WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey teen perspective

  1. Teen pregnancy prevention: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Claudia; Cox, Joanne E

    2012-08-01

    Teen pregnancy has been subject of public concern for many years. In the United States, despite nearly 2 decades of declining teen pregnancy and birth rates, the problem persists, with significant disparities present across racial groups and in state-specific rates. This review examines recent trends, pregnancy prevention initiatives and family planning policies that address the special needs of vulnerable youth. Unintended teen pregnancies impose potentially serious social and health burdens on teen parents and their children, as well as costs to society. Trends in teen pregnancy and birth rates show continued decline, but state and racial disparities have widened. Demographic factors and policy changes have contributed to these disparities. Research supports comprehensive pregnancy prevention initiatives that are multifaceted and promote consistent and correct use of effective methods of contraception for youth at risk of becoming pregnant. There is strong consensus that effective teen pregnancy prevention strategies should be multifaceted, focusing on delay of sexual activity especially in younger teens while promoting consistent and correct use of effective methods of contraception for those youth who are or plan to be sexually active. There is a need for further research to identify effective interventions for vulnerable populations.

  2. Teens, Health and Technology: A National Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ellen Wartella; Vicky Rideout; Heather Montague; Leanne Beaudoin-Ryan; Alexis Lauricella

    2016-01-01

    ... to answer their health questions. This study is the first of its kind to survey a large, nationally-representative sample of teens to investigate how they use the newest digital technologies, including mobile apps, social networking...

  3. With One Voice: America's Adults and Teens Sound Off about Teen Pregnancy. A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    These charts describe adults' and adolescents' views on teen sex and pregnancy. Data come from national surveys of adults and adolescents that examined attitudes toward teen sex and pregnancy, factors influencing teens' sexual decisions, parents' roles, and adults' and teens' advice for policymakers. There is near unanimous agreement among both…

  4. Teens, Health and Technology: A National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen Wartella; Vicky Rideout; Heather Montague; Leanne Beaudoin-Ryan; Alexis Lauricella

    2016-01-01

    In the age of digital technology, as teens seem to be constantly connected online, via social media, and through mobile applications, it is no surprise that they increasingly turn to digital media to answer their health questions. This study is the first of its kind to survey a large, nationally-representative sample of teens to investigate how they use the newest digital technologies, including mobile apps, social networking sites, electronic gaming and wearable devices, to explore health...

  5. Teens, Health and Technology: A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Wartella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the age of digital technology, as teens seem to be constantly connected online, via social media, and through mobile applications, it is no surprise that they increasingly turn to digital media to answer their health questions. This study is the first of its kind to survey a large, nationally-representative sample of teens to investigate how they use the newest digital technologies, including mobile apps, social networking sites, electronic gaming and wearable devices, to explore health topics. The survey covered the types of health topics teens most frequently search for, which technologies they are most likely to use and how they use them, and whether they report having changed their behaviors due to digital health information. In addition, this survey explores how the digital divide continues to impact adolescents. Results of this study indicate that teens are concerned about many health issues, ranging from fitness, sexual activity, drugs, hygiene as well as mental health and stress. As teens virtually always have a digital device at their fingertips, it is clear that public health interventions and informational campaigns must be tailored to reflect the ways that teens currently navigate digital health information and the health challenges that concern them most.

  6. Media and Sex: Perspectives from Hispanic Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston Polacek, Georgia N. L.; Rojas, Viviana; Levitt, Steven; Mika, Virginia Seguin

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about Hispanic teens' sexual knowledge, attitudes and behaviors and their relationship to media influences. Information about this relationship could contribute to an understanding of the early onset of sexual behavior and early teen pregnancy. This paper reports preliminary findings from a pilot project conducted to determine…

  7. Teen Culture, Technology and Literacy Instruction: Urban Adolescent Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern teens have pervasively integrated new technologies into their lives, and technology has become an important component of teen popular culture. Educators have pointed out the promise of exploiting technology to enhance students’ language and literacy skills and general academic success. However, there is no consensus on the effect of technology on teens, and scant literature is available that incorporates the perspective of urban and linguistically diverse students on the feasibility of applying new technologies in teaching and learning literacy in intact classrooms. This paper reports urban adolescents’ perspectives on the use of technology within teen culture, for learning in general and for literacy instruction in particular. Focus group interviews were conducted among linguistically diverse urban students in grades 6, 7 and 8 in a lower income neighborhood in the Northeastern region of the United States. The major findings of the study were that 1 urban teens primarily and almost exclusively used social media and technology devices for peer socializing, 2 they were interested in using technology to improve their literacy skills, but did not appear to voluntarily or independently integrate technology into learning, and 3 8th graders were considerably more sophisticated in their use of technology and their suggestions for application of technology to literacy learning than 6th and 7th graders. These findings lead to suggestions for developing effective literacy instruction using new technologies.

  8. What do adolescents think about teen parenting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W; Waterhouse, Julie K

    2011-06-01

    Unexpected increases in the teen birth rates have stimulated a renewed focus on the prevention of teen pregnancy. Although many adults believe there are certain costs associated with teen parenting, the attitudes of teens toward the parenting experience are not known. The purpose of this descriptive study was to determine teens' thoughts on how their lives would change if they experienced a teen birth in the areas of relationships, vocation, and life impacts. The Thoughts on Teen Parenting Survey (TTPS), designed to measure demographic variables and perspectives on the costs and rewards of teen parenting, was administered to 695 high school students. The survey yielded a composite score, subscale scores, and aggregate data measuring teen thoughts on the consequences of the teen parenting experience. Findings may be used to identify teens at risk for pregnancy, develop interventions, and evaluate prevention strategies based on the insights of teens.

  9. With One Voice 2002: America's Adults and Teens Sound Off about Teen Pregnancy. An Annual National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    Two national surveys, one of youth ages 12 to 19 and the other of adults over age 19 years, examined attitudes toward teen pregnancy. Respondents express more cautious attitudes toward early and casual sex than is generally believed, and large majorities of both groups support a strong abstinence message for teens coupled with information about…

  10. Racial/ethnic differences in teen and parent perspectives toward depression treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Anita; Scott, Molly M; Jaycox, Lisa H; Meredith, Lisa S; Tanielian, Terri; Burnam, Audrey

    2009-06-01

    There are significant racial/ethnic disparities in youth access to and use of appropriate depression treatment. Although there is a growing literature on racial/ethnic differences in treatment preference among adults, we know very little about whether these differences persist for adolescents and whether parents have an influence on their teens' treatment perspectives. Teens and parents from a sample of primary care settings were interviewed at baseline and 6 months. We used bivarate and regression analyses to describe racial/ethnic differences in teen and parent depression knowledge and treatment preference and to assess the impact of parental views on teen perspectives. Latino and African American teens had lower average scores on antidepressant knowledge (p teens (p parents (p Parent antidepressant knowledge had an impact on teen knowledge when teens reported turning to them for advice (beta = 0.20, p Teen knowledge about medication (odds ratio [OR] = 1.16, p parents than teens. Talking to parents who have more knowledge about depression treatment is associated with more teen knowledge and that knowledge is associated with greater willingness to seek depression treatment. Research is needed on the content and type of conversations that parents and teens have about depression treatment, and if there are differences by race/ethnicity.

  11. Religiosity and teen drug use reconsidered: a social capital perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowski, John P; Xu, Xiaohe

    2007-06-01

    Although religiosity has often been shown to have a deterrent effect on teen drug use, noteworthy theoretic gaps and contradictory findings have left important questions unanswered. Conceptualizing religion as a measure of social capital and using cross-sectional data from Monitoring the Future (1996), a nationally representative sample of American high school seniors collected annually, this study is designed to shed new light on the relationship between religiosity and drug use among American youth. Levels of teen drug use for three different components of faith-based social capital-exposure to and internalization of religious norms, integration within religious networks, and trust in religious phenomena-are explored with respect to high school seniors' use of alcohol, marijuana, and other illicit drugs during the year prior to the survey. In addition, drug use associated with faith-based and secular forms of civic engagement among teens (e.g., participation in religious youth groups vs secular organizations such as sports and school clubs, theistic trust vs secular trust) are compared. Among religiosity variables, integration within congregational networks (i.e., worship service attendance) exhibits the most consistent negative association with youth drug use. Theistic trust is not associated with teen drug use, but secular trust and civic participation in secular organizations are associated with less drug use. Elements of both religious and secular social capital are associated with lower reported drug use, thereby suggesting that multiple avenues for the prevention of teen drug use might be pursued. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  12. Kauffman Teen Survey. An Annual Report on Teen Health Behaviors: Use of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs among 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-Grade Students in Greater Kansas City, 1991-92 to 2000-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation began surveying Kansas City area teens during the 1984-85 school year. The Kauffman Teen Survey now addresses two sets of issues for teens. Teen Health Behaviors, addressed in this report, have been a focus of the survey since its inception. The report focuses on teen use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in…

  13. Three Alabama Teen Parent Programs: Perspectives from Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cynthia Ivey

    2009-01-01

    Although there are many programs that concentrate on reducing the overall rate of teen pregnancy, there are few programs designed to assist teen parents. The purpose of this study was to determine how and to what extent three teen parenting programs in Alabama met the needs of teen parents with a positive environment and assisted them in…

  14. Development of a survey to assess adolescent perceptions of teen parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W; Nandakumar, Ratna

    2012-01-01

    Initiatives designed to prevent teen pregnancy are often based on adult perceptions of the negative aspects of a teen birth. Qualitative research has revealed that teens may perceive positive rewards associated with teen parenting. These perceptions have not yet been examined through survey research. The theory of reasoned action proposes that individuals assess the costs and rewards prior to engaging in a behavior and provides a framework for the development of a survey instrument designed to measure adolescent thoughts about the costs and rewards of the teen parenting experience. This manuscript describes the development and testing of a quantitative survey instrument designed to measure adolescents' perceptions. Pretesting, piloting, exploratory factor analysis, and a variety of reliability and validity measures were used to determine the value of the measure. The thoughts on teen parenting survey (TTPS) demonstrates an alpha level of .90. The TTPS yields a cumulative score of teen perceptions about the impact of a teen birth during the adolescent years that may be used to assess youth beliefs, correlated with demographic data, used to identify teens at risk for pregnancy/parenting, or provide a pretest/posttest to assess the effectiveness of interventions designed to foster realistic attitudes toward teen parenting.

  15. National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse VII: Teens, Parents and Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuses surveys have consistently found that the family is fundamental to keeping children away from tobacco, alcohol and illegal drugs. This 2002 survey keeps the focus on family and seeks to assess the impact of siblings on the likelihood of teen substance abuse. This year 1,000 teens ages 12 to 17…

  16. Using the thoughts on teen parenting survey to determine the impact of Wise Guys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W; Moore, Christopher C; Sims, Regina

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine if the Wise Guys program influences young men's perceptions of the impact a teen birth would have on their lives in the areas of relationships, vocation, and personal life. The Wise Guys program was implemented with 70 adolescent males. The Thoughts on Teen Parenting Survey was used to determine participants' perceptions of the costs and rewards associated with teen parenting. Data, analyzed using paired t-tests, demonstrated that Wise Guys was effective in reinforcing less positive perceptions of teen parenting. Wise Guys offers an important strategy to impact young men's perceptions about the teen parenting experience and provides one means to promote responsible sexual behavior in teen men. © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Survey of Teen Museum Education Participants and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Jenny; Bobick, Bryna

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a museum program for teens located in an urban environment. The participants were high school students from public, private, religious and home schools. The program allowed learning to occur in an informal setting and united teens from one city through a common interest in visual art. Also, it was an opportunity for the…

  18. National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse II: Teens and Their Parents Conducted by Luntz Research Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    Illegal drug use by adolescents is on the rise. This alarming trend was quantified in this national survey of the attitudes of teens and their parents (1,200 teens and 1,166 parents, including 819 sets of teens and parents from the same households) towards cigarettes, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, LSD, cocaine, heroin, and other illegal drugs.…

  19. Translanguaging Practices and Perspectives of Four Multilingual Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Shannon M.; Pacheco, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Increasingly, educational research suggests that translanguaging pedagogies can provide meaningful supports for English language learners. Yet, few studies examine how multilingual teens in English-dominant settings independently translanguage to make sense of school and achieve their goals. In this study, we review definitions of translanguaging…

  20. National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse XV: Teens and Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This 15th annual "back-to-school survey" continues the unique effort of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse (CASA) at Columbia University to track attitudes of teens and those, like parents, who influence them. Over a decade and a half, through this survey the researchers have identified factors that increase or decrease the…

  1. Effects of an Introductory Letter on Response Rates to a Teen/Parent Telephone Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Susan I.; Mayer, Joni A.; Clapp, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The authors conducted a pilot study in preparation for a larger investigation that will rely on telephone surveys to assess select health behaviors of teens and their parents, with a focus on indoor tanning. This study used a randomized design to assess the impact of a presurvey letter on response rates to a telephone survey, as well as prevalence…

  2. Estimated Trans-Lamina Cribrosa Pressure Differences in Low-Teen and High-Teen Intraocular Pressure Normal Tension Glaucoma: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Hyung Lee

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between estimated trans-lamina cribrosa pressure difference (TLCPD and prevalence of normal tension glaucoma (NTG with low-teen and high-teen intraocular pressure (IOP using a population-based study design.A total of 12,743 adults (≥ 40 years of age who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES from 2009 to 2012 were included. Using a previously developed formula, cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP in mmHg was estimated as 0.55 × body mass index (kg/m2 + 0.16 × diastolic blood pressure (mmHg-0.18 × age (years-1.91. TLCPD was calculated as IOP-CSFP. The NTG subjects were divided into two groups according to IOP level: low-teen NTG (IOP ≤ 15 mmHg and high-teen NTG (15 mmHg < IOP ≤ 21 mmHg groups. The association between TLCPD and the prevalence of NTG was assessed in the low- and high-teen IOP groups.In the normal population (n = 12,069, the weighted mean estimated CSFP was 11.69 ± 0.04 mmHg and the weighted mean TLCPD 2.31 ± 0.06 mmHg. Significantly higher TLCPD (p < 0.001; 6.48 ± 0.27 mmHg was found in the high-teen NTG compared with the normal group. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in TLCPD between normal and low-teen NTG subjects (p = 0.395; 2.31 ± 0.06 vs. 2.11 ± 0.24 mmHg. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that TLCPD was significantly associated with the prevalence of NTG in the high-teen IOP group (p = 0.006; OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.15, but not the low-teen IOP group (p = 0.636. Instead, the presence of hypertension was significantly associated with the prevalence of NTG in the low-teen IOP group (p < 0.001; OR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.26, 2.16.TLCPD was significantly associated with the prevalence of NTG in high-teen IOP subjects, but not low-teen IOP subjects, in whom hypertension may be more closely associated. This study suggests that the underlying mechanisms may differ between low-teen and high-teen NTG patients.

  3. Alumni Perspectives Survey, 2010. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sabeen

    2010-01-01

    During the months of April and September of 2009, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) conducted the Alumni Perspectives Survey, a longitudinal study of prior respondents to the Global Management Education Graduate Survey of management students nearing graduation. A total of 3,708 alumni responded to the April 2009 survey,…

  4. Surveying Teens in School to Assess the Prevalence of Problematic Drug Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falck, Russel S.; Nahhas, Ramzi W.; Li, Linna; Carlson, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Illicit drug use by school-aged teens can adversely affect their health and academic achievement. This study used a survey administered in schools to assess the prevalence of problematic drug use among teenagers in a Midwestern community. Methods: Self-report data were collected from 11th- and 12th-grade students (N = 3974) in 16…

  5. Does watching sex on television predict teen pregnancy? Findings from a national longitudinal survey of youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Anita; Martino, Steven C; Collins, Rebecca L; Elliott, Marc N; Berry, Sandra H; Kanouse, David E; Miu, Angela

    2008-11-01

    There is increasing evidence that youth exposure to sexual content on television shapes sexual attitudes and behavior in a manner that may influence reproductive health outcomes. To our knowledge, no previous work has empirically examined associations between exposure to television sexual content and adolescent pregnancy. Data from a national longitudinal survey of teens (12-17 years of age, monitored to 15-20 years of age) were used to assess whether exposure to televised sexual content predicted subsequent pregnancy for girls or responsibility for pregnancy for boys. Multivariate logistic regression models controlled for other known correlates of exposure to sexual content and pregnancy. We measured experience of a teen pregnancy during a 3-year period. Exposure to sexual content on television predicted teen pregnancy, with adjustment for all covariates. Teens who were exposed to high levels of television sexual content (90th percentile) were twice as likely to experience a pregnancy in the subsequent 3 years, compared with those with lower levels of exposure (10th percentile). This is the first study to demonstrate a prospective link between exposure to sexual content on television and the experience of a pregnancy before the age of 20. Limiting adolescent exposure to the sexual content on television and balancing portrayals of sex in the media with information about possible negative consequences might reduce the risk of teen pregnancy. Parents may be able to mitigate the influence of this sexual content by viewing with their children and discussing these depictions of sex.

  6. Video Perspectivity Meets Wild and Crazy Teens: A Design Ethnography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Ricki

    2004-01-01

    This article is a digital video design ethnography describing the first phase of introducing a perspectivity meme into a classroom. A meme is an idea that spreads throughout a system. A perspectivity meme is the idea that people who share their viewpoints and interpretations will gradually affect role changes in the learning environment. They will…

  7. Prevalence and Factors Associated with Teen Pregnancy in Vietnam: Results from Two National Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huong Nguyen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study asked two broad questions: (1 what is the prevalence of teen pregnancy in contemporary Vietnam; and (2 what selected social, family, and individual factors are associated with teen pregnancy in Vietnam? The study utilized Vietnam Survey Assessment of Vietnamese Youth surveys conducted in 2003 and 2008 to answer the two research questions within the context of fast political, economic, and social change in Vietnam in the last two decades. Results of this study show that the prevalence of pregnancy among Vietnamese teenagers in the surveys was stable at 4%, or 40 pregnancies per 1000 adolescent girls aged 14 to 19. Age, experience of domestic violence, and early sexual debut were positively correlated with higher odds of teenage pregnancy for both survey cohorts; however, being an ethnic minority, educational attainment, sexual education at school, Internet use, and depressive symptoms were significantly related to teenage pregnancy only in the 2008 cohort.

  8. Alumni Perspectives Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sabeen

    2011-01-01

    Since the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) first began conducting its Alumni Perspectives Surveys 11 years ago, several "truths" about graduate business school alumni have consistently stood the test of time: They are and remain eminently employable. They constantly rate the value of the degree highly. This year's results are…

  9. Teen Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tween and teen health Want to prevent teen smoking? Understand why teens smoke and how to talk ... teen about cigarettes. By Mayo Clinic Staff Teen smoking might begin innocently, but it can become a ...

  10. Teens in cars.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2014-01-01

    A study from Safe Kids Worldwide, made possible by a grant from the General Motors Foundation, surveyed 1,000 teens to learn why more teens die in motor vehicle crashes than from any other cause of death. The report highlights why teens don’t always buckle up, explores their texting and distraction

  11. Teens in cars.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A study from Safe Kids Worldwide, made possible by a grant from the General Motors Foundation, surveyed 1,000 teens to learn why more teens die in motor vehicle crashes than from any other cause of death. The report highlights why teens don’t always buckle up, explores their texting and distraction habits, and examines what teens do when they feel unsafe. (Author/publisher)

  12. Sadness, Suicide, and Their Association with Video Game and Internet Overuse among Teens: Results from the Youth Risk Behavior Survey 2007 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Erick; Castro, Juan; Saini, Anil; Usman, Manzoor; Peeples, Dale

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the association between excessive video game/Internet use and teen suicidality. Data were obtained from the 2007 and 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a high school-based, nationally representative survey (N = 14,041 and N = 16,410, respectively). Teens who reported 5 hours or more of video games/Internet daily use, in the…

  13. Teen sleep and suicidality: results from the youth risk behavior surveys of 2007 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Caris T; Messias, Erick; Buysse, Daniel J

    2011-08-15

    Suicide in the adolescent population is a tragic and preventable cause of death. Previous studies have confirmed both long and short total sleep times (TSTs) are associated with suicidal ideation in the adult population. We hypothesized that both long and short TSTs are risk factors for serious suicide attempt in the adolescent population as well. We tested this hypothesis using the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys from 2007 and 2009, which consist of school-based, nationally representative samples (N = 12,154 for 2007, N = 14,782 for 2009). Logistic regression models were used to assess the relationship between suicidality and sleep after adjusting for confounders including age, sex, race/ethnicity, feelings of sadness, and substance abuse. Of the total sample, roughly 15% reported suicidal ideation, 10% planned suicide, 5% attempted and 2% reported an attempt requiring treatment. Teens who reported sleeping ≤ 5 or ≥ 10 h had a significantly higher risk for suicidality compared to those with a TST of 8 h. The largest odds ratios were found among the most severe forms of suicidality (attempt requiring treatment) with an odds ratio of 5.9 for a TST ≤ 4 h and 4.7 for a TST ≥ 10 h. Both short and long TSTs are risk factors for suicidality among teens and extremes in TST may indicate more serious suicidality. Self-reported sleep duration may be a useful screening question for suicide risk. Future studies should examine whether sleep duration is a causal and/or modifiable risk factor for suicidality in teens.

  14. Back to School 1999--National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse V: Teens and Their Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    This national survey examines the family characteristics and relationships that contribute to a teen's substance abuse risk. It provides insights that can help parents develop in their children the will and skills to resist the lure of cigarettes, alcohol, and drugs. One thousand boys and 1,000 girls age 12-17, and 1,000 parents (536 mothers and…

  15. Violence and Drug Use in Rural Teens: National Prevalence Estimates from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew O.; Mink, Michael D.; Harun, Nusrat; Moore, Charity G.; Martin, Amy B.; Bennett, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare national estimates of drug use and exposure to violence between rural and urban teens. Methods: Twenty-eight dependent variables from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to compare violent activities, victimization, suicidal behavior, tobacco use, alcohol use, and illegal drug use…

  16. Health disparities in human papillomavirus vaccine coverage: trends analysis from the National Immunization Survey-Teen, 2008-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Robert A; Curran, Eileen A; Orenstein, Walter A; Omer, Saad B

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low. We evaluated HPV vaccine uptake patterns over 2008-2011 by race/ethnicity, poverty status, and the combination of race/ethnicity and poverty status, utilizing National Immunization Survey-Teen data. Minority and below-poverty adolescents consistently had higher series initiation than white and above-poverty adolescents.

  17. Telling It like It Is: Teen Perspectives on Romantic Relationships. Research Brief. Publication #2009-44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Lina; Ikramullah, Erum; Manlove, Jennifer; Peterson, Kristen; Scarupa, Harriet J.

    2009-01-01

    Teen romantic relationships have become a pervasive part of popular culture, from TV shows, movies, and books to blogs and social networking sites. But the attention paid to these relationships extends beyond the parameters of popular culture. Romance, teen style, has become of increasing interest to anyone concerned with healthy adolescent…

  18. Teen smoking cessation help via the Internet: a survey of search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christine C; Elliott, Sean P; Conway, Terry L; Woodruff, Susan I

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess Web sites related to teen smoking cessation on the Internet. Seven Internet search engines were searched using the keywords teen quit smoking. The top 20 hits from each search engine were reviewed and categorized. The keywords teen quit smoking produced between 35 and 400,000 hits depending on the search engine. Of 140 potential hits, 62% were active, unique sites; 85% were listed by only one search engine; and 40% focused on cessation. Findings suggest that legitimate on-line smoking cessation help for teens is constrained by search engine choice and the amount of time teens spend looking through potential sites. Resource listings should be updated regularly. Smoking cessation Web sites need to be picked up on multiple search engine searches. Further evaluation of smoking cessation Web sites need to be conducted to identify the most effective help for teens.

  19. Differential social evaluation of pregnant teens, teen mothers and teen fathers by university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed, Keri; Nicholson, Jody S

    2015-01-02

    Youth may be particularly attuned to social evaluation during the teen years with implications for physical and mental health. Negative attitudes and stereotypes constitute an important type of social evaluative threat. Pregnant and parenting teens not only encounter challenges associated with their early transition to parenthood, but also are confronted with unfavourable attitudes of others. A university sample of 255 men and women responded to surveys targeting their feelings and beliefs about pregnant teens, teen mothers and teen fathers. Teen mothers were generally perceived more positively than pregnant teens who were perceived more positively compared to teen fathers. Social evaluations were generally unrelated to respondents' sex or race, but respondents who had contact with a friend or family member who had experienced a teen pregnancy were selectively more positive, as were freshmen compared to seniors. Risks attributed to early childbearing may be exacerbated by negative social evaluations.

  20. Measuring Ocean Literacy: What teens understand about the ocean using the Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greely, T. M.; Lodge, A.

    2009-12-01

    Ocean issues with conceptual ties to science and global society have captured the attention, imagination, and concern of an international audience. Climate change, over fishing, marine pollution, freshwater shortages and alternative energy sources are a few ocean issues highlighted in our media and casual conversations. The ocean plays a role in our life in some way everyday, however, disconnect exists between what scientists know and the public understands about the ocean as revealed by numerous ocean and coastal literacy surveys. While the public exhibits emotive responses through care, concern and connection with the ocean, there remains a critical need for a baseline of ocean knowledge. However, knowledge about the ocean must be balanced with understanding about how to apply ocean information to daily decisions and actions. The present study analyzed underlying factors and patterns contributing to ocean literacy and reasoning within the context of an ocean education program, the Oceanography Camp for Girls. The OCG is designed to advance ocean conceptual understanding and decision making by engagement in a series of experiential learning and stewardship activities from authentic research settings in the field and lab. The present study measured a) what understanding teens currently hold about the ocean (content), b) how teens feel toward the ocean environment (environmental attitudes and morality), and c) how understanding and feelings are organized when reasoning about ocean socioscientific issues (e.g. climate change, over fishing, energy). The Survey of Ocean Literacy and Engagement (SOLE), was used to measure teens understanding about the ocean. SOLE is a 57-item survey instrument aligned with the Essential Principles and Fundamental Concepts of Ocean Literacy (NGS, 2007). Rasch analysis was used to refine and validate SOLE as a reasonable measure of ocean content knowledge (reliability, 0.91). Results revealed that content knowledge and environmental

  1. Parent-reported reasons for nonreceipt of recommended adolescent vaccinations, national immunization survey: teen, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorell, Christina; Yankey, David; Strasser, Sheryl

    2011-12-01

    To identify parent-reported reasons for non-receipt of adolescent vaccinations by provider recommendation status. Parental reasons for non-receipt of adolescent vaccines were analyzed among adolescents 13-17 years using data from the 2009 National Immunization Survey-Teen (n=20,066). Among unvaccinated adolescents, 87.9% (Td/Tdap), 90.9% (MenACWY), and 66.0% (HPV) of parents reported that they did not receive a healthcare provider recommendation for their adolescent to receive the vaccine. Among those without a provider recommendation, the most common reasons for not receiving the vaccines were 'vaccine not recommended' [Td/Tdap, MenACWY] and 'not needed' [HPV]. Among those with a recommendation, the most common parental reasons were 'lack of knowledge' [Td/Tdap], 'vaccine not needed' [MenACWY], and 'lack of knowledge' [HPV]. Non-receipt of provider recommendations was a main parent-reported reason for not getting vaccinated. Increasing parental knowledge and vaccination coverage through increased provider-parent communication about disease risk and vaccine benefits is needed.

  2. Association of childhood and teen school performance and obesity in young adulthood in the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol-Goldberg, Shira; Rabinowitz, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The literature suggests an association between poor school performance and obesity. However, little is known about academic achievement and behavior as possible risk factors for future obesity. The analysis was based on data from 3172 participants aged 6 to 25years from the US National Longitudinal Survey conducted 1986 to 2010. Academic achievement, behavior problems and body mass index (BMI) were assessed at childhood (6-9) and teenhood (10-14). Height and weight were self-reported at pre-young adulthood (15-18) and young adulthood (19-25). Based on logistic regression stratified by sex and race/ethnicity, academic and behavioral deficiencies during childhood and teenhood were risk factors for young adult obesity with some sex and ethnic/racial differences. The highest prevalence rates of obesity by race/ethnicity and sex are as follows: black/Hispanic females, those in the lowest quartile of teen reading and math (32.8%); black/Hispanic males, those in lowest quartile of teen reading (26.1%); white males, those in the highest quartile of behavioral problems (21.9%); and white females, those in the lowest quartile teen math (23.2%). Poor school performance in childhood and teenhood is associated with an increased risk of adult obesity. Prospective studies should further examine the association of school performance and adult obesity and whether programs directed at improving school performance may have secondary gains in preventing obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. School Bullying, Cyberbullying, or both: Correlates of Teen Suicidality in the 2011 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Erick; Kindrick, Kristi; Castro, Juan

    2014-01-01

    While school bullying has been shown to be associated with depression and suicidality among teens, the relationship between these outcomes and cyberbullying has not been studied in nationally representative samples. Data came from the 2011 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a nationally representative sample of high-school students (N=15,425). We calculated weighted estimates representative of all students in grades 9-12 attending school in the US. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios. Overall, girls are more likely to be report being bullied (31.3% vs. 22.9%), in particularly to be cyberbullied (22.0% vs. 10.8%), while boys are only more likely to report exclusive school bullying (12.2% vs. 9.2%). Reports of 2-week sadness and all suicidality items were highest among teens reporting both forms of bullying, followed by those reporting cyberbullying only, followed by those reporting school bullying only. For example, among those reporting not being bullied 4.6% reported having made a suicide attempt, compared to 9.5% of those reporting school bullying only (adjusted odd ratio (AOR) 2.3, 95% C.I. 1.8- 2.9), 14.7% of those reporting cyberbullying only (AOR 3.5 (2.6-4.7)), and 21.1% of those reporting victimization of both types of bullying (AOR 5.6 (4.4-7)). Bullying victimization, in school, cyber, or both, is associated with higher risk of sadness and suicidality among teens. Interventions to prevent school bullying as well as cyberbullying are needed. When caring for teens reporting being bullied, either at school or in cyberbullying, it's important to screen for depression and suicidality. PMID:24768228

  4. School bullying, cyberbullying, or both: correlates of teen suicidality in the 2011 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Erick; Kindrick, Kristi; Castro, Juan

    2014-07-01

    While school bullying has been shown to be associated with depression and suicidality among teens, the relationship between these outcomes and cyberbullying has not been studied in nationally representative samples. Data came from the 2011 CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), a nationally representative sample of high-school students (N=15,425). We calculated weighted estimates representative of all students in grades 9-12 attending school in the US. Logistic regression was used to calculate adjusted odds ratios. Overall, girls are more likely to be report being bullied (31.3% vs. 22.9%), in particularly to be cyberbullied (22.0% vs. 10.8%), while boys are only more likely to report exclusive school bullying (12.2% vs. 9.2%). Reports of 2-week sadness and all suicidality items were highest among teens reporting both forms of bullying, followed by those reporting cyberbullying only, followed by those reporting school bullying only. For example, among those reporting not being bullied 4.6% reported having made a suicide attempt, compared to 9.5% of those reporting school bullying only (adjusted odd ratio (AOR) 2.3, 95% C.I. 1.8-2.9), 14.7% of those reporting cyberbullying only (AOR 3.5 (2.6-4.7)), and 21.1% of those reporting victimization of both types of bullying (AOR 5.6 (4.4-7)). Bullying victimization, in school, cyber, or both, is associated with higher risk of sadness and suicidality among teens. Interventions to prevent school bullying as well as cyberbullying are needed. When caring for teens reporting being bullied, either at school or in cyberbullying, it's important to screen for depression and suicidality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Sport Management Survey. Employment Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quain, Richard J.; Parks, Janet B.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of sport management positions was designed to determine projected vacancy rates in six sport management career areas. Respondents to the survey were also questioned regarding their awareness of college professional preparation programs. Results are presented. (MT)

  6. Teens' Survey of Stores in the District of Columbia on Accessibility of Family Planning Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    Access to and availability of contraceptive methods in stores play an important role in the prevention of AIDS, unwanted pregnancies, and other sexually transmitted diseases. Although teens are generally knowledgable about birth control, many encounter barriers when attempting to obtain contraceptive. Forty-five drug stores and 15 convenience…

  7. Perspectives on User Satisfaction Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Rowena

    2001-01-01

    Discusses academic libraries, digital environments, increasing competition, the relationship between service quality and user satisfaction, and user surveys. Describes the SERVQUAL model that measures service quality and user satisfaction in academic libraries; considers gaps between user expectations and managers' perceptions of user…

  8. Teen Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stages Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Teen Parents Page Content Article Body A girl who has ... geared toward improving the quality of life for teen parents and their children. Here are some examples: Child- ...

