F475W = 28.0 mag, m F606W = 27.3 mag, and m F814W = 27.3 mag, several magnitudes below the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB). The deep fields reach magnitudes sufficient to fully resolve the structure in the red clump. The resulting photometric catalogs are publicly accessible and contain over 34 million photometric measurements of >14 million stars. In this paper we present the details of the sample selection, imaging, data reduction, and the resulting photometric catalogs, along with an analysis of the photometric uncertainties (systematic and random), for both ACS and WFPC2 imaging. We also present uniformly derived relative distances measured from the apparent magnitude of the TRGB.

  3. Environmental Survey in Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Summary report; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009. Sammendragsrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    An environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, has been carried out. This report presents the results from the analyses carried out on samples from a total of 316 stations at 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of the environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (Author)

  4. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : VI. Colour gradients in giant and dwarf early-type galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Brok, M.; Peletier, R. F.; Valentijn, E. A.; Balcells, Marc; Carter, D.; Erwin, P.; Ferguson, H. C.; Goudfrooij, P.; Graham, A. W.; Hammer, D.; Lucey, J. R.; Trentham, N.; Guzman, R.; Hoyos, C.; Kleijn, G. Verdoes; Jogee, S.; Karick, A. M.; Marinova, I.; Mouhcine, M.; Weinzirl, T.

    Using deep, high-spatial-resolution imaging from the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) Coma Cluster Treasury Survey, we determine colour profiles of early-type galaxies in the Coma cluster. From 176 galaxies brighter than M-F814W(AB) = -15 mag that are either

  5. A (Si VI) (1.92 micrometer) coronal line survey of galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, A.; Moorwood, A. F. M.; Salvati, M.; Oliva, E.

    1994-11-01

    We present the results of a (Si VI) lambda 1.962 emission line survey of active, starburst and IRAS luminous galaxies. The line was only detected in known Seyfert type 1 and 2 nuclei confirming previous suggestions that (Si VI) is related to Seyfert activity. By modeling the formation of (Si VI) and (Fe VIII) lambda 6087 we find further strong evidence that these lines arise in gas photoionized by the active nucleus although collisional ionization e.g. by shock fronts may be important in some galaxies exhibiting (Fe VII) much greater than (Si VI). Our failure to detect (Si VI) in the IRAS ultraluminous galaxies does not exclude the possible presence of obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), particularly as some of the known Seyferts were also not detected. Molecular hydrogen lines (a by-product of our spectra) are common in all galaxy types including several IRAS ultraluminous galaxies whose H2 equivalent widths (Wlambda less that 20 A) are 'normal'and much lower than the extreme value (Wlambda approximately = 70 A) found in NGC 6240 and NGC 1275. 'Bare' Seyferts have Wlambda(H2) less than 1 A and a factor greater than or approximately 10 lower than starbursts, and we do not confirm previous claims of H2 line emission in the quasar 3C273. Although the ratio of H2 to (Si VI) emission varies over a wide range it does not appear to provide a useful indicator of activity type or to impose constraints on the He excitation mechanism.

  6. A Survey for Low Surface Brightness Galaxies Around M31. II. The Newly Discovered Dwarf Andromeda VI

    OpenAIRE

    Armandroff, Taft E.; Jacoby, George H.; Davies, James E.

    1999-01-01

    We present B-, V-, and I-band images, as well as an H alpha image, of And VI. This is the second newly identified dwarf spheroidal (dSph) companion to M31 found using a digital filtering technique applied to the second Palomar Sky Survey for which 1550 square degrees now have been surveyed. And VI was confirmed to be a nearby dSph galaxy when it resolved into stars easily with a short 4-m V-band exposure. Sub-arcsec images taken at the Kitt Peak WIYN 3.5-m telescope provided (I,V-I) and (V,B-...

  7. Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. IX. A photometric survey of planetary nebulae in M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veyette, Mark J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Balick, Bruce; Fouesneau, Morgan [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Girardi, Léo [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Gordon, Karl D.; Kalirai, Jason [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rosenfield, Philip [Department of Physics and Astronomy G. Galilei, University of Padova, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Seth, Anil C., E-mail: mveyette@uw.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2014-09-10

    We search the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys and Wide Field Camera 3 broadband imaging data from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey to identify detections of cataloged planetary nebulae (PNs). Of the 711 PNs currently in the literature within the PHAT footprint, we find 467 detected in the broadband. For these 467, we are able to refine their astrometric accuracy from ∼0.''3 to 0.''05. Using the resolution of the HST, we are able to show that 152 objects currently in the catalogs are definitively not PNs, and we show that 32 objects thought to be extended in ground-based images are actually point-like and therefore good PN candidates. We also find one PN candidate that is marginally resolved. If this is a PN, it is up to 0.7 pc in diameter. With our new photometric data, we develop a method of measuring the level of excitation in individual PNs by comparing broadband and narrowband imaging and describe the effects of excitation on a PN's photometric signature. Using the photometric properties of the known PNs in the PHAT catalogs, we search for more PNs, but do not find any new candidates, suggesting that ground-based emission-line surveys are complete in the PHAT footprint to F475W ≅ 24.

  8. Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project - VI. Identification of Pre-Main-Sequence Stars using Machine Learning techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksoll, Victor F.; Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Grebel, Eva K.; Sabbi, Elena; Anderson, Jay; Lennon, Daniel J.; Cignoni, Michele; de Marchi, Guido; Smith, Linda J.; Tosi, Monica; van der Marel, Roeland P.

    2018-05-01

    The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) has provided an unprecedented photometric coverage of the entire star-burst region of 30 Doradus down to the half Solar mass limit. We use the deep stellar catalogue of HTTP to identify all the pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars of the region, i.e., stars that have not started their lives on the main-sequence yet. The photometric distinction of these stars from the more evolved populations is not a trivial task due to several factors that alter their colour-magnitude diagram positions. The identification of PMS stars requires, thus, sophisticated statistical methods. We employ Machine Learning Classification techniques on the HTTP survey of more than 800,000 sources to identify the PMS stellar content of the observed field. Our methodology consists of 1) carefully selecting the most probable low-mass PMS stellar population of the star-forming cluster NGC2070, 2) using this sample to train classification algorithms to build a predictive model for PMS stars, and 3) applying this model in order to identify the most probable PMS content across the entire Tarantula Nebula. We employ Decision Tree, Random Forest and Support Vector Machine classifiers to categorise the stars as PMS and Non-PMS. The Random Forest and Support Vector Machine provided the most accurate models, predicting about 20,000 sources with a candidateship probability higher than 50 percent, and almost 10,000 PMS candidates with a probability higher than 95 percent. This is the richest and most accurate photometric catalogue of extragalactic PMS candidates across the extent of a whole star-forming complex.

  9. THE MUSCLES TREASURY SURVEY. I. MOTIVATION AND OVERVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Youngblood, Allison; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. Christian; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Buccino, Andrea P.; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Davenport, James R. A.; Fontenla, Juan M.; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kowalski, Adam F.; Miguel, Yamila; Redfield, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Ground- and space-based planet searches employing radial velocity techniques and transit photometry have detected thousands of planet-hosting stars in the Milky Way. With so many planets discovered, the next step toward identifying potentially habitable planets is atmospheric characterization. While the Sun–Earth system provides a good framework for understanding the atmospheric chemistry of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars, the observational and theoretical constraints on the atmospheres of rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) around low-mass stars (K and M dwarfs) are relatively few. The chemistry of these atmospheres is controlled by the shape and absolute flux of the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED), however, flux distributions of relatively inactive low-mass stars are poorly understood at present. To address this issue, we have executed a panchromatic (X-ray to mid-IR) study of the SEDs of 11 nearby planet-hosting stars, the Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems (MUSCLES) Treasury Survey. The MUSCLES program consists visible observations from Hubble and ground-based observatories. Infrared and astrophysically inaccessible wavelengths (EUV and Lyα) are reconstructed using stellar model spectra to fill in gaps in the observational data. In this overview and the companion papers describing the MUSCLES survey, we show that energetic radiation (X-ray and ultraviolet) is present from magnetically active stellar atmospheres at all times for stars as late as M6. The emission line luminosities of C iv and Mg ii are strongly correlated with band-integrated luminosities and we present empirical relations that can be used to estimate broadband FUV and XUV (≡X-ray + EUV) fluxes from individual stellar emission line measurements. We find that while the slope of the SED, FUV/NUV, increases by approximately two orders of magnitude form early K to late M dwarfs (≈0.01–1), the absolute FUV

  10. The Muscles Treasury Survey. I. Motivation and Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Youngblood, Allison; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. Christian; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Roberge, Aki; Buccino, Andrea P.

    2016-01-01

    Ground- and space-based planet searches employing radial velocity techniques and transit photometry have detected thousands of planet-hosting stars in the Milky Way. With so many planets discovered, the next step toward identifying potentially habitable planets is atmospheric characterization. While the Sun-Earth system provides a good framework for understanding the atmospheric chemistry of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars, the observational and theoretical constraints on the atmospheres of rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) around low-mass stars (K and M dwarfs) are relatively few. The chemistry of these atmospheres is controlled by the shape and absolute flux of the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED), however, flux distributions of relatively inactive low-mass stars are poorly understood at present. To address this issue, we have executed a panchromatic (X-ray to mid-IR) study of the SEDs of 11 nearby planet-hosting stars, the Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems (MUSCLES) Treasury Survey. The MUSCLES program consists visible observations from Hubble and ground-based observatories. Infrared and astrophysically inaccessible wavelengths (EUV and Lyalpha) are reconstructed using stellar model spectra to fill in gaps in the observational data. In this overview and the companion papers describing the MUSCLES survey, we show that energetic radiation (X-ray and ultraviolet) is present from magnetically active stellar atmospheres at all times for stars as late as M6. The emission line luminosities of C IV and Mg II are strongly correlated with band-integrated luminosities and we present empirical relations that can be used to estimate broadband FUV and XUV (is equivalent to X-ray + EUV) fluxes from individual stellar emission line measurements. We find that while the slope of the SED, FUV/NUV, increases by approximately two orders of magnitude form early K to late M dwarfs (approximately

  11. THE MUSCLES TREASURY SURVEY. I. MOTIVATION AND OVERVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Youngblood, Allison [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. Christian [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Hawley, Suzanne L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Froning, Cynthia S. [Department of Astronomy, C1400, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Roberge, Aki [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Buccino, Andrea P.; Mauas, Pablo J. D. [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio (UBA-CONICET) and Departamento de Física (UBA), CC.67, suc. 28, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Davenport, James R. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Fontenla, Juan M. [NorthWest Research Associates, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301-2245 (United States); Kaltenegger, Lisa [Carl Sagan Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, 14850, NY (United States); Kowalski, Adam F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Miguel, Yamila [Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, CNRS, Blvd de l’Observatoire, CS 34229, F-06304 Nice cedex 4 (France); Redfield, Seth, E-mail: kevin.france@colorado.edu [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459-0123 (United States); and others

    2016-04-01

    Ground- and space-based planet searches employing radial velocity techniques and transit photometry have detected thousands of planet-hosting stars in the Milky Way. With so many planets discovered, the next step toward identifying potentially habitable planets is atmospheric characterization. While the Sun–Earth system provides a good framework for understanding the atmospheric chemistry of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars, the observational and theoretical constraints on the atmospheres of rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) around low-mass stars (K and M dwarfs) are relatively few. The chemistry of these atmospheres is controlled by the shape and absolute flux of the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED), however, flux distributions of relatively inactive low-mass stars are poorly understood at present. To address this issue, we have executed a panchromatic (X-ray to mid-IR) study of the SEDs of 11 nearby planet-hosting stars, the Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems (MUSCLES) Treasury Survey. The MUSCLES program consists visible observations from Hubble and ground-based observatories. Infrared and astrophysically inaccessible wavelengths (EUV and Lyα) are reconstructed using stellar model spectra to fill in gaps in the observational data. In this overview and the companion papers describing the MUSCLES survey, we show that energetic radiation (X-ray and ultraviolet) is present from magnetically active stellar atmospheres at all times for stars as late as M6. The emission line luminosities of C iv and Mg ii are strongly correlated with band-integrated luminosities and we present empirical relations that can be used to estimate broadband FUV and XUV (≡X-ray + EUV) fluxes from individual stellar emission line measurements. We find that while the slope of the SED, FUV/NUV, increases by approximately two orders of magnitude form early K to late M dwarfs (≈0.01–1), the absolute FUV

  12. Treasury operations management

    OpenAIRE

    Laurențiu Dumitru ANDREI; Petre BREZEANU

    2014-01-01

    Amid the globalization and centralization of treasury operations, establishing the principles for their optimal management is the instrument by means of which economic stability, market dynamics and standards of living can be ensured. The directions of these principles, as well as their flexibility, depend on correctly identifying the objectives of the financial management planning of treasury operations, in compliance with European and international policies related to this area.

  13. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. V. RADIAL STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF NGC 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Roskar, Rok; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Quinn, Thomas R.; Holtzman, Jon; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan; Cole, Andrew; Debattista, Victor P.; Olsen, Knut; De Jong, Roelof S.; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2010-01-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of NGC 300 taken as part of the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury (ANGST). Individual stars are resolved in these images down to an absolute magnitude of M F814W = 1.0 (below the red clump). We determine the star formation history of the galaxy in six radial bins by comparing our observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs) with synthetic CMDs based on theoretical isochrones. We find that the stellar disk out to 5.4 kpc is primarily old, in contrast with the outwardly similar galaxy M33. We determine the scale length as a function of age and find evidence for inside-out growth of the stellar disk: the scale length has increased from 1.1 ± 0.1 kpc 10 Gyr ago to 1.3 ± 0.1 kpc at present, indicating a buildup in the fraction of young stars at larger radii. As the scale length of M33 has recently been shown to have increased much more dramatically with time, our results demonstrate that two galaxies with similar sizes and morphologies can have very different histories. With an N-body simulation of a galaxy designed to be similar to NGC 300, we determine that the effects of radial migration should be minimal. We trace the metallicity gradient as a function of time and find a present-day metallicity gradient consistent with that seen in previous studies. Consistent results are obtained from archival images covering the same radial extent but differing in placement and filter combination.

  14. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merin, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nick F. H.

    2011-01-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer C ore to Disk(c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; ∼79% in Lupus V and ∼87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A V ∼ 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  15. Celestial Treasury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachièze-Rey, Marc; Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2001-07-01

    Throughout history, the mysterious dark skies have inspired our imaginations in countless ways, influencing our endeavors in science and philosophy, religion, literature, and art. Filled with 380 full-color illustrations, Celestial Treasury shows the influence of astronomical theories and the richness of illustrations in Western civilization through the ages. The authors explore the evolution of our understanding of astronomy and weave together ancient and modern theories in a fascinating narrative. They incorporate a wealth of detail from Greek verse, medieval manuscripts and Victorian poetry with contemporary spacecraft photographs and computer-generated star charts. Celestial Treasury is more than a beautiful book: it answers a variety of questions that have intrigued scientists and laymen for centuries. -- How did philosophers and scientists try to explain the order that governs celestial motion? -- How did geometers and artists measure and map the skies? -- How many different answers have been proposed for the most fundamental of all questions: When and how did Earth come about? -- Who inhabits the heavens--gods, angels or extraterrestrials? No other book recounts humankind's fascination with the heavens as compellingly as Celestial Treasury. Marc Lachièze-Rey is a director of research at the Centre National pour la Récherche Scientifique and astrophysicist at the Centre d'Etudes de Saclay. He is the author of The Cosmic Background Radiation (Cambridge, 1999), and and The Quest for Unity, (Oxford, 1999 ), as well as many books in French. Jean-Pierre Luminet is a research director of the Centre National pour la Rechérche Scientifique, based at the Paris-Meudon observatory. He is the author of Black Holes, (Cambridge 1992), as well as science documentaries for television.

  16. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.; Rosenfield, Philip; Weisz, Daniel R.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Gogarten, Stephanie M.; Lang, Dustin; Lauer, Tod R.; Dong Hui; Kalirai, Jason S.; Boyer, Martha L.; Gordon, Karl D.; Seth, Anil C.; Dolphin, Andrew; Bell, Eric F.; Bianchi, Luciana C.; Caldwell, Nelson; Dorman, Claire E.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Girardi, Léo

    2012-01-01

    The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury is an ongoing Hubble Space Telescope Multi-Cycle Treasury program to image ∼1/3 of M31's star-forming disk in six filters, spanning from the ultraviolet (UV) to the near-infrared (NIR). We use the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) to resolve the galaxy into millions of individual stars with projected radii from 0 to 20 kpc. The full survey will cover a contiguous 0.5 deg 2 area in 828 orbits. Imaging is being obtained in the F275W and F336W filters on the WFC3/UVIS camera, F475W and F814W on ACS/WFC, and F110W and F160W on WFC3/IR. The resulting wavelength coverage gives excellent constraints on stellar temperature, bolometric luminosity, and extinction for most spectral types. The data produce photometry with a signal-to-noise ratio of 4 at m F275W = 25.1, m F336W = 24.9, m F475W = 27.9, m F814W = 27.1, m F110W = 25.5, and m F160W = 24.6 for single pointings in the uncrowded outer disk; in the inner disk, however, the optical and NIR data are crowding limited, and the deepest reliable magnitudes are up to 5 mag brighter. Observations are carried out in two orbits per pointing, split between WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR cameras in primary mode, with ACS/WFC run in parallel. All pointings are dithered to produce Nyquist-sampled images in F475W, F814W, and F160W. We describe the observing strategy, photometry, astrometry, and data products available for the survey, along with extensive testing of photometric stability, crowding errors, spatially dependent photometric biases, and telescope pointing control. We also report on initial fits to the structure of M31's disk, derived from the density of red giant branch stars, in a way that is independent of assumed mass-to-light ratios and is robust to variations in dust extinction. These fits also show that the 10 kpc ring is not just a region of enhanced recent star formation, but is instead a dynamical structure containing a significant overdensity of

  17. Environmental survey of Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009; Miljoeundersoekelse i Region VI, Haltenbanken, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holm, May-Helen; Cochrane, Sabine; Mannvik, Hans-Petter; Wasbotten, Ingar Halvorsen

    2010-07-01

    There has been an environmental investigation in Region VI Halten Bank. This report presents the results of the chemical and biological assays performed on samples from a total of 316 stations in 16 fields and 15 regional stations. A status of environmental conditions in the region is given at the end of the report. (AG)

  18. The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbi, Elena; Lennon, D. J.; Anderson, J.; Van Der Marel, R. P.; Aloisi, A.; Boyer, M. L.; Cignoni, M.; De Marchi, G.; de Mink, S. E.; Evans, C. J.; Gallagher, J. S.; Gordon, K. D.; Gouliermis, D.; Grebel, E.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Larsen, S. S.; Panagia, N.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Tosi, M.; Zaritsky, D. F.

    2014-01-01

    The Tarantula Nebula (a.k.a. 30 Doradus) in the Large Magellanic Cloud is one of the most famous objects in astronomy, with first astronomical references being more than 150 years old. Today the Tarantula Nebula and its ionizing cluster R136 are considered one of the few known starburst regions in the Local Group and an ideal test bed to investigate the temporal and spatial evolution of a prototypical starburst on a sub-cluster scale. The Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) is a panchromatic imaging survey of the stellar populations and ionized gas in the Tarantula Nebula that reaches into the sub-solar mass regime (eBook that explains how stars form and evolve using images from HTTP. The eBook utilizes emerging technology that works in conjunction with the built-in accessibility features in the Apple iPad to allow totally blind users to interactively explore complex astronomical images.

  19. 31 CFR 5.12 - How will Treasury entities offset a Federal employee's salary to collect a Treasury debt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 5.9(a) of this part, Treasury entities will refer Treasury debts to the Financial Management Service... review of the documentary evidence alone. All travel expenses incurred by the Federal employee in... documentary evidence alone (for example, when an issue of credibility or veracity is involved). The hearing...

  20. Microwave tomography enhanced GPR surveys in Centaur’s Domus, Regio VI of Pompeii, Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catapano, I; Crocco, L; Napoli, R Di; Soldovieri, F; Brancaccio, A; Pesando, F; Aiello, A

    2012-01-01

    The archaeological area of Pompeii (Naples, Italy) is known worldwide as one of the most remarkable examples of a Roman Empire town, but its origins are prior to the Roman age and there is a huge archeological interest in discovering the history of the forma urbis. With respect to this framework, the paper presents results from microwave tomography enhanced ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys carried out in the Centaur’s Domus, Regio VI, one of the most ancient housing areas of Pompeii. The GPR prospections aimed at addressing and driving the archeological excavation campaign performed in this area in October 2010. The results of stratigraphic assays are used to assess the reliability of the tomographic images obtained. (paper)

  1. 31 CFR 357.20 - Securities account in Legacy Treasury Direct ®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Securities account in Legacy Treasury Direct ®. 357.20 Section 357.20 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Securities System (Legacy Treasury Direct) § 357.20 Securities account in Legacy Treasury Direct ®. (a...

  2. 31 CFR 363.0 - What is the TreasuryDirect ® system?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the TreasuryDirect ® system? 363.0 Section 363.0 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued... HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT General § 363.0 What is the TreasuryDirect ® system? The TreasuryDirect system...

  3. 31 CFR 205.7 - Can a Treasury-State agreement be amended?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Can a Treasury-State agreement be amended? 205.7 Section 205.7 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... Treasury-State Agreement § 205.7 Can a Treasury-State agreement be amended? (a) We or a State may amend a...

  4. The institutionalization of treasury note and bond auctions, 1970-75

    OpenAIRE

    Kenneth D. Garbade

    2004-01-01

    The substitution of auctions for fixed-price offerings was expected to lower the U.S. Treasury's cost of financing the federal debt. Despite this and other potential benefits, the Treasury failed in both 1935 and 1963 in its attempts to introduce regular auction sales of coupon-bearing securities. This article examines the Treasury's third and successful attempt between 1970 and 1975. The author identifies three likely reasons why the Treasury succeeded in the early 1970s: it closely imitated...

  5. 31 CFR 223.22 - Fees for services of the Treasury Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fees for services of the Treasury Department. 223.22 Section 223.22 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... BUSINESS WITH THE UNITED STATES § 223.22 Fees for services of the Treasury Department. (a) Fees shall be...

  6. Treasury bond volatility and uncertainty about monetary policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnold, I.J.M.; Vrugt, E.B.

    2010-01-01

    We show that dispersion-based uncertainty about the future course of monetary policy is the single most important determinant of Treasury bond volatility across all maturities. The link between Treasury bond volatility and uncertainty about macroeconomic variables is much stronger than for the more

  7. 76 FR 75781 - Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... tax treatment of Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities issued with more than a de minimis amount of... a toll-free number). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities...

  8. 76 FR 75829 - Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... IRS is issuing temporary regulations that provide guidance on the tax treatment of Treasury Inflation....1275-7(d) applies to Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS) issued with more than a de minimis...

  9. A Survey of Metal Lines at High Redshift. II. SDSS Absorption Line Studies—O VI Line Density, Space Density, and Gas Metallicity at z abs ~ 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S.; Mathur, S.; Pieri, M.; York, D. G.

    2010-09-01

    We have analyzed a large data set of O VI absorber candidates found in the spectra of 3702 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars, focusing on a subsample of 387 active galactic nuclei sight lines with an average S/N >=5.0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W r >= 0.19 Å for the O VI 1032 Å component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density ΔN/Δz for redshifts z abs >= 2.8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending with the ubiquitous Lyα forest lines and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber, and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectrum by modeling typical Lyman forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the "incompleteness and S/N-corrected" redshift number densities of O VI absorbers: ΔN O VI,c /Δzc (2.8 secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: ΩO VI (2.8 = 1.9 × 10-8 h -1. We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionization fraction, {O VI}/{O}, and adopting the Anders & Grevesse solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicity of the gas probed in our search: ζ(2.8 = 3.6 × 10-4 h, in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic data sets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of the relatively low resolution.

  10. 31 CFR 309.9 - Tenders; acceptance by the Secretary of the Treasury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tenders; acceptance by the Secretary... TREASURY BILLS § 309.9 Tenders; acceptance by the Secretary of the Treasury. At the time fixed for closing... acceptable prices offered and will make public announcement thereof those submitting tenders will be advised...

  11. An electrochemical study of U(VI) and Cr(VI) in molten borates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigaudeau, M.; Gregori de Pinochet, I. de

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of U(VI) and Cr(VI), in molten Na 2 B 4 O 7 at 800 deg C was studied by means of linear sweep voltammetry, and chronopotentiometry. The reduction of U(VI) to U(V) proceeded reversibly at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for the U(VI) species at 800 deg C was 4.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 . The activation energy of diffusion was (34,8 +- 0,8) kcal. mole -1 . Electrochemical studies of Cr(VI) at 800 0 C reveal a two-step reduction process at a platinum electrode. Only the voltammogram for the first step charge transfer process was studied. Analysis indicated that Cr(VI) is reversibly reduced to Cr(III) at a platinum electrode. The diffusion coefficient for Cr(VI) at 800 0 C is 1,9.10 -7 cm 2 .s -1 [fr

  12. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D; Jellesen, Morten S; Zachariae, Claus; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2015-11-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit exposures. To evaluate the use of diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a spot test reagent for the identification of chromium(VI) release. A colorimetric chromium(VI) spot test based on DPC was prepared and used on different items from small market surveys. The DPC spot test was able to identify chromium(VI) release at 0.5 ppm without interference from other pure metals, alloys, or leather. A market survey using the test showed no chromium(VI) release from work tools (0/100). However, chromium(VI) release from metal screws (7/60), one earring (1/50), leather shoes (4/100) and leather gloves (6/11) was observed. We found no false-positive test reactions. Confirmatory testing was performed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and spectrophotometrically on extraction fluids. The use of DPC as a colorimetric spot test reagent appears to be a good and valid test method for detecting the release of chromium(VI) ions from leather and metal articles. The spot test has the potential to become a valuable screening tool. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. 31 CFR 205.9 - What is included in a Treasury-State agreement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is included in a Treasury-State agreement? 205.9 Section 205.9 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... must include, at a minimum, a clear indication of: (1) The data used; (2) The sources of the data; (3...

  14. Brazil Geological Basic Survey Program - Lima Duarte - Sheet SF.23-X-C-VI - Minas Gerais State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, C.P.

    1991-01-01

    The present report refers to the Lima Duarte sheet (SF.23-X-C-VI) systematic geological mapping, on the 1:100.000 scale. The surveyed area, localized in the Zona da Mata, Juiz de Fora micro-region, in South Minas Gerais, is dominantly composed by metamorphic rocks of the granulite and amphibolite facies and presents important diphtheritic process. An analysis of the Crustal Evolution Patterns based mostly on geological mapping, and gravimetric, air magneto metric and geochronologic data is given in the Chapter 6, Part II, of the text. Geophysical information is in the Chapter 5, Part II. Seventy two samples were analysed for oxides, trace-elements and REE, to provide litho environment and metallogenesis definition subsidies. Were studied 174 petrographic thin section, and 48 samples of quartzite and schist residual materials were analysed for heavy metals. Seven hundred and fifty outcrops were described. A geochemical survey, based on 81 pan concentrated samples and 277 stream sediments was carried out throughout the Sheet. The anomalies found in the stream sediments reflect the geochemical signature of the analysed elements for the litho types of the investigated terrains. (author)

  15. Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury (TN COMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Tennessee Comptroller of the Treasury (TN COMP) uses SSA's assistance in administering the Tennessee Property Tax Rebate Program. SSA provides assistance through...

  16. 6 CFR 13.45 - Deposit in Treasury of United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deposit in Treasury of United States. 13.45 Section 13.45 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES § 13.45 Deposit in Treasury of United States. All amounts collected pursuant to this part...

  17. Vi, de civiliserede

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyemann, Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?......Vi har i årtier troet på, at mennesker under de rette omstændigheder kan lykkes med at leve i fred og fordragelighed med hinanden. Skal vi til at erkende, at også vores samfundsstrukturer kun er en tynd fernis ovenpå et utæmmeligt voldspotentiale og egoisme?...

  18. 77 FR 15319 - Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium; Hearing Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 [REG-130777-11] RIN 1545-BK45 Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium; Hearing Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue...), providing guidance on the tax treatment of Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities issued with more than a...

  19. 31 CFR 363.10 - What is a TreasuryDirect ® account?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a TreasuryDirect ® account? A TreasuryDirect account is an online account maintained by us solely in... amended at 70 FR 14943, Mar. 23, 2005. Redesignated at 70 FR 57433, Sept. 30, 2005, as amended at 70 FR...

  20. THE ADVANCED CAMERA FOR SURVEYS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. VI. THE ANCIENT STAR-FORMING DISK OF NGC 404

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Stilp, Adrienne; Dolphin, Andrew; Seth, Anil C.; Weisz, Daniel; Skillman, Evan

    2010-01-01

    We present HST/WFPC2 observations across the disk of the nearby isolated dwarf S0 galaxy NGC 404, which hosts an extended gas disk. The locations of our fields contain a roughly equal mixture of bulge and disk stars. All of our resolved stellar photometry reaches m F814W = 26 (M F814W = -1.4), which covers 2.5 mag of the red giant branch and main-sequence stars with ages F814W = 27.2 (M F814W = -0.2), sufficient to resolve the red clump and main-sequence stars with ages 10 Gyr) population. Detailed modeling of the color-magnitude diagram suggests that ∼70% of the stellar mass in the NGC 404 disk formed by z ∼ 2 (10 Gyr ago) and at least ∼90% formed prior to z ∼ 1 (8 Gyr ago). These results indicate that the stellar populations of the NGC 404 disk are on average significantly older than those of other nearby disk galaxies, suggesting that early- and late-type disks may have different long-term evolutionary histories, not simply differences in their recent star formation rates. Comparisons of the spatial distribution of the young stellar mass and FUV emission in Galaxy Evolution Explorer images show that the brightest FUV regions contain the youngest stars, but that some young stars (<160 Myr) lie outside of these regions. FUV luminosity appears to be strongly affected by both age and stellar mass within individual regions. Finally, we use our measurements to infer the relationship between the star formation rate and the gas density of the disk at previous epochs. We find that most of the history of the NGC 404 disk is consistent with star formation that has decreased with the gas density according to the Schmidt law. However, ∼ 0.5-1 Gyr ago, the star formation rate was unusually low for the inferred gas density, consistent with the possibility that there was a gas accretion event that reignited star formation ∼0.5 Gyr ago. Such an event could explain why this S0 galaxy hosts an extended gas disk.

  1. Plutonium(VI) accumulation and reduction by lichen biomass: correlation with U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Aoyagi, Hisao; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Samadfam, Mohammad; Kimura, Yasuhiko; William Purvis, O.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of plutonium(VI) and uranium(VI) by lichen biomass was studied in the foliose lichen Parmotrema tinctorum to elucidate the migration behavior of Pu and U in the terrestrial environment. Pu and U uptake by P. tinctorum averaged 0.040±0.010 and 0.055±0.015 g g dry -1 , respectively, after 96 h incubation with 4.0x10 -4 mol l -1 Pu solutions of pH 3, 4 and 5. SEM observations showed that the accumulated Pu is evenly distributed on the upper and lower surfaces of P. tinctorum, in contrast to U(VI), which accumulated in both cortical and medullary layers. UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that a fraction of Pu(VI) in the solution is reduced to Pu(V) by the organic substances released from P. tinctorum, and the accumulated Pu on the surface is reduced to Pu(IV), while U(VI) keeps the oxidation state of VI. Since the solubility of Pu(IV) hydroxides is very low, reduced Pu(VI) does not penetrate to the medullary layers, but is probably precipitated as Pu(IV) hydroxides on the cortical lichen surface. It is concluded that the uptake and reduction of Pu(VI) by lichens is important to determine the mobilization and oxidation states of Pu in the terrestrial environment

  2. 48 CFR 1019.202-70 - The Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false The Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program. 1019.202-70 Section 1019.202-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Policies 1019.202-70 The Treasury Mentor...

  3. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Santos, Erika; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L -1 U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L -1 Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  4. Anaerobic bio-removal of uranium (VI) and chromium (VI): Comparison of microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Santos, Erika [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-04-15

    Several microbial communities, obtained from uranium contaminated and non-contaminated samples, were investigated for their ability to remove uranium (VI) and the cultures capable for this removal were further assessed on their efficiency for chromium (VI) removal. The highest efficiency for removal of both metals was observed on a consortium from a non-contaminated soil collected in Monchique thermal place, which was capable to remove 91% of 22 mg L{sup -1} U(VI) and 99% of 13 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI). This study revealed that uranium (VI) removing communities have also ability to remove chromium (VI), but when uranium (VI) was replaced by chromium (VI) several differences in the structure of all bacterial communities were observed. TGGE and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene showed that the uranium (VI) removing bacterial consortia are mainly composed by members of Rhodocyclaceae family and Clostridium genus. On the other hand, bacteria from Enterobacteriaceae family were detected in the community with ability for chromium (VI) removal. The existence of members of Enterobacteriaceae and Rhodocyclaceae families never reported as chromium or uranium removing bacteria, respectively, is also a relevant finding, encouraging the exploitation of microorganisms with new abilities that can be useful for bioremediation.

  5. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. IX. CONSTRAINING ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH EVOLUTION WITH OLD METAL-POOR GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardi, Leo; Williams, Benjamin F.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Rosenfield, Philip; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Marigo, Paola; Boyer, Martha L.; Dolphin, Andrew; Weisz, Daniel R.; Skillman, Evan; Melbourne, Jason; Olsen, Knut A. G.; Seth, Anil C.

    2010-01-01

    In an attempt to constrain evolutionary models of the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase at the limit of low masses and low metallicities, we have examined the luminosity functions and number ratios between AGB and red giant branch (RGB) stars from a sample of resolved galaxies from the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury. This database provides Hubble Space Telescope optical photometry together with maps of completeness, photometric errors, and star formation histories for dozens of galaxies within 4 Mpc. We select 12 galaxies characterized by predominantly metal-poor populations as indicated by a very steep and blue RGB, and which do not present any indication of recent star formation in their color-magnitude diagrams. Thousands of AGB stars brighter than the tip of the RGB (TRGB) are present in the sample (between 60 and 400 per galaxy), hence, the Poisson noise has little impact in our measurements of the AGB/RGB ratio. We model the photometric data with a few sets of thermally pulsing AGB (TP-AGB) evolutionary models with different prescriptions for the mass loss. This technique allows us to set stringent constraints on the TP-AGB models of low-mass, metal-poor stars (with M sun , [Fe/H]∼ sun . This is also in good agreement with recent observations of white dwarf masses in the M4 old globular cluster. These constraints can be added to those already derived from Magellanic Cloud star clusters as important mileposts in the arduous process of calibrating AGB evolutionary models.

  6. 31 CFR 357.10 - Laws governing a Treasury book-entry security, TRADES, and security interests or entitlements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Laws governing a Treasury book-entry... PUBLIC DEBT REGULATIONS GOVERNING BOOK-ENTRY TREASURY BONDS, NOTES AND BILLS HELD IN LEGACY TREASURY DIRECT Treasury/Reserve Automated Debt Entry System (TRADES) § 357.10 Laws governing a Treasury book...

  7. II-VI semiconductor compounds

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    For condensed matter physicists and electronic engineers, this volume deals with aspects of II-VI semiconductor compounds. Areas covered include devices and applications of II-VI compounds; Co-based II-IV semi-magnetic semiconductors; and electronic structure of strained II-VI superlattices.

  8. 78 FR 666 - Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium; Bond Premium Carryforward

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ...-BL29 Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities Issued at a Premium; Bond Premium Carryforward AGENCY... contains final regulations that provide guidance on the tax treatment of Treasury Inflation-Protected... regulations in this document provide guidance to holders of Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities and other...

  9. Cinética e equilíbrio de adsorção dos oxiânions Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI pelo sal de amônio quaternário de quitosana Kinetics and equilibrium of adsorption of oxyanions Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI by quaternary ammonium chitosan salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane A. Spinelli

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available O sal quaternário de quitosana foi sintetizado com cloreto de glicidil trimetil amônio. A modificação química foi caracterizada por espectrometria no IV, RMN de 13C e ¹H, e mmol/g de grupos quaternários presentes na matriz polimérica por condutimetria. A remoção de Cr (VI, Mo (VI e Se (VI, em meio aquoso, foi investigada em processo de batelada. A adsorção mostrou ser dependente do pH para o Cr (VI e Se (VI, com um pH ótimo de adsorção, entre 4,0 a 6,0. Para o Mo (VI a adsorção manteve-se quase constante no intervalo de pH entre 4,0 e 11,5. O modelo de isoterma de Langmuir descreveu melhor os dados de equilíbrio na faixa de concentração investigada. No presente estudo, um grama do sal quaternário de quitosana reticulado com glutaraldeído adsorveu 68,3 mg de Cr, 63,4 mg de Mo e 90,0 mg de Se. A velocidade de adsorção, no processo, segue a equação cinética de pseudo segunda-ordem, sendo que o equilíbrio para os três íons foi alcançado próximo aos 200 minutos. A análise dispersiva de raios-X para o Cr (VI mostrou que o principal mecanismo de adsorção é a troca iônica entre os íons Cl- da superfície do polímero pelos oxiânions. O trocador aniônico apresentou a seguinte ordem de seletividade: Cr (VI > Mo (VI > Se (VI.Quaternary chitosan salt was synthesized in the presence of glycidyl trimetyl ammonium chloride. The polymer was characterized by spectroscopic techniques: infrared, 13C and ¹H NMR, while the amount of quaternary ammonium groups was obtained by condutimetry. The removal of Cr (VI, Mo (VI and Se (VI from aqueous solutions was carried out in batch adsorption processes. The process seemed to be pH dependent for Cr (VI and Se (VI with an optimum pH ranging from 4.0 to 6.0; while for Mo (VI the adsorption remained almost constant within the range between 4.0 and 11.5. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit of the equilibrium data over the whole concentration investigated. In the experiment

  10. U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. Effects of pH, U(VI) concentration and oxyanions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Gao; Ziqian Yang; Keliang Shi; Xuefeng Wang; Zhijun Guo; Wangsuo Wu

    2010-01-01

    U(VI) sorption on kaolinite was studied as functions of contact time, pH, U(VI) concentration, solid-to-liquid ratio (m/V) by using a batch experimental method. The effects of sulfate and phosphate on U(VI) sorption were also investigated. It was found that the sorption kinetics of U(VI) can be described by a pseudo-second-order model. Potentiometric titrations at variable ionic strengths indicated that the titration curves of kaolinite were not sensitive to ionic strength, and that the pH of the zero net proton charge (pH PZNPC ) was at 6.9. The sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite increased with pH up to 6.5 and reached a plateau at pH >6.5. The presence of phosphate strongly increased U(VI) sorption especially at pH <5.5, which may be due to formation of ternary surface complexes involving phosphate. In contrast, the presence of sulfate did not cause any apparent effect on U(VI) sorption. A double layer model was used to interpret both results of potentiometric titrations and U(VI) sorption on kaolinite. (author)

  11. Galactic and Circumgalactic O VI and its Impact on the Cosmological Metal and Baryon Budgets at 2 < z <~ 3.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, N.; O'Meara, J. M.; Fox, A. J.; Howk, J. C.; Prochaska, J. X.; Burns, V.; Armstrong, A. A.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first results from our NASA Keck Observatory Database of Ionized Absorbers toward Quasars (KODIAQ) survey which aims to characterize the properties of the highly ionized gas of galaxies and their circumgalactic medium (CGM) at 2 1, log N_{H\\,\\scriptsize{I}} \\textgreater 17.3) as probes of these galaxies and their CGM where both transitions of the O VI doublet have little contamination from the Lyα, β forests. We found 20 absorbers that satisfy these rules: 7 Lyman limit systems (LLSs), 8 super-LLSs (SLLSs) and 5 damped Lyα (DLAs). The O VI detection rate is 100% for the DLAs, 71% for the LLSs, and 63% for the SLLSs. When O VI is detected, log \\langle N_{O\\,\\scriptsize{VI}} \\rangle = 14.9 +/- 0.3, an average O VI column density substantially larger and with a smaller dispersion than found in blind O VI surveys at similar redshifts. Strong O VI absorption is therefore nearly ubiquitous in the CGM of z ~ 2-3 galaxies. The total velocity widths of the O VI profiles are also large (200 \\le \\Delta v_{O\\,\\scriptsize{VI}} \\le 400 km s-1). These properties are quite similar to those seen for O VI in low-z star-forming galaxies, and therefore we hypothesize that these strong CGM O VI absorbers (with τLL > 1) at 2 account, we determine that the τLL > 1 absorbers could contain as much as 3%-14% of the cosmic baryon budget at z ~ 2-3, only second to the Lyα forest. We conservatively show that 5%-20% of the metals ever produced at z ~ 2-3 are in form of highly ionized metals ejected in the CGM of galaxies. We dedicate this paper and the KODIAQ project to the memory and families of Wal Sargent and Arthur M. Wolfe. Without the vision and terrific efforts of these two scientists, this survey would not exist. Their careers have greatly inspired and influenced our own, and we hope that their work continues to flourish with this archival data set.

  12. Chromium(VI) release from leather and metals can be detected with a diphenylcarbazide spot test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Johansen, Jeanne D.; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2015-01-01

    Along with chromium, nickel and cobalt are the clinically most important metal allergens. However, unlike for nickel and cobalt, there is no validated colorimetric spot test that detects chromium. Such a test could help both clinicians and their patients with chromium dermatitis to identify culprit...... exposures. To evaluate the use of diphenylcarbazide (DPC) as a spot test reagent for the identification of chromium(VI) release. A colorimetric chromium(VI) spot test based on DPC was prepared and used on different items from small market surveys. The DPC spot test was able to identify chromium(VI) release...

  13. 75 FR 78900 - Regulations Governing Book-Entry Treasury Bonds, Notes and Bills Held in Legacy Treasury Direct...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... marketable security to a broker or financial institution in order to effect a sale of the security prior to... bypassing the need to transfer their securities to a broker or financial institution for sale. When Treasury...Direct, less than 1.5 percent of holdings. Alternative services by brokers or financial institutions are...

  14. KENO-VI Primer: A Primer for Criticality Calculations with SCALE/KENO-VI Using GeeWiz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, Stephen M.

    2008-01-01

    The SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) computer software system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is widely used and accepted around the world for criticality safety analyses. The well-known KENO-VI three-dimensional Monte Carlo criticality computer code is one of the primary criticality safety analysis tools in SCALE. The KENO-VI primer is designed to help a new user understand and use the SCALE/KENO-VI Monte Carlo code for nuclear criticality safety analyses. It assumes that the user has a college education in a technical field. There is no assumption of familiarity with Monte Carlo codes in general or with SCALE/KENO-VI in particular. The primer is designed to teach by example, with each example illustrating two or three features of SCALE/KENO-VI that are useful in criticality analyses. The primer is based on SCALE 6, which includes the Graphically Enhanced Editing Wizard (GeeWiz) Windows user interface. Each example uses GeeWiz to provide the framework for preparing input data and viewing output results. Starting with a Quickstart section, the primer gives an overview of the basic requirements for SCALE/KENO-VI input and allows the user to quickly run a simple criticality problem with SCALE/KENO-VI. The sections that follow Quickstart include a list of basic objectives at the beginning that identifies the goal of the section and the individual SCALE/KENO-VI features that are covered in detail in the sample problems in that section. Upon completion of the primer, a new user should be comfortable using GeeWiz to set up criticality problems in SCALE/KENO-VI. The primer provides a starting point for the criticality safety analyst who uses SCALE/KENO-VI. Complete descriptions are provided in the SCALE/KENO-VI manual. Although the primer is self-contained, it is intended as a companion volume to the SCALE/KENO-VI documentation. (The SCALE manual is provided on the SCALE installation DVD.) The primer provides specific examples of

  15. Cranial mononeuropathy VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abducens palsy; Lateral rectus palsy; VIth nerve palsy; Cranial nerve VI palsy; Sixth nerve palsy; Neuropathy - sixth nerve ... Cranial mononeuropathy VI is damage to the sixth cranial nerve. This nerve is also called the abducens nerve. ...

  16. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: a potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization’s maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L−1) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L−1. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ~1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42 μg kg−1, representing a minute fraction of total Cr. Chromium(VI) content was typically below detection in surface soils (top 10 cm) where soil organic matter was high, and increased with increasing depth in the soil auger cores as organic matter decreased. Maximum concentrations of Cr(VI) were up to 3 times greater in the deeper drill core samples than the shallow auger cores. Although Cr(VI) in these vadose zone soils and sediments was only a

  17. 31 CFR 19.635 - May the Department of the Treasury settle a debarment or suspension action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May the Department of the Treasury settle a debarment or suspension action? 19.635 Section 19.635 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles...

  18. A survey of Cr(VI) contamination of surface water in the proximity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-07-30

    Jul 30, 2013 ... In this study, Cr(VI) levels present in surface water within the vicinity of ferrochrome smelters located in .... flict in literature pertaining to the toxicity or carcinogenicity ..... Due to the potential human health risks associated with.

  19. Natural and man-made hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in groundwater near a mapped plume, Hinkley, California—study progress as of May 2017, and a summative-scale approach to estimate background Cr(VI) concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John A.; Groover, Krishangi D.

    2018-03-22

    This report describes (1) work done between January 2015 and May 2017 as part of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), background study and (2) the summative-scale approach to be used to estimate the extent of anthropogenic (man-made) Cr(VI) and background Cr(VI) concentrations near the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) natural gas compressor station in Hinkley, California. Most of the field work for the study was completed by May 2017. The summative-scale approach and calculation of Cr(VI) background were not well-defined at the time the USGS proposal for the background Cr(VI) study was prepared but have since been refined as a result of data collected as part of this study. The proposed summative scale consists of multiple items, formulated as questions to be answered at each sampled well. Questions that compose the summative scale were developed to address geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical constraints on Cr(VI) within the study area. Each question requires a binary (yes or no) answer. A score of 1 will be assigned for an answer that represents data consistent with anthropogenic Cr(VI); a score of –1 will be assigned for an answer that represents data inconsistent with anthropogenic Cr(VI). The areal extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI) estimated from the summative-scale analyses will be compared with the areal extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI) estimated on the basis of numerical groundwater flow model results, along with particle-tracking analyses. On the basis of these combined results, background Cr(VI) values will be estimated for “Mojave-type” deposits, and other deposits, in different parts of the study area outside the summative-scale mapped extent of anthropogenic Cr(VI).

  20. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: A potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Christopher T.; Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Southern Sacramento Valley soil and sediment has abundant naturally-occurring Cr(III). → Cr(III) resides mainly in chromite but some is associated with clays and Fe oxides. → Cr(VI) is mostly absent in surface soil but ubiquitous in deeper soil and sediment. → Cr(VI) increased linearly with time during lab soil incubations with no additions. → Cation exchange processes resulted in greater Cr(VI) generation rates. - Abstract: Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization's maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 μg L -1 ) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 μg L -1 . To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to ∼1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged from 0 to 42

  1. Chromium(VI) generation in vadose zone soils and alluvial sediments of the southwestern Sacramento Valley, California: A potential source of geogenic Cr(VI) to groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Christopher T., E-mail: cmills@usgs.gov [United States Geological Survey, Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Federal Center, MS 964D, Denver, CO 80225 (United States); Morrison, Jean M.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Ellefsen, Karl J. [United States Geological Survey, Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Federal Center, MS 964D, Denver, CO 80225 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > Southern Sacramento Valley soil and sediment has abundant naturally-occurring Cr(III). > Cr(III) resides mainly in chromite but some is associated with clays and Fe oxides. > Cr(VI) is mostly absent in surface soil but ubiquitous in deeper soil and sediment. > Cr(VI) increased linearly with time during lab soil incubations with no additions. > Cation exchange processes resulted in greater Cr(VI) generation rates. - Abstract: Concentrations of geogenic Cr(VI) in groundwater that exceed the World Health Organization's maximum contaminant level for drinking water (50 {mu}g L{sup -1}) occur in several locations globally. The major mechanism for mobilization of this Cr(VI) at these sites is the weathering of Cr(III) from ultramafic rocks and its subsequent oxidation on Mn oxides. This process may be occurring in the southern Sacramento Valley of California where Cr(VI) concentrations in groundwater can approach or exceed 50 {mu}g L{sup -1}. To characterize Cr geochemistry in the area, samples from several soil auger cores (approximately 4 m deep) and drill cores (approximately 25 m deep) were analyzed for total concentrations of 44 major, minor and trace elements, Cr associated with labile Mn and Fe oxides, and Cr(VI). Total concentrations of Cr in these samples ranged from 140 to 2220 mg per kg soil. Between 9 and 70 mg per kg soil was released by selective extractions that target Fe oxides, but essentially no Cr was associated with the abundant reactive Mn oxides (up to {approx}1000 mg hydroxylamine-reducible Mn per kg soil was present). Both borehole magnetic susceptibility surveys performed at some of the drill core sites and relative differences between Cr released in a 4-acid digestion versus total Cr (lithium metaborate fusion digestion) suggest that the majority of total Cr in the samples is present in refractory chromite minerals transported from ultramafic exposures in the Coast Range Mountains. Chromium(VI) in the samples studied ranged

  2. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters; Reduction enzymatique de U(VI) dans des eaux souterraines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W. [Center for Radioactive Waste Management, Advanced Materials Laboratory, 1001 University, Albuquerque (United States); Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 67 - Strasbourg (France). Centre de Sedimentologie et Geochimie de la Surface

    1999-03-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors) 12 refs.

  3. A SURVEY OF METAL LINES AT HIGH REDSHIFT. II. SDSS ABSORPTION LINE STUDIES-O VI LINE DENSITY, SPACE DENSITY, AND GAS METALLICITY AT zabs ∼ 3.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, S.; Mathur, S.; Pieri, M.; York, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    We have analyzed a large data set of O VI absorber candidates found in the spectra of 3702 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars, focusing on a subsample of 387 active galactic nuclei sight lines with an average S/N ≥5.0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W r ≥ 0.19 A for the O VI 1032 A component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density ΔN/Δz for redshifts z abs ≥ 2.8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending with the ubiquitous Lyα forest lines and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber, and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectrum by modeling typical Lyman forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the 'incompleteness and S/N-corrected' redshift number densities of O VI absorbers: ΔN O V I,c /Δz c (2.8 O V I,c /Δz c (3.2 O V I,c /Δz c (3.6 O V I (2.8 -8 h -1 . We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionization fraction, O VI /O, and adopting the Anders and Grevesse solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicity of the gas probed in our search: ζ(2.8 -4 h, in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic data sets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of the relatively low resolution.

  4. 31 CFR 356.5 - What types of securities does the Treasury auction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... years. (2) Treasury inflation-protected notes. (i) Are issued with a stated rate of interest to be... more than ten years. (2) Treasury inflation-protected bonds. (i) Are issued with a stated rate of... part to distinguish such securities from “inflation-protected” securities. We refer to fixed-principal...

  5. Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)]: a health survey and clinical examination of community inhabitants (Kanpur, India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priti; Bihari, Vipin; Agarwal, Sudhir K; Verma, Vipin; Kesavachandran, Chandrasekharan N; Pangtey, Balram S; Mathur, Neeraj; Singh, Kunwar Pal; Srivastava, Mithlesh; Goel, Sudhir K

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the health effects of hexavalent chromium groundwater contamination (from tanneries and chrome sulfate manufacturing) in Kanpur, India. The health status of residents living in areas with high Cr (VI) groundwater contamination (N = 186) were compared to residents with similar social and demographic features living in communities having no elevated Cr (VI) levels (N = 230). Subjects were recruited at health camps in both the areas. Health status was evaluated with health questionnaires, spirometry and blood hematology measures. Cr (VI) was measured in groundwater samples by diphenylcarbazide reagent method. Residents from communities with known Cr (VI) contamination had more self-reports of digestive and dermatological disorders and hematological abnormalities. GI distress was reported in 39.2% vs. 17.2% males (AOR = 3.1) and 39.3% vs. 21% females (AOR = 2.44); skin abnormalities in 24.5% vs. 9.2% males (AOR = 3.48) and 25% vs. 4.9% females (AOR = 6.57). Residents from affected communities had greater RBCs (among 30.7% males and 46.1% females), lower MCVs (among 62.8% males) and less platelets (among 68% males and 72% females) than matched controls. There were no differences in leucocytes count and spirometry parameters. Living in communities with Cr (VI) groundwater is associated with gastrointestinal and dermatological complaints and abnormal hematological function. Limitations of this study include small sample size and the lack of long term follow-up.

  6. 31 CFR 356.0 - What authority does the Treasury have to sell and issue securities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to sell and issue securities? 356.0 Section 356.0 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to... sell and issue securities? Chapter 31 of Title 31 of the United States Code authorizes the Secretary of... AND ISSUE OF MARKETABLE BOOK-ENTRY TREASURY BILLS, NOTES, AND BONDS (DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY...

  7. 31 CFR 306.23 - Securities eligible to be held in the TREASURY DIRECT Book-entry Securities System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TREASURY DIRECT Book-entry Securities System. 306.23 Section 306.23 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... Securities eligible to be held in the TREASURY DIRECT Book-entry Securities System. (a) Eligible issues. The... conversion to the TREASURY DIRECT Book-entry Securities System. The notice shall specify the period during...

  8. 78 FR 46686 - Privacy Act of 1974; Treasury/United States Mint .013-United States Mint National Electronic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... available publicly. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For general questions and privacy issues, please... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Privacy Act of 1974; Treasury/United States Mint .013--United States... Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, 5 U.S.C. 552a, the Department of the Treasury (``Treasury'') and the...

  9. 31 CFR 19.630 - May the Department of the Treasury impute conduct of one person to another?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May the Department of the Treasury impute conduct of one person to another? 19.630 Section 19.630 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) General Principles...

  10. Uranium(VI) speciation by spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinrath, G.

    1997-01-01

    The application of UV-Vis and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopies to direct of uranium(VI) in environmental samples offers various prospects that have, however, serious limitations. While UV-Vis spectroscopy is probably not sensitive enough to detect uranium(VI) species in the majority of environmental samples, TRLFS is principially able to speciate uranium(VI) at very low concentration levels in the nanomol range. Speciation by TRLFS can be based on three parameters: excitation spectrum, emission spectrum and lifetime of the fluorescence emission process. Due to quenching effects, the lifetime may not be expected to be as characteristics as, e.g., the emission spectrum. Quenching of U(VI) fluorescence by reaction with organic substances, inorganic ions and formation of carbonate radicals is one important limiting factor in the application of U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy. Fundamental photophysical criteria are illustrated using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra of U(VI) hydrolysis and carbonato species as examples. (author)

  11. 31 CFR 360.3 - Converting definitive savings bonds to book-entry bonds in New Treasury Direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Treasury Direct, an online system for holding Treasury securities. The Web address for New Treasury Direct... follow online instructions for conversion. Regulations governing converted bonds are found at 31 CFR part 363. [70 FR 14942, Mar. 23, 2005] ...

  12. Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI]: a health survey and clinical examination of community inhabitants (Kanpur, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We assessed the health effects of hexavalent chromium groundwater contamination (from tanneries and chrome sulfate manufacturing in Kanpur, India. METHODS: The health status of residents living in areas with high Cr (VI groundwater contamination (N = 186 were compared to residents with similar social and demographic features living in communities having no elevated Cr (VI levels (N = 230. Subjects were recruited at health camps in both the areas. Health status was evaluated with health questionnaires, spirometry and blood hematology measures. Cr (VI was measured in groundwater samples by diphenylcarbazide reagent method. RESULTS: Residents from communities with known Cr (VI contamination had more self-reports of digestive and dermatological disorders and hematological abnormalities. GI distress was reported in 39.2% vs. 17.2% males (AOR = 3.1 and 39.3% vs. 21% females (AOR = 2.44; skin abnormalities in 24.5% vs. 9.2% males (AOR = 3.48 and 25% vs. 4.9% females (AOR = 6.57. Residents from affected communities had greater RBCs (among 30.7% males and 46.1% females, lower MCVs (among 62.8% males and less platelets (among 68% males and 72% females than matched controls. There were no differences in leucocytes count and spirometry parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Living in communities with Cr (VI groundwater is associated with gastrointestinal and dermatological complaints and abnormal hematological function. Limitations of this study include small sample size and the lack of long term follow-up.

  13. Diverse anaerobic Cr(VI) tolerant bacteria from Cr(VI)-contaminated 100H site at Hanford

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R.; Phan, R.; Lam, S.; Leung, C.; Brodie, E. L.; Hazen, T. C.

    2007-12-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)] is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and ground water. Cr(VI) is more soluble, toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic compared to its reduced form Cr(III). In order to stimulate microbially mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound HRC was injected into the chromium contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products, we recently investigated the diversity of the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial population present at this site and their role in Cr(VI) reduction. Positive enrichments set up at 30°C using specific defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron reducing isolate strain HAF, a sulfate reducing isolate strain HBLS and a nitrate reducing isolate, strain HLN among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identifies strain HAF as Geobacter metallireducens, strain HLN as Pseudomonas stutzeri and strain HBLS as a member of Desulfovibrio species. Strain HAF isolated with acetate as the electron donor utilized propionate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Growth was optimal at 37°C, pH of 6.5 and 0% salinity. Strain HLN isolated with lactate as electron donor utilized acetate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced metals like Mn(IV) and Cr(VI). Optimal growth was observed at 37°C, at a pH of 7.5 and 0.3% salinity. Anaerobic active washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95 micromolar Cr(VI) within 4 hours relative to controls. Further, with 100 micromolar Cr(VI) as the sole electron acceptor, cells of strain HLN grew to cell numbers of 4.05X 107/ml over a period of 24hrs after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction by this species. 10mM lactate served as the sole electron donor. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI

  14. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca II K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Brown, Alexander; Mason, James P.; Schneider, P. Christian; Tilley, Matt A.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Buccino, Andrea; Froning, Cynthia S.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Linsky, Jeffrey; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Redfield, Seth; Kowalski, Adam; Miguel, Yamila; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rugheimer, Sarah; Segura, Antígona; Roberge, Aki; Vieytes, Mariela

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca II K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H I Lyα. In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si IV and He II) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10-3 W m-2 and possible proton fluxes ˜102-103 pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  15. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca ii K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Mason, James P.; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. Christian; Tilley, Matt A.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Kowalski, Adam; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Linsky, Jeffrey; Redfield, Seth; Miguel, Yamila; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rugheimer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca ii K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H i Ly α . In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si iv and He ii) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10 −3 W m −2 and possible proton fluxes ∼10 2 –10 3 pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  16. Enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addelouas, A.; Gong, W.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E.; Fritz, B.; Crovisier, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The use of enzymatic reduction of U(VI) in remediation of groundwater contaminated with U(VI) is receiving considerable attention. Certain strains of bacteria can combine the oxidation of an organic compound to the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV), which precipitates as uraninite. In the present study, we tested the reduction of U(VI) in groundwaters with various origins and compositions. In all groundwaters u(VI) was reduced by sulfate reducing bacteria that had been activated by ethanol and tri-metaphosphate. The reduction rate of U(VI) depends on sulfate concentration in water and the abundance of bacteria in the system. This work shows that bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction are ubiquitous in nature, and suggests the possibility of a large application of the enzymatic reduction of U(VI) for in situ clean up of groundwaters contaminated with uranium. (authors)

  17. Enzymatic U(VI) reduction by Desulfosporosinus species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Kelly, S.D.; Kemner, K.M.; Banfield, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    Here we tested U(VI) reduction by a Desulfosporosinus species (sp.) isolate and type strain (DSM 765) in cell suspensions (pH 7) containing 1 mM U(VI) and lactate, under an atmosphere containing N 2 -CO 2 -H 2 (90: 5: 5). Although neither Desulfosporosinus species (spp.) reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions with 0.25% Na-bicarbonate or 0.85% NaCl, U(VI) was reduced in these solutions by a control strain, desulfovibrio desulfuricans (ATCC 642). However, both Desulfosporosinus strains reduced U(VI) in cell suspensions depleted in bicarbonate and NaCl. No U(VI) reduction was observed without lactate and H 2 electron donors or with heat-killed cells, indicating enzymatic U(VI) reduction. Uranium(VI) reduction by both strains was inhibited when 1 mM CuCl 2 was added to the cell suspensions. Because the Desulfosporosinus DSM 765 does not contain cytochrome c 3 used by Desulfovibrio spp. to reduce U(VI), Desulfosporosinus species reduce uranium via a different enzymatic pathway. (orig.)

  18. Kiintoainehäviöselvitys

    OpenAIRE

    Ylimys, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    Teoriaosassa käydään läpi yleisesti pyörrepuhdistuslaitoksen toimintaa sekä kiintoainehäviöitä paperi- ja kartonkitehtailla. Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena oli tutkia Metsä Boardin Kyröskosken tehtaan kiintoainehäviötä. Työssä selvitettiin, minkälaista kiintoainetta jätevesilaitokselle päätyy ja miksi. Selvityksen kohteena oli myös, missä kohteissa kiintoainehäviöt tarkalleen syntyvät ja kuinka paljon häviötä tapahtuu. Kahden edellä mainitun tiedon perusteella selvitettiin, kuinka palj...

  19. Peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV) and thorium(IV) ions containing tridentate Schiff bases derived from salicylaldehyde and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarafder, M.T.H.; Khan, A.R.

    1997-01-01

    The synthesis of peroxo complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), uranium(VI), zirconium(IV), thorium(IV) and their possible oxygen transfer reactions is presented. An attempt has also been made to study the size of the metal ions and the electronic effect derived from the tridentate Schiff bases on the v 1 (O-O) mode of the complexes in their IR spectra

  20. 75 FR 95 - Endorsement and Payment of Checks Drawn on the United States Treasury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... Checks Drawn on the United States Treasury AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury..., Financial Management Service (FMS), is proposing to amend its regulation governing the endorsement and... Banks to debit a financial institution's account at the financial institution's servicing Federal...

  1. 76 FR 57907 - Indorsement and Payment of Checks Drawn on the United States Treasury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ...), Financial Management Service (FMS), to direct Federal Reserve Banks to debit a financial institution's Master Account for all check reclamations against the financial institution that the financial... Checks Drawn on the United States Treasury AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury...

  2. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given

  3. ENDF-201, ENDF/B-VI summary documentation supplement 1, ENDF/HE-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLane, V.

    1996-12-01

    The National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) provides coordination for and serves as the secretariat to the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSWEG). CSEWG is responsible for the oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data File. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the file is maintained at the NNDC. For a description of the ENDF/B-VI file, see the ENDF-102 Data Formats and Procedures for the Evaluated Nuclear Data File ENDF-6. The purpose of this addendum to the ENDF/B-VI Summary Documentation is to provide documentation of Releases 1, 2, 3, and 4 for the ENDF/B-VI and ENDF/HE-VI evaluated nuclear data libraries. These releases contain many new and revised evaluations for the neutron, photo-atomic interaction, radioactive decay data, spontaneous fission product yield, neutron-induced fission product yield, thermal neutron scattering, proton, deuteron, and triton sublibraries. The summaries have been extracted mainly from the ENDF/B-VI File 1 comments (MT = 451), which have been checked, edited, and may also include supplementary information. Some summaries have been provided by the evaluators in electronic format, while others are extracted from reports on the evaluations. All references have been checked and corrected, or updated where appropriate. A list of the laboratories which have contributed evaluations used in ENDF/B-VI is given.

  4. 24 CFR 971.11 - HOPE VI developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HOPE VI developments. 971.11... § 971.11 HOPE VI developments. Developments with HOPE VI implementation grants that have approved HOPE... with reasonable revitalization plans. Future HUD actions to approve or deny proposed HOPE VI...

  5. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca ii K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Mason, James P. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. Christian [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tilley, Matt A. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Kowalski, Adam [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 2000 Colorado Ave., Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo J. D. [Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (FCEN), Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Froning, Cynthia S. [Department of Astronomy/McDonald Observatory, C1400, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne L. [Astronomy Department, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Miguel, Yamila [Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, Boulevard de l’Observatoire, CS 34229 F-06304 NICE Cedex 4 (France); Newton, Elisabeth R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rugheimer, Sarah, E-mail: allison.youngblood@colorado.edu [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St. Andrews, Irvine Building, North Street, St. Andrews, KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca ii K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H i Ly α . In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si iv and He ii) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10{sup −3} W m{sup −2} and possible proton fluxes ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  6. Are Negative Option Prices Possible? The Callable U.S. Treasury-Bond Puzzle.

    OpenAIRE

    Longstaff, Francis A

    1992-01-01

    Market prices for callable Treasury bonds often imply negative values for the implicit call option. The author considers a variety of possible explanations for these negative values including the Treasury's track record in calling bonds optimally, tax-related effects, tax-timing options, and bond liquidity. None of these factors accounts for the negative values. Although the costs of short selling may explain why these apparent arbitrage opportunities persist over time, why these implicit cal...

  7. Technology-derived storage solutions for stabilizing insulin in extreme weather conditions I: the ViViCap-1 device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfützner, Andreas; Pesach, Gidi; Nagar, Ron

    2017-06-01

    Injectable life-saving drugs should not be exposed to temperatures 30°C/86°F. Frequently, weather conditions exceed these temperature thresholds in many countries. Insulin is to be kept at 4-8°C/~ 39-47°F until use and once opened, is supposed to be stable for up to 31 days at room temperature (exception: 42 days for insulin levemir). Extremely hot or cold external temperature can lead to insulin degradation in a very short time with loss of its glucose-lowering efficacy. Combined chemical and engineering solutions for heat protection are employed in ViViCap-1 for disposable insulin pens. The device works based on vacuum insulation and heat consumption by phase-change material. Laboratory studies with exposure of ViViCap-1 to hot outside conditions were performed to evaluate the device performance. ViViCap-1 keeps insulin at an internal temperature phase-change process and 'recharges' the device for further use. ViViCap-1 performed within its specifications. The small and convenient device maintains the efficacy and safety of using insulin even when carried under hot weather conditions.

  8. Reduction of ferrate(VI) and oxidation of cyanate in a Fe(VI)-TiO2-UV-NCO- system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Kurt; Sharma, Virender K; Lin, Yekaterina; Shreve, Katherine A; Winkelmann, Catherine; Hoisington, Laura J; Yngard, Ria A

    2008-08-01

    The aqueous photocatalytic degradation of cyanate (NCO(-)), which is a long-lived neurotoxin formed during the remediation of cyanide in industrial waste streams, was studied in the ferrate(VI)-UV-TiO2-NCO(-) system. Kinetics measurements of the photocatalytic reduction of ferrate(VI) were carried out as a function of [NCO(-)], [ferrate(VI)], [O(2)], light intensity (I(o)), and amount of TiO2 in suspensions at pH 9.0. The photocatalytic reduction rate of ferrate(VI) in the studied system can be expressed as -d[Fe(VI)]/dt=kI(o)(0.5) [NCO(-)] [TiO2]. The rate of photocatalytic oxidation of cyanate with ferrate(VI) was greater than the rate in the analogous system without ferrate(VI). The possibility of involvement of reactive ferrate(V) species for this enhancement was determined by studying the reactivity of ferrate(V) with NCO(-) in a homogeneous solution using a premix pulse radiolysis technique. The rate constant for the reaction of ferrate(V) and NCO(-) in alkaline medium was estimated to be (9.60+/-0.07) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1), which is much slower than the ferrate(VI) self-decomposition reaction (k approximately 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)). An analysis of the kinetic data in the Fe(VI)-UV-TiO2-NCO(-) system suggests that ferrate(V) is not directly participating in the oxidation of cyanate. Possible reactions in the system are presented to explain results of ferrate(VI) reduction and oxidation of cyanate.

  9. Vi har intet lært - hvornår lærer vi det?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    2016-01-01

    WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en kerneakti......WHO anså fra i går ikke længere ebola for at være en trussel mod global folkesundhed, så fra i dag er kameraerne slukket i Vestafrika og vi er tilbage hvor vi startede. SDG målene skal have et dansk udtryk, men hvad er de danske kompetencer på globalt plan når sundhed ikke længere er en...

  10. The new geographic information system in ETVA VI.PE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xagoraris, Zafiris; Soulis, George

    2016-08-01

    ETVA VI.PE. S.A. is a member of the Piraeus Bank Group of Companies and its activities include designing, developing, exploiting and managing Industrial Areas throughout Greece. Inside ETVA VI.PE.'s thirty-one Industrial Parks there are currently 2,500 manufacturing companies established, with 40,000 employees and € 2.5 billion of invested funds. In each one of the industrial areas ETVA VI.PE guarantees the companies industrial lots of land (sites) with propitious building codes and complete infrastructure networks of water supply, sewerage, paved roads, power supply, communications, cleansing services, etc. The development of Geographical Information System for ETVA VI.PE.'s Industrial Parks started at the beginning of 1992 and consists of three subsystems: Cadastre, that manages the information for the land acquisition of Industrial Areas; Street Layout - Sites, that manages the sites sold to manufacturing companies; Networks, that manages the infrastructure networks (roads, water supply, sewerage etc). The mapping of each Industrial Park is made incorporating state-of-the-art photogrammetric, cartographic and surveying methods and techniques. Passing through the phases of initial design (hybrid GIS) and system upgrade (integrated Gis solution with spatial database), the system is currently operating on a new upgrade (integrated gIS solution with spatial database) that includes redesigning and merging the system's database schemas, along with the creation of central security policies, and the development of a new web GIS application for advanced data entry, highly customisable and standard reports, and dynamic interactive maps. The new GIS bring the company to advanced levels of productivity and introduce the new era for decision making and business management.

  11. EXPORT PROMOTION: Export-Import Bank and Treasury Differ in Their Approaches to Using Tied Aid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    Under the tied aid program legislation,4 Treasury had the authority to direct and control the use of Ex-Im Bank's Tied Aid Capital Projects Fund, in effect allowing Treasury to veto individual tied aid proposals...

  12. Effect of uranium (VI) on the growth of yeast and influence of metabolism of yeast on adsorption of U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Fuminori; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Kozai, Naofumi; Wakai, Eiichi; Francis, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out the growth experiments of 3 strains of yeast in a medium containing uranium (VI) to elucidate the effect of U (VI) on the growth of microorganisms. Hansenula fabianii J640 grew in the liquid medium containing 0.1 mM U (VI) at lower rate than the control, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not grow under this condition. The H. fabianii J640 pre-cultured for 21 h in the liquid medium without U (VI) grew even after the exposure to 1 mM U (VI), but did not grow without pre-cultivation. For the pre-cultured H. fabianii J640, radioactivity of U in the medium was the same as the initial one for 110 h, and then gradually decreased. TEM-EDS analysis of H. fabianii J640 exposed to 1 mM U (VI) for 165 h showed accumulation of U (VI) on the cells. When H. fabianii J640 was not pre-cultured, radioactivity of U in the medium was lower than the initial one. These results indicated that U (VI) inhibits the growth of yeast, and that the adsorption of U (VI) by the cells depends on the metabolism of yeast. (author)

  13. Comparision of Istanbul with Hong Kong and Singapore for Regional Treasury Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Selçuk DİZKIRICI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is examining Istanbul to find out whether or not it has the ability to become an appropriate location to host regional treasury centers. Hence; Simkova’s 11 location criteria are compared across Istanbul additionally Hong Kong and Singapore, being already attractive locations in South East Asia for multinational corporations to set up their regional finance offices, to specify Istanbul’s weaker facilities even if it is not regarded as a rival for Hong Kong and Singapore. The study contributes to the understanding of Simkova’s location criteria assessment before establishing a regional treasury center in any location, as it is applied to some European countries and three Asian countries: Brunei, Hong Kong and Singapore, previously. Lastly, it is concluded that Istanbul is not as superior as Hong Kong and Singapore but it has reasonable conditions to become an attractive location for regional treasury centers.

  14. 31 CFR 356.30 - When does the Treasury pay principal and interest on securities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the next business day. If a bond is callable, we will pay the principal prior to maturity if we call... AND ISSUE OF MARKETABLE BOOK-ENTRY TREASURY BILLS, NOTES, AND BONDS (DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... principal and interest on securities? (a) General. We will pay principal on bills, notes, and bonds on the...

  15. The Pricing and Efficiency of Australian Treasury Bond Futures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Frino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the efficiency of the Treasury Bond futures market in Australia. We provide a comprehensive explanation of the method used to price, and evaluate efficiency of the 3 and 10 Year Australian Treasury Bond Futures contracts, against underlying bond baskets. Results indicate that the futures contracts exhibit minimal variation from their theoretical value. The average mispricing equates to 1.96 basis points for 3 Year and 1.19 basis points for 10 Year government bond futures contracts. However, during some periods (including the financial crisis of 2008, the bond futures contracts exhibit greater mispricing. Consistent with prior literature, we find a decreasing pattern of mispricing towards expiry, with the futures contract yields and average forward yields of the underlying bonds converging towards expiry. Further analysis reveals that volatility and time to expiry exhibit a significant positive relationship with the absolute level of mispricing.

  16. Preparation and properties of N-Phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and N-p-Chlorophenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and their uses as extracting agents for Chromium (VI), Molybdenum (VI), Titanium (IV) and Uranium (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu Elnour, Sawsan Hassan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1993-05-01

    Two lignads, N-phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid (1), N-p-chlorophenylbutyryl chloride with {beta} phenyl-hydroylamine and N-p-chlorophenylhydroxylamine, respectively. The acids prepared were identified and characterised through their reactions with Vanadiun (V) and iron (III), their melting points, infra-red spectra and nitrogen content. The extractive properties of these acids towards the metals Cr (VI), Mo (VI), Ti (IV) and U (VI) were examined at different PH values. The percentage of maximum extraction with the two acids was found to be as follows : for Cr (VI) at PH 1, (100%) for both acids, Mo (VI) at PH 2 (33.34%) with acid (I) and (16.67%) with acid (II) and U (VI) at PH 6 (72%) with acid (I) and (76%) with acid (II). The metal: Ligand complexes ratios were determined by using the continuous variation method, the ratio of the two ligands with four metals was found to be 1:2. Finally the suitability of the two acids for spectrophotometric determination of four metals was examined.(Author) 90 refs. , 24 tabs. , 24 figs

  17. Preparation and properties of N-Phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and N-p-Chlorophenylbutyrohydroxamic acid and their uses as extracting agents for Chromium (VI), Molybdenum (VI), Titanium (IV) and Uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu Elnour, Sawsan Hassan

    1993-05-01

    Two lignads, N-phenylbutyrohydroxamic acid (1), N-p-chlorophenylbutyryl chloride with β phenyl-hydroylamine and N-p-chlorophenylhydroxylamine, respectively. The acids prepared were identified and characterised through their reactions with Vanadiun (V) and iron (III), their melting points, infra-red spectra and nitrogen content. The extractive properties of these acids towards the metals Cr (VI), Mo (VI), Ti (IV) and U (VI) were examined at different PH values. The percentage of maximum extraction with the two acids was found to be as follows : for Cr (VI) at PH 1, (100%) for both acids, Mo (VI) at PH 2 (33.34%) with acid (I) and (16.67%) with acid (II) and U (VI) at PH 6 (72%) with acid (I) and (76%) with acid (II). The metal: Ligand complexes ratios were determined by using the continuous variation method, the ratio of the two ligands with four metals was found to be 1:2. Finally the suitability of the two acids for spectrophotometric determination of four metals was examined.(Author)

  18. Lizards and Amphisbaenians, municipality of Viçosa, state of Minas Gerais, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigues, A. C.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a survey of lizards and amphisbaenians from municipality of Viçosa, in Atlantic Forest from state ofMinas Gerais, southeastern Brazil, based on data of the herpetological collections of Museu de Zoologia João Moojen,Universidade Federal de Viçosa, and Museu de Zoologia, Universidade de São Paulo. One hundred and forty sixspecimens of 14 species were analyzed, belonging to the following families: Amphisbaenidae, Anguidae, Gekkonidae,Gymnophthalmidae, Leiosauridae, Polychrotidae, Scincidae, Teiidae and Tropiduridae. We hope to supply basicinformation that helps to understand species distribution of this group in the Atlantic Forest of Minas Gerais andsoutheastern Brazil.

  19. THE MUSCLES TREASURY SURVEY. II. INTRINSIC LY α AND EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET SPECTRA OF K AND M DWARFS WITH EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey L. [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459-0123 (United States); Schneider, P. Christian [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Wood, Brian E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Froning, Cynthia [Dept. of Astronomy C1400, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Miguel, Yamila [Laboratoire Lagrange, Universite de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, CNRS, Blvd de l’Observatoire, CS 34229, F-06304 Nice cedex 4 (France); Rugheimer, Sarah [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Irvine Building, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); Walkowicz, Lucianne, E-mail: allison.youngblood@colorado.edu [The Adler Planetarium, 1300 S Lakeshore Dr, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States)

    2016-06-20

    The ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of low-mass (K- and M-type) stars play a critical role in the heating and chemistry of exoplanet atmospheres, but are not observationally well-constrained. Direct observations of the intrinsic flux of the Ly α line (the dominant source of UV photons from low-mass stars) are challenging, as interstellar H i absorbs the entire line core for even the closest stars. To address the existing gap in empirical constraints on the UV flux of K and M dwarfs, the MUSCLES Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Survey has obtained UV observations of 11 nearby M and K dwarfs hosting exoplanets. This paper presents the Ly α and extreme-UV spectral reconstructions for the MUSCLES targets. Most targets are optically inactive, but all exhibit significant UV activity. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique to correct the observed Ly α profiles for interstellar absorption, and we employ empirical relations to compute the extreme-UV SED from the intrinsic Ly α flux in ∼100 Å bins from 100–1170 Å. The reconstructed Ly α profiles have 300 km s{sup −1} broad cores, while >1% of the total intrinsic Ly α flux is measured in extended wings between 300 and 1200 km s{sup −1}. The Ly α surface flux positively correlates with the Mg ii surface flux and negatively correlates with the stellar rotation period. Stars with larger Ly α surface flux also tend to have larger surface flux in ions formed at higher temperatures, but these correlations remain statistically insignificant in our sample of 11 stars. We also present H i column density measurements for 10 new sightlines through the local interstellar medium.

  20. 76 FR 11079 - Sale and Issue of Marketable Book-Entry Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds; Minimum Interest Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds; Minimum Interest Rate AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt, Fiscal Service... rules to establish a minimum interest rate of \\1/8\\ of one percent for all new Treasury note and bond... Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds \\1\\ (``UOC'' or ``Auction Rules'') to establish a minimum interest rate of...

  1. Different roles of ROS and Nrf2 in Cr(VI)-induced inflammatory responses in normal and Cr(VI)-transformed cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Ram Vinod; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Son, Yong-Ok; Wang, Lei [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Hitron, John Andrew [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Divya, Sasidharan Padmaja; Zhang, Zhuo [Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Center for Research on Environmental Disease, University of Kentucky, 1095 VA Drive, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is classified as a human carcinogen. Cr(VI) has been associated with adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. The present study shows that acute Cr(VI) treatment in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) increased inflammatory responses (TNF-α, COX-2, and NF-кB/p65) and expression of Nrf2. Cr(VI)-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are responsible for increased inflammation. Despite the fact that Nrf2 is a master regulator of response to oxidative stress, silencing of Nrf2 in the acute Cr(VI) treatment had no effect on Cr(VI)-induced inflammation. In contrast, in Cr(VI)-transformed (CrT) cells, Nrf2 is constitutively activated. Knock-down of this protein resulted in decreased inflammation, while silencing of SOD2 and CAT had no effect in the expression of these inflammatory proteins. Results obtained from the knock-down of Nrf2 in CrT cells are very different from the results obtained in the acute Cr(VI) treatment. In BEAS-2B cells, knock-down of Nrf2 had no effect in the inflammation levels, while in CrT cells a decrease in the expression of inflammation markers was observed. These results indicate that before transformation, ROS plays a critical role while Nrf2 not in Cr(VI)-induced inflammation, whereas after transformation (CrT cells), Nrf2 is constitutively activated and this protein maintains inflammation while ROS not. Constitutively high levels of Nrf2 in CrT binds to the promoter regions of COX-2 and TNF-α, leading to increased inflammation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that before cell transformation ROS are important in Cr(VI)-induced inflammation and after transformation a constitutively high level of Nrf2 is important. - Highlights: • Cr(VI)-induced ROS increased inflammation, while Nrf2 had no effect. • In the CrT cells knock-down of Nrf2 resulted in decreased inflammation. • Mechanistic differences in regulating Cr(VI)-induced inflammation.

  2. Kinetic investigations of quinoline oxidation by ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhiyong; Li, Xueming; Zhai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Quinoline is considered as one of the most toxic and carcinogenic compounds and is commonly found in industrial wastewaters, which require treatment before being discharged. Removal of quinoline by the use of an environmentally friendly oxidant, potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4), was assessed by studying the kinetics of the oxidation of quinoline by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) as a function of pH (8.53-10.53) and temperature (21-36°C) in this work. The reaction of quinoline with Fe(VI) was found to be first order in Fe(VI), half order in quinoline, and 1.5 order overall. The observed rate constant at 28°C decreased non-linearly from 0.5334 to 0.2365 M(-0.5) min(-1) with an increase in pH from 8.53 to 10.03. Considering the equilibria of Fe(VI) and quinoline, the reaction between quinoline and Fe(VI) contained two parallel reactions under the given pH conditions. The individual rate constants of these two reactions were determined. The results indicate that the protonated species of Fe(VI) reacts more quickly with quinoline than the deprotonated form of Fe(VI). The reaction activation energy Ea was obtained to be 51.44 kJ·mol(-1), and it was slightly lower than that of conventional chemical reaction. It reveals that the oxidation of quinoline by Fe(VI) is feasible in the routine water treatment.

  3. Immunization with the conjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇ against Salmonella typhi induces Vi-specific mucosal and systemic immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Fabio; Ciabattini, Annalisa; Rondini, Simona; Pozzi, Gianni; Martin, Laura B; Medaglini, Donata

    2012-09-21

    Typhoid fever is a public health problem, especially among young children in developing countries. To address this need, a glycoconjugate vaccine Vi-CRM₁₉₇, composed of the polysaccharide antigen Vi covalently conjugated to the non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin CRM₁₉₇, is under development. Here, we assessed the antibody and cellular responses, both local and systemic, following subcutaneous injection of Vi-CRM₁₉₇. The glycoconjugate elicited Vi-specific serum IgG titers significantly higher than unconjugated Vi, with prevalence of IgG1 that persisted for at least 60 days after immunization. Vi-specific IgG, but not IgA, were present in intestinal washes. Lymphocytes proliferation after restimulation with Vi-CRM₁₉₇ was observed in spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. These data confirm the immunogenicity of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ and demonstrate that the vaccine-specific antibody and cellular immune responses are present also in the intestinal tract, thus strengthening the suitability of Vi-CRM₁₉₇ as a promising candidate vaccine against Salmonella Typhi. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 78 FR 46425 - Sale and Issue of Marketable Book-Entry Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... a simple-interest money market yield computed on an actual/360 basis, subject to an appropriate... 13-week Treasury bill auction High Rate (stop out rate) converted into a simple actual/360 interest...-week Treasury bill auction High Rate that has been translated into a simple-interest money market yield...

  5. 31 CFR 353.3 - Converting definitive savings bonds to book-entry bonds in New Treasury Direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... New Treasury Direct, an online system for holding Treasury securities. The Web address for New... bonds should follow online instructions for conversion. Regulations governing converted bonds are found at 31 CFR part 363. [70 FR 14941, Mar. 23, 2005] ...

  6. Electrochemical alkaline Fe(VI) water purification and remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Stuart; Yu, Xingwen

    2005-10-15

    Fe(VI) is an unusual and strongly oxidizing form of iron, which provides a potentially less hazardous water-purifying agent than chlorine. A novel on-line electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification methodology is introduced. Fe(VI) addition had been a barrier to its effective use in water remediation, because solid Fe(VI) salts require complex (costly) syntheses steps and solutions of Fe(VI) decompose. Online electrochemical Fe(VI) water purification avoids these limitations, in which Fe(VI) is directly prepared in solution from an iron anode as the FeO42- ion, and is added to the contaminant stream. Added FeO42- decomposes, by oxidizing a wide range of water contaminants including sulfides (demonstrated in this study) and other sulfur-containing compounds, cyanides (demonstrated in this study), arsenic (demonstrated in this study), ammonia and other nitrogen-containing compounds (previously demonstrated), a wide range of organics (phenol demonstrated in this study), algae, and viruses (each previously demonstrated).

  7. Electronic structure, fluorescence and photochemistry of the uranyl ion, and comparison with octahedral uranium (VI), ruthenyl (VI), rhenium (V) and osmium (VI) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, C K [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland)

    1977-01-01

    The highly anisotropic uranyl complexes (with very short U-O distances and very long distances to the ligating atoms in the equatorial plane) are compared with trans-dioxo complexes of 4d/sup 2/Ru(VI) and 5d/sup 2/Re(V) and Os(VI). A major difference is the low-lying empty 5f orbitals, and the first excited state is highly oxidizing, and sufficiently long-lived to abstract hydrogen atoms from most organic molecules. It is argued that even the low concentrations of uranyl carbonate present in sea water is excited by solar radiation roughly every 10 minutes. Octahedral U(VI)O/sub 6/ in perovskites and UF/sub 6/ are also discussed, as well as trans-lawrencium chemistry.

  8. 76 FR 18062 - U.S. Securities; Sale and Issue of Marketable Book-Entry Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds; Book...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ...; Sale and Issue of Marketable Book-Entry Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds; Book-Entry Treasury Bonds... longer be opened and transfers of securities from other book-entry systems will no longer be [email protected] . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Legacy Treasury Direct [supreg] is a book- entry, non...

  9. The Assessment Of The Level Of Management Control Standards Completion In Treasury Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulińska Ewa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns the rules of the functioning of management control standards used in the Treasury Control Office. Its purpose is to present research results conducted in the years 2013–2014 in Polish Treasury Control Offices. Obtained results are the effect of applying author’s model of the assessment of management control implementation. The research was conducted for management personnel and the rest of offices employees separately. Significant discrepancies between these two groups of respondents were indicated. Based on the results, the areas of deviation from expected level of management control standards were established and the areas where implementation of control mechanisms relying on increasing the supervision of board of directors over managers were indicated, providing permanent and efficient elements of managers supervision over subordinate employees and making purposes and tasks put on the Treasury Control Office for given year more precise and familiarization of employees and carrying out trainings and series of other corrective measures.

  10. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by coconut coir: Spectroscopic investigation on the reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) with lignocellulosic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Ying-Shuian; Wang, Shan-Li; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Tzou, Yu-Min; Huang, Jang-Hung

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) from water by coconut coir (CC) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that, upon reaction with CC at pH 3, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), which was either bound to CC or released back into solution. As revealed by the FTIR spectra of CC before and after reacting with Cr(VI), the phenolic methoxyl and hydroxyl groups of lignin in CC are the dominant drivers of Cr(VI) reduction, giving rise to carbonyl and carboxyl groups on CC. These functional groups can subsequently provide binding sites for Cr(III) resulting from Cr(VI) reduction. In conjunction with forming complexes with carbonyl and carboxyl groups, the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide precipitate could also readily occur as revealed by the linear combination fitting of the Cr K-edge XANES spectrum using a set of reference compounds. The phenolic groups in lignin are responsible for initiating Cr(VI) reduction, so lignocellulosic materials containing a higher amount of phenolic groups are expected to be more effective scavengers for removal of Cr(VI) from the environment.

  11. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by coconut coir: Spectroscopic investigation on the reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) with lignocellulosic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Ying-Shuian [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Wang, Shan-Li, E-mail: slwang@nchu.edu.tw [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tzou, Yu-Min; Huang, Jang-Hung [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) from water by coconut coir (CC) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that, upon reaction with CC at pH 3, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), which was either bound to CC or released back into solution. As revealed by the FTIR spectra of CC before and after reacting with Cr(VI), the phenolic methoxyl and hydroxyl groups of lignin in CC are the dominant drivers of Cr(VI) reduction, giving rise to carbonyl and carboxyl groups on CC. These functional groups can subsequently provide binding sites for Cr(III) resulting from Cr(VI) reduction. In conjunction with forming complexes with carbonyl and carboxyl groups, the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide precipitate could also readily occur as revealed by the linear combination fitting of the Cr K-edge XANES spectrum using a set of reference compounds. The phenolic groups in lignin are responsible for initiating Cr(VI) reduction, so lignocellulosic materials containing a higher amount of phenolic groups are expected to be more effective scavengers for removal of Cr(VI) from the environment.

  12. Biosorption of Cr(VI) by coconut coir: spectroscopic investigation on the reaction mechanism of Cr(VI) with lignocellulosic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ying-Shuian; Wang, Shan-Li; Huang, Shiuh-Tsuen; Tzou, Yu-Min; Huang, Jang-Hung

    2010-07-15

    In this study, the removal mechanism of Cr(VI) from water by coconut coir (CC) was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Cr K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and FTIR spectroscopy. The results showed that, upon reaction with CC at pH 3, Cr(VI) was reduced to Cr(III), which was either bound to CC or released back into solution. As revealed by the FTIR spectra of CC before and after reacting with Cr(VI), the phenolic methoxyl and hydroxyl groups of lignin in CC are the dominant drivers of Cr(VI) reduction, giving rise to carbonyl and carboxyl groups on CC. These functional groups can subsequently provide binding sites for Cr(III) resulting from Cr(VI) reduction. In conjunction with forming complexes with carbonyl and carboxyl groups, the formation of Cr(III) hydroxide precipitate could also readily occur as revealed by the linear combination fitting of the Cr K-edge XANES spectrum using a set of reference compounds. The phenolic groups in lignin are responsible for initiating Cr(VI) reduction, so lignocellulosic materials containing a higher amount of phenolic groups are expected to be more effective scavengers for removal of Cr(VI) from the environment. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 31 CFR 315.3 - Converting definitive savings bonds to book-entry bonds in New Treasury Direct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... book-entry bonds through New Treasury Direct, an online system for holding Treasury securities. The Web... definitive savings bonds should follow online instructions for conversion. Regulations governing converted bonds are found at 31 CFR part 363. [70 FR 14941, Mar. 23, 2005] ...

  14. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2016-01-01

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U V species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U VI /U V oxo cluster [U(UO 2 ) 5 (μ 3 -O) 5 (PhCOO) 5 (Py) 7 ]. This cluster is only the second example of a U VI /U V cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U V center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U 12 IV U 4 V O 24 cluster {[K(Py) 2 ] 2 [K(Py)] 2 [U 16 O 24 (PhCOO) 24 (Py) 2 ]}.

  15. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)–CO_3/Ca–U(VI)–CO_3 complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Jun; Cao, Xiaohong; Luo, Xuanping; Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan; Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • NZVI can be used for adsorbing U(VI)–CO_3 complexes. • Use of NZVI is feasible for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. • The mechanism of U(VI)–CO_3 complexes adsorbing onto NZVI has been explained. - Abstract: The influence of U(VI)–CO_3 and Ca–U(VI)–CO_3 complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (q_e) and distribution constant (K_d) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the q_e and K_d values of NZVI were 5–10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0–3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)–CO_3 complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO–UO_2CO_3"− or SO–UO_2 (CO_3)_2"3"−. XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  16. 48 CFR 1052.219-73 - Department of the Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Mentor-Protégé Program. 1052.219-73 Section 1052.219-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... and Clauses 1052.219-73 Department of the Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program. As described in DTAR 1019.202-70, insert the following provision: Department of the Treasury Mentor-Protégé Program (JAN 2000...

  17. Reactivity of nitrido complexes of ruthenium(VI), osmium(VI), and manganese(V) bearing Schiff base and simple anionic ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Wai-Lun; Lam, William W Y; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-02-18

    Nitrido complexes (M≡N) may be key intermediates in chemical and biological nitrogen fixation and serve as useful reagents for nitrogenation of organic compounds. Osmium(VI) nitrido complexes bearing 2,2':6',2″-terpyridine (terpy), 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy), or hydrotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate anion (Tp) ligands are highly electrophilic: they can react with a variety of nucleophiles to generate novel osmium(IV)/(V) complexes. This Account describes our recent results studying the reactivity of nitridocomplexes of ruthenium(VI), osmium(VI), and manganese(V) that bear Schiff bases and other simple anionic ligands. We demonstrate that these nitrido complexes exhibit rich chemical reactivity. They react with various nucleophiles, activate C-H bonds, undergo N···N coupling, catalyze the oxidation of organic compounds, and show anticancer activities. Ruthenium(VI) nitrido complexes bearing Schiff base ligands, such as [Ru(VI)(N)(salchda)(CH3OH)](+) (salchda = N,N'-bis(salicylidene)o-cyclohexyldiamine dianion), are highly electrophilic. This complex reacts readily at ambient conditions with a variety of nucleophiles at rates that are much faster than similar reactions using Os(VI)≡N. This complex also carries out unique reactions, including the direct aziridination of alkenes, C-H bond activation of alkanes and C-N bond cleavage of anilines. The addition of ligands such as pyridine can enhance the reactivity of [Ru(VI)(N)(salchda)(CH3OH)](+). Therefore researchers can tune the reactivity of Ru≡N by adding a ligand L trans to nitride: L-Ru≡N. Moreover, the addition of various nucleophiles (Nu) to Ru(VI)≡N initially generate the ruthenium(IV) imido species Ru(IV)-N(Nu), a new class of hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) reagents. Nucleophiles also readily add to coordinated Schiff base ligands in Os(VI)≡N and Ru(VI)≡N complexes. These additions are often stereospecific, suggesting that the nitrido ligand has a directing effect on the incoming nucleophile. M≡N is also

  18. Addition to the analysis of the Sr VI and Sr VII spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyart, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    Fifty-six lines of multicharged strontium are measured with an improved wavelength accuracy, or interpreted for the first time. They are 4p-4s, 4p-5s and 4p-4d transitions in Sr VII and 4p-5s transitions in Sr VI. The revision of the singlet-triplet connection in Sr VII is supported by theoretical survey of the ground configuration in Ge-like ions. (orig.)

  19. Mechanisms of chromium (VI)-induced apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, Fernanda A; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Miler, Eliana A; Cabilla, Jimena P; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2008-07-30

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr (VI)) is a highly toxic metal. Exposure to Cr (VI) compounds may affect reproductive functions. Due to the importance of anterior pituitary hormones on reproductive physiology we have studied the effects of Cr (VI) on anterior pituitary. We previously demonstrated that, after in vivo Cr (VI) administration, Cr accumulates in the pituitary gland and affects prolactin secretion. In vitro, Cr (VI) causes apoptosis in anterior pituitary cells due to oxidative stress generation. To better understand the mechanisms involved in Cr (VI)-induced apoptosis we studied: (a) whether Cr (VI) affects the intracellular antioxidant response and (b) which of the apoptotic factors participates in Cr (VI) effect. Our results show that Cr (VI) treatment induces a decrease in catalase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity but does not modify glutathione reductase (GR) activity. Cr (VI) exposure causes an increase of GSH levels. p53 and Bax mRNA are also upregulated by the metal. Pifithrin alpha, a p53 transcriptional inhibitor, increases Cr (VI) cytotoxicity, suggesting a role of p53 as a survival molecule. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) could prevent Bax mRNA increase and caspase 3 activation, confirming that Cr (VI)-induced apoptosis involves oxidative stress generation.

  20. 78 FR 60020 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Voluntary Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    ... Voluntary Customer Satisfaction Surveys ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of... Treasury is soliciting comments concerning the Customer Satisfaction Survey. DATES: Written comments should..., WV 26106-1328, (304) 480- 8150. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Voluntary Customer Satisfaction...

  1. Emissions of chromium (VI) from arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heung, William; Yun, Myoung-Jin; Chang, Daniel P Y; Green, Peter G; Halm, Chris

    2007-02-01

    The presence of Cr in the +6 oxidation state (Cr[VI]) is still observed in ambient air samples in California despite steps taken to reduce emissions from plating operations. One known source of emission of Cr(VI) is welding, especially with high Cr-content materials, such as stainless steels. An experimental effort was undertaken to expand and update Cr(VI) emission factors by conducting tests on four types of arc-welding operations: gas-metal arc welding (GMAW), shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), fluxcore arc welding, and pulsed GMAW. Standard American Welding Society hood results were compared with a total enclosure method that permitted isokinetic sampling for particle size-cut measurement, as well as total collection of the aerosol. The fraction of Cr(VI) emitted per unit mass of Cr electrode consumed was determined. Consistent with AP-42 data, initial results indicate that a significant fraction of the total Cr in the aerosol is in the +6 oxidation state. The fraction of Cr(VI) and total aerosol mass produced by the different arc welding methods varies with the type of welding process used. Self-shielded electrodes that do not use a shield gas, for example, SMAW, produce greater amounts of Cr(VI) per unit mass of electrode consumed. The formation of Cr(VI) from standard electrode wires used for welding mild steel was below the method detection limit after eliminating an artifact in the analytical method used.

  2. The implied volatility of U.S. interest rates: evidence from callable U. S. Treasuries

    OpenAIRE

    Robert R. Bliss; Ehud I. Ronn

    1995-01-01

    The prices for callable U.S. Treasury securities provide the sole source of evidence concerning the implied volatility of interest rates over the extended 1926-1994 period. This paper uses the prices of callable as well as non-callable Treasury instruments to estimate implied interest rate volatilities for the past sixty years, and, for the more recent 1989-1994 period, the cross-sectional term structures of implied interest rate volatility. We utilize these estimates to perform cross-section...

  3. 77 FR 13388 - Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration; Privacy Act of 1974: Computer Matching Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration; Privacy Act of 1974...: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552a, the Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, notice is hereby given... Administration. Beginning and Completion Dates: This program of computer matches is expected to commence on March...

  4. 77 FR 16116 - Public Input on the Development and Potential Issuance of Treasury Floating Rate Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    ... to the issuance of this type of debt. Treasury has not made a decision to issue floating rate notes... as part of this Request for Information will serve as valuable input into this decision. DATES... structures of debt issuance is consistent with Treasury's mission of financing the government at the lowest...

  5. The Chrysalis Opens? Photometry from the η Carinae Hubble Space Telescope Treasury Project, 2002-2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. C.; Davidson, Kris; Koppelman, M. D.

    2006-12-01

    During the past decade η Car has brightened markedly, possibly indicating a change of state. Here we summarize photometry gathered by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) as part of the HST Treasury Project on this object. Our data include Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) CCD acquisition images, Advanced Camera for Surveys HRC images in four filters, and synthetic photometry in flux-calibrated STIS spectra. The HST's spatial resolution allows us to examine the central star separate from the bright circumstellar ejecta. Its apparent brightness continued to increase briskly during 2002-2006, especially after the mid-2003 spectroscopic event. If this trend continues, the central star will soon become brighter than its ejecta, quite different from the state that existed only a few years ago. One precedent may be the rapid change observed in 1938-1953. We conjecture that the star's mass-loss rate has been decreasing throughout the past century. This research was conducted as part of the η Car Hubble Space Telescope Treasury project via grant GO-9973 from the Space Telescope Science Institute. HST is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Some of the data presented in this paper were obtained from the Multimission Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute (MAST). STScI is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. Support for MAST for non-HST data is provided by the NASA Office of Space Science via grant NAG5-7584 and by other grants and contracts.

  6. 77 FR 67062 - Fee Schedule for the Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-08

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Fee Schedule for the Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book-Entry System AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt, Fiscal... fee schedule applicable to transfers of U.S. Treasury book-entry securities maintained on the National...

  7. 76 FR 68523 - Fee Schedule for the Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Fee Schedule for the Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book-Entry System AGENCY: Bureau of the Public Debt, Fiscal... fee schedule applicable to transfers of U.S. Treasury book-entry securities maintained on the National...

  8. Vi-da: vitiligo diagnostic assistance mobile application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugraha, G. A.; Nurhudatiana, A.; Bahana, R.

    2018-03-01

    Vitiligo is a skin disorder in which white patches of depigmentation appear on different parts of the body. Usually, patients come to hospitals or clinics to have their vitiligo conditions assessed. This can be very tiring to the patients, as vitiligo treatments usually take a relatively long period of time, which can range from months to years. To address this challenge, we present in this paper a prototype of an Android-based mobile application called Vi-DA, which stands for Vitiligo Diagnostic Assistance. Vi-DA consists of three subsystems, which are user sign-up subsystem, camera and image analysis subsystem, and progress report subsystem. The mobile application was developed in Java programming language and uses MySQL as the database system. Vi-DA adopts a vitiligo segmentation algorithm to segment input image into normal skin area, vitiligo skin area, and non-skin area. Results showed that Vi-DA gave comparable results to the previous system implemented in Matlab. User acceptance testing results also showed that all respondents agreed on the usefulness of the system and agreed to use Vi-DA again in the future. Vi-DA benefits both dermatologists and patients as not only a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) tool but also as a smart application that can be used for self-assessment at home.

  9. ViA: a perceptual visualization assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Chris G.; St. Amant, Robert; Elhaddad, Mahmoud S.

    2000-05-01

    This paper describes an automated visualized assistant called ViA. ViA is designed to help users construct perceptually optical visualizations to represent, explore, and analyze large, complex, multidimensional datasets. We have approached this problem by studying what is known about the control of human visual attention. By harnessing the low-level human visual system, we can support our dual goals of rapid and accurate visualization. Perceptual guidelines that we have built using psychophysical experiments form the basis for ViA. ViA uses modified mixed-initiative planning algorithms from artificial intelligence to search of perceptually optical data attribute to visual feature mappings. Our perceptual guidelines are integrated into evaluation engines that provide evaluation weights for a given data-feature mapping, and hints on how that mapping might be improved. ViA begins by asking users a set of simple questions about their dataset and the analysis tasks they want to perform. Answers to these questions are used in combination with the evaluation engines to identify and intelligently pursue promising data-feature mappings. The result is an automatically-generated set of mappings that are perceptually salient, but that also respect the context of the dataset and users' preferences about how they want to visualize their data.

  10. 75 FR 67807 - Fee Schedule for the Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Fiscal Service Fee Schedule for the Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book-Entry System Authority: 31 CFR 357.45. AGENCY: Bureau of the...) is announcing a new fee schedule applicable to transfers of U.S. Treasury book-entry securities...

  11. Comparison of U(VI) adsorption onto nanoscale zero-valent iron and red soil in the presence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3}/Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhibin [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Liu, Jun [State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Cao, Xiaohong, E-mail: xhcao@ecit.cn [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Luo, Xuanping [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Hua, Rong; Liu, Yan [Key Laboratory of Radioactive Geology and Exploration Technology Fundamental Science for National Defense, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Nuclear Resources and Environment (East China Institute of Technology), Ministry of Education, Nanchang 330013 (China); Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); Yu, Xiaofeng; He, Likai [Chemistry, Biological and Materials Sciences Department, East China Institute of Technology, Nanchang 330013 (China); and others

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • NZVI can be used for adsorbing U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes. • Use of NZVI is feasible for remediation of uranium-contaminated soils. • The mechanism of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbing onto NZVI has been explained. - Abstract: The influence of U(VI)–CO{sub 3} and Ca–U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes on U(VI) adsorption onto red soil and nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) was investigated using batch adsorption and fixed-bed column experiments to simulate the feasibility of NZVI as the reactive medium in permeable- reactive barriers (PRB) for in situ remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils. The adsorption capacity (q{sub e}) and distribution constant (K{sub d}) of NZVI and red soil decreased with increasing pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentrations, but the q{sub e} and K{sub d} values of NZVI were 5–10 times higher than those of red soil. The breakthrough pore volume (PV) values increased with the decrease of pH, dissolved carbonate and calcium concentration; however, the breakthrough PV values of the PRB column filled with 5% NZVI were 2.0–3.5 times higher than the 100% red soil column. The U(VI)–CO{sub 3} complexes adsorbed onto the surface of red soil/NZVI (≡SOH) to form SO–UO{sub 2}CO{sub 3}{sup −} or SO–UO{sub 2} (CO{sub 3}){sub 2}{sup 3−}. XPS and XRD analysis further confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) and the formation of FeOOH on NZVI surfaces. The findings of this study are significant to the remediation of uranium-contaminated red soils and the consideration of practical U(VI) species in the natural environment.

  12. Study of new U(VI) and Pu(VI) coprecipitation methods for the preparation of (U,Pu)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanoit, J. de.

    1990-01-01

    Two U(VI) and Pu(VI) coprecipitation methods have been studied, for the definition of new processes to prepare (U,Pu)O 2 mixed oxides suitable for making MoX fuels or fast breeder reactor fuels. The first system is based on the coprecipitation of a new U(VI), Pu(VI) compound; ammonium uranoplutonate, where as a second system is related to the precipitation of uranyl plutonyl monocarbonate. Experimental conditions to optimize the precipitation and the filtration steps of these two systems have been determined. After calcination under reducing conditions, the mixed oxides obtained are characterized according to different techniques: granulometry, thermogravimetry, solubility in boiling HNO 3 solutions. The properties of such oxides are excellent. The possible processes for preparing (U, Pu)O 2 using these new routes are compared with those actually exploited [fr

  13. Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solution by dried activated sludge biomass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Jun; Zhang Hua; He Pinjing; Yao Qian; Shao Liming

    2010-01-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution using activated sludge biomass. The effects of acid pretreatment of the biomass, initial pH, biomass and Cr(VI) concentrations on Cr(VI) removal efficiency were investigated. Proton consumption during the removal process and the reducing capacity of sludge biomass were studied. The results show that acid pretreatment could significantly improve Cr(VI) removal efficiency and increase Cr(VI) reducing capacity by 20.4%. Cr(VI) removal was remarkably pH-dependent; lower pH (pH = 1, 2) facilitated Cr(VI) reduction while higher pH (pH = 3, 4) favored sorption of the converted Cr(III). Lower Cr(VI) concentration as well as higher biomass concentration could accelerate Cr(VI) removal. Cr(VI) reduction was not the only reason for proton consumption in the removal process. Pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic model could successfully simulate Cr(VI) removal except under higher pH conditions (pH = 3, 4).

  14. Behaviour of chromium(VI) in stormwater soil infiltration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederkvist, Karin; Ingvertsen, Simon T.; Jensen, Marina B.

    2013-01-01

    mm in 2 h) and extreme (100 mm in 3 h) rain events. The objectives were to understand the behaviour of the anionic and toxic Cr(VI) in soil at neutral pH and to asses treatment efficiency towards Cr(VI). During normal rain events Cr(VI) was largely retained (more than 50, even though pH was neutral......The ability of stormwater infiltration systems to retain Cr(VI) was tested by applying a synthetic stormwater runoff solution with a neutral pH and high Cr(VI) concentrations to four intact soil columns excavated from two roadside infiltration swales in Germany. Inlet flow rates mimicked normal (10......, while under extreme rain events approximately 20% of Cr(VI) was retained. In both cases effluent concentrations of Cr(VI) would exceed the threshold value of 3.4 mu g/L if the infiltrated water were introduced to freshwater environments. More knowledge on the composition of the stormwater runoff...

  15. 78 FR 66803 - Fee Schedule for the Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ... Transfer of U.S. Treasury Book-Entry Securities Held on the National Book-Entry System AGENCY: Bureau of... (Treasury) is announcing a new fee schedule applicable to transfers of U.S. Treasury book-entry securities maintained on the National Book-Entry System (NBES) that occur on or after January 2, 2014. DATES: Effective...

  16. Isolation of a star-shaped uranium(V/VI) cluster from the anaerobic photochemical reduction of uranyl(VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, Lucile; White, Sarah; Scopelliti, Rosario; Mazzanti, Marinella [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland). Inst. de Sciences et Ingenierie Chimiques

    2016-11-07

    Actinide oxo clusters are an important class of compounds due to their impact on actinide migration in the environment. The photolytic reduction of uranyl(VI) has potential application in catalysis and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing, but the intermediate species involved in this reduction have not yet been elucidated. Here we show that the photolysis of partially hydrated uranyl(VI) in anaerobic conditions leads to the reduction of uranyl(VI), and to the incorporation of the resulting U{sup V} species into the stable mixed-valent star-shaped U{sup VI}/U{sup V} oxo cluster [U(UO{sub 2}){sub 5}(μ{sub 3}-O){sub 5}(PhCOO){sub 5}(Py){sub 7}]. This cluster is only the second example of a U{sup VI}/U{sup V} cluster and the first one associating uranyl groups to a non-uranyl(V) center. The U{sup V} center in 1 is stable, while the reaction of uranyl(V) iodide with potassium benzoate leads to immediate disproportionation and formation of the U{sub 12}{sup IV}U{sub 4}{sup V}O{sub 24} cluster {[K(Py)_2]_2[K(Py)]_2[U_1_6O_2_4(PhCOO)_2_4(Py)_2]}.

  17. Microbial Precipitation of Cr(III)-Hydroxide and Se(0) Nanoparticles During Anoxic Bioreduction of Cr(VI)- and Se(VI)-Contaminated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yumi; Oh, Jong-Min; Roh, Yul

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the microbial precipitations of Cr(III)-hydroxide and Se(0) nanoparticles during anoxic bioreductions of Cr(VI) and Se(VI) using metal-reducing bacteria enriched from groundwater. Metal-reducing bacteria enriched from groundwater at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) Underground Research Tunnel (KURT), Daejeon, S. Korea were used. Metal reduction and precipitation experiments with the metal-reducing bacteria were conducted using Cr(VI)- and Se(VI)-contaminated water and glucose as a carbon source under an anaerobic environment at room temperature. XRD, SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX analyses were used to characterize the mineralogy, crystal structure, chemistry, shape, and size distribution of the precipitates. The metal-reducing bacteria reduced Cr(VI) of potassium chromate (K₂CrO₄) to Cr(III) of chromium hydroxide [Cr(OH)3], and Se(VI) of sodium selenate (Na₂SeO₄) to selenium Se(0), with changes of color and turbidity. XRD, SEM-EDX, and TEM-EDX analyses revealed that the chromium hydroxide [Cr(OH)₃] was formed extracellularly with nanoparticles of 20–30 nm in size, and elemental selenium Se(0) nanoparticles had a sphere shape of 50–250 nm in size. These results show that metal-reducing bacteria in groundwater can aid or accelerate precipitation of heavy metals such as Cr(VI) and Se(VI) via bioreduction processes under anoxic environments. These results may also be useful for the recovery of Cr and Se nanoparticles in natural environments.

  18. The Royal Treasury of the Kingdom of Majorca during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1715

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo PASCUAL RAMOS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The royal treasury of the kingdom of Majorca during the War of the Spanish Succession suffered an economic downturn caused mainly by its logistical contribution to the war. This article shows the evolution of the taxation carried out by the Royal Treasury of Majorca during the war, and is divided into three parts. The first one is a description of the Royal Treasury as an institution. The second one analyses revenues and expenses and shows the evolution of the institution’s finances during the conflict. The third part is a general inventory of the royal accounts during the war.

  19. 31 CFR 19.645 - Do other Federal agencies know if the Department of the Treasury agrees to a voluntary exclusion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Do other Federal agencies know if the Department of the Treasury agrees to a voluntary exclusion? 19.645 Section 19.645 Money and Finance: Treasury... Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 19.645 Do other Federal agencies know if the...

  20. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory

  1. Learning the vi and Vim Editor

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold; Hannah, Elbert

    2008-01-01

    There's nothing that hard-core Unix and Linux users are more fanatical about than their text editor. Editors are the subject of adoration and worship, or of scorn and ridicule, depending upon whether the topic of discussion is your editor or someone else's. vi has been the standard editor for close to 30 years. Popular on Unix and Linux, it has a growing following on Windows systems, too. Most experienced system administrators cite vi as their tool of choice. And since 1986, this book has been the guide for vi. However, Unix systems are not what they were 30 years ago, and neither is this

  2. 31 CFR 363.28 - Does Public Debt reserve the right to require that any TreasuryDirect ® transaction be conducted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does Public Debt reserve the right to... Provisions Governing Securities Held in TreasuryDirect § 363.28 Does Public Debt reserve the right to require that any TreasuryDirect ® transaction be conducted in paper form? We reserve the right to require any...

  3. Chromium(VI) bioremediation by probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younan, Soraia; Sakita, Gabriel Z; Albuquerque, Talita R; Keller, Rogéria; Bremer-Neto, Hermann

    2016-09-01

    Chromium is a common mineral in the earth's crust and can be released into the environment from anthropogenic sources. Intake of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) through drinking water and food causes toxic effects, leading to serious diseases, and is a commonly reported environmental problem. Microorganisms can mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by heavy metals in addition to having effective resistance mechanisms to prevent cell damage and bind to these metals, sequestering them from the cell surface and removing them from the body. Species of Lactobacillus, Streptococcus, Bacillus and Bifidobacterium present in the human mouth and gut and in fermented foods have the ability to bind and detoxify some of these substances. This review address the primary topics related to Cr(VI) poisoning in animals and humans and the use of probiotics as a way to mitigate or prevent the toxic effects caused by Cr(VI). Further advances in the genetic knowledge of such microorganisms may lead to discoveries which will clarify the most active microorganisms that act as bioprotectants in bodies exposed to Cr(VI) and are an affordable option for people and animals intoxicated by the oral route. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. National Youth Survey US: Wave VI (NYS-1983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the sixth wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this collection. This research project, which was designed to gain a better understanding...

  5. The panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury. VI. The reliability of far-ultraviolet flux as a star formation tracer on subkiloparsec scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simones, Jacob E.; Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Weisz, Daniel R.; Johnson, Benjamin D. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bianchi, Luciana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E., E-mail: jsimones@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu, E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu, E-mail: bjohnso6@ucsc.edu, E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: ben@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: ericbell@umich.edu, E-mail: bianchi@pha.jhu.edu, E-mail: adolphin@raytheon.com [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States)

    2014-06-10

    We have used optical observations of resolved stars from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury to measure the recent (<500 Myr) star formation histories (SFHs) of 33 far-UV (FUV)-bright regions in M31. The region areas ranged from ∼10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} pc{sup 2}, which allowed us to test the reliability of FUV flux as a tracer of recent star formation on subkiloparsec scales. The star formation rates (SFRs) derived from the extinction-corrected observed FUV fluxes were, on average, consistent with the 100 Myr mean SFRs of the SFHs to within the 1σ scatter. Overall, the scatter was larger than the uncertainties in the SFRs and particularly evident among the smallest regions. The scatter was consistent with an even combination of discrete sampling of the initial mass function and high variability in the SFHs. This result demonstrates the importance of satisfying both the full-IMF and the constant-SFR assumptions for obtaining precise SFR estimates from FUV flux. Assuming a robust FUV extinction correction, we estimate that a factor of 2.5 uncertainty can be expected in FUV-based SFRs for regions smaller than 10{sup 5} pc{sup 2} or a few hundred parsecs. We also examined ages and masses derived from UV flux under the common assumption that the regions are simple stellar populations (SSPs). The SFHs showed that most of the regions are not SSPs, and the age and mass estimates were correspondingly discrepant from the SFHs. For those regions with SSP-like SFHs, we found mean discrepancies of 10 Myr in age and a factor of 3-4 in mass. It was not possible to distinguish the SSP-like regions from the others based on integrated FUV flux.

  6. Titanium dioxide-based DGT for measuring dissolved As(V), V(V), Sb(V), Mo(VI) and W(VI) in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panther, Jared G.; Stewart, Ryan R.; Teasdale, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    A titanium dioxide-based DGT method (Metsorb-DGT) was evaluated for the measurement of As(V), V(V), Sb(V), Mo(VI), W(VI) and dissolved reactive phosphorus (DRP) in synthetic waters. Mass vs. time DGT deployments at pH 6.06 (0.01 mol L-1 NaNO3) demonstrated linear uptake of all analytes (R2...... for deployment times >4 h (CDGT=0.27-0.72). For ferrihydrite-DGT, CDGT/CSol values in the range 0.92-1.16 were obtained for As(V), V(V) and DRP, however, Mo(VI), Sb(V) and W(VI) could not be measured to within 15% of the solution concentration (C DGT/CSol 0.02-0.83)....

  7. Når vi taler om 68

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Metz, Georg

    Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi......Når vi taler om 68 er en intellektuel samtale mellem to ligeværdige gentlemen og skallesmækkere. En essayistisk dyst om porno, RAF, Pittelkow og livsfilosofi...

  8. Research progress in the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macova, Zuzana; Bouzek, Karel; Hives, Jan; Sharma, Virender K.; Terryn, Raymond J.; Baum, J. Clayton

    2009-01-01

    There is renewed interest in the +6 oxidation state of iron, ferrate (VI) (Fe VI O 4 2- ), because of its potential as a benign oxidant for organic synthesis, as a chemical in developing cleaner ('greener') technology for remediation processes, and as an alternative for environment-friendly battery cathodes. This interest has led many researchers to focus their attention on the synthesis of ferrate(VI). Of the three synthesis methods, electrochemical, wet chemical and thermal, electrochemical synthesis has received the most attention due to its ease and the high purity of the product. Moreover, electrochemical processes use an electron as a so-called clean chemical, thus avoiding the use of any harmful chemicals to oxidize iron to the +6 oxidation state. This paper reviews the development of electrochemical methods to synthesize ferrate(VI). The approaches chosen by different laboratories to overcome some of the difficulties associated with the electrochemical synthesis of ferrate(VI) are summarized. Special attention is paid to parameters such as temperature, anolyte, and anode material composition. Spectroscopic work to understand the mechanism of ferrate(VI) synthesis is included. Recent advances in two new approaches, the use of an inert electrode and molten hydroxide salts, in the synthesis of ferrate(VI) are also reviewed. Progress made in the commercialization of ferrate(VI) continuous production is briefly discussed as well

  9. Synthesis, characterization and oxidative behaviour of dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, D.D.; Rastogi, Rachana

    1995-01-01

    Dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes are found to give low yield of epoxide but good yield of cyclohexanone. The complexes are electro active giving metal centered Ru VI /Ru V couple. Cis-stilbene gives trans epoxide and benzaldehyde. Norbornene gives exo epoxy norbornene. The selectivity for allylic oxidation is high. In the present note the synthesis of dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes and their oxidation behaviour is reported. The dioxoruthenium(VI) complexes have been stoichiometrically found to be good oxidants. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab

  10. Inhibition of bacterial U(VI) reduction by calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, Scott C.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Carroll, S. L.; Kennedy, David W.; Zachara, John M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fendorf, S.