  9. Gabonese French Dictionaries: Survey and Perspectives*

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gabonese French Dictionaries: Survey and Perspectives. 261. —. Neologisms: buflon (young buffalo), dédeuillement (the ending of the mourning period), fétichisme (fetishism), tresseuse (a female who plaits), marabout (a sangoma), maraboutisme (the craft of the sangoma), marabouter. (to act as a sangoma), se saper (to ...

  10. Barriers to and facilitators of child influenza vaccine - perspectives from parents, teens, marketing and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat-Schelbert, Kavitha; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Matambanadzo, Annamore; Hannibal, Kristin; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2012-03-23

    The CDC recommends annual influenza vaccination for all children age 6 months and older, yet vaccination rates remain modest. Effective strategies to improve influenza vaccination for children are needed. Eight focus groups with 91 parents, teens, pediatric healthcare staff and providers, and immunization and marketing experts were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and coded based on grounded theory. Three themes emerged: barriers, facilitators, and strategies. Barriers included fear, misinformation, and mistrust, with exacerbation of these barriers attributed to media messages. Many considered influenza vaccination unnecessary and inconvenient, but would accept vaccination if recipients or other family members were considered high risk, if recommended by their doctor or another trusted person, or if offered or mandated by the school. Access to better information regarding influenza disease burden and vaccine safety and efficacy were notable facilitators, as were prevention of the inconvenience of missing work or important events, and if the child requests to receive the vaccine. Marketing strategies included incentives, jingles, videos, wearable items, strategically-located information sheets or posters, and promotion by informed counselors. Practice-based strategies included staff buy-in, standing orders protocols, vaccination clinics, and educational videos. Teen-specific strategies included message delivery through schools, texting, internet, and social networking sites. To improve influenza vaccination rates for children using practice-based interventions, participants suggested campaigns that provide better information regarding the vaccine, the disease and its implications, and convenient access to vaccination. Strategies targeting adolescents should use web-based social marketing technologies and campaigns based in schools. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Parent and teen agreement on driving expectations prior to teen licensure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Cara J; Ramirez, Marizen; Yang, Jingzhen; Chande, Vidya; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    To examine pre-licensure agreement on driving expectations and predictors of teen driving expectations among parent-teen dyads. Cross-sectional survey of 163 parent-teen dyads. Descriptive statistics, weighted Kappa coefficients, and linear regression were used to examine expectations about post-licensure teen driving. Teens reported high pre-licensure unsupervised driving (N = 79, 48.5%) and regular access to a car (N = 130, 81.8%). Parents and teens had low agreement on teen driving expectations (eg, after dark, κw = 0.23). Each time teens currently drove to/from school, their expectation of driving in risky conditions post-licensure increased (β = 0.21, p = .02). Pre-licensure improvement of parent-teen agreement on driving expectations are needed to have the greatest impact on preventing teens from driving in high risk conditions.

  12. Parents, Teens, and Online Privacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Mary; Cortesi, Sandra; Gasser, Urs; Lenhart, Amanda; Duggan, Maeve

    2012-01-01

    Most parents of teenagers are concerned about what their teenage children do online and how their behavior could be monitored by others. Some parents are taking steps to observe, discuss, and check up on their children's digital footprints. A new survey of 802 parents and their teens shows that: (1) 81% of parents of online teens say they are…

  13. Gay and Bisexual Adolescent Boys' Perspectives on Parent-Adolescent Relationships and Parenting Practices Related to Teen Sex and Dating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Brian A; Thomann, Matthew; Coventry, Ryan; Macapagal, Kathryn; Mustanski, Brian; Newcomb, Michael E

    2017-12-26

    Close parent-adolescent relationships and specific parenting practices (e.g., communication about sex, monitoring) are associated with reduced sexual risk behavior among heterosexual youth. Despite gay/bisexual male youth being at increased risk of HIV, little is known about parental influences on their sexual behavior. As such, the goal of the current study was to examine parent-adolescent relationships and parenting practices related to teen sex and dating from the perspective of gay/bisexual adolescent boys. Online focus groups were conducted with 52 gay/bisexual male youth ages 14-17 years. Most gay/bisexual adolescent boys felt that their sexual orientation had an influence on their relationships with their parents and discussions about sex/dating. Although some felt that their relationships improved after coming out, a larger percentage reported that it put strain on their relationships. Discussions about sex/dating generally decreased after coming out, but some youth described positive conversations with their parents. Many reported that their parents struggled with whether or not to adapt parenting practices (e.g., rules about dating) after they came out. Youth consistently noted that parent-adolescent relationships and parenting practices depended on the adolescent's level of outness. Findings have important implications for refining HIV prevention programs for gay/bisexual adolescent boys, especially interventions that include parents.

  14. Helping your teen with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teen depression - helping; Teen depression - talk therapy; Teen depression - medicine ... teen the most. The most effective treatments for depression are: Talk therapy Antidepressant medicines If your teen ...

  15. Teen Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or support for problems.Include doctors, family, friends, teachers, and coaches in your teen’s well being. Surround them with positive role models.Help your teen with confidence. Teach them skills for handling conflict, violence, and peer pressure.Sadly, teen suicide can ...

  16. Teens and E-cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Future Survey on teen drug use ( December 2017 ) View more related News Releases This page was last updated February 2016 Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice ...

  17. Teen Pregnancy and Childbearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy has sub items, Reproductive Health & Teen Pregnancy Contraceptive Use STDs Teen Pregnancy & Childbearing Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Trends Negative Impacts Strategies & Approaches for Prevention Engaging Adolescent Males in Prevention Tips for Parents of Teens Find ...

  18. Marijuana: Facts for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications » Marijuana: Facts for Teens » Letter to Teens Marijuana: Facts for Teens Email Facebook Twitter Letter to ... they once were. Did you know that teen marijuana use has dropped dramatically since the late 1990s? ...

  19. Teen Dating Violence (Physical and Sexual) Among US High School Students: Findings From the 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagi, Kevin J; O'Malley Olsen, Emily; Basile, Kathleen C; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M

    2015-05-01

    National estimates of teen dating violence (TDV) reveal high rates of victimization among high school populations. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's national Youth Risk Behavior Survey has provided often-cited estimates of physical TDV since 1999. In 2013, revisions were made to the physical TDV question to capture more serious forms of physical TDV and to screen out students who did not date. An additional question was added to assess sexual TDV. To describe the content of new physical and sexual TDV victimization questions first administered in the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, to share data on the prevalence and frequency of TDV (including the first-ever published overall "both physical and sexual TDV" and "any TDV" national estimates using these new questions), and to assess associations of TDV experience with health-risk behaviors. Secondary data analysis of a cross-sectional survey of 9900 students who dated, from a nationally representative sample of US high school students, using the 2013 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Two survey questions separately assessed physical and sexual TDV; this analysis combined them to create a 4-level TDV measure and a 2-level TDV measure. The 4-level TDV measure includes "physical TDV only," "sexual TDV only," "both physical and sexual TDV," and "none." The 2-level TDV measure includes "any TDV" (either or both physical and sexual TDV) and "none." Sex-stratified bivariate and multivariable analyses assessed associations between TDV and health-risk behaviors. In 2013, among students who dated, 20.9% of female students (95% CI, 19.0%-23.0%) and 10.4% of male students (95% CI, 9.0%-11.7%) experienced some form of TDV during the 12 months before the survey. Female students had a higher prevalence than male students of physical TDV only, sexual TDV only, both physical and sexual TDV, and any TDV. All health-risk behaviors were most prevalent among students who experienced both forms of TDV and were

  20. Teen Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teen violence refers to harmful behaviors that can start early and continue into young adulthood. The young person can ... victim, an offender, or a witness to the violence. Violent acts can include Bullying Fighting, including punching, ...

  1. Teen Gambling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Teen Gambling Page Content Article Body How can I tell ... son or daughter is having a problem with gambling? Look for the following warning signs: Finding gambling " ...

  2. Grieving Teen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... must gain the trust and respect of the students — just as students will seek the trust and respect of the ... alone or with friends. Isolation. Is the teen spending too much time alone, canceling on dates and ...

  3. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Perceived Smoking Prevalence: Evidence from a National Survey of Teens

    OpenAIRE

    Hosanna A. Asfaw; Vallone, Donna M; Nonnemaker, James M.; Davis, Kevin C.

    2010-01-01

    Prior studies show that perceived smoking prevalence is a significant predictor of smoking initiation. In this study, we examine racial/ethnic differences in perceived smoking prevalence and racial/ethnic differences in exposure to contextual factors associated with perceived smoking prevalence. We used cross-sectional time series data from the Legacy Media Tracking Surveys (LMTS), a national sample of 35,000 12- to 17-year-olds in the United States. Perceived smoking prevalence was the prima...

  4. Factors Associated With Parents' Intent to Vaccinate Adolescents for Human Papillomavirus: Findings From the 2014 National Immunization Survey-Teen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Kahee A; Vivian, Elaina; Loux, Travis M; Arnold, Lauren D

    2017-06-08

    While factors associated with receipt of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination have been well characterized, less is known about the characteristics associated with parents' intent to have their adolescent children vaccinated. This study aimed to examine factors associated with parental intention toward HPV vaccination. We analyzed data on 10,354 adolescents aged 13 to 17 years from the 2014 National Immunization Survey-Teen. Weighted multivariable logistic regression was used to examine associations between sociodemographic characteristics of mothers and adolescents, as well as a health care provider recommendation with parents' intention to have their children receive HPV vaccine. Among unvaccinated adolescents, Hispanic ethnicity (boys adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34-2.61; and girls AOR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.05-2.35), mothers with less than a high school diploma (boys AOR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.58-3.67; and girls AOR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.02-3.38), and having a health care provider recommend the vaccine (boys AOR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.52-2.31; and girls AOR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.05-1.82) were significantly associated with parents' intention to have their adolescent child vaccinated within the next 12 months. In addition, non-Hispanic black race was a significant predictor of parents' intent to vaccinate for boys (AOR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.35-2.65). Maternal education and Hispanic ethnicity were the strongest predictors of parental intent to vaccinate against HPV, followed by provider recommendation. As HPV vaccination rates in the United States remain below the Healthy People 2020 goal, messages may need to be targeted based on maternal education, race/ethnicity, and provider recommendation.

  5. Teen Perceptions of the Promotion of Safer Sexual Practices: A Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W.; Kelley, Andrea; Haigh, Katherine M.

    2017-01-01

    Teens' own thoughts on fostering safe sexual practice are important perspectives in promoting adolescent sexual health yet are relatively absent in the literature. This focus group study explored teens' perceptions about the supports and challenges that exist as teens strive to engage in healthy sexual practices. Seventy-five teens participated in…

  6. Variations in Teens' Perception of Risk Factors for Teen Motor Vehicle Collision Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Katherine L.; Cooper, Jill F MSW; Grembek, Offer PhD; Henk, Russell H. PE; Tisdale, Stacey M.

    2014-01-01

    Teen drivers, especially males, are known to be at greater risk of being involved in a motor vehicle collision than any other age group. While novice teen drivers’ primary risk factors are commonly known, less is known about what teens perceive as risk factors for peers getting hurt or killed in motor vehicle collisions. This mixed methods study uses survey data from the Teens in the Drivers Seat (TDS) program in California to explore (1) teens' perceived risk factors for motor vehicle coll...

  7. Differential social evaluation of pregnant teens, teen mothers and teen fathers by university students

    OpenAIRE

    Weed, Keri; Nicholson, Jody S.

    2014-01-01

    Youth may be particularly attuned to social evaluation during the teen years with implications for physical and mental health. Negative attitudes and stereotypes constitute an important type of social evaluative threat. Pregnant and parenting teens not only encounter challenges associated with their early transition to parenthood, but also are confronted with unfavourable attitudes of others. A university sample of 255 men and women responded to surveys targeting their feelings and beliefs ab...

  8. Pediatrician attitudes, knowledge, and practice behavior regarding teen driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Brendan T; Borrup, Kevin; Corsi, John M; Kelliher, Kristine M; Saleheen, Hassan; Banco, Leonard; Lapidus, Garry

    2009-01-01

    Each year about 4,000 teens ages 16-19 die on U.S. roads. Injury prevention counseling is recommended as a valuable and cost-effective part of routine health supervision. This study describes pediatrician knowledge and practice regarding teen driving safety. A 31-item self-administered survey was mailed to pediatricians. 160 of 392 pediatricians (41%) completed the survey. During a health supervision visit 93% of pediatricians reported discussing seat belt use, 89% impaired driving, 54% teen licensing laws, and 16% parent teen contract. Half reported having a teen in their practice killed in a crash. A majority surveyed report discussing and counseling teens on first wave teen driver safety issues (seat belts, alcohol use), but most do not discuss graduated driver licensing laws or related issues. Broadly adopted, this inexpensive counseling approach, could lead to reductions in teen motorvehicle crash injuries.

  9. Understanding Teen UX

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitton, Daniel; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Bell, Beth

    2014-01-01

    UX is a widely explored topic within HCI and has a large practitioners' community. However, the users considered in research and practice, are most often adults -- since adults represent the largest technology market share. However teenagers represent a growing market of unique users, and more...... needs to be understood about this population, from a UX perspective. The theme of this workshop is Building a Bridge to the Future and the aim is to gather together academics and UX practitioners, interested in teen users specifically, in order to discuss experiences, understandings, insights...... and methods that we can use to comprehend teen UX now and explore how this may lead to the creation of better interactive products in the future. The workshop will also foster new collaborations, and define new research agendas to grow the research and literature in this area....

  10. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Perceived Smoking Prevalence: Evidence from a National Survey of Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosanna A. Asfaw

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Prior studies show that perceived smoking prevalence is a significant predictor of smoking initiation. In this study, we examine racial/ethnic differences in perceived smoking prevalence and racial/ethnic differences in exposure to contextual factors associated with perceived smoking prevalence. We used cross-sectional time series data from the Legacy Media Tracking Surveys (LMTS, a national sample of 35,000 12- to 17-year-olds in the United States. Perceived smoking prevalence was the primary outcome variable, measured using an LMTS question: “Out of every 10 people your age, how many do you think smoke?” Multivariable models were estimated to assess the association between perceived smoking prevalence; race/ethnicity; and exposure to social contextual factors. Findings indicate that African American, Hispanic, and American Indian youth exhibit the highest rates of perceived smoking prevalence, while white and Asian youth exhibit the lowest. Minority youth are also disproportionately exposed to social contextual factors that are correlated with high perceived smoking prevalence. These findings suggest that disproportionate exposure to social contextual factors may partially explain why minority youth exhibit such high levels of perceived smoking prevalence.

  11. Racial/ethnic differences in perceived smoking prevalence: evidence from a national survey of teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kevin C; Nonnemaker, James M; Asfaw, Hosanna A; Vallone, Donna M

    2010-12-01

    Prior studies show that perceived smoking prevalence is a significant predictor of smoking initiation. In this study, we examine racial/ethnic differences in perceived smoking prevalence and racial/ethnic differences in exposure to contextual factors associated with perceived smoking prevalence. We used cross-sectional time series data from the Legacy Media Tracking Surveys (LMTS), a national sample of 35,000 12- to 17-year-olds in the United States. Perceived smoking prevalence was the primary outcome variable, measured using an LMTS question: "Out of every 10 people your age, how many do you think smoke?" Multivariable models were estimated to assess the association between perceived smoking prevalence; race/ethnicity; and exposure to social contextual factors. Findings indicate that African American, Hispanic, and American Indian youth exhibit the highest rates of perceived smoking prevalence, while white and Asian youth exhibit the lowest. Minority youth are also disproportionately exposed to social contextual factors that are correlated with high perceived smoking prevalence. These findings suggest that disproportionate exposure to social contextual factors may partially explain why minority youth exhibit such high levels of perceived smoking prevalence.

  12. Teen pregnancy and educational gaps: Analysis of a national survey in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aremis Villalobos-Hernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To characterize female adolescents who have been pregnant, and to analyze the association between adolescent pregnancy and educational gaps. Materials and methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data come from the Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (Ensanut 2012, a Mexican representative survey. The set of data used is related to sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics from 1 790 women from 12 to 19 years who had begun their sexual life and had a pregnancy record. Three statistical models were adjusted to observe the association between variables. The dependent variable of the first model was the condition of previous pregnancy, the second to be pregnant at the time of data collection, and the third, educational gap. Results. A 74.9% of the adolescents with history of pregnancy has educational gap. To have the condition of previous pregnancy is associated with living with sexual partner (OR=8.4, educational gap (OR=2.4, low socioeconomical level (OR=2.0 and school assistance (OR=0.5. To be pregnant at the time of data collection has related only to living with sexual partner (OR=9.4. The educational gap shows an association with having more than one pregnancy (OR=2.4, live with sexual partner (OR=1.6, low socioeconomical level (OR=1.8, and school assistance as protective factor (OR=0.3. Conclusion. It is necessary to implement effective and efficient educational public politics in order to decrease educational gap. At the same time, to guarantee and improve sexual education in the school system to prevent adolescent pregnancy.

  13. [Teen pregnancy and educational gaps: Analysis of a national survey in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos-Hernández, Aremis; Campero, Lourdes; Suárez-López, Leticia; Atienzo, Erika E; Estrada, Fátima; De la Vara-Salazar, Elvia

    2015-01-01

    To characterize female adolescents who have been pregnant, and to analyze the association between adolescent pregnancy and educational gaps. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data come from the Encuesta Nacional de Salud y Nutrición (Ensanut 2012), a Mexican representative survey. The set of data used is related to sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics from 1 790 women from 12 to 19 years who had begun their sexual life and had a pregnancy record. Three statistical models were adjusted to observe the association between variables. The dependent variable of the first model was the condition of previous pregnancy, the second to be pregnant at the time of data collection, and the third, educational gap. A 74.9% of the adolescents with history of pregnancy has educational gap. To have the condition of previous pregnancy is associated with living with sexual partner (OR=8.4), educational gap (OR=2.4), low socioeconomical level (OR=2.0) and school assistance (OR=0.5). To be pregnant at the time of data collection has related only to living with sexual partner (OR=9.4). The educational gap shows an association with having more than one pregnancy (OR=2.4), live with sexual partner (OR=1.6), low socioeconomical level (OR=1.8), and school assistance as protective factor (OR=0.3). It is necessary to implement effective and efficient educational public politics in order to decrease educational gap. At the same time, to guarantee and improve sexual education in the school system to prevent adolescent pregnancy.

  14. Teen Smoking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after brief, intermittent use. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. 2007;161:704. Child and teen tobacco use. ... And-Kids-068.aspx. American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry. ... Drug Administration. http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/PublicHealthFocus/ucm172906. ...

  15. Homosexuality: Facts for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Virginity Home Family Health Kids and Teens Homosexuality: Facts for Teens Homosexuality: Facts for Teens Share Print What is sexuality? ... no wrong type of orientation.You may be homosexual if you are attracted to people of the ...

  16. Ages and Stages: Teen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Use Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen Teen Article Body Adolescence can be a rough ...

  17. Recognizing teen depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000648.htm Recognizing teen depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... life. Be Aware of the Risk for Teen Depression Your teen is more at risk for depression ...

  18. New Teen Drivers and Their Parents: What They Know and What They Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Keith; Lapidus, Garry; Gelven, Erica; Banco, Leonard

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To assess teens' and parents' knowledge of teen driver safety and to compare teens' and parents' expectations about learning to drive and acquiring a driver's license. Methods: A convenience sample of 613 Connecticut teens enrolled in commercial driving schools and one of their parents completed self-administered surveys. Results:…

  19. Teen theaters grapple with issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugni, J L

    1984-01-01

    At this time there are about 20 Planned Parenthood teen theater groups throughout the US. The idea originated in New York in 1973, when the staff of the Family Planning Division of the New York Medical College needed an effective way to reach adolescents about important issues. FOCUS, a teen family life theater sponsored by Planned Parenthood of Greater Charlotte, performs skits about life as seen from the teenager's perspective. The teenagers do not use a script but create their performances from their own experiences, expressed through carefully learned improvisational techniques. This approach gives the presentations an authentic flavor that enables the troupe to connect with the audience. The topics dealt with vary. For example, 1982-83 shows included peer pressure, divorce, teenage pregnancy, drinking, teenage suicide, parent-teen relationships, and loneliness. The performances do not offer absolute answers but rather pose important questions to the audience. Following the performance the actors and actresses return to the stage, still portraying their characters, and invite the audience to ask questions and discuss possible alternatives for the characters. THE SOURCE is the Teen Council of Planned Parenthood of Southwest Florida. It works to inform the community of problems teenagers face by presenting short plays, written, directed, and cast by teens themselves. Through education, honest answers, healthy building of self esteem, and parent support, SOURCE members reach a higher level of self awareness. They then share what they learn with their families, peers, and the community through performance and special events. THE SOURCE, formed in October 1980, grew out of Planned Parenthood's belief that if teens feel self worth, their decision-making process will be affected less by peer pressure and negative social influences. The Youth Expression Theater (YET) of Cambridge is an education outreach project of the Planned Parenthood League of Massachusetts (PPLM

  20. Concordance of adolescent human papillomavirus vaccination parental report with provider report in the National Immunization Survey-Teen (2008-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Jacqueline; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Laz, Tabassum Haque; Starkey, Jonathan M; Rupp, Richard E; Rahman, Mahbubur; Berenson, Abbey B

    2016-08-17

    To examine the accuracy of parental report of HPV vaccination through examination of concordance, with healthcare provider vaccination report as the comparison. The 2008-2013 National Immunization Survey (NIS)-Teen was used to examine accuracy of parent reports of HPV vaccination for their female daughters aged 13-17years, as compared with provider report of initiation and number of doses. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to examine associations related to concordance of parent and provider report. Of 51,746 adolescents, 84% concordance for HPV vaccine initiation and 70% concordance for number of doses was observed. Accuracy varied by race/ethnicity, region, time, and income. The parent report of number of doses was more likely to be accurate among parents of 13 and 14year old females than 17year olds. Accuracy of initiation and number of doses were lower among Hispanic and black adolescents compared to white parents. The odds of over-report was higher among minorities compared to whites, but the odds of underreport was also markedly higher in these groups compared to parents of white teens. Accuracy of parental vaccine report decreased across time. These findings are important for healthcare providers who need to ascertain the vaccination status of young adults. Strengthening existing immunization registries to improve data sharing capabilities and record completeness could improve vaccination rates, while avoiding costs associated with over-vaccination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Parental perceptions of teen driving: Restrictions, worry and influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Amy; Shults, Ruth A; Bhat, Geeta

    2016-12-01

    Parents play a critical role in preventing crashes among teens. Research of parental perceptions and concerns regarding teen driving safety is limited. We examined results from the 2013 Summer ConsumerStyles survey that queried parents about restrictions placed on their teen drivers, their perceived level of "worry" about their teen driver's safety, and influence of parental restrictions regarding their teen's driving. We produced frequency distributions for the number of restrictions imposed, parental "worry," and influence of rules regarding their teen's driving, reported by teen's driving license status (learning to drive or obtained a driver's license). Response categories were dichotomized because of small cell sizes, and we ran separate log-linear regression models to explore whether imposing all four restrictions on teen drivers was associated with either worry intensity ("a lot" versus "somewhat, not very much or not at all") or perceived influence of parental rules ("a lot" versus "somewhat, not very much or not at all"). Among the 456 parent respondents, 80% reported having restrictions for their teen driver regarding use of safety belts, drinking and driving, cell phones, and text messaging while driving. However, among the 188 parents of licensed teens, only 9% reported having a written parent-teen driving agreement, either currently or in the past. Worrying "a lot" was reported less frequently by parents of newly licensed teens (36%) compared with parents of learning teens (61%). Parents report having rules and restrictions for their teen drivers, but only a small percentage formalize the rules and restrictions in a written parent-teen driving agreement. Parents worry less about their teen driver's safety during the newly licensed phase, when crash risk is high as compared to the learning phase. Further research is needed into how to effectively support parents in supervising and monitoring their teen driver. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Teens Mix Prescription Opioids with Other Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Future Survey on teen drug use ( December 2017 ) View more related News Releases This page was last updated April 2013 Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults Criminal Justice ...

  3. Sexual risk attitudes and intentions of youth aged 12-14 years: survey comparisons of parent-teen prevention and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Regina P; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors compared differences in sexual risk attitudes and intentions for three groups of youth (experimental program, n = 90; attention control, n = 80; and nonparticipant control, n = 634) aged 12-14 years. Two student groups participated with their parents in programs focused on strengthening family interaction and prevention of sexual risks, HIV, and adolescent pregnancy. Surveys assessed students' attitudes and intentions regarding early sexual and other health-risk behaviors, family interactions, and perceived parental disapproval of risk behaviors. The authors used general linear modeling to compare results. The experimental prevention program differentiated the total scores of the 3 groups (p group scored higher than the nonparticipant group on total scores (p < .01) and on students' intention to avoid sex (p < .01). The results suggest this novel educational program involving both parents and students offers a promising approach to HIV and teen pregnancy prevention.

  4. Factors associated with driving in teens with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Patty; Kao, Trudy; Curry, Allison E; Durbin, Dennis R

    2012-01-01

    To compare the characteristics of driving and nondriving teens and explore the driving outcomes for teens with higher functioning autism spectrum disorders. Parents of teens aged 15 to 18 years with a parent-reported diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder enrolled in Interactive Autism Network, an online research registry, were eligible for this cross-sectional study. An online survey was used for data collection. A total of 297 parents completed the survey. Sixty-three percent of teens currently drive or plan to drive. Twenty-nine percent of the teens who are age-eligible to drive currently drive. Compared with age-eligible but nondriving teens, a greater proportion of driving teens were in full-time regular education (p job (p = .008). A greater proportion of parents of driving teens had taught ≥1 teen to drive previously (p education, or access to public transportation. Driving predictors included individualized education plans with driving goals, indicators of functional status (classroom placement, college aspiration, and job experience), and parent experience with teaching teens to drive. Twelve percent of teens received driving citations, and 12% of teens had been involved in a motor vehicle crash. Although a significant proportion of teens with higher functioning autism spectrum disorders were driving or learning to drive, the fact that most driving teens' individualized education plans did not include driving goals suggests an area of opportunity for improvement in transition planning. Driving teens were more frequently in regular education settings with college aspirations, which could help schools identify potential drivers.

  5. The incorporation of gender perspective into Spanish health surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs, Izabella; Borrell, Carme; Artazcoz, Lucia; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta

    2007-12-01

    Most studies into social determinants of health conducted in Spain based on data from health surveys have focused on social class inequalities. This paper aims to review the progressive incorporation of gender perspective and sex differences into health surveys in Spain, and to suggest design, data collection and analytical proposals as well as to make policy proposals. Changes introduced into health surveys in Spain since 1995 to incorporate gender perspective are examined, and proposals for the future are made, which would permit the analysis of differences in health between women and men as a result of biology or because of gender inequalities. The introduction of gender perspective in health surveys requires the incorporation of questions related to family setting and reproductive work, workplace and society in general to detect gender differences and inequalities (for example, domestic work, intimate partner violence, discrimination, contract type or working hours). Health indicators reflecting differential morbidity and taking into account the different life cycle stages must also be incorporated. Analyses ought to be disaggregated by sex and interpretation of results must consider the complex theoretical frameworks explaining the differences in health between men and women based on sex differences and those related to gender. Analysis of survey data ought to consider the impact of social, political and cultural constructs of each society. Any significant modification in procedures for collection of data relevant to the study of gender will require systematic coordination between institutions generating the data and researchers who are trained in and sensitive to the topic.

  6. Pre-teen alcohol use initiation and suicide attempts among middle and high school students: findings from the 2006 Georgia Student Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahn, Monica H; Bossarte, Robert M; Ashby, Jeffrey S; Meyers, Joel

    2010-05-01

    Early alcohol use initiation has been linked to suicide attempts among youth. However, very little is known about the potential impact of alcohol-related norms and beliefs and how these may impact the association between alcohol use and suicide attempt. This study examines the associations between early alcohol use and suicide attempts while controlling for demographic characteristics, and alcohol-related beliefs and norms (e.g., believing alcohol causes harm to health or that adults or friends disapprove of alcohol use) and potential confounders. Analyses were based on the 2006 Georgia Student Health Survey (N=175,311) of students in grades 6, 8, 10 and 12. The current analyses were limited to students in grades 8, 10 and 12, who either began drinking prior to age 13 or who were non drinkers (n=87,349). Pre-teen alcohol use initiation was associated with suicide attempts (Adj.OR=1.51; 95%CI:1.38-1.66) relative to not drinking with similar associations for boys (Adj.OR=1.72; 95%CI:1.52-1.94) and girls (Adj.OR=1.26; 95%CI:1.08-1.45). Students who believed that alcohol was harmful to their health, or that friends or adults disapproved of their alcohol use, or who had been taught about substance use in school were less likely to make a suicide attempt, although findings differed for boys and girls. Pre-teen alcohol use initiation is an important risk factor for suicide attempts among boys and girls in Georgia. Increased efforts to delay and reduce early alcohol use through clinical interventions, education, and policies that impact norms and knowledge related to alcohol use are needed and may in turn reduce suicide attempts. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. La Marihuana: Informacion para los Adolescentes. Revisada (Marijuana: Facts for Teens. Revised).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Using a question and answer format, this booklet is designed to inform teens about the dangers of marijuana usage. Inset facts about marijuana and teen perspectives compliment the following topics: (1) What is marijuana? (2) How is marijuana used? (3) How long does marijuana stay in the user's body? (4) How many teens smoke marijuana? (5) Why do…

  8. Report on Teen Cigarette Smoking and Marijuana Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    While other surveys seek to measure the extent of substance abuse in the population, the "CASA National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse VIII: Teens and Parents" probes substance-abuse risk and identifies factors that increase or diminish the likelihood that teens will abuse tobacco, alcohol or illegal drugs. This year,…

  9. Helping Teens Cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jami I.

    2003-01-01

    Considers the role of school library media specialists in helping teens cope with developmental and emotional challenges. Discusses resiliency research, and opportunities to develop programs and services especially for middle school and high school at-risk teens. (LRW)

  10. Teen Suicide and Guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Issues Listen Text Size Email Print Share Teen Suicide and Guns Page Content Article Body Protect Your ... thinking of a passing problem, not the outcome! Teen Suicide—A Big Problem Suicide is one of the ...