    2003-01-01

    The rapid kinetics of bacterial U(VI) reduction and low solubility of uraninite (UO2,cr) make this process an attractive option for removing uranium from groundwater. Nevertheless, conditions that may promote or inhibit U(VI) reduction are not well-defined. Recent descriptions of Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes indicate that these species may dominate the aqueous speciation of U(VI) in many environments. We monitored the bacterial reduction of U(VI) in bicarbonate-buffered solution in the presence and absence of Ca. XAFS measurements confirmed the presence of a Ca-U(VI)-CO3 complex in the initial solutions containing calcium. Calcium, at millimolar concentrations (0.45-5 mM), caused a significant decrease in the rate and extent of bacterial U(VI) reduction. Both facultative (Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN32) and obligate (Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, Geobacter sulfurreducens) anaerobic bacteria were affected by the presence of calcium. Reduction of U(VI) ceased when the calculated system Eh re ached -0.046+/- 0.001 V, based on the Ca2UO2(CO3)(3) -- > UO2,cr couple. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that U is a less energetically favorable electron acceptor when the Ca-UO2-CO3 complexes are present. The results do not support Ca inhibition caused by direct interactions with the cells or with the electron donor as the reduction of fumarate or Tc(VII)O-4(-) under identical conditions was unaffected by the presence of Ca

  11. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uygun, Murat; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Özçalışkan, Emir; Caka, Müşerref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO 3 solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m 2 /g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities

  12. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uygun, Murat; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Özçalışkan, Emir; Caka, Müşerref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgöl, Sinan; Denizli, Adil

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO3 solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m2/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  13. New generation ion-imprinted nanocarrier for removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uygun, Murat, E-mail: muygun@adu.edu.tr [Adnan Menderes University, Kocarl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Vocational and Training School (Turkey); Feyzioglu, Esra; Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Caka, Mueserref; Ergen, Aygen; Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Denizli, Adil [Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-08-15

    The purpose of this study was to prepare a novel ion-imprinted nanoparticle to remove Cr(VI) ions from waste water. For this, Cr(VI) ions were complexed with 2-methacryloylamido histidine (MAH) and then Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization technique. The templates, Cr(VI) ions, were removed from the nanoparticles using 0.1 M of HNO{sub 3} solution. The specific surface area of the Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles was found to be 1,397.85 m{sup 2}/g, and the particle size was calculated as 155.3 nm. These Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used for the adsorption/desorption of Cr(VI) ions from its aqueous solutions. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration and medium pH on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity were also studied. The maximum adsorbed amount of Cr(VI) on the imprinted nanoparticles was found to be 3,830.58 mg/g nanoparticle in pH 4.0. In order to investigate the selectivity of the imprinted nanoparticle, adsorption studies were repeated using Cr(III) ions. The selectivity results demonstrated that Cr(VI)-imprinted poly(HEMAH) nanoparticles showed high affinity for the Cr(VI) ions than Cr(III). The Cr(VI)-imprinted nanoparticles were used several times without decreasing their Cr(VI) adsorption capacities.

  14. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-02-21

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO{sub 2} in spent nuclear fuel and the UO{sub 2+x}, in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO{sub 2+x}, to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements.

  15. ALTERATION OF U(VI)-PHASES UNDER OXIDIZING CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.P. Deditius; S. Utsunomiya; R.C. Ewing

    2006-01-01

    Uranium-(VI) phases are the primary alteration products of the UO 2 in spent nuclear fuel and the UO 2+x , in natural uranium deposits. The U(VI)-phases generally form sheet structures of edge-sharing UO 2 2+ polyhedra. The complexity of these structures offers numerous possibilities for coupled-substitutions of trace metals and radionuclides. The incorporation of radionuclides into U(VI)-structures provides a potential barrier to their release and transport in a geologic repository that experiences oxidizing conditions. In this study, we have used natural samples of UO 2+x , to study the U(VI)-phases that form during alteration and to determine the fate of the associated trace elements

  16. 31 CFR 356.4 - What are the book-entry systems in which auctioned Treasury securities may be issued?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in which auctioned Treasury securities may be issued? There are three book-entry securities systems... marketable Treasury securities. We maintain and transfer securities in these three book-entry systems at... inflation. Securities may be transferred from one system to the other, unless the securities are not...

  17. Oxidation of trimethoprim by ferrate(VI): kinetics, products, and antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anquandah, George A K; Sharma, Virender K; Knight, D Andrew; Batchu, Sudha Rani; Gardinali, Piero R

    2011-12-15

    Kinetics, stoichiometry, and products of the oxidation of trimethoprim (TMP), one of the most commonly detected antibacterial agents in surface waters and municipal wastewaters, by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) were determined. The pH dependent second-order rate constants of the reactions of Fe(VI) with TMP were examined using acid-base properties of Fe(VI) and TMP. The kinetics of reactions of diaminopyrimidine (DAP) and trimethoxytoluene (TMT) with Fe(VI) were also determined to understand the reactivity of Fe(VI) with TMP. Oxidation products of the reactions of Fe(VI) with TMP and DAP were identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Reaction pathways of oxidation of TMP by Fe(VI) are proposed to demonstrate the cleavage of the TMP molecule to ultimately result in 3,4,5,-trimethoxybenzaldehyde and 2,4-dinitropyrimidine as among the final identified products. The oxidized products mixture exhibited no antibacterial activity against E. coli after complete consumption of TMP. Removal of TMP in the secondary effluent by Fe(VI) was achieved.

  18. The development vector of the treasury technologies in order to improve the efficiency of financial resources management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achmedov Shahmurad, S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The current social-economic situation in the country is accompanied by a sharp reduction of budgetary allocations, which in turn actualizes the problem of creation of conditions providing sustainable economic development, as well as unconditional fulfillment of state obligations, primarily social. Course on the solution of these tasks is defined in the plan of priority measures for the sustainable development of economy and social stability, signed in January 2015 by the Government of the Russian Federation. The paper notes that in the beginning of the budget cuts period all outputs of the budget reform were aimed at improving the quality of public (municipal finances, at creation the conditions most effective use of state (municipal financial resources. The specific essence of reforms is to move to active methods of management of budget resources and to use new financial instruments that ensure the effectiveness of state (municipal spending. The author emphasizes that the achievement of objectives largely depends on the Federal Treasury. In this regard, the author investigates the process of technology improvement of the Treasury execution of the budget, the scale of which was determined by the program "Modernization of the Treasury system of the Russian Federation" and direction of the Strategic map of the Treasury of Russia for the period 2015-2019. Special attention is paid to the complex events that determine the vector of development of Treasury technologies in order to improve the efficiency of financial resources management.

  19. 76 FR 11402 - Recovery of Delinquent Debts-Treasury Offset Program Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ...-1213 or TTY 1-800-325- 0778, or visit our Internet site, Social Security Online, at http://www... SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION 20 CFR Parts 404, 408, 416, and 422 [Docket No. SSA-2010-0010] RIN 0960-AH19 Recovery of Delinquent Debts--Treasury Offset Program Enhancements AGENCY: Social Security...

  20. Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flesch, Benjamin; Vatrapu, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the second iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi), a set theoretical visual analytics dashboard of big social data. In order to further demonstrate its usefulness in large-scale visual analytics tasks of individual and collective behavior of actors in social networks......, the current iteration of the Social Set Visualizer (SoSeVi) in version II builds on recent advancements in visualizing set intersections. The development of the SoSeVi dashboard involved cutting-edge open source visual analytics libraries (D3.js) and creation of new visualizations such as of actor mobility...

  1. Fremtidens lavenergibyggeri - kan vi gøre som vi plejer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Tine Steen

    2011-01-01

    Stramninger af kravene til energiforbruget i vores boliger medfører stor fokus på energiberegningen, men erfaringer fra lavenergiboliger opført i dag viser, at vi, for at sikre succes for fremtidens boliger, også skal inddrage dokumentation af indeklimaet og forbedre samarbejdet mellem arkitekter...

  2. 31 CFR 19.610 - What procedures does the Department of the Treasury use in suspension and debarment actions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What procedures does the Department of the Treasury use in suspension and debarment actions? 19.610 Section 19.610 Money and Finance...) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 19.610 What procedures does the...

  3. Modelling biological Cr(VI) reduction in aquifer microcosm column systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molokwane, Pulane E; Chirwa, Evans M N

    2013-01-01

    Several chrome processing facilities in South Africa release hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) into groundwater resources. Pump-and-treat remediation processes have been implemented at some of the sites but have not been successful in reducing contamination levels. The current study is aimed at developing an environmentally friendly, cost-effective and self-sustained biological method to curb the spread of chromium at the contaminated sites. An indigenous Cr(VI)-reducing mixed culture of bacteria was demonstrated to reduce high levels of Cr(VI) in laboratory samples. The effect of Cr(VI) on the removal rate was evaluated at concentrations up to 400 mg/L. Following the detailed evaluation of fundamental processes for biological Cr(VI) reduction, a predictive model for Cr(VI) breakthrough through aquifer microcosm reactors was developed. The reaction rate in batch followed non-competitive rate kinetics with a Cr(VI) inhibition threshold concentration of approximately 99 mg/L. This study evaluates the application of the kinetic parameters determined in the batch reactors to the continuous flow process. The model developed from advection-reaction rate kinetics in a porous media fitted best the effluent Cr(VI) concentration. The model was also used to elucidate the logistic nature of biomass growth in the reactor systems.

  4. Diverse functions of myosin VI elucidated by an isoform-specific α-helix domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollscheid, Hans-Peter; Biancospino, Matteo; He, Fahu; Magistrati, Elisa; Molteni, Erika; Lupia, Michela; Soffientini, Paolo; Rottner, Klemens; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pozzoli, Uberto; Mapelli, Marina; Walters, Kylie J; Polo, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Myosin VI functions in endocytosis and cell motility. Alternative splicing of myosin VI mRNA generates two distinct isoform types, myosin VI(short) and myosin VI(long), which differ in the C-terminal region. Their physiological and pathological roles remain unknown. Here we identified an isoform-specific regulatory helix, named the α2-linker, that defines specific conformations and hence determines the target selectivity of human myosin VI. The presence of the α2-linker structurally defines a new clathrin-binding domain that is unique to myosin VI(long) and masks the known RRL interaction motif. This finding is relevant to ovarian cancer, in which alternative myosin VI splicing is aberrantly regulated, and exon skipping dictates cell addiction to myosin VI(short) in tumor-cell migration. The RRL interactor optineurin contributes to this process by selectively binding myosin VI(short). Thus, the α2-linker acts like a molecular switch that assigns myosin VI to distinct endocytic (myosin VI(long)) or migratory (myosin VI(short)) functional roles.

  5. The Information Content of Treasury Bond Options Concerning Future Volatility and Price Jumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch, Thomas; Christensen, Bent Jesper; Nielsen, Morten Ørregaard

    We study the relation between realized and implied volatility in the bond market. Realizedvolatility is constructed from high-frequency (5-minute) returns on 30 year Treasury bond futures.Implied volatility is backed out from prices of associated bond options. Recent nonparametric statisticaltech......We study the relation between realized and implied volatility in the bond market. Realizedvolatility is constructed from high-frequency (5-minute) returns on 30 year Treasury bond futures.Implied volatility is backed out from prices of associated bond options. Recent nonparametric...... components. We also introduce a new vector HAR (VecHAR) modelfor the resulting simultaneous system, controlling for possible endogeneity of implied volatility inthe forecasting equations. We show that implied volatility is a biased and inefficient forecast in thebond market. However, implied volatility does...

  6. The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of NpO 2+ and PuO 2 2+ by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO 2 O 2+ was rapidly reduced to form NpO 2 + organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO 2 2+ was predominantly reduced to Pu 4+ , resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO 2 2+ and PuO 2 P 2+ in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present

  7. Contribution to the study of the redox couple Np(VI)/Np(V) in the presence of uranium(VI) in solutions of nitric acid and nitrous acid; Contribution a l'etude du comportement redox du couple Np(VI)/Np(V) en presence d'uranium VI dans les solutions constituees d'acide nitrique et d'acide nitreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arpigny, S. [CEA Marcoule, Dept. de Radiochimie et Procedes, DRP, 30 (France)

    2001-07-01

    The redox behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was the subject of a spectrometric study of the Np(VI) reduction reaction in nitric acid solutions (4 to 5 M) containing variable concentrations (1.5 to 3.5 x 10{sup -3} M) of nitrous acid. A low nitrous acid concentration and a high nitric acid concentration were found to favor the stabilization of Np(VI). The stoichiometric coefficients of nitrous acid and nitric acid in the Np(VI) reduction reaction were determined thermodynamically, although only the reaction order with respect to HNO{sub 2} could be calculated from a kinetic analysis. Adding nitrate ions to a HNO{sub 3}/HNO{sub 2} solution enhanced the stability of neptunium at oxidation state +VI, but also increased the reduction rate. When uranium(VI) was added to the HNO{sub 3}/HNO{sub 2} solutions, the total quantity of neptunium at oxidation state +V (either free or as a Np(V)-U(VI) complex) remained practically unchanged, as did the Np(VI) reduction rate. The electrochemical behavior of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple was investigated in a weak acidic medium by voltammetry with an ultra-micro-electrode (UME). The oxidation wave limiting current variation was a linear function of the Np(V) concentration when a gold UME was used, but not with a platinum UME; the reduction wave limiting current variation versus the Np(V) concentration was linear with either gold or platinum UMEs. The presence of the Np(V)-U(VI) complex in the neptunium solutions was characterized by a shift in the normal apparent potential of the Np(VI)/Np(V) couple toward anodic potentials consistent with the previously determined values of the complexation constants. (author)

  8. Vi behøver innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAloone, Tim C.

    2007-01-01

    -Produktion og Maskiner. Innovation og bæredygtighed er to områder som vi i Skandinavien giver meget stor opmærksomhed for at kunne vedligeholde vores globale konkurrencekraft og stærke velfærdssamfund. Gennem årene har mange brancher bidraget til skabelsen af vidensbaserede innovationer, og det faktum, at de......Analyse: Vi behøver innovation En ny miljøbølge ruller, og danske virksomheder bør ride med Af Tim McAloone, fredag 02. feb 2007 kl. 04:50 Tim McAloone Lektor og ph.d. ved Institut for mekanik, energi og konstruktion ved DTU. Tim McAloone skriver fremover jævnligt kommentarer i Ingeniøren...... skandinaviske lande er relativt små, har ledt til en interessant evne til at etablere og derefter samarbejde inden for tætte netværk, som strækker sig over både faglige og geografiske grænser. Samtidig har vi set miljøhensyn vinde og tabe samfundsmæssig og industriel opmærksomhed på en nærmest periodisk basis...

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of Cr(VI) extraction using TOPO impregnated membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Praveen, Prashant; Loh, Kai-Chee, E-mail: chelohkc@nus.edu.sg

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Cr(VI) extraction by extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) was investigated. • EIM exhibited high extraction efficiency, mass transfer rate and stability. • Mass transfer mechanism was proposed based on kinetics and equilibrium data. • Uptake of Cr(VI) by EIMs was endothermic and spontaneous. • Cr(VI) extraction by EIMs was dominated by physical interactions. - Abstract: Solid/liquid extraction of Cr(VI) was accomplished using trioctylphosphine oxide impregnated polypropylene hollow fiber membranes. Extraction of 100–500 mg/L Cr(VI) by the extractant impregnated membranes (EIM) was characterized by high uptake rate and capacity, and equilibrium was attained within 45 min of contact. Extraction equilibrium was pH-dependent (at an optimal pH 2), whereas stripping using 0.2 M sodium hydroxide yielded the highest recovery of 98% within 60 min. The distribution coefficient was independent of initial Cr(VI) concentration, and the linear distribution equilibrium isotherm could be modeled using Freundlich isotherm. The mass transfer kinetics of Cr(VI) was examined using pseudo-second-order and intraparticle diffusion models and a mass transfer mechanism was deduced. The distribution coefficient increased with temperature, which indicated endothermic nature of the reaction. Enthalpy and entropy change during Cr(VI) extraction were positive and varied in the range of 37–49 kJ/mol and 114–155 J/mol, respectively. The free energy change was negative, confirming the feasibility and spontaneity of the mass transfer process. Results obtained suggest that EIMs are efficient and sustainable for extraction of Cr(VI) from wastewater.

  10. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey : II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Derek; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzman, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in

  11. Influence of Calcium on Microbial Reduction of Solid Phase Uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of calcium on microbial reduction of a solid phase U(VI), sodium boltwoodite (NaUO2SiO3OH · 1.5H2O), was evaluated in a culture of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium (DMRB), Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Batch experiments were performed in a non-growth bicarbonate medium with lactate as electron donor at pH 7 buffered with PIPES. Calcium increased both the rate and extent of Na-boltwoodite dissolution by increasing its solubility through the formation of a ternary aqueous calcium-uranyl-carbonate species. The ternary species, however, decreased the rates of microbial reduction of aqueous U(VI). Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) is a sequentially coupled process of Na-boltwoodite dissolution, U(VI) aqueous speciation, and microbial reduction of dissolved U(VI) to U(IV) that accumulated on bacterial surfaces/periplasm. The overall rates of microbial reduction of solid phase U(VI) can be described by the coupled rates of dissolution and microbial reduction that were both influenced by calcium. The results demonstrated that dissolved U(VI) concentration during microbial reduction was a complex function of solid phase U(VI) dissolution kinetics, aqueous U(VI) speciation, and microbial activity

  12. A simple Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system for rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and oxidative degradation of organic pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Yanan; Yang, Shaojie [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China); Zhou, Danna, E-mail: zdncug@163.com [Faculty of Material Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wu, Feng [Department of Environmental Science, Hubei Key Lab of Biomass Resource Chemistry and Environmental Biotechnology, School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, 430079 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Rapid and simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and degradation of organic pollutants occur. • Oxysulfur radicals generated in Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system oxidize the organic pollutants. • Acidic pH facilitates the reactions from both directions of reduction and oxidation. • Degradation potential of aromatic amines depends on the substituted groups. • Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system is promising for “waste control by waste”. - Abstract: Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), a heavy-metal contaminant, can be easily reduced to less toxic trivalent chromium (Cr(III)) by sulfite ions (S(IV)). However, S(IV) has not drawn as much attention as the ferrous ion has. We report herein a novel Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system containing sulfite ions that rapidly and simultaneously reduces Cr(VI) and oxidize organic pollutants in the presence of oxygen in aqueous solutions. This Cr(VI)–S(IV)-O{sub 2} system contains the initiator Cr(VI), the reductant S(IV), and the oxidant O{sub 2}, which produce oxysulfur radicals (mainly SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and SO{sub 5}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radicals (OH·). The Cr(VI)/S(IV) molar ratio, pH, and oxygen content play important roles in the entire reaction system. Acidic conditions (pH 3.0) facilitated degradation of organic compounds and reduction of Cr(VI) as well. In addition, experiments of rapid degradation of several kinds of organic pollutants such as azo dye (acid orange 7, AO7), aniline, phenol, bisphenol A etc were also conducted. Preliminary results show that the removal rates of the analogs of phenols or aromatic amines in this Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system have a relationship with the electronic parameters (Hammett constant, σ) of the substituted groups. Thus, the Cr(VI)–S(IV)–O{sub 2} system, provides an excellent strategy of “waste control by waste” for removing multiple industrial contaminants.

  13. THE ACS NEARBY GALAXY SURVEY TREASURY. VII. THE NGC 4214 STARBURST AND THE EFFECTS OF STAR FORMATION HISTORY ON DWARF MORPHOLOGY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Weisz, Daniel R.; Seth, Anil C.; Skillman, Evan D.; Dolphin, Andrew E.

    2011-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 optical observations obtained as part of the ACS Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury as well as early release Wide Field Camera 3 ultraviolet and infrared observations of the nearby dwarf starbursting galaxy NGC 4214. Our data provide a detailed example of how covering such a broad range in wavelength provides a powerful tool for constraining the physical properties of stellar populations. The deepest data reach the ancient red clump at M F814W ∼ - 0.2. All of the optical data reach the main-sequence turnoff for stars younger than ∼300 Myr and the blue He-burning sequence for stars younger than 500 Myr. The full color-magnitude diagram (CMD) fitting analysis shows that all three fields in our data set are consistent with ∼75% of the stellar mass being older than 8 Gyr, in spite of showing a wide range in star formation rates at present. Thus, our results suggest that the scale length of NGC 4214 has remained relatively constant for many gigayears. As previously noted by others, we also find the galaxy has recently ramped up production consistent with its bright UV luminosity and its population of UV-bright massive stars. In the central field we find UV point sources with F336W magnitudes as bright as -9.9. These are as bright as stars with masses of at least 52-56 M sun and ages near 4 Myr in stellar evolution models. Assuming a standard initial mass function, our CMD is well fitted by an increase in star formation rate beginning 100 Myr ago. The stellar populations of this late-type dwarf are compared with those of NGC 404, an early-type dwarf that is also the most massive galaxy in its local environment. The late-type dwarf appears to have a similar high fraction of ancient stars, suggesting that these dominant galaxies may form at early epochs even if they have low total mass and very different present-day morphologies.

  14. Liquidity, Reconstitution, and the Value of U.S. Treasury Strips.

    OpenAIRE

    Daves, Phillip R; Ehrhardt, Michael C

    1993-01-01

    An apparent pricing anomaly exists in the market for U.S. Treasury strips: zero-coupon strips created from principal payments typically trade at significantly higher prices than otherwi se identical zero-coupon strips created from coupon payments. In additi on to documenting this phenomenon, this study demonstrates that differences in liquidity and differences in reconstitution characteristics explain much of this price variation. Copyright 1993 by American Finance Association.

  15. 77 FR 64399 - Order of Succession for HUD Region VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Region VI AGENCY: Office of Field Policy and Management, HUD. ACTION: Notice of Order of Succession... its Field Offices (Region VI). This Order of Succession supersedes all previous Orders of Succession for HUD Region VI. DATES: Effective Date: October 9, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lawrence D...

  16. Extraction behavior of uranium(VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingchia Huang; Donghwang Chen; Muchang Shieh; Chingtsven Huang

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution with polyether-based polyurethane (PU) foam was studied. The effects of the kinds and concentrations of nitrate salts, uranium(VI) concentration, temperature, nitric acid concentration, pH, the content of poly(ethylene oxide) in the polyurethane foam, and the ratio of PU foam weight and solution volume on the extraction of uranium(VI) were investigated. The interferences of fluoride and carbonate ions on the extraction of uranium(VI) were also examined, and methods to overcome both interferences were suggested. It was found that no uranium was extracted in the absence of a nitrate salting-out agent, and the extraction behaviors of uranium(IV) with polyurethane foam could be explained in terms of an etherlike solvent extraction mechanism. In addition, the percentage extraction of a multiple stage was also estimated theoretically

  17. Vi-CRM 197 as a new conjugate vaccine against Salmonella Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoli, F; Rondini, S; Pisoni, I; Proietti, D; Berti, F; Costantino, P; Rappuoli, R; Szu, S; Saul, A; Martin, L B

    2011-01-17

    An efficacious, low cost vaccine against typhoid fever, especially for young children, would make a major impact on disease burden in developing countries. The virulence capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella Typhi (Vi) coupled to recombinant mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A (Vi-rEPA) has been shown to be highly efficacious. We investigated the use of carrier proteins included in infant vaccines, standardized the conjugation process and developed key assays required for routine lot release at production scale. Vi from a BSL1 organism, Citrobacter freundii, strain WR7011, was used as an alternative to Vi from S. Typhi. We showed that Vi conjugated to CRM(197), a non-toxic mutant of diphtheria toxin, widely used in commercial vaccines, was produced at high yield. Vi-CRM(197) proved immunogenic in animal studies, even without adjuvant. Thus, Vi-CRM(197) appears to be a suitable candidate for the development of a commercially viable, effective typhoid vaccine for developing countries. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The adsorption ability of Cr(VI) on sawdust–polyaniline nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binh Phan, Thi; Que Do, Ngoc; Thanh Thuy Mai, Thi

    2010-01-01

    The results of this study of sawdust–polyaniline nanocomposite synthesized by a chemical method for Cr(VI) treatment in the environment are presented. Cr(VI) adsorption on a composite was determined by colorimetry. The results showed that sawdust–polyaniline composite synthesized with an aniline:sawdust ratio equal to 0.5 had an adsorption degree of 21.4 mg g −1 and adsorbed nearly 99% of the Cr(VI) after 2 h. The composite could be used for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from waste water. The Cr(VI) adsorption ability of the composite slightly depends on the pH value of the medium. The adsorption is fast during the first half hour and then the rate decreases

  19. Testing of ENDF/B-VI data for shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    1995-01-01

    Version VI of the U.S. Evaluated Nuclear Data File (END/B-VI) was released for open distribution in 1990 after an extensive multiyear, multilaboratory evaluation effort coordinated by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). More than 75 of the 320 evaluations contained in the library are new for Version VI, including many relatively important nuclides and many with substantial changes to the cross-section data. Also, several important changes were made to the basic data formats for Version VI to permit better representation of the data and to allow additional types of data. Although these format changes yielded improved evaluations, they hindered processing of the data for use in applications codes and delayed the timely integral testing of the data. It has been only during the past year that significant integral testing of END/B-VI data has been achieved. The results and conclusions from some of these efforts are summarized in the following paragraphs

  20. 76 FR 16038 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Prepaid Card Marketing Customer Survey, CS-10-251.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... of social marketing. Social marketing principles and practices apply marketing principles to social... Prepaid Card Marketing Customer Survey, CS-10-251. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury..., the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Prepaid Card Marketing Customer Survey, CS-10-251 DATES...

  1. Photoreduction of chromium(VI) in the presence of algae, Chlorella vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Lin; Wang Hongli; Deng Nansheng

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the photochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in the presence of algae, Chlorella vulgaris, was investigated under the irradiation of metal halide lamps (λ=365nm, 250W). The affecting factors of photochemical reduction were studied in detail, such as exposure time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, initial algae concentration and pH. The rate of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction increased with algae concentration increasing, exposure time increasing, initial Cr(VI) concentration decreasing and the decrease of pH. When pH increased to 6, the rate of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction nearly vanished. When initial Cr(VI) concentration ranged from 0.4 to 1.0mgL -1 and initial algae concentration ranged from ABS algae (the absorbency of algae)=0.025 to ABS algae =0.180, According to the results of kinetic analyses, the kinetic equation of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction in aqueous solution with algae under 250W metal halide lamps was V 0 =kC 0 0.1718 A algae 0.5235 (C 0 was initial concentration of Cr(VI); A algae was initial concentration of algae) under the condition of pH 4

  2. Importance of c-Type cytochromes for U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leang Ching

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to study the mechanism of U(VI reduction, the effect of deleting c-type cytochrome genes on the capacity of Geobacter sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI with acetate serving as the electron donor was investigated. Results The ability of several c-type cytochrome deficient mutants to reduce U(VI was lower than that of the wild type strain. Elimination of two confirmed outer membrane cytochromes and two putative outer membrane cytochromes significantly decreased (ca. 50–60% the ability of G. sulfurreducens to reduce U(VI. Involvement in U(VI reduction did not appear to be a general property of outer membrane cytochromes, as elimination of two other confirmed outer membrane cytochromes, OmcB and OmcC, had very little impact on U(VI reduction. Among the periplasmic cytochromes, only MacA, proposed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane to the periplasm, appeared to play a significant role in U(VI reduction. A subpopulation of both wild type and U(VI reduction-impaired cells, 24–30%, accumulated amorphous uranium in the periplasm. Comparison of uranium-accumulating cells demonstrated a similar amount of periplasmic uranium accumulation in U(VI reduction-impaired and wild type G. sulfurreducens. Assessment of the ability of the various suspensions to reduce Fe(III revealed no correlation between the impact of cytochrome deletion on U(VI reduction and reduction of Fe(III hydroxide and chelated Fe(III. Conclusion This study indicates that c-type cytochromes are involved in U(VI reduction by Geobacter sulfurreducens. The data provide new evidence for extracellular uranium reduction by G. sulfurreducens but do not rule out the possibility of periplasmic uranium reduction. Occurrence of U(VI reduction at the cell surface is supported by the significant impact of elimination of outer membrane cytochromes on U(VI reduction and the lack of correlation between periplasmic uranium accumulation and the capacity for uranium

  3. Cr(III) reactivity and foot dermatitis in Cr(VI) positive patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    Chromium allergy has become synonymous with Cr(VI) allergy. However, real exposure to chromium from leather products may include both Cr(III) and Cr(VI). In this study, we investigate the reactivity to both Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in consecutive patients to analyse the relation between foot eczema/leather...... to Cr(III). The increased risk was not due to a higher degree of sensitivity to Cr(VI). Leather was reported most frequently as the suspected cause of chromium dermatitis (54%). However, Cr(VI) allergics having foot eczema and positive or doubtful Cr(III) reactions often had positive reactions to other...

  4. An experimental study on the sorption of U(VI) onto granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Pil Soo

    2002-01-01

    The sorption of U(VI) on a domestic granite is studied as a function of experimental conditions such as contact time, solution-solid ratio, ionic strength, and pH using a batch procedure. The distribution coefficients, K d 's, of U(VI) are about 1-100mL/g depending on the experimental conditions. The sorption of U(VI) onto granite particles is greatly dependent upon the contact time, solution-solid ratio, and pH, but very little is dependent on the ionic strength. It is noticed that an U(VI)-carbonato ternary surface complex can be formed in the neutral range of pH. In the alkaline range of pH above 7, U(VI) sorption onto granite particles is greatly decreased due to the formation of anionic U(VI)-carbonato aqueous complexes

  5. Simultaneous Cr(VI) bio-reduction and methane production by anaerobic granular sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qian; Sun, Jiaji; Sun, Dezhi; Tian, Lan; Ji, Yanan; Qiu, Bin

    2018-08-01

    Wastewater containing toxic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) were treated with well-organized anaerobic granular sludge in this study. Results showed that the anaerobic granular sludge rapidly removed Cr(VI), and 2000 µg·L -1 Cr(VI) was completely eliminated within 6 min, which was much faster than the reported duration of removal by reported artificial materials. Sucrose added as a carbon source acted as an initial electron donor to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III). This process was considered as the main mechanism of Cr(VI) removal. Methane production by anaerobic granular sludge was improved by the addition of Cr(VI) at a concentration lower than 500 µg·L -1 . Anaerobic granular sludge had a well-organized structure, which presented good resistance against toxic Cr(VI). Trichoccus accelerated the degradation of organic substances to generate acetates with a low Cr(VI) concentration, thereby enhancing methane production by acetotrophic methanogens. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 31 CFR 380.3 - What collateral may I pledge if I am a Treasury Tax and Loan depositary under 31 CFR part 203...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What collateral may I pledge if I am a Treasury Tax and Loan depositary under 31 CFR part 203, and what value will you assign to it? 380...) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT COLLATERAL ACCEPTABILITY AND...

  7. Re-examination of immune response and estimation of anti-Vi IgG protective threshold against typhoid fever-based on the efficacy trial of Vi conjugate in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Shousun C; Klugman, Keith P; Hunt, Steven

    2014-04-25

    The capsular polysaccharide of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, Vi antigen, is an essential virulence factor and a protective antigen. Similar to other polysaccharide vaccines, the protective action of Vi, both to the polysaccharide alone or when presented as a conjugate, is mediated by serum IgG Vi antibodies. The evaluation of Vi capsular polysaccharide based vaccines to prevent typhoid fever would be significantly facilitated by the identification of a "protective level" of serum antibodies to Vi antigen. The protective level of anti-Vi IgG against typhoid fever was derived from the protective efficacy and immune response of a Vi-rEPA conjugate vaccine efficacy trial. The estimation was derived by two methods: correlation of the percent efficacy and the antibody distribution profile in the vaccine group at a given period of observation, and use of the relative ratio of anti-Vi IgG levels between the vaccine and placebo groups greater or equal to the Relative Risk of typhoid fever used in the efficacy determination. Both methods predicted a similar range of a minimum protective level of anti-Vi IgG between 1.4 and 2.0μg/ml (short term threshold). When applying a protective threshold of 10μg/ml at 6 months post immunization, an IgG level in excess of 1.4μg/ml was achieved by 90% of children at 46 months post immunization, consistent with an 89% level of protection over the duration of the study. We thus suggest that the proportion of children with Vi IgG>10μg/ml (long term threshold) 6 months after immunization may reflect the proportion protected over at least a 4 year period. The current assignment of an anti-Vi IgG protective level may be of value when evaluating vaccine performance of future Vi conjugate vaccines. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Factors affecting the adsorption of chromium (VI) on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Orbak, I.; Karatepe, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the adsorption behavior of chromium (VI) on two different activated carbon samples produced from Tuncbilek lignite. The effects of the initial chromium (VI) concentration (250-1000 mg/L), temperature (297-323 K) and pH (2.0-9.5) on adsorption were investigated systematically. The effectiveness of the parameters on chromium adsorption was found to be in the order of pH, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and the temperature. Increasing the pH from 2.0 to 9.5 caused a decrease in adsorption. However, the adsorption was increased by increasing the initial Cr(VI) concentration and temperature. The multilinear mathematical model was also developed to predict the Cr(VI) adsorption on activated carbon samples within the experimental conditions.

  9. Analytical applications of N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acids towards chromium (VI), copper (II), iron (III) and uranium (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkhadir, A. Y. F.

    2001-05-01

    Two aliphatic hydroxamic acids were prepared; N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid, by the reaction of β-phenylhydroxylamine and p-tolyl hydroxylamine with n-butyryl chloride. The acids were identified by: their melting points, characteristic reactions with acidic solutions of vanadium (V) and iron (III), infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen content and molecular weight determination. The extractability of these acids towards Cr (VI), Cu (II), Fe (III) and U (VI) were investigated at different pH values and molar acid concentrations. N-phenyl-n- butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.80%) for Cr (VI) at 4 M H 2 SO 4 , (83.25%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (99.17%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.76%) at 4 M HNO 3 for U (VI) respectively. N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.40%) for Cr (VI)at 4 M H 2 SO 4 , (81.30%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (92.80%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.64%) for U (VI) at 4 M HNO 3 , respectively. The ratios of the metal to ligands were determined by job method (continuous variation method) and were found to be 1:2 for Cr (VI) and U (VI). (Author)

  10. Analytical applications of N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acids towards chromium (VI), copper (II), iron (III) and uranium (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elkhadir, A Y. F. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2001-05-01

    Two aliphatic hydroxamic acids were prepared; N-phenyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid and N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid, by the reaction of {beta}-phenylhydroxylamine and p-tolyl hydroxylamine with n-butyryl chloride. The acids were identified by: their melting points, characteristic reactions with acidic solutions of vanadium (V) and iron (III), infrared spectroscopy, nitrogen content and molecular weight determination. The extractability of these acids towards Cr (VI), Cu (II), Fe (III) and U (VI) were investigated at different pH values and molar acid concentrations. N-phenyl-n- butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.80%) for Cr (VI) at 4 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, (83.25%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (99.17%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.76%) at 4 M HNO{sub 3} for U (VI) respectively. N-p-tolyl-n-butyro hydroxamic acid has a maximum extraction (98.40%) for Cr (VI)at 4 M H{sub 2} SO{sub 4}, (81.30%) for Cu (II) at pH 6, (92.80%) for Fe (III) at pH 5 and (99.64%) for U (VI) at 4 M HNO{sub 3}, respectively. The ratios of the metal to ligands were determined by job method (continuous variation method) and were found to be 1:2 for Cr (VI) and U (VI). (Author)

  11. Photoreduction of chromium(VI) in the presence of algae, Chlorella vulgaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Lin [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wang Hongli [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Deng Nansheng [School of Resources and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)]. E-mail: nsdengwhu@163.com

    2006-11-16

    In this thesis, the photochemical reduction of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) in the presence of algae, Chlorella vulgaris, was investigated under the irradiation of metal halide lamps ({lambda}=365nm, 250W). The affecting factors of photochemical reduction were studied in detail, such as exposure time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, initial algae concentration and pH. The rate of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction increased with algae concentration increasing, exposure time increasing, initial Cr(VI) concentration decreasing and the decrease of pH. When pH increased to 6, the rate of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction nearly vanished. When initial Cr(VI) concentration ranged from 0.4 to 1.0mgL{sup -1} and initial algae concentration ranged from ABS{sub algae} (the absorbency of algae)=0.025 to ABS{sub algae}=0.180, According to the results of kinetic analyses, the kinetic equation of Cr(VI) photochemical reduction in aqueous solution with algae under 250W metal halide lamps was V{sub 0}=kC{sub 0}{sup 0.1718}A{sub algae}{sup 0.5235} (C{sub 0} was initial concentration of Cr(VI); A{sub algae} was initial concentration of algae) under the condition of pH 4.

  12. CoQ10 Deficiency May Indicate Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Cr(VI Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiali Zhong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the toxic mechanism of hexavalent chromium Cr(VI and search for an antidote for Cr(VI-induced cytotoxicity, a study of mitochondrial dysfunction induced by Cr(VI and cell survival by recovering mitochondrial function was performed. In the present study, we found that the gene expression of electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase (ETFDH was strongly downregulated by Cr(VI exposure. The levels of coenzyme 10 (CoQ10 and mitochondrial biogenesis presented by mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial DNA copy number were also significantly reduced after Cr(VI exposure. The subsequent, Cr(VI-induced mitochondrial damage and apoptosis were characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation, decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD and ATP production, increased methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA content, mitochondrial membrane depolarization and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP opening, increased Ca2+ levels, Cyt c release, decreased Bcl-2 expression, and significantly elevated Bax expression. The Cr(VI-induced deleterious changes were attenuated by pretreatment with CoQ10 in L-02 hepatocytes. These data suggest that Cr(VI induces CoQ10 deficiency in L-02 hepatocytes, indicating that this deficiency may be a biomarker of mitochondrial dysfunction in Cr(VI poisoning and that exogenous administration of CoQ10 may restore mitochondrial function and protect the liver from Cr(VI exposure.

  13. As duas naturezas de Lévi-Strauss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Descola

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Aborda-se aqui a complexidade do status do par conceitual natureza e cultura no pensamento de Lévi-Strauss. Ao mesmo tempo ferramenta de análise, cena filosófica dos primórdios e antinomia a superar, revisita-se os diferentes usos e significados na obra de Lévi-Strauss do conceito de natureza e sua relação com o de cultura. Mostra-se como é possível reconhecer na obra de Lévi-Strauss dois conceitos de natureza: por um lado, uma natureza que se opõe à cultura num programa científico formulado em termos classicamente dualistas e, por outro, uma teoria do conhecimento decididamente monista que considera o espírito como parte e produto desse mesmo mundo. Argumenta-se que se o dualismo entre cultura e natureza fundou o pensamento estruturalista de Lévi-Strauss, é na própria obra deste que encontramos os argumentos e meios de superá-lo. A vocação do estruturalismo na antropologia de hoje, no entanto, é de ir mais longe neste caminho do que foi o próprio fundador.

  14. VALUE OF THE NET TREASURY AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON THE FINANCIAL STABILITY OF THE COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela-Cristina Solomon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Practice proved that the management process cannot be based on routine and intuition, but on scientific analysis, on deep knowledge of the actual situation, as well as on identifying the vulnerabilities and the development opportunities. The economic and financial analysis performed by means the net treasury has the role of using the information supplied by accounting, based on which conclusions will be drawn on the efficiency of the activity performed within an entity. The importance of the net treasury arises from the fact that it shows the amount of liquid assets of an entity at a certain moment in time, being connected to the short-term financial operations, the purpose of which is to ensure the resources necessary to finance the company’s economic activity. The net treasury synthetically reflects the method of achieving financial stability within the company on long and short term. Our endeavour ends by determining the strengths and the weaknesses in the activity of a trading company, as well as the measures that are to be applied on short and on long term in order to achieve the present objectives.

  15. Procedure for plutonium determination using Pu(VI) spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, L.F.; Temer, D.J.; Jackson, D.D.

    1996-01-01

    This document describes a simple spectrophotometric method for determining total plutonium in nitric acid solutions based on the spectrum of Pu(VI). Plutonium samples in nitric acid are oxidized to Pu(VI) with Ce(IV) and the net absorbance at the 830 nm peak is measured

  16. Cross-correlation analysis between Chinese TF contracts and treasury ETF based on high-frequency data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Chen, Shi

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the high-frequency cross-correlation relationship between Chinese treasury futures contracts and treasury ETF. We analyze the logarithmic return of these two price series, from which we can conclude that both return series are not normally distributed and the futures markets have greater volatility. We find significant cross-correlation between these two series. We further confirm the relationship using the DCCA coefficient and the DMCA coefficient. We quantify the long-range cross-correlation with DCCA method, and we further show that the relationship is multifractal. An arbitrage algorithm based on DFA regression with stable return is proposed in the last part.

  17. Synthesis of surface Cr (VI)-imprinted magnetic nanoparticles for selective dispersive solid-phase extraction and determination of Cr (VI) in water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xue; Gao, Shuang; Ding, Guosheng; Tang, An-Na

    2017-01-01

    A facile, rapid and selective magnetic dispersed solid-phase extraction (dSPE) method for the extraction and enrichment of Cr (VI) prior to flame atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was introduced. For highly selective and efficient extraction, magnetic Cr (VI)-imprinted nanoparticles (Fe 3 O 4 @ Cr (VI) IIPs) were prepared by hyphenating surface ion-imprinted with sol-gel techniques. In the preparation process, chromate (Cr(VI)) was used as the template ion; vinylimidazole and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane were selected as organic functional monomer and co-monomer respectively. Another reagent, methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane was adopted as coupling agent to form the stable covalent bonding between organic and inorganic phases. The effects of various parameters on the extraction efficiency, such as pH of sample solution, the amount of adsorbent, extraction time, the type and concentration of eluent were systematically investigated. Furthermore, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the adsorption process were studied to explore the internal adsorption mechanism. Under optimized conditions, the preconcentration factor, limit of detection and linear range of the established dSPE-AAS method for Cr (VI) were found to be 98, 0.29μgL -1 and 4-140μgL -1 , respectively. The developed method was also successfully applied to the analysis of Cr (VI) in different water samples with satisfactory results, proving its reliability and feasibility in real sample analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modelling Cr(VI) removal by a combined carbon-activated sludge system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco, A. Micaela Ferro; Contreras, Edgardo M.; Zaritzky, Noemi E.

    2008-01-01

    The combined carbon-activated sludge process has been proposed as an alternative to protect the biomass against toxic substances in wastewaters; however, the information about the effect of powdered-activated carbon (PAC) addition in activated sludge reactors for the treatment of wastewaters containing Cr(VI) is limited. The objectives of the present study were: (a) to evaluate the removal of hexavalent chromium by (i) activated sludge microorganisms in aerobic batch reactors, (ii) powdered-activated carbon, and (iii) the combined action of powdered-activated carbon and biomass; (b) to propose mathematical models that interpret the experimental results. Different Cr(VI) removal systems were tested: (S1) biomass (activated sludge), (S2) PAC, and (S3) the combined activated carbon-biomass system. A Monod-based mathematical model was used to describe the kinetics of Cr(VI) removal in the system S1. A first-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI) and PAC respectively, was proposed to model the removal of Cr(VI) in the system S2. Cr(VI) removal in the combined carbon-biomass system (S3) was faster than both Cr(VI) removal using PAC or activated sludge individually. Results showed that the removal of Cr(VI) using the activated carbon-biomass system (S3) was adequately described by combining the kinetic equations proposed for the systems S1 and S2

  19. 21 CFR 17.54 - Deposit in the Treasury of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....54 Section 17.54 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL CIVIL MONEY PENALTIES HEARINGS § 17.54 Deposit in the Treasury of the United States. All amounts...-100), Food and Drug Administration, rm. 11-61, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, and shall be...

  20. A CMOS rail-to-rail linear VI-converter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, P.P.; Vervoort, P.P.; Wassenaar, R.F.

    1995-01-01

    A linear CMOS VI-converter operating in strong inversion with a common-mode input range from the negative to the positive supply rail is presented. The circuit consists of three linear VI-converters based on the difference of squares principle. Two of these perform the actual V to I conversion,

  1. Ternary uranium(VI) carbonato humate complex studied by cryo-TRLFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steudtner, R.; Sachs, S.; Schmeide, K.; Brendler, V.; Bernhard, G.

    2011-01-01

    The complex formation of U(VI) with humic acid (HA) in the presence of carbonate was studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low temperature (cryo-TRLFS) at pH 8.5. In the presence of HA, a decrease of the luminescence intensity of U(VI) and no shift of the emission band maxima in comparison to the luminescence spectrum of the UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- complex, the dominating U(VI) species under the applied experimental conditions in the absence of HA, was observed. The formation of a ternary U(VI) carbonato humate complex of the type UO 2 (CO 3 ) 2 HA(II) 4- starting from UO 2 (CO 3 ) 3 4- was concluded from the luminescence data. For this complex a complex stability constant of log K=2.83 ± 0.17 was determined. Slope analysis resulted in a slope of 1.12 ± 0.11, which verifies the postulated complexation reaction. The results agree very well with literature data. Speciation calculations show that the formation of the ternary U(VI) carbonato humate complex can significantly influence the U(VI) speciation under environmental conditions. (orig.)

  2. THE SURPRISINGLY CONSTANT STRENGTH OF O VI ABSORBERS OVER COSMIC TIME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    O VI absorption is observed in a wide range of astrophysical environments, including the local interstellar medium, the disk and halo of the Milky Way, high-velocity clouds, the Magellanic Clouds, starburst galaxies, the intergalactic medium (IGM), damped Lyα systems, and gamma-ray-burst host galaxies. Here, a new compilation of 775 O VI absorbers drawn from the literature is presented, all observed at high resolution (instrumental FWHM ≤ 20 km s -1 ) and covering the redshift range z = 0-3. In galactic environments [log N(H I) ∼> 20], the mean O VI column density is shown to be insensitive to metallicity, taking a value log N(O VI) ∼ 14.5 for galaxies covering the range -1.6 ∼ 4 K) clouds and hot (∼10 6 K) plasma, although many such layers would have to be intersected by a typical galaxy-halo sight line to build up the characteristic galactic N(O VI). The alternative, widely used model of single-phase photoionization for intergalactic O VI is ruled out by kinematic evidence in the majority of IGM O VI components at low and high redshift.

  3. Reduction of trace quantities of chromium(VI by strong acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezzin Sérgio H

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical behavior of Cr(VI at low concentrations (10-4 to 10-7 mol L-1 in several strong acids was studied using high specific activity 51Cr(VI as a tracer. The speciation of the products from these systems was carried out by ion exchange chromatography with stepwise elution. The results show that trace quantities of Cr(VI, monitored by means of radiochromium (51Cr, are reduced in the presence of mineral acids such as perchloric, hydrochloric, hydrofluoric, sulfuric, nitric and trifluoromethanesulfonic acids, even in the absence of conventional reducing agents, producing different measureable Cr(III species, depending on the acid anion. Detailed studies of the reduction of low concentrations of Cr(VI with nitric acid have shown that the relative rate of reduction increases as the concentration of the acid increases or as the concentration of the Cr(VI decreases.

  4. Estudio de inmunogenicidad de la vacuna antitifoídica cubana de polisacárido Vi vax-TyVi® en ratones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Ramírez

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi es un microorganismo que provoca más de 16 millones de casos de fiebre tifoidea con aproximadamente 600 000 muertes al año en todo el mundo. Dentro de las vacunas antitifoídicas la de polisacárido capsular Vi ha encontrado, gracias a sus incuestionables ventajas, una gran aceptación entre productores y consumidores. El presente trabajo aborda el estudio de inmunogenicidad de la vacuna antitifoídica cubana de polisacárido Vi vax-TyViâ en ratones. El estudio estuvo conformado por un grupo control no inoculado y un segundo grupo que recibió 0,05 mL de la vacuna por vía intramuscular. Se tomaron muestras de sangre a los -3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56 y 84 días. La actividad de anticuerpos IgG antipolisacárido Vi de los sueros individuales fue determinada por ELISA. Los datos fueron analizados por grupo y por sexo y se calculó el porcentaje de seroconversión, considerándose respondedor aquel animal que al menos aumentara en cuatro veces su título inicial. La respuesta de anticuerpos inducida por la vacuna mostró un aumento notable de los títulos de IgG antipolisacárido Vi en el grupo vacunado (100% de seroconversión, mientras que el grupo control no incrementó sus niveles mínimos iniciales (0% de respondedores. Aunque más dispersa, la respuesta de anticuerpos antiVi fue significativamente mayor en las hembras que en los machos.

  5. The October 2014 United States Treasury bond flash crash and the contributory effect of mini flash crashes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary S Levine

    Full Text Available We investigate the causal uncertainty surrounding the flash crash in the U.S. Treasury bond market on October 15, 2014, and the unresolved concern that no clear link has been identified between the start of the flash crash at 9:33 and the opening of the U.S. equity market at 9:30. We consider the contributory effect of mini flash crashes in equity markets, and find that the number of equity mini flash crashes in the three-minute window between market open and the Treasury Flash Crash was 2.6 times larger than the number experienced in any other three-minute window in the prior ten weekdays. We argue that (a this statistically significant finding suggests that mini flash crashes in equity markets both predicted and contributed to the October 2014 U.S. Treasury Bond Flash Crash, and (b mini-flash crashes are important phenomena with negative externalities that deserve much greater scholarly attention.

  6. The October 2014 United States Treasury bond flash crash and the contributory effect of mini flash crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary S; Hale, Scott A; Floridi, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the causal uncertainty surrounding the flash crash in the U.S. Treasury bond market on October 15, 2014, and the unresolved concern that no clear link has been identified between the start of the flash crash at 9:33 and the opening of the U.S. equity market at 9:30. We consider the contributory effect of mini flash crashes in equity markets, and find that the number of equity mini flash crashes in the three-minute window between market open and the Treasury Flash Crash was 2.6 times larger than the number experienced in any other three-minute window in the prior ten weekdays. We argue that (a) this statistically significant finding suggests that mini flash crashes in equity markets both predicted and contributed to the October 2014 U.S. Treasury Bond Flash Crash, and (b) mini-flash crashes are important phenomena with negative externalities that deserve much greater scholarly attention.

  7. Synthesis, structure and properties of oxo- and dioxochloride complexes of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramenko, V.L.; Sergienko, V.S.; Egorova, O.A.

    2005-01-01

    Complexes of oxo- and dioxochlorides of molybdenum(VI) and tungsten(VI) with 8-oxyquinoline of molecular and intracomplex type are synthesized and studied by the method of IR spectroscopy. The complexes have octahedral structure. It is proposed that 8-oxyquinoline in molecular complexes is coordinated by central atom through nitrogen atom of heterocycle, but in intracomplex compounds - through heterocyclic nitrogen atom and oxygen atom of deprotonated OH-group. Thermal stability of the complexes is studied [ru

  8. Quantifying Cr(VI) Production and Export from Serpentine Soil of the California Coast Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Cynthia N; Fendorf, Scott; Webb, Samuel M; Maher, Kate

    2017-01-03

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is generated in serpentine soils and exported to surface and groundwaters at levels above health-based drinking water standards. Although Cr(VI) concentrations are elevated in serpentine soil pore water, few studies have reported field evidence documenting Cr(VI) production rates and fluxes that govern Cr(VI) transport from soil to water sources. We report Cr speciation (i) in four serpentine soil depth profiles derived from the California Coast Range serpentinite belt and (ii) in local surface waters. Within soils, we detected Cr(VI) in the same horizons where Cr(III)-minerals are colocated with biogenic Mn(III/IV)-oxides, suggesting Cr(VI) generation through oxidation by Mn-oxides. Water-extractable Cr(VI) concentrations increase with depth constituting a 7.8 to 12 kg/km 2 reservoir of Cr(VI) in soil. Here, Cr(VI) is produced at a rate of 0.3 to 4.8 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr and subsequently flushed from soil during water infiltration, exporting 0.01 to 3.9 kg Cr(VI)/km 2 /yr at concentrations ranging from 25 to 172 μg/L. Although soil-derived Cr(VI) is leached from soil at concentrations exceeding 10 μg/L, due to reduction and dilution during transport to streams, Cr(VI) levels measured in local surface waters largely remain below California's drinking water limit.

  9. Chromium (VI) biosorption properties of multiple resistant bacteria isolated from industrial sewerage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyetibo, Ganiyu Oladunjoye; Ilori, Matthew Olusoji; Obayori, Oluwafemi Sunday; Amund, Olukayode Oladipo

    2013-08-01

    Chromium (VI) [Cr (VI)] biosorption by four resistant autochthonous bacterial strains was investigated to determine their potential for use in sustainable marine water-pollution control. Maximum exchange between Cr (VI) ions and protons on the cells surfaces were at 30-35 °C, pH 2.0 and 350-450 mg/L. The bacterial strains effectively removed 79.0-90.5 % Cr (VI) ions from solution. Furthermore, 85.3-93.0 % of Cr (VI) ions were regenerated from the biomasses, and 83.4-91.7 % of the metal was adsorbed when the biomasses was reused. Langmuir isotherm performed better than Freundlich isotherm, depicting that Cr (VI) affinity was in the sequence Rhodococcus sp. AL03Ni > Burkholderia cepacia AL96Co > Corynebacterium kutscheri FL108Hg > Pseudomonas aeruginosa CA207Ni. Biosorption isotherms confirmed that Rhodococcus sp. AL03Ni was a better biosorbent with a maximum uptake of 107.46 mg of Cr (VI) per g (dry weight) of biomass. The results highlight the high potential of the organisms for bacteria-based detoxification of Cr (VI) via biosorption.

  10. QUALITY, EFFECTIVENESS AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE OF LOCAL TREASURIES BUDGET ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Tešić

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of management information systems (MIS of local treasuries budget accounting is to provide qualitative information support to management in process of decision making and to provide effective managing of key processes of budget accounting, in accordance with requests of management on all levels of decision making. From the aspect of effectiveness and request for quality, in accordance with request of users and defined system goals, this research includes the analysis of characteristics and goals of identified key processes, critical success factors (CSF, key performance indicators (KPI, standards for realization of users requests, results of processes and indicators of goals realisation. The aim of this paper, based on the results of the analysis, is to develop models for evaluation of quality and effectiveness and to define key performance indicators of MIS of budget accounting, in order to perceive the level of achievement of the goals of the system, effectiveness of processes and level of fulfillment of requirements and needs of all users groups that are significant for budge t accounting of local treasuries.

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmatz Paul

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine, severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14. Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity ®, clinical management was limited to supportive care and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Galsulfase is now widely available and is a specific therapy providing improved endurance with an acceptable safety profile. Prognosis is variable depending on the age of onset, rate of disease progression, age at initiation of ERT and on the quality of the medical care provided.

  12. Integrated Cr(VI) removal using constructed wetlands and composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Mar-Yam; Chowdhury, Abu Khayer Md Muktadirul Bari; Michailides, Michail K; Akratos, Christos S; Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Vayenas, Dimitrios V

    2015-01-08

    The present work was conducted to study integrated chromium removal from aqueous solutions in horizontal subsurface (HSF) constructed wetlands. Two pilot-scale HSF constructed wetlands (CWs) units were built and operated. One unit was planted with common reeds (Phragmites australis) and one was kept unplanted. Influent concentrations of Cr(VI) ranged from 0.5 to 10mg/L. The effect of temperature and hydraulic residence time (8-0.5 days) on Cr(VI) removal were studied. Temperature was proved to affect Cr(VI) removal in both units. In the planted unit maximum Cr(VI) removal efficiencies of 100% were recorded at HRT's of 1 day with Cr(VI) concentrations of 5, 2.5 and 1mg/L, while a significantly lower removal rate was recorded in the unplanted unit. Harvested reed biomass from the CWs was co-composted with olive mill wastes. The final product had excellent physicochemical characteristics (C/N: 14.1-14.7, germination index (GI): 145-157%, Cr: 8-10mg/kg dry mass), fulfills EU requirements and can be used as a fertilizer in organic farming. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Retention of U(VI) onto silica in presence of model organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham, T.T.H.; Mercier-Bion, F.; Drot, R.; Lagarde, G.; Simoni, E.; Lambert, J.

    2008-01-01

    It is well-known that the organic matter influences the retention of ions onto mineral surfaces. However, the major part of concerned studies implies humic substances and complex solids. Another approach for identifying the sorption mechanisms is possible by studying simpler solids than those present in natural medium. So, silica is chosen as mineral surface because of its abundance in soils and of the presence of Si-O groups in clayey minerals. Uranium (VI) is selected as cation. Simple organic molecules like acetic (one carboxylic group) and oxalic (two carboxylic functions) acids are considered as models of the natural organic matter for understanding their role in the retention of U(VI) onto powders and slides of silica. Binary (organics/silica, U(VI)/silica) and ternary systems (organics/silica/U(VI)) are studied by complementary approaches. Sorption edges as function of pH are obtained by liquid scintillation methods and capillary electrophoresis. Different spectroscopic techniques are used to deduce the interactions between the organic matter and U(VI) sorbed onto the silica whose: Time-Resolved Laser induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Nuclear Microprobe Analysis (NMA). The results of the effect of these model organic molecules onto the U(VI) retention showed a good agreement between the different techniques. Concerning the acetic acid, there are not differences in the sorption percentages of uranyl (see the figure). All these results indicate that the uranyl-acetate complexes stay in the aqueous solution rather than sorbing onto the silica. On the contrary, oxalic acid influences the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. The sorption percentage of U(VI) in the ternary system (oxalic acid/silica/U(VI)) is lower than the binary system (U(VI)/silica) (see the figure). So, the presence of oxalic acid decreases the sorption of U(VI) onto the silica surface. (authors)

  14. Experimental Monitoring of Cr(VI) Bio-reduction Using Electrochemical Geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birsen Canan; Gary R. Olhoeft; William A. Smith

    2007-01-01

    Many Department of Energy (DOE) sites are contaminated with highly carcinogenic hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)). In this research, we explore the feasibility of applying complex resistivity to the detection and monitoring of microbially-induced reduction of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) to a less toxic form (Cr(III)). We hope to measure the change in ionic concentration that occurs during this reduction reaction. This form of reduction promises to be an attractive alternative to more expensive remedial treatment methods. The specific goal of this research is to define the minimum and maximum concentration of the chemical and biological compounds in contaminated samples for which the Cr(VI) - Cr(III) reduction processes could be detected via complex resistivity. There are three sets of experiments, each comprised of three sample columns. The first experiment compares three concentrations of Cr(VI) at the same bacterial cell concentration. The second experiment establishes background samples with, and without, Cr(VI) and bacterial cells. The third experiment examines the influence of three different bacterial cell counts on the same concentration of Cr(VI). A polarization relaxation mechanism was observed between 10 and 50 Hz. The polarization mechanism, unfortunately, was not unique to bio-chemically active samples. Spectral analysis of complex resistivity data, however, showed that the frequency where the phase minimum occurred was not constant for bio-chemically active samples throughout the experiment. A significant shifts in phase minima occurred between 10 to 20 Hz from the initiation to completion of Cr(VI) reduction. This phenomena was quantified using the Cole-Cole model and the Marquardt-Levenberg nonlinear least square minimization method. The data suggests that the relaxation time and the time constant of this relaxation are the Cole-Cole parameters most sensitive to changes in biologically-induced reduction of Cr(VI)

  15. Paisaje del viñedo: patrimonio y recurso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Vicente Elías

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available La propuesta de que el paisaje del viñedo sea el complemento a la visita a la bodega, siendo esta el eje del turismo del vino, es el objetivo de este trabajo. Repasando los conceptos variables de patrimonio, llegamos al paisaje del viñedo como recurso, formando parte del patrimonio natural. Pero este no se puede desvincular de los otros aspectos patrimoniales, por lo que la cultura tradicional es el soporte de la tipología de paisaje que queremos proponer y que va contrastar con los nuevos paisajes del viñedo que surgen de las recientes técnicas en los cultivos y de la actual vitivicultura, emparejada con una moderna “cultura del vino”. El análisis de las diversas normativas, que salvaguardan el paisaje y la comprobación del escaso valor legal del paisaje del viñedo, es otro puntal de este trabajo que trata de unir paisaje con cultura tradicional como recursos del Turismo del Vino, integrados en las Rutas del Vino.

  16. PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. XII. MAPPING STELLAR METALLICITY DISTRIBUTIONS IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregersen, Dylan; Seth, Anil C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Williams, Benjamin F.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Johnson, L. C.; Lewis, Alexia R. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lang, Dustin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Girardi, Leó [Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova—INAF, Vicolo dell’Osservatori 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bell, Eric [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon, 1151 E. Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85706 (United States); Fouesneau, Morgan [MPIA, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Guhathakurta, Puragra; Hamren, Katherine M. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kalirai, Jason [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Monachesi, Antonela [MPA, Garching (Germany); Olsen, Knut, E-mail: dylan.gregersen@utah.edu, E-mail: aseth@astro.utah.edu [NOAO, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    We present a study of spatial variations in the metallicity of old red giant branch stars in the Andromeda galaxy. Photometric metallicity estimates are derived by interpolating isochrones for over seven million stars in the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey. This is the first systematic study of stellar metallicities over the inner 20 kpc of Andromeda’s galactic disk. We see a clear metallicity gradient of −0.020 ± 0.004 dex kpc{sup −1} from ∼4–20 kpc assuming a constant red giant branch age. This metallicity gradient is derived after correcting for the effects of photometric bias and completeness and dust extinction, and is quite insensitive to these effects. The unknown age gradient in M31's disk creates the dominant systematic uncertainty in our derived metallicity gradient. However, spectroscopic analyses of galaxies similar to M31 show that they typically have small age gradients that make this systematic error comparable to the 1σ error on our metallicity gradient measurement. In addition to the metallicity gradient, we observe an asymmetric local enhancement in metallicity at radii of 3–6 kpc that appears to be associated with Andromeda’s elongated bar. This same region also appears to have an enhanced stellar density and velocity dispersion.

  17. Delineation and Diagnostic Criteria of Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poretti Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome type VI (OFD VI represents a rare phenotypic subtype of Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD. In the original report polydactyly, oral findings, intellectual disability, and absence of the cerebellar vermis at post-mortem characterized the syndrome. Subsequently, the molar tooth sign (MTS has been found in patients with OFD VI, prompting the inclusion of OFD VI in JSRD. We studied the clinical, neurodevelopmental, neuroimaging, and genetic findings in a cohort of 16 patients with OFD VI. We derived the following inclusion criteria from the literature: 1 MTS and one oral finding and polydactyly, or 2 MTS and more than one typical oral finding. The OFD VI neuroimaging pattern was found to be more severe than in other JSRD subgroups and includes severe hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, hypoplastic and dysplastic cerebellar hemispheres, marked enlargement of the posterior fossa, increased retrocerebellar collection of cerebrospinal fluid, abnormal brainstem, and frequently supratentorial abnormalities that occasionally include characteristic hypothalamic hamartomas. Additionally, two new JSRD neuroimaging findings (ascending superior cerebellar peduncles and fused thalami have been identified. Tongue hamartomas, additional frenula, upper lip notch, and mesoaxial polydactyly are specific findings in OFD VI, while cleft lip/palate and other types of polydactyly of hands and feet are not specific. Involvement of other organs may include ocular findings, particularly colobomas. The majority of the patients have absent motor development and profound cognitive impairment. In OFD VI, normal cognitive functions are possible, but exceptional. Sequencing of known JSRD genes in most patients failed to detect pathogenetic mutations, therefore the genetic basis of OFD VI remains unknown. Compared with other JSRD subgroups, the neurological findings and impairment of motor development and cognitive functions in OFD

  18. New approach in modeling Cr(VI) sorption onto biomass from metal binary mixtures solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Anhui Normal University, South Jiuhua Road, 189, 241002 Wuhu (China); Chemical Engineering Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain); Fiol, Núria [Chemical Engineering Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain); Villaescusa, Isabel, E-mail: Isabel.Villaescusa@udg.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain); Poch, Jordi [Applied Mathematics Department, Escola Politècnica Superior, Universitat de Girona, Ma Aurèlia Capmany, 61, 17071 Girona (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    In the last decades Cr(VI) sorption equilibrium and kinetic studies have been carried out using several types of biomasses. However there are few researchers that consider all the simultaneous processes that take place during Cr(VI) sorption (i.e., sorption/reduction of Cr(VI) and simultaneous formation and binding of reduced Cr(III)) when formulating a model that describes the overall sorption process. On the other hand Cr(VI) scarcely exists alone in wastewaters, it is usually found in mixtures with divalent metals. Therefore, the simultaneous removal of Cr(VI) and divalent metals in binary mixtures and the interactive mechanism governing Cr(VI) elimination have gained more and more attention. In the present work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto exhausted coffee from Cr(VI)–Cu(II) binary mixtures has been studied in a stirred batch reactor. A model including Cr(VI) sorption and reduction, Cr(III) sorption and the effect of the presence of Cu(II) in these processes has been developed and validated. This study constitutes an important advance in modeling Cr(VI) sorption kinetics especially when chromium sorption is in part based on the sorbent capacity of reducing hexavalent chromium and a metal cation is present in the binary mixture. - Highlights: • A kinetic model including Cr(VI) reduction, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption/desorption • Synergistic effect of Cu(II) on Cr(VI) elimination included in the model • Model validation by checking it against independent sets of data.

  19. New approach in modeling Cr(VI) sorption onto biomass from metal binary mixtures solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chang; Fiol, Núria; Villaescusa, Isabel; Poch, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades Cr(VI) sorption equilibrium and kinetic studies have been carried out using several types of biomasses. However there are few researchers that consider all the simultaneous processes that take place during Cr(VI) sorption (i.e., sorption/reduction of Cr(VI) and simultaneous formation and binding of reduced Cr(III)) when formulating a model that describes the overall sorption process. On the other hand Cr(VI) scarcely exists alone in wastewaters, it is usually found in mixtures with divalent metals. Therefore, the simultaneous removal of Cr(VI) and divalent metals in binary mixtures and the interactive mechanism governing Cr(VI) elimination have gained more and more attention. In the present work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto exhausted coffee from Cr(VI)–Cu(II) binary mixtures has been studied in a stirred batch reactor. A model including Cr(VI) sorption and reduction, Cr(III) sorption and the effect of the presence of Cu(II) in these processes has been developed and validated. This study constitutes an important advance in modeling Cr(VI) sorption kinetics especially when chromium sorption is in part based on the sorbent capacity of reducing hexavalent chromium and a metal cation is present in the binary mixture. - Highlights: • A kinetic model including Cr(VI) reduction, Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption/desorption • Synergistic effect of Cu(II) on Cr(VI) elimination included in the model • Model validation by checking it against independent sets of data

  20. Cr(VI) retention and transport through Fe(III)-coated natural zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Gaoxiang [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Geosciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liao, Libing [School of Materials Science and Technology, China University of Geosciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Hanson, Renee; Leick, Samantha; Hoeppner, Nicole [Geosciences Department, University of Wisconsin-Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2012-06-30

    Graphical abstract: Breakthrough curves of Cr(VI) from columns packed with raw zeolite (a) and Fe(III)-zeolite (b). The solid line in (b) is the HYDRUS-1D fit to the observed data with adsorption term only, while the dashed line in (b) includes a reduction term in the HYDRUS-1D fit. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zeolite modified with Fe(III) could be used for adsorption and retention of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Fe present on zeolite was in an amorphous Fe(OH){sub 3} form. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of 82 mg/kg was found on Fe(III)-zeolite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A Cr(VI) retardation factor of 3 or 5 was determined from column and batch studies. - Abstract: Cr(VI) is a group A chemical based on the weight of evidence of carcinogenicity. Its transport and retention in soils and groundwater have been studied extensively. Zeolite is a major component in deposits originated from volcanic ash and tuff after alteration. In this study, zeolite aggregates with the particle size of 1.4-2.4 mm were preloaded with Fe(III). The influence of present Fe(III) on Cr(VI) retention by and transport through zeolite was studied under batch and column experiments. The added Fe(III) resulted in an enhanced Cr(VI) retention by the zeolite with a capacity of 82 mg/kg. The Cr(VI) adsorption on Fe(III)-zeolite followed a pseudo-second order kinetically and the Freundlich adsorption isotherm thermodynamically. Fitting the column experimental data to HYDRUS-1D resulted in a retardation factor of 3 in comparison to 5 calculated from batch tests at an initial Cr(VI) concentration of 3 mg/L. The results from this study showed that enhanced adsorption and retention of Cr(VI) may happen in soils derived from volcanic ash and tuff that contains significant amounts of zeolite with extensive Fe(III) coating.

  1. Simultaneous Treatment of Agro-Industrial and Industrial Wastewaters: Case Studies of Cr(VI/Second Cheese Whey and Cr(VI/Winery Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triantafyllos I. Tatoulis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI was co-treated either with second cheese whey (SCW or winery effluents (WE using pilot-scale biological trickling filters in series under different operating conditions. Two pilot-scale filters in series using plastic support media were used in each case. The first filter (i.e., Cr-SCW-filter or Cr-WE-filter aimed at Cr(VI reduction and the partial removal of dissolved chemical oxygen demand (d-COD from SCW or WE and was inoculated with indigenous microorganisms originating from industrial sludge. The second filter in series (i.e., SCW-filter or WE-filter aimed at further d-COD removal and was inoculated with indigenous microorganisms that were isolated from SCW or WE. Various Cr(VI (5–100 mg L−1 and SCW or WE (d-COD, 1000–25,000 mg L−1 feed concentrations were tested. Based on the experimental results, the sequencing batch reactor operating mode with recirculation of 0.5 L min−1 proved very efficient since it led to complete Cr(VI reduction in the first filter in series and achieved high Cr(VI reduction rates (up to 36 and 43 mg L−1 d−1, for SCW and WW, respectively. Percentage d-COD removal for SCW and WE in the first filter was rather low, ranging from 14 to 42.5% and from 4 to 29% in the Cr-SCW-filter and Cr-WE-filter, respectively. However, the addition of the second filter in series enhanced total d-COD removal to above 97% and 90.5% for SCW and WE, respectively. The above results indicate that agro-industrial wastewater could be used as a carbon source for Cr(VI reduction, while the use of two trickling filters in series could effectively treat both industrial and agro-industrial wastewaters with very low installation and operational costs.

  2. Ternary uranium(VI) carbonato humate complex studied by cryo-TRLFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steudtner, R.; Sachs, S.; Schmeide, K.; Brendler, V.; Bernhard, G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Radiochemistry

    2011-07-01

    The complex formation of U(VI) with humic acid (HA) in the presence of carbonate was studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy at low temperature (cryo-TRLFS) at pH 8.5. In the presence of HA, a decrease of the luminescence intensity of U(VI) and no shift of the emission band maxima in comparison to the luminescence spectrum of the UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} complex, the dominating U(VI) species under the applied experimental conditions in the absence of HA, was observed. The formation of a ternary U(VI) carbonato humate complex of the type UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}HA(II){sup 4-} starting from UO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4-} was concluded from the luminescence data. For this complex a complex stability constant of log K=2.83 {+-} 0.17 was determined. Slope analysis resulted in a slope of 1.12 {+-} 0.11, which verifies the postulated complexation reaction. The results agree very well with literature data. Speciation calculations show that the formation of the ternary U(VI) carbonato humate complex can significantly influence the U(VI) speciation under environmental conditions. (orig.)

  3. Recovery of uranium (VI) from low level aqueous radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulshrestha, Mukul

    1996-01-01

    Investigation was undertaken to evaluate the uranium (VI) removal and recovery potential of a naturally occurring, nonviable macrofungus, Ganoderma Lucidum from the simulated low level aqueous nuclear waste. These low level waste waters discharged from nuclear mine tailings and nuclear power reactors have a typical U(VI) concentration of 10-100 mg/L. It is possible to recover this uranium economically with the advent of biosorption as a viable technology. Extensive laboratory studies have revealed Ganoderma Lucidum to be a potential biosorbent with a specific uptake of 2.75 mg/g at an equilibrium U(VI) concentration of 10 mg/L at pH 4.5. To recover the sorbed U(VI), the studies indicated 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 to be an effective elutant. The kinetics of U(VI) desorption from loaded Ganoderma Lucidum with 0.2N Na 2 CO 3 as elutant, was found to be rapid with more than 75% recovery occurring in the first five minutes, the specific metal release rate being 0.102 mg/g/min. The equilibrium data fitted to a linearised Freundlich plot and exhibited a near 100% recovery of sorbed U(VI), clearly revealing a cost-effective method of recovery of precious uranium from low level wastewater. (author). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. Solvent impregnated resin for isolation of U(VI) from industrial wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karve, M.; Rajgor, R.V.

    2008-01-01

    A solid-phase extraction method based upon impregnation of Cyanex 302 (bis(2,4,4- trimethylpentyl)mono-thio-phosphinic acid) on Amberlite XAD-2 resin is proposed for isolation of U(VI) from uranmicrolite ore tailing samples and industrial effluent samples. U(VI) was sorbed from nitric acid media on the solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) and was recovered completely with 1.0 M HCl. Based upon sorption behavior of U(VI) with Cyanex 302, it was quantitatively sorbed on the SIR in a dynamic method, while the other metal ions were not sorbed by the modified resin. The preparation of impregnated resin is simple, based upon physical interaction of the extractant and solid support, has good sorption capacity for U(VI), and is also reliable for detection of traces of U(VI). (authors)

  5. 31 CFR 19.615 - How does the Department of the Treasury notify a person of a suspension or debarment action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Department of the Treasury notify a person of a suspension or debarment action? 19.615 Section 19.615 Money and Finance...) General Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 19.615 How does the Department of the...

  6. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Liyuan; Huang Shunhong; Yang Zhihui; Peng Bing; Huang Yan; Chen Yuehui

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr) is a toxic element causing serious environmental threat. Recently, more and more attention is paid to the bio-remediation of Cr (VI) in the contaminated soils. Cr (VI) remediation by indigenous bacteria in soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag at a steel-alloy factory in Hunan Province, China, was investigated in the present study. The results showed that when sufficient nutrients were amended into the contaminated soils, total Cr (VI) concentration declined from the initial value of 462.8 to 10 mg kg -1 at 10 days and the removal rate was 97.8%. Water soluble Cr (VI) decreased from the initial concentration of 383.8 to 1.7 mg kg -1 . Exchangeable Cr (VI) and carbonates-bound Cr (VI) were removed by 92.6% and 82.4%, respectively. Meanwhile, four Cr (VI) resistant bacterial strains were isolated from the soil under the chromium-containing slag. Only one strain showed a high ability for Cr (VI) reduction in liquid culture. This strain was identified as Pannonibacter phragmitetus sp. by gene sequencing of 16S rRNA. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) analysis indicated that Cr (VI) was reduced into trivalent chromium. The results suggest that indigenous bacterial strains have potential application for Cr (VI) remediation in the soils contaminated by chromium-containing slag.

  7. Impact of water quality parameters on the sorption of U(VI) onto hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Donglin; Wang Xianbiao; Yang Shitong; Guo Zhiqiang; Sheng Guodong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the sorption of U(VI) from aqueous solution on hematite was studied as a function of various water quality parameters such as contact time, pH, ionic strength, soil humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA), solid content and temperature by using a batch technique. The results demonstrated that the sorption of U(VI) was strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH 6.0 and the sorption was mainly dominated by inner-sphere surface complexation. The presence of HA/FA increases U(VI) sorption at low pH, whereas decreases U(VI) sorption at high pH. The thermodynamic parameters (ΔH 0 , ΔS 0 , and ΔG 0 ) were calculated from the temperature dependent sorption isotherms, and the results suggested that U(VI) sorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results might be important for the application of hematite in U(VI) pollution management. Highlights: ► The sorption of U(VI) was strongly dependent on ionic strength at pH 6.0. ► A positive effect of HA/FA on U(VI) sorption was found at low pH, whereas a negative effect was observed at high pH. ► U(VI) sorption was a spontaneous and endothermic process. ► The results are quite important for the application of hematite in U(VI) pollution management.

  8. Electrochemical processes for the environmental remediation of toxic Cr(VI): A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Wei; Du, Hao; Zheng, Shili; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent advances in electrochemical technologies for practical Cr(VI) treatment applications was reviewed. • The mechanism and performance of electrocoagulation, electrochemical reduction, electrodialysis, electro-electrodialysis and electrodeionization were discussed and compared. • The remained challenges and future perspectives were commented. - Abstract: Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) is extremely toxic and classified as one of the 17 chemicals posing the greatest threat to humans. Large amounts of Cr(VI) compounds are directly or indirectly discharged into the environment, therefore considerable efforts have been made to control the Cr(VI) concentration below the recommended level. It has been demonstrated that electrochemical technique is one of the most efficient and environmental benign approach for the Cr(VI) removal. This review aims at recent advances in electrochemical technology for practical Cr(VI) treatment applications. By using the “clean reagent” of electron, Cr(VI) can be completely eliminated or separated via different electrochemical techniques such as electrocoagulation, electrochemical reduction, electrodialysis, electro-electrodialysis and electrodeionization. Besides, the mechanism and performance of different strategies are commented and compared. The treatment process is largely dependent on variables such as pH, electrode materials, cell configuration and techniques integration. Furthermore, the remained limitation and challenges for the electrochemical Cr(VI) remediation are also discussed.

  9. Bulk solubility and speciation of plutonium(VI) in phosphate-containing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weger, H.T.; Okajima, S.; Cunnane, J.C.; Reed, D.T.

    1992-01-01

    The solubility and speciation of Pu(VI) with phosphate as a function of pH was investigated to determine the ability of phosphate to act as an actinide getter. The general properties were first investigated and are reported here with the goal of performing more quantitative experiments in the future. Solubility was approached from oversaturation at initial pH = 4, 10 and 13.4. Absorption spectra were recorded, the solution filtered and the filtrate counted. Absorption spectra were obtained at varying phosphate concentrations and at pH of 2.7 to 11.9. The effect of complexation on the 833 mn Pu(VI) band was characterized. Evidence for three phosphate complexes was obtained for pH -5 to 10 -6 M Pu(VI) was measured in the filtrate at pH ≤ 10 that were passed through a 50 mn filter. Pu(VI) complexes with phosphate over hydroxide at pH ≤ 11.6, but at pH ≥ 11.9, only hydrolyzed Pu(VI) was detected. At pH = 12, the concentration of Pu(VI) was as high as 10 -4 M

  10. Bacillus lichenformis γ-glutamyl exopolymer: Physicochemical characterization and U(VI) interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, L.M.; Neu, M.P.; Vanderberg, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Complexation by microbially produced exopolymers may significantly impact the environmental mobility and toxicity of metals. This study focused on the conformational structure of the bacterial exopolymer, γ-D-poly(glutamic acid) and its interactions with U(VI) examined using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Solution pH, polymer concentration, and ionic strength affected the conformation of the exopolymer, and U(VI) binding was monitored. At low pH, low concentration, or low ionic strength, this exopolymer exists in an α-helical conformation, while at high pH, concentration, or ionic strength the exopolymer exhibits a β-sheet structure. The change in exopolymer conformation is likely to influence the number and nature of exposed surface functional groups, sites most responsible for metal complexation. The authors found the polyglutamate capsule binds U(VI) in a binuclear, bidentate fashion; in contrast the glutamate monomer forms a mononuclear, bidentate complex with U(VI). The apparent polynuclear binding of U(VI) may induce β-sheet structure formation provided the U(VI) Concentration is sufficiently high

  11. Selectivity enhancement of phosphate based functional polymeric gels towards Uranium(VI) using ion imprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chappa, Sankararao; Agarwal, Chhavi; Pandey, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    The imprinting of gel containing polymer chains of ethylene glycol methacrylate phosphate (EGMP) for U(VI) ions were carried out. The U(VI) imprinting has been carried out in pure EGMP and in EGMP: poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) = 1:9 composition. Complexation of the monomer with template (U(VI)) followed by polymerization have been used to imprint the U(VI) onto the polymer chains. The comparison of uptake studies of U(VI) and Pu(IV) at 3 M HNO 3 shows increased selectivity of U(VI) relative to Pu(IV) for both the gel compositions. The less uptake of U(VI) for imprinted EGMP:PEGMA gel relative to pure imprinted EGMP gel at tracer level can be possibly due to the requirement of two EGMP units in the vicinity for U(VI) complexation. (author)

  12. Clinical evaluation of complete solo surgery with the "ViKY®" robotic laparoscope manipulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Takahashi, Masanori; Nishinari, Naoto; Matsuya, Hideki; Tosha, Tsutomu; Minagawa, Yukihiro; Shimooki, Osamu; Abe, Tadashi

    2017-02-01

    Advancement in both surgical technique and medical equipment has enabled solo surgery. ViKY ® Endoscope Positioning System (ViKY ® ) is a robotic system that remotely controls an endoscope and provides direct vision control to the surgeon. Here, we report our experience with ViKY ® -assisted solo surgery. We retrospectively examined 25 cases of solo surgery TAPP with ViKY ® . ViKY ® was setup by the surgeon alone, and the setup duration was determined as the time at which the side rail was positioned and that when the endoscope was installed. For assessing the control unit, the number of false movements was counted. We compared the operative results between ViKY ® -assisted solo surgery TAPP and the conventional method with an assistant. The average time to set up ViKY ® was 7.9 min. The average number of commands for ViKY ® during surgery was 98.3, and the average number of errors and no response of control unit was 7.9. The mean duration of surgery was 136 min for the ViKY ® group, including the setup time, and 117 min for the conventional method. No case required an assistant during the operation. There was also no difference between the two groups with regard to postoperative complications and the rate of recurrence. ViKY ® proved reliable in recognizing orders with very few failures, and the operations were performed safely and were comparable to the conventional operations with assistants. Solo surgery with ViKY ® was beneficial in this clinical evaluation.

  13. EXPORT PROMOTION: Export-Import Bank and Treasury Differ in Their Approaches to Using Tied Aid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... This legislation required Ex-Im Bank to administer the program in consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury and in accordance with the Secretary's recommendations on the most effective use...

  14. cis-dioxomolybdenum(VI)-(ONO)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Various ONO type Schiff base ligands L(H)2 used for the preparation of ... and derivatives.6–33 Depending on the method of prepa- ration .... HCl. Scheme 6. Synthesis of a Mo(VI) Schiff base complexe by selective inversion at C–1 carbon of a ...

  15. Multi-crystalline II-VI based multijunction solar cells and modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Brian E.; Connor, Stephen T.; Groves, James R.; Peters, Craig H.

    2015-06-30

    Multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells and methods for fabrication of same are disclosed herein. A multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cell includes a first photovoltaic sub-cell comprising silicon, a tunnel junction, and a multi-crystalline second photovoltaic sub-cell. A plurality of the multi-crystalline group II-VI solar cells can be interconnected to form low cost, high throughput flat panel, low light concentration, and/or medium light concentration photovoltaic modules or devices.

  16. 24 CFR 972.115 - Relationship between required conversions and HOPE VI developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conversions and HOPE VI developments. 972.115 Section 972.115 Housing and Urban Development Regulations... Relationship between required conversions and HOPE VI developments. HUD actions to approve or deny proposed HOPE VI revitalization plans must be consistent with the requirements of this subpart. Developments...

  17. Enhanced Cr(VI) removal by polyethylenimine- and phosphorus-codoped hierarchical porous carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shixia; Wang, Jun; Wu, Zeliang; Deng, Qiang; Tu, Wenfeng; Dai, Guiping; Zeng, Zheling; Deng, Shuguang

    2018-08-01

    The amino- and phosphorus-codoped (N,P-codoped) porous carbons derived from oil-tea shells were facilely fabricated through a combination of phosphoric acid (H 3 PO 4 ) activation and amino (polyethylenimine, PEI) modification method. The as-synthesized carbon adsorbents were systematically characterized and evaluated for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous solutions. The relationship between adsorbent properties and adsorption behaviors was illustrated. Moreover, the influences of contact time, initial Cr(VI) concentration, pH, coexisting anions and temperature were also investigated. The adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) could be perfectly described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Sips adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) on the carbon adsorbents synthesized in this work was 355.0 mg/g, and this excellent Cr(VI) capacity could be sustained with other coexisting anions. In addition to high surface area and suitable pore size distribution, the high Cr(VI) removal capacity is induced by rich heteroatoms incorporation and the Cr(VI) removal mechanism was clearly illustrated. Furthermore, the continuous column breakthrough experiment on obtained N,P-codoped carbon was conducted and well fitted by the Thomas model. This work revealed that PEI modification and P-containing groups could significantly enhance Cr(VI) adsorption capacity and make these N,P-codoped biomass-derived carbons potent adsorbents in practical water treatment applications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A combined wet chemistry and EXAFS study of U(VI) uptake by cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, E.; Harfouche, M.; Tits, J.; Kunz, D.; Daehn, R.; Fujita, T.; Tsukamoto, M.

    2006-01-01

    The sorption behaviour and speciation of U(VI) in cementitious systems was investigated by a combination of wet chemistry experiments and synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. Radiotracer studies using 233 U were carried out on hardened cement paste (HCP) and calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), which are the major constituents of HCP, to determine the uptake kinetics and sorption isotherms. C-S-H phases were synthesized using different methods for solid phase preparation, which enabled us to study the U(VI) uptake by different types of C-S-H phases and a wide range of Ca/Si compositions, and to distinguish U(VI) sorption on the surface of C-S-H from U(VI) incorporation into the structure. XAS measurements were performed using U(VI) loaded HCP and C-S-H materials (sorption and co-precipitation samples) to gain structural information on the U(VI) speciation in these systems, i.e., the type and number of neighbouring atoms, and bond distances. Examples of studies that have utilized XAS to characterize U(VI) speciation in cementitious systems are still rare, and to the best of our knowledge, detailed XAS investigations of the U(VI)/C-S-H system are lacking. The results obtained from the combined use of wet chemical and spectroscopic techniques allow mechanistic models of the immobilization process to be proposed for cementitious waste forms containing low and high U(VI) inventories. In the latter case U(VI) immobilization is controlled by a solubility-limiting process with the U(VI) mineral predominantly formed under the conditions prevailing in cementitious systems. At low U(VI) concentrations, however, U(VI) appears to be predominantly bound onto C-S-H phases. The coordination environment of U(VI) taken up by C-S-H was found to resemble that of U(VI) in uranophane. A mechanistic understanding of the U(VI) binding by cementitious materials will allow more detailed and scientifically well founded predictions of the retention of

  19. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  20. Sorption of chromium (VI) by Mg/Fe hydrotalcite type compunds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Sosa, I., E-mail: irma.garcia@inin.gob.mx; Cabral-Prieto, A., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química (Mexico); Nava, N., E-mail: tnava@imp.mx; Navarrete, J. [Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo (Mexico); Olguín, M. T., E-mail: teresa.olguin@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Química (Mexico); Escobar, Luis, E-mail: luis.escobar@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Física (Mexico); López-Castañares, R., E-mail: rlc@anuies.mx; Olea-Cardoso, O., E-mail: olc@anuies.mx [Universidad Autónoma del Edo. de México, Facultad de Química (Mexico)

    2015-06-15

    The synthesis by co-precipitation and characterization by X-ray diffraction, Raman and Mössbauer spectroscopies of Mg-Fe-hydrotalcite compounds, and their sorption capacities for Cr(VI) in aqueous media were carried out. The average sorption capacity of Cr(VI) for the non-thermal treated samples was of 6.2 mg/g. The ferrihydrite was omnipresent in all prepared hydrotalcite samples. A brief discussion is made on the role of both the hydrotalcite and ferrihydrite for removing such amount of Cr(VI)

  1. Uranium(VI) retention on quartz and kaolinite. Experiments and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mignot, G.

    2001-01-01

    The behaviour of uranium in the geosphere is an important issue for safety performance assessment of nuclear waste repositories, or in the context of contaminated sites due to mining activity related to nuclear field. Under aerobic conditions, the fate of uranium is mainly governed by the ability of minerals to sorb U(VI) aqueous species. Hence, a thorough understanding of U(VI) sorption processes on minerals is required to provide a valuable prediction of U(VI) migration in the environment. In this study, we performed sorption/desorption experiments of U(VI) on quartz and kaolinite, for systems favouring the formation in solution (i) of UO 2 2+ and monomeric hydrolysis products or (ii) of di-/tri-meric uranyl aqueous species, and / or U(VI)-colloids or UO 2 (OH) 2 precipitates, or (iii) of uranyl-carbonate complexes. Particular attention was paid to determine the surface characteristics of the solids and their modification due to dissolution/precipitation processes during experiments. A double layer surface complexation model was applied to our experimental data in order to derive surface complexation equilibria and intrinsic constants which allow a valuable description of U(VI) retention over a wide range of pH, ionic strength, initial concentration of uranium [0.1-10μM] and solid - solution equilibration time. U(VI) sorption on quartz was successfully modeled by using two sets of adsorption equilibria, assuming (i) the formation of the surface complexes SiOUO 2 + , SiOUO 2 OH and SiO(UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 , or (ii) the formation of the mono-dentate complex SiO(UO 2 ) 3 (OH) 5 and of the bidentate complex (SiO) 2 UO 2 . Assumptions on the density of each type of surface sites of kaolinite and on their acid-base properties were made from potentiometric titrations of kaolinite suspensions. We proposed on such a basis a set of surface complexation equilibria which accounts for U(VI) uptake on kaolinite over a wide range of chemical conditions, with aluminol edge sites as

  2. strong>Hvad skal vi med en hjerne?strong>

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Judy

    2009-01-01

    neurologen Antonio Damasio, at sikre vores overlevelse og velbefindende (i nævnte rækkefølge). Vi ved, at der findes såkaldte belønningsstrukturer i hjernen på både dyr og mennesker, som aktiverer følelser af velbehag, når vi gør "det rigtige", dvs. noget der er godt for os. Men hvordan de mere konkret...

  3. Reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution with DC diaphragm glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Jin, Xinglong; Zhou, Minghua; Chen, Zhenhai; Deng, Kai

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigated the reduction of Cr(VI) in aqueous solution with direct current diaphragm glow discharge (DGD). The glow discharge sustained around the hole on a quartz tube which divided the electrolyte cell into two parts. The reduction efficiencies of Cr(VI) under different applied voltages, initial conductivities, hole diameters, hole numbers, initial pH values and initial concentrations were systematically studied. The results showed that the reduction efficiency of Cr(VI) increased with the increase of applied voltage, initial conductivity, hole diameter and hole number. The different initial pH values showed less effects on the reduction of Cr(VI). The reduction efficiency decreased with the increasing initial concentration. In addition, the simultaneous reduction of Cr(VI) and decolorization of acid orange (AO) with DGD were also fulfilled. Furthermore, the energy efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction with DGD was calculated and compared with those in photocatalysis and other glow discharge reactor

  4. Characterization of U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes on hematite: EXAFS and electrophoretic mobility measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Lenhart, John J.; Davis, James A.

    2000-01-01

    We have measured U(VI) adsorption on hematite using EXAFS spectroscopy and electrophoresis under conditions relevant to surface waters and aquifers (0.01 to 10 μM dissolved uranium concentrations, in equilibrium with air, pH 4.5 to 8.5). Both techniques suggest the existence of anionic U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. Fits to EXAFS spectra indicate that U(VI) is simultaneously coordinated to surface FeO6 octahedra and carbonate (or bicarbonate) ligands in bidentate fashions, leading to the conclusion that the ternary complexes have an inner-sphere metal bridging (hematite-U(VI)-carbonato) structure. Greater than or equal to 50% of adsorbed U(VI) was comprised of monomeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes, even at pH 4.5. Multimeric U(VI) species were observed at pH ≥ 6.5 and aqueous U(VI) concentrations approximately an order of magnitude more dilute than the solubility of crystalline β-UO2(OH)2. Based on structural constraints, these complexes were interpreted as dimeric hematite-U(VI)-carbonato ternary complexes. These results suggest that Fe-oxide-U(VI)-carbonato complexes are likely to be important transport-limiting species in oxic aquifers throughout a wide range of pH values.

  5. The transition to electronic communications networks in the secondary treasury market

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Mizrach; Christopher J. Neely

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the history of the recent shift to electronic trading in equity, foreign exchange, and fixed-income markets. The authors analyze a new data set: the eSpeed electronic Treasury network. They contrast the market microstructure of the eSpeed trading platform with the traditional voice-assisted networks that report through GovPX. The electronic market (eSpeed) has greater volume, smaller spreads, and a lower estimated trade impact than the voice market (GovPX). ; Appeared ear...

  6. Extraction kinetics of uranium (VI) with polyurethane foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Ting-Chia; Chen, Dong-Hwang; Huang, Shius-Dong; Huang, Ching-Tsven; Shieh, Mu-Chang.

    1993-01-01

    The extraction kinetics of uranium(VI) from aqueous nitrate solution with polyether-based polyurethane foam was investigated in a batch reactor with automatic squeezing. The extraction curves of uranium(VI) concentration in solution vs. extraction time exhibited a rather rapid exponential decay within the first few minutes, followed by a slower exponential decay during the remaining period. This phenomenon can be attributed to the presence of two-phase structure, hard segment domains and soft segment matrix in the polyurethane foam. A two-stage rate model expressed by a superposition of two exponential curves was proposed, according to which the experimental data were fitted by an optimization method. The extraction rate of uranium (VI) was also found to increase with increasing temperature, nitrate concentration, and hydration of the cation of nitrate salt. (author)

  7. Adsorption of Cr(VI and Speciation of Cr(VI and Cr(III in Aqueous Solutions Using Chemically Modified Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ChunYuan Tao

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new type of grafting chitosan (CTS was synthesized using 2-hydroxyethyl- trimethyl ammonium chloride (HGCTS. The adsorption of Cr(VI on HGCTS was studied. The effect factors on adsorption and the adsorption mechanism were considered. The results indicated that the HGCTS could concentrate and separate Cr(VI at pH 4.0; the adsorption equilibrium time was 80 min; the maximum adsorption capacity was 205 mg/g. The adsorption isotherm and kinetics were investigated, equilibrium data agreed very well with the Langmuir model and the pseudo second-order model could describe the adsorption process better than the pseudo first-order model. A novel method for speciation of Cr(VI and Cr(III in environmental water samples has been developed using HGCTS as adsorbent and FAAS as determination means. The detection limit of this method was 20 ng/L, the relatively standard deviation was 1.2% and the recovery was 99%~105%.

  8. Wavelengths and energy levels of I V and I VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, V.; Sugar, J.; Joshi, Y.N.

    1988-01-01

    The spectra of iodine were photographed in the 139--1500-Aat;O region on various spectrographs. Earlier analyses of I V and I VI were revised and extended. For I V 26 lines were classified, and for I VI 35 lines were classified. Ionization energies have been estimated to be 415 510 atm≅ 300 cm -1 (51.52 atm≅ 0.04 eV) and 599 800 atm≅ 3 000 cm -1 (74.37 atm≅ 0.37 eV) for I V and I VI, respectively

  9. Group ib organometallic chemistry. XXXIV. Thermal behaviour and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarypropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Koten, G. van; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1,2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi2CU4Br2 and Z-Vi2Cu4R2 [Vi = (2-Me2NC6H4)C=C(Me)-(C6H4Me-4), R = 2-Me2NC6H4 or 4-MeC6H4CC] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were formed on thermolysis of (Z-ViCu2OTf)η

  10. Intervening O vi Quasar Absorption Systems at Low Redshift: A Significant Baryon Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp; Savage; Jenkins

    2000-05-01

    Far-UV echelle spectroscopy of the radio-quiet QSO H1821+643 (zem=0.297), obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) at approximately 7 km s-1 resolution, reveals four definite O vi absorption-line systems and one probable O vi absorber at 0.15quasar in redshift; these are likely intervening systems unrelated to the background QSO. In the case of the strong O vi system at zabs=0.22497, multiple components are detected in Si iii and O vi as well as H i Lyman series lines, and the differing component velocity centroids and b-values firmly establish that this is a multiphase absorption system. A weak O vi absorber is detected at zabs=0.22637, i.e., offset by approximately 340 km s-1 from the zabs=0.22497 system. Lyalpha absorption is detected at zabs=0.22613, but no Lyalpha absorption is significantly detected at 0.22637. Other weak O vi absorbers at zabs=0.24531 and 0.26659 and the probable O vi system at 0.21326 have widely diverse O vi/H i column density ratios with N(O vi)/N(H i) ranging from vi absorbers with rest equivalent width greater than 30 mÅ in the H1821+643 spectrum is remarkably high, dN&solm0;dz approximately 48, which implies with a high (90%) confidence that it is greater than 17 in the low-redshift intergalactic medium. We conservatively estimate that the cosmological mass density of the O vi systems is Omegab(Ovi&parr0; greater, similar0.0008 h-175. With an assumed metallicity of 1/10 solar and a conservative assumption that the fraction of oxygen in the O vi ionization stage is 0.2, we obtain Omegab(Ovi&parr0; greater, similar0.004 h-175. This is comparable to the combined cosmological mass density of stars and cool gas in galaxies and X-ray-emitting gas in galaxy clusters at low redshift.

  11. On halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) and -tungstates(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schleid, Thomas; Hartenbach, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidomolybdates(VI) have been investigated comprehensively over the last decade comprising the halogens fluorine, chlorine, and bromine. Iodide-containing compounds are so far unknown. The simple composition REXMoO 4 (RE=rare-earth element, X=halogen) is realized for X=F almost throughout the complete lanthanide series as well as for yttrium. While ytterbium and lutetium do not form any fluoride derivative, for lanthanum, only a fluoride-deprived compound with the formula La 3 FMo 4 O 16 is realized. Moreover, molybdenum-rich compounds with the formula REXMo 2 O 7 are also known for yttrium and the smaller lanthanoids. For X=Cl the composition REClMoO 4 is known for yttrium and the whole lanthanide series, although, four different structure types were identified. Almost the same holds for X=Br, however, only two different structure types are realized in this class of compounds. In the case of halide derivatives of rare-earth metal(III) oxidotungstates(VI) the composition REXWO 4 is found for chlorides and bromides only, so far. Due to the similar size of Mo 6+ and W 6+ cations, the structures found for the tungstates are basically the same as for the molybdates. With the larger lanthanides, the representatives for both chloride and bromide derivates exhibit similar structural motifs as seen in the molybdates, however, the crystal structure cannot be determined reliably. In case of the smaller lanthanoids, the chloride derivatives are isostructural with the respective molybdates, although the existence ranges differ slightly. The same is true for rare-earth metal(III) bromide oxidotungstates(VI).

  12. Implementation of Treasury Single Account and Strengthening of Cash Management in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    Vietnam has made progress to improve oversight and control over cash balances for the state budget. The current arrangement however falls short of a treasury single account (TSA), which has led to inefficiencies in the management of cash balances and higher than necessary borrowing costs. In response to this, the Government of Vietnam has embarked on reforms to adopt a TSA and strengthen o...

  13. Uranium(VI) Reduction by Nanoscale Zerovalent Iron in Anoxic Batch Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Sen; Hua, Bin; Bao, Zhengyu; Yang, John; Liu, Chongxuan; Deng, Baolin

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the influences of pH, bicarbonate, and calcium on U(VI) adsorption and reduction by synthetic nanosize zero valent iron (nano Fe 0 ) particles under an anoxic condition. The results showed that about 87.1%, 82.7% and 78.3% of U(VI) could be reduced within 96 hours in the presence of 10 mM bicarbonate at pHs 6.92, 8.03 and 9.03, respectively. The rates of U(VI) reduction and adsorption by nano Fe 0 , however, varied significantly with increasing pH and concentrations of bicarbonate and/or calcium. Solid phase analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the formation of UO 2 and iron (hydr)oxides as a result of the redox interactions between adsorbed U(VI) and nano Fe 0 . This study highlights the potential important role of groundwater chemical composition in controlling the rates of U(VI) reductive immobilization using nano Fe 0 in subsurface environments.

  14. Extractive behavior of U(VI) in the paraffin soluble ionic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rama, R.; Kumaresan, R.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Antony, M.P.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.

    2013-01-01

    An Aliquat-336 based ionic liquid namely, tri-n-octylmethylammonium bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphate ((A3636) + (DEHP) - ) was prepared and studied for the extraction of U(VI) from nitric acid medium. Since the ionic liquid, (A336) + (DEHP) - , was miscible in n-dodecane (n-DD), the extraction of U(VI) in the solution of tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) in n-DD, was investigated in the presence of small concentrations of ionic liquid. The distribution ratio of U(VI) in 0.3 M (A336) + (DEHP) - /n-DD decreased with increase in the concentration of nitric acid. The effect of concentration of TBP, ionic liquid nitric acid and nitrate ion on the extraction of U(VI) in ionic liquid medium was studied. The mechanistic aspect of extraction was investigated by the slope analysis of the extraction data. The studies indicated the feasibility of modifying the extractive properties of U(VI) in TBP/n-DD using ionic liquid. (author)

  15. Gravimetric determination of uranium(VI) and thorium(IV) with substituted pyrazolones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, H.C.; Rao, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    4-Acylpyrazolones like 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-benzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMBP), 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-p-nitrobenzoyl-5-pyrazolone (PMNP) and 1-phenyl-3-methyl-4-(3,5 dinitrobenzoyl)-5-pyrazolone (PMDP) have been synthesized and developed as gravimetric reagents for the determination of U(VI) and Th(IV). Uranium(VI) is almost quantitatively precipitated with PMBP, PMNP, and PMDP at pH 2.20, 1.85 and 1.70 respectively. The pH values for the complete precipitation of thorium(IV) with PMBP, PMNP and PMDP are 2.90, 2.75 and 2.50 respectively. PMBP has proved to be an efficient ligand for gravimetric determination of U(VI) by direct weighing method after drying at 100 +- 10 deg C. The percentage relative error varies from 0.4 to 1.6 in the determination of U(VI) by this method. The effect of a number of interfering ions on the precipitation of U(VI) by PMBP has been reported. (author)

  16. ViCTree: An automated framework for taxonomic classification from protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modha, Sejal; Thanki, Anil; Cotmore, Susan F; Davison, Andrew J; Hughes, Joseph

    2018-02-20

    The increasing rate of submission of genetic sequences into public databases is providing a growing resource for classifying the organisms that these sequences represent. To aid viral classification, we have developed ViCTree, which automatically integrates the relevant sets of sequences in NCBI GenBank and transforms them into an interactive maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree that can be updated automatically. ViCTree incorporates ViCTreeView, which is a JavaScript-based visualisation tool that enables the tree to be explored interactively in the context of pairwise distance data. To demonstrate utility, ViCTree was applied to subfamily Densovirinae of family Parvoviridae. This led to the identification of six new species of insect virus. ViCTree is open-source and can be run on any Linux- or Unix-based computer or cluster. A tutorial, the documentation and the source code are available under a GPL3 license, and can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.cvr.ac.uk/victree_web/. sejal.modha@glasgow.ac.uk.

  17. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

  18. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J Hart

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  19. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Peter J; O'Shaughnessy, Colette M; Siggins, Matthew K; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A; Goulding, David A; Crump, John A; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies.

  20. Spectroscopic confirmation of uranium(VI)-carbonato adsorption complexes on hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, John R.; Reitmeyer, Rebecca; Davis, James A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)−carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of ≡FeOsurface−U(VI)−carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)−carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)−carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium.

  1. Bicarbonate Impact on U(VI) Bioreduction in a Shallow Alluvial Aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, L.; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al. 2003, Williams et al. 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al. 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, that the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ~3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in aquifers.

  2. Bicarbonate impact on U(VI) bioreduction in a shallow alluvial aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Philip E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Davis, James A.; Fox, Patricia M.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Fang, Yilin; Waichler, Scott R.; Berman, Elena S. F.; Gupta, Manish; Chandler, Darrell P.; Murray, Chris; Peacock, Aaron D.; Giloteaux, Ludovic; Handley, Kim M.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-02-01

    Field-scale biostimulation and desorption tracer experiments conducted in a uranium (U) contaminated, shallow alluvial aquifer have provided insight into the coupling of microbiology, biogeochemistry, and hydrogeology that control U mobility in the subsurface. Initial experiments successfully tested the concept that Fe-reducing bacteria such as Geobacter sp. could enzymatically reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) during in situ electron donor amendment (Anderson et al., 2003; Williams et al., 2011). In parallel, in situ desorption tracer tests using bicarbonate amendment demonstrated rate-limited U(VI) desorption (Fox et al., 2012). These results and prior laboratory studies underscored the importance of enzymatic U(VI)-reduction and suggested the ability to combine desorption and bioreduction of U(VI). Here we report the results of a new field experiment in which bicarbonate-promoted uranium desorption and acetate amendment were combined and compared to an acetate amendment-only experiment in the same experimental plot. Results confirm that bicarbonate amendment to alluvial aquifer sediments desorbs U(VI) and increases the abundance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato complexes. At the same time, the rate of acetate-promoted enzymatic U(VI) reduction was greater in the presence of added bicarbonate in spite of the increased dominance of Ca-uranyl-carbonato aqueous complexes. A model-simulated peak rate of U(VI) reduction was ∼3.8 times higher during acetate-bicarbonate treatment than under acetate-only conditions. Lack of consistent differences in microbial community structure between acetate-bicarbonate and acetate-only treatments suggest that a significantly higher rate of U(VI) reduction in the bicarbonate-impacted sediment may be due to a higher intrinsic rate of microbial reduction induced by elevated concentrations of the bicarbonate oxyanion. The findings indicate that bicarbonate amendment may be useful in improving the engineered bioremediation of uranium in

  3. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Monica [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Faleiro, Maria Leonor [IBB - Centro de Biomedicina Molecular e Estrutural, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Costa, Ana M. Rosa da [Centro de Investigacao em Quimica do Algarve, Universidade do Algarve, FCT, DQF, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal); Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio [Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Biodiversidade, Genomica Integrativa e Funcional (BioFIG), Campus de FCUL, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Matos, Antonio Pedro [Servico de Anatomia Patologica, Hospital Curry Cabral, Lisboa (Portugal); Costa, Maria Clara, E-mail: mcorada@ualg.pt [Centro de Ciencias do Mar, Universidade do Algarve, FCT-DQF (edificio 8), Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  4. Mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Monica; Faleiro, Maria Leonor; Costa, Ana M. Rosa da; Chaves, Sandra; Tenreiro, Rogerio; Matos, Antonio Pedro; Costa, Maria Clara

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism of uranium (VI) removal by two anaerobic bacterial consortia, recovered from an uncontaminated site (consortium A) and other from an uranium mine (consortium U), was investigated. The highest efficiency of U (VI) removal by both consortia (97%) occurred at room temperature and at pH 7.2. Furthermore, it was found that U (VI) removal by consortium A occurred by enzymatic reduction and bioaccumulation, while the enzymatic process was the only mechanism involved in metal removal by consortium U. FTIR analysis suggested that after U (VI) reduction, U (IV) could be bound to carboxyl, phosphate and amide groups of bacterial cells. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA showed that community A was mainly composed by bacteria closely related to Sporotalea genus and Rhodocyclaceae family, while community U was mainly composed by bacteria related to Clostridium genus and Rhodocyclaceae family.

  5. Cr(VI) occurrence and geochemistry in water from public-supply wells in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izbicki, John; Wright, Michael; Seymour, Whitney A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth; Esser, Bradley K.

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), in 918 wells sampled throughout California between 2004 and 2012 by the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment-Priority Basin Project (GAMA-PBP) ranged from less than the study reporting limit of 1 microgram per liter (μg/L) to 32 μg/L. Statewide, Cr(VI) was reported in 31 percent of wells and equaled or exceeded the recently established (2014) California Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for Cr(VI) of 10 μg/L in 4 percent of wells. Cr(VI) data collected for regulatory purposes overestimated Cr(VI) occurrence compared to spatially-distributed GAMA-PBP data. Ninety percent of chromium was present as Cr(VI), which was detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in alkaline (pH ≥ 8), oxic water; and more frequently in agricultural and urban land uses compared to native land uses. Chemical, isotopic (tritium and carbon-14), and noble-gas data show high Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers in the southern California deserts result from long groundwater-residence times and geochemical reactions such as silicate weathering that increase pH, while oxic conditions persist. High Cr(VI) in water from wells in alluvial aquifers along the west-side of the Central Valley results from high-chromium in source rock eroded to form those aquifers, and areal recharge processes (including irrigation return) that can mobilize chromium from the unsaturated zone. Cr(VI) co-occurred with oxyanions having similar chemistry, including vanadium, selenium, and uranium. Cr(VI) was positively correlated with nitrate, consistent with increased concentrations in areas of agricultural land use and mobilization of chromium from the unsaturated zone by irrigation return.

  6. Oxidation of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin by ferrate(VI): Products identification, and toxicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Bin; Kookana, Rai S.; Williams, Mike; Ying, Guang-Guo; Du, Jun; Doan, Hai; Kumar, Anupama

    2016-01-01

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) has been known to react with emerging organic contaminants containing electron-rich organic moieties, such as phenols, anilines, olefins, reduced sulfur and deprotonated amines. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, ciprofloxacin (CIP) and enrofloxacin (ENR), by Fe(VI) were investigated for their reaction products and toxicity changes as well as biodegradability of these products. Ten products were identified for both CIP and ENR reactions with Fe(VI) using a high-resolution accurate-mass Orbitrap mass analyzer. Structural changes to the CIP and ENR molecule included dealkylation, formation of alcohols and amides in piperazine ring and oxygen transfer to the double bond in quinolone structure. An enamine formation mechanism was tentatively proposed to facilitate the interpretation of CIP and ENR oxidation pathways. Toxicity evaluation using Microbial Assay for toxicity Risk Assessment (MARA) bioassay indicated that Fe(VI) oxidation products of CIP and ENR contributed negligible antibacterial potency and Fe(VI) oxidation treatment can remove the residual toxicity of CIP and ENR impacted source waters. The Fe(VI) oxidation treatment resulted in formation of relatively more biodegradable products (based on in silico assessment) than their corresponding parent compounds. The results showed that Fe(VI) has a good potential to degrade fluoroquinolone antibiotics and their antimicrobial potency in natural waters.

  7. Oxidation of ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin by ferrate(VI): Products identification, and toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Yang@csiro.au [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia); Kookana, Rai S.; Williams, Mike [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia); Ying, Guang-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Du, Jun; Doan, Hai; Kumar, Anupama [CSIRO Land and Water, Waite Campus, PMB 2, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064 (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) has been known to react with emerging organic contaminants containing electron-rich organic moieties, such as phenols, anilines, olefins, reduced sulfur and deprotonated amines. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, ciprofloxacin (CIP) and enrofloxacin (ENR), by Fe(VI) were investigated for their reaction products and toxicity changes as well as biodegradability of these products. Ten products were identified for both CIP and ENR reactions with Fe(VI) using a high-resolution accurate-mass Orbitrap mass analyzer. Structural changes to the CIP and ENR molecule included dealkylation, formation of alcohols and amides in piperazine ring and oxygen transfer to the double bond in quinolone structure. An enamine formation mechanism was tentatively proposed to facilitate the interpretation of CIP and ENR oxidation pathways. Toxicity evaluation using Microbial Assay for toxicity Risk Assessment (MARA) bioassay indicated that Fe(VI) oxidation products of CIP and ENR contributed negligible antibacterial potency and Fe(VI) oxidation treatment can remove the residual toxicity of CIP and ENR impacted source waters. The Fe(VI) oxidation treatment resulted in formation of relatively more biodegradable products (based on in silico assessment) than their corresponding parent compounds. The results showed that Fe(VI) has a good potential to degrade fluoroquinolone antibiotics and their antimicrobial potency in natural waters.

  8. A Salmonella Typhimurium-Typhi genomic chimera: a model to study Vi polysaccharide capsule function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Jansen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Vi capsular polysaccharide is a virulence-associated factor expressed by Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi but absent from virtually all other Salmonella serotypes. In order to study this determinant in vivo, we characterised a Vi-positive S. Typhimurium (C5.507 Vi(+, harbouring the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-7, which encodes the Vi locus. S. Typhimurium C5.507 Vi(+ colonised and persisted in mice at similar levels compared to the parent strain, S. Typhimurium C5. However, the innate immune response to infection with C5.507 Vi(+ and SGB1, an isogenic derivative not expressing Vi, differed markedly. Infection with C5.507 Vi(+ resulted in a significant reduction in cellular trafficking of innate immune cells, including PMN and NK cells, compared to SGB1 Vi(- infected animals. C5.507 Vi(+ infection stimulated reduced numbers of TNF-α, MIP-2 and perforin producing cells compared to SGB1 Vi(-. The modulating effect associated with Vi was not observed in MyD88(-/- and was reduced in TLR4(-/- mice. The presence of the Vi capsule also correlated with induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in vivo, a factor that impacted on chemotaxis and the activation of immune cells in vitro.

  9. Uranium(VI) adsorption properties of a chelating resin containing polyamine-substituted methylphosphonic acid moiety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Masaaki; Akiyoshi, Yoshirou

    1991-01-01

    Uranium(VI) adsorption and desorption properties of a chelating resin containing polyamine-substituted methylphosphonic acid moiety of 2.29 mmol/g-resin (APA) were examined. Uranium(VI) adsorption properties of several ion exchange resins and extractant agents which were known as excellent adsorbents for uranium(VI), were examined together for a comparison with those of APA. Uranium(VI) adsorption capacity of APA at the concentration of 100 mg·dm -3 -uranium(VI) in 100 g·dm -3 -H 2 SO 4 aq. soln., 190 g·dm -3 -H 3 PO 4 aq. soln. and uranium enriched sea water, was 0.2, 0.05 and 0.05 mmol·g -1 respectively. The adsorption capacity of APA for uranium(VI) in these solutions was larger than that of another adsorbents, except the adsorption of uranium(VI) in enriched sea water on ion exchange resin containing phosphoric acid moiety (adsorption capacity ; 0.2 mmol·g -1 ). Uranium(VI) adsorption rate on APA was high and the relation between treatment time (t : min) and uranium(VI) concentration (y : mg·dm -3 ) in 100 g·dm -3 H 2 SO 4 aq. soln. after treatment, was shown as following equation, y=20 0.048t+1.90 (0≤t≤30). The adsorbed uranium(VI) on APA was able to be eluted with a mixed aq. soln. of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hydroxide and also was able to be eluted with an aq. alkaline soln. dissolved reduction agents such as sodium sulfite and hydrazine. From these results, it was thought that uranium(VI) adsorbed on APA was eluted due to the reduction to uranium(VI) by these eluents. (author)

  10. Group IB Organometallic Chemistry XXXIV: Thermal behavior and chemical reactivity of tetranuclear Me2N-substituted diarylpropenylcopper-copper anion (Vi2Cu4X2) and mixed diarylpropenyl/organocopper (Vi2Cu4R2) compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koten, G. van; Hoedt, R.W.M. ten; Noltes, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of configurationally pure 1, 2-diarylpropenylcopper compounds Z-Vi{2}CU{4}Br{2} and Z-Vi{2}Cu{4}R{2} [Vi @? (2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4})C@?C(Me)-(C{6}H{4}Me-4), R @? 2-Me{2}NC{6}H{4} or 4-MeC{6}H{4}C@?C] predominantly results in the formation of ViH. In contrast, only dimers (ViVi) were

  11. Oxidação de microcistinas-LR em águas pelo íon ferrato(VI Aqueous oxidation of microcystin-LR by ferrate(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio João de Luca

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxinas de cianobactérias têm se tornado um grave problema na produção segura de água para consumo humano e animal. Técnicas convencionais de tratamento falham em atingir padrões de potabilidade. O ferrato(VI de potássio, um composto oxidante e coagulante, mostra potencialidade no tratamento de águas contaminadas. Neste trabalho, são apresentados resultados da oxidação pelo ferrato(VI de uma toxina gerada por cianobactérias, a microcistina-LR. Ensaios de cinética de oxidação e de teste de jarros mostram um valor médio de 0,012 min-1 para a constante de taxa de reação de pseudoprimeira ordem, para concentrações de MC-LR de 100 a 200 µg.L-1 na água bruta. Dosagens de 1,6 a 5,0 mg.L-1 de ferrato(VI sugerem o atendimento ao padrão de potabilidade para microcistinas, mostrando que o oxidante poderá ser empregado como coadjuvante no tratamento de água.Algae toxins are becoming a severe problem in the water treatment industry, especially for human and animal consumption. Traditional treatment processes have failed in complying with water supply standards. Potassium ferrate(VI is a powerful oxidant, disinfectant and, also, a coagulant. In this paper, the results of microcystin-LR oxidation by ferrate(VI ion are presented. Kinetic and jar tests showed a average value of 0,012 min-1 for the pseudo first order reaction rate constant, for 100 and 200 µg.L-1 concentration of MC-LR. Ferrate(VI dosages between 1.6 and 5.0 mg.L-1 suggest that water supply standards for MC-LR can be reached, which means that the oxidant may be employed as coadjuvant in water treatment.

  12. Retention of uranium(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baik, M.H.; Lee, S.Y.; Shon, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Retention of U(VI) by laumontite, a fracture-filling material of granite as investigated by conducting dynamic and batch sorption experiments in a love-box using a granite core with a natural fracture. The hydrodynamic properties of the granite core were obtained from the elution curve of a on-sorbing tracer, Br - . The elution curve of U(VI) showed a similar behavior to Br - . This reveals that the retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material was not significant when migrating through the fracture at a given condition. From the dynamic sorption experiment, the retardation factor R a and the distribution coefficient K a of U(VI) were obtained as about 2.9 and 0.16 cm, respectively. The distribution coefficient K d ) of U(VI) onto laumontite obtained by conducting a batch sorption experiment resulted in a small value of 2.3±0.5 mL/g. This low K d value greed with the result of the dynamic sorption experiment. For the distribution of uranium on the granite surface investigated by an X-ray image mapping, the fracture region filled with laumontite showed a relatively lower content of uranium compared to the surrounding granite surface. Thus, the low retention of U(VI) by the fracture-filling material can be explained by following two mechanisms. One is that U(VI) exists as anionic uranyl hydroxides or uranyl carbonates at a given groundwater condition and the other is the remarkably low sorption capacity of the laumontite for U(VI). author)

  13. Fluorescent silver nanoclusters for ultrasensitive determination of chromium(VI) in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian Rong; Zeng, Ai Lian; Luo, Hong Qun; Li, Nian Bing

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Fluorescent Ag nanoclusters were first applied to Cr(VI) detection. • The proposed method is simple, rapid, and environmentally friendly. • The sensor shows a wide linear range, low detection limit, and good selectivity. • The system can also be used for the indirect assay of total chromium and Cr(III). • The analyses in real water samples are satisfactory. - Abstract: In this work, a simple and sensitive Cr(VI) sensor is proposed based on fluorescent polyethyleneimine-stabilized Ag nanoclusters, which allows the determination over a wide concentration range of 0.1 nM–3.0 μM and with a detection limit as low as 0.04 nΜ and a good selectivity. The quenching mechanism was discussed in terms of the absorption and fluorescence spectra, suggesting that Cr(VI) is connected to Ag nanoclusters by hydrogen bond between the oxygen atom at the vertex of tetrahedron structure of Cr(VI) and the amino nitrogen of polyethyleneimine that surrounded Ag nanoclusters and electron transfer from Ag nanoclusters to highly electron-deficient Cr(VI) results in fluorescence quenching. Despite the failure to quench the fluorescence efficiently, Cr(III) can also be measured using the proposed Ag nanoclusters by being oxidized to Cr(VI) in alkaline solution (pH ∼9) containing H 2 O 2 . Therefore, our approach could be used to detect Cr(VI), Cr(III) and the total chromium level in aqueous solution. In addition, Cr(VI) analysis in real water samples were satisfactory, indicating this method could be practically promising for chromium measurements.