  11. Writing, Technology and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Amanda; Arafeh, Sousan; Smith, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Teenagers' lives are filled with writing. All teens write for school, and 93% of teens say they write for their own pleasure. Most notably, the vast majority of teens have eagerly embraced written communication with their peers as they share messages on their social network pages, in emails and instant messages online, and through fast-paced thumb…

  12. The Teen Parent Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptiste, H. Prentice, Jr.; Walker, Diane

    2005-01-01

    Pregnant teenagers and young parents often do not receive the quality of education available to other students. Most schools do not have a separate facility or program that deals with their special needs. Pregnant teens and teen parents should not be left behind. The Teen Parent Academy--a unique program in a predominantly Hispanic Texas border…

  13. The Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher, 1996. Students Voice Their Opinions On: Violence, Social Tension and Equality among Teens. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This report, the first in a series of four 1996 releases of students' opinions, represents a continued effort by MetLife to provide insight and understanding to the issues of violence and social tension in American public schools. The survey focuses on the social climate of the nation's public schools from the perspective of public school students…

  14. Trends in teen sexual behaviour and condom use

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rotermann, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Results from the 1996/1997 National Population Health Survey and the 2003 and 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey suggest that the proportion of teens who have had sexual intercourse has declined. In 2005, 43...

  15. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Coverage Among Girls Before 13 Years: A Birth Year Cohort Analysis of the National Immunization Survey-Teen, 2008-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyarajah, Jenny; Elam-Evans, Laurie D; Stokley, Shannon; Smith, Philip J; Singleton, James A

    2016-09-01

    Routine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is recommended at 11 or 12 years by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. National Immunization Survey-Teen data were analyzed to evaluate, among girls, coverage with one or more doses of HPV vaccination, missed opportunities for HPV vaccination, and potential achievable coverage before 13 years. Results were stratified by birth year cohorts. HPV vaccination coverage before 13 years (≥1 HPV dose) increased from 28.4% for girls born in 1995 to 46.8% for girls born in 2000. Among girls born during 1999-2000 who had not received HPV vaccination before 13 years (57.2%), 80.1% had at least 1 missed opportunity to receive HPV vaccination before 13 years. Opportunities to vaccinate for HPV at age 11 to 12 years are missed. Strategies are needed to decrease these missed opportunities for HPV vaccination. This can be facilitated by the administration of all vaccines recommended for adolescents at the same visit. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Development of A Teen-Focused Exergame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Cantu, Dora; Rajendran, Madhur; Rajendran, Mayur; Bhargava, Tanay; Zhang, Yuting; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yan; Deng, Zhigang

    2016-09-28

    Exergames require body movement to play and may be an effective method for enhancing teen physical activity (PA). However, results have been mixed. Innovative methods are needed to develop Exergames that increase and maintain PA. Self-representational avatars, or avatars created from a digital image of an individual, may increase PA (e.g., intensity, duration) during Exergame play. This article addresses this novel idea by describing the development of an Exergame played with a self-representational avatar. Twelve- to 14-year-olds, stratified by gender, body mass index, and PA, were invited to participate in two rounds of data collection. Each round consisted of an online survey, followed by a telephone interview to ensure comprehension of survey responses. After the first round, an Exergame prototype and the system for creating the self-representational avatar were created. A second round of data was collected to obtain information with which to create a fully functional Exergame and the avatar creation system. Forty-eight teens were recruited. The sample was multi-ethnic (41.7% White, 37.5% Black, 18.8% Hispanic, 2.1% Mixed/Other). Complete data were obtained on 48 teens in the first round of data collection and on 43 teens in the second round. Teens provided important information regarding preferences and expectations. Gender similarities and differences were observed. This research contributes to the body of knowledge regarding how to design an appealing Exergame for teens navigated by a self-representational avatar.

  17. Medication Adherence Survey: A First Year Pharmacy Immersion Students’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia F Ortiz Lopez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available First year pharmacy Immersion students from University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy used a three question survey during their rotation at Moses H. Cone Hospital that analyzed patients’ medication adherence. Data collection revealed common trends that have been shown in the literature and areas for improvement. This method of evaluation was used by Phase I Immersion students to gain perspective on the problems we continue to have with medication adherence. Conflict of Interest We do not have any potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.   Type: Student Project

  18. The impact of over-the-counter availability of "Plan B" on teens' contraceptive decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Tamar; Eggers, Sara L; Fischhoff, Baruch

    2008-08-01

    In ruling on the over-the-counter status (OTC) of the emergency contraceptive, "Plan B", the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) questioned whether younger adolescent females could adequately self-select and self-medicate. That determination requires a judgment of fact, regarding how increased emergency contraceptive availability would affect adolescents' behavior, and a judgment of values, regarding the acceptability of different outcomes. We present a general approach to such problems, using analytical and empirical methods grounded in behavioral decision research. We illustrate it with findings from 30 in-depth interviews and follow-up surveys, with adolescent females aged 13-19 in the Pittsburgh area reporting how Plan B availability would affect three decisions (having sex, choosing contraceptives, using Plan B). Although the FDA expressed concern about younger teens using Plan B as their primary form of contraception, neither younger nor older teens revealed such an intention. However, teens preferred easier availability, should emergency contraceptive be needed. Incorporating an understanding of teens' decision-related perspectives can make such policies more predictable and transparent.

  19. What's behind the Good News: The Decline in Teen Pregnancy Rates during the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Christine

    Noting that rates of teen pregnancies and births have declined over the past decade, this analysis examined how much of the progress is due to fewer teens having sex and how much to lower rates of pregnancy among sexually active teens. The analysis drew on data from the federal government's National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), a large,…

  20. Menu Ideas for Vegetarian Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Menu Ideas for Vegetarian Teens Menu Ideas for Vegetarian Teens By Mindy Hermann, MBA, RD Published July ... a sample menu to try. Menu for Teen Vegetarian (Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian) Calories: 2,270; Protein: 112g; ...

  1. Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Use Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Helping Teens Resist Sexual Pressure Ages & Stages Listen ...

  2. Global change: The geological survey of Canada perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckman, B.H. (University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)); Harry, D.G. (Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada))

    Geological processes are fundamental to understanding global change, or the study of the way mankind modifies the earth environment, and many activities of the Geological Survey of Canada are directly relevant to global change issues. From the Survey's perspective, several aspects of these issues are critical: prediction of present and future climate-process systems from past and present environments, the present rate and magnitude of environmental change in Canada, and the areas of Canada which are at risk due to global change impacts. Global change studies are of particular importance in the Arctic for such reasons as the probability of early detection of global warming in the Arctic, the critical role of the Canadian Arctic in determining global climate, and the strength of Canadian expertise in Arctic research. Research being conducted on contemporary environments, the paleoenvironmental record, the carbon cycle and greenhouse effect, changes in sea level, and environmental geochemistry is outlined.

  3. The Effect(s) of Teen Pregnancy: Reconciling Theory, Methods, and Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Christina J; Fiel, Jeremy E

    2016-02-01

    Although teenage mothers have lower educational attainment and earnings than women who delay fertility, causal interpretations of this relationship remain controversial. Scholars argue that there are reasons to predict negative, trivial, or even positive effects, and different methodological approaches provide some support for each perspective. We reconcile this ongoing debate by drawing on two heuristics: (1) each methodological strategy emphasizes different women in estimation procedures, and (2) the effects of teenage fertility likely vary in the population. Analyses of the Child and Young Adult Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 3,661) confirm that teen pregnancy has negative effects on most women's attainment and earnings. More striking, however, is that effects on college completion and early earnings vary considerably and are most pronounced among those least likely to experience an early pregnancy. Further analyses suggest that teen pregnancy is particularly harmful for those with the brightest socioeconomic prospects and who are least prepared for the transition to motherhood.

  4. The Meth Project and Teen Meth Use: New Estimates from the National and State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D Mark; Elsea, David

    2015-12-01

    In this note, we use data from the national and state Youth Risk Behavior Surveys for the period 1999 through 2011 to estimate the relationship between the Meth Project, an anti-methamphetamine advertising campaign, and meth use among high school students. During this period, a total of eight states adopted anti-meth advertising campaigns. After accounting for pre-existing downward trends in meth use, we find little evidence that the campaign curbed meth use in the full sample. We do find, however, some evidence that the Meth Project may have decreased meth use among White high school students. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Changing Sociodemographic Factors and Teen Fertility: 1991-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Anne K; Abma, Joyce C

    2015-10-01

    This study analyzed the roles of trends in sociodemographic factors known to be related to the risk of a teen birth. The goal was to analyze the roles of these trends in maternal education, family structure and mother's age at first birth in the likelihood of adolescents becoming teen mothers across multiple birth cohorts of women covering the years since 1991. Data are from the 1995, 2002, 2006-2010 and 2011-2013 National Surveys of Family Growth (NSFG). Consecutive birth cohorts of female respondents were constructed and retrospectively followed to estimate the risk of a teen birth for each cohort. Logistic regression models estimate the odds of a teen birth across cohorts and within strata of the predictors across cohorts. Maternal education rose across cohorts; the proportion who were non-Hispanic white declined. In general, the likelihood of an adolescent birth did not change within categories of the predictors that are considered at higher risk for a teen birth across birth cohorts. Specifically, there was no change in the odds of a teen birth among women whose mothers did not finish high school, those born to teen mothers and those not from two-parent families. The odds of a birth declined across cohorts for black women. The findings suggest that much of the decline in teen birth rates is due to declines in the proportion of teens in higher risk categories, rather than to declines within those categories.

  6. Adult outcomes of teen mothers across birth cohorts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Driscoll

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teen and young adult mothers have lower socioeconomic status than older mothers. Objective: This study analyzes the socioeconomic status (SES of teen, young adult, and older adult mothers across four five-year birth cohorts from 1956 to 1975 who were teens from 1971 to 1994. Methods: Data were pooled from the 1995, 2002, and 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG. Mothers were categorized by age at first birth and by their birth cohorts. The SES (education, single motherhood, poverty, employment of teen, young adult, and older mothers was compared across cohorts and within cohorts. Results: Among teen mothers, the odds of fulltime employment improved across birth cohorts and the odds of educational attainment beyond high school did not vary. Their odds of single motherhood and living in poverty increased across cohorts. The odds of higher education and single motherhood increased across birth cohorts for young adult mothers as did the odds of living in poverty, even if working fulltime. Among older adult mothers, educational attainment and the odds of single motherhood rose for recent cohorts. Conclusions: Comparisons between teen mothers and both young adult and all adult mothers within cohorts suggest that gaps in single motherhood and poverty between teen and adult mothers have widened over time, to the detriment of teen mothers. Teen mothers have become more likely to be single and poor than in the past and compared to older mothers.

  7. NIDA for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week® Enter Search Term(s): Teens: Drug Use and the Brain Get the latest on ... News About Drugs Activities, Games, and More National Drug & Alcohol Facts Week About ... Find NIDA for Teens on: Site last updated December 14, 2017 NOTE: ...

  8. Teen mothers and schooling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teen mothers, their educators, and parents were interviewed to gather infor- mation about the girls' schooling situation. ... from parents, peers and teachers. On the one hand they receive very little ...... teenage pregnancy is another area of conflict between the teen mothers and the communities. One LO teacher narrated that ...

  9. Risky Teen Driving in a Rural Southern State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Kathy; Hardwick, William; Lawson, Victoria; Nichols, Elizabeth; Nichols, Michele; King, William D

    2017-05-01

    Alabama is one of the five US states with the highest teen driving mortality. We recruited teen drivers to participate in a questionnaire regarding high-risk driving behaviors. Teens were recruited from a large county school system to participate in a voluntary anonymous survey. Questions were taken in part from the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Descriptive statistics and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. A total of 1023 teen drivers participated (46% boys, 47% African American, 39% white, 6% Latino, and 7% other). In all, 526 students (52%) reported inconsistent seat belt use. Half of the teens surveyed reported using a cellular telephone while driving within the past 30 days (51%); 10% admitted to driving after drinking alcoholic beverages in the past 30 days, with 23% saying they had ridden with a driver who had been drinking. High-risk teen driving behaviors were reported by many of the participants in our study. The majority of teens surveyed do not routinely wear seatbelts. Common misperceptions still exist regarding seatbelts and should be a focus of future education. Future research should focus on parental behaviors and correcting misperceptions of young drivers.

  10. Awareness and Knowledge of Child and Adolescent Risky Behaviors: A Parent's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, Nancy R; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Thacker, Paige

    2016-04-01

    Adolescence is a developmental stage marked by risk-taking and limited comprehension of dangers of risky behaviors. Previous research has focused on adolescents' perspective of risk with little evidence on parents' knowledge regarding risk. This qualitative study examined parental knowledge and perspectives of child/teen risk behaviors associated with salvia, sexting, inhalant use/abuse, and self/participant-assisted choking. A sample of 30 parents of children/teens aged 10-17 completed a self-administered survey based on Flanagan's critical incident technique. Data were analyzed according to Flanagan's guidelines. Two advanced practice nurses determined category reliability with 95% agreement. The survey yielded five categories of parental responses to potential risky behaviors in their child/teen including the following: talking to my children, setting up consequences, confronting the child, seeking help, and talking to others. Although the majority of the parents were aware of newer behaviors, less than one half of the participants reported discussing risks with their child/teen. One third reported that their child knew a friend who was thinking about/tried sexting. One quarter of parents reported that they were not monitoring their child/teen's media use. Study findings provide important implications for developing an evidence-based education intervention to improve parents' awareness, knowledge, and identification of risk behaviors in their children/teens. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Understanding multiple levels of norms about teen pregnancy and their relationships to teens' sexual behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Domingue, Benjamin W; Boardman, Jason D

    2014-06-01

    Researchers seeking to understand teen sexual behaviors often turn to age norms, but they are difficult to measure quantitatively. Previous work has usually inferred norms from behavioral patterns or measured group-level norms at the individual level, ignoring multiple reference groups. Capitalizing on the multilevel design of the Add Health survey, we measure teen pregnancy norms perceived by teenagers, as well as average norms at the school and peer network levels. School norms predict boys' perceived norms, while peer network norms predict girls' perceived norms. Peer network and individually perceived norms against teen pregnancy independently and negatively predict teens' likelihood of sexual intercourse. Perceived norms against pregnancy predict increased likelihood of contraception among sexually experienced girls, but sexually experienced boys' contraceptive behavior is more complicated: When both the boy and his peers or school have stronger norms against teen pregnancy he is more likely to contracept, and in the absence of school or peer norms against pregnancy, boys who are embarrassed are less likely to contracept. We conclude that: (1) patterns of behavior cannot adequately operationalize teen pregnancy norms, (2) norms are not simply linked to behaviors through individual perceptions, and (3) norms at different levels can operate independently of each other, interactively, or in opposition. This evidence creates space for conceptualizations of agency, conflict, and change that can lead to progress in understanding age norms and sexual behaviors.

  12. Development of a Teen-Focused Exergame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Debbe; Cantu, Dora; Rajendran, Madhur; Rajendran, Mayur; Bhargava, Tanay; Zhang, Yuting; Chen, Cheng; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Exergames require body movement to play and may be an effective method for enhancing teen physical activity (PA). However, results have been mixed. Innovative methods are needed to develop Exergames that increase and maintain PA. Self-representational avatars, or avatars created from a digital image of an individual, may increase PA (e.g., intensity, duration) during Exergame play. This article addresses this novel idea by describing the development of an Exergame played with a self-representational avatar. Materials and Methods: Twelve- to 14-year-olds, stratified by gender, body mass index, and PA, were invited to participate in two rounds of data collection. Each round consisted of an online survey, followed by a telephone interview to ensure comprehension of survey responses. After the first round, an Exergame prototype and the system for creating the self-representational avatar were created. A second round of data was collected to obtain information with which to create a fully functional Exergame and the avatar creation system. Results: Forty-eight teens were recruited. The sample was multi-ethnic (41.7% White, 37.5% Black, 18.8% Hispanic, 2.1% Mixed/Other). Complete data were obtained on 48 teens in the first round of data collection and on 43 teens in the second round. Teens provided important information regarding preferences and expectations. Gender similarities and differences were observed. Conclusion: This research contributes to the body of knowledge regarding how to design an appealing Exergame for teens navigated by a self-representational avatar. PMID:27680385

  13. Emotional Eating (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Emotional Eating KidsHealth > For Teens > Emotional Eating Print A A ... make you feel sickeningly full? What Is Emotional Eating? Emotional eating is when people use food as ...

  14. Date Rape (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breath? Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Date Rape KidsHealth > For Teens > Date Rape Print A ... Yourself Getting Help Reporting a Rape What Is Date Rape? When people think of rape , they might ...

  15. Lactose Intolerance (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Lactose Intolerance KidsHealth / For Teens / Lactose Intolerance What's in this ... really consider it a disease. Who Gets Lactose Intolerance? A person may be or may become lactose ...

  16. Thyroid Disease and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Thyroid Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Thyroid Disease Print A ... other parts of your body. continue What Is Thyroid Disease? Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid gland ...

  17. Endocrine System (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counselors Kidney Stones Brain and Nervous System Endocrine System KidsHealth > For Teens > Endocrine System Print A A ... called the endocrine system . What Is the Endocrine System? Although we rarely think about the endocrine system, ...

  18. Digestive System (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counselors Kidney Stones Brain and Nervous System Digestive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Digestive System Print A A ... of the body as feces. About the Digestive System Every morsel of food we eat has to ...

  19. Appendicitis in Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Appendicitis in Teens Page Content Article Body Early adolescence ... it has no known function. Symptoms that Suggest Appendicitis may Include: Persistent abdominal pain that migrates from ...

  20. Hemophilia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Personal Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Hemophilia KidsHealth > For Teens > Hemophilia Print A A A ... bruises can be a big deal. What Is Hemophilia? Hemophilia is a disease that prevents blood from ...

  1. Help Teens Manage Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children and adolescents in the United States. However, management of diabetes—which involves frequent testing of blood sugar levels ... Skills Training (CST) as a part of routine diabetes management. Its aim is to improve diabetic teens' coping ...

  2. Bipolar Disorder (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the juvenile justice system, abusing drugs, or committing suicide. Because children and teens with bipolar disorder do not usually show the ... September 2015 previous 1 • 2 • 3 • 4 ... Contact Us Print Resources Send to a Friend ...

  3. Endometriosis (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often suggest lifestyle changes for teens who have endometriosis, too. A healthy diet, moderate exercise, and relaxation techniques such as yoga and meditation can sometimes help. What's It Like ...

  4. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth > For Teens > Cerebral Palsy Print A A ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  5. Anemia (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of these causes is linked to a different type of anemia. When someone has anemia, you might hear people ... Anemia Iron deficiency anemia is the most common type of anemia in U.S. teens. It happens when a person's ...

  6. Blood Transfusions (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Blood Transfusions KidsHealth > For Teens > Blood Transfusions Print A A ... his or her body. continue What Is a Blood Transfusion? A transfusion is a simple medical procedure that ...

  7. A survey of stakeholder perspectives on exoskeleton technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Jamie; Parker, Claire; Borisoff, Jaimie; Mortenson, W Ben; Mattie, Johanne

    2014-12-19

    Exoskeleton technology has potential benefits for wheelchair users' health and mobility. However, there are practical barriers to their everyday use as a mobility device. To further understand potential exoskeleton use, and facilitate the development of new technologies, a study was undertaken to explore perspectives of wheelchair users and healthcare professionals on reasons for use of exoskeleton technology, and the importance of a variety of device characteristics. An online survey with quantitative and qualitative components was conducted with wheelchair users and healthcare professionals working directly with individuals with mobility impairments. Respondents rated whether they would use or recommend an exoskeleton for four potential reasons. Seventeen design features were rated and compared in terms of their importance. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to categorize the 17 design features into meaningful groupings. Content analysis was used to identify themes for the open ended questions regarding reasons for use of an exoskeleton. 481 survey responses were analyzed, 354 from wheelchair users and 127 from healthcare professionals. The most highly rated reason for potential use or recommendation of an exoskeleton was health benefits. Of the design features, 4 had a median rating of very important: minimization of falls risk, comfort, putting on/taking off the device, and purchase cost. Factor analysis identified two main categories of design features: Functional Activities and Technology Characteristics. Qualitative findings indicated that health and physical benefits, use for activity and access reasons, and psychosocial benefits were important considerations in whether to use or recommend an exoskeleton. This study emphasizes the importance of developing future exoskeletons that are comfortable, affordable, minimize fall risk, and enable functional activities. Findings from this study can be utilized to inform the priorities for future

  8. Surveying and Mapping Geographical Information from the Perspective of Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LÜ Guonian

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It briefly reviewed the history of geographic information content development since the existence of geographic information system. It pointed out that the current definition of geographic information is always the extension from the "spatial+ attributes" basic mapping framework of geographic information. It is increasingly difficult to adapt to the analysis and application of spatial-temporal big data. From the perspective of geography research subject and content, it summarized systematically that the content and extension of the "geographic information" that geography needs. It put forward that a six-element expression model of geographic information, including spatial location, semantic description, attribute characteristics, geometric form, evolution process, and objects relationship.Under the guidance of the laws of geography, for geographical phenomenon of spatial distribution, temporal pattern and evolution process, the interaction mechanism of the integrated expression, system analysis and efficient management, it designed that a unified GIS data model which is expressed by six basic elements, a new GIS data structure driven by geographical rules and interaction, and key technologies of unstructured spatio-temporal data organization and storage. It provided that a theoretical basis and technical support for the shift from the surveying and mapping geographic information to the scientific geographic information, and it can help improving the organization, management, analysis and expression ability of the GIS of the geographical laws such as geographical pattern, evolution process, and interaction between elements.

  9. Vital signs: teen pregnancy--United States, 1991--2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    In 2009, approximately 410,000 teens aged 15-19 years gave birth in the United States, and the teen birth rate remains higher than in other developed countries. To describe U.S. trends in teen births and related factors, CDC used data on 1) teen birth rates during 1991-2009 from the National Vital Statistics System, 2) sexual intercourse and contraceptive use among high school students during 1991-2009 from the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey, and 3) sex education, parent communication, use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs), and receipt of reproductive health services among teens aged 15-19 years from the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth. In 2009, the national teen birth rate was 39.1 births per 1,000 females, a 37% decrease from 61.8 births per 1,000 females in 1991 and the lowest rate ever recorded. State-specific teen birth rates varied from 16.4 to 64.2 births per 1,000 females and were highest among southern states. Birth rates for black and Hispanic teens were 59.0 and 70.1 births per 1,000 females, respectively, compared with 25.6 for white teens. From 1991 to 2009, the percentage of high school students who ever had sexual intercourse decreased from 54% to 46%, and the percentage of students who had sexual intercourse in the past 3 months but did not use any method of contraception at last sexual intercourse decreased from 16% to 12%. From 1999 to 2009, the percentage of students who had sexual intercourse in the past 3 months and used dual methods at last sexual intercourse (condoms with either birth control pills or the injectable contraceptive Depo-Provera) increased from 5% to 9%. During 2006-2008, 65% of female teens and 53% of male teens received formal sex education that covered saying no to sex and provided information on methods of birth control. Overall, 44% of female teens and 27% of male teens had spoken with their parents about both topics, but among teens who had ever had sexual intercourse, 20% of females and 31

  10. Is Teen Marriage a Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Naomi

    Many policy proposals related to welfare will have the effect, intended or unintended, of encouraging teens to marry. This paper discusses the implications of teen marriage. Marriage is one route to reducing out-of-wedlock births to teens who become pregnant, but there is reason to believe such marriages are often unstable. A review of the…

  11. Teens, technology, and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanza, Francesco; Hauser, Diane

    2014-09-01

    Teens are avid users of new technologies and social media. Nearly 95% of US adolescents are online at least occasionally. Health care professionals and organizations that work with teens should identify online health information that is both accurate and teen friendly. Early studies indicate that some of the new health technology tools are acceptable to teens, particularly texting, computer-based psychosocial screening, and online interventions. Technology is being used to provide sexual health education, medication reminders for contraception, and information on locally available health care services. This article reviews early and emerging studies of technology use to promote teen health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. IsTeen Court effective for repeat offenders? A test of the restorative justice approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgays, Deborah Kirby; DeMilio, Lisa

    2005-02-01

    Teen Courts are an effective judicial alternative for many youth offenders. The majority of youth courts deal solely with first-time offenders. However, repeat offenders are at a greater risk for future crime. Is Teen Court effective with more experienced offenders? In this study, the authors examine the outcomes of 26 Whatcom County Teen Court offenders with at least one prior conviction. The sentence completion rate was higher and the recidivism was lower for the Teen Court offenders when compared with a sample of first-time Court Diversion offenders. This objective evidence of program success is augmented by an offender's perspective on his or her court experience. These perspectives as well as the continued voluntary involvement with Teen Court are discussed in relation to empowerment theory.

  13. Prevalence and characteristics of teen motherhood in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sahab, Ban; Heifetz, Marina; Tamim, Hala; Bohr, Yvonne; Connolly, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The study aims to examine the prevalence and characteristics of adolescent mothers throughout the provinces of Canada. The analysis was based on the Maternity Experience Survey targeting women aged ≥15 years who had singleton live births during 2005/2006 in the Canadian provinces and territories. The main dependent variable in this study was the mother's age at the time of delivery divided into teen mothers (<20 years) and average-aged mothers (≥20 and <35 years). Socio-economic factors, demographic factors and pregnancy related factors were considered for a logistic regression analysis comparing teen mothers to average-aged mothers. Bootstrapping was performed to account for the complex sampling design. The sample size was 6,188 weighted to represent 76,110 Canadian women. The proportion of teen mothers in the MES study was 2.9%, and their average age was 18.1 years (SD = 1.1). As compared to average-aged mothers, teen mothers were more likely to have low socio-economic status, be non-immigrants, have no partner, reside in the Western Prairies, have previously experienced physical or sexual abuse and have preferred to have had their pregnancies later into their adulthood. Despite the above, teen mothers were more likely to attend prenatal classes than average-aged mothers (Odds ratio = 2.54, 95% confidence interval: 1.74-3.71). Intervention studies should aim to raise awareness among teens to prevent teen pregnancies. Since teen mothers are very likely to attend prenatal courses, the focus of these classes should be tailored to the needs of teen mothers. More in depth qualitative studies should aim to understand their individual needs.

  14. "You just don't report that kind of stuff": investigating teens' ambivalence toward peer-perpetrated, unwanted sexual incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karen G

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of narratives from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) finds that one in three teenagers--12-18 years old--who experience an unwanted sexual incident perpetrated by another teen trivialize their incidents as minor, unimportant, or normal kid stuff. This study contextualizes these responses within a framework of ambivalence that highlights separately teens' ambiguity of definitions, or uncertainty that incidents perpetrated by other teens (especially dating partners and schoolmates) are "real" crimes or offenses worth reporting, and adaptive indifference, a more tactical response to conflicting norms and allegiances that discourage teens from reporting their peers' sexual misconduct to authorities. The context and consequences of teens' ambivalence are discussed.

  15. Depression (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Depression KidsHealth / For Teens / Depression What's in this article? ... Yourself Print en español Depresión Regular Sadness vs. Depression It's natural to feel sad, down, or discouraged ...

  16. Cyberbulling among Children and Teens: A Pervasive Global Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2017-01-01

    This report is a compiliation of evidence-informed blog posts on cyberbulling among children and teens. It examines the issue of cyberbullying from the perspective of both the victim and the perpetrator. A key argument is that cyberbullying is a matter not only for the children involved, but also for their families and educators.

  17. Improving safety for teens working in the retail trade sector: opportunities and obstacles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakocs, R C; Runyan, C W; Schulman, M D; Dunn, K A; Evensen, C T

    1998-10-01

    Using both quantitative and qualitative data, this study examined teen workers' perceptions about their work environments and the ways in which teens believe workplaces can be made safer. We conducted telephone interviews (n = 117) and six focus groups (n = 49) with two separate samples of North Carolina teens who worked in the retail trade sector. Survey findings indicate one-fifth of teens used equipment they thought dangerous; nearly 40% always or often felt rushed at work; and about half received training on how to avoid injury. Teens in the focus groups expressed concerns about workplace physical hazards, the threat of assault, being rushed, and having little power in the work environment. They also indicated that their workplace safety training was ineffective and that child labor laws were unnecessary. In order to be effective, interventions targeted at working teens need to address the organization of work and adolescent-manager interaction patterns.

  18. Rural junior high school students' risk factors for and perceptions of teen-age parenthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, K L; Price, J H; Thompson, C L; Schmalzried, H D

    1998-10-01

    A sample consisting of 689 junior high school rural adolescents was surveyed about their perceptions of being a teen parent and their current sexual behavior. A risk factor analysis also was conducted to determine factors that significantly predict whether adolescents had engaged in sexual intercourse. Results indicate that one in nine adolescents had engaged in sexual intercourse (11%). The risk factor analyses showed that smoking and efficacy expectations of not engaging in sexual intercourse were significant predictors for both genders. For the most part, adolescents responded positively on four constructs: 1) attitudes toward being a teen parent; 2) efficacy expectations of not engaging in sexual intercourse; 3) benefits of being a teen parent; and 4) and barriers to being a teen parent. However, when analyses were conducted for males and females separately, females scored higher on each factor. Overall, results indicate these teens recognized problems that may occur from being a teen parent.

  19. TANF and the Status of Teen Mothers Under Age 18. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies, Series A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acs, Gregory; Koball, Heather

    This brief uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort to profile teen mothers under welfare reform policies. Initially, it assesses the extent to which teen childbearing among 15- to 17-year-old girls has changed between the start of federal welfare reform in 1997 and 2000. Then, it examines changes in teen mothers'…

  20. Teaching Teens To Use Condoms Faithfully

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby Toddler Preschool Gradeschool Teen Dating & Sex Fitness Nutrition Driving Safety School Substance Use Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > Teen > Dating & Sex > Teaching Teens To Use Condoms Faithfully Ages & Stages ...