  14. Effect of Salicylic and Picolinic Acids on the Adsorption of U(VI) onto Oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang; Cho, Hye Ryun; Song, Kyu Seok

    2009-01-01

    The effect of organic acids on the adsorption of U(VI) onto oxide surfaces (TiO 2 (anatase), SiO 2 (amorphous) and Al 2 O-3(amorphous)) has been investigated. Two different organic acids, salicylic and picolinic acids, were used. Changes of adsorption ratio of U(VI), which depend on the existence of organic acids in a sample, were measured as a function of pH. Quantities of adsorbed organic acids, which depend on the existence of U(VI) in a sample, were also measured as a function of pH. It is confirmed that the soluble complex formation of U(VI) with organic acids can deteriorate the adsorption of U(VI) onto TiO 2 surface. It is noteworthy that salicylic acid does not affect the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO 2 surface, however, picolinic acid enhances the adsorption of U(VI) onto SiO 2 surface. The latter effect can be understood by considering the formation of a ternary surface complex on SiO 2 surface, which was confirmed by the co-adsorption of picolinic acid with U(VI) and the change in a fluorescence spectra of U(VI) on surface, In the case of Al 2 O-3, organic acids themselves were largely adsorbed onto a surface without deteriorating the adsorption of U(VI). This would support the possibility of a ternary surface complex formation on the Al 2 O-3 surface, and an additional spectroscopic study is required.

  15. Role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in cultured mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Sugiyama, M

    1994-01-01

    Chromium(VI) compounds are known to be potent toxic and carcinogenic agents. Because chromium(VI) is easily taken up by cells and is subsequently reduced to chromium(III), the formation of paramagnetic chromium such as chromium(V) and chromium(III) is believed to play a role in the adverse biological effects of chromium(VI) compounds. The present report, uses electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy; the importance of the role of paramagnetic chromium in chromium(VI)-induced damage in intac...

  16. Biased Brownian motion mechanism for processivity and directionality of single-headed myosin-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Mitsuhiro; Iwane, Atsuko Hikikoshi; Ikebe, Mitsuo; Yanagida, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Conventional form to function as a vesicle transporter is not a 'single molecule' but a coordinated 'two molecules'. The coordinated two molecules make it complicated to reveal its mechanism. To overcome the difficulty, we adopted a single-headed myosin-VI as a model protein. Myosin-VI is an intracellular vesicle and organelle transporter that moves along actin filaments in a direction opposite to most other known myosin classes. The myosin-VI was expected to form a dimer to move processively along actin filaments with a hand-over-hand mechanism like other myosin organelle transporters. However, wild-type myosin-VI was demonstrated to be monomer and single-headed, casting doubt on its processivity. Using single molecule techniques, we show that green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused single-headed myosin-VI does not move processively. However, when coupled to a 200 nm polystyrene bead (comparable to an intracellular vesicle in size) at a ratio of one head per bead, single-headed myosin-VI moves processively with large (40 nm) steps. Furthermore, we found that a single-headed myosin-VI-bead complex moved more processively in a high-viscous solution (40-fold higher than water) similar to cellular environment. Because diffusion of the bead is 60-fold slower than myosin-VI heads alone in water, we propose a model in which the bead acts as a diffusional anchor for the myosin-VI, enhancing the head's rebinding following detachment and supporting processive movement of the bead-monomer complex. This investigation will help us understand how molecular motors utilize Brownian motion in cells.

  17. Molasses as an efficient low-cost carbon source for biological Cr(VI) removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michailides, Michail K. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G., E-mail: atekerle@upatras.gr [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Akratos, Christos S.; Coles, Sandra [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Pavlou, Stavros [Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Patras, GR-26504 Patras (Greece); Vayenas, Dimitrios V. [Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, 2 G. Seferi Str., GR-30100 Agrinio (Greece); Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Stadiou Str., Platani, P.O. Box 1414, GR-26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-01-08

    Highlights: • Suspended and attached growth reactors were examined for Cr(VI) bio-reduction. • Molasses was proved an efficient and very low cost carbon source. • Molasses was more efficient than sugar in enhancing Cr(VI) reduction. • SBR with recirculation was the most proper operating mode. - Abstract: In the present study, indigenous microorganisms from industrial sludge were used to reduce the activity of Cr(VI). Molasses, a by-product of sugar processing, was selected as the carbon source (instead of sugar used in a previous work) as it is a low-cost energy source for bioprocesses. Initially, experiments were carried out in suspended growth batch reactors for Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.5–110 mg/L. The time required for complete Cr(VI) reduction increased with initial Cr(VI) concentration. Initial molasses concentration was also found to influence the Cr(VI) reduction rate. The optimal concentration for all initial Cr(VI) concentrations tested was 0.8 gC/L. Experiments were also carried out in packed-bed reactors. Three different operating modes were used to investigate the optimal performance and efficiency of the filter, i.e. batch, continuous and SBR with recirculation. The latter mode with a recirculation rate of 0.5 L/min lead to significantly high Cr(VI) reduction rates (up to 135 g/m{sup 2} d). The results of this work were compared with those of a similar work using sugar as the carbon source and indicate that molasses could prove a feasible technological solution to a serious environmental problem.

  18. Kinetic study of time-dependent fixation of U{sup VI} on biochar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashry, A. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Radiation Protection Department, Nuclear Research Centre, Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt); Bailey, E.H., E-mail: liz.bailey@nottingham.ac.uk [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom); Chenery, S.R.N. [British Geological Survey, Nicker Hill, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Young, S.D. [Division of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, School of Biosciences, University of Nottingham, Sutton Bonington, Leicestershire LE12 5RD (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    Biochar, a by-product from the production of biofuel and syngas by gasification, was tested as a material for adsorption and fixation of U{sup VI} from aqueous solutions. A batch experiment was conducted to study the factors that influence the adsorption and time-dependent fixation on biochar at 20 °C, including pH, initial concentration of U{sup VI} and contact time. Uranium (U{sup VI}) adsorption was highly dependent on pH but adsorption on biochar was high over a wide range of pH values, from 4.5 to 9.0, and adsorption strength was time-dependent over several days. The experimental data for pH > 7 were most effectively modelled using a Freundlich adsorption isotherm coupled to a reversible first order kinetic equation to describe the time-dependent fixation of U{sup VI} within the biochar structure. Desorption experiments showed that U{sup VI} was only sparingly desorbable from the biochar with time and isotopic dilution with {sup 233}U{sup VI} confirmed the low, or time-dependent, lability of adsorbed {sup 238}U{sup VI}. Below pH 7 the adsorption isotherm trend suggested precipitation, rather than true adsorption, may occur. However, across all pH values (4.5-9) measured saturation indices suggested precipitation was possible: autunite below pH 6.5 and either swartzite, liebigite or bayleyite above pH 6.5.

  19. Raman spectrometric determination of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) in nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantner, E.; Freudenberger, M.; Steinert, D.; Ache, H.J.

    1987-03-01

    The determination of Pu(VI) in nitric acid solutions by spontaneous Laser Raman Spectrometry (LRS) was investigated and a calibration curve was established using U(VI) as internal standard. In addition, the concentrations of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) as a function of time were measured by this method in Pu(VI) solutions of different acidity containing H 2 O 2 as the reducing agent. In solutions which are intensely coloured by the presence of Ru(NO) complexes Pu(VI) can also be determined by LRS using a Kr + laser as excitation source. In future experiments, the study of the Pu(IV)-interaction with Ru using LRS and spectrophotometry as analytical techniques is therefore intended. (orig.) [de

  20. 28 CFR 42.405 - Public dissemination of title VI information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Federally Assisted Programs § 42.405 Public dissemination of title VI information. (a) Federal agencies... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public dissemination of title VI information. 42.405 Section 42.405 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION; EQUAL...

  1. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, P.F.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe 56 . The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ''tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ''tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use

  2. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. (comp.)

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on tapes.'' Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the tape'' number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  3. ENDF-201: ENDF/B-VI summary documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, P.F. [comp.

    1991-10-01

    Responsibility for oversight of the ENDF/B Evaluated Nuclear Data file lies with the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG), which is comprised of representatives from various governmental and industrial laboratories in the United States. Individual evaluations are provided by scientists at several US laboratories, including significant contributions by scientists from all over the world. In addition, ENDF/B-VI includes for the first time complete evaluations for three materials that were provided from laboratories outside the US. All data are checked and reviewed by CSEWG, and the data file is maintained and issued by the National Nuclear Data Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The previous version of the library, ENDF/B-V, was issued in 1979, and two revisions to the data file were provided in subsequent years, the latest occurring in 1981. A total of 75 new or extensively modified neutron sublibrary evaluations are included in ENDF/B-VI, and are summarized in this document. One incident proton sublibrary is described for Fe{sup 56}. The remaining evaluations in ENDF/B-VI have been carried over from earlier versions of ENDF, and have been updated to reflect the new formats. The release of ENDF/B-VI was carried out between January and June of 1990, with groups of materials being released on ``tapes.`` Table 1 is an index to the evaluation summaries, and includes the material identification or MAT number, the responsible laboratory, and the ``tape`` number. These evaluations have been released without restrictions on their distribution or use.

  4. Biological Cr(VI) removal using bio-filters and constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailides, Michail K; Sultana, Mar-Yam; Tekerlekopoulou, Athanasia G; Akratos, Christos S; Vayenas, Dimitrios V

    2013-01-01

    The bioreduction of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solution was carried out using suspended growth and packed-bed reactors under a draw-fill operating mode, and horizontal subsurface constructed wetlands. Reactors were inoculated with industrial sludge from the Hellenic Aerospace Industry using sugar as substrate. In the suspended growth reactors, the maximum Cr(VI) reduction rate (about 2 mg/L h) was achieved for an initial concentration of 12.85 mg/L, while in the attached growth reactors, a similar reduction rate was achieved even with high initial concentrations (109 mg/L), thus confirming the advantage of these systems. Two horizontal subsurface constructed wetlands (CWs) pilot-scale units were also built and operated. The units contained fine gravel. One unit was planted with common reeds and one was kept unplanted. The mean influent concentrations of Cr(VI) were 5.61 and 5.47 mg/L for the planted and unplanted units, respectively. The performance of the planted CW units was very effective as mean Cr(VI) removal efficiency was 85% and efficiency maximum reached 100%. On the contrary, the unplanted CW achieved very low Cr(VI) removal with a mean value of 26%. Both attached growth reactors and CWs proved efficient and viable means for Cr(VI) reduction.

  5. VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaal / Leonhard Lapin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lapin, Leonhard, 1947-

    2005-01-01

    15.-17. IX Tallinnas Niguliste kirikus toimuval VI Tallinna arhitektuuritriennaalil esinevad inglise arhitektuurikriitik Peter Davey, šveitsi arhitekt Peter Zumthor, soome arhitekt Juha Leviskä, eesti arhitekt Vilen Künnapu, eesti kunstiajaloolane Juhan Maiste jt. Külastatakse KUMU, tutvutab autor Pekka Vapaavuori

  6. Extraction of uranium (VI) sulphate complexes by Adogen amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elyamani, I S; Abd Elmessieh, E N [Nuclear chemistry department, hot laboratories center, atomic energy authority, Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    The distribution of U(VI) between aqueous H{sub 2} So{sub 4} solutions and organic phases of adogen-368 has been described. The dependence of extraction on acidity, diluent type, metal and extractant concentrations was investigated. The possible extraction mechanism is discussed in the light of results obtained. The separation of U(VI) from rare earths is suggested. 5 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Reduction of chromium (VI by the indirect action of Thiobacillus thioparus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Donati

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The microbial reduction of chromium(VI to chromium(III has been one of the most widely studied forms of metal bioremediation. Recently, we have found that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans, growing on elemental sulphur, can indirectly promote chromium(VI reduction by producing reducing agents such as sulphite and thiosulphate, which abiotically reduce chromium(VI. Those species of Thiobacillus are acidophilic bacteria which grow optimally at pH values lower than 4. However, most of those reducing agents are stabilised at higher pH values. Thus, the present paper reports on the ability to reduce chromium(VI using another specie of Thiobacilli, Thiobacillus thioparus, which is able to grow at pH close to 7.0. T. thioparus cultures were carried out in a fermentation vessel containing medium and sulphur as the sole energy source and maintained at 30ºC and 400 rpm. The pH was adjusted to 6.0, 7.0 or 8.0 and maintained with the automatic addition of KOH. Our results show high chromium (VI reduction values (close to 100% at the end of bacterial growth at the three pH values. The results of these experiments are very promising for development of a microbiological process to be used in the detoxification of chromium(VI-polluted effluents.

  8. CHROMIUM(VI REDUCTION BY A MIXED CULTURE OF SULFATE REDUCING BACTERIA DEVELOPED IN COLUMN REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Henny

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A lactate enriched mixed sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB culture was examined for the reduction of Cr(VI in a continuous flow system. The influent was mineral salts media added with lactate and sulfate with amounts of 8 and 6 mM respectively as electron donor and electron acceptor. The SRB culture was allowed to stabilize in the column before adding the Cr(VI to the influent. Chromium and sulfate reduction and lactate oxidation were examined by measuring the concentrations of Cr(Vl, sulfate and lactate in the influent and the effluent over time. The experiment was discontinued when Cr(VI concentration in the effiuent was breakthrough. In the absence of Cr(VI, sulfate was not completely reduced in the column, although lactate was completely oxidized and acetate as an intermediate product was not often detected. Almost all of Cr(VI loaded was reduced in the column seeded with the SRB culture at influent Cr(VI concentrations of 192,385 and769 mM. There was no significant Cr(VI loss in the control column, indicating that Cr(VI removal was due to the reduction of Cr(VI to Cr (lll by the SRB culture. The instantaneous Cr(VI removal decreased to a minimum of 32%, 24 days after the influent Cr(VI concentration was increased to 1540 mM, ancl sulfate removal efficiency decreased to a minimum of 17%. The SRB population in the column decreased 100 days after C(VI was added to the column. The total mass of Cr(VI reduced was approximately 878 mmol out of 881 mmol of Cr(Vl loaded in 116 days. The results clearly show that our developed SRB culture could reduced Cr(Vl considerably.

  9. Studies on the kinetics of uranium (VI) electro-reduction and reextraction: Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Jihong; Ma Xuquan; Tai Derong; Sun Shiren

    1992-01-01

    The kinetics of U(VI) reextraction and U(IV) extraction in the process of U(VI) electro-reduction with the system of HNO 3 -N 2 H 5 NO 3 (H 2 O)/UO 2 (NO 3 ) 2 -HNO 3 (30% TBP-OK) is investigated with a constant interfacial area cell (Lewis cell) with cathode and anode in it. According to the experimental results and data processing, the apparent activation energy of the U(VI) reextraction process is 36.02 kJ/nol. The U(VI) reextraction rate increases when the stirring speed of two phases increases. This process is mainly diffusion controlled. For the U(VI) extraction process, the apparent activation energy is 21.13 kJ/mol. The U(IV) extraction rate also increases when the stirring speed of two phases increases. This process is mainly diffusion controlled. The lower the potential of cathode is, the higher the rates of U(VI) reextraction and U(IV) extraction are

  10. Kinetics and Products of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Iron(II/III)-Bearing Clay Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe-Wong, Claresta; Brown, Gordon E; Maher, Kate

    2017-09-05

    Hexavalent chromium is a water-soluble pollutant, the mobility of which can be controlled by reduction of Cr(VI) to less soluble, environmentally benign Cr(III). Iron(II/III)-bearing clay minerals are widespread potential reductants of Cr(VI), but the kinetics and pathways of Cr(VI) reduction by such clay minerals are poorly understood. We reacted aqueous Cr(VI) with two abiotically reduced clay minerals: an Fe-poor montmorillonite and an Fe-rich nontronite. The effects of ionic strength, pH, total Fe content, and the fraction of reduced structural Fe(II) [Fe(II)/Fe(total)] were examined. The last variable had the largest effect on Cr(VI) reduction kinetics: for both clay minerals, the rate constant of Cr(VI) reduction varies by more than 3 orders of magnitude with Fe(II)/Fe(total) and is described by a linear free energy relationship. Under all conditions examined, Cr and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectra show that the main Cr-bearing product is a Cr(III)-hydroxide and that Fe remains in the clay structure after reacting with Cr(VI). This study helps to quantify our understanding of the kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction by Fe(II/III)-bearing clay minerals and may improve predictions of Cr(VI) behavior in subsurface environments.

  11. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xinghao [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Cheng, Cheng [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xiao, Chengjian, E-mail: xiaocj@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Shao, Dadong, E-mail: shaodadong@126.com [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Zimu, E-mail: xzm@mail.ustc.edu.cn [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng [Intelligent Manufacturing Technology Research Institute, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230088 (China); Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • PANI/bentonie can be synthesized by simple plasma technique. • PANI/bentonie has an excellent adsorption capacity for trace uranium in solution. • U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite is a spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH < 6.5 because of the strong complexation, and inhibits U(VI) adsorption at pH > 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  12. Study on Cr(VI) Leaching from Cement and Cement Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palascakova, Lenka; Kanuchova, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on hexavalent chromium leaching from cement samples and cement composites containing silica fume and zeolite additions that were subjected to various leaching agents. The water-soluble Cr(VI) concentrations in cements ranged from 0.2 to 3.2 mg/kg and represented only 1.8% of the total chromium content. The presence of chromium compounds with both chromium oxidation states of III and VI was detected in the cement samples by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Leaching tests were performed in a Britton-Robinson buffer to simulate natural conditions and showed increased dissolution of Cr(VI) up to 6 mg/kg. The highest amount of leached hexavalent chromium was detected after leaching in HCl. The findings revealed that the leaching of chromium from cements was higher by 55–80% than that from the cement composites. A minimum concentration was observed for all cement samples when studying the relationship between the soluble Cr(VI) and the cement storage time. PMID:29690550

  13. Remediation of U(VI)-contaminated water using zero-valent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelouas, A.; Gong, W.; Lutze, W.; Nuttall, E.

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the possibility of U(VI) reduction by zero-valent iron (Fe 0 ). We conducted batch experiments with granular iron and solutions containing 0.25 and 9.3 mg L -1 U(VI) at 24 deg C. The solution pH ranges between 2 and 9. In all experiments uranium removal was complete within several hours to several days regardless of the pH value. The reduced uranium precipitated as poorly crystallized hydrated uraninite, UO 2 .nH 2 O. The reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) by Fe 0 was found to be the principal mechanism of U removal from the solution. Other mechanisms such as U(VI) sorption on the newly formed Fe(III) hydroxides are insignificant. These results show that zero-valent iron can be used to remedy U-contaminated waters from uranium mines and mill tailings sites, the pH of which usually ranges between 2 and 9. (authors)

  14. A critical review of ferrate(VI)-based remediation of soil and groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Prabhat Kumar; Lee, Jechan; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Kwon, Eilhann E; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Ok, Yong Sik; Kim, Ki-Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Over the past few decades, diverse chemicals and materials such as mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles, metal oxides, and zeolites have been used for soil and groundwater remediation. Ferrate (Fe VI O 4 2- ) has been widely employed due to its high-valent iron (VI) oxo compound with high oxidation/reduction potentials. Ferrate has received attention for wide environmental applications including water purification and sewage sludge treatment. Ferrate provides great potential for diverse environmental applications without any environmental problems. Therefore, this paper provides comprehensive information on the recent progress on the use of (Fe VI O 4 2- ) as a green material for use in sustainable treatment processes, especially for soil and water remediation. We reviewed diverse synthesis recipes for ferrates (Fe VI O 4 2- ) and their associated physicochemical properties as oxidants, coagulants, and disinfectants for the elimination of a diverse range of chemical and biological species from water/wastewater samples. A summary of the eco-sustainable performance of ferrate(VI) in water remediation is also provided and the future of ferrate(VI) is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D.; Sullivan, J.C.; Stout, B.E.

    1992-01-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using 13 C NMR of 99.9% 13 C-enriched U VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- and Am VI O 2 ( 13 CO 3 ) 3 4- systems has been examined by variable temperature 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques 13 C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of ΔG double-dagger 295 = 56 kJ/M, ΔH double-dagger = 38 kJ/M, and ΔS double-dagger = -60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress

  16. QUALITY, EFFECTIVENESS AND MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE OF LOCAL TREASURIES BUDGET ACCOUNTING

    OpenAIRE

    Biljana Tešić

    2011-01-01

    The role of management information systems (MIS) of local treasuries budget accounting is to provide qualitative information support to management in process of decision making and to provide effective managing of key processes of budget accounting, in accordance with requests of management on all levels of decision making. From the aspect of effectiveness and request for quality, in accordance with request of users and defined system goals, this research includes the analysis of characterist...

  17. 19 CFR Appendix to 19 Cfr Part 0 - Treasury Department Order No. 100-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... completion of entry or substance of entry summary including duty assessment and collection, classification... the Committee on Ways and Means and the Chairman and Ranking Member of the Committee on Finance every... Ranking Member of the Committee on Finance every six months. The Secretary of the Treasury shall list any...

  18. Oral-facial-digital syndrome with mesoaxial polysyndactyly, common AV canal, hirschsprung disease and sacral dysgenesis: Probably a transitional type between II, VI, variant of type VI or a new type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4 month old male infant, the first in order of birth of healthy first cousin consanguineous parents who has many typical features of oral-facial-digital syndrome type VI (OFDS VI including hypertelorism, bilateral convergent squint, depressed nasal bridge, and wide upturned nares, low set posteriorly rotated ears, long philtrum, gum hyperplasia with notches of the alveolar borders, high arched palate, and hyperplastic oral frenula. He has mesoaxial and postaxial, polysyndactyly which is the specific feature of OFDS VI, however the cerebellum is normal on MRI brain. He has also some rare congenital anomalies including common atrioventricular canal, hirschsprung disease, and sacral dysgenesis. This patient may have a transitional type between II and VI, a variant of type VI or a new type.

  19. Hvad skal vi med Trump-satire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Mette

    2017-01-01

    Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?......Trump-satire er et stort hit, og særligt en lang række satiriske videohilsner til Trump fra lande verden over får folk til at trække på smilebåndet. Men hvorfor er det så sjovt at gøre grin med Trump, og hvad kan vi bruge den politiske humor til?...

  20. Analysis of KROTOS KS-2 and KS-4 steam explosion experiments with TEXAS-VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ronghua, E-mail: rhchen@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Wang, Jun [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Su, G.H.; Qiu, Suizheng [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Corradini, M.L., E-mail: Corradini@engr.wisc.edu [Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The KS-2 and KS-4 steam explosion experiments were analyzed by TEXAS-VI. • The coarse mixing status up to the explosion triggering time was well predicted by TEXAS-VI. • The predicted dynamic explosion pressure was in good agreement with the experimental results. - Abstract: TEXAS-VI is a transient, three-field, one-dimensional mechanistic model for the steam explosion phenomena. A fuel solidification model and associated fragmentation criteria of the solidifying particle for both the mixing phase and explosion phase were developed and incorporated into TEXAS-VI to account for solidification. In the present study, TEXAS-VI was used to analyze the KS-2 and KS-4 steam explosion experiments, which were performed in the KROTOS facility as part of the OECD-SERENA-2 program. In the simulation, the KROTOS experimental facility was modeled as Eulerian control volumes based on the facility geometry. The molten corium jet was divided up into a series of LaGrangian master particles equal to the initial jet diameter. Both the mixing phase and the explosion phase of the experiments were simulated by TEXAS-VI. Comparison to test data indicates that the fuel jet kinematics and the vapor volume during the mixing phase were well predicted by TEXAS-VI. The TEXAS-VI prediction of the dynamic explosion pressure at different axial locations in the test was also in good agreement with the experimental results. The maximum pressure of KS-2 and KS-4 predicted by TEXAS-VI were 16.7 MPa and 41.9 MPa, respectively. The KS-4 maximum steam explosion pressure predicted by TEXAS-VI was higher than that of KS-2, which was consistent with experiment observation. The observed differences of the dynamic explosion pressure between the KS-2 and KS-4 experiments were also successfully simulated by TEXAS-VI. This suggests that TEXAS-VI is able to analyze the effect of prototypic melt compositions on the steam explosion phenomena. Additional benchmarking and evaluations are ongoing.

  1. KENO-VI: A Monte Carlo Criticality Program with generalized quadratic geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses KENO-VI which is a new version of the KENO monte Carlo Criticality Safety developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The purpose of KENO-VI is to provide a criticality safety code similar to KENO-V.a that possesses a more general and flexible geometry package. KENO-VI constructs and processes geometry data as sets of quadratic equations. A lengthy set of simple, easy-to-use geometric functions, similar to those provided in KENO-V.a., and the ability to build more complex geometric shapes represented by sets of quadratic equations are the heart of the geometry package in KENO-VI. The code's flexibility is increased by allowing intersecting geometry regions, hexagonal as well as cuboidal arrays, and the ability to specify an array boundary that intersects the array

  2. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  3. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction by a dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium under non-growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truex, M.J.; Peyton, B.M.; Valentine, N.B.; Gorby, Y.A.

    1997-01-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganisms may be useful in processes designed for selective removal of uranium from aqueous streams. These bacteria can use U(VI) as an electron acceptor and thereby reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). While significant research has been devoted to demonstrating and describing the mechanism of dissimilatory metal reduction, the reaction kinetics necessary to apply this for remediation processes have not been adequately defined. In this study, pure culture Shewanella alga strain BrY reduced U(VI) under non-growth conditions in the presence of excess lactate as the electron donor. Initial U(VI) concentrations ranged from 13 to 1,680microM. A maximum specific U(VI) reduction rate of 2.37 micromole-U(VI)/(mg-biomass h) and Monod half-saturation coefficient of 132 microM-U(VI) were calculated from measured U(VI) reduction rates. U(VI) reduction activity was sustained at 60% of this rate for at least 80 h. The initial presence of oxygen at a concentration equal to atmospheric saturation at 22 C delays but does not prevent U(VI) reduction. The rate of U(VI) reduction by BrY is comparable or better than rates reported for other metal reducing species. BrY reduces U(VI) at a rate that is 30% of its Fe(III) reduction rate

  4. Towards a consistent geochemical model for prediction of uranium(VI) removal from groundwater by ferrihydrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Daessman, Ellinor; Baeckstroem, Mattias

    2009-01-01

    Uranium(VI), which is often elevated in granitoidic groundwaters, is known to adsorb strongly to Fe (hydr)oxides under certain conditions. This process can be used in water treatment to remove U(VI). To develop a consistent geochemical model for U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite, batch experiments were performed and previous data sets reviewed to optimize a set of surface complexation constants using the 3-plane CD-MUSIC model. To consider the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on U(VI) speciation, new parameters for the Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) were optimized using previously published data. The model, which was constrained from available X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy evidence, fitted the data well when the surface sites were divided into low- and high-affinity binding sites. Application of the model concept to other published data sets revealed differences in the reactivity of different ferrihydrites towards U(VI). Use of the optimized SHM parameters for U(VI)-DOM complexation showed that this process is important for U(VI) speciation at low pH. However in neutral to alkaline waters with substantial carbonate present, Ca-U-CO 3 complexes predominate. The calibrated geochemical model was used to simulate U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite for a hypothetical groundwater in the presence of several competitive ions. The results showed that U(VI) adsorption was strong between pH 5 and 8. Also near the calcite saturation limit, where U(VI) adsorption was weakest according to the model, the adsorption percentage was predicted to be >80%. Hence U(VI) adsorption to ferrihydrite-containing sorbents may be used as a method to bring down U(VI) concentrations to acceptable levels in groundwater

  5. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the ... time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. .... model, the separation factor r, according to Calvo et al (2001) cited .... Lead (II) and nickel (II) adsorption kinetics .... heavy metal by Talaromyces helicus: a trained fungus for copper and.

  6. Cloning and expression of a Vi mimotope of Salmonella enterica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-15

    Sep 15, 2009 ... A recombinant His-Vi protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi was successfully constructed and cloned into ... mainly through consumption of food or water contami- nated with .... and healthy individuals (double arrows) followed by the detection using recombinant His-Vi protein as the primary antibody ...

  7. Uranium(VI) sorption on iron oxides in Hanford Site sediment: Application of a surface complexation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, Wooyong; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Brown, Christopher F.; Rod, Kenton A.

    2008-01-01

    Sorption of U(VI) on Hanford fine sand (HFS) with varying Fe-oxide (especially ferrihydrite) contents showed that U(VI) sorption increased with the incremental addition of synthetic ferrihydrite into HFS, consistent with ferrihydrite being one of the most reactive U(VI) sorbents present in natural sediments. Surface complexation model (SCM) calculations for U(VI) sorption, using only U(VI) surface-reaction constants obtained from U(VI) sorption data on freshly synthesized ferrihydrite at different pHs, were similar to the measured U(VI) sorption results on pure synthetic ferrihydrite and on HFS with high contents of ferrihydrite (5 wt%) added. However, the SCM prediction using only U(VI) sorption reactions and constants for synthetic ferrihydrite overestimated U(VI) sorption on the natural HFS or HFS with addition of low amounts of added ferrihydrite (1 wt% added). Over-predicted U(VI) sorption was attributed to reduced reactivity of natural ferrihydrite present in Hanford Site sediments, compared to freshly prepared synthetic ferrihydrite. Even though the SCM general composite (GC) approach is considered to be a semi-quantitative estimation technique for contaminant sorption, which requires systematic experimental data on the sorbent-sorbate system being studied to obtain credible SCM parameters, the general composite SCM model was still found to be a useful technique for describing U(VI) sorption on natural sediments. Based on U(VI) batch sorption results, two simple U(VI) monodentate surface species, SO U O 2 HCO 3 and SO U O 2 OH on ferrihydrite and phyllosillicate in HFS, respectively, can be successfully used to describe U(VI) sorption onto Hanford Site sediment contacting varying geochemical solutions

  8. Ferrate(VI) as a greener oxidant: Electrochemical generation and treatment of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuhui; Zhang, Qi; Liang, He; Ying, Li; Xiangxu, Meng; Sharma, Virender K

    2016-12-05

    Ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)O4(2-), Fe(VI)) is a greener oxidant in the treatment of drinking water and wastewater. The electrochemical synthesis of Fe(VI) may be considered environmentally friendly because it involves one-step process to convert Fe(0) to Fe(VI) without using harmful chemicals. Electrolysis was performed by using a sponge iron as an anode in NaOH solution at different ionic strengths. The cyclic voltammetric (CV) curves showed that the sponge iron had higher electrical activity than the grey cast iron. The optimum current density was 0.054mAcm(-2) in 10M NaOH solution, which is much lower than the electrolyte concentrations used in other electrode materials. A comparison of current efficiency and energy consumption was conducted and is briefly discussed. The generated ferrate solution was applied to degrade phenol in water at two levels (2mgL(-1) and 5mgL(-1)). The maximum removal efficiency was ∼70% and the optimum pH for phenol treatment was 9.0. Experiments on phenol removal using conventional coagulants (ferric chloride (FeCl3) and polyaluminium chloride (PAC)) were performed independently to demonstrate that removal of phenol by Fe(VI) occurred mainly by oxidative transformation. A combination of Fe(VI) and coagulant may be advantageous in enhancing removal efficiency, adjusting pH, and facilitating flocculation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The O VI Mystery: Mismatch between X-Ray and UV Column Densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, S.; Nicastro, F.; Gupta, A.; Krongold, Y.; McLaughlin, B. M.; Brickhouse, N.; Pradhan, A.

    2017-12-01

    The UV spectra of Galactic and extragalactic sightlines often show O VI absorption lines at a range of redshifts, and from a variety of sources from the Galactic circumgalactic medium to active galactic nuclei (AGN) outflows. Inner shell O VI absorption is also observed in X-ray spectra (at λ =22.03 Å), but the column density inferred from the X-ray line was consistently larger than that from the UV line. Here we present a solution to this discrepancy for the z = 0 systems. The O II Kβ line {}4{S}0\\to {(}3D)3{p}4P at 562.40 eV (≡22.04 Å) is blended with the O VI Kα line in X-ray spectra. We estimate the strength of this O II line in two different ways, and show that in most cases the O II line accounts for the entire blended line. The small amount of O VI equivalent width present in some cases has column density entirely consistent with the UV value. This solution to the O VI discrepancy, however, does not apply to high column-density systems like AGN outflows. We discuss other possible causes to explain their UV/X-ray mismatch. The O VI and O II lines will be resolved by gratings on board the proposed mission Arcus and the concept mission Lynx, and would allow the detection of weak O VI lines not just at z = 0, but also at higher redshift.

  10. Sediment studies of the biological factors controlling the reduction of U(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovley, Derek R.

    2004-01-01

    Studies were conducted primarily with sediments, both in laboratory incubations and in a field experiment, with supporting studies with pure cultures. To our knowledge the sediment studies were the first on microbial U(VI) reduction in actual uranium-contaminated subsurface sediments, under conditions that mimic those found in situ. Important findings included: (1) U(VI) reduction is a biotic process in subsurface sediments. (2) U(VI) reduction can be stimulated most effectively with the addition of acetate. Although it had been speculated that microbial U(VI) reduction might be capable of this type of environmental remediation ever since the discovery of microbial U(VI) reduction, this had not been previously demonstrated under environmentally relevant conditions. (3) U(VI) is reduced concurrently with Fe(III) and prior to sulfate reduction. U(VI) and Fe(III) reduction proceeded concurrently, accompanied by a dramatic enrichment in organisms in the Geobacteraceae. Sulfate-reducing microorganisms do not appear to be important components of the microbial community reducing U(VI) in these subsurface sediments. (4) Nitrate has important influences on U(VI) reduction. Nitrate inhibits the reduction of metals until nitrate is depleted. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms such as Geobacter metallireducens and Desulfitobacterium species can oxidize Fe(II) with the reduction of nitrate which is an important consideration because our previous studies have demonstrated that freshly precipitated Fe(III) oxides can reoxidize U(IV) to U(VI). The discovery that G. metallireducens can ''run backwards'' and oxidize U(IV) when nitrate is present reveals another mechanism preventing precipitation of U(IV) in the presence of nitrate as well as potential novel strategy for removing uranium from the subsurface after a site has been remediated. (5) Importance of understanding Fe(III) forms available for microbial reduction. Fe(III) is orders of magnitude more abundant than U(VI) as an

  11. Chromium VI and stomach cancer: a meta-analysis of the current epidemiological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welling, Roberta; Beaumont, James J; Petersen, Scott J; Alexeeff, George V; Steinmaus, Craig

    2015-02-01

    Chromium VI (hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI)) is an established cause of lung cancer, but its association with gastrointestinal cancer is less clear. The goal of this study was to examine whether the current human epidemiological research on occupationally inhaled Cr(VI) supports the hypothesis that Cr(VI) is associated with human stomach cancer. Following a thorough literature search and review of individual studies, we used meta-analysis to summarise the current epidemiological literature on inhaled Cr(VI) and stomach cancer, explore major sources of heterogeneity, and assess other elements of causal inference. We identified 56 cohort and case-control studies and 74 individual relative risk (RR) estimates on stomach cancer and Cr(VI) exposure or work in an occupation associated with high Cr(VI) exposure including chromium production, chrome plating, leather work and work with Portland cement. The summary RR for all studies combined was 1.27 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.38). In analyses limited to only those studies identifying increased risks of lung cancer, the summary RR for stomach cancer was higher (RR=1.41, 95% CI 1.18 to 1.69). Overall, these results suggest that Cr(VI) is a stomach carcinogen in humans, which is consistent with the tumour results reported in rodent studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. GeoViQua: quality-aware geospatial data discovery and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigagli, L.; Papeschi, F.; Mazzetti, P.; Nativi, S.

    2012-04-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualization for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is a recently started FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and evaluation tools, which will be integrated in the GEO-Portal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators, also contributing to the definition of a quality label (GEOLabel). GeoViQua proposed solutions will be assessed in several pilot case studies covering the whole Earth Observation chain, from remote sensing acquisition to data processing, to applications in the main GEOSS Societal Benefit Areas. This work presents the preliminary results of GeoViQua Work Package 4 "Enhanced geo-search tools" (WP4), started in January 2012. Its major anticipated technical innovations are search and evaluation tools that communicate and exploit data quality information from the GCI. In particular, GeoViQua will investigate a graphical search interface featuring a coherent and meaningful aggregation of statistics and metadata summaries (e.g. in the form of tables, charts), thus enabling end users to leverage quality constraints for data discovery and evaluation. Preparatory work on WP4 requirements indicated that users need the "best" data for their purpose, implying a high degree of subjectivity in judgment. This suggests that the GeoViQua system should exploit a combination of provider-generated metadata (objective indicators such as summary statistics), system-generated metadata (contextual

  13. Immobilization of Cr(Vi) as a contaminant from soil by iron compounds; Inmovilizacion de Cr(VI) como contaminante del suelo por compuestos de hierro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin A, M. de J.; Romero G, E. T. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Reyes G, L. R. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencias de la Tierra, Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo Km. 4.5, Pachuca 42184, Hidalgo (Mexico)], e-mail: elizabeth.romero@inin.gob.mx

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the physicochemical and surface properties of Fe{sup 0} and FeS to select the appropriate radioactive material for use in the design of artificial barriers or walls and remove Cr (Vi). The physicochemical characterization was carried out of iron: Fe{sup 0} and FeS, using scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum, X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis techniques. As for the characterization of the surface, was used to determine the surface area, point of zero charge, density of active sites and kinetics of moisture. We obtained a solution of Cr (Vi) by elution of deionized water on the pollution land of Buenavista, Guanajuato. The concentration of Cr (Vi) from a stock solution was 55.56 mg / L determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Stripping or maximum immobilization of Cr (Vi) with Fe{sup 0} (material chosen by their physicochemical and surface properties) was 68.25% using Fe{sup 0}, at a concentration less than 0.1, ph equal to 3 and a contact time of 24 hours. (Author)

  14. Ferric chloride modified zeolite in wastewater on Cr (VI) adsorption characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Kang; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Hua

    2018-03-01

    Zeolite was modified by ferric chloride(Fe-Z) removal Cr (VI) ion from wastewater. The results showed that the effect of Cr(VI) adsorption on modified zeolite depended significantly on pH. It is favorable for the adsorption of Cr(VI) in acid condition. The Langmuir isotherm model has high fitting accuracy with experimental data, demonstrated that is monolayer adsorption and chemical adsorption.The pseudo-second-order equation provided the best correlation to the data. The model can describe the adsorption reaction process well.

  15. 29 CFR 1910.1026 - Chromium (VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allows employees to consume food or beverages at a worksite where chromium (VI) is present, the employer... effect on productivity. 2. Plating Bath Surface Tension Management and Fume Suppression • Lower surface...

  16. HUBBLE TARANTULA TREASURY PROJECT. V. THE STAR CLUSTER HODGE 301: THE OLD FACE OF 30 DORADUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cignoni, M. [Department of Physics—University of Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3 Pisa, I-56127 (Italy); Sabbi, E.; Marel, R. P. van der; Aloisi, A.; Panagia, N. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Lennon, D. J. [European Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Tosi, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Gallagher, J. S. III [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Marchi, G. de [European Space Research and Technology Centre, Keplerlaan 1, NL-2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gouliermis, D. A. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Larsen, S. [Department of Astrophysics, Radboud University, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Smith, L. J., E-mail: michele.cignoni@unipi.it [European Space Agency and Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Based on color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) from the Hubble Space Telescope  Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP) survey, we present the star formation history of Hodge 301, the oldest star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula. The HTTP photometry extends faint enough to reach, for the first time, the cluster pre-main sequence (PMS) turn-on, where the PMS joins the main sequence. Using the location of this feature, along with synthetic CMDs generated with the latest PARSEC models, we find that Hodge 301 is older than previously thought, with an age between 26.5 and 31.5 Myr. From this age, we also estimate that between 38 and 61 Type II supernovae exploded in the region. The same age is derived from the main sequence turn-off, whereas the age derived from the post-main sequence stars is younger and between 20 and 25 Myr. Other relevant parameters are a total stellar mass of ≈8800 ± 800  M {sub ⊙} and average reddening E ( B − V ) ≈ 0.22–0.24 mag, with a differential reddening δE ( B − V ) ≈ 0.04 mag.

  17. Validación de un ELISA tipo inhibición para cuantificar polisacárido Vi en la vacuna antitifoídica cubana vax-TyVi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther María Fajardo

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Se describe la validación de un ELISA tipo inhibición, reportado por primera vez en la literatura científica para cuantificar un antígeno vacunal: el polisacárido Vi de Salmonella Typhi, para ser empleado en el control de la calidad de la vacuna antitifoídica cubana vax- TyViâ. El ensayo consta de seis pasos: 1 Recubrimiento de placa de reacción con poli-L-lisina y posteriormente polisacárido Vi; 2 Bloqueo con leche descremada; 3 Inhibición o neutralización en tubos de suero anti-Vi de conejo, respectivamente, con polisacárido Vi de Curva de Calibración (concentraciones desde 1–32 μg/mL, control positivo y muestras de vacuna (3 diluciones; 4 Neutralización de anticuerpos anti-Vi libres, presentes en las mezclas anteriores, por el Polisacárido de Recubrimiento; 5 Reconocimiento de anticuerpos anti-Vi unidos a la placa (conjugado anti-IgG de conejo-fosfatasa alcalina y 6 Revelado por reacción enzima-sustrato. Los parámetros de validación estudiados y sus resultados fueron: 1 Precisión, expresada como coeficiente de variación a tres niveles de concentración de polisacárido, comprendidos en el rango de su especificación (35, 50 y 70 μg/mL y evaluada en términos de repetibilidad; precisión intraensayos (cuatro analistas y reproducibilidad (seis analistas: £ 20%; 2 Linealidad (100*R2: 99,68 %; 3 Límite de detección: 0,5 μg/mL; 4 Exactitud (recuperación para las tres diluciones de la muestra: entre 100 y 118%, y 5 Robustez: no influye 1,5 h de bloqueo (p = 0,52 ni ± 5 min para leer placa (p = 0,56; influye grandemente la calidad del agua (p = 0,026, a favor del agua para inyección. El ensayo es adecuado para los fines propuestos y es una medida de la inmunogenicidad in vitro del polisacárido Vi.

  18. Ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI from contaminated mine water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eRomero-Gonzalez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The ex-situ bioremoval of U(VI from contaminated water using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans strain 8455 and 13538 was studied under a range of pH and uranium concentrations. The effect of pH on the growth of bacteria was evaluated across the range 1.5 – 4.5 pH units. The respiration rate of At. ferrooxidans at different U(VI concentrations was quantified as a measure of the rate of metabolic activity over time using an oxygen electrode. The biosorption process was quantified using a uranyl nitrate solution, U-spiked growth media and U-contaminated mine water. The results showed that both strains of At. ferrooxidans are able to remove U(VI from solution at pH 2.5 – 4.5, exhibiting a buffering capacity at pH 3.5. The respiration rate of the micro-organism was affected at U(VI concentration of 30 mg L-1. The kinetics of the sorption fitted a pseudo-first order equation, and depended on the concentration of U(VI. The KD obtained from the biosorption experiments indicated that strain 8455 is more efficient for the removal of U(VI. A bioreactor designed to treat a solution of 100 mg U(VI L-1 removed at least 50% of the U(VI in water. The study demonstrated that At. ferrooxidans can be used for the ex-situ bioremediation of U(VI contaminated mine water.

  19. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PANI/bentonie can be synthesized by simple plasma technique. • PANI/bentonie has an excellent adsorption capacity for trace uranium in solution. • U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite is a spontaneous and endothermic process. - Abstract: Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  20. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Uranium (VI)-Carbonato Adsorption Complexes on Hematite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargar, John R

    1999-01-01

    Evaluating societal risks posed by uranium contamination from waste management facilities, mining sites, and heavy industry requires knowledge about uranium transport in groundwater, often the most significant pathway of exposure to humans. It has been proposed that uranium mobility in aquifers may be controlled by adsorption of U(VI)-carbonato complexes on oxide minerals. The existence of such complexes has not been demonstrated, and little is known about their compositions and reaction stoichiometries. We have used Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopies to probe the existence, structures, and compositions of FeO surface -U(VI)-carbonato complexes on hematite throughout the pH range of uranyl uptake under conditions relevant to aquifers. U(VI)-carbonato complexes were found to be the predominant adsorbed U(VI) species at all pH values examined, a much wider pH range than previously postulated based on analogy to aqueous U(VI)-carbonato complexes, which are trace constituents at pH < 6. This result indicates the inadequacy of the common modeling assumption that the compositions and predominance of adsorbed species can be inferred from aqueous species. By extension, adsorbed carbonato complexes may be of major importance to the groundwater transport of similar actinide contaminants such as neptunium and plutonium

  1. Experiments indicating a second hydrogen ordered phase of ice VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Tobias M; Thoeny, Alexander V; Plaga, Lucie J; Köster, Karsten W; Etter, Martin; Böhmer, Roland; Loerting, Thomas

    2018-05-14

    In the last twelve years five new ice phases were experimentally prepared. Two of them are empty clathrate hydrates and three of them represent hydrogen ordered counterparts of previously known disordered ice phases. Here, we report on hydrogen ordering in ice VI samples produced by cooling at pressures up to 2.00 GPa. Based on results from calorimetry, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction the existence of a second hydrogen ordered polymorph related to ice VI is suggested. Powder X-ray data show the oxygen network to be the one of ice VI. For the 1.80 GPa sample the activation energy from dielectric spectroscopy is 45 kJ mol -1 , which is much larger than for the known hydrogen ordered proxy of ice VI, ice XV. Raman spectroscopy indicates the 1.80 GPa sample to be more ordered than ice XV. It is further distinct from ice XV in that it experiences hydrogen disordering above ≈103 K which is 26 K below the ice XV to ice VI disordering transition. Consequently, below 103 K it is thermodynamically more stable than ice XV, adding a stability region to the phase diagram of water. For the time being we suggest to call this new phase ice β-XV and to relabel it ice XVIII once its crystal structure is known.

  2. Cr(VI) reduction in wastewater using a bimetallic galvanic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugo-Lugo, Violeta; Barrera-Diaz, Carlos; Bilyeu, Bryan; Balderas-Hernandez, Patricia; Urena-Nunez, Fernando; Sanchez-Mendieta, Victor

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of Cr(VI)-Cr(III) in wastewater by iron and copper-iron bimetallic plates was evaluated and optimized. Iron has been used as a reducing agent, but in this work a copper-iron galvanic system in the form of bimetallic plates is applied to reducing hexavalent chromium. The optimal pH (2) and ratio of copper to iron surface areas (3.5:1) were determined in batch studies, achieving a 100% reduction in about 25 min. The Cr(VI) reduction kinetics for the bimetallic system fit a first order mechanism with a correlation of 0.9935. Thermodynamic analysis shows that the Cr(VI) reduction is possible at any pH value. However, at pH values above 3.0 for iron and 5.5 for chromium insoluble species appear, indicating that the reaction will be hindered. Continuous column studies indicate that the bimetallic copper-iron galvanic system has a reduction capacity of 9.5890 mg Cr(VI) cm -2 iron, whereas iron alone only has a capacity of 0.1269 mg Cr(VI) cm -2 . The bimetallic copper-iron galvanic system is much more effective in reducing hexavalent chromium than iron alone. The exhausted plates were analyzed by SEM, EDS, and XRD to determine the mechanism and the surface effects, especially surface fouling.

  3. Validation of the Preverbal Visual Assessment (PreViAs) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ormaechea, Inés; González, Inmaculada; Duplá, María; Andres, Eva; Pueyo, Victoria

    2014-10-01

    Visual cognitive integrative functions need to be evaluated by a behavioral assessment, which requires an experienced evaluator. The Preverbal Visual Assessment (PreViAs) questionnaire was designed to evaluate these functions, both in general pediatric population or in children with high risk of visual cognitive problems, through primary caregivers' answers. We aimed to validate the PreViAs questionnaire by comparing caregiver reports with results from a comprehensive clinical protocol. A total of 220 infants (visual development, as determined by the clinical protocol. Their primary caregivers completed the PreViAs questionnaire, which consists of 30 questions related to one or more visual domains: visual attention, visual communication, visual-motor coordination, and visual processing. Questionnaire answers were compared with results of behavioral assessments performed by three pediatric ophthalmologists. Results of the clinical protocol classified 128 infants as having normal visual maturation, and 92 as having abnormal visual maturation. The specificity of PreViAs questionnaire was >80%, and sensitivity was 64%-79%. More than 80% of the infants were correctly classified, and test-retest reliability exceeded 0.9 for all domains. The PreViAs questionnaire is useful to detect abnormal visual maturation in infants from birth to 24months of age. It improves the anamnesis process in infants at risk of visual dysfunctions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  4. [Adsorptive Stabilization of Soil Cr (VI) Using HDTMA Modified Montmorillonite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A series of organo-montomorillonites were prepared using Na-montomorillonite and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA). The organo-montomorillonites were then investigated for the remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soils. FT-IR, XRD, SEM and N2 -BET, CEC, Zeta potential measurement were conducted to understand the structural changes of montmorillonites as different amounts of HDTMAs were added as modifier. The characterization results indicated that the clay interlayer spacing distance increased from 1. 25 nm to 2. 13 nm, the clay surface roughness decreased, the clay surface area reduced from 38.91 m² · g⁻¹ to 0.42 m² · g⁻¹, the clay exchangeable cation amount reduced from 62 cmol · kg⁻¹ to 9.9 cmol · kg⁻¹ and the clay surface charge changed from -29.1 mV to 5.59 mV as the dosage of HDTMA in montmorillonite was increased. The TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) was used to evaluate the leachate toxicity of Cr(VI). The effects of the initial soil Cr(VI) concentration, montmorillonites dosage, reaction time and HDTMA modification amount were investigated, respectively. The results revealed that modification of montmorillonites would manifest an attenuated physical adsorptive effect and an enhanced electrostatic adsorptive effect on Cr(VI), suggesting electrostatic effect was the major force that resulted in improved Cr(VI) adsorption onto HDTMA modified montmorillonites.

  5. Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite by plasma technique for U(VI) removal from aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinghao; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Chengjian; Shao, Dadong; Xu, Zimu; Wang, Jiaquan; Hu, Shuheng; Li, Xiaolong; Wang, Weijuan

    2017-07-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) modified bentonite (PANI/bentonie) was synthesized by plasma induced polymerization of aniline on bentonite surface, and applied to uptake of uranium(VI) ions from aqueous solution. The as-synthesized PANI/bentonie was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch adsorption technique was utilized to investigate the adsorption of U(VI) on bentonite and PANI/bentonite. The adsorption of U(VI) (10 mg/L) on PANI/bentonite surface is fairly depend on solution pH, ionic strength, and temperature in solution. The modified PANI on PANI/bentonite surface significantly enhances its adsorption capability for U(VI). The presence of humic acid (HA) can sound enhance U(VI) adsorption on PANI/bentonite at pH 6.5. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the adsorption of U(VI) on PANI/bentonite surface is a spontaneous and endothermic process. The results highlight the application of PANI/bentonite composites as candidate material for the uptake of trace U(VI) from aqueous solution.

  6. Adsorption equilibrium studies of uranium (VI) onto cross-linked chitosan-citric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Thi Yeu Ly; Nguyen Van Suc; Vo Quang Mai; Nguyen Mong Sinh

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of U(VI) adsorption by the cross- linked chitosan with citric acid was conduced by bath method. Effect of parameters such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and other metal cations was determined. The maximum adsorption capacity of U(VI) at pH 4 was found to be 71.43 mg U(VI) / g cross-linked chitosan - citric acid after 300 min of contact time. The Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were used to describe adsorption equilibrium. The correction values, R 2 of two models were found to be 0.991 and 0.997, respectively. Therefore, it could be concluded that the adsorption equilibrium for U(VI) was followed the Langmuir and the Freundlich isotherm models. (author)

  7. Removal of Cr(VI) from Aqueous Environments Using Micelle-Clay Adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qurie, Mohannad; Khamis, Mustafa; Manassra, Adnan; Ayyad, Ibrahim; Nir, Shlomo; Scrano, Laura; Bufo, Sabino A.; Karaman, Rafik

    2013-01-01

    Removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions under different conditions was investigated using either clay (montmorillonite) or micelle-clay complex, the last obtained by adsorbing critical micelle concentration of octadecyltrimethylammonium ions onto montmorillonite. Batch experiments showed the effects of contact time, adsorbent dosage, and pH on the removal efficiency of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. Langmuir adsorption isotherm fitted the experimental data giving significant results. Filtration experiments using columns filled with micelle-clay complex mixed with sand were performed to assess Cr(VI) removal efficiency under continuous flow at different pH values. The micelle-clay complex used in this study was capable of removing Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions without any prior acidification of the sample. Results demonstrated that the removal effectiveness reached nearly 100% when using optimal conditions for both batch and continuous flow techniques. PMID:24222757

  8. Predicting chromium (VI) adsorption rate in the treatment of liquid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption rate of chromium (VI) on commercial activated carbon during the treatment of the flocculation effluent of liquid-phase oil-based drill-cuttings has been investigated in terms of contact time and initial chromium (VI) ion concentration. Homogenizing 1 g of the activated carbon with 100 ml of the flocculation ...

  9. Effect of selected ligands on the U(VI) immobilization by zerovalent iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noubactep, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Cl - , CO 3 2- , EDTA, NO 2 - , NO 3 - , PO 4 3- , SO 4 2- , and humic substances (HS) on the U(VI) co-precipitation from aqueous solutions by zerovalent iron (ZVI) was investigated in the neutral pH range.Batch experiments without shaking were conducted for 14 days mostly with five different ZVI materials (15 g/l), selected ligands (10mM) and an U(VI) solution (20 mg/l, 0.084mM). Apart from Cl - , all tested ligands induced a decrease of U(VI) coprecipitation. This decrease is attributed to the surface adsorption and complexation of the ligands at the reactive sites on the surface of ZVI and their corrosion products. The decrease of U(VI) removal was not uniform with the five ZVI materials. Generally, groundwater with elevated EDTA concentration could not be remediated with the ZVI barrier technology. The response of the system on the pre-treating by two ZVI materials in 250mM HCl indicated that in situ generated corrosion products favor an irreversible U(VI) uptake. Thus for the long term performance of ZVI barrier, the iron dissolution should continue in such a way that fresh iron oxide be always available for U(VI) coprecipitation. (author)

  10. Influence of U(VI) on the metabolism of plant cells studied by microcalorimetry and TRLFS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Susanne; Geipel, Gerhard [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry; Fahmy, Karim; Oertel, Jana [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Bok, Frank [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    Uranium(VI) shows a concentration-dependent influence on the metabolic activity of plant cells. With increasing U(VI) concentration, the predominant U(VI) species in medium R{sub red} changes from UO{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}(s) to (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 5}{sup +}, which may affect the bioavailability of U(VI).

  11. Adsorption of chromium(VI) on pomace-An olive oil industry waste: Batch and column studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malkoc, Emine; Nuhoglu, Yasar; Dundar, Murat

    2006-01-01

    The waste pomace of olive oil factory (WPOOF) was tested for its ability to remove chromium(VI) from aqueous solution by batch and column experiments. Various thermodynamic parameters, such as ΔG o , ΔH o and ΔS o have been calculated. The thermodynamics of chromium(VI) ion onto WPOOF system indicates spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. The ability of WPOOF to adsorb chromium(VI) in a fixed bed column was investigated, as well. The effect of operating parameters such as flow rate and inlet metal ion concentration on the sorption characteristics of WPOOF was investigated. The longest breakthrough time and maximum of Cr(VI) adsorption is obtained at pH 2.0. The total adsorbed quantities, equilibrium uptakes and total removal percents of chromium(VI) related to the effluent volumes were determined by evaluating the breakthrough curves obtained at different flow rates and different inlet chromium(VI) concentrations for adsorbent. The data confirmed that the total amount of sorbed chromium(VI) and equilibrium chromium(VI) uptake decreased with increasing flow rate and increased with increasing inlet chromium(VI) concentration. The Adams-Bohart model were used to analyze the experimental data and the model parameters were evaluated

  12. Remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil using long-duration sodium thiosulfate supported by micro–nano networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Lulu; Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilong; Qiu, Guannan; Cai, Dongqing; Wu, Zhengyan; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work aims to develop a long-duration remediation agent (LRA). • LRA was obtained using Na 2 S 2 O 3 supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks. • ATP micro–nano networks was induced by high-energy electron beam irradiation. • LRA can effectively control the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). • LRA displayed high performance on the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. - Abstract: In this work, a long-duration remediation agent (LRA) on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed using sodium thiosulfate (ST) supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks induced through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The ATP networks could effectively reduce the leaching amount of Cr(VI) in soil. More importantly, the ATP networks could significantly control the leaching behavior of ST, and then prolong the duration and increase the reduction efficiency of ST on Cr(VI). As a result, LRA displayed high performance on controlling the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Additionally, pot experiment indicated that LRA could effectively decrease the absorbed amount of Cr(VI) in corn, and reduce the inhibition effect of Cr(VI) on the growth of corn. Therefore, this work could provide a facile approach to remediate the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil and lower the harmful effect of Cr(VI) on crop

  13. Remediation of Cr(VI) contaminated soil using long-duration sodium thiosulfate supported by micro–nano networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Lulu [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilong [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Qiu, Guannan [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Cai, Dongqing, E-mail: dqcai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Zhengyan, E-mail: zywu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Hefei Institutes of Physical Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Anhui Province, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Bioenergy Forest Research Center of State Forestry Administration, Hefei 230031 (China); Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xinzhang@ahau.edu.cn [School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • This work aims to develop a long-duration remediation agent (LRA). • LRA was obtained using Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks. • ATP micro–nano networks was induced by high-energy electron beam irradiation. • LRA can effectively control the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). • LRA displayed high performance on the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil. - Abstract: In this work, a long-duration remediation agent (LRA) on hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) was developed using sodium thiosulfate (ST) supported by attapulgite (ATP) micro–nano networks induced through high-energy electron beam (HEEB) irradiation. The ATP networks could effectively reduce the leaching amount of Cr(VI) in soil. More importantly, the ATP networks could significantly control the leaching behavior of ST, and then prolong the duration and increase the reduction efficiency of ST on Cr(VI). As a result, LRA displayed high performance on controlling the migration of Cr(VI) and reducing Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Additionally, pot experiment indicated that LRA could effectively decrease the absorbed amount of Cr(VI) in corn, and reduce the inhibition effect of Cr(VI) on the growth of corn. Therefore, this work could provide a facile approach to remediate the Cr(VI)-contaminated soil and lower the harmful effect of Cr(VI) on crop.

  14. Strain/size analysis in ternary compounds AgIn{sub 5} VI{sub 8} (Vi = S, Se, Te) by X-ray diffraction; Analisis de tension/tamano en compuestos ternarios AgIn{sub 5} VI{sub 8} (VI = S, Se, Te) mediante difraccion de rayos X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fermin, J. R.; Salcedo, D. Y.; Durante R, C.; Castro, J. A. [Universidad del Zulia, Facultad Experimental de Ciencias, Departamento de Fisica, Maracaibo, Zulia (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we have study the microstructural properties of the ternary compounds AgIn{sub 5} VI{sub 8} (Vi = S, Se, Te) by X-ray diffraction technique (XRD). The linewidth of the XRD profile is measured as function of the diffraction angle. Structural parameters such as, average grain size, micro strains, and crystalline dislocation density, are obtained on the framework of a strain/size analysis based on the modified Scherrer equation for Gaussian profiles. The crystalline dislocation arrange according to a Gaussian distribution function, indicating that these dislocations are randomly distributed within the grains. (Author)

  15. Modification of zirconium diphosphate with salicylic acid and its effect on the uranium (Vi) sorption; Modificacion del difosfato de circonio con acido salicilico y su efecto sobre la sorcion de uranio (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazan T, M. G.; Garcia G, N. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Simoni, E., E-mail: guadalupe.almazan@inin.gob.mx [Universidad Paris Sud, Instituto de Fisica Nuclear, Georges Clemenceau No. 15, Orsay (France)

    2014-10-15

    The surface of zirconium diphosphate (ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}) was modified with salicylic acid and its effect was evaluated on the uranium (Vi) sorption. The modified surface of the material was analyzed with different analytical techniques among which are included the atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This analysis allowed showing that the salicylic acid is being held on the surface of the zirconium diphosphate. The reactivity of modified zirconium diphosphate compared with uranium (Vi) was investigated using the classical method of batch sorption. The analysis of sorption isotherms shows that the salicylic acid has an important effect in the uranium (Vi) sorption. According to the study conducted, the interaction among the uranium (Vi) and the surface of zirconium diphosphate modified with the salicylic acid most likely leads to the complexes formation of binary (U(Vi)/ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}) and ternary (U(Vi)/salicylate/ZrP{sub 2}O{sub 7}) surface. (Author)

  16. Delineation and Diagnostic Criteria of Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome Type VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poretti, Andrea; Vitiello, Giuseppina; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bertini, Enrico; Borgatti, Renato; Brancati, Francesco; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Faravelli, Francesca; Giordano, Lucio; Huisman, Thierry A. G. M.; Iannicelli, Miriam; Kluger, Gerhard; Kyllerman, Marten; Landgren, Magnus; Lees, Melissa M.; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Romaniello, Romina; Scheer, Ianina; Schwarz, Christoph E.; Spiegel, Ronen; Tibussek, Daniel; Valente, Enza Maria; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    Oral-Facial-Digital Syndrome type VI (OFD VI) represents a rare phenotypic subtype of Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD). In the original report polydactyly, oral findings, intellectual disability, and absence of the cerebellar vermis at post-mortem characterized the syndrome.

  17. Plutonium(IV) peroxide formation in nitric medium and kinetics Pu(VI) reduction by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, C.; Adnet, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    Reduction of plutonium (VI) to Pu(IV) with hydrogen peroxide is a step in industrial processes used to purify plutonium nitrate solutions. This operation must be carefully controlled, in order to avoid any formation of the Pu(IV) peroxide green precipitate and to obtain exclusively Pu(IV). This led us to study the acidity and Pu and H 2 O 2 concentrations influences on the precipitate appearance and to perform a Pu(VI) reduction kinetic study on a wide range of acidities ([HNO 3 ]: 0.5 to 8 M), plutonium concentrations ([Pu(VI)]: 0.1 to 0.8 M) and [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] ratio (from 1 to 8). Thus, the domain of Pu(IV) peroxide formation and the reactional paths were established. With the exception of 0.5 M nitric acid medium, the kinetic curves show two distinct regims: the first one corresponds to an induction period where the Pu(VI) concentration doesn't change, the second corresponds to a linear decrease of Pu(VI). An increase of the temperature greatly accelerates the Pu(VI) reduction rate while [H 2 O 2 ]/[Pu(VI)] has almost no influence. The Pu(VI) total reduction time decreases when initial concentration of plutonium increases. By increasing nitric acid concentration from 0.5 M to 6 M, the total Pu(VI) reduction time decreases. This time increases when [HNO 3 ] varies from 6 M to 8 M. (orig.)

  18. Synthesis and application of magnetic hydrogel for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Samuel C N; Wang, Peng; Yin, Ke; Lo., Irene Man Chi

    2010-01-01

    Many magnetic adsorbents reported in the literature, such as iron oxides, for Cr(VI) removal have been found effective only in low pH environments. Moreover, the application of polymeric hydrogels on heavy metal removal has been hindered by difficulties in separation by filtration. In this study, a magnetic cationic hydrogel was synthesized for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water, making use of the advantages of magnetic adsorbents and polymeric hydrogels. The magnetic hydrogel was produced by imbedding 10-nm γ-Fe2O 3 nanoparticles into the polymeric matrix via radical polymerization. Characterization of the hydrogel was undertaken with Fourier transform infrared and vibrating sample magnetometer; swelling properties were tested and anionic adsorption capacity was evaluated. The magnetic hydrogel showed a superior Cr(VI) removal capacity compared to commercial products such as MIEX®. Cr(VI) removal was independent of solution pH. Results show that Cr(VI) removal kinetics was improved drastically by grinding the bulk hydrogel into powder form. At relevant concentrations, common water anions (e.g., Cl-, SO4 2-, PO4 3-) and natural organic matter did not exhibit significant inhibition of Cr(VI) adsorption onto the hydrogel. Results of vibrating sample magnetometer indicate that the magnetic hydrogel can be easily separated from treatment systems. Regeneration of the magnetic hydrogel can be easily achieved by washing the Cr(VI)-loaded hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl solution, with a recovery rate of about 90% of Cr(VI). © Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2010.

  19. Synthesis and application of magnetic hydrogel for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Samuel C N

    2010-11-01

    Many magnetic adsorbents reported in the literature, such as iron oxides, for Cr(VI) removal have been found effective only in low pH environments. Moreover, the application of polymeric hydrogels on heavy metal removal has been hindered by difficulties in separation by filtration. In this study, a magnetic cationic hydrogel was synthesized for Cr(VI) removal from contaminated water, making use of the advantages of magnetic adsorbents and polymeric hydrogels. The magnetic hydrogel was produced by imbedding 10-nm γ-Fe2O 3 nanoparticles into the polymeric matrix via radical polymerization. Characterization of the hydrogel was undertaken with Fourier transform infrared and vibrating sample magnetometer; swelling properties were tested and anionic adsorption capacity was evaluated. The magnetic hydrogel showed a superior Cr(VI) removal capacity compared to commercial products such as MIEX®. Cr(VI) removal was independent of solution pH. Results show that Cr(VI) removal kinetics was improved drastically by grinding the bulk hydrogel into powder form. At relevant concentrations, common water anions (e.g., Cl-, SO4 2-, PO4 3-) and natural organic matter did not exhibit significant inhibition of Cr(VI) adsorption onto the hydrogel. Results of vibrating sample magnetometer indicate that the magnetic hydrogel can be easily separated from treatment systems. Regeneration of the magnetic hydrogel can be easily achieved by washing the Cr(VI)-loaded hydrogel with 0.5 M NaCl solution, with a recovery rate of about 90% of Cr(VI). © Copyright 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2010.

  20. Modeling of Cr(VI) Bioreduction Under Fermentative and Denitrifying Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Steefel, C.; Yang, L.; Beller, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    The mechanisms of bioreductive immobilization of Cr(VI) were investigated by reactive transport modeling of a set of flow-through column experiments performed using natural Hanford 100H aquifer sediment. The columns were continuously eluted with 5 μM Cr(VI), 5 mM lactate as the electron donor, and selected electron acceptors (tested individually). Here we focus on the two separate experimental conditions that showed the most removal of Cr(VI) from solution: fermentation and denitrification. In each case, a network of enzymatic and abiotic reaction pathways was considered to interpret the rate of chromate reduction. The model included biomass growth and decay, and thermodynamic limitations on reaction rates, and was constrained by effluent concentrations measured by IC and ICP-MS and additional information from bacterial isolates from column effluent. Under denitrifying conditions, Cr(VI) reduction was modeled as co-metabolic with nitrate reduction based on experimental observations and previous studies on a denitrifying bacterium derived from the Hanford 100H aquifer. The reactive transport model results supported this interpretation of the reaction mechanism and were used to quantify the efficiency of the process. The models results also suggest that biomass growth likely relied on a nitrogen source other than ammonium (e.g. nitrate). Under fermentative conditions and based on cell suspension studies performed on a bacterial isolate from the columns, the model assumes that Cr(VI) reduction is carried out directly by fermentative bacteria that convert lactate into acetate and propionate. The evolution to complete lactate fermentation and Cr(VI) reduction took place over a week's time and simulations were used to determine an estimate for a lower limit of the rate of chromate reduction by calibration with the flow-through column experimental results. In spite of sulfate being added to these columns, sulfate reduction proceeded at a slow rate and was not well

  1. Uranium(VI) retention by Ca-bentonite under (hyper)alkaline conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philipp, Thimo; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    The sorption behavior of U(VI) on Ca-bentonite was studied in saline, (hyper)alkaline solution via batch experiments. At pH 8.5-9.5 sorption is low in the presence of CO{sub 2} due to the formation of weakly sorbing uranyl carbonate species, which have been observed to dominate speciation up to pH 10 by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In the pH region 10-12, U(VI) retention is almost complete. The retention can either be attributed to strongly sorbing uranyl hydroxo complexes or to a partial precipitation of uranium due to an altered solubility of U(VI) induced by ions leached out of the bentonite.

  2. Application of NKF-6 zeolite for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pengfei Zong; Hai Wang; Hui Pan; Yaolin Zhao; Chaohui He

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the application of NKF-6 zeolite as an adsorbent for the removal of U(VI) from radionuclides and heavy metal ions polluted water, herein, NKF-6 zeolite was employed to remove U(VI) at different experimental conditions. The influence of solid/liquid ratio, contact time, pH, ionic strength, humic substances and temperature on sorption of U(VI) to NKF-6 zeolite was investigated using batch technique under ambient conditions. The experimental results demonstrated that the sorption of U(VI) on NKF-6 zeolite was strongly dependent on pH. The sorption property of U(VI) was influenced by ionic strength at pH 7.0. The presence of fulvic acid or humic acid promoted the sorption of U(VI) on NKF-6 zeolite at low pH values while restrained the sorption at high pH values. The thermodynamic parameters (i.e., ΔS 0 , ΔH 0 , and ΔG 0 ) calculated from the temperature-dependent sorption isotherms demonstrated that the sorption process of U(VI) on NKF-6 zeolite was endothermic and spontaneous. At low pH values, the sorption of U(VI) was dominated by outer-sphere surface complexation and ion exchange with Na + /H + on NKF-6 zeolite surfaces, while inner-sphere surface complexation was the main sorption mechanism at high pH values. From the experimental results, one can conclude that NKF-6 zeolite can be used as a potential adsorbent for the preconcentration and solidification of U(VI) from large volumes of aqueous solutions. (author)

  3. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips , Elizabeth J.P.; Landa, Edward R.; Lovely, Derek R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranuum-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20–94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism,Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils.

  4. Remediation of uranium contaminated soils with bicarbonate extraction and microbial U(VI) reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, E.J.P.; Landa, E.R.; Lovley, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for concentrating uranium from contaminated soils in which the uranium is first extracted with bicarbonate and then the extracted uranium is precipitated with U(VI)-reducing microorganisms was evaluated for a variety of uranium-contaminated soils. Bicarbonate (100 mM) extracted 20-94% of the uranium that was extracted with nitric acid. The U(VI)-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans reduced the U(VI) to U(IV) in the bicarbonate extracts. In some instances unidentified dissolved extracted components, presumably organics, gave the extract a yellow color and inhibited U(VI) reduction and/or the precipitation of U(IV). Removal of the dissolved yellow material with the addition of hydrogen peroxide alleviated this inhibition. These results demonstrate that bicarbonate extraction of uranium from soil followed by microbial U(VI) reduction might be an effective mechanism for concentrating uranium from some contaminated soils. (author)

  5. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Type VI in Individuals from Northern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Leanne; Bardai, Ghalib; Moffatt, Pierre; Al-Jallad, Hadil; Trejo, Pamela; Glorieux, Francis H; Rauch, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type VI is a recessively inherited form of OI that is caused by mutations in SERPINF1, the gene coding for pigment-epithelium derived factor (PEDF). Here, we report on two apparently unrelated children with OI type VI who had the same unusual homozygous variant in intron 6 of SERPINF1 (c.787-10C>G). This variant created a novel splice site that led to the in-frame addition of three amino acids to PEDF (p.Lys262_Ile263insLeuSerGln). Western blotting showed that skin fibroblasts with this mutation produced PEDF but failed to secrete it. Both children were treated with intravenous bisphosphonates, but the treatment of Individual 1 was switched to subcutaneous injections of denosumab (dose 1 mg per kg body weight, repeated every 3 months). An iliac bone sample obtained after 5 denosumab injections (and 3 months after the last injection) showed no change in the increased osteoid parameters that are typical of OI type VI, but the number of osteoclasts in trabecular bone was markedly increased. This suggests that the effect of denosumab on osteoclast suppression is of shorter duration in children with OI type VI than what has previously been reported on adults with osteoporosis.

  6. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-01-01

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience and nanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis and application of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based on high temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has become one of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. This method is first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkers in 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and later extended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well as anisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod. This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystal synthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied by characterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and products and following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on these results, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction between the precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth of nanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theory calculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursor decomposition and monomer formation pathway. Based on the proposed reaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses water as a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSe and CdS nanorods

  7. Kinetics of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal from water by two floating macrophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine, M A; Hadad, H R; Sánchez, G; Caffaratti, S; Pedro, M C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal kinetics from water by Pistia stratiotes and Salvinia herzogii. The accumulation in plant tissues and the effects of both Cr forms on plant growth were also evaluated. Plants were exposed to 2 and 6 mg L(-1) of Cr(III) or Cr(VI) during 30 days. At the end of the experiment, Cr(VI) removal percentages were significantly lower than those obtained for Cr(III) for both macrophytes. Cr(III) removal kinetics involved a fast and a slow component. The fast component was primarily responsible for Cr(III) removal while Cr(VI) removal kinetics involved only a slow process. Cr accumulated principally in the roots. In the Cr(VI) treatments a higher translocation from roots to aerial parts than in Cr(III) treatments was observed. Both macrophytes demonstrated a high ability to remove Cr(III) but not Cr(VI). Cr(III) inhibited the growth at the highest studied concentration of both macrophytes while Cr(VI) caused senescence. These results have important implications in the use of constructed wetlands for secondary industrial wastewater treatment. Common primary treatments of effluents containing Cr(VI) consists in its reduction to Cr(III). Cr(III) concentrations in these effluents are normally below the highest studied concentrations in this work.

  8. Box-Behnken experimental design for chromium(VI) ions removal by bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Mihalache, Nicoleta; Botez, Adriana; Matei, Cristian; Berger, Daniela; Damian, Celina Maria; Ionita, Valentin

    2016-10-01

    In this study bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites were synthesised for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites and to reveal the uniform dispersion of nanomagnetite in the BC matrix. Magnetic properties were also measured to confirm the magnetite immobilization on bacterial cellulose membrane. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration, solution pH and solid/liquid ratio upon chromium removal were examined using the statistical Box-Behnken Design. Because of the possibility of magnetite dissolution during chromium(VI) adsorption, the degree of iron leaching was also analysed in the same conditions as Cr(VI) adsorption. From the factors affecting chromium(VI) adsorption the most important was solution pH. The highest Cr(VI) removal efficiency was observed at pH 4, accompanied by the lowest iron leaching in the solution. The adsorption experiments also indicated that the adsorption process of chromium(VI) is well described by Freundlich adsorption model. Our results proved that the BC-magnetite composites could be used for an efficient removal of chromium(VI) from diluted solutions with a minimum magnetite dissolution during operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Reaction kinetics and oxidation products formation in the degradation of ciprofloxacin and ibuprofen by ferrate(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of ciprofloxacin (CIP) and ibuprofen (IBU) in test solutions by ferrate(VI) was investigated in this study. A series of jar test was performed in bench-scale at pH 6-9 and ferrate(VI) dose of 1-5 mg L(-1). Results demonstrated that ferrate(VI) removed CIP from test solutions efficiently, with above 70% of reduction under study conditions. In contrary, the removal rates of IBU were very low, less than 25% in all conditions. Raising ferrate(VI) dose improved the treatment performance, while the influence of solution pH was not significant at pH 6-9 compared with that of ferrate(VI) dose. In addition, kinetic studies of ferrate(VI) with both compounds were carried out at pH 8 and pH 9 (20 °C). Ferrate(VI) had a much higher reactivity with CIP than IBU at pH 8 and pH 9, with CIP's apparent second-order rate constants of 113.7±6.3 M(-1) s(-1) and 64.1±1.0 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. The rate constants of ferrate(VI) with IBU were less than 0.2 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 8 and pH 9. Furthermore, seven oxidation products (OPs) were formed during CIP degradation by ferrate(VI). The attack on the piperazinyl ring of the CIP by ferrate(VI) appeared to lead to the cleavage or hydroxylation of the rings, and the attack on the quinolone moiety by ferrate(VI) might lead to the cleavage of the double bond at the six-member heterocyclic ring. No OPs of IBU were detected during ferrate(VI) oxidation due to very small part of IBU was degraded by ferrate(VI). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HUBBLE TARANTULA TREASURY PROJECT. III. PHOTOMETRIC CATALOG AND RESULTING CONSTRAINTS ON THE PROGRESSION OF STAR FORMATION IN THE 30 DORADUS REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbi, E.; Anderson, J.; Cignoni, M.; Marel, R. P. van der; Panagia, N.; Sana, H.; Aloisi, A.; Arab, H.; Gordon, K. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Lennon, D. J. [ESA—European Space Astronomy Center, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Associate Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Zaritsky, D. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marchi, G. De [Space Science Department, European Space Agency, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gouliermis, D. A. [Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12-14, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); III, J. S. Gallagher [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Smith, L. J. [ESA/STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD, 21218 (United States); Tosi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Center, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Boyer, M. [Observational Cosmology Lab, Code 665, NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, 20771 (United States); Mink, S. E. de, E-mail: sabbi@stsci.edu [Astronomical Institute “Anton Pannekoek,”University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2016-01-15

    We present and describe the astro-photometric catalog of more than 800,000 sources found in the Hubble Tarantula Treasury Project (HTTP). HTTP is a Hubble Space Telescope Treasury program designed to image the entire 30 Doradus region down to the sub-solar (∼0.5 M{sub ⊙}) mass regime using the Wide Field Camera 3 and the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We observed 30 Doradus in the near-ultraviolet (F275W, F336W), optical (F555W, F658N, F775W), and near-infrared (F110W, F160W) wavelengths. The stellar photometry was measured using point-spread function fitting across all bands simultaneously. The relative astrometric accuracy of the catalog is 0.4 mas. The astro-photometric catalog, results from artificial star experiments, and the mosaics for all the filters are available for download. Color–magnitude diagrams are presented showing the spatial distributions and ages of stars within 30 Dor as well as in the surrounding fields. HTTP provides the first rich and statistically significant sample of intermediate- and low-mass pre-main sequence candidates and allows us to trace how star formation has been developing through the region. The depth and high spatial resolution of our analysis highlight the dual role of stellar feedback in quenching and triggering star formation on the giant H ii region scale. Our results are consistent with stellar sub-clustering in a partially filled gaseous nebula that is offset toward our side of the Large Magellanic Cloud.

  11. Effect of flavin compounds on uranium(VI) reduction- kinetic study using electrochemical methods with UV-vis spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shinya; Tanaka, Kazuya; Kozai, Naofumi; Ohnuki, Toshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The reduction of uranium hexavalent (U(VI)) to tetravalent (U(IV)) is an important reaction because of the change in its mobility in the natural environment. Although the flavin mononucleotide (FMN) has acted as an electron shuttle for the U(VI) reduction in vivo system, which is called an electron mediator, only the rate constant for the electron transfer from FMN to U(VI) has been determined. This study examined the rate constant for the U(VI) reduction process by three flavin analogues (riboflavin, flavin mononucleotide, flavin adenine dinucleotide) to elucidate their substituent group effect on the U(VI) reduction rate by electrochemical methods. The formation of the U(IV) was monitored by UV-vis spectrometry at 660 nm during the constant potential electrolysis of the U(VI) solution in the presence of the mediator. The cyclic voltammograms indicated that the three flavin analogues behaved as electron mediator to reduce U(VI). The logarithmic rate constant for the U(VI) reduction was related to the standard redox potential of the mediators. This linear relationship indicated that the redox-active group of the mediator and the substituent group of the mediator dominate capability of the U(VI) reduction and its rate, respectively. The apparent reduction potential of U(VI) increased about 0.2 V in the presence of the mediators, which strongly suggests that the biological electron mediator makes the U(VI) reduction possible even under more oxidative conditions. - Highlights: • The rate constant for the U(VI) reduction by flavin analogues was determined. • The flavins showed a mediator effect on the U(VI) reduction. • The logarithmic rate constants for the U(VI) reduction was proportional to redox potential of the mediator. • The presence of the mediator increased about 0.2 V apparent redox potential of U(VI) to U(IV).

  12. Ryger troværdigheden ned, når vi taler læreruddannelsen op?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Nu er vi ved at få talt læreruddannelsen op af sin lavstatus. Resultatet er, at flere søger uddannelsen. Så må vi håbe, at talen er troværdig, for ellers vil frafaldet stige.......Nu er vi ved at få talt læreruddannelsen op af sin lavstatus. Resultatet er, at flere søger uddannelsen. Så må vi håbe, at talen er troværdig, for ellers vil frafaldet stige....

  13. ColVI myopathies: where do we stand, where do we go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allamand Valérie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Collagen VI myopathies, caused by mutations in the genes encoding collagen type VI (ColVI, represent a clinical continuum with Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD and Bethlem myopathy (BM at each end of the spectrum, and less well-defined intermediate phenotypes in between. ColVI myopathies also share common features with other disorders associated with prominent muscle contractures, making differential diagnosis difficult. This group of disorders, under-recognized for a long time, has aroused much interest over the past decade, with important advances made in understanding its molecular pathogenesis. Indeed, numerous mutations have now been reported in the COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3 genes, a large proportion of which are de novo and exert dominant-negative effects. Genotype-phenotype correlations have also started to emerge, which reflect the various pathogenic mechanisms at play in these disorders: dominant de novo exon splicing that enables the synthesis and secretion of mutant tetramers and homozygous nonsense mutations that lead to premature termination of translation and complete loss of function are associated with early-onset, severe phenotypes. In this review, we present the current state of diagnosis and research in the field of ColVI myopathies. The past decade has provided significant advances, with the identification of altered cellular functions in animal models of ColVI myopathies and in patient samples. In particular, mitochondrial dysfunction and a defect in the autophagic clearance system of skeletal muscle have recently been reported, thereby opening potential therapeutic avenues.

  14. Thermodynamics of U(VI) and Eu(III) complexation by unsaturated carboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawat, Neetika; Bhattacharyya, A. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Tomar, B.S., E-mail: bstomar@barc.gov.in [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ghanty, T.K. [Theoretical Chemistry Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Manchanda, V.K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2011-05-10

    Highlights: {yields} {Delta}H and log K determined for U(VI) and Eu(III) complexes with maleate and fumarate. {yields} log K and coordination environment of Eu(III) complexes has been studied by TRFS. {yields} Higher log K of U(VI) complexes than Eu(III) complexes is due to higher entropy. {yields} Plot of log K vs log K{sub P} suggest charge polarization in fumarate complexes. {yields} Ab initio calculations support charge polarization in fumarate complexes. - Abstract: The thermodynamic parameters ({Delta}G, {Delta}H and {Delta}S) of complexation of U(VI) and Eu(III) by unsaturated dicarboxylic acids, namely, maleic and fumaric acid, has been determined by potentiometric and microcalorimetric titrations at fixed ionic strength (I = 1.0 M) and temperature (298 K). The results show formation of 1:1 complexes by both the ligands with Eu(III). In the case of U(VI), maleate forms both 1:1 and 1:2 complexes, while only 1:1 complex was formed with fumarate. The fluorescence emission spectra of Eu(III)-dicarboxylate solutions at varying ligand to metal ratio were also used to obtain their stability constants. In addition, the fluorescence lifetimes reveal higher dehydration of Eu(III)-maleate compared to Eu(III)-fumarate which corroborates the {Delta}S values. The thermodynamic quantities suggest charge polarization effects in the case of U(VI) and Eu(III) complexes of fumarate, which is further corroborated by theoretical calculations. For the same ligand, U(VI) complexes were found to be more stable which was mainly due to higher entropy term.

  15. Transient groundwater chemistry near a river: Effects on U(VI) transport in laboratory column experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Haggerty, Roy; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Kent, Douglas B.; Istok, Jonathan D.; Greskowiak, Janek; Zachara, John M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 300 Area of a U(VI)-contaminated aquifer at Hanford, Washington, USA, inorganic carbon and major cations, which have large impacts on U(VI) transport, change on an hourly and seasonal basis near the Columbia River. Batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the factors controlling U(VI) adsorption/desorption by changing chemical conditions over time. Low alkalinity and low Ca concentrations (Columbia River water) enhanced adsorption and reduced aqueous concentrations. Conversely, high alkalinity and high Ca concentrations (Hanford groundwater) reduced adsorption and increased aqueous concentrations of U(VI). An equilibrium surface complexation model calibrated using laboratory batch experiments accounted for the decrease in U(VI) adsorption observed with increasing (bi)carbonate concentrations and other aqueous chemical conditions. In the column experiment, alternating pulses of river and groundwater caused swings in aqueous U(VI) concentration. A multispecies multirate surface complexation reactive transport model simulated most of the major U(VI) changes in two column experiments. The modeling results also indicated that U(VI) transport in the studied sediment could be simulated by using a single kinetic rate without loss of accuracy in the simulations. Moreover, the capability of the model to predict U(VI) transport in Hanford groundwater under transient chemical conditions depends significantly on the knowledge of real-time change of local groundwater chemistry.

  16. Nicomachean Ethics VI.9: good deliberation and phronesis [Ética a Nicômaco VI.9: boa deliberação e phronesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo Antonio Pires de Oliveira

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I put under scrutiny the arguments put forward by Aristotle in Nicomachean Ethics (NE VI.9. The paper has two main parts. In the first, I examine the NE VI.9’s first part where Aristotle develops the concept of good deliberation, offering its definition in 1142b27-28. In the second, I examine the connection between good deliberation and phronesis, and, then, discuss the vexata quæstio about if the lines 1142b31-33 might be read as introducing the claim that phronesis provides moral ends. [Neste artigo, analiso pormenorizadamente os argumentos apresentados por Aristóteles em Ética a Nicômaco (EN VI.9. O artigo é dividido em duas partes principais. Na primeira, abordo a primeira parte de EN VI.9 onde Aristóteles desenvolve a noção de boa deliberação, culminando com a apresentação da sua definição em 1142b27-28. Na segunda, abordo a conexão entre boa deliberação e phronesis e discuto a vexata quaestio de se as linhas 1142b31-33 podem ser lidas como introduzindo a tese de que a phronesis fornece os fins morais

  17. Urinary carbonic anhydrase VI as a biomarker for kidney disease in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishita, Toshiho; Yatsu, Juro; Watanabe, Kazuo; Ochiai, Hideharu; Ichihara, Nobutsune; Orito, Kensuke; Arishima, Kazuyoshi

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated whether carbonic anhydrase (CA)-VI has utility as a biomarker in swine kidney disease. Serum chemistry, histopathology, immunohistochemical staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses were performed. In the kidney of normal healthy pigs, CA-VI was localized in the epithelial cells of the renal distal straight tubules. CA-VI levels were 16 ± 35 ng/g wet tissue and 50 ± 66 ng/mL in normal pig kidney and urine, respectively, and 136 ± 173 ng/mL in the urine of pigs with kidney disease. CA-VI urinary concentration was not correlated with urinary urea nitrogen (UUN), urinary creatinine (Cre), or urinary albumin levels in pigs with kidney disease. However, UUN and Cre levels were positively correlated in the urine of pigs with kidney disease. These data suggest that urinary CA-VI may represent a biomarker for kidney disease in pigs, particularly for disorders affecting distal straight tubules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Influence of Calcite and Dissolved Calcium on Uranium(VI) Sorption to a Hanford Subsurface Sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Stone, Alan T.; Bai, Jing; Zachara, John M.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of calcite and dissolved calcium on U(VI) adsorption was investigated using a calcite-containing sandy silt/clay sediment from the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site. U(VI) adsorption to sediment, treated sediment, and sediment size fractions was studied in solutions that both had and had not been preequilibrated with calcite, at initial [U(VI)] ) 10-7-10-5 mol/L and final pH ) 6.0- 10.0. Kinetic and reversibility studies (pH 8.4) showed rapid sorption (30 min), with reasonable reversibility in the 3-day reaction time. Sorption from solutions equilibrated with calcite showed maximum U(VI) adsorption at pH 8.4 (0.1. In contrast, calcium-free systems showed the greatest adsorption at pH 6.0-7.2. At pH > 8.4, U(VI) adsorption was identical from calcium-free and calcium-containing solutions. For calcite-presaturated systems, both speciation calculations and laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopic analyses indicated that aqueous U(VI) was increasingly dominated by Ca2UO2(CO3)3 0(aq) at pH<8.4 and that formation of Ca2UO2(CO3)3 0(aq) is what suppresses U(VI) adsorption. Above pH 8.4, aqueous U(VI) speciation was dominated by UO2(CO3)3 4- in all solutions. Finally, results also showed that U(VI) adsorption was additive in regard to size fraction but not in regard to mineral mass: Carbonate minerals may have blocked U(VI) access to surfaces of higher sorption affinity

  19. combined effect of polyaniline emeraldine salt for removal of Cr(VI)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cr(VI) ion is one of the major industrial wastes as dichromate and chromate ions are ... more [9–12]. For the toxic nature of Cr(VI) in aqueous medium, it becomes a ... techniques such as adsorption [13–15], chemical reduction. [16], reverse ...

  20. Probing uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of amidoxime ligands using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Adetayo M; Pasilis, Sofie P

    2013-10-15

    Extraction processes using poly(acrylamidoxime) resins are being developed to extract uranium from seawater. The main complexing agents in these resins are thought to be 2,6-dihydroxyiminopiperidine (DHIP) and N(1),N(5)-dihydroxypentanediimidamide (DHPD), which form strong complexes with uranyl(VI) at the pH of seawater. It is important to understand uranyl(VI) speciation in the presence of these and similar amidoxime ligands to understand factors affecting uranyl(VI) adsorption to the poly(acrylamidoxime) resins. Experiments were carried out in positive ion mode on a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with an electrospray ionization source. The ligands investigated were DHIP, DHPD, and N(1),N(2)-dihydroxyethanediimidamide (DHED). DHED and DHPD differ only in the number of carbons separating the oxime groups. The effects on the mass spectra of changes in uranyl(VI):ligand ratio, pH, and ligand type were examined. DHIP binds uranyl(VI) more effectively than DHPD or DHED in the pH range investigated, forming ions derived from solution-phase species with uranyl(VI):DHIP stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, and 2:3. The 2:3 uranyl(VI):DHIP complex appears to be a previously undescribed solution species. Ions related to uranyl(VI):DHPD complexes were detected in very low abundance. DHED is a more effective complexing agent for uranyl(VI) than DHPD, forming ions having uranyl(VI):DHED stoichiometries of 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 2:3. This study presents a first look at the solution chemistry of uranyl(VI)-amidoxime complexes using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The appearance of previously undescribed solution species suggests that the uranyl-amidoxime system is a rich and relatively complex one, requiring a more in-depth investigation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. 77 FR 50454 - Department of the Treasury Acquisition Regulations; Contract Clause on Minority and Women...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ..., requires that a contractor make good faith efforts to include minorities and women in its workforce. This... termination, against a contractor who fails to make good faith efforts to include minorities and women in its workforce. Treasury interprets ``good faith efforts'' to mean efforts consistent with the Equal Protection...

  2. Surface complexation modeling of the effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero-Gonzalez, M.R.; Cheng, T.; Barnett, M.O. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engeneering; Roden, E.E. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    2007-07-01

    Previous published data for the adsorption of U(VI) and/or phosphate onto amorphous Fe(III) oxides (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO) and crystalline Fe(III) oxides (goethite) was examined. These data were then used to test the ability of a commonly-used surface complexation model (SCM) to describe the adsorption of U(VI) and phosphate onto pure amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and synthetic goethite-coated sand, a surrogate for a natural Fe(III)-coated material, using the component additivity (CA) approach. Our modeling results show that this model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and also goethite-coated sand quite well in the absence of phosphate. However, because phosphate adsorption exhibits a stronger dependence on Fe(III) oxide type than U(VI) adsorption, we could not use this model to consistently describe phosphate adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand. However, the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption could be incorporated into the model to describe U(VI) adsorption to both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand, at least for an initial approximation. These results illustrate both the potential and limitations of using surface complexation models developed from pure systems to describe metal/radionuclide adsorption under more complex conditions. (orig.)

  3. Surface complexation modeling of the effects of phosphate on uranium(VI) adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Gonzalez, M.R.; Cheng, T.; Barnett, M.O.; Roden, E.E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous published data for the adsorption of U(VI) and/or phosphate onto amorphous Fe(III) oxides (hydrous ferric oxide, HFO) and crystalline Fe(III) oxides (goethite) was examined. These data were then used to test the ability of a commonly-used surface complexation model (SCM) to describe the adsorption of U(VI) and phosphate onto pure amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and synthetic goethite-coated sand, a surrogate for a natural Fe(III)-coated material, using the component additivity (CA) approach. Our modeling results show that this model was able to describe U(VI) adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and also goethite-coated sand quite well in the absence of phosphate. However, because phosphate adsorption exhibits a stronger dependence on Fe(III) oxide type than U(VI) adsorption, we could not use this model to consistently describe phosphate adsorption onto both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand. However, the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption could be incorporated into the model to describe U(VI) adsorption to both amorphous and crystalline Fe(III) oxides and goethite-coated sand, at least for an initial approximation. These results illustrate both the potential and limitations of using surface complexation models developed from pure systems to describe metal/radionuclide adsorption under more complex conditions. (orig.)

  4. Linkages among U.S. Treasury Bond Yields, Commodity Futures and Stock Market Implied Volatility: New Nonparametric Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vychytilova Jana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to explore specific cross-asset market correlations over the past fifteen- yearperiod-from January 04, 1999 till April 01, 2015, and within four sub-phases covering both the crisis and the non-crisis periods. On the basis of multivariate statistical methods, we focus on investigating relations between selected well-known market indices- U.S. treasury bond yields- the 30-year treasury yield index (TYX and the 10-year treasury yield (TNX; commodity futures the TR/J CRB; and implied volatility of S&P 500 index- the VIX. We estimate relative logarithmic returns by using monthly close prices adjusted for dividends and splits and run normality and correlation analyses. This paper indicates that the TR/J CRB can be adequately modeled by a normal distribution, whereas the rest of benchmarks do not come from a normal distribution. This paper, inter alia, points out some evidence of a statistically significant negative relationship between bond yields and the VIX in the past fifteen years and a statistically significant negative linkage between the TR/J CRB and the VIX since 2009. In rather general terms, this paper thereafter supports the a priori idea- financial markets are interconnected. Such knowledge can be beneficial for building and testing accurate financial market models, and particularly for the understanding and recognizing market cycles.

  5. Surveying Earth Science Users: Improvements Increase Participation and Insight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquist, C. L.

    2006-12-01

    NASA has surveyed users of its Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) for three years to determine user satisfaction with its services. The survey is being conducted by Claes Fornell International (CFI) under contract with the Department of Treasury's Federal Consulting Group, Executive Agent in government for the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). The purpose of this survey is to help EOSDIS and the data centers assess current status and improve future services. Analysis of each year's results has led to refining, dropping, and adding questions that provide the basis of understanding satisfaction levels across data centers, and for functions within each center. This paper will present lessons learned in preparing the invitation and survey questions and the steps taken to make the survey easier to complete. Year three Indicators include increased participation and better identification with data center names and information services.

  6. Modeling of kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste in a stirred batch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero, Carlos; Fiol, Nuria; Poch, Jordi; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Recently, Cr(VI) removal by grape stalks has been postulated to follow two mechanisms, adsorption and reduction to trivalent chromium. Nevertheless, the rate at which both processes take place and the possible simultaneity of both processes has not been investigated. In this work, kinetics of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste has been studied. Experiments were carried out at different temperatures but at a constant pH (3 ± 0.1) in a stirred batch reactor. Results showed that three steps take place in the process of Cr(VI) sorption onto grape stalk waste: Cr(VI) sorption, Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) and the adsorption of the formed Cr(III). Taking into account the evidences above mentioned, a model has been developed to predict Cr(VI) sorption on grape stalks on the basis of (i) irreversible reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reaction, whose reaction rate is assumed to be proportional to the Cr(VI) concentration in solution and (ii) adsorption and desorption of Cr(VI) and formed Cr(III) assuming that all the processes follow Langmuir type kinetics. The proposed model fits successfully the kinetic data obtained at different temperatures and describes the kinetics profile of total, hexavalent and trivalent chromium. The proposed model would be helpful for researchers in the field of Cr(VI) biosorption to design and predict the performance of sorption processes.

  7. Biological detoxification of Cr(VI) using wood-husk immobilized Acinetobacter haemolyticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakaria, Zainul Akmar; Zakaria, Zainoha; Surif, Salmijah; Ahmad, Wan Azlina

    2007-01-01

    Acinetobacter haemolyticus, a Gram-negative aerobic locally isolated bacterium, immobilized on wood-husk showed the ability to detoxify Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Wood-husk, a natural cellulose-based support material, packed in an upward-flow column was used as support material for bacterial attachment. Around 97% of the Cr(VI) in wastewater containing 15 mg L -1 of Cr(VI) was reduced at a flow rate of 8.0 mL min -1 . The wastewater containing Cr(VI) was added with liquid pineapple wastewater as nutrient source for the bacteria. Electron microscopic examinations of the wood-husk after 42 days of column operation showed gradual colonization of the wood-husk by bacterial biofilm. The use of 0.1% (v/v) formaldehyde as a disinfecting agent inhibited growth of bacteria present in the final wastewater discharge. This finding is important in view of the ethical code regarding possible introduction of exogenous bacterial species into the environment

  8. Biological detoxification of Cr(VI) using wood-husk immobilized Acinetobacter haemolyticus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakaria, Zainul Akmar; Zakaria, Zainoha [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Surif, Salmijah [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Ahmad, Wan Azlina [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)], E-mail: azlina@kimia.fs.utm.my

    2007-09-05

    Acinetobacter haemolyticus, a Gram-negative aerobic locally isolated bacterium, immobilized on wood-husk showed the ability to detoxify Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Wood-husk, a natural cellulose-based support material, packed in an upward-flow column was used as support material for bacterial attachment. Around 97% of the Cr(VI) in wastewater containing 15 mg L{sup -1} of Cr(VI) was reduced at a flow rate of 8.0 mL min{sup -1}. The wastewater containing Cr(VI) was added with liquid pineapple wastewater as nutrient source for the bacteria. Electron microscopic examinations of the wood-husk after 42 days of column operation showed gradual colonization of the wood-husk by bacterial biofilm. The use of 0.1% (v/v) formaldehyde as a disinfecting agent inhibited growth of bacteria present in the final wastewater discharge. This finding is important in view of the ethical code regarding possible introduction of exogenous bacterial species into the environment.

  9. Cr(VI) adsorption from electroplating plating wastewater by chemically modified coir pith.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksabye, Parinda; Thiravetyan, Paitip

    2012-07-15

    Coir pith samples were chemically modified by grafting with acrylic acid for the removal of Cr(VI) from electroplating wastewater. The presence of acrylic acid on the coir pith surface was verified by a scanning electron microscope with an electron dispersive x-ray spectrometer (SEM/EDX), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TG). The carbonyl groups (C==O) from the carboxylic acids (COOH) increased on the coir pith surface after grafting with acrylic acid. In addition, the thermal stability of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith also improved. The optimum conditions for grafting the acrylic acid on the coir pith consisted of 2 M acrylic acid and 0.00125 M ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN, as an initiator). The maximum Cr(VI) removal (99.99 ± 0.07%) was obtained with the following conditions: a 1.3% (w/v) dosage of acrylic acid-grafted coir pith, a system pH of 2, a contact time of 22 h, a temperature of 30 °C, a particle size of <150 μm and an initial Cr(VI) of 1,171 mg l(-1). At system pH of 2, Cr(VI) in the HCrO(4)(-) form can be adsorbed with acrylic acid-grafted coir pith via an electrostatic attraction. The adsorption isotherm of 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith exhibited a good fit with the Langmuir isotherm. The maximum Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of the 2 M acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was 196.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent, whereas for coir pith without grafting, the maximum Cr(VI) removal was 165.00 mg Cr(VI) g(-1) adsorbent. The adsorption capacity of the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith for Cr(VI) was higher compared to the original coir pith. This result was due to the enhancement of the carbonyl groups on the coir pith surface that may have involved the mechanism of chromium adsorption. The X-ray absorption near edged structure (XANES) and desorption studies suggested that most of the Cr(III) that presented on the acrylic acid-grafted coir pith was due to the Cr(VI) being reduced to Cr(III) on the adsorbent surface. FTIR

  10. Formation of nitridotechnetium(VI) μ-oxo dimer complexes with EDTA and EDDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, T.; Kani, Y.; Sekine, T.; Kudo, H.; Yoshihara, K.

    1995-01-01

    Reactions of [ 99 TcNCl 4 ] - with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid 4 (ETDA) and ethylenediamine-N,N'-diacetic acid (EDDA) in a mixture of water and acetone gave Tc VI N-EDTA and Tc VI N-EDTA complexes. The infrared spectra of both reaction products showed the existence of the Tc≡N and C=O groups. The elemental analysis indicated the 1:1 TcN-ligand ratio in the EDTA and EDDA complexes. Electrophoresis showed that the Tc VI -EDTA complex was an anionic species in a perchlorate solution. For the Tc VI N-EDDA complex, neutral and anionic species were formed, depending on the pH of the solution. Formation of the μ-oxo dimer complexes was suggested from the UV-Vis absorption spectra. (author) 11 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  11. Study on Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by Activated Carbon from Cassava Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinhui; Li, Chuanshu; Yang, Bin; Kang, Sijun; Zhang, Zhen

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a new type of adsorbent prepared by waste sludge from alcohol production industry was used to adsorb Cr (VI) in activated carbon from cassava sludge. A series of static adsorption experiments were carried out on the initial concentration of solution Cr (VI), pH value of solution, adsorption time and dosage of adsorbent. The results of single factor experiments show that the removal rate of Cr (VI) increases with the initial concentration of Cr(VI), while the adsorption amount is opposite. When the pH value of the solution is low, the adsorption effect of activated carbon is better.The adsorption time should be controlled within 40-60min. When the activated carbon dosage is increased, the removal rate increases but the adsorption capacity decreases.

  12. Spectroscopic Studies on Complex Formation of U(VI)-thiosalicylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Wan Sik; Cho, Hye Ryun; Park, Kyoung Kyun; Jung, Euo Chang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    The dynamic interaction between radionuclides and organic ligands is largely dependent on the composition of functional groups in a ligand chemical structure. Therefore, the structural mimics of natural ligands possessing specific functional groups, such as hydroxy, phenol, carboxyl, thiol and amine groups, have been studied to understand their influence on the migration of radionuclides including actinide species under geological groundwater conditions. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the fraction of hydrolyzed U(VI) species occurring in weak acidic solutions (pH {approx}4.5) is significantly influenced by the presence of salicylate (Sal) ligand due to the simultaneous participation of both phenol and carboxyl groups in the formation of U(VI)-complexes. Thiosalicylic acid (TSalH{sub 2}) is a good model compound for studying the effects of both carboxyl and thiol (-SH) groups. The fraction of di-anionic ligand form (TSal{sup 2-}) is higher at near neutral pH due to the lower pKa ({approx} 8) of the thiol group than the case of salicylic acid (pKa, {approx}13 for salicylic -OH), despite the structural similarity. In addition, the redox capability of the thiol group is expected to influence the reducible radiouclides and the chemical structures of natural ligands by creating cross-linkage (-S-S-) upon oxidation. The goal of the present study is to investigate aqueous U(VI)-TSal complexation equilibrium via laser-based spectroscopic techniques including time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). In this preliminary work, we report the results of spectroscopic studies using conventional UVVis absorbance and fluorescence (FL) measurement methods. The photo-stability of U(VI)-TSal complex or ligand itself upon exposure to a series of laser pulses is estimated by monitoring the change in their absorption bands. Additionally, TSal FL-quenching effect by U(VI) ions is discussed in comparison with that of Sal FL-quenching

  13. Determination of chromium (VI) in primary and secondary fertilizer and their respective precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Oliver; Fiedler, Francesca; Adam, Christian; Vogel, Christian; Senz, Rainer

    2017-09-01

    Hexavalent chromium species (Cr(VI)) are often carcinogenic, of high acute toxicity, highly mobile, and thus pose a severe risk to health and environment. Fertilizers usually contain significant amounts of chromium. Therefore, a reliable analysis of chromium and the fraction of Cr(VI) are crucial for safe use of fertilizers. This problem is expected to increase in the future, since more and more recycled fertilizers emerge due to increasing fertilizer demand and respective supply risks. However, existing analytical methods have been developed for conventional fertilizers and have to be tested whether they are suitable for the new materials. Thus, we performed a wet-chemical extraction for Cr(VI) on several matrices as well as respective quality control experiments including spiking with Cr(III) and Cr(VI) compounds. We found the Cr(VI) amounts to be below 2 mg/kg except for a thermally post-treated sewage sludge ash (SSA) that showed 12.3 mg/kg. The presence of organic matter e.g. in sludge or precipitated struvite caused a reduction of spiked Cr(VI) and thus no satisfying recovery for quality control. Cr(VI) reduction was also observed for SSA, presumably due to the presence of Fe(II) compounds. Even though the tested procedure can be hampered in some recycled fertilizer matrices, it might be adapted to be applicable also for these complex samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Can iron oxides remove Cr(VI) from drinking water at sub-ppb levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaprara, Efthymia; Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Samaras, Petros; Zouboulis, Anastasios; Mitrakas, Manassis

    2013-04-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] has long been recognized as a potential carcinogen via inhalation, in contrast to trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] which is 100 times less toxic and also a necessary nutrient, essential to human glucidic metabolism. Nowadays there is an increasing concern that Cr(VI) is also carcinogenic by the oral route of exposure, while an increased number of publications indicate that Cr(VI) is a common natural pollutant. Hexavalent chromium formation is attributed to natural oxidation of Cr(III) in ultramafic derived soils and ophiolithic rocks. To verify this theory, drinking water samples were collected from targeted areas of Greece e.g. areas in which the geological background is predominated by ultramafic minerals and the water supply depends mainly on groundwater resources. Valuable guide for the samples collection was the geological map of Greece and emphasis was given to regions where the natural occurrence of Cr(VI) is thought to be more possible. A wide range of Cr concentrations (2-100 μg/L) were detected in the areas studied, with most of them ranging below the current limit of 50 μg/L, and the Cr(VI) concentration being more than 90% of the total. Since the Cr(VI) affects significant part of population worldwide, a debate was established concerning the enforcement of stringent regulation, which also demands the drinking water treatment processes re-evaluation in view of Cr(VI) removal at sub-ppb level. In this regard, adsorption has evolved as the front line of defense for chromium removal. The motivation of this work was to investigate the efficiency of iron oxides for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from drinking water and its removal at sub-ppb levels. The adsorbents examined included iron oxy-hydroxides and magnetite prepared using common low cost iron salts. Their effectiveness as Cr(VI) adsorbents was evaluated through the decrease of a Cr(VI) concentration of 100μg/L prepared in NSF water at pH 7. Preliminary batch experiments did not

  15. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W.; Chiang, P.N.; Liu, J.C.; Kuan, W.H.; Huang, J.H.; Hung, J.T.; Tzou, Y.M.; Chen, C.C.; Wang, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Low molecular weights (M w ) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. ► The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). ► Low M w of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. ► Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M w of HA. ► Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M w ): >100, 50–100, 10–50 and w HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M w of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H 2 O 2 through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  16. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl (U(VI)) desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments

  17. Characterization of Cr(VI) removal from aqueous solutions by a surplus agricultural waste-Rice straw

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Hui; Liu Yunguo; Zeng Guangming; Xu Weihua; Li Ting; Xia Wenbin

    2008-01-01

    The removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution by rice straw, a surplus agricultural byproduct was investigated. The optimal pH was 2.0 and Cr(VI) removal rate increased with decreased Cr(VI) concentration and with increased temperature. Decrease in straw particle size led to an increase in Cr(VI) removal. Equilibrium was achieved in about 48 h under standard conditions, and Cr(III), which appeared in the solution and remained stable thereafter, indicating that both reduction and adsorption played a part in the Cr(VI) removal. The increase of the solution pH suggested that protons were needed for the Cr(VI) removal. A relatively high level of NO 3 - notably restrained the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), while high level of SO 4 2- supported it. The promotion of the tartaric acid modified rice straw (TARS) and the slight inhibition of the esterified rice straw (ERS) on Cr(VI) removal indicated that carboxyl groups present on the biomass played an important role in chromium remediation even though were not fully responsible for it. Isotherm tests showed that equilibrium sorption data were better represented by Langmuir model and the sorption capacity of rice straw was found to be 3.15 mg/g

  18. Study of Cr(VI) adsorption onto magnetite nanoparticles using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Liu, Dian-Yu; Lee, Jyh-Fu

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Cr(VI) adsorption onto nano-magnetite was examined by batch experiments, and the Cr(VI) adsorption mechanism was investigated using synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Magnetite nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 10 nm were synthesized using an inexpensive and simple co-precipitation method. It shows a saturation magnetization of 54.3 emu/g, which can be recovered with an external magnetic field. The adsorption data fitted the Langmuir adsorption isotherm well, implying a monolayer adsorption behavior of Cr(VI) onto nano-magnetite. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicate that the adsorption mechanism involves electron transfer between Fe(II) in nano-magnetite (Fe2+OFe3+ 2O3) and Cr(VI) to transform into Cr(III), which may exist as an Fe(III)-Cr(III) mixed solid phase. Moreover, the Cr(III)/Cr(VI) ratio in the final products can be determined by the characteristic pre-edge peak area of Cr(VI) in the Cr K-edge spectrum. These findings suggest that nano-magnetite is effective for Cr(VI) removal from wastewater because it can transform highly poisonous Cr(VI) species into nontoxic Cr(III) compounds, which are highly insoluble and immobile under environmental conditions.

  19. Adsorption isotherm studies of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions using sol-gel hydrotalcite-like compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos-Ramirez, Esthela, E-mail: ramosre@quijote.ugto.mx [Centro de Investigaciones en Quimica Inorganica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, Noria Alta s/n, Col. Noria Alta, C.P. 36050, Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico); Gutierrez Ortega, Norma L.; Conteras Soto, Cesar A. [Centro de Investigaciones en Quimica Inorganica de la Universidad de Guanajuato, Noria Alta s/n, Col. Noria Alta, C.P. 36050, Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, km 36.5, La Marquesa, Coyoacan Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico); Olguin Gutierrez, Maria T. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, km 36.5, La Marquesa, Coyoacan Mexico, C.P. 52750 (Mexico)

    2009-12-30

    In under-developed countries, industries such as paint and pigment manufacturing, leather tanning, chrome plating and textile processing, usually discharge effluents containing Cr(VI) and Cr(III) into municipal sanitary sewers. It has been reported that Cr(VI) acts as a powerful epithelial irritant and as a human carcinogen. In the present work, hydrotalcite-like compounds with a Mg/Al ratio = 2 were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and their corresponding thermally treated products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and N{sub 2} adsorption. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and the heated solids were used as adsorbents for Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherm studies of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution are described. The adsorbent capacity was determined using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherm models. The Cr(VI) adsorption isotherm data fit best to the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum Cr(VI) uptake by hydrotalcite and the heated solids was determined using the Langmuir equation and was found to range between 26 and 29 mg Cr(VI)/g adsorbent.

  20. Adsorption isotherm studies of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions using sol-gel hydrotalcite-like compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos-Ramirez, Esthela; Gutierrez Ortega, Norma L.; Conteras Soto, Cesar A.; Olguin Gutierrez, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    In under-developed countries, industries such as paint and pigment manufacturing, leather tanning, chrome plating and textile processing, usually discharge effluents containing Cr(VI) and Cr(III) into municipal sanitary sewers. It has been reported that Cr(VI) acts as a powerful epithelial irritant and as a human carcinogen. In the present work, hydrotalcite-like compounds with a Mg/Al ratio = 2 were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and their corresponding thermally treated products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and N 2 adsorption. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and the heated solids were used as adsorbents for Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherm studies of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution are described. The adsorbent capacity was determined using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherm models. The Cr(VI) adsorption isotherm data fit best to the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum Cr(VI) uptake by hydrotalcite and the heated solids was determined using the Langmuir equation and was found to range between 26 and 29 mg Cr(VI)/g adsorbent.

  1. Adsorption isotherm studies of chromium (VI) from aqueous solutions using sol-gel hydrotalcite-like compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ramírez, Esthela; Ortega, Norma L Gutiérrez; Soto, Cesar A Contreras; Gutiérrez, Maria T Olguín

    2009-12-30

    In under-developed countries, industries such as paint and pigment manufacturing, leather tanning, chrome plating and textile processing, usually discharge effluents containing Cr(VI) and Cr(III) into municipal sanitary sewers. It has been reported that Cr(VI) acts as a powerful epithelial irritant and as a human carcinogen. In the present work, hydrotalcite-like compounds with a Mg/Al ratio=2 were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and their corresponding thermally treated products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and N(2) adsorption. The hydrotalcite-like compounds and the heated solids were used as adsorbents for Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions. Adsorption isotherm studies of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution are described. The adsorbent capacity was determined using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption isotherm models. The Cr(VI) adsorption isotherm data fit best to the Langmuir isotherm model. The maximum Cr(VI) uptake by hydrotalcite and the heated solids was determined using the Langmuir equation and was found to range between 26 and 29 mg Cr(VI)/g adsorbent.

  2. A kinetic study of biological Cr(VI) reduction in trickling filters with different filter media types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermou, E.; Vayenas, D.V.

    2007-01-01

    Two pilot-scale trickling filters were used in order to estimate Cr(VI) reduction through biological mechanisms in biofilm reactors operated in SBR mode with recirculation using different filter media types, i.e. plastic media and calcitic gravel. The feed concentrations of Cr(VI) examined were about 5, 10, 20, 30, 50 and 100 mg/l, while the concentration of the organic carbon was constant at 400 mg/l, in order to avoid carbon limitations in the bulk liquid. Maximum reduction rates of 4.8 and 4.7 g Cr(VI)/d were observed for feed Cr(VI) concentration of about 5 mg Cr(VI)/l, for the filters with the plastic support material and the gravel media, respectively. The reduction rates were significantly affected by the feed Cr(VI) concentration in both bioreactors. A dual-enzyme kinetic model was used in order to describe Cr(VI) reduction by aerobically grown mixed cultures. Model predictions were found to correspond very closely to experimental quantitative observations of Cr(VI) reduction at both pilot-scale trickling filters used

  3. A Green Microbial Fuel Cell-Based Biosensor for In Situ Chromium (VI) Measurement in Electroplating Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li-Chun; Tsai, Teh-Hua; Liu, Man-Hai; Kuo, Jui-Ling; Chang, Yung-Chu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2017-10-27

    The extensive use of Cr(VI) in many industries and the disposal of Cr(VI)-containing wastes have resulted in Cr(VI)-induced environmental contamination. Cr(VI) compounds are associated with increased cancer risks; hence, the detection of toxic Cr(VI) compounds is crucial. Various methods have been developed for Cr(VI) measurement, but they are often conducted offsite and cannot provide real-time toxicity monitoring. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an eco-friendly and self-sustaining device that has great potential as a biosensor for in situ Cr(VI) measurement, especially for wastewater generated from different electroplating units. In this study, Exiguobacterium aestuarii YC211, a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing, salt-tolerant, and exoelectrogenic bacterium, was isolated and inoculated into an MFC to evaluate its feasibility as a Cr(VI) biosensor. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency of E. aestuarii YC211 was not affected by the surrounding environment (pH 5-9, 20-35 °C, coexisting ions, and salinity of 0-15 g/L). The maximum power density of the MFC biosensor was 98.3 ± 1.5 mW/m² at 1500 Ω. A good linear relationship ( r ² = 0.997) was observed between the Cr(VI) concentration (2.5-60 mg/L) and the voltage output. The developed MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI) concentrations in the actual electroplating wastewater that is generated from different electroplating units within 30 min with low deviations (-6.1% to 2.2%). After treating the actual electroplating wastewater with the MFC, the predominant family in the biofilm was found to be Bacillaceae (95.3%) and was further identified as the originally inoculated E. aestuarii YC211 by next generation sequencing (NGS). Thus, the MFC biosensor can measure Cr(VI) concentrations in situ in the effluents from different electroplating units, and it can potentially help in preventing the violation of effluent regulations.

  4. Derivative spectrophotometric determination of trace amounts of Tungsten(VI) in real water samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanatha, C.; Ramakrishna Reddy, K.; Devanna, N.; Praveen Kumar, M.D.

    2012-01-01

    2,4-Dimethoxybenzaldehydeisonicotinoylhydrazone (DMBHIH) has been synthesized and characterized with IR, NMR and Mass Spectroscopic methods. A simple and derivative spectrophotometric method has been developed for the determination of trace amounts of W(VI). The reagent forms a yellow coloured water soluble complex with W(VI) in basic medium (pH 8.0). The molar absorptivity and Sandell's sensitivity of coloured species are 3.43 x 10 4 L.mol -1 cm -1 and 0.0049 μg/cm 2 respectively. Beer's law is obeyed in the range 0.4113-6.2138 μg/ml of W(VI) at λ max 394 nm. W(VI) forms 1:1 complex with DMBHIH and stability constant of the complex was 5.22x10 6 . The first and second derivative amplitude was measured at 453 nm and 468 nm. The developed method applied for the determination of W(VI) in alloys and biological samples. (author)

  5. Complex formation between glutamic acid and molybdenum (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, Farrokh; Khorrami, S.A.; Sharifi, Sasan

    1997-01-01

    Equilibria of the reaction of molybdenum (VI) with L-glutamic acid have been studied in aqueous solution in the pH range 2.5 to 9.5, using spectrophotometric and optical rotation methods at constant ionic strength (0.15 mol dm -3 sodium perchlorate) and temperature 25 ± 0.1 degC. Our studies have shown that glutamic acid forms a mononuclear complex with Mo(VI) of the type MoO 3 L 2- at pH 5.5. The stability constant of this complexation and the dissociation constants of L-glutamic acid have been determined. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  6. Thermophysical Properties of Selected II-VI Semiconducting Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, S. L.; Scripa, R. N.; Ban, H.; Lin, B.

    2004-01-01

    Thermophysical properties are essential for the accurate predication of the crystal growth process by computational modeling. Currently, the temperature dependent thermophysical property data for the II-VI semiconductor melts are scarce. This paper reports the results of the temperature dependence of melt density, viscosity and electrical conductivity of selected II-VI compounds, including HgTe, HgCdTe and HgZnTe. The melt density was measured using a pycnometric method, and the viscosity and electrical conductivity were measured by a transient torque method. The results were compared with and showed good agreement with the existing data in the literature.