  1. Teen Ambassador Leadership Kit (TALK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna R. Gillespie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Teen Ambassador Leadership Kit, (TALK, is an annual weekend retreat designed for teens interested in promoting and marketing 4-H in their communities. TALK organizers felt teens would benefit from an intensive weekend retreat focused on communication. TALK produces a network of educated and excited 4-H teens that are available to help with 4-H promotion and marketing. Participants arrive on Friday evening for team building activities, on Saturday they participate in one of the workshops offered and on Sunday morning each workshop group has the opportunity to share their completed projects and what they learned. At the conclusion of the retreat, teens are designated "County 4-H Ambassadors" and certificates of completion, professional business cards and polo shirts are presented. The TALK teen participants return home to share what they learned with their local county 4-H staff and help promote and market 4-H in their communities.

  2. Small-body surveys and the Minor Planet Center perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, T.

    2014-07-01

    Surveys for small bodies in the Solar System have dramatically expanded capacity and capability over the last two decades; the principal reason being the shift from photographic to digital imaging and reduction techniques. This talk will discuss our current knowledge of minor planet and comet populations, as well as the main surveys responsible for the discovery of these objects. Amateur and professional contributions to the Solar System inventory will be discussed as well. Lastly there will be a discussion of future surveys, with an emphasis on the lessons learned from Pan-STARRS and NEOWISE.

  3. Understanding Your Teen's Emotional Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids and TeensTags: adolescence, emotional health, emotional problems, emotional wellness, mental health, patient education, patient information, stress September 2000 Copyright © American Academy ...

  4. Advanced biofuels: Future perspectives from an expert elicitation survey

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorese, Giulia; Catenacci, Michela; Verdolini, Elena; Bosetti, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates the main results of an expert elicitation survey on advanced (second and third generation) biofuel technologies. The survey focuses on eliciting probabilistic information on the future costs of advanced biofuels and on the potential role of RD&D (Research, Development and Demonstration) efforts in reducing these costs and in supporting the deployment of biofuels in OECD and non-OECD countries. Fifteen leading experts from different EU member states provide insights on t...

  5. Smells Like Teen Spirit: Evaluating a Midwestern Teen Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Michael; Twill, Sarah; Kim, Chigon

    2011-01-01

    Teen courts have grown rapidly in the United States despite little evidence of their effectiveness. A survival analysis of 635 teen court and 186 regular diversion participants showed no significant differences in recidivism, although program completers were half as likely to reoffend as noncompleters. Older offenders survived significantly better…

  6. Survey of survivors' perspective on return to work after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartke, Robert J; Trierweiler, Robert

    2015-10-01

    To describe the development and results of a detailed survey on return to work (RTW) after stroke completed by survivors at various stages of recovery. This study used a multi-method qualitative and quantitative research strategy to design and implement a 39-item survey for stroke survivors. Individual interviews, focus groups, and working committees were used to conceptualize the issues and translate them into a survey format. Surveys were distributed in regular and electronic mail. Groups of rehabilitation professionals, employers, and stroke survivors were assembled to review findings and obtain feedback to aide in interpretation. Overall 715 surveys were completed. The respondents were on average 54 years of age, mostly white, well-educated, urban dwelling, and in skilled occupations. Results are described in seven areas: financial, stroke impairments, organizational, work and psychological issues, interpersonal support, and therapy. Several salient findings are described including the role of fatigue, under utilization of vocational rehabilitation (VR) services, and motivational factors related to finances, self-esteem, work, and workplace relationships. Although earning an income is a strong motivation to RTW, salary decreases in importance when compared with other psychological benefits. Fatigue was rated as the second highest impairment barrier to RTW and persisted as a relevant impediment over time. Attitudes of co-workers and flexibility in work schedule were viewed as most helpful to the RTW process, whereas work stress was viewed as the greatest impediment to return. Only 24% of the sample received VR counseling with more respondents receiving counseling if they returned 6 months or longer after their stroke. Other trends and clinical and research implications are discussed.

  7. A National Survey of Graduate Education in Psychopharmacology: Advancing the Social Work Perspective on Psychiatric Medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Shannon; Narendorf, Sarah; Lacasse, Jeffrey R.

    2017-01-01

    Social workers' unique skills and professional perspective can contribute to improved practices in psychopharmacology, yet it is unclear how social work programs prepare students for this area of practice. This study examined instruction of psychopharmacology through a national Web-based survey of MSW program directors and instructors of…

  8. Teen Science Cafés: A Vehicle for Scientists Seeking Broader Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M.; Mayhew, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Teen Science Cafés are a global phenomenon where scientists and teenagers engage in lively conversations about current, relevant, and intriguing science. In the past two years, Teen Café programs have been initiated in 41 sites in 18 U.S. states via the Teen Science Cafe Network, teensciencecafe.org. Other such programs are growing in the UK, eastern Africa, South Africa, and Singapore. The events are a free, informal, and low risk way for scientists to share their science with a receptive audience much focused on future careers. The success of a Café depends on the core principle that rich conversation occurs; a Café program is not a lecture series. Engaging teen participants brings out different perspectives and new dimensions to the topic; this has typically given scientists new ways of thinking about their own research! Presenting the event as a conversation and inviting the teens to bring in questions and points of view is key to fostering a dynamic Café. Scientists report that the training provided for these engagements has changed the way they talk about their science to peers, managers, and funding agencies. Teen Cafés have been shown to significantly change teens' view of the importance of science in their lives, positively influence teens' understanding of science in the news, and increase their ability and confidence to use facts to support scientific points of view. The Café events also positively influenced teens' interest in science and science careers, and revealed to them the true nature of scientific research and the interesting lives that scientists lead. Cafés are an excellent vehicle for scientists to have broader impact on the current generation of students, our future adult citizens. The Teen Science Café Network is an open community of practice committed to helping others implement Teen Cafés.

  9. PERSPECTIVES ON PATIENT CENTERED CARE: A SURVEY OF GHANAIAN PHYSIOTHERAPISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahenkorah Josephine

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Implementation of patient-centered care (PCC in health-care has been shown to improve safety, trust, health outcomes and adherence. There is however a dearth of literature on perspectives around PCC with specific regard to physiotherapy. This study aimed at investigating the perspectives of Ghanaian physiotherapists on patient-centered care in relation to its meaning, attitude and limitations. Methods: A questionnaire design was used. A questionnaire comprising both closed and open-ended questions was used to collect data from Ghanaian physiotherapists via post and e-mail. A response rate of 60% was recorded. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and framework analysis. Results: Majority (97% of physiotherapists indicated practicing a PCC approach is important. Nine (9 themes arose regarding the meaning of PCC. Superficial understanding was present across most respondents. Misinterpretation of the meaning of PCC was also recorded from few respondents. Communication and education were the perceived most important and practiced PCC approaches. The least practiced approaches were determining number of treatment by patient preferences and departmental standards and administering patient preferred treatment choice. Twelve (12 themes arose from the limitations to PCC. The greatest limitation to PCC was found to be poor therapist-to-patient ratio. Conclusion: Ghanaian physiotherapists perceive PCC to be an important approach. Well known aspects of PCC are practiced and aspects regarding consideration of patient preferences are not practiced. The Ghanaian physiotherapist-patient experience is largely paternalistic. An increased awareness and understanding of PCC might translate into better implementation of PCC.

  10. Comparing Sexuality Communication Among Offspring of Teen Parents and Adult Parents: a Different Role for Extended Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Jennifer M; Tracy, Allison J; Richer, Amanda M; Erkut, Sumru

    2015-06-01

    This brief report examined teenagers' sexuality communication with their parents and extended families. It compared who teens of early parents (those who had children when they were adolescents) and teens of later parents (those who were adults when they had children) talk to about sex. Eighth grade students (N=1281) in 24 schools completed survey items about their communication about sex. Structural equation modeling was used to predict communication profiles, while adjusting for the nesting of students within schools. After controlling for teens' age, gender, race/ethnicity, grades, parent/guardian closeness, and social desirability of survey responses, as well as family status and median family income, results showed that teens of early (teen) parents were more likely than teens of later (adult) parents to talk with both parents and extended family about sex and less likely than later parents to talk only with parents. These findings indicate that realities of teen sexuality communication for teens of early parents may extend beyond a parent-teen model to include extended family. Extended family involvement in educational outreach is a potential untapped resource to support sexual health for teens of early parents.

  11. Flight physiology training experiences and perspectives: survey of 117 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrão, Luís; Zorro, Sara; Silva, Jorge; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Ribeiro, João

    2013-06-01

    Human factors and awareness of flight physiology play a crucial role in flight safety. Even so, international legislation is vague relative to training requirements in hypoxia and altitude physiology. Based on a previously developed survey, an adapted questionnaire was formulated and released online for Portuguese pilots. Specific questions regarding the need for pilot attention monitoring systems were added to the original survey. There were 117 pilots, 2 of whom were women, who completed the survey. Most of the pilots had a light aviation license and flew in unpressurized cabins at a maximum ceiling of 10,000 ft (3048 m). The majority of the respondents never experienced hypoxic symptoms. In general, most of the individuals agreed with the importance of an introductory hypoxia course without altitude chamber training (ACT) for all pilot populations, and with a pilot monitoring system in order to increase flight safety. Generally, most of the pilots felt that hypoxia education and training for unpressurized aircraft is not extensive enough. However, almost all the respondents were willing to use a flight physiology monitoring system in order to improve flight safety.

  12. Characteristics of Single Vehicle Crashes with a Teen Driver in South Carolina, 2005-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, Ruth A; Bergen, Gwen; Smith, Tracy J; Cook, Larry; Kindelberger, John; West, Bethany

    2017-09-22

    Teens' crash risk is highest in the first years of independent driving. Circumstances surrounding fatal crashes have been widely documented, but less is known about factors related to nonfatal teen driver crashes. This study describes single vehicle nonfatal crashes involving the youngest teen drivers (15-17 years), compares these crashes to single vehicle nonfatal crashes among adult drivers (35-44 years) and examines factors related to nonfatal injury producing crashes for teen drivers. Police crash data linked to hospital inpatient and emergency department data for 2005-2008 from the South Carolina Crash Outcomes Data Evaluation System (CODES) were analyzed. Nonfatal, single vehicle crashes involving passenger vehicles occurring on public roadways for teen (15-17 years) drivers were compared with those for adult (35-44 years) drivers on temporal patterns and crash risk factors per licensed driver and per vehicle miles traveled. Vehicle miles traveled by age group was estimated using data from the 2009 National Household Travel Survey. Multivariable log-linear regression analysis was conducted for teen driver crashes to determine which characteristics were related to crashes resulting in a minor/moderate injury or serious injury to at least one vehicle occupant. Compared with adult drivers, teen drivers in South Carolina had 2.5 times the single vehicle nonfatal crash rate per licensed driver and 11 times the rate per vehicle mile traveled. Teen drivers were nearly twice as likely to be speeding at the time of the crash compared with adult drivers. Teen driver crashes per licensed driver were highest during the afternoon hours of 3:00-5:59 pm and crashes per mile driven were highest during the nighttime hours of 9:00-11:59 pm. In 66% of the teen driver crashes, the driver was the only occupant. Crashes were twice as likely to result in serious injury when teen passengers were present than when the teen driver was alone. When teen drivers crashed while

  13. Teen Addiction. Current Controversies Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Paul A., Ed.

    The Current Controversies series explores social, political, and economic controversies that dominate the national and international scenes today from a variety of perspectives. Recent surveys have shown that, after years of decline, drug use among teenagers has increased during the 1990s, and that alcohol and tobacco use have remained…

  14. Survey on sedation in paediatric dentistry: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Alcaino, Eduardo A

    2011-09-01

    Paediatric dentists receive training in sedation during their advanced education training, but evidence suggests that this training varies widely. The purpose of this study was to survey members of the International Association of Paediatric Dentistry (IAPD) and the European Academy of Paediatric Dentistry (EAPD) on their opinion on pharmacological and other behavioural management techniques and their training related to provision of oral health care of paediatric patients in the dental setting. A request was made for access to the IAPD and EAPD membership email addresses. The responses were recorded anonymously and data uploaded into spss (version 9) and analysed using descriptive analysis and chi-square with and without tabulation processes. A total of 311 respondents of 1973 targeted individuals answered the survey. The response rate was 16%. The majority of the respondents came from the continent of Europe, Asia, and the Americas. The most frequent type of sedation was general anaesthesia (52% of the respondents), followed by nitrous oxide (46%) and then oral sedation (44%). At least 91% of the respondents indicated that they were interested in the development of continuing education on the topic of sedation. Paediatric dentists around the world use relatively few behaviour management techniques, including pharmacological management. There is a definite interest in continuing education in the area of sedation. The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2011 BSPD, IAPD and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. A 15-Year Perspective of the Fabry Outcome Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Giugliani MD, PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS is an international long-term observational registry sponsored by Shire for patients diagnosed with Fabry disease who are receiving or are candidates for therapy with agalsidase alfa (agalα. Established in 2001, FOS provides long-term data on agalα safety/efficacy and collects data on the natural history of Fabry disease, with the aim of improving clinical management. The FOS publications have helped establish prognostic and severity scores, defined the incidence of specific disease variants and implications for clinical management, described clinical manifestations in special populations, confirmed the high prevalence of cardiac morbidity, and demonstrated correlations between ocular changes and Fabry disease severity. These FOS data represent a rich resource with utility not only for description of natural history/therapeutic effects but also for exploratory hypothesis testing and generation of tools for diagnosis/management, with the potential to improve future patient outcomes.

  16. European perspective on less invasive surfactant administration-a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Daniel; Porcaro, Ugo; Fleck, Thilo; Fuchs, Hans

    2017-02-01

    Less invasive surfactant administration or minimally invasive surfactant therapy (LISA/MIST) has been proposed for the administration of surfactant in preterm infants without intubation. The aim of our survey was to assess the rate of utilization, premedication as well as technique and equipment used for LISA/MIST. Furthermore, attitudes and experiences in regard to indications, side effects, and efficacy should be assessed. An online-based survey was sent to 324 neonatologists from different centers within 37 European countries between December 2015 and March 2016. Of those 165 who responded (response rate 51%), 86 (52%) were using LISA/MIST. It is regarded the standard procedure for surfactant administration by 41%, with a wide variation in personal views on patient selection in terms of indication, appropriate gestational and postnatal age. Policies concerning premedication, devices, and technique of LISA/MIST differed widely. Side effects like surfactant reflux, bradycardia, and hypoxia were observed by 77% of neonatologists. Of neonatologists inexperienced in LISA/MIST, 89% would consider utilizing it in the future. Perceived efficacy of LISA/MIST was high (52%) to medium (33%). The use of LISA/MIST within Europe is widespread. There is a wide variation concerning all aspects of LISA in daily clinical routine and different views on when and how LISA should be performed. What is Known: • Noninvasive surfactant administration has been the subject of randomized controlled trials and has found its way into clinical routine. What is New: • Noninvasive surfactant administration techniques are widely applied in European neonatal units. • There is a wide variety of equipment used and techniques applied for less invasive surfactant delivery as well as different views on the indications and perceived efficacy of this intervention.

  17. Sexuality-Related Outcomes of Adolescent Children of Teen Mothers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshbaugh, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between being an adolescent child of a teen mother and sexuality-related outcomes was investigated using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth. Adolescents whose mothers were teenagers at first birth were more likely to have had sex by age 16 than other adolescents. Gender moderated this effect, as this relationship…

  18. Sports Promotion and Teen Smoking and Drinking: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Paul N.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Surveys of adolescents examined the link between sports promotion and advertising of alcohol and tobacco and teen smoking and drinking behaviors. Data analysis found an association between exposure to sporting events and cigarette use and beer consumption. Watching stock car racing was related to cigarette use; football and basketball to beer use.…

  19. Teen Sleep: Why Is Your Teen So Tired?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... temperature, sleep cycles, appetite and hormonal changes. The biological and psychological processes that follow the cycle of this 24-hour internal clock are called circadian rhythms. Puberty changes a teen's internal clock, delaying the ...

  20. Teen Eating Disorders: Tips to Protect Your Teen

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors. Genetics or biological factors might make some teens more likely to develop eating disorders. Personality traits such as perfectionism, anxiety or rigidity also might play a role. Signs ...

  1. Do as I say, not as I do: Distracted driving behavior of teens and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond Bingham, C; Zakrajsek, Jennifer S; Almani, Farideh; Shope, Jean T; Sayer, Tina B

    2015-12-01

    Driver distraction is an important contributor to crash risk. Teenage driver distraction can be influenced by the attitudes and behaviors of parents. This study examined teens' and their parents' engagement in distracting behavior while driving. Survey data were collected from a national sample of 403 parent-teen dyads using random-digit dialing telephone interviews. Results demonstrated few parent or teen sex differences in distracting behavior engagement while driving, or in their perceptions of each others' behavior. Parents and teens' frequencies of distracting behavior engagement were positively correlated. Parents' and teens' perceptions of each others' distracting behavior engagement while driving exceeded their own selfreports. Finally, the likelihood that teens reported engaging in distracting behavior while driving was more strongly associated with their perceptions of their parents' distracting behavior than by parents' self reports of their own behavior. These results suggest that parents' examples of driving behavior are an important influence on teen driving behavior, but potentially more important are teens' perceptions of their parents' behaviors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Primary care providers' beliefs about teen and parent barriers to depression care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ana; Farris, Coreen; Reynolds, Kerry; Reis, Evelyn C; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D

    2014-10-01

    Only one-third of US adolescents with depression obtain treatment for depression. Teen and parent barriers differ, but both contribute to low treatment rates. Primary care providers (PCPs) may be able to elicit and address such barriers, but little is known about their perceptions of teen and parent barriers, and whether they recognize these differences. We administered a survey to 58 PCPs assessing their perceptions of the importance of specific barriers to depression care for teens and parents using McNemar's test to examine differences. Most PCPs believed barriers for parents included difficulty making appointments, worry about what others would think, and cost. PCPs believed barriers for teens included not wanting treatment and worry about what others would think. PCPs believed parents and teens differed in the extent to which they would perceive cost, difficulty in making appointments, and not wanting care as a barrier (p teens and parents have different barriers to care, but may have discordant perceptions of the importance of certain barriers for teens and their parents. PCPs may need to probe parents and teens individually about barriers, which impede depression care to enhance shared decision making and treatment uptake.

  3. A survey of rural hospitals' perspectives on health information technology outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Murphy, Alison; McNeese, Nathan; Reddy, Madhu; Purao, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    A survey of rural hospitals was conducted in the spring of 2012 to better understand their perspectives on health information technology (HIT) outsourcing and the role that hospital-to-hospital HIT partnerships (HHPs) can play as an outsourcing mechanism. The survey sought to understand how HHPs might be leveraged for HIT implementation, as well as the challenges with forming them. The results suggest that HHPs have the potential to address rural hospitals' slow rate of HIT adoption, but there are also challenges to creating these partnerships. These issues, as well as avenues for further research, are then discussed.

  4. A Survey of Rural Hospitals’ Perspectives on Health Information Technology Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nicholas; Murphy, Alison; McNeese, Nathan; Reddy, Madhu; Purao, Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    A survey of rural hospitals was conducted in the spring of 2012 to better understand their perspectives on health information technology (HIT) outsourcing and the role that hospital-to-hospital HIT partnerships (HHPs) can play as an outsourcing mechanism. The survey sought to understand how HHPs might be leveraged for HIT implementation, as well as the challenges with forming them. The results suggest that HHPs have the potential to address rural hospitals’ slow rate of HIT adoption, but there are also challenges to creating these partnerships. These issues, as well as avenues for further research, are then discussed. PMID:24551373

  5. Teen Brain: Still Under Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changing brain in youthful drinking, and the relation- ship between youth drinking and the risk of addiction ... 11– 4929 2011 The Teen Brain: STILL UNDER CONSTRUCTION O ne of the ways that scientists have ...

  6. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Personal Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma ... A en español Fumar y el asma Does Smoking Make Asthma Worse? Yes. If you have asthma, ...

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weather Sports 5 Ideas for Eco-Friendly Celebrations Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth > For Teens > Urinary Tract Infections Print ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is ...

  8. Sickle Cell Crisis (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis) KidsHealth > For Teens > Sickle Cell ... drepanocíticas (Crisis de dolor) What Is a Sickle Cell Crisis? Sickle cell disease changes the shape of ...

  9. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  10. Male Reproductive System (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Male Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Male Reproductive System ... and female reproductive systems. continue What Is the Male Reproductive System? Most species have two sexes: male ...

  11. Dealing with Addiction (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Dealing With Addiction KidsHealth > For Teens > Dealing With Addiction Print A ... is even harder. What Are Substance Abuse and Addiction? The difference between substance abuse and addiction is ...

  12. Preventing Teen Pregnancy PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-07

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Teen births in the U.S. have declined, but still, more than 273,000 infants were born to teens ages 15 to 19 in 2013. Learn about the most effective types of birth control.  Created: 4/7/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/7/2015.

  13. Parent-Teen Relationships and Interactions: Far More Positive Than Not. Child Trends Research Brief. Publication # 2004-25

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kristin A.; Guzman, Lina; Hair, Elizabeth; Lippman, Laura; Garrett, Sarah

    2004-01-01

    This Research Brief brings together recent results of a nationally representative survey of U.S. teens about the nature of their relationships with their parents and findings from rigorous research studies on the parent-adolescent bond. The evidence presented shows that while the proportion of teens reporting positive relationships with their…

  14. Perspectives on Canadian core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia: a survey of graduate fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, James D; Crawford, Mark W

    2015-10-01

    Educators in anesthesia have an obligation to ensure that fellowship programs are training anesthesiologists to meet the highest standards of performance in clinical and academic practice. The objective of this survey was to characterize the perspectives of graduates of Canadian core fellowship programs in pediatric anesthesia (during a ten-year period starting in 2003) on the adequacies and inadequacies of fellowship training. We conducted an electronic survey of graduates from eight departments of pediatric anesthesia in Canada who completed one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia from 2003 to 2013. A novel survey design was implemented, and the content and structure of the design were tested before distribution. Data were collected on respondents' demographics, details of training and practice settings, perceived self-efficacy in subspecialty practices, research experience, and perspectives on one-year core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia. Descriptive statistics and 95% confidence intervals were determined. The survey was sent to 132 anesthesiologists who completed core fellowship training in pediatric anesthesia in Canada. Sixty-five (49%) completed and eligible surveys were received. Most of the anesthesiologists surveyed perceived that 12 months of core fellowship training are sufficient to acquire the knowledge and critical skills needed to practice pediatric anesthesia. Subspecialty areas most frequently perceived to require improved training included pediatric cardiac anesthesia, chronic pain medicine, and regional anesthesia. This survey reports perceived deficiencies in domains of pediatric anesthesia fellowship training. These findings should help guide the future development of core and advanced fellowship training programs in pediatric anesthesia.

  15. Three Toxic Heavy Metals in Open-Angle Glaucoma with Low-Teen and High-Teen Intraocular Pressure: A Cross-Sectional Study from South Korea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si Hyung Lee

    Full Text Available To investigate the association between heavy metal levels and open-angle glaucoma (OAG with low- and high-teen baseline intraocular pressure (IOP using a population-based study design.This cross-sectional study included 5,198 participants older than 19 years of age who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES from 2008 to 2012 and had blood heavy metal levels available. The OAG with normal baseline IOP (IOP ≤ 21 mmHg subjects were stratified into low-teen OAG (baseline IOP ≤ 15 mmHg and high-teen OAG (15 mmHg < baseline IOP ≤ 21 mmHg, and the association between blood lead, mercury, and cadmium levels and glaucoma prevalence was assessed for low- and high-teen OAG.The adjusted geometric mean of blood cadmium levels was significantly higher in subjects with low-teen OAG than that of the non-glaucomatous group (P = 0.028, whereas there were no significant differences in blood lead and mercury levels. After adjusting for potential confounders, the low-teen OAG was positively associated with log-transformed blood cadmium levels (OR, 1.41; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.03-1.93; P = 0.026. For high-teen OAG, log-transformed blood levels of the three heavy metals were not associated with disease prevalence. The association between log-transformed blood cadmium levels and low-teen OAG was significant only in men (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10-2.48; P = 0.016, and not in women (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.66-1.85; P = 0.709.The results of this study suggest that cadmium toxicity could play a role in glaucoma pathogenesis, particularly in men and in OAG with low-teen baseline IOP.

  16. Perception of transition readiness and preferences for use of technology in transition programs: teens' ideas for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applebaum, Mark A; Lawson, Erica F; von Scheven, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Efforts to facilitate transition of care to adult providers for adolescents with chronic disease are not uniformly successful and many patients encounter challenges. The goal of this study was to assess transition readiness and preferences for tools to aid in the transition process with an emphasis on technology and social media. We surveyed and performed focus groups on patients aged 13-21 years from a pediatric university-based rheumatology and general pediatric practice. Demographics and transition readiness were assessed using a questionnaire. Transition readiness was assessed by examining patient knowledge and independence with care. Focus groups were conducted to elicit perspectives about desirable features of a transition program and useful tools. Thirty-five patients completed surveys; and 20 patients and 13 of their parents participated in a focus group. The median patient age was 17 years and 74.3% were female. A Likert scale (0-10, 10=most) was used to evaluate concern over changing to an adult medical provider, (mean=6.4, SD=2.6), preparedness for disease self-management (mean=6.0, SD=2.8), and perceived importance of self-managing their condition (mean=7.1, SD=3.1). Themes that emerged from focus groups included a desire for support groups with other teens, a preference for using text messaging for communication and a desire for an online health management program. Teens with chronic disease are able to identify health maintenance tasks and strategies that will aid in developing independence with healthcare management. These findings support the idea that developing engaging applications and support groups will assist teens in the transitioning.

  17. Mental health problems in teens investigated by U.S. child welfare agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneghan, Amy; Stein, Ruth E K; Hurlburt, Michael S; Zhang, Jinjin; Rolls-Reutz, Jennifer; Fisher, Emily; Landsverk, John; Horwitz, Sarah McCue

    2013-05-01

    To examine prevalence and correlates of five mental health (MH) problems among 12-17.5 year olds investigated by child welfare. Data from the National Survey on Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW II) were analyzed to examine depression, anxiety, substance use/abuse, suicidality, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as reported by teens and their caregivers. In a sample of 815 adolescents, prevalence for each MH problem and correlates (e.g., age, placement location) were identified using bivariate and multivariable logistic analyses. After investigation for maltreatment, 42.7% of teens reported at least one MH problem, regardless of placement. Nine percent reported depression, 13.9% reported suicidality, 23% had substance use/abuse, 13.5% reported anxiety, and 18.6% had ADHD. Of 332 teens with any MH problem, 52.1% reported only one problem, 28.3% had two problems, and 19.6% had ≥ three problems. Teens with prior out-of-home placement had odds 2.29 times higher of reporting a MH problem and odds 2.12 times higher of reporting substance use/abuse. Males were significantly less likely to report depression. Older teens were more likely to report substance use/abuse. Black teens were significantly less likely to report suicidality and ADHD and almost half as likely to report anxiety. Teens with a chronic health condition and teens whose caregiver reported depression had more than twice the odds of reporting anxiety. This study highlights high rates of MH problems in teens of all ages and placement locations and suggests that all teens involved with child welfare should be screened for MH problems, regardless of initial placement status. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Survey of the University Students’ Perspectives about Using Digital Technologies in Education: Zimbabwean Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibusisiwe Dube

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the perspectives of university students on the use of digital technologies as tools for teaching and learning. Digital technologies are an essential asset for academic institutions as they can support strategic teaching and learning objectives for education institutions. Studies have shown that limited use of digital technologies could lead to a second order digital divide. This problem negatively impacts the Government and university efforts and initiatives of increased technological investment. There is therefore a need to uncover and obtain a deeper insight into university students’ perspectives due to the sparse literature discussing this problem within the Zimbabwean context. Quantitative data on student perspectives was collected using 100 questionnaires administered to students at a single university of technology in Zimbabwe. Although the findings concur with existing literature that students highly value the integration of technology into their learning process, there were issues that appeared to be peculiar to the surveyed environment. For example, the surveyed students professed disappointment with the current traditional teaching methods despite the high availability and accessibility to digital technologies within the institution. They indicated their frustration emanating from the disconnection between commonly used teaching methods and the digital technologies effective for teaching and learning.

  19. Kidney Stones in Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Kidney Stones in Children and Teens Page Content Article ... teen girls having the highest incidence. Types of Kidney Stones There are many different types of kidney ...

  20. Retail shopping typology of American teens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breazeale, Michael; Lueg, Jason E

    2011-01-01

    .... Therefore, marketers need the ability to divide this teen market into unique segments. In this study, the authors develop a psychographic retail shopping typology of American teens' retail channel preferences depending on levels of self-esteem (SE...

  1. Talking to Your Doctor (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plus, if you're still in your early teens, parents may feel more inclined to oversee your medical ... cases, the doctor is obligated to inform the teen's parents. Some schools offer health clinics to students during ...

  2. PCOS: What Teens Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turner Syndrome Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search PCOS for Teens September 2013 Download PDFs English Espanol ... PCOS Challenge womenshealth.gov Teens Health What is PCOS? PCOS, which stands for polycystic ovary syndrome, is ...

  3. Health Concerns for Gay and Lesbian Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gay and Lesbian Teens Page Content Article Body Sexual activity Most teens, whether they are gay, lesbian, ... or alcohol to relieve depression , anxiety , and low self-esteem . Doing so can lead to addiction. Drug and ...

  4. Parenting Skills: Tips for Raising Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... responsible adult is no small task. Understand the parenting skills you need to help guide your teen. ... your teen and encourage responsible behavior. Use these parenting skills to deal with the challenges of raising ...

  5. Preventing Pregnancy in Younger Teens PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-04-08

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Births to teens are declining, still, more than 305,000 teens ages 15 to 19 gave birth. This program discusses what health care providers, parents, and teens can do to help prevent teen pregnancy.  Created: 4/8/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/8/2014.

  6. Children of Teen Parents: Challenges and Hope

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Barbara A.; Graham, Mimi; Bradford, Seaton K.

    2005-01-01

    This article by the editors of this issue describes key elements of high-quality services for teen parents and their children. Programs for teen parents and their children can promote dual development by: a) acknowledging the role of multiple risk factors in the lives of the children of teen parents; b) integrating services from a variety of…

  7. Learning Guide for New Mexico Teens Talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Mary M.

    Teens Talk is a project conducted to develop peer leadership among pregnant/parenting teens (both male and female) by participation in panels. After training, the panels present information as well as experiences and attitudes to adult community groups to raise awareness and support, to youth groups to prevent teen pregnancy, and to other…

  8. teen court教育学的研究

    OpenAIRE

    太田, 和敬

    2012-01-01

    Teen Courts are peer-run courts that are authorized to pass sentence on first-time juvenile offenders for certain non-violent misdemeanors. Few juveniles commit a second offense. The teen court system is believed to have some elements that encourage teens to go straight: 1. Teen court focuses on first misdemeanors since failure to intervene may lead to teens becoming felons. 2. Teens can choose the justice system they want tobe subjected to. Choice is crucial to teens accepting responsibility...

  9. Primary care providers’ beliefs about teen and parent barriers to depression care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovic, Ana; Farris, Coreen; Reynolds, Kerry; Reis, Evelyn C.; Miller, Elizabeth; Stein, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Only one-third of U.S. adolescents with depression obtain treatment for depression. Teen and parent barriers differ, but both contribute to low treatment rates. Primary care providers (PCPs) may be able to elicit and address such barriers, but little is known about their perceptions of teen and parent barriers, and whether they recognize these differences. Methods We administered a survey to 58 PCPs assessing their perceptions of the importance of specific barriers to depression care for teens and parents using McNemar’s test to examine differences. Results Most PCPs believed barriers for parents included difficulty making appointments, worry about what others would think, and cost. PCPs believed barriers for teens included not wanting treatment and worry about what others would think. PCPs believed parents and teens differed in the extent to which they would perceive cost, difficulty making appointments, and not wanting care as a barrier (psteens and parents have different barriers to care, but may have discordant perceptions of the importance of certain barriers for teens and their parents. PCPs may need to probe parents and teens individually about barriers which impede depression care to enhance shared decision making and treatment uptake. PMID:25098692

  10. A Survey of Clinical Uncertainty from the Paediatric Basic Specialist Trainee Perspective

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate uncertainty from the Basic Specialist Trainee perspective. The survey of trainees explored 1) factors in decision making, 2) the personal impact of uncertainty, 3) the responses to both clinical errors and challenges to their decision making and 4) the potential strategies to address uncertainty. Forty-one (93%) of trainees surveyed responded. Important factors in decision making were clinical knowledge and senior colleague’s opinion. Sixty percent experienced significant anxiety post call as a consequence of their uncertainty. When errors are made by colleagues, the trainee’s response is acceptance (52.5%), and sympathy (32%).Trainees are strongly influenced by the opinions of senior colleagues often changing their opinions having made confident decisions. Solutions to address uncertainty include enhanced knowledge translation, and to a lesser extent, enhanced personal awareness and resilience awareness. To enhance the training experience for BST and lessen the uncertainty experienced these strategies need to be enacted within the training milieu.

  11. Influence of family members on utilization of maternal health care services among teen and adult pregnant women in Kathmandu, Nepal: a cross sectional study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Upadhyay, Priti; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Shrestha, Amir Babu; Pradhan, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    ...) and delivery care services among teen, young adult and adult pregnant women from the perspective of the woman themselves, their husband and their mother-in-law, identify the factors associated...

  12. Trends in teen sexual behaviour and condom use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotermann, Michelle

    2008-09-01

    Results from the 1996/1997 National Population Health Survey and the 2003 and 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey suggest that the proportion of teens who have had sexual intercourse has declined. In 2005, 43% of 15- to 19-year-olds reported that they had had sexual intercourse at least once, down from 47% in 1996/1997. As well, the proportion of teens reporting that they had become sexually active before age 15 declined. About one-third of those who had had intercourse in the previous year did so with more than one partner. Condom use was reported by around three-quarters of sexually active 15- to 19-year-olds who had had multiple partners or who were not married or in a common-law relationship.

  13. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a Survey of Perspectives on Carrier Testing and Communication Within the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brenna; Hassed, Susan; Chaloner, Jae Lindsay; Aston, Christopher E; Guy, Carrie

    2016-06-01

    Carrier testing is widely available for multiple genetic conditions, and several professional organizations have created practice guidelines regarding appropriate clinical application and the testing of minors. Previous research has focused on carrier screening, predictive testing, and testing for X-linked conditions. However, family perspectives on carrier testing for X-linked lethal diseases have yet to be described. In this study, we explored communication within the family about carrier testing and the perspectives of mothers of sons with an X-linked lethal disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Twenty-five mothers of sons with DMD participated in an anonymous online survey. Survey questions included multiple choice, Likert scale, and open ended, short answer questions. Analysis of the multiple choice and Likert scale questions revealed that most mothers preferred a gradual style of communication with their daughters regarding risk status. In addition, most participants reported having consulted with a genetic counselor and found it helpful. Comparisons between groups, analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, found no differences in preferred style due to mother's carrier status or having a daughter. Thematic analysis was conducted on responses to open ended questions. Themes identified included the impact of family implications, age and maturity, and a desire for autonomy regarding the decision to discuss and undergo carrier testing with at-risk daughters, particularly timing of these discussions. Implications for genetic counseling practice are discussed.

  14. Cloud service performance evaluation: status, challenges, and opportunities – a survey from the system modeling perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Duan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available With rapid advancement of Cloud computing and networking technologies, a wide spectrum of Cloud services have been developed by various providers and utilized by numerous organizations as indispensable ingredients of their information systems. Cloud service performance has a significant impact on performance of the future information infrastructure. Thorough evaluation on Cloud service performance is crucial and beneficial to both service providers and consumers; thus forming an active research area. Some key technologies for Cloud computing, such as virtualization and the Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA, bring in special challenges to service performance evaluation. A tremendous amount of effort has been put by the research community to address these challenges and exciting progress has been made. Among the work on Cloud performance analysis, evaluation approaches developed with a system modeling perspective play an important role. However, related works have been reported in different sections of the literature; thus lacking a big picture that shows the latest status of this area. The objectives of this article is to present a survey that reflects the state of the art of Cloud service performance evaluation from the system modeling perspective. This articles also examines open issues and challenges to the surveyed evaluation approaches and identifies possible opportunities for future research in this important field.

  15. Perceptions of the food marketing environment among African American teen girls and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibeau, Wendy S; Saksvig, Brit I; Gittelsohn, Joel; Williams, Sonja; Jones, Lindsey; Young, Deborah Rohm

    2012-02-01

    Obesity disproportionately affects African American adolescents, particularly girls. While ethnically targeted marketing of unhealthful food products contributes to this disparity, it is not known how African Americans perceive the food marketing environment in their communities. Qualitative methods, specifically photovoice and group discussions, were used to understand perceptions of African American adults and teen girls regarding targeted food marketing to adolescent girls. An advisory committee of four students, two faculty, and two parents was formed, who recruited peers to photograph their environments and participate in group discussions to answer "what influences teen girls to eat what they do." Seven adults and nine teens (all female) participated in the study. Discussions were transcribed, coded, and analyzed with ATLAS.ti to identify common and disparate themes among participants. Results indicated that adults and teens perceived the type of food products, availability of foods, and price to influence the girls' choices. The girls spoke about products that were highly convenient and tasty as being particularly attractive. The adults reported that advertisements and insufficient nutrition education were also influencers. The teens discussed that the places in which food products were available influenced their choices. Results suggest that the marketing of highly available, convenient food at low prices sell products to teen girls. Future work is needed to better understand the consumer's perspective on the food and beverage marketing strategies used. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Person-environment fit: everyday conflict and coparenting conflict in Mexican-origin teen mother families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derlan, Chelsea L; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Toomey, Russell B; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Jahromi, Laudan B

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined whether a match or mismatch between teen mothers' cultural orientation and the cultural context of the family (i.e., familial ethnic socialization) predicted mother-daughter everyday and coparenting conflict, and in turn, teen mothers' adjustment. Participants were 204 Mexican-origin teen mothers (M age = 16.81 years; SD = 1.00). Consistent with a person-environment fit perspective, findings indicated that a mismatch between teen mothers' cultural orientation (i.e., high mainstream cultural involvement) and the cultural context of the family (i.e., higher levels of familial ethnic socialization) predicted greater mother-daughter everyday conflict and coparenting conflict 1 year later. However, when there was a match (i.e., high levels of familial ethnic socialization for teen mothers with high Mexican orientation), familial ethnic socialization was not associated with mother-daughter conflict. In addition, mother-daughter conflict was positively associated with depressive symptoms and engagement in risky behaviors 1 year later among all teen mothers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Freeze Frame 2012: A Snapshot of America's Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alison; Kaye, Kelleen

    2012-01-01

    When it comes to making decisions about sex, teens today are doing far better than they were 20 years ago. Fewer teens are having sex, and among those who are, more teens are using contraception. The happy result is that teen pregnancy and birth rates have declined dramatically. Despite this extraordinary progress, teen pregnancy and childbearing…

  18. High School Teen Mentoring Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Big Brothers Big Sisters Edmonton & Area, in partnership with Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, are providing the High School Teen Mentoring Program, a school-based mentoring program where mentor-mentee matches meet for one hour per week to engage in relationship-building activities at an elementary school. This initiative aims to…

  19. Interactive Web Sites for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haycock, Ken

    2005-01-01

    Eighty-three percent of teenagers are online. The average teen spends 5 to 10 hours a week on the Web. When using Web sites, teenagers are easily bored. Teenagers are also not nearly as skilled as adults at navigating the Web and do not really care for glitzy graphics. Insufficient reading skills, immature research strategies, and unwillingness to…

  20. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help? Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Polycystic Ovary Syndrome KidsHealth > For Teens > Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Print A ... en español Síndrome de ovario poliquístico What Is Polycystic Ovary Syndrome? Polycystic (pronounced: pol-ee-SISS-tik) ovary syndrome ( ...

  1. Body Image (Children and Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reye SyndromeTeenage Pregnancy and Birth Control AccessRead Article >>Teenage Pregnancy and Birth Control Access Visit our interactive symptom ... harmful to the brain and liver. It often…Teenage Pregnancy and Birth Control AccessRead Article >>Kids and TeensTeenage ...

  2. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Protecting Your Online Identity and Reputation ADHD Medicines Inflammatory Bowel Disease KidsHealth > For Teens > Inflammatory Bowel Disease Print A ... en español Enfermedad inflamatoria del intestino What Is Inflammatory Bowel Disease? Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a condition that ...

  3. Types of Cancer Teens Get

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with a prosthesis (pronounced: pros-THEE-sis), or artificial limb. Most teens with a prosthesis are able to return to normal activities, even sports. Most people develop side effects, ... within the muscles in the trunk, arms, or legs. The types of treatment used and ...

  4. Effectiveness of a brief parent-directed teen driver safety intervention (Checkpoints) delivered by driver education instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, Jennifer S; Shope, Jean T; Greenspan, Arlene I; Wang, Jing; Bingham, C Raymond; Simons-Morton, Bruce G

    2013-07-01

    The Checkpoints program (Checkpoints) uses a Parent-Teen Driving Agreement (PTDA) to help parents monitor teens' driving, and has shown efficacy in increasing parental restrictions on teens' driving and decreasing teens' risky driving. In previous trials, research staff administered Checkpoints. This study examined the effectiveness of Checkpoints when delivered by driver educators. It was hypothesized that Checkpoints would result in more PTDA use, greater PTDA limits on higher risk driving situations, and less high-risk driving. Eight trained driving instructors were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups in a group randomized trial. Instructors enrolled 148 parent-teen dyads (intervention = 99, control = 49); 35% of those eligible. Intervention parents joined teens for a 30-minute Checkpoints session during driver education. The session included a video, persuasive messages, discussion, and PTDA initiation. Teens completed four surveys: baseline, licensure, and 3- and 6-months post-licensure. Intervention teens were more likely to report that they used a PTDA (OR= 15.92, p = .004) and had restrictions on driving with teen passengers (OR = 8.52, p = .009), on weekend nights (OR = 8.71, p = .021), on high-speed roads (OR = 3.56, p = .02), and in bad weather (b = .51, p = .05) during the first six months of licensure. There were no differences in offenses or crashes at six months, but intervention teens reported less high-risk driving (p = .04). Although challenges remain to encourage greater parent participation, Checkpoints conducted by driver education instructors resulted in more use of PTDAs, greater restrictions on high-risk driving, and less high-risk driving. Including Checkpoints in driver education parent meetings/classes has potential to enhance teen driver safety. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Effectiveness of a Brief Parent-Directed Teen Driver Safety Intervention (Checkpoints) Delivered by Driver Education Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrajsek, Jennifer S.; Shope, Jean T.; Greenspan, Arlene I.; Wang, Jing; Bingham, C. Raymond; Simons-Morton, Bruce G.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Checkpoints program (Checkpoints) uses a Parent-Teen Driving Agreement (PTDA) to help parents monitor teens' driving, and has shown efficacy in increasing parental restrictions on teens' driving and decreasing teens' risky driving. In previous trials, research staff administered Checkpoints. This study examined the effectiveness of Checkpoints when delivered by driver educators. It was hypothesized that Checkpoints would result in more PTDA use, greater PTDA limits on higher risk driving situations, and less high-risk driving. Methods Eight trained driving instructors were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups in a group randomized trial. Instructors enrolled 148 parent-teen dyads (intervention = 99, control = 49); 35% of those eligible. Intervention parents joined teens for a 30-minute Checkpoints session during driver education. The session included a video, persuasive messages, discussion, and PTDA initiation. Teens completed four surveys: baseline, licensure, and 3- and 6-months post-licensure. Results Intervention teens were more likely to report that they used a PTDA (OR= 15.92, p = .004) and had restrictions on driving with teen passengers (OR = 8.52, p = .009), on weekend nights (OR = 8.71, p = .021), on high-speed roads (OR = 3.56, p = .02), and in bad weather (b = .51, p = .05) during the first six months of licensure. There were no differences in offenses or crashes at six months, but intervention teens reported less high-risk driving (p = .04). Conclusions Although challenges remain to encourage greater parent participation, Checkpoints conducted by driver education instructors resulted in more use of PTDAs, greater restrictions on high-risk driving, and less high-risk driving. Including Checkpoints in driver education parent meetings/classes has potential to enhance teen driver safety. PMID:23481298

  6. Teen driving in rural North Dakota: a qualitative look at parental perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simerpal K; Shults, Ruth A; Cope, Jennifer Rittenhouse; Cunningham, Timothy J; Freelon, Brandi

    2013-05-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teens in the United States. Graduated driver licensing (GDL) programs allow new drivers to gain driving experience while protecting them from high-risk situations. North Dakota was one of the last states to implement GDL, and the current program does not meet all of the best practice recommendations. This study used qualitative techniques to explore parents' perceptions of the role teen driving plays in the daily lives of rural North Dakota families, their understanding of the risks faced by their novice teen drivers, and their support for GDL. A total of 28 interviews with parents of teens aged 13-16 years were conducted in four separate rural areas of the state. During the face-to-face interviews, parents described their teens' daily lives as busy, filled with school, sports, and other activities that often required traveling considerable distances. Participation in school-sponsored sports and other school-related activities was highly valued. There was nearly unanimous support for licensing teens at age 14½, as was permitted by law at the time of the interviews. Parents expressed that they were comfortable supervising their teen's practice driving, and few reported using resources to assist them in this role. Although few parents expressed concerns over nighttime driving, most parents supported a nighttime driving restriction with exemptions for school, work or sports-related activities. Despite many parents expressing concern over distracted driving, there was less consistent support among parents for passenger restrictions, especially if there would be no exemptions for family members or school activities. These findings can assist in planning policies and programs to reduce crashes among novice, teen drivers, while taking into account the unique perspectives and lifestyles of families living in rural North Dakota. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Native Teen Voices: adolescent pregnancy prevention recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garwick, Ann W; Rhodes, Kristine L; Peterson-Hickey, Melanie; Hellerstedt, Wendy L

    2008-01-01

    American Indian adolescent pregnancy rates are high, yet little is known about how Native youth view primary pregnancy prevention. The aim was to identify pregnancy prevention strategies from the perspectives of both male and female urban Native youth to inform program development. Native Teen Voices (NTV) was a community-based participatory action research study in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Twenty focus groups were held with 148 Native youth who had never been involved in a pregnancy. Groups were stratified by age (13-15 and 16-18 years) and sex. Participants were asked what they would do to prevent adolescent pregnancy if they were in charge of programs for Native youth. Content analyses were used to identify and categorize the range and types of participants' recommendations within and across the age and sex cohorts. Participants in all cohorts emphasized the following themes: show the consequences of adolescent pregnancy; enhance and develop more pregnancy prevention programs for Native youth in schools and community-based organizations; improve access to contraceptives; discuss teen pregnancy with Native youth; and use key messages and media to reach Native youth. Native youth perceived limited access to comprehensive pregnancy prevention education, community-based programs and contraceptives. They suggested a variety of venues and mechanisms to address gaps in sexual health services and emphasized enhancing school-based resources and involving knowledgeable Native peers and elders in school and community-based adolescent pregnancy prevention initiatives. A few recommendations varied by age and sex, consistent with differences in cognitive and emotional development.

  8. Perceptions of Supervision Among Injured and Non-Injured Teens Working in the Retail or Service Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierold, Kristina M

    2016-04-01

    According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a teen is injured every 9 minutes at work. Workplace supervision may affect whether teens are injured on the job. Because research on workplace supervision among teens is limited, the objectives of this study were to characterize the perceptions of supervision among injured and non-injured teen workers and assess the characteristics and perceptions of supervisors that may be associated with work-related injuries. In 2011, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among high school students. Teens who worked in retail or service industries (n= 270) were included in the sample. Non-injured teens were more likely to have reported that their supervisors cared about their safety, were helpful, listened well, and ensured that teen workers understood workplace safety. Most teens (70%) did not feel comfortable talking about safety issues with their supervisors. The importance of supervision and how supervisors are perceived in the workplace may be significant in creating a safety culture that leaves a lasting impression. © 2015 The Author(s).

  9. A survey on management perspectives of the state of workplace health and safety practices in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbakaya, C F; Onyoyo, H A; Lwaki, S A; Omondi, O J

    1999-07-01

    A baseline survey was conducted in 1995 on management perspectives of occupational health and safety (OHS) structures and practices in Kenya. This was achieved by interviewing management and supervisory staff attending 1 week multi-disciplinary courses that were organized by the Federation of Kenya Employers (FKE) and the International Labour Office (ILO) at hotel venues in Kenya. The purpose of the survey was to gain some insight into work safety conditions in Kenya and to assess the potential for a new OHS manual to meet existing knowledge gaps. The manual was locally developed in 1993/4 by Kenyan OHS experts in collaboration with colleagues from the Swedish National Institute for Working Life. Results of the survey from 65 participants indicated that most workplace managers were not familiar with the Kenyan work safety legislation. Work injuries were largely attributable to working with dangerous machinery. Occupational diseases and HIV/AIDS were cited as other causes of workplace morbidity and mortality. Although most respondents (70%) were satisfied with their work safety conditions, only 37% said their workplaces were annually audited by labour inspectors while 45% said injured workers were not treated well by management. Many workplaces (65%) violated the mandatory legal requirement on the establishment of health and safety committees. The OHS resource person and course content were rated highly by most respondents (96%). The foregoing results provided the basis of a needs analysis for future OHS programs in Kenya.

  10. Social norms of "good" design: Interdisciplinary perspectives from a survey of engineers and clinicians in bioengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela N

    2016-08-01

    In bioengineering training for new researchers and engineers, a great deal of time is spent discussing what constitutes "good" design. Conceptualization of good design, however, varies widely across interdisciplinary team members, with potential to both foster innovation or lead to unproductive conflict. To explore how groups central to bioengineering teams (physicians/clinicians and engineers/physicists) conceptualize good design, we asked 176 professionals in bioengineering to complete a comprehensive online survey including items designed to assess cognitive and moral foundations (validated MFQ30 tool) and custom items assessing perceptions on good design in three areas (good design characteristics, reputation of design approvers, and perceived design patient/consumer suitability). Of those that responded, 82 completed all quantitative survey sections and were included in this preliminary analysis. Correlations between response areas were examined to explore the possible links between cognitive and moral biases and perspectives on good design. The survey results indicated that both groups were more conservative than average Americans based on previous reports, and clinicians scored higher on average for all MFQ30 domains. Numerous significant correlations with good design were observed among clinicians, while engineers/physicists most closely correlated good design with prescriber approval and scientific/technical literature. The exploratory analysis demonstrated the potential utility of sociological frameworks to explore relationships in design thinking with potential utility to stimulate thriving conversation on team-based design thinking in bioengineering education and practice.

  11. Isokinetic trunk muscle performance in pre-teens and teens with and without back pain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bernard, J-C; Boudokhane, S; Pujol, A; Chaléat-Valayer, E; Le Blay, G; Deceuninck, J

    2014-01-01

    To assess with an isokinetic dynamometer the force and endurance of the spinal flexor and extensor muscles in pre-teens or teens aged 11 to 13 and 14 to 16 years with and without low back pain (LBP...

  12. Reduced Disparities in Birth Rates Among Teens Aged 15-19 Years - United States, 2006-2007 and 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Lisa; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Cox, Shanna; Kroelinger, Charlan; Besera, Ghenet; Brittain, Anna; Fuller, Taleria R; Koumans, Emilia; Barfield, Wanda

    2016-04-29

    Teen childbearing can have negative health, economic, and social consequences for mothers and their children (1) and costs the United States approximately $9.4 billion annually (2). During 1991-2014, the birth rate among teens aged 15-19 years in the United States declined 61%, from 61.8 to 24.2 births per 1,000, the lowest rate ever recorded (3). Nonetheless, in 2014, the teen birth rate remained approximately twice as high for Hispanic and non-Hispanic black (black) teens compared with non-Hispanic white (white) teens (3), and geographic and socioeconomic disparities remain (3,4), irrespective of race/ethnicity. Social determinants associated with teen childbearing (e.g., low parental educational attainment and limited opportunities for education and employment) are more common in communities with higher proportions of racial and ethnic minorities (4), contributing to the challenge of further reducing disparities in teen births. To examine trends in births for teens aged 15-19 years by race/ethnicity and geography, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) data at the national (2006-2014), state (2006-2007 and 2013-2014), and county (2013-2014) levels. To describe socioeconomic indicators previously associated with teen births, CDC analyzed data from the American Community Survey (ACS) (2010-2014). Nationally, from 2006 to 2014, the teen birth rate declined 41% overall with the largest decline occurring among Hispanics (51%), followed by blacks (44%), and whites (35%). The birth rate ratio for Hispanic teens and black teens compared with white teens declined from 2.9 to 2.2 and from 2.3 to 2.0, respectively. From 2006-2007 to 2013-2014, significant declines in teen birth rates and birth rate ratios were noted nationally and in many states. At the county level, teen birth rates for 2013-2014 ranged from 3.1 to 119.0 per 1,000 females aged 15-19 years; ACS data indicated unemployment was higher, and education attainment and family income were lower in

  13. Green ICT Adoption Survey Focused on ICT Lifecycle from the Consumer’s Perspective (SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchalcevova Alena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the extent to which the initiatives determined as Green ICT are reflected in the lifecycle of information and communication technologies (ICTs in Czech Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs. The research model is based on the ICT Lifecycle viewpoint that from the perspective of non-ICT businesses consists of three phases – ICT procurement, ICT use and End of ICT use. The results of our research conducted via questionnaire survey among 61 respondents indicate a significant potential among businesses for improvement in all ICT lifecycle phases. The utilization of this potential can increase their competitiveness not only by achieving cost savings in the operation of ICT, but also by contributing to their sustainable development.

  14. PERSPECTIVES OF ORGANIC AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT IN THE LIGHT OF EMPIRICAL STUDY SURVEYED AMONG CONVENTIONAL FARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Kociszewski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to evaluate the perspectives of development of organic food supply in Poland. The work contains the results of the nationwide survey which was carried out among conventional farms’ owners. It was evaluated that – according to farmers’ declaration – organic farms number can be equal to 6.8-24.2% of all Polish farms. The main incentives influencing conversion into organic farming methods are health and environment care, satisfaction from work and agri-environmental subsidies. The main identified barriers are limited sales possibilities, low profitability of production, high labour intensity, high production cost, and low yield. In a long run the development of organic market could be stimulated by the increase of demand. In the middle time period, there is a need for the increase of subsidies rates which should be combined with the improvement of certification and control system.

  15. Recruitment barriers in a randomized controlled trial from the physicians' perspective – A postal survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karrer Werner

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The feasibility of randomized trials often depends on successful patient recruitment. Although numerous recruitment barriers have been identified it is unclear which of them complicate recruitment most. Also, most surveys have focused on the patients' perspective of recruitment barriers whereas the perspective of recruiting physicians has received less attention. Therefore, our aim was to conduct a postal survey among recruiting physicians of a multi-center trial to weigh barriers according to their impact on recruitment. Methods We identified any potential recruitment barriers from the literature and from our own experience with a multi-center trial of respiratory rehabilitation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We developed and pilot-tested a self-administered questionnaire where recruiting physicians were asked to express their agreement with statements about recruitment barriers on a Likert-type scale from 1 (full agreement with statement = very substantial recruitment barrier to 7 (no agreement with statement = no recruitment barrier. Results 38 of 55 recruiting physicians returned questionnaires (69% response rate, of which 35 could be analyzed (64% useable response rate. Recruiting physicians reported that "time constraints" (median agreement of 3, interquartile range 2–5 had the most negative impact on recruitment followed by "difficulties including identified eligible patients" (median agreement of 5, IQR 3–6. Other barriers such as "trial design barriers", "lack of access to treatment", "individual barriers of recruiting physicians" or "insufficient training of recruiting physicians" were perceived to have little or no impact on patient recruitment. Conclusion Physicians perceived time constraints as the most relevant recruitment barrier in a randomized trial. To overcome recruitment barriers interventions, that are affordable for both industry- and investigator-driven trials, need to be

  16. Authors’ perspectives on academic publishing: initial observations from a large-scale global survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil D’Souza

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Authors are at the heart of academic publishing, but their voices are underrepresented in discussions about improving the academic publishing system. To understand the viewpoints of authors on various aspects of academic publishing and the challenges they face, we developed a large-scale survey entitled “Author perspectives on the academic publishing process” and made it available in December 2016. The survey has received 8,795 responses; this paper is based on the interim results drawn from 5,293 survey responses, and presents some interesting and thought-provoking trends that were observed in the authors’ responses, such as their interpretation of plagiarism and decisive factors in journal selection, as well as their thoughts on what needs to change in the publishing system for it to be more author-friendly. Some of the most important findings of the survey were: (1 the majority of the authors found manuscript preparation to be the most challenging task in the publication process, (2 the impact factor of a journal was reported to be the most important consideration for journal selection, (3 most authors found journal guidelines to be incomplete, (4 major gaps existed in author-journal communication, and (5 although awareness of ethics was high, awareness of good publication practice standards was low. Moreover, more than half of the participants indicated that among areas for improvement in the publishing system, they would like to see changes in the time it takes to publish a paper, the peer review process, and the fairness and objectivity of the publication process. These findings indicate the necessity of making the journal publication process more author-centered and smoothing the way for authors to get published.

  17. Online social networking amongst teens: friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Bridianne; Campbell, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The impact of Internet communication on adolescent social development is of considerable importance to health professionals, parents and teachers. Online social networking and instant messaging programs are popular utilities amongst a generation of techno-savvy youth. Although these utilities provide varied methods of communication, their social benefits are still in question. This study examined the relationship between online social interaction, perceived social support, self-esteem and psychological distress amongst teens. A total of 400 participants (M(age) = 14.31 years) completed an online survey consisting of parametric and non-parametric measures. No significant relationship was found between online interaction and social support. Time spent interacting online was negatively correlated with self-esteem and psychological distress. While previous research has focused on young adults, this study examines the impact of online social networking on emerging teens. It highlights the need for continued caution in the acceptance of these utilities.

  18. Mobile Phones Bridging the Digital Divide for Teens in the US?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Brown

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2009, just 27% of American teens with mobile phones reported using their devices to access the internet. However, teens from lower income families and minority teens were significantly more likely to use their phones to go online. Together, these surprising trends suggest a potential narrowing of the digital divide, offering internet access to those without other means of going online. This is an important move, as, in today’s society, internet access is central to active citizenship in general and teen citizenship in particular. Yet the cost of this move toward equal access is absorbed by those who can least afford it: Teenagers from low income households. Using survey and focus group data from a national study of “Teens and Mobile Phone Use” (released by Pew and the University of Michigan in 2010, this article helps identify and explain this and other emergent trends for teen use (as well as non-use of the internet through mobile phones.

  19. A survey of language barriers from the perspective of pediatric oncologists, interpreters, and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbe, Marisa; Simon, Christian; Angiolillo, Anne; Ruccione, Kathy; Kodish, Eric D

    2006-11-01

    Oncologists in the US increasingly face the challenge of communicating with non-English speaking parents of children with cancer. This study explores this challenge from the perspectives of a sample of pediatric oncologists, interpreters, and Spanish-speaking parents of children with newly diagnosed leukemia. Thirty-seven oncologists and 17 professional language interpreters based at two non-profit pediatric hospitals in the US were surveyed on the topic of language barriers in pediatric care. Seventeen parents who communicated with their child's oncologist through an interpreter were also surveyed. All groups expressed considerable concern over the process of communicating across a language barrier. For oncologists, these concerns included the accuracy and completeness of interpretations, complexity of information, and loss of confidence and control over the communication process. For interpreters, they included complexity of information, information overload, and lack of clinician sensitivity toward the cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds of limited English proficiency (LEP) families. Parent concerns included difficulties comprehending information and anxiety over the possibility of missing out on important information. All groups provided multiple suggestions for improving communication across a language barrier. Oncologists, interpreters, and parents expressed considerable concern over the process of communicating across a language barrier. Some of these concerns could be minimized through efforts to boost interpreter accuracy and completeness, including the use of more simple, easy to understand language. Other issues, such as differences in culture and socioeconomic background, warrant consideration of the intercultural knowledge and skills of interpreters. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Supervision in neuropsychological assessment: a survey of training, practices, and perspectives of supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Laura A Schwent; Pedersen, Heather A; Roper, Brad L; Rey-Casserly, Celiane

    2014-01-01

    Within the psychology supervision literature, most theoretical models and practices pertain to general clinical or counseling psychology. Supervision specific to clinical neuropsychology has garnered little attention. This survey study explores supervision training, practices, and perspectives of neuropsychology supervisors. Practicing neuropsychologists were invited to participate in an online survey via listservs and email lists. Of 451 respondents, 382 provided supervision to students, interns, and/or fellows in settings such as VA medical centers (37%), university medical centers (35%), and private practice (15%). Most supervisors (84%) reported supervision was discussed in graduate school "minimally" or "not at all." Although 67% completed informal didactics or received continuing education in supervision, only 27% reported receiving training specific to neuropsychology supervision. Notably, only 39% were satisfied with their training in providing supervision and 77% indicated they would likely participate in training in providing supervision, if available at professional conferences. Results indicate that clinical neuropsychology as a specialty has paid scant attention to developing supervision models and explicit training in supervision skills. We recommend that the specialty develop models of supervision for neuropsychological practice, supervision standards and competencies, training methods in provision of supervision, and benchmark measures for supervision competencies.

  1. A Survey on M2M Systems for mHealth: A Wireless Communications Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsakli, Elli; Lalos, Aris S.; Antonopoulos, Angelos; Tennina, Stefano; Di Renzo, Marco; Alonso, Luis; Verikoukis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    In the new era of connectivity, marked by the explosive number of wireless electronic devices and the need for smart and pervasive applications, Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications are an emerging technology that enables the seamless device interconnection without the need of human interaction. The use of M2M technology can bring to life a wide range of mHealth applications, with considerable benefits for both patients and healthcare providers. Many technological challenges have to be met, however, to ensure the widespread adoption of mHealth solutions in the future. In this context, we aim to provide a comprehensive survey on M2M systems for mHealth applications from a wireless communication perspective. An end-to-end holistic approach is adopted, focusing on different communication aspects of the M2M architecture. Hence, we first provide a systematic review of Wireless Body Area Networks (WBANs), which constitute the enabling technology at the patient's side, and then discuss end-to-end solutions that involve the design and implementation of practical mHealth applications. We close the survey by identifying challenges and open research issues, thus paving the way for future research opportunities. PMID:25264958

  2. Do privacy and security regulations need a status update? Perspectives from an intergenerational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Stacey; Robinson, Jill Oliver; Peoples, Hayley A; Gutierrez, Amanda M; Majumder, Mary A; McGuire, Amy L; Rothstein, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    The importance of health privacy protections in the era of the "Facebook Generation" has been called into question. The ease with which younger people share personal information about themselves has led to the assumption that they are less concerned than older generations about the privacy of their information, including health information. We explored whether survey respondents' views toward health privacy suggest that efforts to strengthen privacy protections as health information is moved online are unnecessary. Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk), which is well-known for recruitment for survey research, we distributed a 45-item survey to individuals in the U.S. to assess their perspectives toward privacy and security of online and health information, social media behaviors, use of health and fitness devices, and demographic information. 1310 participants (mean age: 36 years, 50% female, 78% non-Hispanic white, 54% college graduates or higher) were categorized by generations: Millennials, Generation X, and Baby Boomers. In multivariate regression models, we found that generational cohort was an independent predictor of level of concern about privacy and security of both online and health information. Younger generations were significantly less likely to be concerned than older generations (all P 0.05). This study is limited by the non-representativeness of our sample. Though Millennials reported lower levels of concern about privacy and security, this was not related to internet or social media behaviors, and majorities within all generations reported concern about both the privacy and security of their health information. Thus, there is no intergenerational imperative to relax privacy and security standards, and it would be advisable to take privacy and security of health information more seriously.

  3. Do privacy and security regulations need a status update? Perspectives from an intergenerational survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Pereira

    Full Text Available The importance of health privacy protections in the era of the "Facebook Generation" has been called into question. The ease with which younger people share personal information about themselves has led to the assumption that they are less concerned than older generations about the privacy of their information, including health information. We explored whether survey respondents' views toward health privacy suggest that efforts to strengthen privacy protections as health information is moved online are unnecessary.Using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk, which is well-known for recruitment for survey research, we distributed a 45-item survey to individuals in the U.S. to assess their perspectives toward privacy and security of online and health information, social media behaviors, use of health and fitness devices, and demographic information.1310 participants (mean age: 36 years, 50% female, 78% non-Hispanic white, 54% college graduates or higher were categorized by generations: Millennials, Generation X, and Baby Boomers. In multivariate regression models, we found that generational cohort was an independent predictor of level of concern about privacy and security of both online and health information. Younger generations were significantly less likely to be concerned than older generations (all P 0.05.This study is limited by the non-representativeness of our sample.Though Millennials reported lower levels of concern about privacy and security, this was not related to internet or social media behaviors, and majorities within all generations reported concern about both the privacy and security of their health information. Thus, there is no intergenerational imperative to relax privacy and security standards, and it would be advisable to take privacy and security of health information more seriously.

  4. Why is the teen birth rate in the United States so high and why does it matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Melissa S; Levine, Phillip B

    2012-01-01

    Teens in the United States are far more likely to give birth than in any other industrialized country in the world. U.S. teens are two and a half times as likely to give birth as compared to teens in Canada, around four times as likely as teens in Germany or Norway, and almost 10 times as likely as teens in Switzerland. Among more developed countries, Russia has the next highest teen birth rate after the United States, but an American teenage girl is still around 25 percent more likely to give birth than her counterpart in Russia. Moreover, these statistics incorporate the almost 40 percent fall in the teen birth rate that the United States has experienced over the past two decades. Differences across U.S. states are quite dramatic as well. A teenage girl in Mississippi is four times more likely to give birth than a teenage girl in New Hampshire--and 15 times more likely to give birth as a teen compared to a teenage girl in Switzerland. This paper has two overarching goals: understanding why the teen birth rate is so high in the United States and understanding why it matters. Thus, we begin by examining multiple sources of data to put current rates of teen childbearing into the perspective of cross-country comparisons and recent historical context. We examine teen birth rates alongside pregnancy, abortion, and "shotgun" marriage rates as well as the antecedent behaviors of sexual activity and contraceptive use. We seek insights as to why the rate of teen childbearing is so unusually high in the United States as a whole, and in some U.S. states in particular. We argue that explanations that economists have tended to study are unable to account for any sizable share of the variation in teen childbearing rates across place. We describe some recent empirical work demonstrating that variation in income inequality across U.S. states and developed countries can explain a sizable share of the geographic variation in teen childbearing. To the extent that income inequality

  5. Comparing Sexuality Communication Among Offspring of Teen Parents and Adult Parents: a Different Role for Extended Family

    OpenAIRE

    Grossman, Jennifer M.; Tracy, Allison J.; Richer, Amanda M.; Erkut, Sumru

    2015-01-01

    This brief report examined teenagers’ sexuality communication with their parents and extended families. It compared who teens of early parents (those who had children when they were adolescents) and teens of later parents (those who were adults when they had children) talk to about sex. Eighth grade students (N=1281) in 24 schools completed survey items about their communication about sex. Structural equation modeling was used to predict communication profiles, while adjusting for the nesting...

  6. Teen PACK: Population Awareness Campaign Kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zero Population Growth, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This packet of instructional materials is designed to teach teenagers about the effects of overpopulation on the world and on the individual. Information is presented in three related booklets. The first of the three parts of the "Teen Population Awareness Campaign Kit," illustrates overpopulation through profiles of teens living in…

  7. Teen Parents in Early Childhood Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfmacher, Jon

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews five large national studies that include significant findings about the effects of early care and intervention on the children of teens. Five large-scale, national early childhood intervention research trials have included teen parents: Early Head Start, Nurse Family Partnership, Parents as Teachers, Healthy Start/Healthy…

  8. Caring for the Children of Teen Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    This article examines how specialized primary health care is a useful approach in the intervention of adverse health, developmental, educational, and social outcomes for children born to teen parents. The Teen Tot Clinic at Hasbro Children's Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island is an example of such a health care program; it provides services such…

  9. Book Clubs for Kids and Teens

    OpenAIRE

    Neumann, Linda

    2007-01-01

    How to plan and implement book clubs for kids and teens in a public library setting. Includes tips on selecting materials and activity planning to make your kid or teen book club a success, as well as useful titles for further inspiration and information.

  10. Magazines for Kids and Teens. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Donald R., Ed.

    Noting that many kids' and teens' magazines are not available at newsstands or bookstores, this book describes and provides ordering information for more than 200 such magazines. The magazines described cover almost every conceivable interest of children and teens in the United States and in many other countries. After a foreword by Jim Trelease…

  11. Preventing Repeat Teen Births PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  12. Teen Mothers and Schooling: Lacunae and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigona, Agnes; Chetty, Rajendra

    2008-01-01

    While many girls who become mothers before completing schooling consider academic qualifications to be very important, they may not be able to succeed academically if the support they need to complete their studies is insufficient. Usually, instead of getting support, the teen mothers endure misunderstandings and pressure. The teen mothers may…

  13. Comparing distances in mental images constructed from visual experience or verbal descriptions: the impact of survey versus route perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péruch, Patrick; Chabanne, Vanessa; Nesa, Marie-Pascale; Thinus-Blanc, Catherine; Denis, Michel

    2006-11-01

    Mental images constructed after visual examination of a spatial configuration or after processing a verbal description of that configuration have been shown to share similar properties, in particular the capacity to preserve metric information contained in the configuration represented. In the present study, we investigated the properties of mental images constructed under learning conditions resulting from the combination of a visual or a verbal mode of acquisition and a survey or route perspective. Participants memorized a virtual environment (a garden containing six objects) under one of four learning conditions: (a) viewing a map of the garden (visual-survey); (b) viewing a video presentation of a journey along the path around the garden (visual-route); (c) listening to a verbal description of the map of the garden (verbal-survey); and (d) listening to a verbal description of the journey around the garden (verbal-route). The participants were then invited to compare the distances separating objects in the garden mentally. Experiment 1, where the pairs of distances to be compared had a common starting point, revealed that the frequency of correct responses was higher, and response times were shorter when participants had learned about the environment visually rather than by a verbal description. The conditions involving a survey perspective resulted in a higher frequency of correct responses and shorter response times than those involving a route perspective. Lastly, a symbolic distance effect was obtained in the first three conditions, in that the greater the difference between the two distances being compared, the higher the frequency of correct responses, and the shorter the response times. Experiment 2, where the pairs of distances had different starting points, replicated these results, although longer response times revealed that the comparison process was more costly. Taken together, these findings support the view that mental spatial representations

  14. A survey of stakeholder perspectives on a proposed combined exoskeleton-wheelchair technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Ben Mortensen, W; Mattie, Johanne; Wolff, Jamie; Parker, Claire; Borisoff, Jaimie

    2017-07-01

    Exoskeleton technology has potential benefits for wheelchair users' health and mobility. However, there are practical barriers to their everyday use as a mobility device. In particular, challenges related to travelling longer distances and transitioning between using a wheelchair and exoskeleton walking may present significant deterrents to regular exoskeleton use. In an effort to remove these barriers, a combined exoskeleton-wheelchair concept ('COMBO') has been proposed, which aims to achieve the benefits of both these mobility technologies. Given the inherent importance of including user-stakeholder opinions when designing an assistive technology solution, a study was undertaken to explore the perspectives of wheelchair users and healthcare professionals on the proposed conceptual design of the COMBO. An online survey with quantitative and qualitative components was conducted with wheelchair users and healthcare professionals working directly with individuals with mobility impairments. Respondents rated whether they would use or recommend a COMBO for four potential reasons. Nine design features were rated and compared in terms of their importance. Content analysis was used to analyze data from an open-ended question regarding additional perceptions about using or recommending a COMBO. A total of 481 survey responses were analyzed, 354 from wheelchair users and 127 from healthcare professionals. Potential health benefits was the most highly rated reason for potential use or recommendation of a COMBO. Of the 9 design features, 2 had a median rating of very important: inclusion of a fall-protection mechanism, and the ability for the operator to use their hands while standing. Qualitative findings indicated that health and physical benefits, use for daily life activities, and psychosocial benefits were important considerations in whether to use or recommend the COMBO. This study captures the opinions and perspectives of two stakeholder groups for an exoskeleton

  15. Computer-assisted client assessment survey for mental health: patient and health provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Manuela; Ahmad, Farah; Shakya, Yogendra; Ledwos, Cliff; McKenzie, Kwame

    2016-09-23

    The worldwide rise in common mental disorders (CMDs) is posing challenges in the provision of and access to care, particularly for immigrant, refugee and racialized groups from low-income backgrounds. eHealth tools, such as the Interactive Computer-Assisted Client Assessment Survey (iCCAS) may reduce some barriers to access. iCCAS is a tablet-based, touch-screen self-assessment completed by clients while waiting to see their family physician (FP) or nurse practitioner (NP). In an academic-community initiative, iCCAS was made available in English and Spanish at a Community Health Centre in Toronto through a mixed-method trial. This paper reports the perspectives of clients in the iCCAS group (n = 74) collected through an exit survey, and the perspectives of 9 providers (four FP and five NP) gathered through qualitative interviews. Client acceptance of the tool was assessed for cognitive and technical dimensions of their experience. They rated twelve items for perceived Benefits and Barriers and four questions for the technical quality. Most clients reported that the iCCAS completion time was acceptable (94.5 %), the touch-screen was easy to use (97.3 %), and the instructions (93.2 %) and questions (94.6 %) were clear. Clients endorsed the tool's Benefits, but were unsure about Barriers to information privacy and provider interaction (mean 4.1, 2.6 and 2.8, respectively on a five-point scale). Qualitative analysis of the provider interviews identified five themes: challenges in Assessing Mental Health Services, such as case complexity, time, language and stigma; the Tool's Benefits, including non-intrusive prompting of clients to discuss mental health, and facilitation of providers' assessment and care plans; the Tool's Integration into everyday practice; Challenges for Use (e.g. time); and Promoting Integration Effectively, centered on the timing of screening, setting readiness, language diversity, and technological advances. Participant clients and

  16. Reducing the Teen Death Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Life continues to hold considerable risk for adolescents in the United States. In 2006, the teen death rate stood at 64 deaths per 100,000 teens (13,739 teens) (KIDS COUNT Data Center, 2009). Although it has declined by 4 percent since 2000, the rate of teen death in this country remains substantially higher than in many peer nations, based…

  17. Bundles of Norms About Teen Sex and Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie

    2015-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is a cultural battleground in struggles over morality, education, and family. At its heart are norms about teen sex, contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. Analyzing 57 interviews with college students, we found that "bundles" of related norms shaped the messages teens hear. Teens did not think their communities encouraged teen sex or pregnancy, but normative messages differed greatly, with either moral or practical rationalizations. Teens readily identified multiple norms intended to regulate teen sex, contraception, abortion, childbearing, and the sanctioning of teen parents. Beyond influencing teens' behavior, norms shaped teenagers' public portrayals and post hoc justifications of their behavior. Although norm bundles are complex to measure, participants could summarize them succinctly. These bundles and their conflicting behavioral prescriptions create space for human agency in negotiating normative pressures. The norm bundles concept has implications for teen pregnancy prevention policies and can help revitalize social norms for understanding health behaviors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. A Survey of Caregiver Perspectives on Children's Pain Management in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Samina; Weingarten, Laura E; Kircher, Janeva; Dong, Kathryn; Drendel, Amy L; Rosychuk, Rhonda J; Curtis, Sarah; Newton, Amanda S

    2016-03-01

    We explored caregiver perspectives on their children's pain management in both a pediatric (PED) and general emergency department (GED). Study objectives were to: (1) measure caregiver estimates of children's pain scores and treatment; (2) determine caregiver level of satisfaction; and (3) determine factors associated with caregiver satisfaction. This prospective survey examined a convenience sample of 97 caregivers (n=51 PED, n=46 GED) with children aged caregivers were female (n=77, 79%) and were the child's mother (n=69, 71%). Children were treated primarily for musculoskeletal pain (n=41, 42%), headache (n=16, 16%) and abdominal pain (n=7, 7%). Using a 100 mm Visual Analog Scale, the maximum mean reported pain score was 75 mm (95% CI: 70-80) and mean score at discharge was 39 mm (95% CI: 32-46). Ninety percent of caregiver respondents were satisfied (80/89, 90%); three (3/50, 6%) were dissatisfied in the PED and six (6/39, 15%) in the GED. Caregivers who rated their child's pain at ED discharge as severe were less likely to be satisfied than those who rated their child's pain as mild or moderate (p=0.034). Despite continued pain upon discharge, most caregivers report being satisfied with their child's pain management. Caregiver satisfaction is likely multifactorial, and physicians should be careful not to interpret satisfaction as equivalent to adequate provision of analgesia. The relationship between satisfaction and pain merits further exploration.

  19. Influence of learning disabilities on the tumour predisposition syndrome NF1--survey from adult patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granström, Sofia; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Langenbruch, Anna Katharina; Augustin, Matthias; Mautner, Victor-Felix

    2014-07-01

    To analyze psychosocial burdens associated with neurofibromatosis type-1 (NF1) phenotype--visible symptoms, medical complications, learning disabilities (LD)--from patients' perspective with focus on LD. A survey of 228 adult patients with NF1 was carried-out. Symptoms to estimate disease severity and visibility, and learning disability were assessed. Outcome parameters were social situation and psychosocial aspects. Social situation and psychosocial aspects differed depending on NF1 phenotype. Patients with LD (n=55) were less frequently in a partnership (p=0.005) or had children (p=0.015) than those without (n=132). They also reported a higher frequency of depression (p=0.019) and sensitivity to stress (p<0.001) and more uncertainty regarding NF1-associated symptoms. These differences were significant when adjusting for disease severity and self-perceived disease visibility. Beside the psychosocial needs of patients with LD with NF1, medical management of this sub-group should include doctor-patient communication in easy language to compensate for patients' lack of knowledge about symptoms associated with cancer. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Emergency nurses' perspective of workplace violence in Jordanian hospitals: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALBashtawy, Mohammed; Aljezawi, Ma'en

    2016-01-01

    Emergency departments are considered high-risk areas, where violence against nurses is a serious and prevalent problem. Such violence has negative effects on nurses, and therefore on the quality of care provided. To explore the risk factors behind violence, and to specify reasons for the level of low reporting of violence among Jordanian nurses in emergency departments. A cross-sectional design through conducting a survey in emergency departments in Jordanian hospitals. The total number of emergency department nurses who participated in the study was 227. Of these, 172 (75%) had experienced some form of violence. Verbal violence was the most reported (63.9%), compared to physical violence (48%). The most reported reasons for violence from the nurses' perspective were waiting time, overcrowding, and patient and family expectations not being met, with frequencies of 54.3%, 53.3%, and 46% respectively. The treatment room was the most common place where the violence occurred. Only 16.6% of the nurses who experienced violence actually reported it. Being accustomed to workplace violence is the most stated reason for not reporting violence to the hospital administration or the authorities. Violence against emergency department nurses is a significant issue that cannot be ignored. There are multiple reasons. The key point in dealing with the problem is to treat its specific causes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Perspectives of Spanish psychiatrists on the management of dementias: the PsicoDem survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Carrasco, Manuel; Arranz, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Mental health services are not systematically involved in the care of dementias in Spain. Nevertheless, many patients with dementia attend these services. The perspective of psychiatrist as regards this situation has not been evaluated at the national level to date, and it may be of interest to determine their actual involvement and the strategies to foster it. A survey was conducted on 2,000 psychiatrists on a range of mental health care services. Respondents provided socio-demographic data and information about clinical aspects, together with their opinions regarding the management of dementia. Responses were described by their raw frequencies and measures of association for cross-tabulations resulting from selected pairs of questions. Inferences were made by calculating their 95% confidence intervals. Psychiatrist involvement in the management of dementias was limited, aside from those involved in psycho-geriatric units or nursing homes facilities. However, there were wide, regional differences. Nearly all respondents (81%) were ready to augment their knowledge and skills in the area of dementia. In particular, the insufficient medical education, together with other organizational factors, such as the difficulties in ordering diagnostic tests (i.e. neuroimaging), or prescribing anti-dementia drugs in some regions, were common barriers psychiatrists faced when approaching patients with dementia. Increasing psychiatrist involvement and boosting coordinated efforts with other specialists in a form of integrated care may advance the care of dementias in Spain to a more valuable level. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Are cellular phone blocking applications effective for novice teen drivers?

    OpenAIRE

    Creaser, J.

    2014-01-01

    Distracted driving is a significant concern for novice teen drivers. Although cellular phone bans are applied in many jurisdictions to restrict cellular phone use, teen drivers often report making calls and texts while driving. Method The Minnesota Teen Driver Study incorporated cellular phone blocking functions via a software application for 182 novice teen drivers in two treatment conditions. The first condition included 92 teens who ran a driver support application on a smartphone that als...

  3. Prevalence of teen driver errors leading to serious motor vehicle crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, Allison E; Hafetz, Jessica; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K; Durbin, Dennis R

    2011-07-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of adolescent deaths. Programs and policies should target the most common and modifiable reasons for crashes. We estimated the frequency of critical reasons for crashes involving teen drivers, and examined in more depth specific teen driver errors. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration's (NHTSA) National Motor Vehicle Crash Causation Survey collected data at the scene of a nationally representative sample of 5470 serious crashes between 7/05 and 12/07. NHTSA researchers assigned a single driver, vehicle, or environmental factor as the critical reason for the event immediately leading to each crash. We analyzed crashes involving 15-18 year old drivers. 822 teen drivers were involved in 795 serious crashes, representing 335,667 teens in 325,291 crashes. Driver error was by far the most common reason for crashes (95.6%), as opposed to vehicle or environmental factors. Among crashes with a driver error, a teen made the error 79.3% of the time (75.8% of all teen-involved crashes). Recognition errors (e.g., inadequate surveillance, distraction) accounted for 46.3% of all teen errors, followed by decision errors (e.g., following too closely, too fast for conditions) (40.1%) and performance errors (e.g., loss of control) (8.0%). Inadequate surveillance, driving too fast for conditions, and distracted driving together accounted for almost half of all crashes. Aggressive driving behavior, drowsy driving, and physical impairments were less commonly cited as critical reasons. Males and females had similar proportions of broadly classified errors, although females were specifically more likely to make inadequate surveillance errors. Our findings support prioritization of interventions targeting driver distraction and surveillance and hazard awareness training. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Associations of Teen Dating Violence Victimization with School Violence and Bullying among US High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M.; Olsen, Emily O'Malley; Bacon, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Background: Teen dating violence (TDV) negatively impacts health, mental and physical well-being, and school performance. Methods: Data from a nationally representative sample of high school students participating in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)'s 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) are used to demonstrate associations…

  5. Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Use in Teens: Prevalence, Demographics, and Perception of Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorang, Melissa; Callahan, Bryan; Cummins, Kevin M.; Achar, Suraj; Brown, Sandra A.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple risks are associated with early use of anabolic androgenic steroids, yet public understanding is limited and teen use not uncommon. The present study surveyed 4,231 high school students to understand prevalence of use, association with athletics and other substance use and expectations of drug effects. While overall rates of steroid use…

  6. Reducing the stigmatization of teen mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SmithBattle, Lee I

    2013-01-01

    Teen mothers are stigmatized by stereotypes that they are unmotivated, irresponsible, and incompetent parents. In spite of the pervasiveness of these stereotypes, stigma is rarely described as a contributing factor to teen mothers' difficulties and their health and social disparities. After tracing how teen mothers have been misrepresented and stereotyped over the last half century, I describe what is known about the stigma associated with teen mothering, reasons for its persistence, efforts to reduce it, and its potentially harmful effects. Stigma should be of concern to nurses because stigmatizing practices impede effective clinical care, contribute to teen mothers' many challenges, and violate the nursing ethic that patients be treated with respect and dignity. Recommendations for restoring dignity and reducing stigma in healthcare focus on developing recognition practices that are predicated on respect and concern for the teen's well-being and her capacity as a mother. Nurses are also urged to advocate for services and policies that reduce the stigmatization and marginalization of teen mothers.

  7. College Freshmen Students' Perspectives on Weight Gain Prevention in the Digital Age: Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Larsen, Chelsea A; Magradey, Karen; Brandt, Heather M; Wilcox, Sara; Sundstrom, Beth; West, Delia Smith

    2017-10-12

    College freshmen are highly vulnerable to experiencing weight gain, and this phenomenon is associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases and mortality in older adulthood. Technology offers an attractive and scalable way to deliver behavioral weight gain prevention interventions for this population. Weight gain prevention programs that harness the appeal and widespread reach of Web-based technologies (electronic health or eHealth) are increasingly being evaluated in college students. Yet, few of these interventions are informed by college students' perspectives on weight gain prevention and related lifestyle behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess college freshmen students' concern about weight gain and associated topics, as well as their interest in and delivery medium preferences for eHealth programs focused on these topics. Web-based surveys that addressed college freshmen students' (convenience sample of N=50) perspectives on weight gain prevention were administered at the beginning and end of the fall 2015 semester as part of a longitudinal investigation of health-related issues and experiences in first semester college freshmen. Data on weight gain prevention-related concerns and corresponding interest in eHealth programs targeting topics of potential concern, as well as preferred program delivery medium and current technology use were gathered and analyzed using descriptive statistics. A considerable proportion of the freshmen sample expressed concern about weight gain (74%, 37/50) and both traditional (healthy diet: 86%, 43/50; physical activity: 64%, 32/50) and less frequently addressed (stress: 82%, 41/50; sleep: 74%, 37/50; anxiety and depression: 60%, 30/50) associated topics within the context of behavioral weight gain prevention. The proportion of students who reported interest in eHealth promotion programs targeting these topics was also generally high (ranging from 52% [26/50] for stress management to 70% [35/50] for eating a

  8. A survey on IVIVC/IVIVR development in the pharmaceutical industry - Past experience and current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M A; Flanagan, T; Brewster, M; Kesisoglou, F; Beato, S; Biewenga, J; Crison, J; Holm, R; Li, R; Mannaert, E; McAllister, M; Mueller-Zsigmondy, M; Muenster, U; Ojala, K; Page, S; Parr, A; Rossenu, S; Timmins, P; Van Peer, A; Vermeulen, A; Langguth, P

    2017-05-01

    of non-compendial dissolution methods for establishing a successful IVIVC/IVIVR. The lack of appropriate in vivo data and regulatory uncertainty were considered the major difficulties in IVIVC/IVIVR development. The results of this survey provide unique insights into current IVIVC/IVIVR practices in the pharmaceutical industry. Pursuing an IVIVC/IVIVR should be generally encouraged, considering its high value from both industry and regulators' perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Parents' views of teen driving risks, the role of parents, and how they plan to manage the risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allan F; Leaf, William A; Simons-Morton, Bruce G; Hartos, Jessica L

    2006-01-01

    There is limited information about how parents view teen driving risks and intend to handle these risks during the licensing process, and how they will respond to graduated licensing provisions. Parents in Connecticut were interviewed when their teens got their learner's permit. The survey was undertaken when the state did not have a midnight restriction or a passenger restriction. Generally, parents were well aware of teen driving risks, thought parents should be thoroughly involved in the licensing process, and plan to be active participants themselves. Parents were concerned about the risk of driving after midnight and already restrict that behavior. However, parents do not seem to see or understand the risks of having even one teen passenger in the vehicle. The views and existing practices of parents need to be taken into account in deciding on the provisions of graduated licensing legislation and how to best ensure acceptance and compliance.

  10. The co-occurrence of physical and cyber dating violence and bullying among teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahner, Jennifer; Dank, Meredith; Zweig, Janine M; Lachman, Pamela

    2015-04-01

    This study examined the overlap in teen dating violence and bullying perpetration and victimization, with regard to acts of physical violence, psychological abuse, and-for the first time ever-digitally perpetrated cyber abuse. A total of 5,647 youth (51% female, 74% White) from 10 schools participated in a cross-sectional anonymous survey. Results indicated substantial co-occurrence of all types of teen dating violence and bullying. Youth who perpetrated and/or experienced physical, psychological, and cyber bullying were likely to have also perpetrated/experienced physical and sexual dating violence, and psychological and cyber dating abuse. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. A Content Analysis of Teen Parenthood in "Teen Mom" Reality Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Nicole; Malacane, Mona; Lewis, Nicky; Kraus, Ashley

    2016-12-01

    A content analysis of the MTV shows 16 and Pregnant (n = 59), Teen Mom (n = 20), and Teen Mom 2 (n = 20) was conducted to determine whether these programs accurately portray teen pregnancy. The results revealed that teen mothers on 16 and Pregnant were younger, more often White, and had more healthy babies as compared to national averages. The babies' fathers were more involved in the daily care of their child as compared to reality. Medical insurance or receipt of government assistance was almost never discussed. Teen mothers in the Teen Mom shows were significantly more likely to achieve a high school diploma as compared to reality. Finally, mothers on Teen Mom and Teen Mom 2 were significantly less likely to voice concern about finances and had more active social lives than mothers on 16 and Pregnant. Using social learning theory as a theoretical framework, we argue that these shows provide mixed messages to young audiences about teen pregnancy and parenthood.

  12. Contraceptive use among Medicaid-covered teens and risk of teen conception: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, M Femi; Kuo, Tzy-Mey; Adams, E Kathleen; Gavin, Norma I

    2012-02-01

    To investigate Medicaid-covered teens' receipt of physician-prescribed contraceptives and the impact of this receipt on pregnancy rates before and after welfare reform and the expansion of children's public health insurance in the late 1990s. Contraceptive prescriptions and pregnancy events were identified from Medicaid claims for two 24-month periods (January 1, 1994-December 31, 1995, and January 1, 2000-December 31, 2001). Participants were all female Medicaid beneficiaries aged 15-19 enrolled anytime in the two 24-month periods, excluding teens pregnant within the first 3 months of enrollment, with incomplete enrollment data or undocumented immigration status, enrolled in a capitated Medicaid plan, or with other concurrent health coverage. We used a discrete-time hazard model to examine the association between paid contraceptive prescriptions and other variables and conception in Florida and Georgia. Receipt of physician-prescribed contraceptives increased from 11% to 18% among Florida teens and from 22% to 27% among Georgia teens during the study period. Georgia teens receiving contraceptive prescriptions were 45% less likely to conceive than teens with no contraceptive prescriptions in 1994-1995 and 64% less likely in 2000-2001. In Florida, teens receiving contraceptive prescriptions were one third less likely to conceive than teens with no contraceptive prescriptions in both 1994-1995 and 2000-2001. An increase in the receipt of contraceptive prescriptions paid by Medicaid may help in reducing pregnancies among low-income teens.

  13. Understanding multiple levels of norms about teen pregnancy and their relationships to teens’ sexual behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Domingue, Benjamin W.; Boardman, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers seeking to understand teen sexual behaviors often turn to age norms, but they are difficult to measure quantitatively. Previous work has usually inferred norms from behavioral patterns or measured group-level norms at the individual level, ignoring multiple reference groups. Capitalizing on the multilevel design of the Add Health survey, we measure teen pregnancy norms perceived by teenagers, as well as average norms at the school and peer network levels. School norms predict boys’ perceived norms, while peer network norms predict girls’ perceived norms. Peer network and individually perceived norms against teen pregnancy independently and negatively predict teens’ likelihood of sexual intercourse. Perceived norms against pregnancy predict increased likelihood of contraception among sexually experienced girls, but sexually experienced boys’ contraceptive behavior is more complicated: When both the boy and his peers or school have stronger norms against teen pregnancy he is more likely to contracept, and in the absence of school or peer norms against pregnancy, boys who are embarrassed are less likely to contracept. We conclude that: (1) patterns of behavior cannot adequately operationalize teen pregnancy norms, (2) norms are not simply linked to behaviors through individual perceptions, and (3) norms at different levels can operate independently of each other, interactively, or in opposition. This evidence creates space for conceptualizations of agency, conflict, and change that can lead to progress in understanding age norms and sexual behaviors. PMID:25104920

  14. Cigarette advertising and teen smoking initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanewinkel, Reiner; Isensee, Barbara; Sargent, James D; Morgenstern, Matthis

    2011-02-01

    To test the specificity of the association between cigarette advertising and adolescent smoking initiation. A longitudinal survey of 2102 adolescents, aged 10 to 17 years at baseline, who never smoked was conducted by using masked images of 6 cigarette advertisements and 8 other commercial products with all brand information digitally removed. The exposure variable was a combination of contact frequency and cued recall of brands for cigarette and other advertisements. Multilevel mixed-effects Poisson regressions were used to assess smoking initiation 9 months after the baseline assessment as a function of cigarette-advertisement exposure, other advertisement exposure, and baseline covariates. Thirteen percent (n = 277) of students initiated smoking during the observation period. Although the incidence of trying smoking was associated with increased exposure to cigarette advertisements (10% in the low, 12% in the medium, and 19% in the high cigarette-advertisement exposure tertile initiated smoking), exposure to other advertisements did not predict smoking initiation. Compared with low exposure to cigarette advertisements, high exposure remained a significant predictor of adolescent smoking initiation after controlling for baseline covariates (adjusted relative risk: 1.46 [95% confidence interval: 1.08-1.97]; P advertisements and underlines the specificity of the relationship between tobacco marketing and teen smoking; exposure to cigarette advertisements, but not other advertisements, is associated with smoking initiation.

  15. Surveys of current status in biomedical science grant review: funding organisations' and grant reviewers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroter, Sara; Groves, Trish; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-10-20

    The objectives of this research were (a) to describe the current status of grant review for biomedical projects and programmes from the perspectives of international funding organisations and grant reviewers, and (b) to explore funders' interest in developing uniform requirements for grant review aimed at making the processes and practices of grant review more consistent, transparent, and user friendly. A survey to a convenience sample of 57 international public and private organisations that give grants for biomedical research was conducted. Nine participating organisations then emailed a random sample of their external reviewers an invitation to participate in a second electronic survey. A total of 28 of 57 (49%) organisations in 19 countries responded. Organisations reported these problems as frequent or very frequent: declined review requests (16), late reports (10), administrative burden (7), difficulty finding new reviewers (4), and reviewers not following guidelines (4). The administrative burden of the process was reported to have increased over the past 5 years. In all, 17 organisations supported the idea of uniform requirements for conducting grant review and for formatting grant proposals. A total of 258/418 (62%) reviewers responded from 22 countries. Of those, 48% (123/258) said their institutions encouraged grant review, yet only 7% (17/258) were given protected time and 74% (192/258) received no academic recognition for this. Reviewers rated these factors as extremely or very important in deciding to review proposals: 51% (131/258) desire to support external fairness, 47% (120/258) professional duty, 46% (118/258) relevance of the proposal's topic, 43% (110/258) wanting to keep up to date, 40% (104/258) desire to avoid suppression of innovation. Only 16% (42/258) reported that guidance from funders was very clear. In all, 85% (220/258) had not been trained in grant review and 64% (166/258) wanted this. Funders reported a growing workload of

  16. German ambulatory care physicians' perspectives on clinical guidelines – a national survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Böcken Jan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There has been little systematic research about the extent to which German physicians accept or reject the concept and practice of a clinical practice guidelines (CPG and b evidence based medicine (EBM The aim of this study was to investigate German office-based physicians' perspective on CPGs and EBM and their application in medical practice. Methods Structured national telephone survey of ambulatory care physicians, four thematic blocks with 21 questions (5 point Likert scale. 511 office-based general practitioners and specialists. Main outcome measures were the application of Clinical Practice Guidelines in daily practice, preference for sources of guidelines and degree of knowledge and acceptance of EBM. In the data analysis Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for explorative analysis of correlations. The comparison of groups was performed by Student's t-test. Chi2 test was used to investigate distribution of two or more categorical variables. Results Of the total study population 55.3% of physicians reported already using guidelines in the treatment of patients. Physicians in group practices (GrP as well as general practitioners (GP agreed significantly more with the usefulness of guidelines as a basis for patient care than doctors in single practices (SP or specialists (S (Student's t-test mean GP 2.57, S 2.84, p Conclusion Despite a majority of physicians accepting and applying CPGs a large group remains that is critical and opposed to the utilization of CPGs in daily practice and to the concept of EBM in general. Doctors in single practice and specialists appear to be more critical than physicians in group practices and GPs. Future research is needed to evaluate the willingness to acquire necessary knowledge and skills for the promotion and routine application of CPGs.

  17. ASPECT: A Survey to Assess Student Perspective of Engagement in an Active-Learning Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Benjamin L; Eddy, Sarah L; Wener-Fligner, Leah; Freisem, Karen; Grunspan, Daniel Z; Theobald, Elli J; Timbrook, Jerry; Crowe, Alison J

    2017-01-01

    The primary measure used to determine relative effectiveness of in-class activities has been student performance on pre/posttests. However, in today's active-learning classrooms, learning is a social activity, requiring students to interact and learn from their peers. To develop effective active-learning exercises that engage students, it is important to gain a more holistic view of the student experience in an active-learning classroom. We have taken a mixed-methods approach to iteratively develop and validate a 16-item survey to measure multiple facets of the student experience during active-learning exercises. The instrument, which we call Assessing Student Perspective of Engagement in Class Tool (ASPECT), was administered to a large introductory biology class, and student responses were subjected to exploratory factor analysis. The 16 items loaded onto three factors that cumulatively explained 52% of the variation in student response: 1) value of activity, 2) personal effort, and 3) instructor contribution. ASPECT provides a rapid, easily administered means to measure student perception of engagement in an active-learning classroom. Gaining a better understanding of students' level of engagement will help inform instructor best practices and provide an additional measure for comprehensively assessing the impact of different active-learning strategies. © 2017 B. L. Wiggins, S. L. Eddy, et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  18. Teen driving in rural North Dakota: A qualitative look at parental perceptions☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simerpal K.; Shults, Ruth A.; Cope, Jennifer Rittenhouse; Cunningham, Timothy J.; Freelon, Brandi

    2017-01-01

    Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death among teens in the United States. Graduated driver licensing (GDL) programs allow new drivers to gain driving experience while protecting them from high-risk situations. North Dakota was one of the last states to implement GDL, and the current program does not meet all of the best practice recommendations. This study used qualitative techniques to explore parents’ perceptions of the role teen driving plays in the daily lives of rural North Dakota families, their understanding of the risks faced by their novice teen drivers, and their support for GDL. A total of 28 interviews with parents of teens aged 13–16 years were conducted in four separate rural areas of the state. During the face-to-face interviews, parents described their teens’ daily lives as busy, filled with school, sports, and other activities that often required traveling considerable distances. Participation in school-sponsored sports and other school-related activities was highly valued. There was nearly unanimous support for licensing teens at age 14½, as was permitted by law at the time of the interviews. Parents expressed that they were comfortable supervising their teen’s practice driving, and few reported using resources to assist them in this role. Although few parents expressed concerns over nighttime driving, most parents supported a nighttime driving restriction with exemptions for school, work or sports-related activities. Despite many parents expressing concern over distracted driving, there was less consistent support among parents for passenger restrictions, especially if there would be no exemptions for family members or school activities. These findings can assist in planning policies and programs to reduce crashes among novice, teen drivers, while taking into account the unique perspectives and lifestyles of families living in rural North Dakota. PMID:23499983

  19. Teen mothers and schooling: lacunae and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Chigona

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available While many girls who become mothers before completing schooling consider academic qualifications to be very important, they may not be able to succeed academically if the support they need to complete their studies is insufficient. Usually, instead of getting support, the teen mothers endure misunderstandings and pressure. The teen mothers may feel disempowered because they are 'othered' and consequently, they develop forms of resistance which in most cases may foster their failure as learners. Our aim was to find out how much support was offered to these girls to facilitate their schooling, thus making it possible for them to complete their education and become self-reliant. A qualitative research approach was employed to gather information for the study. Teen mothers, their educators, and parents were interviewed to gather information about the girls' schooling situation. The results showed that many teen mothers failed to succeed with schooling because they lacked support to avoid the numerous disruptions to school attendance.

  20. Teen Guide: Dealing with Crohn's & Colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Colitis Go Back Teen Guide: Dealing with Crohn’s & Colitis Email Print + Share Your doctor has just told ... types of IBD are Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis . The GI tract is responsible for digestion of ...

  1. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... text version SOURCE: Adapted from Trussell J in Contraceptive Technology, 2011, and FDA Office of Women’s Health ... about how to avoid repeat births with both male and female teens. http://www.cdc.gov/teenpregnancy/ ...

  2. Reduced Disparities in Birth Rates Among Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Innovative Approaches Projects and Initiatives Health Centers Evaluating Male-focused Programs Clinical Services for Young Men Communitywide Initiatives Communitywide Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative Partners Contraceptive Action Plan Program Tools and Resources Community Mobilization ...

  3. Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is in crisis. What do I do? Share Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens Download PDF Download ePub ... brochure will give you more information. What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder is a serious brain illness. It ...

  4. Anesthesia -- What to Expect (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help? Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Anesthesia - What to Expect KidsHealth > For Teens > Anesthesia - What ... the Operating Room After Surgery Different Kinds of Anesthesia If you're having any kind of procedure ...

  5. CDC Vital Signs: Teen Drinking and Driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the number of teen passengers Never use a cell phone or text while driving Obey speed limits Get ... Vital Signs Issue: Drinking and Driving Among High School Students Aged ≥16 Years — United States, 1991-2011. ...

  6. Help your teen cope with stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolescents - stress; Anxiety - cope with stress ... Common sources of stress in teens include: Worrying about schoolwork or grades Juggling responsibilities, such as school and work or sports Having problems ...

  7. Risky Business: Dealing with Your Teen's Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and judgment. They may become more motivated by self-esteem and personal achievement. Parents can help by encouraging ... use drugs, think about suicide or engage in sexual activity. Links Puberty Teen Health Adolescent Medicine Trials ...

  8. Especially for Teens: You and Your Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... described as transgender. It often is difficult for parents or schoolmates to accept that a person is transgender. Transgender teens may face bullying or discrimination. Some may feel scared and alone. ...

  9. Weight Loss Surgery: An Option for Teens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Preventable Diseases Healthy Children > Health Issues > Conditions > Obesity > Weight Loss Surgery: An Option for Teens? Health Issues Listen ... for extremely overweight adolescents for whom more conservative weight loss ... obesity-related medical conditions such as high blood pressure , ...

  10. When Your Teen Is Having a Baby

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your teen son or daughter into an unwanted marriage. Offer advice, but remember that forcing your opinions ... to deal with some of the uncomfortable side effects of pregnancy, like nausea and vomiting Knowing what ...

  11. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with caffeine fatty and fried foods garlic and onions mint flavorings spicy foods tomato-based foods, like ... doctor who treats kids and teens who have diseases of the gastrointestinal system (the esophagus, stomach, intestines, ...

  12. Teen Safety: Putting an End to Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Teen Safety: Putting An End to Bullying Page Content Article Body The outbreak of school ... that has been allowed to go virtually unchecked: bullying. It turns out that many of these adolescent ...

  13. Behavioral self-concept as predictor of teen drinking behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudovitz, Rebecca N; Li, Ning; Chung, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical developmental period for self-concept (role identity). Cross-sectional studies link self-concept's behavioral conduct domain (whether teens perceive themselves as delinquent) with adolescent substance use. If self-concept actually drives substance use, then it may be an important target for intervention. In this study, we used longitudinal data from 1 school year to examine whether behavioral self-concept predicts teen drinking behaviors or vice versa. A total of 291 students from a large, predominantly Latino public high school completed a confidential computerized survey in the fall and spring of their 9th grade year. Survey measures included the frequency of alcohol use, binge drinking and at-school alcohol use in the previous 30 days; and the Harter Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents behavioral conduct subscale. Multiple regressions were performed to test whether fall self-concept predicted the frequency and type of spring drinking behavior, and whether the frequency and type of fall drinking predicted spring self-concept. Fall behavioral self-concept predicted both the frequency and type of spring drinking. Students with low versus high fall self-concept had a predicted probability of 31% versus 20% for any drinking, 20% versus 8% for binge drinking and 14% versus 4% for at-school drinking in the spring. However, neither the frequency nor the type of fall drinking significantly predicted spring self-concept. Low behavioral self-concept may precede or perhaps even drive adolescent drinking. If these results are confirmed, then prevention efforts might be enhanced by targeting high-risk teens for interventions that help develop a healthy behavioral self-concept. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hispanic Teens & Drugs. A Special Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of National Drug Control Policy, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Across the Nation, teen drug use is down 23 percent since 2001 among 8th, 10th, and 12th graders, reflecting reductions in the use of nearly every drug. However, data from 2005 and 2006 indicate that there are still some areas of concern for Hispanic youth. Hispanic 8th graders have a higher rate of illicit drug use than other teens in the same…

  15. Vital Signs-Preventing Teen Pregnancy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-04-07

    This podcast is based on the April 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Teen births in the U.S. have declined, but still, more than 273,000 infants were born to teens ages 15 to 19 in 2013. Learn about the most effective types of birth control.  Created: 4/7/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/7/2015.

  16. Teen Depression and Suicide, A SILENT CRISIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroning, Maureen; Kroning, Kayla

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent depression is a serious problem affecting 10.7% of all teens and 29.9% of high school students; 17% of high school students have contemplated suicide. Yet, depression in teens is often unrecognized. This article relays the tragic death of a 17-year-old, along with symptoms of depression and suicide in adolescents; DSM-5 criteria for depression; treatments including protective factors, psychotherapy, and medications; and imparts interventions for addressing this huge but silent crisis.

  17. Perspectives

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    regards scientific funding4. He never had a big institute in the modern sense and did not dispose of large funds or large numbers of people5. Conflict between Bernal and. Perspectives ... The problems of being a “polytropic scientist” have increased enormously. ... as ever for managing populations. People with power are.

  18. Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarone, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this "Perspectives" column is "Requiring a Proficiency Level as a Requirement for U.S. K-12 Teacher Licensure." In 1998, the American Council of Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) began to work with the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), which accredits teacher education programs…

  19. Perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kussmann, Martin; Morine, Melissa J; Hager, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    We review here the status of human type 2 diabetes studies from a genetic, epidemiological, and clinical (intervention) perspective. Most studies limit analyses to one or a few omic technologies providing data of components of physiological processes. Since all chronic diseases are multifactorial...

  20. Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tamara Shefer

    maintaining safe school environments. This perspective paper outlines the NSSF's approach to preventing school violence. Keywords: national school safety framework, violence prevention, South African schools, school safety. INTRODUCTION. Schools should be safe places for teaching and learning, free of violence and ...

  1. In Search of Teen Dating Violence Typologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Dennis E; Ball, Barbara; Houry, Debra; Holland, Kristin M; Valle, Linda A; Kearns, Megan C; Marshall, Khiya J; Rosenbluth, Barri

    2016-02-01

    The goal of the present research was to identify distinct latent classes of adolescents that commit teen dating violence (TDV) and assess differences on demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal correlates. Boys and girls (N = 1,149; Mage = 14.3; Grades 6-12) with a history of violence exposure completed surveys assessing six indices of TDV in the preceding 3 months. Indices of TDV included controlling behaviors, psychological TDV, physical TDV, sexual TDV, fear/intimidation, and injury. In addition, adolescents provided demographic and dating history information and completed surveys assessing attitudes condoning violence, relationship skills and knowledge, and reactive/proactive aggression. Latent class analysis indicated a three-class solution wherein the largest class of students was nonviolent on all indices ("nonaggressors") and the smallest class of students demonstrated high probability of nearly all indices of TDV ("multiform aggressors"). In addition, a third class of "emotional aggressors" existed for which there was a high probability of controlling and psychological TDV but low likelihood of any other form of TDV. Multiform aggressors were differentiated from emotional and nonaggressors on the use of self-defense in dating relationships, attitudes condoning violence, and proactive aggression. Emotional aggressors were distinguished from nonaggressors on nearly all measured covariates. Evidence indicates that different subgroups of adolescents engaging in TDV exist. In particular, a small group of youth engaging in multiple forms of TDV can be distinguished from a larger group of youth that commit acts of TDV restricted to emotional aggression (i.e., controlling and psychological) and most youth that do not engage in TDV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. The Teen Science Café Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M.; Mayhew, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    The 'Teen Cafè' phenomenon grew out of an NSF-funded experiment to bring the Cafè Scientifique model for engagement of the public with science and scientists to high school teenagers. Cafè Scientifique New Mexico (cafènm.org), now in its seventh year, has proven highly popular with high school teens for much the same reason as for adult Cafè programs: the blend of socializing in an attractive venue and interaction with a scientist on an interesting science topic. Teen Cafés also include exploration of the topic with hands-on activities. The success of the model has led to the creation of the national Teen Science Cafè Network (teensciencecafe.org. This first year of the new program, four 'Founding Members' of the Network-- in Florida, Colorado, North Carolina, and the St. Louis, Missouri region--started up Teen Cafè programs. Each applied the model with a unique flair appropriate to local institutions and demographics. Each Member in the Network runs Cafès in multiple local venues. We are now gearing up for our second year, and the Network is growing. Our Teen Cafè topics have covered a very wide range, from belly-button biodiversity to cyber-security to patterns of mega-earthquakes to a day in the life of a teen dolphin to corals on acid to emergency room medicine to alternative fuel cars. Presenters have come from a great variety of local institutions. Though they are popular with teens because they are fun and interesting, our evaluations have demonstrated that the programs are having a significant impact on participating teens' understanding of the nature of science, the work that scientists do, and the importance of science to their daily lives. We are also having success in training scientists to communicate effectively with this public audience. Presenters report strong satisfaction with their resulting quality of science communication. A surprising number have reported that their experience with the program has led them to think in a new way about

  3. The Teen Depression Awareness Project: Building an Evidence Base for Improving Teen Depression Care. Research Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Depression's effects on adolescent functioning and family burden are not well understood; there is also limited understanding of teens' and parents' attitudes and knowledge about depression, how these and other factors influence readiness for treatment, and the barriers to care that teens and their parents encounter. To address these knowledge…

  4. Teens Will Be Teens: The Latest Brain Research Has a Lot to Say about Adolescent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jami

    2005-01-01

    Most adults are challenged when it comes to understanding teens' motives. "What were they thinking of?" is an all-too-common response. Without a doubt, no developmental period in life is more confounding and baffling than adolescence. Until recently, erratic teen behavior was blamed on raging hormones, but scientific research in the last decade…

  5. Real Teens, Real Tours: Teen Engagement Strategies for the One-Time Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Krista Dahl; Wyrick, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    The teen behavior typically exhibited in school visit groups is often read by museum teachers as resistance or disengagement, when the opposite is more likely the case. This paper attempts to dispel some of the myths around teen behavior and serve as a practical guide to museum educators who desire a deeper, more successful engagement with teen…

  6. Pregnancy resolutions among pregnant teens: termination, parenting or adoption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Alice Yuen; Lam, Pui-Ling

    2014-12-19

    Teenagers are unprepared to face or to deal with an unexpected pregnancy. Adolescents do not necessarily possess the cognitive ability needed to clearly evaluate such a situation or to determine how to resolve their pregnancy. This study seeks to shed light on what pregnant adolescents consider when coming to a decision about what to do about their pregnancy. In-depth interviews were conducted among a purposive sample of Hong Kong Chinese women recruited from a Maternal and Child Health Centre, who had a history of being pregnant in their teens and out of wedlock. Interviews were conducted to explore the considerations surrounding their decision on how to resolve their pregnancy. A total of nine women were interviewed. An analysis of the interview transcripts revealed that to arrive at a decision on what to do about their pregnancy, pregnant teens took into consideration their relationship with their boyfriend, their family's advice or support, practical considerations, their personal values in life, and views on adoption. The results of this study results highlighted that during this life-altering event for adolescents, an open discussion should take place among all of the parties concerned. A better understanding of each party's perspective would allow for better decision making on the resolution of the pregnancy. Health professionals or social workers are there to help pregnant adolescents, romantic partners, and family members make informed choices on how to resolve the pregnancy.

  7. Understanding the Areas and Correlates of Diabetes-Related Distress in Parents of Teens With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessler, Danielle; Fisher, Lawrence; Polonsky, William; Johnson, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    To identify the unique areas of diabetes-related distress (DD) for parents of teens with type 1 diabetes and parent and teen characteristics associated with DD. Areas of DD were developed from structured interviews and translated into 46 survey items. Items were analyzed with exploratory factor analysis (EFA). An EFA with 332 parents (88% mothers) reduced items to four Parent Diabetes Distress Scale (PDDS) factors (20 items, α = .94): Personal, Teen Management, Parent/Teen Relationship, and Healthcare Team Distress. Parent DD was higher among fathers, younger or single parents, parents of teens with higher hemoglobin A1c or severe low blood glucose levels, authoritarian parenting, depressive symptoms, and low emotional support. 4 areas of parent DD were identified using a newly developed measure, the PDDS. DD was associated with family demographic, teen diabetes status, and parent contextual factors, and can help identify parents who may be more vulnerable to DD. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. German ambulatory care physicians' perspectives on clinical guidelines - a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzlaff, Martin; Kempkens, Daniela; Schnee, Melanie; Dieterle, Wilfried E; Böcken, Jan; Rieger, Monika A

    2006-07-20

    There has been little systematic research about the extent to which German physicians accept or reject the concept and practice of a) clinical practice guidelines (CPG) and b) evidence based medicine (EBM)The aim of this study was to investigate German office-based physicians' perspective on CPGs and EBM and their application in medical practice. Structured national telephone survey of ambulatory care physicians, four thematic blocks with 21 questions (5 point Likert scale). 511 office-based general practitioners and specialists. Main outcome measures were the application of Clinical Practice Guidelines in daily practice, preference for sources of guidelines and degree of knowledge and acceptance of EBM. In the data analysis Pearson's correlation coefficient was used for explorative analysis of correlations. The comparison of groups was performed by Student's t-test. Chi2 test was used to investigate distribution of two or more categorical variables. Of the total study population 55.3% of physicians reported already using guidelines in the treatment of patients. Physicians in group practices (GrP) as well as general practitioners (GP) agreed significantly more with the usefulness of guidelines as a basis for patient care than doctors in single practices (SP) or specialists (S) (Student's t-test mean GP 2.57, S 2.84, p institution was substantially lower than from physician networks or medical societies (36.2% vs. 53.4% vs. 62.0%). 73.8% of doctors interpret EBM as a combination of scientific research and individual medical knowledge; 80% regard EBM as the best basis for patient care. Despite a majority of physicians accepting and applying CPGs a large group remains that is critical and opposed to the utilization of CPGs in daily practice and to the concept of EBM in general. Doctors in single practice and specialists appear to be more critical than physicians in group practices and GPs. Future research is needed to evaluate the willingness to acquire necessary

  9. Medicaid service use and program costs for pregnant teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavin, Norma I; Kuo, May; Adams, E Kathleen; Ayadi, M Femi; Gilbert, Brenda Colley

    2005-12-01

    Teen pregnancy is an important public health issue for all teens, but particularly for low-income teens who rely on the public health safety net for services. Medicaid pays for more than two-thirds of deliveries among teenagers in the USA. To discern how this public program serves pregnant teens (aged 11-19 years), the authors used Medicaid enrollment and claims data for Florida, Georgia and New Jersey in 1995 to examine teens' enrollment duration, service use and average payments relative to 20-24-year-olds on Medicaid. Teens were more likely than the older women to have been enrolled in Medicaid before pregnancy and to have maintained coverage through the third month following delivery. If not enrolled prepregnancy, teens were more likely than older women to enroll later in pregnancy. Teens were less likely to receive early prenatal care and more likely to be hospitalized during pregnancy, usually for preterm labor. While total Medicaid payments for routine prenatal and delivery-related care were equivalent between teens and older women, payments for nonroutine care during pregnancy were modestly higher for teens in Florida and Georgia. Thus, only modest cost savings can accrue from lower average costs per pregnancy and delivery among teens who delay pregnancy. Additional and larger cost savings to the Medicaid program from preventing teen pregnancy would accrue from the expected lower enrollment in Medicaid among the teens as they age.

  10. Choose Health Action Teens: A Review of a Teens as Teachers Nutritional Education Training Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Flesch

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This review draws from published research related to the best practices for the utilization of teens as teachers to examine Choose Health Action Teens (CHAT, a teen’s as teachers (TAT training curriculum.  Research shows that there are various components necessary to build a high quality TAT program.  Most of these components fall under four areas in which training is necessary for teens and adults: Teaching strategies, youth/child development, subject matter to be taught, and youth-adult partnerships.  These four areas provide a framework to review the Choose Health Action Teens (CHAT (Crosiar & Wolfe, 2013 teens as teachers training program curriculum.

  11. Supervisors' perspective on medical thesis projects and dropout rates: survey among thesis supervisors at a large German university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Elif; Richter, Felicitas; Valchanova, Ralitsa; Dewey, Marc

    2016-10-14

    To identify underlying causes for failure of medical thesis projects and the constantly high drop-out rate in Germany from the supervisors' perspective and to compare the results with the students' perspective. Cross-sectional survey. Online questionnaire for survey of medical thesis supervisors among the staff of Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. Published, earlier longitudinal survey among students for comparison. 1069 thesis supervisors participated. Data are presented using descriptive statistics, and the χ 2 test served to compare the results among supervisors with the earlier data from the longitudinal survey of doctoral students. Not applicable. This survey is an observational study. Of 3653 potential participants, 1069 (29.3%) supervising 3744 doctoral candidates participated in the study. Supervisors considered themselves to be highly motivated and to offer adequate supervision. On the other hand, 87% stated that they did not feel well prepared for thesis supervision. Supervisors gave lack of timeliness of doctoral students and personal differences (p=0.024 and p=0.001) as the main reasons for terminating thesis projects. Doctoral students predominantly mentioned methodological problems and difficult subjects as critical issues (p=0.001 and pthesis supervisors and medical students feel ill prepared for their roles in the process of a medical dissertation. Contradictory reasons for terminating medical thesis projects based on supervisors' and students' self-assessment suggest a lack of communication and true scientific collaboration between supervisors and doctoral students as the major underlying issue that requires resolution. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. [Use of the Smartphone to Promote Healthy Habits among Teen-agers, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrion, Carme; Arroyo Moliner, Liliana; Castell, Conxa; Puigdomènech, Elisa; Felipe Gómez, Santiago; Domingo, Laia; Espallargues, Mireia

    2016-11-03

    The PEGASO Project aims to design a technological system aimed at European adolescents to promote healthy lifestyles. The objective was to explore teenagers and their parents and teachers perceptions with regards to mobile technology use in promoting a healthier lifestyle, in terms of food and physical activity. Qualitative study based on primary data obtained through four focus groups analysis (three teenager groups between 13 and 15 y and 1 parent/teacher group). Verbatim transcriptions have been analysed following content analysis perspective. Four different categories were identified: 1: social and cultural context, 2: adolescents and health, 3: role of technology in teenagers' lives and 4: use of technology to acquire healthier habits. Each category helped to arise various subcategories linked to the relation between teens and health: holistic health concept, health/disease perception directly related with feeling physically fit and social acceptance. With regards to technology, the arisen themes were: feeling connected with others, importance of entertainment/games, omnipresent use of Smartphones and risk of excessive dependence on technology. The difference between teens and adults with regards to health and technology categories were not significant. Both teens and adults think that for technology to be effective in acquiring healthier habits it has to help teens to improve and maintain their self-esteem, in an entertaining way and using their own communication codes, mainly audio-visual ones, always under the umbrella of a holistic and integrated perception of health.

  13. The hedgehog and the fox; the history of victimisation surveys from a Trans-Atlantic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, Jan; Guzy, Nathalie; Birkel, Christoph; Mischkowitz, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In his PhD thesis defended at the University of Versailles on November 12, 2014, Matthieu de Castelbajac traces back the early history of victimisation surveys in the USA and Europe with a focus on the National Crime Victims Surveys in the USA (starting in 1973), the Dutch Victimisation Survey

  14. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adult (13 to 21)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health Care Decisions Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young Adults KidsHealth > For Parents > Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Teens & Young ... plan healthy meals. continue Step 3: Explore Young-Adult Education Young adults with cerebral palsy are entitled ...

  15. Dealing With Feelings When You're Overweight (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Your Parents - or Other Adults Dealing With Feelings When You're Overweight KidsHealth > For Teens > Dealing ... Abordar tus propios sentimientos cuando tienes sobrepeso Recognizing Feelings Living through our teen years comes with all ...

  16. Food Safety and Nutrition Information for Kids and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Food Home Food Resources for You Consumers Kids & Teens ... More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Food Safety & Nutrition Information for Kids and Teens Fun & ...

  17. E-Cigarettes Lead to 'Real' Smoking by Teens: Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166899.html E-Cigarettes Lead to 'Real' Smoking by Teens: Review But ... News) -- Teens and young adults who use electronic cigarettes -- also known as vaping -- are almost four times ...

  18. Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions May 9, 2013 Teenage pregnancy is a serious public ... to treatment entry TEDS_121 THE TEDS REPORT: Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions May ...

  19. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Pregnancies in Younger Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... could use this opportunity to discuss advantages and disadvantages of different contraceptive methods and the importance of ... their teen's use of social media and digital technology (e.g., cell phones, computers, tablets). Younger teens ...

  20. Soft Contact Lenses Safe for Kids and Teens, Review Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167037.html Soft Contact Lenses Safe for Kids and Teens, Review Finds Infection ... 2017 WEDNESDAY, July 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Soft contact lenses are as safe for children and teens as ...

  1. Teen Choice of Inwood House.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The Teen Choice Program in New York City was described and the outcome of the program evaluation was reported. Teen Choice is a school based sex education and pregnancy prevention program run by trained social workers. The aim is to provide information, counseling, and referrals on a range of issues relating to sexuality. The program is elective and meets during a regularly scheduled gym period for one or two semesters from the 7th to the 12th grades. There are single sex and coeducational classes. The program aim is to change attitudes toward birth control, to change risky sexual behavior, such as unprotected coitus, to offer accurate knowledge about contraception, and to prevent unplanned pregnancies. Abstinence is encouraged, but for those sexually experienced, there is attention to responsible and reliable use of contraception. Program methods include small group discussion, individual counseling, and classroom discussion. Topics of discussion range from sexuality issues and birth control to values clarification and peer pressure. Small groups may discuss human sexual growth, relationship formation, family life, responsibility to self and others, consequences of teenage pregnancy, and social and cultural peer pressures. Girls are encouraged to assume more assertive and less reactive roles. Communication skills are reinforced in respectful exchanges of personal views and questions. Differentiating facts and issues is a primary focus. A question about when an individual first had sex would be redirected to asking about the appropriate age to first have sex. Respect for privacy helps to build students confidence in the program. A longitudinal evaluation conducted between 1984 and 1987 found that the program was effective in reaching and recruiting high risk adolescents. Students left the program with increased knowledge about contraception, more mature and responsible attitudes about the use of birth control, and reduced frequency of unprotected coitus. Boys were

  2. Vital Signs-Preventing Pregnancy in Younger Teens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-04-08

    This podcast is based on the April 2014 CDC Vital Signs report. Births to teens are declining, still, in 2012, more than 86,000 teens ages 15 to 17 gave birth. This program discusses what health care providers, parents, and teens can do to help prevent teen pregnancy.  Created: 4/8/2014 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/8/2014.

  3. Effectiveness of a Federal Healthy Start program in reducing primary and repeat teen pregnancies: our experience over the decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihu, Hamisu M; August, Euna M; Jeffers, Delores F; Mbah, Alfred K; Alio, Amina P; Berry, Estrellita

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a Federal Healthy Start program in reducing primary and repeat teen pregnancies in a disadvantaged community. An ecological study that compares trends in teen pregnancy in the catchment area in which the community-based intervention was administered with two ecologic controls: the county (Hillsborough) and the state (Florida). Our catchment area is East Tampa, a socio-economically disadvantaged community in Hillsborough County, Florida. Preconception care targeted teenagers between the ages of 10 and 19 years. Interconception care involved young mothers under the age of 20 with a previous birth. The population was comprised primarily of African Americans. Preconception care services for primary teen pregnancy reduction offered sex education, family planning, drug and violence prevention education, and communication and negotiation skills acquisition. Interconception care service offered young women health education through monthly home visitation or monthly peer support group meetings addressing a range of topics using the life course perspective as framework. Reduction in primary teen pregnancy and repeat teen pregnancy among adolescents. The decline in primary teen pregnancy in the catchment area was 60% and 80% greater than the reduction experienced at the county level and at the state level respectively over the period of the study. However, efforts to prevent repeat pregnancy were not successful. The Federal Healthy Start Preconception Care program, in collaboration with community partners, contributed to the prevention of first-time teen pregnancy in a community faced with significant social and economic challenges. Copyright © 2011 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Teen and Parent Perceptions of a Secondary School Family Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonely, Heather M.; Klein, Shirley R.

    2004-01-01

    Adolescent and parent focus groups were conducted to do a needs assessment and discover possible topics for a secondary school family class. Results included identifying teen and parent family-related needs and societal concerns; discovering where teens currently learn about family life; and receiving teen and parent feedback about a proposed…

  5. Health Care Factors Influencing Teen Mothers' Use Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This implies that less than 50% of teen mothers use contraceptives after experiencing teen birth. It is noted that health care factors such as use of antenatal care, awareness of pregnancy complications, attainment of primary education and exposure to media predict teen mothers' use of modern contraceptives. Conclusion: ...

  6. Teen Depression and Suicide: Effective Prevention and Intervention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Keith A.; Vidourek, Rebecca A.

    2012-01-01

    Teen depression and suicidal behaviors are intricately intertwined, with untreated depression being a leading cause of adolescent suicide. Most depressed or suicidal teens tend to show warning signs and possess specific risk factors. A key component to preventing teen depression is for adults to remain aware of such warning signs and risk factors…

  7. A Study of Taiwanese Teens' Traditional and Cyberbullying Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shu Ching; Lin, Chia-Ying; Chen, An-Sing

    2014-01-01

    This study examined several types of teen behaviors, specifically bullying, being bullied, and witnessing bullying, and analyzed teens' judgments of the seriousness of the bullying. A Bullying Behaviors Scale (BBS) was designed to investigate both traditional bullying (TB) and cyberbullying (CB) behaviors among teens in grades 5 through 11. The…

  8. The relatives' perspective on advanced cancer care in Denmark. A cross-sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Anna T; Ross, Lone; Petersen, Morten A

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve advanced cancer care, evaluations are necessary. An important element of such evaluations is the perspective of the patient's relatives who have the role of being caregivers as well as co-users of the health care system. The aims were to investigate the scale structure of the ...... of the FAMCARE scale, to investigate satisfaction with advanced cancer care from the perspective of the relatives of a representative sample of advanced cancer patients, and to investigate whether some sub-groups of relatives were more dissatisfied than others.......In order to improve advanced cancer care, evaluations are necessary. An important element of such evaluations is the perspective of the patient's relatives who have the role of being caregivers as well as co-users of the health care system. The aims were to investigate the scale structure...

  9. Vocabulary Development of Junior Teens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Nikonova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the communicative competence formation of young adolescents in the secondary school at the Russian language lessons. The author maintains that the key element of the above problem is the vocabulary development guaranteeing both comprehension and verbal expression formation – oral and written. The theoretical part of the research explores different word functions: nominal, communicative, text generating and semantic. The correlation between the mental development level and lexical semantic system formation is emphasized. The age specific features of junior teens are listed: rising interest to various life spheres and activi- ties, capability of formulating opinions and judgments, self-awareness, formation of values. The relationship complexity stimulates vocabulary development of 10 to 12 year-old children; however, the process requires peda- gogical facilitation.The monitoring of speech development proves the necessity of commutative competence formation of the fifth- and sixth-year pupils. The paper presents the model of communicative competence development and its approbation results received for the junior adolescents. 

  10. Contraceptive considerations in overweight teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneshiro, Bliss; Edelman, Alison

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore the efficacy and safety of contraceptives in overweight adolescents. There are few studies exploring hormonal contraceptive efficacy and safety in overweight and obese adults and almost none addressing these issues in adolescents. Luckily for teens, in terms of safety, many of the comorbidities associated with obesity are yet to transpire and their options for contraception remain relatively unrestricted. Studies of the combined oral contraceptive pill and patch in adults suggest that efficacy may be decreased in overweight adolescents. There is no evidence to suggest that the efficacy of the contraceptive implant or intrauterine device (IUD) is decreased in overweight adolescents. Indeed, these long-acting reversible methods will be the best choice for many adolescents because of their high efficacy. Although the literature is not definitive, there is probably a subset of adolescents who are susceptible to weight gain with use of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate. Although there is little research regarding contraceptive efficacy in overweight adolescents, IUDs and implants will be the best methods for many adolescents because of their high efficacy, reversibility, and safety. (C) 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  11. Teen online problem solving for teens with traumatic brain injury: Rationale, methods, and preliminary feasibility of a teen only intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L; Narad, Megan E; Kingery, Kathleen M; Taylor, H Gerry; Stancin, Terry; Kirkwood, Michael W; Yeates, Keith O

    2017-08-01

    To describe the Teen Online Problem Solving-Teen Only (TOPS-TO) intervention relative to the original Teen Online Problem Solving-Family (TOPS-F) intervention, to describe a randomized controlled trial to assess intervention efficacy, and to report feasibility and acceptability of the TOPS-TO intervention. Research method and design: This is a multisite randomized controlled trial, including 152 teens (49 TOPS-F, 51 TOPS-TO, 52 IRC) between the ages of 11-18 who were hospitalized for a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in the previous 18 months. Assessments were completed at baseline, 6-months post baseline, and 12-months post baseline. Data discussed include adherence and satisfaction data collected at the 6-month assessment (treatment completion) for TOPS-F and TOPS-TO. Adherence measures (sessions completed, dropout rates, duration of treatment engagement, and rates of program completion) were similar across treatment groups. Overall, teen and parent reported satisfaction was high and similar across groups. Teens spent a similar amount of time on the TOPS website across groups, and parents in the TOPS-F spent more time on the TOPS website than those in the TOPS-TO group (p = .002). Parents in the TOPS-F group rated the TOPS website as more helpful than those in the TOPS-TO group (p = .05). TOPS-TO intervention is a feasible and acceptable intervention approach. Parents may perceive greater benefit from the family based intervention. Further examination is required to understand the comparative efficacy in improving child and family outcomes, and who is likely to benefit from each approach. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Results from an online survey of patient and caregiver perspectives on unmet needs in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Prakash S; Tracy, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    To look at the manner in which patients and caregivers perceive the treatment of bipolar disorder compared with the evidence base for bipolar treatment. Between April 2013 and March 2014, 469 respondents took a 14-question online survey on demographics, medications taken, and perspectives on bipolar treatment and medications. Participants were recruited through social media outlets (Facebook and Twitter accounts) of Global Medical Education (New York, New York) and the blog Bipolar Burble, which has a primary audience of people with bipolar disorder. There were no exclusion criteria to participation, and both patients and health care professionals were encouraged to participate. Most respondents were taking ≥ 3 medications, and the greatest unmet need in treatment was for bipolar depression. In general, respondent perspectives on the effectiveness of individual medication treatments did not align with the available literature. Weight gain was the greatest side effect concern for both antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Our survey demonstrates that there are still many unmet needs in the treatment of bipolar disorder. There is also a mismatch between the evidence base for treatments in bipolar disorder and patient perception of the relative efficacy of different medications. In order to achieve better outcomes, there is a need to provide patients and clinicians greater quality education with regard to the best evidence-based treatments for bipolar disorder.

  13. Student Preparation for PGY1 Residency Training by US Colleges of Pharmacy: Survey of the Residency Program Director Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Alyssa B; Beyer, Jacob; Dickson, Whitney L; Gutman, Irina; Yucebay, Filiz; Lepkowsky, Marcie; Chan, Juliana; Carter, Kristen; Shaffer, Christopher L; Fuller, Patrick D

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate current residents' level of preparation by US colleges of pharmacy for postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) residency training from the perspective of residency program directors (RPDs). Methods: RPDs were asked in an electronic survey questionnaire to rate PGY1 pharmacy residents' abilities in 4 domains: communication, clinical knowledge, interpersonal/time-management skills, and professionalism/leadership. Results: One hundred ninety-seven RPDs of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP)-accredited PGY1 programs completed the survey. The majority of RPDs strongly agreed or agreed that residents were prepared as students to effectively communicate both verbally and nonverbally, were able to appropriately respond to drug inquiries using drug resources and literature searches, and consistently displayed professionalism. Respondents were more likely to disagree or give a neutral response when asked about residents' understanding of biostatistics and their ability to provide enteral and parenteral nutritional support for patients. Conclusion: Overall, RPDs agreed that residents were prepared to perform the majority of the tasks of each of the 4 domains assessed in this survey relating to PGY1 training. RPDs may use the results of this survey to provide additional support for their residents in the areas in which residents lack adequate preparation, while colleges of pharmacy may focus on incorporating more time in their curriculum for certain areas to better prepare their students for residency training.

  14. Teens, Kindness and Cruelty on Social Network Sites: How American Teens Navigate the New World of "Digital Citizenship"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Amanda; Madden, Mary; Smith, Aaron; Purcell, Kristen; Zickuhr, Kathryn; Rainie, Lee

    2011-01-01

    Social media use has become so pervasive in the lives of American teens that having a presence on a social network site is almost synonymous with being online. Fully 95% of all teens ages 12-17 are now online and 80% of those online teens are users of social media sites. The authors focused their attention in this research on social network sites…

  15. Surveys of current status in biomedical science grant review: funding organisations' and grant reviewers' perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroter, Sara; Groves, Trish; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (a) to describe the current status of grant review for biomedical projects and programmes from the perspectives of international funding organisations and grant reviewers, and (b) to explore funders' interest in developing uniform requirements for grant review...

  16. A Survey of the University Students' Perspectives about Using Digital Technologies in Education: Zimbabwean Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, Sibusisiwe; Scott, Elsje

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the perspectives of university students on the use of digital technologies as tools for teaching and learning. Digital technologies are an essential asset for academic institutions as they can support strategic teaching and learning objectives for education institutions. Studies have shown that limited use of digital…

  17. Positive versus Negative. A cognitive perspective on wording effects for contrastive questions in attitude surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamoen, N.

    2012-01-01

    Standardized surveys are used in many contexts to measure people’s opinions and attitudes. Although it is widely assumed that survey answers represent the ‘true values’ of the concepts measured, a large body of research has shown that seemingly irrelevant question characteristics influence how

  18. German Ambulatory Care Physicians' Perspectives on Continuing Medical Education--A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempkens, Daniela; Dieterle, Wilfried E.; Butzlaff, Martin; Wilson, Andrew; Bocken, Jan; Rieger, Monika A.; Wilm, Stefan; Vollmar, Horst C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: This survey aimed to investigate German ambulatory physicians' opinions about mandatory continuing medical education (CME) and CME resources shortly before the introduction of mandatory CME in 2004. Methods: A structured national telephone survey of general practitioners and specialists was conducted. Main outcome measures were…

  19. Parental acceptability of contraceptive methods offered to their teen during a confidential health care visit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Lauren B; Shafer, Mary-Ann; Pollack, Lance M; Wibbelsman, Charles; Chang, Fay; Tebb, Kathleen P

    2013-02-01

    To examine parental acceptability of contraceptive methods offered confidentially to their adolescent daughter. A random sample of 261 parents/guardians with a daughter aged 12-17 years completed a telephone survey examining the relationship between parental acceptability of seven contraceptive methods and adolescents' likelihood to have sex, parenting beliefs, parents' sexual health as teens, sexually transmitted infection knowledge, and demographic factors. Acceptability was highest for oral contraceptive pills (59%) and lowest for intrauterine device (18%). Parental acceptance of teens' autonomy was significantly associated with increased acceptability of all methods. Parental knowledge of sexually transmitted infections was poor, and 51% found it acceptable for clinicians to provide their sexually active teen with condoms. Parents were more accepting of oral contraceptive pills and condoms compared with intrauterine devices and implants. Parental recognition of their teen's autonomy was associated with greater parental acceptability of clinicians providing their adolescent with contraceptives (regardless of the specific type of method being offered). Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Levels of teen dating violence and substance use in an urban emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michael J; Campbell, Leah; Zaharakis, Nikola; Foster, Robin; Richards, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Teen dating violence (TDV) is associated with multiple sequelae including substance use. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and association between levels of dating violence and substance use among urban adolescents presenting at a pediatric emergency department (ED). As part of standard practice, 282 adolescents were screened for relationship status, producing 135 dating violence screens. Scales from the Revised Conflict Tactics Scale and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to capture variables of interest. Logistic regression was performed to test the influence of levels of dating violence on substance use, while controlling for gender, race, age, sexual orientation, and psychiatric symptoms. Over one-quarter of those teens (27.3%) within a current relationship reported experiencing any dating violence, 26.1% experienced psychological violence, and 11.9% experienced physical violence. Teens experiencing psychological violence were at twice the risk for any substance use (alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco use) and specifically for alcohol and marijuana, whereas no increased risk was found for teens experiencing physical violence. This study contributes to the understanding of TDV within the context of high-risk, urban adolescents presenting at a pediatric ED. Identifying levels of TDV and understanding the association with substance use can provide an important foundation for prevention and early intervention for urban youth.

  1. Family communication patterns and teen drivers' attitudes toward driving safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhen; Campo, Shelly; Ramirez, Marizen; Krapfl, Julia Richards; Cheng, Gang; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Family communication patterns (FCPs) play an important role in reducing the risk-taking behaviors of teens, such as substance use and safer sex. However, little is known about the relationship between family communication and teen driving safety. We analyzed the baseline data from a randomized trial that included 163 parent-teen dyads, with teens who would be receiving their intermediate driver's license within 3 months. FCPs were divided into four types-pluralistic, protective, consensual, and laissez-faire-and were correlated with the frequency of parent-teen discussions and teens' driving safety attitudes. The ratings on four types of FCPs were distributed quite evenly among teens and parents. Parents and teens agreed on their FCP ratings (p = .64). In families with communication patterns that were laissez-faire, protective, and pluralistic, parents talked to their teens less about safe driving than did parents in families with a consensual communication pattern (p communication about safe driving was positively associated with teen attitudes toward safe driving (adjusted β = 0.35, p = .03). Health care providers need to encourage parents, particularly those with non-consensual FCPs, to increase frequency of parent-teen interactions. Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Youth preferences for prenatal and parenting teen services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Joanne E; Bevill, Laura; Forsyth, Jessica; Missal, Sylvia; Sherry, Mollie; Woods, Elizabeth R

    2005-06-01

    Parenting teens served by a teen-tot program and teens from a prenatal clinic participated in focus groups to explore their perceptions of medical care, social services, and psycho-educational parenting groups. The teens met in four focus groups, two prenatal and two postnatal. Teens receiving care from a teen-tot program and associated prenatal clinic in a large metropolitan area in New England. A total of 16 pregnant (n=6) and parenting (n=10) teens ages ranging from 16 to 21 years (13 African American, 2 Latina, and 1 Haitian) participated in the four focus groups. A qualitative focus group study was performed. Structured, culturally sensitive questions guided the discussion based on a hypothetical case scenario. Themes were identified through grounded theory with three coders and differences were reconciled. The groups revealed prenatal and postnatal mothers valued medical and social services provided in a teen-focused hospital clinic. Prenatal teens looked to providers for health education services and group support. Parenting teens requested consistent doctors for their children and social supports for themselves. Both groups desired assistance with social services, education, housing, and finances as well as educational services for fathers. Teen parents' perceptions and suggestions for services are critical to program development that meets the needs of participants.

  3. Teen driving: motor-vehicle crashes and factors that contribute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, Jean T; Bingham, C Raymond

    2008-09-01

    The motor-vehicle crash risk of novice teen drivers is unacceptably high. This article examines the historical trends in fatal crash rates for male and female teen drivers as compared to adult drivers by both population and person-miles driven. The effect of motor-vehicle policies on teen driver crashes, characteristics of teen driver crashes, and combinations of these crash characteristics are also examined. A framework of seven categories of influences on teen driving behavior is presented, including the following elements: driving ability, developmental factors, behavioral factors, personality factors, demographics, the perceived environment, and the driving environment. Because a complex set of different factors influence teen drivers' behavior, comprehensive, multilevel interventions are needed to reduce teen drivers' exposure to high-risk driving conditions and to address factors identified in the framework.

  4. Partnership for a Drug-Free America: Partnership Attitude Tracking Study. Teens: Ethnic and Racial Trends, Spring 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Barbara

    The annual Partnership Attitude Tracking Study (PATS) tracks consumers' attitudes about illegal drugs. PATS consists of two nationally projectable samples: a teen sample for students in grades 7-12 and a parent sample. The 2002 PATS, conducted in homes and schools, collected data using self-report surveys. Results indicate that after a decade of…

  5. Survey of Primary Care and Mental Health Prescribers' Perspectives on Reducing Opioid and Benzodiazepine Co-Prescribing Among Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Eric J; Malte, Carol A; Hagedorn, Hildi J; Berger, Douglas; Frank, Anissa; Lott, Aline; Achtmeyer, Carol E; Mariano, Anthony J; Saxon, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    Due to the involvement of opioids and benzodiazepines in rising pharmaceutical overdoses, a reduction in coprescribing of these medications is a national priority, particularly among patients with substance use disorders and other high-risk conditions. However, little is known about primary care (PC) and mental health (MH) prescribers' perspectives on these medications and efforts being implemented to reduce coprescribing. An anonymous survey. One multisite VA health care system. Participants were 55 PC and 31 MH prescribers. Survey development was guided by the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) conceptual framework. PC and MH prescribers of opioids or benzodiazepines were invited to complete an anonymous electronic survey. Responses were collapsed to highlight agreement, disagreement, and neutrality and summarized with means and percentages. Over 80% of both prescriber groups reported concern about concurrent use and > 75% strongly agreed with clinical practice guidelines (CPG) that recommend caution in coprescribing among patients with high-risk conditions. More than 40% of both prescriber groups indicated that coprescribing continues because of beliefs that patients appear stable without adverse events and tapering/discontinuation is too difficult. Over 70% of prescribers rated strategies for addressing patients who refuse to discontinue, more time with patients, and identification of high-risk patients as helpful in reducing coprescribing. Despite strong agreement with CPGs, prescribers reported several barriers that contribute to coprescribing of opioids and benzodiazepines and challenge their ability to taper these medications. Multiple interventions are likely needed to reduce opioid and benzodiazepine coprescribing.

  6. Child passenger injury risk in sibling versus non‐sibling teen driver crashes: a US study

    OpenAIRE

    Senserrick, Teresa M; Kallan, Michael J.; Winston, Flaura K.

    2007-01-01

    Several international jurisdictions allow family exemptions to graduated driver licensing passenger restrictions. The objective of this research was to examine differences in injury risk to US child passengers in crashes involving sibling versus non‐sibling teen drivers, and to compare outcomes with crashes involving adult drivers. Insurance claim and telephone survey data were collected on 16 233 child passengers (representing 289 329 children) in 17 US jurisdictions. There was a trend towar...

  7. Is Your Teen in an Abusive Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and access to birth control.Childhood Overweight and Obesity: Helping Your Child Achieve a Healthy WeightRead Article >>Kids and TeensChildhood Overweight and Obesity: Helping Your Child Achieve a Healthy WeightGood nutrition and regular physical ...

  8. Teen Appeal — Touching the Moving Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Christina

    An article to discuss the difficulties of designing educational multimedia for the teen target audience (13 - 16 year olds). The report will assess techniques used in existing online artefacts and reveal major trends in the attempt to appeal to this notoriously hard to reach user group.

  9. Is My Penis Normal? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Your Parents - or Other Adults Is My Penis Normal? KidsHealth > For Teens > Is My Penis Normal? Print A A A en español ¿Es ... any guy who's ever worried about whether his penis is a normal size. There's a fairly wide ...

  10. Teen Dating Violence Prevention Program Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Quincy Arrianna Rose

    2013-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) has identified the prevention of and intervention in relationship violence as a top priority (APA, n.d.). According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's 2012 Teen Dating Violence Fact Sheet, dating violence is a serious problem in the United States. In accordance with Foshee et al. (1998):…

  11. Challenge to Care: Educating Teen Mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proweller, Amira

    2001-01-01

    Explores the need to restore social and relational aspects to education for youth at risk. Anti-youth mass media discourses present negative images of pregnant and parenting teens. Labeled at risk, they are set up for academic and social failure. Describes an alternative public school serving the educational and social support needs of pregnant…

  12. Can Diabetes Be Prevented? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Can Diabetes Be Prevented? KidsHealth / For Teens / Can Diabetes Be ... español ¿Es posible prevenir la diabetes? What Is Diabetes? Diabetes is a disease that affects how the ...

  13. High School Dropout and Teen Childbearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Dave E.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between high school dropout and teen childbearing is complicated because both are affected by a variety of difficult to control factors. In this paper, I use panel data on aggregate dropout and fertility rates by age for all fifty states to develop insight by instrumenting for dropout using information on state…

  14. Communication: A 4-H Teen Intern Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moenter, Barry, Ed.

    This report summarizes and evaluates the experiences of a member of a three-week teen internship program in communications which was held at the National 4-H Center, Washington, D.C., during the summer of 1974. Specific activities in which the intern participated are discussed. The interest emphasis was on photojournalism. (MKM)

  15. Sex Parties: Female Teen Sexual Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano, Sharyl Eve

    2006-01-01

    Adolescent participants in a study aimed at exploring the nature and characteristics of girls' dating relationships revealed the phenomenon of sex parties. These teens defined a "sex party" as an opportunity to engage in sexual contact outside of typical dating relationships. Sexual activity could involve actual intercourse, but usually involved…

  16. Multicultural Programs for Tweens and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Linda B., Ed.; Kwon, Nahyun, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Multicultural Programs for Tweens and Teens" is a one-stop resource that encourages children and young adults to explore different cultures. Dozens of flexible programming ideas allow you to: (1) Choose a program specific to your scheduling, budget, or age group requirements; (2) Create an event that reflects a specific culture; and (3) Recommend…

  17. [Video games, a therapeutic mediator for teens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickler, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Teenagers love video games and other multimedia tools. Sometimes they love them too much, leading to addictive use. A child psychiatry team in Nancy has developed a therapeutic multimedia workshop to contribute to treating teens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Immunization Schedules for Preteens and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the quiz in Spanish . Spanish Version (en español) Vacunas recomendadas para los niños desde los 7 hasta ... Immunizations for Preteens and Teens (7-18 years)) Vacunas recomendadas [2 pages] (Recommended Immunizations) You can display ...

  19. Meningococcal Immunizations for Preteens and Teens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-11

    This podcast provides information about vaccine recommendations to help prevent meningococcal disease in preteens and teens.  Created: 8/11/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch (MVPDB).   Date Released: 8/11/2015.

  20. Why Is My Voice Changing? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enter puberty earlier or later than others. How Deep Will My Voice Get? How deep a guy's voice gets depends on his genes: ... of Use Notice of Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on TeensHealth® is for ...

  1. Time-series surveys and pulsating stars: The near-infrared perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsunaga Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this review is to discuss the advantages and problems of nearinfrared surveys in observing pulsating stars in the Milky Way. One of the advantages of near-infrared surveys, when compared to optical counterparts, is that the interstellar extinction is significantly smaller. As we see in this review, a significant volume of the Galactic disk can be reached by infrared surveys but not by optical ones. Towards highly obscured regions in the Galactic mid-plane, however, the interstellar extinction causes serious problems even with near-infrared data in understanding the observational results. After a review on previous and current near-infrared surveys, we discuss the effects of the interstellar extinction in optical (including Gaia to near-infrared broad bands based on a simple calculation using synthetic spectral energy distribution. We then review the recent results on classical Cepheids towards the Galactic center and the bulge, as a case study, to see the impact of the uncertainty in the extinction law. The extinction law, i.e. the wavelength dependency of the extinction, is not fully characterized, and its uncertainty makes it hard to make the correction. Its characterization is an urgent task in order to exploit the outcomes of ongoing large-scale surveys of pulsating stars, e.g. for drawing a map of pulsating stars across the Galactic disk.

  2. The Rhode Island Teen Institute: Positive Youth Development in Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Apsler

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the application of the positive youth development approach to promote and enhance leadership skills among middle and high school age peer leaders. The article reviews the goals of the positive youth development approach and describes how this approach was adopted and implemented by the Rhode Island Teen Institute (RITI, a comprehensive, residential prevention program founded in 1989. Data are presented from pretests and posttests administered during each of seven annual Institutes delivered between 2002 and 2009 with 775 youth. Participants in the RITI demonstrated significant gains in their leadership skills; an effect that persisted at a 3-month follow-up survey administered with high school age youth. Other significant findings and anecdotal effects are also discussed, such as creation by RITI graduates of a youth-led prevention program for elementary and middle school children.

  3. Pronunciation Issues and Varieties of English from an EIL Perspective: A Survey of Outer and Expanding Circle Learners’ Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Monfared

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In a globalized era where English keeps the position of an international language, learnt and spoken by lots of people from diverse linguistic, cultural and national backgrounds, there is a need for a new perspective towards English as an international language which can bridge notions and cultures. The appearance of varieties of English is the consequence of the global dissemination of English. Based on a combination of quantitative and qualitative data using a semi-structured questionnaire (see Appendix A administered to 60 Iranian learners from expanding circle and 60 Indian learners from outer circle, this study surveyed the developing picture of EIL pronunciation and evaluation of different varieties of English from the perspective of learners from two circles which include the most users of English in the globalized world. The results of the questionnaires supplemented by interviews with leaners from expanding and outer circles revealed that expanding-circle learners like more to have a native-like identity with their preference towards nativism. The implications on the findings on the spread of native speaker norms and the status of ELF and its reflections in learning and teaching in expanding and outer circle countries are discussed.

  4. Patient perspectives on Parkinson’s disease therapy in Japan and the United States: results of two patient surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hattori N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nobutaka Hattori,1 Kenichi Fujimoto,2 Tomoyoshi Kondo,3 Miho Murata,4 Mark Stacy51Department of Neurology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, Tokyo; 2Department of Neurology, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi; 3Department of Neurology, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama; 4Department of Neurology, National Center Hospital of Neurology and Psychiatry, Tokyo, Japan; 5Division of Neurology, Duke University, Durham, NC, USABackground: Despite evidence suggesting that patient attitudes towards therapy may influence treatment outcomes, the impact of these factors on treatment for Parkinson’s disease is poorly understood. These two surveys, based in Japan and the US, investigated the attitudes of patients towards antiparkinsonian medications, the complications of these therapies, and how these differ across geographies.Methods: The US PRELUDE survey collected data from May 13 to May 20, 2003, from 300 interviews with patients with Parkinson’s disease from the National Parkinson Foundation. The Japanese survey was carried out from June to December 2008 in a stepwise manner using questionnaires (n = 3548 followed by interviews with those who had consented to participate in the questionnaire (n = 407. Both surveys assessed the attitudes of patients towards therapies for Parkinson’s disease and associated complications.Results: Dyskinesia was not a major challenge of therapy for Parkinson’s disease, and wearing-off caused greater concern in the US, while hallucinations had a greater emphasis in Japan. Patients who had previously experienced dyskinesia were less concerned about this side effect than those who had not. Although pill burden was thought to be a concern in the US, Japanese patients did not indicate that pill burden would limit their drug intake. There were also discrepancies between the perspectives and concerns of patients and those of their treating physicians.Conclusion: Recognizing patient perspectives regarding therapies for

  5. 1992-2002: Perspective on a decade of tsunami field surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okal, E. A.; Synolakis, C. E.; Borrero, J. C.; Members Of Itst, .

    2003-12-01

    The past decade has seen the systematic deployment of international field survey teams (ITST), following damaging regional tsunamis. Fourteen such surveys have been carried out: Nicaragua (1992), Okushiri (1993), Mindoro (1994), Java (1994), Flores (1994), Kuriles (1994), Mexico (1995), Biak (1996), Chimbote (1996), PNG (1998), Izmit (1999), Fatu Hiva (1999), Vanuatu (1999), Peru (2001) and PNG (2002). In addition, similar techniques have been applied to the survey of important historical tsunamis such as Aleutian (1946) and Amorgos (1956). The primary goal of the field surveys is to obtain a reliable, quantitative dataset of run-up and inundation measurements, which can be used in simulation experiments based on hydrodynamic modeling, in order to unravel the mechanism of generation of the tsunami. One of the most important results obtained from the compilation of such datasets has been the emergence of the aspect ratio of the distribution of run-up in the near field as a most promising discriminant between generation by the seismic dislocation (e.g., Nicaragua; Peru, 2001; PNG 2002) and by an underwater slump (e.g., Aleutian 1946, PNG 1998). Surveying also reveals localized enhancement of run-up, controlled on a smaller scale by occasional underwater landslides (Flores, 1992), splashes against cliffs (Mexico, 1995; Peru, 2001) or interaction with steep coastal valleys (Okushiri, 1993). Field surveys have also provided insight into engineering and societal factors controlling the extent of human and property losses, such as coastal land use, building codes and materials, and public education and awareness. To foster the latter, the teams constantly repeat simple messages on tsunami mitigation during one-on-one interviews with local residents, as well as town meetings. In this respect, the successful self-evacuation at Bay Mairtele, Vanuatu in 1999 is a gratifying example of the value of education.

  6. A patient-initiated voluntary online survey of adverse medical events: the perspective of 696 injured patients and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, Frederick S; Cranley, Nicole M; Hallisy, Julia A

    2015-10-01

    Preventable medical errors continue to be a major cause of death in the USA and throughout the world. Many patients have written about their experiences on websites and in published books. As patients and family members who have experienced medical harm, we have created a nationwide voluntary survey in order to more broadly and systematically capture the perspective of patients and patient families experiencing adverse medical events and have used quantitative and qualitative analysis to summarise the responses of 696 patients and their families. Harm was most commonly associated with diagnostic and therapeutic errors, followed by surgical or procedural complications, hospital-associated infections and medication errors, and our quantitative results match those of previous provider-initiated patient surveys. Qualitative analysis of 450 narratives revealed a lack of perceived provider and system accountability, deficient and disrespectful communication and a failure of providers to listen as major themes. The consequences of adverse events included death, post-traumatic stress, financial hardship and permanent disability. These conditions and consequences led to a loss of patients' trust in both the health system and providers. Patients and family members offered suggestions for preventing future adverse events and emphasised the importance of shared decision-making. This large voluntary survey of medical harm highlights the potential efficacy of patient-initiated surveys for providing meaningful feedback and for guiding improvements in patient care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. Recent trends in teen births in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, S J; Curtin, S C

    1999-01-01

    Teenage births and birth rates have dropped steadily during the 1990s. Overall, the teen birth rate declined 15 percent between 1991 and 1997. The trend in the 1990s reverses a period of steep increases from 1986 to 1991. Despite the recent declines, the teen birth rate in 1997 is still higher than rates in the mid 1980s when they