  7. Thermodynamic parameters and sorption of U(VI) on ACSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donat, R.; Cilgi, G.K.; Cetisli, H.; Aytas, S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the sorption properties for U(VI) by alginate coated CaSO 4 x 2H 2 O sepiolite and calcined diatomite earth (Kieselguhr) (ACSD). The removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution by sorption onto ACSF in a single component system with various contact times, pH, temperatures, and initial concentrations of U(VI) was investigated. The sorption patterns of uranium on the composite adsorbent followed the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkhevic (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich, Langmuir, and D-R models have been applied and the data correlated well with Freundlich model and that the sorption was physical in nature (sorption energy, E a = 17.05 kJ/mol). The thermodynamic parameters such as variation of enthalpy ΔH, variation of entropy ΔS and variation of Gibbs free energy ΔG were calculated from the slope and intercept of lnK 0 vs. 1/T plots. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔH ads = 31.83 kJ/mol, ΔS ads = 167 J/mol x K, ΔGdeg ads (293.15 K) = -17.94 kJ/mol) showed the endothermic heat of sorption and the feasibility of the process. The thermodynamics of U(VI) ion/ACSD system indicates the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. It was noted that an increase in temperature resulted in a higher uranium loading per unit weight of the adsorbent. (author)

  8. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of Cr(VI) using Sakura waste from aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Wenfang; Zhao, Yingxin; Zheng, Xinyi; Ji, Min; Zhang, Zhenya

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The main chemical components of Sakura leaves are cellulose 16.6%, hemicellulose 10.4%, lignin 18.3%, ash 11.4%, and others 43.3%. The adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto Sakura leaves can achieve 435.25 mg g"−"1, much higher than other similar agroforestry wastes. - Highlights: • Sakura leaves were prepared to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. • The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) reached 435.25 mg g"−"1. • Cr(VI) adsorption fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic model. • Isotherm models indicated Cr(VI) adsorption occurred on a monolayer surface. • The influence order of coexisting ions followed PO_4"3"− > SO_4"2"− > Cl"−. - Abstract: A forestall waste, Sakura leave, has been studied for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The materials before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To investigate the adsorption performance of Sakura waste, batch experiments were conducted under different adsorbent dosage, contact time, initial concentration of Cr(VI), and co-existing ions. Results showed the data fitted pseudo-second-order better than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data was analyzed with Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherm models at temperature ranges from 25 °C to 45 °C. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model was 435.25 mg g"−"1 at pH 1.0. The presence of Cl"−, SO_4"2"− and PO_4"3"− would lead to an obvious negative effect on Cr(VI) adsorption, and their influence order follows PO_4"3"− > SO_4"2"− > Cl"−. The study developed a new way to reutilize wastes and showed a great potential for resource recycling.

  9. Study on the DNA-protein crosslinks induced by chromium (VI) in SPC-A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanqun; Ding, Jianjun; Lu, Xiongbing; You, Hao

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effect of chromium (VI) on DNA-protein crosslinks (DPC) of SPC-A1 cells. Methods: We exposed SPC-A1 cells were cultured in 1640 medium and treated with the SPC-A1 cells in vitro to different concentrations of Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) for 2h, the KC1-SDS precipitation assay were used to measure the DNA-protein cross-linking effect. Results: All the different concentrations of Cr(VI) could cause the increase of DPC coefficient in SPC-A1 cells. But this effect was not significant (P>0.05) at low concentrations; while in high concentration Cr(VI) induced SPC-A1 cells could produce DNA-protein cross-linking effect significantly (P<0.05). Conclusions: chromium (VI) could induce DNA-protein crosslink.

  10. AR4VI: AR as an Accessibility Tool for People with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, James M; Miele, Joshua

    2017-10-01

    Although AR technology has been largely dominated by visual media, a number of AR tools using both visual and auditory feedback have been developed specifically to assist people with low vision or blindness - an application domain that we term Augmented Reality for Visual Impairment (AR4VI). We describe two AR4VI tools developed at Smith-Kettlewell, as well as a number of pre-existing examples. We emphasize that AR4VI is a powerful tool with the potential to remove or significantly reduce a range of accessibility barriers. Rather than being restricted to use by people with visual impairments, AR4VI is a compelling universal design approach offering benefits for mainstream applications as well.

  11. Inhibition of bone resorption by Tanshinone VI isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Nicolin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, a more detailed knowledge of molecular mechanisms involved in osteoclastogenesis has driven research efforts in the development and screening of compound libraries of several small molecules that specifically inhibit the pathway involved in the commitment of the osteoclast precursor cells. Natural compounds that suppress osteoclast differentiation may have therapeutic value in treating osteoporosis and other bone erosive diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or metastasis associated with bone loss. In ongoing investigation into anti-osteoporotic compounds from natural products we have analyzed the effect of Tanshinone VI on osteoclasts differentiation, using a physiologic three-dimensional osteoblast/bone marrow model of cell co-culture. Tanshinone VI is an abietane diterpene extracted from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Labiatae, a Chinese traditional crude drug, ‘’Tan-Shen’’. Tashinone has been widely used in clinical practice for the prevention of cardiac diseases, arthritis and other inflammation-related disorders based on its pharmacological actions in multiple tissues. Although Tanshinone VI A has been used as a medicinal agent in the treatment of many diseases, its role in osteoclast-related bone diseases remains unknown. We showed previously that Tanshinone VI greatly inhibits osteoclast differentiation and suppresses bone resorption through disruption of the actin ring; subsequently, we intended to examine the precise inhibitory mechanism of Tanshinone VI on osteoclast differentiating factor. This study shows, for the first time, that Tanshinone VI prevents osteoclast differentiation by inhibiting RANKL expression and NFkB induction.

  12. Oxidation of indometacin by ferrate (VI): kinetics, degradation pathways, and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junlei; Wang, Yahui; Liu, Guoguang; Chen, Ping; Wang, Fengliang; Ma, Jingshuai; Li, Fuhua; Liu, Haijin; Lv, Wenying

    2017-04-01

    The oxidation of indometacin (IDM) by ferrate(VI) (Fe(VI)) was investigated to determine the reaction kinetics, transformation products, and changes in toxicity. The reaction between IDM and Fe(VI) followed first-order kinetics with respect to each reactant. The apparent second-order rate constants (k app ) decreased from 9.35 to 6.52 M -1  s -1 , as the pH of the solution increased from 7.0 to 10.0. The pH dependence of k app might be well explained by considering the species-specific rate constants of the reactions of IDM with Fe(VI). Detailed product studies using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) indicated that the oxidation products were primarily derived from the hydrolysis of amide linkages, the addition of hydroxyl groups, and electrophilic oxidation. The toxicity of the oxidation products was evaluated using the Microtox test, which indicated that transformation products exhibited less toxicity to the Vibrio fischeri bacteria. Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis calculated by the ecological structure activity relationship (ECOSAR) revealed that all of the identified products exhibited lower acute and chronic toxicity than the parent pharmaceutical for fish, daphnid, and green algae. Furthermore, Fe(VI) was effective in the degradation IDM in water containing carbonate ions or fulvic acid (FA), and in lake water samples; however, higher Fe(VI) dosages would be required to completely remove IDM in lake water in contrast to deionized water.

  13. Liquid-liquid extraction and separation studies of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langade, A.D.; Shinde, V.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separation of uranium(VI) from iron(III), molybdenum(VI), vanadium(V), bismuth(III), zirconium(IV) and thorium(IV) is achieved by liquid-liquid extraction with 4-methyl-3-pentene-2-one (mesityl oxide; MeO) from sodium salicylate media (0.1M, pH 6.0). The extracted species is UO 2 (HO.C 6 H 4 COO) 2 .2MeO. A procedure for separating 50 μg of uranium from mg amounts of the other metals is described. (author)

  14. Vi mangler endnu et panel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Vi mangler højtuddannede værdiskabere, som transformerer gode idéer og teknologier til indtjening og velstand. Først i mødet med markedet afgøres fremtiden. Troels Lund Poulsen bør nedsætte et kommercialiseringspanel, der byder ind med løsninger, hvordan Danmark bliver et land ikke kun med gode...

  15. Spectrophotometric study of the complexation equilibria of uranium(VI) with 1,4-bis(4'-methylanilino)anthraquinone and determination of uranium(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idriss, K.A.; Seleim, M.M.; Abu-Bakr, M.S.; Sedaira, H.

    1985-01-01

    The reaction of U(VI) with 1,4-bis(4'-methylanilino)anthraquinone (quinizarin green) in water-dimethylformamide medium was investigated spectrophotometrically. The complexation equilibria in solution were demonstrated. The study of the reaction in presence of equimolar concentrations or in solutions containing metal or ligand excess gave evidence for the formation of complexes with stoichiometric ratios of UO 2 :L = 1:1 and 1:2 in dependence on the pH of the medium. Their thermodynamic stabilities and the values of their molar absorption coefficients were determined. The optimum conditions for spectrophotometric determination of U(VI) with this reagent were found. (author)

  16. Influence of radiolytic products on the chemistry of uranium VI in brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchini, J-F.; Reed, D.T.; Borkowski, M.; Rafalski, A.; Conca, J.

    2004-01-01

    In the near field of a salt repository of nuclear waste, ionizing radiations can strongly affect the chemistry of concentrated saline solutions. Radiolysis can locally modify the redox conditions, speciation, solubility and mobility of the actinide compounds. In the case of uranium VI, radiolytic products can not only reduce U(VI), but also react with uranium species. The net effect on the speciation of uranyl depends on the relative kinetics of the reactions and the buildup of molecular products in brine solutions. The most important molecular products in brines are expected to be hypochlorite ion, hypochlorous acid and hydrogen peroxide. Although U(VI) is expected not to be significantly affected by radiolysis, the combined effects of the major molecular radiolytic products on the chemistry of U(VI) in brines have not been experimentally established previously. (authors)

  17. Unconstrained steps of myosin VI appear longest among known molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M Yusuf; Homma, Kazuaki; Iwane, Atsuko Hikikoshi; Adachi, Kengo; Itoh, Hiroyasu; Kinosita, Kazuhiko; Yanagida, Toshio; Ikebe, Mitsuo

    2004-06-01

    Myosin VI is a two-headed molecular motor that moves along an actin filament in the direction opposite to most other myosins. Previously, a single myosin VI molecule has been shown to proceed with steps that are large compared to its neck size: either it walks by somehow extending its neck or one head slides along actin for a long distance before the other head lands. To inquire into these and other possible mechanism of motility, we suspended an actin filament between two plastic beads, and let a single myosin VI molecule carrying a bead duplex move along the actin. This configuration, unlike previous studies, allows unconstrained rotation of myosin VI around the right-handed double helix of actin. Myosin VI moved almost straight or as a right-handed spiral with a pitch of several micrometers, indicating that the molecule walks with strides slightly longer than the actin helical repeat of 36 nm. The large steps without much rotation suggest kinesin-type walking with extended and flexible necks, but how to move forward with flexible necks, even under a backward load, is not clear. As an answer, we propose that a conformational change in the lifted head would facilitate landing on a forward, rather than backward, site. This mechanism may underlie stepping of all two-headed molecular motors including kinesin and myosin V.

  18. Influence of chemical compositions and molecular weights of humic acids on Cr(VI) photo-reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y.; Huang, S.W. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chiang, P.N. [The Experimental Forest, National Taiwan University, Nantou, 55743 Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, J.C. [Agricultural Research Institute No. 189, Jhongjheng Rd., Wufong, Taichung County, 41301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Kuan, W.H. [Department of Safety, Health, and Environmental Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei, 24301 Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, J.H. [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Hung, J.T. [Department of Horticulture, National Taitung Junior College, Taitung, 95045 Taiwan, ROC (China); Tzou, Y.M., E-mail: ymtzou@dragon.nchu.edu.tw [Department of Soil and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 40227 Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.C. [Department of Life Science, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei, 116 Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, M.K. [Department of Agricultural Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, 10617 Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low molecular weights (M{sub w}) of HA bear more polar and aromatic C in its structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The polar sites of HA dominate the photo-reduction of Cr(VI). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low M{sub w} of HA exhibits greater photochemical efficiency for Cr(VI) reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cr(VI) adsorption on HA is indiscernible, particularly on the small M{sub w} of HA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon Cr(VI) reduction by HA, most of Cr(III) are released into the solution. - Abstract: Humic acids (HA) strongly affect the fate of trace metals in soils and aquatic environments. One of the remarkable properties of HA is its ability to reduce Cr(VI), an extremely toxic anion. However, it is unclear which HA components are involved in Cr(VI) reduction and possess the photo-induced properties. In this study, an ultrafiltration technique was used to fractionate HAs into four fractions of different nominal molecular weights (M{sub w}): >100, 50-100, 10-50 and <10 kDa. Each HA fraction was characterized by spectroscopic analyses followed by examining Cr(VI) removal on each fraction of HA at pH 1-5. Spectroscopic results indicated that low-M{sub w} HA was enriched with polar and aromatic domains. These polar, including polar C in aliphatic region, and aromatic groups were the major sites for Cr(VI) reduction because they disappeared rapidly upon interaction with Cr(VI). As a result, low M{sub w} of HA exhibited greater efficiency of Cr(VI) reduction. Light induced the rapid transfer of electrons between chromate-phenol/carboxyl ester, or the formation of peroxide radicals or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} through the ready decay of peroxy radicals associated with polar substituents, explained the rapid scavenging of Cr(VI) on polar and aromatic groups of HAs under illumination.

  19. Summary of the planning, management, and evaluation process for the Geothermal Program Review VI conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    The purpose of this document is to present an overview of the planning, facilitation, and evaluation process used to conduct the Geothermal Program Review VI (PR VI) conference. This document was also prepared to highlight lessons learned from PR VI and, by utilizing the evaluation summaries and recommendations, be used as a planning tool for PR VII. The conference, entitled Beyond Goals and Objectives,'' was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Geothermal Technology Division (GTD), PR VI was held in San Francisco, California on April 19--21, 1988 and was attended by 127 participants. PR VI was held in conjunction with the National Geothermal Association's (NGA) Industry Round Table. This document presents a brief summary of the activities, responsibilities, and resources for implementing the PR VI meeting and provides recommendations, checklists, and a proposed schedule for assisting in planning PR VII.

  20. Hvad skal vi med Etisk Råd?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, Thomas; Gjerris, Mickey

    2012-01-01

    Det Etiske Råd har for os at se en væsentlig rolle at spille i et åbent og demokratisk samfund som det danske. Vi skal være med til at skabe grobund for de værdidiskussioner, som skal forme fremtidens samfund. Etik er at være i dialog – ikke at kaste med mudder.......Det Etiske Råd har for os at se en væsentlig rolle at spille i et åbent og demokratisk samfund som det danske. Vi skal være med til at skabe grobund for de værdidiskussioner, som skal forme fremtidens samfund. Etik er at være i dialog – ikke at kaste med mudder....

  1. Chromium(VI) sorption efficiency of acid-activated banana peel over organo-montmorillonite in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Anam; Bibi, Irshad; Niazi, Nabeel Khan; Ok, Yong Sik; Murtaza, Ghulam; Shahid, Muhammad; Kunhikrishnan, Anitha; Li, Dongwei; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-07-03

    In the present study, we examined sorption of chromate (Cr(VI)) to acid-activated banana peel (AABP) and organo-montmorillonite (O-mont) as a function of pH, initial Cr(VI) concentration at a sorbent dose of 4 g L -1 and at 20 ± 1°C in aqueous solutions. In sorption edge experiments, maximum Cr(VI) removal was obtained at pH 3 after 2 hours by AABP and O-mont (88% and 69%). Sorption isotherm data showed that the sorption capacity of AABP was higher than O-mont (15.1 vs. 6.67 mg g -1 , respectively, at pH 4). Freundlich and Langmuir models provided the best fits to describe Cr(VI) sorption onto AABP (R 2 = 0.97) and O-mont (R 2 = 0.96). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy elucidated that for AABP mainly the -OH, -COOH, -NH 2 , and for O-mont intercalated amines and -OH surface functional groups were involved in Cr(VI) sorption. The scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) analyses, although partly, indicate that the (wt. %) proportion of cations (e.g., Ca, Mg) in AABP decreased after Cr(VI) sorption. This may be due to ion exchange of chromite (Cr(III)) (produced from Cr(VI) reduction) with cationic elements in AABP. Also, Cr(VI) desorption (using phosphate solution) from AABP was lower (29%) than that from O-mont (51%) up to the third regeneration cycle. This bench scale comparative study highlights that the utilization of widely available and low-cost acid-activated biomaterials has a greater potential than organo-clays for Cr(VI) removal in aqueous media. However, future studies are warranted to precisely delineate different mechanisms of Cr(VI) sorption/reduction by acid-activated biomaterials and organo-clays.

  2. Designing and implementing a Quality Broker: the GeoViQua experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papeschi, Fabrizio; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Masò, Joan; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    GeoViQua (QUAlity aware VIsualisation for the Global Earth Observation System of Systems) is an FP7 project aiming at complementing the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS) with rigorous data quality specifications and quality-aware capabilities, in order to improve reliability in scientific studies and policy decision-making. GeoViQua main scientific and technical objective is to enhance the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI) providing the user community with innovative quality-aware search and visualization tools, which will be integrated in the GEOPortal, as well as made available to other end-user interfaces. To this end, GeoViQua will promote the extension of the current standard metadata for geographic information with accurate and expressive quality indicators. Employing and extending several ISO standards such as 19115, 19157 and 19139, a common set of data quality indicators has been selected to be used within the project. The resulting work, in the form of a data model, is expressed in XML Schema Language and encoded in XML. Quality information can be stated both by data producers and by data users, actually resulting in two conceptually distinct data models, the Producer Quality model and the User Quality model (or User Feedback model). GeoViQua architecture is built on the brokering approach successfully experimented within the EuroGEOSS project and realized by the GEO DAB (Discovery and Access Broker) which is part of the GCI. The GEO DAB allows for harmonization and distribution in a transparent way for both users and data providers. This way, GeoViQua can effectively complement and extend the GEO DAB obtaining a Quality augmentation Broker (DAB-Q) which plays a central role in ensuring the consistency of the Producer and User quality models. The GeoViQua architecture also includes a Feedback Catalog, a particular service brokered by the DAB-Q which is dedicated to the storage and discovery of user feedbacks. A very important issue

  3. Structural and elastic properties of AIBIIIC 2 VI semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, V.; Singh, Bhanu P.

    2018-01-01

    The plane wave pseudo-potential method within density functional theory has been used to calculate the structural and elastic properties of AIBIIIC 2 VI semiconductors. The electronic band structure, density of states, lattice constants (a and c), internal parameter (u), tetragonal distortion (η), energy gap (Eg), and bond lengths of the A-C (dAC) and B-C (dBC) bonds in AIBIIIC 2 VI semiconductors have been calculated. The values of elastic constants (Cij), bulk modulus (B), shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (Y), Poisson's ratio (υ), Zener anisotropy factor (A), Debye temperature (ϴD) and G/B ratio have also been calculated. The values of all 15 parameters of CuTlS2 and CuTlSe2 compounds, and 8 parameters of 20 compounds of AIBIIIC 2 VI family, except AgInS2 and AgInSe2, have been calculated for the first time. Reasonably good agreement has been obtained between the calculated, reported and available experimental values.

  4. Benchmark analysis of MCNP trademark ENDF/B-VI iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Court, J.D.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1994-12-01

    The MCNP ENDF/B-VI iron cross-section data was subjected to four benchmark studies as part of the Hiroshima/Nagasaki dose re-evaluation for the National Academy of Science and the Defense Nuclear Agency. The four benchmark studies were: (1) the iron sphere benchmarks from the Lawrence Livermore Pulsed Spheres; (2) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fusion Reactor Shielding Benchmark; (3) a 76-cm diameter iron sphere benchmark done at the University of Illinois; (4) the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Benchmark for Neutron Transport through Iron. MCNP4A was used to model each benchmark and computational results from the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations were compared to ENDF/B-IV, ENDF/B-V, the MCNP Recommended Data Set (which includes Los Alamos National Laboratory Group T-2 evaluations), and experimental data. The results show that the ENDF/B-VI iron evaluations are as good as, or better than, previous data sets

  5. Treatment of selected pharmaceuticals by ferrate(VI): performance, kinetic studies and identification of oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhengwei; Jiang, Jia-Qian

    2015-03-15

    The performance of ferrate(VI) in treating sulfamethoxazole (SMX), diclofenac (DCF), carbamazepine (CBZ) and bezafibrate (BZF) in test solutions containing the four compounds was investigated. A series of jar-test experiments was performed on a bench-scale at pH 6-9 and at a ferrate(VI) dose of 1-5 mg Fe/L. The results suggested that ferrate(VI) can effectively remove SMX, DCF and CBZ from the test solutions, with greater than 80% removal under optimum conditions. However, the removal efficiency of BZF was very low, less than 25% under the studied conditions. Increasing the dose of ferrate(VI) improved the treatment performance, while the influence of solution pH on ferrate(VI) performance varied among the different target compounds. Ferrate(VI) demonstrated the highest reactivity with SMX at pH 8 and pH 9 (20 °C), with apparent second-order rate constants of 360±17 M(-1) s(-1) and 1.26±0.02 M(-1) s(-1), respectively. However, BZF showed the lowest removal by ferrate(VI) with the smallest rate constants (less than 0.5 M(-1) s(-1)) at pH 8 and pH 9. Furthermore, a number of oxidation products (OPs) of SMX, DCF and CBZ during ferrate(VI) oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and their degradation pathways were tentatively proposed. No OPs of BZF were detected during ferrate(VI) oxidation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A coupled mass transfer and surface complexation model for uranium (VI) removal from wastewaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenhart, J.; Figueroa, L.A.; Honeyman, B.D.

    1994-01-01

    A remediation technique has been developed for removing uranium (VI) from complex contaminated groundwater using flake chitin as a biosorbent in batch and continuous flow configurations. With this system, U(VI) removal efficiency can be predicted using a model that integrates surface complexation models, mass transport limitations and sorption kinetics. This integration allows the reactor model to predict removal efficiencies for complex groundwaters with variable U(VI) concentrations and other constituents. The system has been validated using laboratory-derived kinetic data in batch and CSTR systems to verify the model predictions of U(VI) uptake from simulated contaminated groundwater

  7. The effects of chromium(VI) on the thioredoxin system: Implications for redox regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] compounds are highly redox active and have long been recognized as potent cytotoxins and carcinogens. The intracellular reduction of Cr(VI) generates reactive Cr intermediates, which are themselves strong oxidants, as well as superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radical. These probably contribute to the oxidative damage and effects on redox-sensitive transcription factors that have been reported. However, the identification of events that initiate these signaling changes has been elusive. More recent studies show that Cr(VI) causes irreversible inhibition of thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) and oxidation of thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx). Mitochondrial Trx2/Prx3 are more sensitive to Cr(VI) treatment than cytosolic Trx1/Prx1, although both compartments show thiol oxidation with higher doses or longer treatments. Thiol redox proteomics demonstrate that Trx2, Prx3, and Trx1 are among the most sensitive proteins in cells to Cr(VI) treatment. Their oxidation could therefore represent initiating events that have widespread implications for protein thiol redox control and for multiple aspects of redox signaling. This review summarizes the effects of Cr(VI) on the TrxR/Trx system and how these events could influence a number of downstream redox signaling systems that are influenced by Cr(VI) exposure. Some of the signaling events discussed include the activation of apoptosis signal regulating kinase and MAP kinases (p38 and JNK) and the modulation of a number of redox-sensitive transcription factors including AP-1, NF-κB, p53, and Nrf2. PMID:22542445

  8. Microbial reduction of uranium(VI) in sediments of different lithologies collected from Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newsome, Laura; Morris, Katherine; Trivedi, Divyesh; Atherton, Nick; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • U(VI) (aq) mobility can be controlled by stimulating biogeochemical interactions. • Indigenous microbes in varied sediments reduced U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). • Sediment cell numbers and amount of bioavailable Fe(III) could limit this process. - Abstract: The presence of uranium in groundwater at nuclear sites can be controlled by microbial processes. Here we describe the results from stimulating microbial reduction of U(VI) in sediment samples obtained from a nuclear-licensed site in the UK. A variety of different lithology sediments were selected to represent the heterogeneity of the subsurface at a site underlain by glacial outwash deposits and sandstone. The natural sediment microbial communities were stimulated via the addition of an acetate/lactate electron donor mix and were monitored for changes in geochemistry and molecular ecology. Most sediments facilitated the removal of 12 ppm U(VI) during the onset of Fe(III)-reducing conditions; this was reflected by an increase in the proportion of known Fe(III)- and U(VI)-reducing species. However U(VI) remained in solution in two sediments and Fe(III)-reducing conditions did not develop. Sequential extractions, addition of an Fe(III)-enrichment culture and most probable number enumerations revealed that a lack of bioavailable iron or low cell numbers of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria may be responsible. These results highlight the potential for stimulation of microbial U(VI)-reduction to be used as a bioremediation strategy at UK nuclear sites, and they emphasise the importance of both site-specific and borehole-specific investigations to be completed prior to implementation

  9. Removing uranium (VI) from aqueous solution with insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fande; Yuan, Guodong; Larson, Steven L; Ballard, John H; Waggoner, Charles A; Arslan, Zikri; Han, Fengxiang X

    2017-12-01

    The occurrence of uranium (U) and depleted uranium (DU)-contaminated wastes from anthropogenic activities is an important environmental problem. Insoluble humic acid derived from leonardite (L-HA) was investigated as a potential adsorbent for immobilizing U in the environment. The effect of initial pH, contact time, U concentration, and temperature on U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA was assessed. The U(VI) adsorption was pH-dependent and achieved equilibrium in 2 h. It could be well described with pseudo-second-order model, indicating that U(VI) adsorption onto L-HA involved chemisorption. The U(VI) adsorption mass increased with increasing temperature with maximum adsorption capacities of 91, 112 and 120 mg g -1 at 298, 308 and 318 K, respectively. The adsorption reaction was spontaneous and endothermic. We explored the processes of U(VI) desorption from the L-HA-U complex through batch desorption experiments in 1 mM NaNO 3 and in artificial seawater. The desorption process could be well described by pseudo-first-order model and reached equilibrium in 3 h. L-HA possessed a high propensity to adsorb U(VI). Once adsorbed, the release of U(VI) from L-HA-U complex was minimal in both 1 mM NaNO 3 and artificial seawater (0.06% and 0.40%, respectively). Being abundant, inexpensive, and safe, L-HA has good potential for use as a U adsorbent from aqueous solution or immobilizing U in soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Preparation of N-1 -naphthyl benzo- and N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acids and study of their extractability towards Fe (III), Cr (VI) and U (VI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Eltoum Elnour [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    1997-12-01

    Two aryl hydroxamic acids were prepared; The N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid and the N-1- naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid the first one was prepared by the partial reduction of nitrobenzene to the {beta}-phenyl hydroxylamine and coupling the latter with benzyl chloride. The reduction was carried out using ammonium chloride and zinc dust; this pair failed after so many attempts to give the N-1- naphthyl hydroxylamine. So the latter was prepared by using a somewhat milder reducing agent; hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas in absolute alcohol. The two acids were obtained using the modified procedure of Tandon coupling the hydroxylamine with benzoyl chloride. The two acids were characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, their I.R functional group frequencies and by their characteristic colour tests with vanadium (VI) and Iron (III). The acids were used for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination for iron (III), Chromium (VI), and Uranium (VI) from different molar solution, PH and from synthetic sea water. The maximum recovery of iron (III) occurred at PH 4 and PH 5 giving 92.25 and 91.25% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 100% at PH 5 with other acid. The maximum recovery of Chromium (VI) occurred at 3MH{sup 2}SO{sup 4} of 97.50% when using N-1-naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid and a maximum of 94.25% at the same molar concentration with N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid. The maximum recovery for Uranium (VI) was occurred at PH 7 giving 100% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 85% at PH 7 and PH* with the other acid. The two reagents give sharp colour with both iron (III) and chromium (VI), so trials were carried out to compare the curves obtained with that of the original reagent i.e. Thiocynate and diphenylcarbazide, which give a smaller slope.(Author) 121 refs. , 15 tabs. , 13 figs

  11. Preparation of N-1 -naphthyl benzo- and N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acids and study of their extractability towards Fe (III), Cr (VI) and U (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Eltoum Elnour

    1997-12-01

    Two aryl hydroxamic acids were prepared; The N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid and the N-1- naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid the first one was prepared by the partial reduction of nitrobenzene to the β-phenyl hydroxylamine and coupling the latter with benzyl chloride. The reduction was carried out using ammonium chloride and zinc dust; this pair failed after so many attempts to give the N-1- naphthyl hydroxylamine. So the latter was prepared by using a somewhat milder reducing agent; hydrogen sulphide and ammonia gas in absolute alcohol. The two acids were obtained using the modified procedure of Tandon coupling the hydroxylamine with benzoyl chloride. The two acids were characterized by their melting points, elemental analysis, their I.R functional group frequencies and by their characteristic colour tests with vanadium (VI) and Iron (III). The acids were used for the extraction and spectrophotometric determination for iron (III), Chromium (VI), and Uranium (VI) from different molar solution, PH and from synthetic sea water. The maximum recovery of iron (III) occurred at PH 4 and PH 5 giving 92.25 and 91.25% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 100% at PH 5 with other acid. The maximum recovery of Chromium (VI) occurred at 3MH 2 SO 4 of 97.50% when using N-1-naphthyl benzohydroxamic acid and a maximum of 94.25% at the same molar concentration with N-phenyl benzo hydroxamic acid. The maximum recovery for Uranium (VI) was occurred at PH 7 giving 100% when using N-1-naphthyl benzo hydroxamic acid and a maximum recovery of 85% at PH 7 and PH* with the other acid. The two reagents give sharp colour with both iron (III) and chromium (VI), so trials were carried out to compare the curves obtained with that of the original reagent i.e. Thiocynate and diphenylcarbazide, which give a smaller slope.(Author)

  12. Pair copula constructions to determine the dependence structure of Treasury bond yields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Brutti Righi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the dependence structure of US Treasury bonds through a pair copula construction. As a result, we verified that the variability of the yields decreases with a longer time of maturity of the bond. The yields presented strong dependence with past values, strongly positive bivariate associations between the daily variations, and prevalence of the Student's t copula in the relationships between the bonds. Furthermore, in tail associations, we identified relevant values in most of the relationships, which highlights the importance of risk management in the context of bonds diversification.

  13. A conserved aromatic lock for the tryptophan rotameric switch in TM-VI of seven-transmembrane receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Birgitte; Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin

    2010-01-01

    simulations in rhodopsin demonstrated that rotation around the chi1 torsion angle of Trp-VI:13 brings its side chain close to the equally highly conserved Phe-V:13 (Phe-5.47) in TM-V. In the ghrelin receptor, engineering of high affinity metal-ion sites between these positions confirmed their close spatial...... degree as observed in the constructs where Trp-VI:13 itself was mutated, but again without affecting agonist potency. In a proposed active receptor conformation generated by molecular simulations, where the extracellular segment of TM-VI is tilted inwards in the main ligand-binding pocket, Trp-VI:13......The conserved tryptophan in position 13 of TM-VI (Trp-VI:13 or Trp-6.48) of the CWXP motif located at the bottom of the main ligand-binding pocket in TM-VI is believed to function as a rotameric microswitch in the activation process of seven-transmembrane (7TM) receptors. Molecular dynamics...

  14. Removal of Cr(VI) by nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) from soil contaminated with tannery wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ritu; Misra, Virendra; Singh, Rana Pratap

    2012-02-01

    The illegal disposal of tannery wastes at Rania, Kanpur has resulted in accumulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], a toxic heavy metal in soil posing risk to human health and environment. 27 soil samples were collected at various depths from Rania for the assessment of Cr(VI) level in soil. Out of 27 samples, five samples had shown significant level of Cr(VI) with an average concentration of 15.84 mg Kg(-1). Varied doses of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) were applied on Cr(VI) containing soil samples for remediation of Cr(VI). Results showed that 0.10 g L(-1) nZVI completely reduces Cr(VI) within 120 min following pseudo first order kinetics. Further, to test the efficacy of nZVI in field, soil windrow experiments were performed at the contaminated site. nZVI showed significant Cr(VI) reduction at field also, indicating it an effective tool for managing sites contaminated with Cr(VI).

  15. 77 FR 16251 - Announcement of Funding Awards, HOPE VI Revitalization Grant Program, Fiscal Year 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... Awards, HOPE VI Revitalization Grant Program, Fiscal Year 2010 AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary... the Fiscal Year 2010 (FY2010) Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) for the HOPE VI Revitalization... recipients under the HOPE VI Revitalization grant program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For questions...

  16. Removal of chromium (VI) from electroplating wastewater using an anion exchanger derived from rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Dang, Zhi; Yia, Xiao-Yun; Yang, Chen; Lu, Gui-Ning; Liu, Yun-Feng; Huang, Se-Yan; Zheng, Liu-Chun

    2013-01-01

    An anion exchanger from rice straw was used to remove Cr (VI) from synthetic wastewater and electroplating effluent. The exchanger was characterized using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and it was found that the quaternary amino group and hydroxyl group are the main functional groups on the fibrous surface of the exchanger. The effect of contact time, initial concentration and pH on the removal of Cr (VI), and adsorption isotherms at different temperature, was investigated. The results showed that the removal of Cr (VI) was very rapid and was significantly affected by the initial pH of the solution. Although acidic conditions (pH = 2-6) facilitated Cr (VI) adsorption, the exchanger was effective in neutral solution and even under weak base conditions. The equilibrium data fitted well with Langmuir adsorption model, and the maximum Cr (VI) adsorption capacities at pH 6.4 were 0.35, 0.36 and 0.38 mmol/g for 15, 25 and 35 degrees C, respectively. The exchanger was finally tested with real electroplating wastewater, and at sorbent dosage of 10 g/L, the removal efficiencies for Cr (VI) and total Cr were 99.4% and 97.8%, respectively. In addition, the positive relationship between adsorbed Cr (VI) and desorbed Cl- suggested that Cr (VI) was mainly removed by ion exchange with chlorine.

  17. Comparative EXAFS study of uranium(VI) and neptunium(V) sorption onto kaolinite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, T.; Amayri, S.; Reich, Ta.; Jermolajev, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: We investigated the surface sorption process of U(VI) and Np(V) on kaolinite by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in the 10 μM concentration range. Batch experiments with kaolinite in CO 2 -equilibrated systems showed that the adsorption edge of U(VI) occurs at pH 5.5, i.e., near the pH PZC of kaolinite. The adsorption edge of Np(V) occurs well above the pH PZC value at pH 8.5. This may indicate that the bonds between Np(V) and the surface functional groups of kaolinite are not as strong as in the case of U(VI). U(VI) and Np(V) have in common that the amount which is adsorbed decreases when the pH is increased beyond the absorption maximum. This behavior can be attributed to the formation of U(VI) and Np(V) carbonato complexes in the aqueous solutions. The aim of this comparative EXAFS study was to investigate the reason for the different affinities of U(VI) and Np(V) for kaolinite by measuring their local environments at the clay surface. Samples were prepared from 4 g/L kaolinite, 0.1 M NaClO 4 , pH 3.0 - 10.5, presence and absence of ambient CO 2 . The U L 3 - and Np L 2 -edge EXAFS spectra of the wet paste samples were measured at room temperature in fluorescence mode at the Rossendorf Beamline (ROBL) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The measured U-O and U-Al/Si distances indicate inner-sphere sorption of U(VI) on kaolinite. There was no evidence of uranium neighbors in the EXAFS spectra, suggesting that the adsorbed U(VI) complexes were predominantly monomeric. The average distance between uranium and its equatorial oxygen atoms, O eq , increased from 2.32 to 2.38 Angstrom in the presence of atmospheric CO 2 when the pH was increased from 5.0 to 8.5. In the CO 2 -free system, the U-O eq distance was independent from pH and equal to 2.32 Angstrom. The lengthening of the average U-O eq distance in the presence of carbonate (or bicarbonate) suggests the formation of ternary U(VI

  18. Collagen VI disorders: Insights on form and function in the extracellular matrix and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamandé, Shireen R; Bateman, John F

    2017-12-22

    Mutations in the three canonical collagen VI genes, COL6A1, COL6A2 and COL6A3, cause a spectrum of muscle disease from Bethlem myopathy at the mild end to the severe Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Mutations can be either dominant or recessive and the resulting clinical severity is influenced by the way mutations impact the complex collagen VI assembly process. Most mutations are found towards the N-terminus of the triple helical collagenous domain and compromise extracellular microfibril assembly. Outside the triple helix collagen VI is highly polymorphic and discriminating mutations from rare benign changes remains a major diagnostic challenge. Collagen VI deficiency alters extracellular matrix structure and biomechanical properties and leads to increased apoptosis and oxidative stress, decreased autophagy, and impaired muscle regeneration. Therapies that target these downstream consequences have been tested in a collagen VI null mouse and also in small human trials where they show modest clinical efficacy. An important role for collagen VI in obesity, cancer and diabetes is emerging. A major barrier to developing effective therapies is the paucity of information about how collagen VI deficiency in the extracellular matrix signals the final downstream consequences - the receptors involved and the intracellular messengers await further characterization. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Energy balance of ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, R.E.

    1994-01-01

    ENDF/B-VI through Release 2 has been tested for neutron-photon energy balance using the Heater module of the NJOY nuclear data procesing system. The situation is much improved over ENDF/B-V, but there are still a number of maerials that show problems

  20. Some organodioxygen complexes of molybdenum(VI), tungsten(VI), zinc(II) and cadmium(II) containing some monodentate and multidentate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarafder, M.T.H.; Leo Man Lin; Grouse, Karen A.; Mariotto, Gino

    2003-08-01

    Several novel organodioxygen complexes of the type [M(O)(O 2 ) 2 L](MMo(VI), W(VI)) and [M'(O 2 )L](M'= Cd(II) and Zn(II)) have been synthesized using monodentate, bidentate and tridentate ligands, L pyridine, picolinic acid, diethylenetriamine, 1,2-phenylenediamine, triphenylphosphine oxide. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, conductivity measurements, infrared, Raman spectral studies. For dioxygen complexes, the v(O=O) stretches of the superoxo moities were only Raman active, because of apparent linearity of the M-O 2 moieties, giving peaks at 1020-1030 cm -1 . The complexes were all thermodynamically stable. The dioxygen complexes containing bidentate co-ligands were found to show oxygen transfer reactions to various organic and inorganic substrates. Mechanisms have been postulated. (author)

  1. Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in leather and elicitation of eczema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Malene Barré; Menne, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relation between the content of Cr(VI) and soluble Cr(III) in leather and the ability of the leather to elicit eczema in chromium allergic patients. An array of chromium-tanned leather samples was analysed for the content of total Cr(VI) and sol...

  2. Biosorption of Cr(VI from Aqueous Solution Using Murraya koenigii (Curry tree Stems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Suresh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the sorption capacity of Murraya Koenigii Stems (MKST, an agricultural waste, is identified for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution and the effect of different process parameters likes pH and adsorbent dosage were studied. pH 1 is observed to be the optimum pH for Cr(VI sorption onto the biosorbent. The equilibrium data of Cr(VI sorption fit well with the Langmuir model with a monolayer sorption capacity of 12.25 mg/g. The results show that the metal ion interacts strongly with the biosorbent and can be effectively used in the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solution. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v0i0.867

  3. 78 FR 59228 - Sale and Issue of Marketable Book-Entry Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds; Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... and Issue of Marketable Book-Entry Treasury Bills, Notes, and Bonds; Corrections AGENCY: Fiscal... accommodate the public offering of floating rate notes. This document corrects the final regulations by.... Accordingly, 31 CFR part 356 is corrected by making the following correcting amendments: PART 356--SALE AND...

  4. Adsorción de Cr VI sobre residuos de café

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cubides Guerrero

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se estudió el proceso de adsorción de cromo VI en 3 diferentes adsorbentes; carbón activado comercial, carbón activado preparado a partir de residuos de café y los residuos de café. De estos se eligió el residuo de café (cuncho, como la mejor alternativa entre las analizadas, para este propósito se trabajó como modelo de estudio, soluciones acuosas de dicromato de potasio en concentraciones de 5μg/ml (expresada como cromo VI y diferentes dosificaciones de residuo de café; la concentración de cromo VI se analizó por espectrofotometría a 540 nm y la de cromo total se realizó por absorción atómica, para este proceso se analizaron las isotermas de adsorción y se determinó que el proceso se adapta al modelo de Freundlich, la cinética de la adsorción es de segundo orden y se llegaron a obtener adsorciones superiores al 95% de cromo VI.

  5. Estimation of chromium (VI) in various body parts of local chicken

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmud, T.; Rehman, R.; Anwar, J.; Abbas, A.; Farooq, M.

    2011-01-01

    Chicken is a common type of meat source in our food. It is fed with the feed containing small pieces of leather having Cr (VI) which persisted in it during chrome tanning process. The core purpose of present study was to determine the concentration of Cr (VI) in different body parts of chicken like leg, arm, head, heart, liver and bone. Estimation of Cr (VI) was done by preparing the sample solutions after ashing and digestion with nitric acid, by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results depicted that the meat part of leg had higher mean concentration (1.266 mg/kg) with 0.037 mg/kg standard error while the lowest average concentration was found in arm (0.233 mg/kg) with standard error as 0.019 mg/kg. In case of bones, the maximum mean concentration was found in head (1.433 mg/kg) with standard error as 0.670 mg/kg. The concentration of Cr (VI) was not found similar in meat and bones of chicken by employing Kruskal Wallis Test. (author)

  6. Implementation of MP_Lite for the VI Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weiyi [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    MP_Lite is a light weight message-passing library designed to deliver the maximum performance to applications in a portable and user friendly manner. The Virtual Interface (VI) architecture is a user-level communication protocol that bypasses the operating system to provide much better performance than traditional network architectures. By combining the high efficiency of MP_Lite and high performance of the VI architecture, they are able to implement a high performance message-passing library that has much lower latency and better throughput. The design and implementation of MP_Lite for M-VIA, which is a modular implementation of the VI architecture on Linux, is discussed in this thesis. By using the eager protocol for sending short messages, MP_Lite M-VIA has much lower latency on both Fast Ethernet and Gigabit Ethernet. The handshake protocol and RDMA mechanism provides double the throughput that MPICH can deliver for long messages. MP_Lite M-VIA also has the ability to channel-bonding multiple network interface cards to increase the potential bandwidth between nodes. Using multiple Fast Ethernet cards can double or even triple the maximum throughput without increasing the cost of a PC cluster greatly.

  7. Modification of zirconium diphosphate with salicylic acid and its effect on the uranium (Vi) sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almazan T, M. G.; Garcia G, N.; Simoni, E.

    2014-10-01

    The surface of zirconium diphosphate (ZrP 2 O 7 ) was modified with salicylic acid and its effect was evaluated on the uranium (Vi) sorption. The modified surface of the material was analyzed with different analytical techniques among which are included the atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This analysis allowed showing that the salicylic acid is being held on the surface of the zirconium diphosphate. The reactivity of modified zirconium diphosphate compared with uranium (Vi) was investigated using the classical method of batch sorption. The analysis of sorption isotherms shows that the salicylic acid has an important effect in the uranium (Vi) sorption. According to the study conducted, the interaction among the uranium (Vi) and the surface of zirconium diphosphate modified with the salicylic acid most likely leads to the complexes formation of binary (U(Vi)/ZrP 2 O 7 ) and ternary (U(Vi)/salicylate/ZrP 2 O 7 ) surface. (Author)

  8. Chromium sorption and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by grape stalks and yohimbe bark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiol, Núria; Escudero, Carlos; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2008-07-01

    In this work, two low cost sorbents, grape stalks and yohimbe bark wastes were used to remove Cr(VI) and Cr(III) from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were designed to obtain Cr(VI) and Cr(III) sorption data. The mechanism of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) removal and Cr(VI) reduction to Cr(III) by the two vegetable wastes, has been investigated. Fourier transform infrared rays (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis on solid phase were performed to determine the main functional groups that might be involved in metal uptake and to confirm the presence of Cr(III) on the sorbent, respectively. Results put into evidence that both sorbents are able to reduce Cr(VI) to its trivalent form.

  9. Extraction and Separation of Uranium (VI) and Thorium (IV) Using Tri-n-dodecylamine Impregnated Resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metwally, E.; Saleh, A.Sh.; El-Naggar, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Extraction of U(VI) and Th(IV) from chloride and nitrate solutions with tri-n- dodecylamine impregnated on Amberlite XAD4, was investigated. The distribution of U(VI) and Th(IV) was studied at different concentrations of acid, salting-out agent, extractant, aqueous metal ion and other parameters. Absorption spectral studies have been investigated for uranium species in both aqueous HCl solution and the resin phase. From these studies, it is suggested that the tetrachloro complex of U(VI) is formed in the extraction of uranium (VI) from hydrochloric acid solutions by TDA impregnated resin. Stripping of the extracted U(VI) and Th(IV) was assayed with HCl and HNO 3 . Finally, the separation of uranium from thorium and fission products in HCl media was achieved

  10. Speciation of Cr(VI) in environmental samples in the vicinity of the ferrochrome smelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedumedi, Hilda N; Mandiwana, Khakhathi L; Ngobeni, Prince; Panichev, Nikolay

    2009-12-30

    The impact of ferrochrome smelter on the contamination of its environment with toxic hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), was assessed by analyzing smelter dusts, soil, grass and tree barks. For the separation of Cr(VI) from Cr(III), solid samples were treated with 0.1M Na(2)CO(3) and filtered through hydrophilic PDVF 0.45 microm filter prior to the determination of Cr(VI) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). Ferrochrome smelter dust was found to contain significant levels of Cr(VI), viz. 43.5 microg g(-1) (cyclone dust), 2710 microg g(-1) (fine dust), and 7800 microg g(-1) (slimes dust) which exceeded the maximum acceptable risk concentration (20 microg g(-1)). The concentration of Cr(VI) in environmental samples of grass (3.4+/-0.2), soil (7.7+/-0.2), and tree bark (11.8+/-1.2) collected in the vicinity of the chrome smelter were higher as compared with the same kind of samples collected from uncontaminated area. The results of the investigation show that ferrochrome smelter is a source of environmental pollution with contamination factors of Cr(VI) ranging between 10 and 50.

  11. Speciation of Cr(VI) in environmental samples in the vicinity of the ferrochrome smelter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedumedi, Hilda N.; Mandiwana, Khakhathi L.; Ngobeni, Prince; Panichev, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    The impact of ferrochrome smelter on the contamination of its environment with toxic hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), was assessed by analyzing smelter dusts, soil, grass and tree barks. For the separation of Cr(VI) from Cr(III), solid samples were treated with 0.1 M Na 2 CO 3 and filtered through hydrophilic PDVF 0.45 μm filter prior to the determination of Cr(VI) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). Ferrochrome smelter dust was found to contain significant levels of Cr(VI), viz. 43.5 μg g -1 (cyclone dust), 2710 μg g -1 (fine dust), and 7800 μg g -1 (slimes dust) which exceeded the maximum acceptable risk concentration (20 μg g -1 ). The concentration of Cr(VI) in environmental samples of grass (3.4 ± 0.2), soil (7.7 ± 0.2), and tree bark (11.8 ± 1.2) collected in the vicinity of the chrome smelter were higher as compared with the same kind of samples collected from uncontaminated area. The results of the investigation show that ferrochrome smelter is a source of environmental pollution with contamination factors of Cr(VI) ranging between 10 and 50.

  12. Vi har selv designet naturens love

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Martin Mose

    2014-01-01

    ForskerZonenNaturlovene er universelt gyldige i de flestes øjne. De gælder altid, uanset hvad vi tænker. Men dette billede står ikke uimodsagt i videnskabsfilosofien, og der er meget, der tyder på, at det ikke er specielt empirisk korrekt...

  13. Classification of mood disorders in DSM-V and DSM-VI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Peter R

    2008-10-01

    For any diagnostic system to be clinically useful, and go beyond description, it must provide an understanding that informs about aetiology and/or outcome. DSM-III and DSM-IV have provided reliability; the challenge for DSM-V and DSM-VI will be to provide validity. For DSM-V this will not be achieved. Believers in DSM-III and DSM-IV have impeded progress towards a valid classification system, so DSM-V needs to retain continuity with its predecessors to retain reliability and enhance research, but position itself to inform a valid diagnostic system by DSM-VI. This review examines the features of a diagnostic system and summarizes what is really known about mood disorders. The review also questions whether what are called mood disorders are primarily disorders of mood. Finally, it provides suggestions for DSM-VI.

  14. Ferrate(VI) and ferrate(V) oxidation of cyanide, thiocyanate, and copper(I) cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Virender K.; Yngard, Ria A.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Clayton Baum, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanide (CN - ), thiocyanate (SCN - ), and copper(I) cyanide (Cu(CN) 4 3- ) are common constituents in the wastes of many industrial processes such as metal finishing and gold mining, and their treatment is required before the safe discharge of effluent. The oxidation of CN - , SCN - , and Cu(CN) 4 3- by ferrate(VI) (Fe VI O 4 2- ; Fe(VI)) and ferrate(V) (Fe V O 4 3- ; Fe(V)) has been studied using stopped-flow and premix pulse radiolysis techniques. The rate laws for the oxidation of cyanides were found to be first-order with respect to each reactant. The second-order rate constants decreased with increasing pH because the deprotonated species, FeO 4 2- , is less reactive than the protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO 4 - . Cyanides react 10 3 -10 5 times faster with Fe(V) than with Fe(VI). The Fe(V) reaction with CN - proceeds by sequential one-electron reductions from Fe(V) to Fe(IV) to Fe(III). However, a two-electron transfer process from Fe(V) to Fe(III) occurs in the reaction of Fe(V) with SCN - and Cu(CN) 4 3- . The toxic CN - species of cyanide wastes is converted into relatively non-toxic cyanate (NCO - ). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is highly efficient in removing cyanides from electroplating rinse water and gold mill effluent

  15. 75 FR 22168 - Region VI-Houston District; Advisory Council Meeting; Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Region VI--Houston District; Advisory Council Meeting; Public Meeting The Small Business Administration-Region VI--Houston Advisory Council, located in the geographical Area of Houston, Texas will hold a federal public meeting on--Thursday, May 20, 2010, starting at 10:30...

  16. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salah, El-Maraghy B.

    1980-01-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO 4 and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible. (author)

  17. Polarography of uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salah, E M.B. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Faculty of Education

    1980-08-01

    Uranium(VI)-salicylic acid system has been studied polarographically in perchloric acid medium. Varying concentrations of HClO/sub 4/ and salicylic acid have been used. The nature of the polarographic waves is irreversible.

  18. vi and Vim Editors Pocket Reference Support for every text editing task

    CERN Document Server

    Robbins, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Many Unix, Linux, and Mac OS X geeks enjoy using the powerful, platform-agnostic text editors vi and Vim, but there are far too many commands for anyone to remember. Author Arnold Robbins has chosen the most valuable commands for vi, Vim, and vi's main clones-vile, elvis, and nvi-and packed them into this easy-to-browse pocket reference. You'll find commands for all kinds of editing tasks, such as programming, modifying system files, and writing and marking up articles. This second edition includes: Command-line optionsvi commands and set optionsInput mode shortcutsSubstitution and regular e

  19. Laser enhanced reductions of uranium(VI) ion in aqueous phosphoric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Y.Y.; Harada, M.; Tomiyasu, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Takashima, Y.

    1991-01-01

    Photochemical reactions of U(VI) ions with inorganic anions (I - , Br - , Cl - , NCS - ) and organic compounds (1-hexene, cyclohexene, pyridine) in phosphoric acid were studied for the purpose of finding an efficient method of adjusting the oxidation states of uranium ions in nuclear fuel reprocessing. The formation of U(IV) was observed in the photoreactions with I - , Br - and NCS - , but not with Cl - . The yield of U(VI) increased in the order, Br - - - . This order was the same as the quenching rate constants of the excited U(VI) ions with these anions, and the reverse of their standard redox potentials. The rates of the formation of U(IV) in the presence of Br - were measured spectrophotometrically. It was found that the rate equation was first order in both [U(VI)] and [Br - ]. The results were reasonably interpreted by a series of reaction processes involving U(V) and Br radical. With organic molecules, 1-hexene, cyclohexene, and pyridine, the formation of U(IV) were observed. The yield of U(IV) increased in the order pyridine < 1-hexene < cyclohexene. This order is the reverse of their vertical ionization potentials, suggesting an electron transfer mechanism between these organic molecules and excited U(VI). (author)

  20. Kinetics of U(VI) reduction control kinetics of U(IV) reoxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senko, J.M.; Minyard, M.L.; Dempsey, B.A.; Roden, E.E.; Yeh, G.-T.; Burgos, W.D.

    2006-01-01

    For the in situ reductive immobilization of U to be an acceptable strategy for the removal of that element from groundwater, the long-term stability of U(IV) must be determined. Rates of biotransformation of Fe species influence the mineralogy of the resulting products (Fredrickson et al., 2003; Senko et al., 2005), and we hypothesize that the rate of U(VI) reduction influences the mineralogy of resultant U(IV) precipitates. We hypothesize that slower rates of U(VI) reduction will yield U(IV) phases that are more resistant to reoxidation, and will therefore be more stable upon cessation of electron donor addition. U(IV) phases formed by relatively slow reduction may be more crystalline or larger in comparison to their relatively rapidly-formed counterparts (Figure 1), thus limiting the reactivity of slowly-formed U(IV) phases toward various oxidants. The physical location of U(IV) precipitates relative to bacterial cells may also limit the reactivity of biogenic U(IV) phases. In this situation, we expect that precipitation of U(IV) within the bacterial cell may protect U(IV) from reoxidation by limiting physical contact between U(IV) and oxidants (Figure 1). We assessed the effect of U(VI) reduction rate on the subsequent reoxidation of biogenic U(IV) and are currently conducting column scale studies to determine whether U(VI) reduction rate can be manipulated by varying the electron donor concentration used to stimulate U(VI) reduction

  1. Neutron cross section standards evaluations for ENDF/B-VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.D.; Poenitz, W.P.; Hale, G.M.; Peelle, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The neutron cross section standards are now being evaluated as the initial phase in the development of the new ENDF/B-VI file. These standards evaluations are following a somewhat different process compared with that used for earlier versions of ENDF. The primary effort is concentrated on a simultaneous evaluation using a generalized least squares program, R-matrix evaluations, and a procedure for combining the results of these evaluations. The ENDF/B-VI standards evaluation procedure is outlined, and preliminary simultaneous evaluation and R-matrix results are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs

  2. Studies on extraction of uranium (VI) with petroleum sulfoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yanzhao; Sun Sixiu; Bao Borong

    1999-01-01

    The extraction of uranium(VI) with petroleum sulfoxides(PSO) in different diluents is studied. The extraction ability of U(VI) decreases in the following order: benzene, toluene, cyclohexane, heptane, kerosene, carbon tetrachloride and chloroform. The influence of the concentrations of nitric acid, PSO, salting out agent, complexing anion and temperature on the extraction equilibrium is also investigated, and the enthalpy of the extraction reaction is obtained. The relationship between the extraction equilibrium constants K ex and the physical parameters of diluents is derived. The extraction mechanism and equilibrium are examined by measurement of IR spectrophotometry

  3. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-29

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor.

  4. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-01-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor. PMID:27021522

  5. An Exploratory Study on the Pathways of Cr (VI) Reduction in Sulfate-reducing Up-flow Anaerobic Sludge Bed (UASB) Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Wei, Li; Liu, Rulong; Jiang, Feng; Hao, Xiaodi; Chen, Guang-Hao

    2016-03-01

    Electroplating wastewater contains both Cr (VI) and sulfate. So Cr (VI) removal under sulfate-rich condition is quite complicated. This study mainly investigates the pathways for Cr (VI) removal under biological sulfate-reducing condition in the up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor. Two potential pathways are found for the removal of Cr (VI). The first one is the sulfidogenesis-induced Cr (VI) reduction pathway (for 90% Cr (VI) removal), in which Cr (VI) is reduced by sulfide generated from biological reduction of sulfate. The second one leads to direct reduction of Cr (VI) which is utilized by bacteria as the electron acceptor (for 10% Cr (VI) removal). Batch test results confirmed that sulfide was oxidized to elemental sulfur instead of sulfate during Cr (VI) reduction. The produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) provided protection to the microbes, resulting in effective removal of Cr (VI). Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera accounted for 11.1% of the total bacterial community; thus they could be the major organisms mediating the sulfidogenesis-induced reduction of Cr (VI). In addition, chromate-utilizing genera (e.g. Microbacterium) were also detected, which were possibly responsible for the direct reduction of Cr (VI) using organics as the electron donor and Cr (VI) as the electron acceptor.

  6. REMOVAL OF Cr(VI FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION BY ACTIVATED COAL FROM LIGNITE COAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet MAHRAMANLIOĞLU

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Activated coal produced from Ağaçlı Lignite coal was used to remove Cr(VI from aqueous solutions. The adsorption of Cr(VI was studied as a function of initial concentration, time, pH, adsorbent concentration and temperature. The adsorption data were found to fit to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Lagergren equation was used to calculate the adsorption rate. The amount of Cr(VI adsorbed was increased with decreasing pH and decreased with increasing temperature.

  7. Adsorption behavior and mechanism of Cr(VI) using Sakura waste from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Wenfang [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhao, Yingxin, E-mail: yingxinzhao@tju.edu.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Urban River Eco-Purification Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zheng, Xinyi [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Ji, Min [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin Engineering Center of Urban River Eco-Purification Technology, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Zhenya [Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 3058572 (Japan)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The main chemical components of Sakura leaves are cellulose 16.6%, hemicellulose 10.4%, lignin 18.3%, ash 11.4%, and others 43.3%. The adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) onto Sakura leaves can achieve 435.25 mg g{sup −1}, much higher than other similar agroforestry wastes. - Highlights: • Sakura leaves were prepared to remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. • The maximum adsorption capacity of Cr(VI) reached 435.25 mg g{sup −1}. • Cr(VI) adsorption fitted pseudo-second-order kinetic model. • Isotherm models indicated Cr(VI) adsorption occurred on a monolayer surface. • The influence order of coexisting ions followed PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −}. - Abstract: A forestall waste, Sakura leave, has been studied for the adsorption of Cr(VI) from aqueous solution. The materials before and after adsorption were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). To investigate the adsorption performance of Sakura waste, batch experiments were conducted under different adsorbent dosage, contact time, initial concentration of Cr(VI), and co-existing ions. Results showed the data fitted pseudo-second-order better than pseudo-first-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data was analyzed with Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich–Peterson isotherm models at temperature ranges from 25 °C to 45 °C. The maximum adsorption capacity from the Langmuir model was 435.25 mg g{sup −1} at pH 1.0. The presence of Cl{sup −}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} would lead to an obvious negative effect on Cr(VI) adsorption, and their influence order follows PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} > SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} > Cl{sup −}. The study developed a new way to reutilize wastes and showed a great potential for resource recycling.

  8. Virtual phantom magnetic resonance imaging (ViP MRI) on a clinical MRI platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Bordelois, Alejandro; Gambarota, Giulio

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to implement Virtual Phantom Magnetic Resonance Imaging (ViP MRI), a technique that allows for generating reference signals in MR images using radiofrequency (RF) signals, on a clinical MR system and to test newly designed virtual phantoms. MRI experiments were conducted on a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system was done using the principle of reciprocity. The ViP RF signals were generated using a compact waveform generator (dimensions of 26 cm × 18 cm × 16 cm), connected to a homebuilt 25 mm-diameter RF coil. The ViP RF signals were transmitted to the MRI scanner bore, simultaneously with the acquisition of the signal from the object of interest. Different types of MRI data acquisition (2D and 3D gradient-echo) as well as different phantoms, including the Shepp-Logan phantom, were tested. Furthermore, a uniquely designed virtual phantom - in the shape of a grid - was generated; this newly proposed phantom allows for the investigations of the vendor distortion correction field. High quality MR images of virtual phantoms were obtained. An excellent agreement was found between the experimental data and the inverse cube law, which was the expected functional dependence obtained from the electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system. Short-term time stability measurements yielded a coefficient of variation in the signal intensity over time equal to 0.23% and 0.13% for virtual and physical phantom, respectively. MR images of the virtual grid-shaped phantom were reconstructed with the vendor distortion correction; this allowed for a direct visualization of the vendor distortion correction field. Furthermore, as expected from the electromagnetic modelling of the ViP system, a very compact coil (diameter ~ cm) and very small currents (intensity ~ mA) were sufficient to generate a signal comparable to that of physical phantoms in MRI experiments. The ViP MRI technique was successfully implemented on a clinical MR

  9. Chromium(III) and chromium(VI) release from leather during 8 months of simulated use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Yolanda S; Lidén, Carola

    2016-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) release from Cr-tanned leather articles is a major cause of Cr contact dermatitis. It has been suggested that Cr(VI) release from leather is not necessarily an intrinsic property of the leather, but is strongly dependent on environmental conditions. To test this hypothesis for long-term (8 months) simulated use. The release of total Cr and Cr(VI) from Cr-tanned, unfinished leather was analysed in subsequent phosphate buffer (pH 8.0) immersions for a period of 7.5 months. The effect of combined ultraviolet treatment and alkaline solution (pH 12.1) was tested. Dry storage [20% relative humidity (RH)] was maintained between immersions. Atomic absorption spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and diphenylcarbazide tests were used. Cr(VI) release was dependent on previous dry storage or alkaline treatment, but not on duration or number of previous immersions. Cr(III) release decreased with time. Fifty-two percent of the total Cr released during the last immersion period was Cr(VI). Cr(VI) release exceeded 9 mg/kg in all immersion periods except in the first 10-day immersion (2.6 mg/kg). Cr(VI) release is primarily determined by environmental factors (RH prior to immersion, solution pH, and antioxidant content). The RH should be kept low prior to testing Cr(VI) release from leather. © 2016 The Authors. Contact Dermatitis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Investigation of equilibrium and kinetics of Cr(VI) adsorption by dried Bacillus cereus using response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Wang, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    In this study, response surface methodology (RSM) based on three-variable-five-level central composite rotatable design was used to analyze the effects of combined and individual operating parameters (biomass dose, initial concentration of Cr(VI) and pH) on the Cr(VI) adsorption capacity of dried Bacillus cereus. A quadratic polynomial equation was obtained to predict the adsorbed Cr(VI) amount. Analysis of variance showed that the effect of biomass dose was the key factor in the removal of Cr(VI). The maximum adsorbed Cr(VI) amount (30.93 mg g(-1)) was found at 165.30 mg L(-1), 2.96, and 3.01 g L(-1) for initial Cr(VI) concentration, pH, and biosorbent dosage, respectively. The surface chemical functional groups and microstructure of unloaded and Cr(VI)-loaded dried Bacillus cereus were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. Besides, the results gained from these studies indicated that Langmuir isotherm and the second-order rate expression were suitable for the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater. The results revealed RSM was an effective method for optimizing biosorption process, and dried Bacillus cereus had a remarkable performance on the removal of Cr(VI) from wastewater.

  11. Osmium(VI) complexes as a new class of potential anti-cancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Wen-Xiu; Man, Wai-Lun; Cheung, Myra Ting-Wai; Sun, Raymond Wai-Yin; Shu, Yuan-Lan; Lam, Yun-Wah; Che, Chi-Ming; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2011-02-21

    A nitridoosmium(VI) complex [Os(VI)(N)(sap)(OH(2))Cl] (H(2)sap = N-salicylidene-2-aminophenol) displays prominent in vitro and in vivo anti-cancer properties, induces S- and G2/M-phase arrest and forms a stable adduct with dianionic 5'-guanosine monophosphate.

  12. Optimizing the application of magnetic nanoparticles in Cr(VI) removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Konstantinos; Kaprara, Efthymia; Mitrakas, Manassis; Tziomaki, Magdalini; Angelakeris, Mavroidis; Vourlias, Georgios; Andritsos, Nikolaos

    2013-04-01

    The presence of heavy metals in aqueous systems is an intense health and environmental problem as implied by their harmful effects on human and other life forms. Among them, chromium is considered as an acutely hazardous compound contaminating the surface water from industrial wastes or entering the groundwater, the major source of drinking water, by leaching of chromite rocks. Chromium occurs in two stable oxidation states, Cr(III) and Cr(VI), with the hexavalent form being much more soluble and mobile in water having the ability to enter easily into living tissues or cells and thus become more toxic. Despite the established risks from Cr(VI)-containing water consumption and the increasing number of incidents, the E.U. tolerance limit for total chromium in potable water still stands at 50 μg/L. However, in the last years a worldwide debate concerning the establishment of a separate and very strict limit for the hexavalent form takes place. In practice, Cr(VI) is usually removed from water by various methods such as chemical coagulation/filtration, ion exchange, reverse osmosis and adsorption. Adsorption is considered as the simplest method which may become very effective if the process is facilitated by the incorporation of a Cr(VI) to Cr(III) reduction stage. This work studies the potential of using magnetic nanoparticles as adsorbing agents for Cr(VI) removal at the concentration levels met in contaminated drinking water. A variety of nanoparticles consisting of ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Mn, Mg, Zn) were prepared by precipitating the corresponding bivalent or trivalent sulfate salts under controlled acidity and temperature. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to verify their crystal structure and determine the morphological characteristics. The mean particle size of the samples was found in the range 10-50 nm. Batch Cr(VI) removal tests were performed in aqueous nanoparticles dispersions showing the efficiency of ferrite

  13. Characterization of U(VI) Sorption-Desorption Processes and Model Upscaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Jing; Dong, Wenming; Ball, William P.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of the overall collaborative EMSP effort (with which this project is associated) were to characterize sorption and desorption processes of U(VI) on pristine and contaminated Hanford sediments over a range of sediment facies and materials properties and to relate such characterization both to fundamental molecular-scale understanding and field-scale models of geochemistry and mass transfer. The research was intended to provide new insights on the mechanisms of U(VI) retardation at Hanford, and to allow the development of approaches by which laboratory-developed geochemical models could be upscaled for defensible field-scale predictions of uranium transport in the environment. Within this broader context, objectives of the JHU-based project were to test hypotheses regarding the coupled roles of adsorption and impermeable-zone diffusion in controlling the fate and transport of U(VI) species under conditions of comparatively short-term exposure. In particular, this work tested the following hypotheses: (1) the primary adsorption processes in the Hanford sediment over the pH range of 7 to 10 are surface complexation reactions of aqueous U(VI) hydroxycarbonate and carbonate complexes with amphoteric edge sites on detrital phyllosilicates in the silt/clay size fraction; (2) macroscopic adsorption intensity (at given aqueous conditions) is a function of mineral composition and aquatic chemistry; and (3) equilibrium sorption and desorption to apply in short-term, laboratory-spiked pristine sediments; and (4) interparticle diffusion can be fully understood in terms of a model that couples molecular diffusion of uranium species in the porewater with equilibrium sorption under the relevant aqueous conditions. The primary focus of the work was on developing and applying both models and experiments to test the applicability of ''local equilibrium'' assumptions in the modeling interpretation of sorption retarded interparticle diffusion, as relevant to processes of

  14. Formation of stable uranium(VI) colloidal nanoparticles in conditions relevant to radioactive waste disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Pieter; Morris, Katherine; Hibberd, Rosemary; Law, Gareth T W; Mosselmans, J Frederick W; Brown, Andy P; Doutch, James; Smith, Andrew J; Shaw, Samuel

    2014-12-09

    The favored pathway for disposal of higher activity radioactive wastes is via deep geological disposal. Many geological disposal facility designs include cement in their engineering design. Over the long term, interaction of groundwater with the cement and waste will form a plume of a hyperalkaline leachate (pH 10-13), and the behavior of radionuclides needs to be constrained under these extreme conditions to minimize the environmental hazard from the wastes. For uranium, a key component of many radioactive wastes, thermodynamic modeling predicts that, at high pH, U(VI) solubility will be very low (nM or lower) and controlled by equilibrium with solid phase alkali and alkaline-earth uranates. However, the formation of U(VI) colloids could potentially enhance the mobility of U(VI) under these conditions, and characterizing the potential for formation and medium-term stability of U(VI) colloids is important in underpinning our understanding of U behavior in waste disposal. Reflecting this, we applied conventional geochemical and microscopy techniques combined with synchrotron based in situ and ex situ X-ray techniques (small-angle X-ray scattering and X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XAS)) to characterize colloidal U(VI) nanoparticles in a synthetic cement leachate (pH > 13) containing 4.2-252 μM U(VI). The results show that in cement leachates with 42 μM U(VI), colloids formed within hours and remained stable for several years. The colloids consisted of 1.5-1.8 nm nanoparticles with a proportion forming 20-60 nm aggregates. Using XAS and electron microscopy, we were able to determine that the colloidal nanoparticles had a clarkeite (sodium-uranate)-type crystallographic structure. The presented results have clear and hitherto unrecognized implications for the mobility of U(VI) in cementitious environments, in particular those associated with the geological disposal of nuclear waste.

  15. The use of stable isotopes for Cr(VI) determination in silty-clay soil solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuliani, Tea; Sčančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2013-09-01

    In assessing the environmental hazard of Cr(VI) present in soil, exchangeable Cr(VI) is important, since it can be easily washed out from the upper part of the soil into subsurface soil, surface and ground water, and taken up by plants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of species interconversion that may occur during the extraction of exchangeable Cr(VI) from silty-clay soil with phosphate buffer in order to establish an extraction method that would be effective, accurate and with minimal or no species interconversions. The Cr(VI) concentration in soil extracts was determined by speciated isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SID-ICP-MS). The study was performed on soil samples from a field treated with tannery waste for 17 years. Samples were spiked by enriched stable isotopic solutions of (50)Cr(VI) and (53)Cr(III) that were added to phosphate buffers (0.1 M KH2PO4-K2HPO4 (pH 7.2) and/or 0.1 M K2HPO4 (pH 8)). To optimize extraction, mechanical shaking and/or ultrasound-assisted extraction were compared. The separation and detection of Cr species was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ICP-MS. When mechanical shaking was applied, 90 % reduction of Cr(VI) was induced by extraction with 0.1 M KH2PO4-K2HPO4, while with 0.1 M K2HPO4 reduction was around 40 %. To shorten the extraction time and the possibility of species interconversions, ultrasound-assisted extraction was further applied only with 0.1 M K2HPO4. For total extraction of exchangeable Cr(VI) with a maximum 10 % reduction of Cr(VI), five consecutive ultrasound-assisted extractions were needed.

  16. Extraction of uranium (VI) from sea water using hydrous metalic oxide binded with hydrophilic polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigetomi, Yasumasa; Kojima, Takehiro; Kamba, Hideaki

    1978-01-01

    In the past five years, many researches have been made to extract U(VI) from sea water. This is a report of the extraction of U(VI) from sea water using hydrous titanium oxide binded with hydrophilic polymers, the apparatus for the adsorption and the separation of U(VI) by means of ion exchange. (author)

  17. Non-enzymatic U(VI) interactions with biogenic mackinawite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramani, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Kukkadapu, R. K.; Murayama, M.; Hochella, M. F.

    2011-12-01

    Reductive immobilization of hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] by stimulation of dissimilatory metal and/or sulfate reducing bacteria (DMRB or DSRB) has been extensively researched as a remediation strategy for subsurface U(VI) contamination. These bacteria derive energy by reducing oxidized metals as terminal electron acceptors, often utilizing organic substrates as electron donors. Thus, when evaluating the potential for in-situ uranium remediation in heterogeneous subsurface media, it is important to understand how the presence of alternative electron acceptors such as Fe(III) and sulfate affect U(VI) remediation and the long term behavior and reactivity of reduced uranium. Iron, an abundant subsurface element, represents a substantial sink for electrons from DMRB, and the reduction of Fe(III) leads to the formation of dissolved Fe(II) or to reactive biogenic Fe(II)- and mixed Fe(II)/Fe(III)- mineral phases. Consequently, abiotic U(VI) reduction by reactive forms of biogenic Fe(II) minerals could be a potentially important process for uranium immobilization. In our study, the DMRB Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was used to synthesize a biogenic Fe(II)-bearing sulfide mineral: mackinawite, that has been characterized by XRD, SEM, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Batch experiments involving treated biogenic mackinawite and uranium (50:1 molar ratio) were carried out at room temperature under strict anoxic conditions. Following complete removal of uranium from solution, the biogenic mackinawite was analyzed by a suite of analytical techniques including XAS, HRTEM and Mössbauer spectroscopy to determine the speciation of uranium and investigate concomitant Fe(II)-phase transformation. Determining the speciation of uranium is critical to success of a remediation strategy. The present work elucidates non-enzymatic/abiotic molecular scale redox interactions between biogenic mackinawite and uranium.

  18. Analytical recovery of Cr (VI), Mo (VI), Ti (IV) and Co (II) by N-phenyl-meta-nitro-benzohydroxamic and N-P-tolyl-meta-nitro-benzohydroxamic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Abdul Aziz Malik Mohamed

    2000-05-01

    Two hydroxamic acids were prepared; N-phenyl-m-nitro-benzohydroxamic and N-p-tolyl-m-nitro-benzo hydroxamic acids. N-phenyl-m-nitro-benzohydroxamic was prepared by coupling the β-phenyl hydroxylamine with m-nitro-benzoyl chloride in ratio 1:1 in alkaline medium at zero degree centigrade. It recrystallized from a mixture of benzene and petroleum ether (2:1) with the yield of 67%. The product was characterized by: A-nitrogen content which was found to be 10.7% (lit. 10.9%). B-infra-red spectroscopy. C-the molecular weight which was determined by titration, was found to be 257.7 gram (lit. 257 gram). D-the molecular weight which was determined by elevation of the boiling point, was found to be 253.7 gram (lit. 257 gram). E-characteristic violet color reaction with vanadium and blood-red reaction with ferric chloride solutions. F-melting point 117 degree centigrade. N-p-tolyl-m-nitro benzo hydroxamic acid was prepared by coupling the p-tolyl-hydroxylamine with m-nitro benzoyl chloride using the same procedure. It was recrystallized from a mixture of benzene and petroleum ether (2:1) with the yield of 63%. The product was characterized by: A-nitrogen content which was found to be 10.1% (lit. 10.3). B-infra-red spectroscopy. C-the molecular weight which was determined by titration, was found to be 271.6 gram (lit. 272). D-the molecular weight which was determined by elevation of the boiling point, was found to be 269.9 gram (lit. 272 gram). E.characteristic violet color reaction with vanadium and blood-red color with ferric chloride solutions. F-melting point which was found to be 105 degree centigrade (lit. 106 degree c). the two hydroxamic acids were used as analytical reagents for extraction of metal ions Ti (IV), Cr (VI), Mo (VI) and Co (II). With an equal volume of the organic and aqueous phase, and only one extraction, N-phenyl-m-nitro-benzohydroxamic acid was found to have a maximum extraction of 30.18% for Ti (IV) at pH 2.0, of 97.06% for Cr (VI) at 3MH 2 SO 4

  19. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution using TiO{sub 2} modified β-zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Peng; Yuan, Ni; Xiong, Wei; Wu, Hanyu; Pan, Duoqiang; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry and Nuclear Environment Laboratory; Ministry of Education, Lanzhou (China). Key Laboratory of Special Function Materials and Structure Design

    2017-07-01

    β-Zeolite was synthesized and modified with TiO{sub 2}. The synthesized materials were characterized and used for removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions. The influences of pH, contact time and temperature on U(VI) adsorption onto modified β-zeolite by TiO{sub 2} were studied by batch technique, and XPS was employed to analysed the experimental data. The dynamic process showed that the adsorption of U(VI) onto TiO{sub 2}/β-zeolite matched the pseudo-second-order kinetics model, and the adsorption of U(VI) were significantly dependent on pH values. Through simulating the adsorption isotherms by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubini-Radushkevich (D-R) models, it could be seen, respectively that the adsorption patterns of U(VI) onto TiO{sub 2}/β-zeolite were mainly controlled by surface complexation, and the adsorption processes were endothermic and spontaneous. The modification of β-zeolite by TiO{sub 2} it shows a novel material for the removing of U(VI) from water environment for industrialized application.

  20. Electrochemical investigations on cation-cation interaction between Np(V) and U(VI) in nitric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, P.K.; Murali, M.S.; Pathak, P.N.; Mohapatra, P.K.

    2014-01-01

    Ever since the first report on cation-cation interactions (CCIs) in 1961 by Sullivan et al., many researchers have worked on this using different techniques like optical spectroscopy and potentiometry. However, there is almost no report, in recent times, on this interesting subject using an electrochemical technique. In the present work, we set out to use simple cyclic voltammetry (CV) as a probe to study this phenomenon in the case of Np(V)-U(VI) in nitric acid medium. Accordingly, cyclic voltammograms were recorded individually for Np(V) , U(VI) in 4M HNO 3 and for solutions resulting from a titration of Np(V) with incremental additions of U(VI) in the same medium. These experiments were carried out using AutoLab 30 with three solid electrode system. Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode while Pt wires were used as working and counter electrode. The paper gives the part of CVs for successive additions of only U(VI) (1.4M) at fixed scan rate and room temperature. It can be seen that that the reduction peak shifts only slightly towards left with increased aliquots of U(VI). In contrast, the paper also gives the part of CVs for only U(VI) and for a titration mixture of fixed concentration of Np(V) and successive volume aliquot-additions of U(VI). It can be seen that there was no appreciable shift in the cathodic peak (∼ -0.15V) for additions of 1225μL of only U(VI) and 3225 μL of U(VI) in presence of Np. This showed that no change occurred till this composition. But with the addition of next aliquot of 4225μL of U(VI), there was an appreciable shift in the peak. This signified the formation of a new complex which can be attributed to the cation-cation interaction envisaged for Np(V)-U(VI). With further addition of an aliquot of 4725 μL of U(VI), it can be seen that again there was no appreciable shift in the cathodic peak position which probably underlined that the formation of the complex was complete

  1. Glycosylation of the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites in the human α1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lise Lotte; Bross, Peter Gerd; Ørntoft, Torben Falck

    2000-01-01

    Human alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase V and -VI (hFucTV and -VI) each contain four potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105, Asn167 and Asn198 and hFucTVI: Asn46, Asn91, Asn153 and Asn184). Glycosylation of the two N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites (hFucTV: Asn60, Asn105 and h......FucTVI: Asn46 and Asn91) have never been studied in detail. In the present study, we have analysed the glycosylation of these potential N-glycosylation sites. Initially, we compared the molecular mass of hFucTV and -VI expressed in COS-7 cells treated with tunicamycin with the mass of the proteins...... in untreated cells. The difference in molecular mass between the proteins in treated and untreated cells corresponded to the presence of at least three N-linked glycans. We then made a series of mutants, in which the asparagine residues in the N-terminal potential N-glycosylation sites were replaced...

  2. Separation of Th(IV) and U(VI) by extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadkarni, M.N.; Mayankutty, P.C.; Pillai, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    Application of extraction chromatography to the analytical separation of Th(IV) and U(VI) has been investigated. The stationary phase was a macroporous resin Amberlite XE-270 impregnated with undiluted tri-n-butylphosphate (TBP) and the mobile phase was either 5.0M HNO 3 or 6M HCl. Separation of traces of Th(IV) from large quantities of U(VI) was achieved on a laboratory column by elution of the absorbed Th(IV) with 6M HCl. (author)

  3. Polarographic behaviour of uranium (VI) in tributyl phosphate organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degueldre, C.A.; Meklati, M.

    1984-01-01

    U(VI) determination by D.C. and differential pulse polarography was studied in the organic solutions derived from tributyl phosphate - diluent extracts (after separation from nitric acid media) along with a selected aprotic solvent (i.e.: propylene carbonate and N,N-dimethylacetamide). Miscibility of the TBP-diluent (e.g. cyclohexane, n-hexane, kerosene, n-dodecane) phase with nitric acid as supporting electrolyte, either by addition or already present in the extract was larger in DMA than in PC. In the DMA organic mixture, U(VI) exhibited a DPP peak due to a one electron step, with Esub(p)=-0.4 V (position connected with H 2 O and HNO 3 concentrations). This peak which was proportionnel to the U(VI) concentration from 5x10 -6 to 10 -3 M can be used to determinate directly hexavalent uranium in the industrial organic extraction phases TBP-diluent. (orig.)

  4. Domingos Vandelli and the deficit in royal Portuguese treasury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Dalla Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to discuss the economic situation and policy recommendations of Vandelli to solve the difficulties in economic situation in Portugal at the end of seven hundred. Starting with a prior proposal for Vandelli on institutionalization of knowledge in Sciencia of Finance to further expose the difficulties in maintaining the Kingdom in not justifiable times as costly ordered and even military expenditures, investments in manufacturing, arts and science without there being at that time a real war economy. As a result, it failed to materialize the idea of a Portuguese Economic Society since it was transmuted into a Science Academy. With regard to the deficit in the Royal Treasury, there was an increase of Portuguese State spending concurrently with the drop in revenue from overseas, and finally opportunism behind the financial difficulties of the metropolis led Vandelli to do harsh criticism to financial managers and usurers who took advantage of an emblematic situation and suggest economic policies to balance public finances

  5. Speciation of Cr(VI) in environmental samples in the vicinity of the ferrochrome smelter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedumedi, Hilda N. [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, P.O. Box 56208, Arcadia, 0007, Pretoria (South Africa); Mandiwana, Khakhathi L., E-mail: MandiwanaKL@tut.ac.za [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, P.O. Box 56208, Arcadia, 0007, Pretoria (South Africa); Ngobeni, Prince; Panichev, Nikolay [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, P.O. Box 56208, Arcadia, 0007, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2009-12-30

    The impact of ferrochrome smelter on the contamination of its environment with toxic hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), was assessed by analyzing smelter dusts, soil, grass and tree barks. For the separation of Cr(VI) from Cr(III), solid samples were treated with 0.1 M Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and filtered through hydrophilic PDVF 0.45 {mu}m filter prior to the determination of Cr(VI) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ET-AAS). Ferrochrome smelter dust was found to contain significant levels of Cr(VI), viz. 43.5 {mu}g g{sup -1} (cyclone dust), 2710 {mu}g g{sup -1} (fine dust), and 7800 {mu}g g{sup -1} (slimes dust) which exceeded the maximum acceptable risk concentration (20 {mu}g g{sup -1}). The concentration of Cr(VI) in environmental samples of grass (3.4 {+-} 0.2), soil (7.7 {+-} 0.2), and tree bark (11.8 {+-} 1.2) collected in the vicinity of the chrome smelter were higher as compared with the same kind of samples collected from uncontaminated area. The results of the investigation show that ferrochrome smelter is a source of environmental pollution with contamination factors of Cr(VI) ranging between 10 and 50.

  6. Antioxidant Activity of Lawsonia inermis Extracts Inhibits Chromium(VI-Induced Cellular and DNA Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Guha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexavalent chromium Cr(VI is a very strong oxidant which consequently causes high cytotoxicity through oxidative stress. Prevention of Cr(VI-induced cellular damage has been sought in this study in aqueous and methanolic extracts of Lawsonia inermis Linn. (Lythraceae, commonly known as Henna. The extracts showed significant (P < .05 potential in scavenging free radicals (DPPH• and ABTS•+ and Fe3+, and in inhibiting lipid peroxidation. DNA damage caused by exposure of pBR322 to Cr(VI-UV is markedly inhibited by both extracts in varying degrees. A distinct decline in Cr(VI-induced cytotoxicity was noticed in MDA-MB-435S (human breast carcinoma cells with an increase in dosage of both extracts individually. Furthermore, both extracts proved to contain a high content of phenolic compounds which were found to have a strong and significant (P < .05 positive correlation to the radical scavenging potential, lipid peroxidation inhibition capacity and cyto-protective efficiency against Cr(VI-induced oxidative cellular damage. HPLC analysis identified some of the major phenolic compounds in both extracts, which might be responsible for the antioxidant potential and the properties of DNA and cyto-protection. This study contributes to the search for natural resources that might yield potent therapeutic drugs against Cr(VI-induced oxidative cell damage.

  7. Langmuir and Freundlich Isotherm Adsorption Equations for Chromium (VI) Waste Adsorption by Zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murni Handayani; Eko Sulistiyono

    2009-01-01

    The research of chromium (VI) waste adsorption by zeolite has done. Wastes which are produced by Industries, both radioactive waste and heavy metal waste need done more processing so that they are not endanger environment and human health. Zeolite has very well-ordered crystal form with cavity each other to way entirely so that cause surface wide of zeolite become very big and very good as adsorbents. This research intends to know appropriate isotherm adsorption method to determine maximum capacity of zeolite to chromium (VI) waste. The equations which used in adsorption process are Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm Adsorption equations. The instrument was used in adsorption process by using Atomic Adsorption Spectroscopy (AAS). The experiment result showed that the biggest mass of chromium (VI) metal ion which was absorb by zeolite in 20 ppm concentration was 7.71 mg/gram zeolite. Adsorption process of Chromium (VI) waste by zeolite followed Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm equations with R 2 >0,9 . Appropriate equation to determine maximum adsorption capacity of zeolite for chromium (VI) waste adsorption is Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of zeolite is 52.25 mg/gram. (author)

  8. Adsorption of Cr(VI) using silica-based adsorbent prepared by radiation-induced grafting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Jingyi; Wang Ziyue; Li Huibo; Xu Ling; Peng Jing; Zhai Maolin; Yang Chao; Li Jiuqiang; Wei Genshuan

    2009-01-01

    Silica-based adsorbent was prepared by radiation-induced grafting of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) onto the silanized silica followed by a protonation process. The FTIR spectra and XPS analysis proved that DMAEMA was grafted successfully onto the silica surface. The resultant adsorbent manifested a high ion exchange capacity (IEC) of ca. 1.30 mmol/g and the Cr(VI) adsorption behavior of the adsorbent was further investigated, revealing the recovery of Cr(VI) increased with the adsorbent feed and the equilibrium adsorption could be achieved within 40 min. The adsorption capacity, strongly depended on the pH of the solution, reached a maximum Cr(VI) uptake (ca. 68 mg/g) as the pH was in the range of 2.5-5.0. Furthermore, even in strong acidic (4.0 mol/L HNO 3 ) or alkaline media (pH 11.0), the adsorbent had a sound Cr(VI) uptake capacity (ca. 22 and 30 mg/g, respectively), and the adsorption followed Langmuir mode. The results indicated that this adsorbent, prepared via a convenient approach, is applicable for removing heavy-metal-ion pollutants (e.g. Cr(VI)) from waste waters.

  9. In vivo and in vitro effects of chromium VI on anterior pituitary hormone release and cell viability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinteros, Fernanda A.; Poliandri, Ariel H.B.; Machiavelli, Leticia I.; Cabilla, Jimena P.; Duvilanski, Beatriz H.

    2007-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) is a highly toxic metal and an environmental pollutant. Different studies indicate that Cr VI exposure adversely affects reproductive functions. This metal has been shown to affect several tissues and organs but Cr VI effects on pituitary gland have not been reported. Anterior pituitary hormones are central for the body homeostasis and have a fundamental role in reproductive physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cr VI at the pituitary level both in vivo and in vitro. We showed that Cr VI accumulates in the pituitary and hypothalamus, and decreases serum prolactin levels in vivo but observed no effects on LH levels. In anterior pituitary cells in culture, the effect of Cr VI on hormone secretion followed the same differential pattern. Besides, lactotrophs were more sensitive to the toxicity of the metal. As a result of oxidative stress generation, Cr VI induced apoptosis evidenced by nuclear fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Our results indicate that the anterior pituitary gland can be a target of Cr VI toxicity in vivo and in vitro, thus producing a negative impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and affecting the normal endocrine function

  10. In vivo and in vitro effects of chromium VI on anterior pituitary hormone release and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, Fernanda A; Poliandri, Ariel H B; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Cabilla, Jimena P; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2007-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr VI) is a highly toxic metal and an environmental pollutant. Different studies indicate that Cr VI exposure adversely affects reproductive functions. This metal has been shown to affect several tissues and organs but Cr VI effects on pituitary gland have not been reported. Anterior pituitary hormones are central for the body homeostasis and have a fundamental role in reproductive physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Cr VI at the pituitary level both in vivo and in vitro. We showed that Cr VI accumulates in the pituitary and hypothalamus, and decreases serum prolactin levels in vivo but observed no effects on LH levels. In anterior pituitary cells in culture, the effect of Cr VI on hormone secretion followed the same differential pattern. Besides, lactotrophs were more sensitive to the toxicity of the metal. As a result of oxidative stress generation, Cr VI induced apoptosis evidenced by nuclear fragmentation and caspase 3 activation. Our results indicate that the anterior pituitary gland can be a target of Cr VI toxicity in vivo and in vitro, thus producing a negative impact on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and affecting the normal endocrine function.

  11. Microbial conversion of Cr (VI) in to Cr (III) in industrial effluent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These bacterial strains also take up and reduce Cr (VI) present in industrial effluents, and their reduction potential was not significantly affected in the presence of different metallic salts. Key Words: Cr (VI) reduction, bacteria, industrial effluent, heavy metals. African Journal of Biotechnology Vol.3(11) 2004: 610-617 ...

  12. Uranium(VI) transport modeling: geochemical data and submodels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, V.S.

    1984-01-01

    Understanding the geochemical mobility of U(VI) and modeling its transport is important in several contexts including ore genesis, uranium exploration, nuclear and mill-tailings waste management, and solution mining of uranium ores. Adsorption is a major control on partitioning of solutes at the mineral/solution interface. The effect of carbonate, fluoride, and phosphate complexing on adsorption of uranium was investigated. A critical compilation of stability constants of inorganic complexes and solid compounds of U(VI) necessary for proper design of experiment and for modeling transport of uranium was prepared. The general features of U(VI) adsorption in ligand-free systems are similar to those characteristic of other hydrolyzable metal ions. The adsorption processes studied were found to be reversible. The adsorption model developed in ligand-free systems, when solution complexing is taken into account, proved remarkably successful in describing adsorption of uranium in the presence of carbonate and fluoride. The presence of phosphate caused a much smaller decrease in the extent of adsorption than expected; however, a critical reassessment of the stability of UO 2 2+ .HPO 4 2- complexes, showed that phosphato complexes, if any, are extremely weak under experimental conditions. Removal of uranium may have occurred due to precipitation of sodium uranyl phosphates in addition to adsorption

  13. 76 FR 60707 - Supplemental Standards for Ethical Conduct for Employees of the Department of the Treasury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... liabilities held on the balance sheet of a financial company, where positions are created or changed by the... nature and importance of the employee's position and the degree to which the employee had access to non... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Financial Research 12 CFR Chapter XVI RIN 1505-AC38...

  14. AR4VI: AR as an Accessibility Tool for People with Visual Impairments

    OpenAIRE

    Coughlan, James M.; Miele, Joshua

    2017-01-01

    Although AR technology has been largely dominated by visual media, a number of AR tools using both visual and auditory feedback have been developed specifically to assist people with low vision or blindness – an application domain that we term Augmented Reality for Visual Impairment (AR4VI). We describe two AR4VI tools developed at Smith-Kettlewell, as well as a number of pre-existing examples. We emphasize that AR4VI is a powerful tool with the potential to remove or significantly reduce a r...

  15. Screen-printed sensor for batch and flow injection potentiometric chromium(VI) monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Moreno, Raul A.; Gismera, M.J.; Sevilla, M.T.; Procopio, Jesus R. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Quimica Analitica y Analisis Instrumental, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    A disposable screen-printed electrode was designed and evaluated for direct detection of chromium(VI) in batch and flow analysis. The carbon screen-printed electrode was modified with a graphite-epoxy composite. The optimal graphite-epoxy matrix contains 37.5% graphite powder, 12.5% diphenylcarbohydrazide, a selective compound for chromium(VI), and 50% epoxy resin. The principal analytical parameters of the potentiometric response in batch and flow analysis were optimized and calculated. The screen-printed sensor exhibits a response time of 20 {+-} 1 s. In flow analysis, the analytical frequency of sampling is 70 injections per hour using 0.1 M NaNO{sub 3} solution at pH 3 as the carrier, a flow rate of 2.5 mL.min{sup -1}, and an injection sample volume of 0.50 mL. The sensor shows potentiometric responses that are very selective for chromium(VI) ions and optimal detection limits in both static mode (2.1 x 10{sup -7} M) and online analysis (9.4 x 10{sup -7} M). The disposable potentiometric sensor was employed to determine toxicity levels of chromium(VI) in mineral, tap, and river waters by flow-injection potentiometry and batch potentiometry. Chromium(VI) determination was also carried out with successful results in leachates from municipal solid waste landfills. (orig.)

  16. Kinetics modeling and reaction mechanism of ferrate(VI) oxidation of benzotriazoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Ying, Guang-Guo; Zhang, Li-Juan; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Shan; Fang, Yi-Xiang

    2011-03-01

    Benzotriazoles (BTs) are high production volume chemicals with broad application in various industrial processes and in households, and have been found to be omnipresent in aquatic environments. We investigated oxidation of five benzotriazoles (BT: 1H-benzotriazole; 5MBT: 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole; DMBT: 5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzotriazole hydrate; 5CBT: 5-chloro-1H-benzotriazole; HBT: 1-hydroxybenzotriazole) by aqueous ferrate (Fe(VI)) to determine reaction kinetics as a function of pH (6.0-10.0), and interpreted the reaction mechanism of Fe(VI) with BTs by using a linear free-energy relationship. The pK(a) values of BT and DMBT were also determined using UV-Visible spectroscopic method in order to calculate the species-specific rate constants, and they were 8.37 ± 0.0 and 8.98 ± 0.08 respectively. Each of BTs reacted moderately with Fe(VI) with the k(app) ranged from 7.2 to 103.8 M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7.0 and 24 ± 1 °C. When the molar ratio of Fe(VI) and BTs increased up to 30:1, the removal rate of BTs reached about >95% in buffered milli-Q water or secondary wastewater effluent. The electrophilic oxidation mechanism of the above reaction was illustrated by using a linear free-energy relationship between pH-dependence of species-specific rate constants and substituent effects (σ(p)). Fe(VI) reacts initially with BTs by electrophilic attack at the 1,2,3-triazole moiety of BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, and at the N-OH bond of HBT. Moreover, for BT, 5MBT, DMBT and 5CBT, the reactions with the species HFeO(4)(-) predominantly controled the reaction rates. For HBT, the species H(2)FeO(4) with dissociated HBT played a major role in the reaction. The results showed that Fe(VI) has the ability to degrade benzotriazoles in water. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The determination of uranium(VI) by flow-injection analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    A method is described for the direct determination of uranium(VI) in waste waters and acid leach liquors by use of a flow-injection procedure and spectrophotometric measurement with 2-(5-bromo-2-pyridylazo)-5-diethylaminophenol (bromo-PADAP). The interference effects of several commonly occurring elements were studied. The calibration curve is linear over concentrations of uranium(VI) from 0,5 to 20 mg/1, and the precision obtained on a synthetic leach liquor was 0,019 (relative standard deviation). The procedure is rapid and convenient, and up to 40 samples can be analysed in an hour

  18. Financial Management: Reliability of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Civil Works, Fund Balance With Treasury and Unexpended Appropriations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Granetto, Paul J; Neville, Douglas P; Benefiel, Robert E., Jr; Lemmon, William W; Fleischman, James H; Delino, Jose J; Moreira, Marlon A; Petrucci, John C; Howison, Benjamin M; Polak, Michael A

    2004-01-01

    Our overall audit objective was to conduct agreed-upon procedures to assist the USACE in its efforts to establish beginning FY 2004 Fund Balance With Treasury and Unexpended Appropriations balances...

  19. Approaches to surface complexation modeling of Uranium(VI) adsorption on aquifer sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J.A.; Meece, D.E.; Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.

    2004-01-01

    Uranium(VI) adsorption onto aquifer sediments was studied in batch experiments as a function of pH and U(VI) and dissolved carbonate concentrations in artificial groundwater solutions. The sediments were collected from an alluvial aquifer at a location upgradient of contamination from a former uranium mill operation at Naturita, Colorado (USA). The ranges of aqueous chemical conditions used in the U(VI) adsorption experiments (pH 6.9 to 7.9; U(VI) concentration 2.5 ?? 10-8 to 1 ?? 10-5 M; partial pressure of carbon dioxide gas 0.05 to 6.8%) were based on the spatial variation in chemical conditions observed in 1999-2000 in the Naturita alluvial aquifer. The major minerals in the sediments were quartz, feldspars, and calcite, with minor amounts of magnetite and clay minerals. Quartz grains commonly exhibited coatings that were greater than 10 nm in thickness and composed of an illite-smectite clay with occluded ferrihydrite and goethite nanoparticles. Chemical extractions of quartz grains removed from the sediments were used to estimate the masses of iron and aluminum present in the coatings. Various surface complexation modeling approaches were compared in terms of the ability to describe the U(VI) experimental data and the data requirements for model application to the sediments. Published models for U(VI) adsorption on reference minerals were applied to predict U(VI) adsorption based on assumptions about the sediment surface composition and physical properties (e.g., surface area and electrical double layer). Predictions from these models were highly variable, with results overpredicting or underpredicting the experimental data, depending on the assumptions used to apply the model. Although the models for reference minerals are supported by detailed experimental studies (and in ideal cases, surface spectroscopy), the results suggest that errors are caused in applying the models directly to the sediments by uncertain knowledge of: 1) the proportion and types of

  20. The roles of polycarboxylates in Cr(VI)/sulfite reaction system: Involvement of reactive oxygen species and intramolecular electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Bo, E-mail: bjiang86upc@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Qingdao University of Technology, Qingdao 266033 (China); Wang, Xianli; Liu, Yukun [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Wang, Zhaohui [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Southern Cross GeoScience, Southern Cross University, Lismore, NSW 2480 (Australia); Zheng, Jingtang, E-mail: jtzheng03@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China); Wu, Mingbo, E-mail: wumb@upc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Qingdao 266580, Shandong (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • The formations of SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH·, involve in Cr(VI) reduction induced by S(IV). • Affinity of polycarboxylate to Cr(VI) accelerates Cr(VI) reduction rate. • Polycarboxylates can act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction retrenching S(IV). • Only oxalate can enhance the formations of SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH· in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of polycarboxylates on both Cr(VI) reduction and S(IV) consumption in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system was investigated in acidic solution. Under aerobic condition, the productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS), i.e., SO{sub 4}·{sup −} and OH·, have been confirmed in S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process by using electron spin resonance and fluorescence spectrum techniques, leading to the excess consumption of S(IV). However, when polycarboxylates (oxalic, citric, malic and tartaric acid) were present in Cr(VI)/S(IV) system, the affinity of polycarboxylates to CrSO{sub 6}{sup 2−} can greatly promote the reduction of Cr(VI) via expanding the coordination of Cr(VI) species from tetrahedron to hexahedron. Besides, as alternatives to S(IV), these polycarboxylates can also act as electron donors for Cr(VI) reduction via intramolecular electron transfer reaction, which is dependent on the energies of the highest occupied molecular orbital of these polycarboxylates. Notably, the variant electron donating capacity of these polycarboxylates resulted in different yield of ROS and therefore the oxidation efficiencies of other pollutants, e.g., rhodamine B and As(III). Generally, this study does not only shed light on the mechanism of S(IV) reducing Cr(VI) process mediated by polycarboxylates, but also provides an escalated, cost-effective and green strategy for the remediation of Cr(VI) using sulfite as a reductant.

  1. TRANSPARENCY OF THE ACTIVITY OF THE STATE TREASURY, AN IMPORTANT FACTOR IN STRENGTHENING THE ROLE OF PUBLIC FINANCE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANNE MARIE BARTALIS

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The State Treasury focuses all the financial resources of the public sector. Given this quality of the State Treasury we examined how transparently its activity is reflected. The methods of scientific research applied have helped us to examine specific issues from the taxpayer's position, and their need of conclusive information about the services of the public sector, which should be consistent with the efforts of citizens regarding the payment of taxes and fees.

  2. Adsorption of Cu(II) and Cr(VI) ions by chitosan: kinetics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability of chitosan as an adsorbent for Cu (II) and Cr (VI) ions in aqueous solution was studied. The experiments were done as batch processes. Equilibrium studies were done on both cross-linked and non-cross-linked chitosan for both metals. Cr (VI) adsorption behaviour could be described using the Langmuir ...

  3. Karakterisasi Adsorben dari Kulit Manggis dan Kinerjanya pada Adsorpsi Logam Pb(II dan Cr(VI - (Adsorbent Characterization from Mangosteen Peel and Its Adsorption Performance on Pb(II and Cr(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulfa Haura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The usage of biomass waste-based adsorbent for the adsorption of hazardous metal in wastewater is not only reducing waste but also lowering adsorbent price. This research aims to study the characteristics of adsorbent from mangosteen peel (Garcinia Mangostana L. and activated charcoal from mangosteen peel, also to compare the adsorption performance on metal ion Pb(II and Cr(VI. Synthetic wastewater used from a solution of Pb(NO32 and K2Cr2O7 with variations in initial concentration of 20, 40, 80, 100 and 200 mg/L. Adsorption performed at pH 5, ratio of adsorbent and waste solution 1/200 (w/v, 60 rpm, 0.5 gs nano-sized adsorbent. Characterization using SEM, FTIR and SEM-EDS showed that both adsorbents characteristics met the requirements of SNI 06-3730-1995. The highest adsorption capacity of activated carbon to adsorb Pb(II and Cr(VI were 38.543 mg/g and 36.838 mg/g while biosorbent adsorb Pb(II and Cr(VI respectively 3.98 mg/g and 36.12 mg/g.Keywords: adsorption, biosorbent, Cr(VI, mangosteen peel, Pb(IIABSTRAKPenggunaan adsorben berbasis limbah biomassa untuk adsorpsi kandungan logam berbahaya dari limbah cair industri selain dapat mengurangi limbah juga dapat menekan harga jual adsorben. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mempelajari karakteristik adsorben yang terbuat dari limbah kulit manggis (Garcinia mangostana L. dan arang aktif dari limbah kulit manggis serta membandingkan kinerja kedua jenis adsorben tersebut pada proses adsorpsi ion logam Pb(II dan Cr(VI. Limbah sintetis yang digunakan berupa ion dari Pb(II dan Cr(VI dari larutan Pb(NO32 dan K2Cr2O7 dengan variasi konsentrasi awal 20, 40, 80, 100 dan 200 mg/L. Proses adsorpsi dilakukan pada pH 5, rasio perbandingan berat adsorben dan volume larutan limbah 1:200, kecepatan pengadukan 60 rpm, adsorben berukuran nano dengan berat adsorben 0,5 g. Masing-masing adsorben dikarakterisasi menggunakan SEM untuk mengetahui sturktur morfologi, FTIR untuk mengetahui gugus fungsi dan SEM-EDS untuk

  4. Stability of uranium(VI) doped CSH phases in high saline water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolter, Jan-Martin; Schmeide, Katja [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the long-term stability of U(VI) doped calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) phases at high saline conditions, leaching experiments with NaCl, NaCl/Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and NaCl/NaHCO{sub 3} containing solutions were performed. Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were applied to study the U(VI) binding onto the CSH phases and to get a deeper understanding of structural changes due to leaching. Results indicate that neither NaCl nor Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} affect the structural stability of CSH phases and their retention potential for U(VI). However, carbonate containing solutions lead to a decomposition of CSH phases and thus, to a release of incorporated uranium.

  5. Adsorption behavior of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal—polyethyleneimine composite for removal of Cr(VI) ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chao; Jin, Ru-Na; Ouyang, Xiao-kun, E-mail: xkouyang@zjou.edu.cn; Wang, Yang-Guang

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • A carboxylated cellulose nanocrystal-polyethyleneimine composite (CCN-PEI) was prepared. • The as-prepared CCN-PEI was characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, and XPS. • Results suggested that the reusable CCN-PEI could remove Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions with a high adsorption capacity. • The adsorption isotherm, thermodynamics, and kinetics of the adsorption process are also discussed. - Abstract: In this study, a composite adsorbent (CCN-PEI) composed of carboxylated cellulose nanocrystals (CCN) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) was prepared through an amidation reaction between the carboxyl groups of the CCN and the amine groups of the PEI. The adsorption performance of the CCN-PEI was tested by removing Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions. The physicochemical properties of the CCN and the Cr(VI) ion-loaded CCN-PEI were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To investigate the adsorption kinetics of Cr(VI) ions onto this newly developed CCN-PEI, we performed experiments under different adsorption conditions, by varying the contact time, solution pH, initial Cr(VI) ion concentration, and adsorption temperature. The prepared CCN-PEI exhibited an encouraging uptake capacity of 358.42 mg × g{sup −1}. The adsorption process was fast: within the first 100 min, Cr(VI) ion adsorption onto the CCN-PEI was about 65%, and the adsorption equilibrium was reached within 250 min. Kinetics experiments indicated that the adsorption process could be described by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Furthermore, our adsorption equilibrium data fit the Langmuir isotherms well. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, such as the free energy change (ΔG = −2.93 kJ × mol{sup −1}), enthalpy change (ΔH = −5.69 kJ × mol{sup −1}), and entropy change (ΔS = −9.14 kJ × mol{sup −1}), indicate that the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions onto CCN

  6. Am(VI) Extraction Final Report: FY16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mincher, Bruce Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Grimes, Travis Shane [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tillotson, Richard Dean [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Law, Jack Douglas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This report summarizes activities related to hexavalent Am extraction for FY16, in completion of FCR&D Milestone M3FT-16IN030103027. Activities concentrated on three areas of research: 1) centrifugal contactor hot testing, 2) Am(VI) stability studies, and 3) alternative oxidant studies. A brief summary of each task follows. Hot Testing: A new engineering-scale oxidation and solvent extraction test bed was built at Idaho National Laboratory to allow for solvent extraction testing of minor actinide separation concepts. The test bed consists of an oxidation vessel, filtration apparatus, four, 3D printed, 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors, feed/product vessels, and sample ports. This system replaced the previous 3 stage, 5-cm contactor test bed that was used for the initial testing in FY14. In the FY16 hot test, a feed simulant was spiked with 243Am and 139Ce and treated with 60 g/L sodium bismuthate for two hours to oxidize the Am(III) to Am(VI). This solution was then pumped through a filter and into the four-stage centrifugal contactor setup. The organic phase solvent formulation was 1 M diethylhexylbutyramide (DEHBA)/dodecane. The test showed that Am(VI) was produced by bismuthate oxidation and the residual oxidant was successfully filtered without back pressure buildup. Sixty-four percent of Am was extracted in the contactors using DEHBA. Both Am and Ce were quantitatively stripped by 0.1 M H2O2. Successful demonstration of the utility of small, printable contactors suggests that hot testing of separations concepts can now be conducted more often, since it is cheaper, generates less waste, and entails much less radcon risk than previous testing. Am(VI) stability: A rigorous examination of reagents was conducted to determine if contaminants could interfere with Am oxidation and extraction. An series of DAm measurements showed that bismuthate particle size, water source, acid quality, and DAAP batch or pre-treatment had little effect on extraction efficiency

  7. 76 FR 18570 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment; HOPE VI Public Housing Programs...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Information Collection for Public Comment; HOPE VI Public Housing Programs: Funding and Program Data... responses. This Notice also lists the following information: Title of Proposal: HOPE VI program. OMB Control... (Pub. L. 105- 276, 112 Stat. 2461, approved October 21, 1998) and revised by the HOPE VI Program...

  8. 78 FR 72056 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Christiansted, St. Croix, VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-02

    ... Class D and Class E Airspace; Christiansted, St. Croix, VI AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA... Class E Airspace at Christiansted, St. Croix, VI, to adjust the geographic coordinates of Henry E..., Christiansted, St. Croix, VI, to bring it in concert with the FAAs aeronautical database. The coordinates would...

  9. Isolation and characterization of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, David M.; Tuna, Floriana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; McMaster, Jonathan; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J.; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2013-06-01

    The nature and extent of covalency in uranium bonding is still unclear compared with that of transition metals, and there is great interest in studying uranium-ligand multiple bonds. Although U=O and U=NR double bonds (where R is an alkyl group) are well-known analogues to transition-metal oxo and imido complexes, the uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond has long remained a synthetic target in actinide chemistry. Here, we report the preparation of a uranium(VI)-nitride triple bond. We highlight the importance of (1) ancillary ligand design, (2) employing mild redox reactions instead of harsh photochemical methods that decompose transiently formed uranium(VI) nitrides, (3) an electrostatically stabilizing sodium ion during nitride installation, (4) selecting the right sodium sequestering reagent, (5) inner versus outer sphere oxidation and (6) stability with respect to the uranium oxidation state. Computational analyses suggest covalent contributions to U≡N triple bonds that are surprisingly comparable to those of their group 6 transition-metal nitride counterparts.

  10. Diagnostic and treatment strategies in mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vairo F

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Filippo Vairo,1–3 Andressa Federhen,1,3,4 Guilherme Baldo,1,2,5–7 Mariluce Riegel,1,6 Maira Burin,1 Sandra Leistner-Segal,1,8 Roberto Giugliani1,5,6,81Medical Genetics Service, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 2Department of Genetics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 3Clinical Research Group on Medical Genetics, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 4Post-Graduate Program in Child and Adolescent Health, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 5Gene Therapy Center, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 6Post-Graduate Program in Genetics and Molecular Biology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 7Department of Physiology, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil; 8Post-Graduate Program in Medical Sciences, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, which lead to deficient activity of the lysosomal enzyme ASB. This enzyme is important for the breakdown of the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate, which accumulate in body tissues and organs of MPS VI patients. The storage of GAGs (especially dermatan sulfate causes bone dysplasia, joint restriction, organomegaly, heart disease, and corneal clouding, among several other problems, and reduced life span. Despite the fact that most cases are severe, there is a spectrum of severity and some cases are so attenuated that diagnosis is made late in life. Although the analysis of urinary GAGs and/or the measurement of enzyme activity in dried blood spots are useful screening methods, the diagnosis is based in the demonstration of the enzyme deficiency in leucocytes or fibroblasts, and/or in the identification of pathogenic mutations in the ARSB gene

  11. Elemental sulfur amendment decreases bio-available Cr-VI in soils impacted by leather tanneries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingjing; Chen, Hualin; Arocena, Joselito M; Whitcombe, Todd; Thring, Ronald W; Memiaghe, Jeff Nze

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the potential use of elemental S (S(0)) to convert Cr-VI to Cr-III which should decrease the bio-availability hence, toxicity of Cr-VI in soils. The bio-available fraction of Cr in soil was measured by phosphate buffer extraction (PBE) and the results showed that the fraction is about 10% of the total Cr-VI and varied from 12.8 to 42.5 mg kg(-1). The addition of 4.0 mg g(-1) S(0) decreased PBE Cr-VI to soils. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and micro-XRD revealed that Cr-III was the dominant species (99% of total Cr) and Cr was retained by hematite and goethite in soil. Fe-containing minerals may have provided sufficient protection to render the dominant Cr-III species biochemically inert to redox processes in soils. It is concluded that S(0)amendment is a promising approach to remediate Cr-VI contaminated soils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of porosity and surface chemistry on the adsorption-desorption of uranium(VI) from aqueous solution and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakout, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Rice straw-based biochars modified with different chemical regents were used as an adsorbent for uranium(VI). Effect of pyrolysis temperature and nature of modifying agent's as well as surface chemistry, surface charge, and pore structure on U(VI) removal was investigated. Amount and nature of the surface groups has, in general, more influence than its porosity on U(VI) adsorption. The adsorption was maximum for the initial pH of 5.5. Rice straw derived biochars had comparable U(VI) adsorption as compared to other adsorbents. The U(VI) removal was 90 % from groundwater. NaHCO 3 was found to be the most efficient desorbent eluent for U(VI). (author)

  13. Synthesis of Graphene Oxide by Oxidation of Graphite with Ferrate(VI) Compounds: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Luxa, Jan; Jankovský, Ondřej; Sedmidubský, David; Bystroň, Tomáš; Pumera, Martin

    2016-09-19

    It is well established that graphene oxide can be prepared by the oxidation of graphite using permanganate or chlorate in an acidic environment. Recently, however, the synthesis of graphene oxide using potassium ferrate(VI) ions has been reported. Herein, we critically replicate and evaluate this new ferrate(VI) oxidation method. In addition, we test the use of potassium ferrate(VI) for the synthesis of graphene oxide under various experimental routes. The synthesized materials are analyzed by a number of analytical methods in order to confirm or disprove the possibility of synthesizing graphene oxide by the ferrate(VI) oxidation route. Our results confirm the unsuitability of using ferrate(VI) for the oxidation of graphite on graphene oxide because of its high instability in an acidic environment and low oxidation power in neutral and alkaline environments. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Synthesis of Poly(Ortho-Phenylenediamine Fluffy Microspheres and Application for the Removal of Cr(VI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhoufeng Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported the synthesis of fluffy poly(o-phenylenediamine (PoPD microspheres via chemical polymerization of oPD monomers by ammonium persulfate (APS at room temperature. The SEM images showed that PoPD microspheres with an average diameter of 1.5 μm and their surfaces consist of highly oriented nanofibers. Furthermore, PoPD microspheres were used as adsorbent materials for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions. The Cr(VI adsorption behavior on the prepared PoPD microspheres was studied at different adsorption contact times, solution pH values, and amount of the adsorbent. Experimental isotherms of Cr(VI ions were successfully fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. The results indicate that the PoPD fluffy microspheres are an effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI ions from aqueous solutions, and they could be useful in treatment of Cr(VI-polluted wastewaters.

  15. Synthesis of Poly(Ortho-Phenylenediamine) Fluffy Microspheres and Application for the Removal of Cr(VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Liao, F.

    2012-01-01

    We reported the synthesis of fluffy poly(o-phenylenediamine) (PoPD) microspheres via chemical polymerization of PoPD monomers by ammonium persulfate (APS) at room temperature. The SEM images showed that PoPD microspheres with an average diameter of 1.5 μm and their surfaces consist of highly oriented nano fibers. Furthermore, PoPD microspheres were used as adsorbent materials for the removal of Cr(VI) from aqueous solutions. The Cr(VI) adsorption behavior on the prepared PoPD microspheres was studied at different adsorption contact times, solution ph values, and amount of the adsorbent. Experimental isotherms of Cr(VI) ions were successfully fit to the Langmuir isotherm model. The results indicate that the PoPD fluffy microspheres are an effective adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions, and they could be useful in treatment of Cr(VI)-polluted wastewaters.

  16. Accumulation of type VI collagen in the primary osteon of the rat femur during postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Yukihiro; Soeta, Satoshi; Izu, Yayoi; Amasaki, Hajime

    2015-05-01

    In rodents, the long bone diaphysis is expanded by forming primary osteons at the periosteal surface of the cortical bone. This ossification process is thought to be regulated by the microenvironment in the periosteum. Type VI collagen (Col VI), a component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the periosteum, is involved in osteoblast differentiation at early stages. In several cell types, Col VI interacts with NG2 on the cytoplasmic membrane to promote cell proliferation, spreading and motility. However, the detailed functions of Col VI and NG2 in the ossification process in the periosteum are still under investigation. In this study, to clarify the relationship between localization of Col VI and formation of the primary osteon, we examined the distribution of Col VI and osteoblast lineages expressing NG2 in the periosteum of rat femoral diaphysis during postnatal growing periods by immunohistochemistry. Primary osteons enclosing the osteonal cavity were clearly identified in the cortical bone from 2 weeks old. The size of the osteonal cavities decreased from the outer to the inner region of the cortical bone. In addition, the osteonal cavities of newly formed primary osteons at the outermost region started to decrease in size after rats reached the age of 4 weeks. Immunohistochemistry revealed concentrated localization of Col VI in the ECM in the osteonal cavity. Col VI-immunoreactive areas were reduced and they disappeared as the osteonal cavities became smaller from the outer to the inner region. In the osteonal cavities of the outer cortical regions, Runx2-immunoreactive spindle-shaped cells and mature osteoblasts were detected in Col VI-immunoreactive areas. The numbers of Runx2-immunoreactive cells were significantly higher in the osteonal cavities than in the osteogenic layers from 2 to 4 weeks. Most of these Runx2-immunoreactive cells showed NG2-immunoreactivity. Furthermore, PCNA-immunoreactivity was detected in the Runx2-immunoreactive spindle

  17. Immobilization of Cr(Vi) as a contaminant from soil by iron compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin A, M. de J.; Romero G, E. T.; Reyes G, L. R.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to determine the physicochemical and surface properties of Fe 0 and FeS to select the appropriate radioactive material for use in the design of artificial barriers or walls and remove Cr (Vi). The physicochemical characterization was carried out of iron: Fe 0 and FeS, using scanning electron microscopy of high vacuum, X-ray diffraction and thermal gravimetric analysis techniques. As for the characterization of the surface, was used to determine the surface area, point of zero charge, density of active sites and kinetics of moisture. We obtained a solution of Cr (Vi) by elution of deionized water on the pollution land of Buenavista, Guanajuato. The concentration of Cr (Vi) from a stock solution was 55.56 mg / L determined by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Stripping or maximum immobilization of Cr (Vi) with Fe 0 (material chosen by their physicochemical and surface properties) was 68.25% using Fe 0 , at a concentration less than 0.1, ph equal to 3 and a contact time of 24 hours. (Author)

  18. Microbial Fuel Cell Inoculated with Ochrobactrum Tritici KCC210 for Chromium (VI) Measurement in Electroplating Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Jongtar; Kuo, Juiling; Cheng, Chiuyu; Chung, Yingchien

    2018-01-01

    Many methods/techniques have been developed for Cr(VI) measurement, but they are often conducted offsite or/and cannot provide real-time for Cr(VI) monitoring. A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a self-sustaining device and has great potential as a biosensor for in situ Cr(VI) measurement, especially for wastewater generated from different electroplating units. In this study, Ochrobactrum tritici KCC210, a facultatively anaerobic, Cr(VI)-reducing, and exoelectrogenic bacterium, was isolated and inoculated into the MFC to evaluate its feasibility as a Cr(VI) biosensor. The results indicated that O. tritici KCC210 exhibited high adaptability to pH, and temperature under anaerobic conditions. The maximum power density of the MFC biosensor was 17.5±0.9 mW/m2 at 2,000 Ω. A good linear relationship was observed between the Cr(VI) concentration (10-80 mg/L) and voltage output. The stable performance of the MFC biosensor indicated its potential as a reliable biosensor system. Moreover, the developed MFC biosensor is a simple device that can accurately measure Cr(VI) concentrations in the actual electroplating wastewater generated from different electroplating units within 15 min with low deviations (-1.8% to 7.8%) in comparison with the values determined using standard method. Thus, the MFC biosensor can measure Cr(VI) concentrations in situ in the effluents and has potential as an early warning detection device.

  19. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  20. Methylbutylmalonamide as an extractant for U(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, G.M.; Prabhu, D.R.; Mahajan, G.R.

    1994-01-01

    The unsymmetrical diamide methylbutylmalonamide has been synthesized and used in the extraction of U(VI), Pu(IV), and Am(III) in benzene medium. The distribution ratio for three cations was found to increase with increasing aqueous nitric acid concentration. U(VI) and Pu(IV) were found to be extracted as disolvates while Am(III) as a trisolvate. The thermodynamic parameters determined by the temperature variation method showed the extraction reactions to be mainly enthalphy-controlled. Am(III) was found to be back-extracted with dilute nitric acid, while Pu(IV) by dilute nitric acid - hydrofluoric acid mixture and U(VI) by dilute sodium carbonate solution. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs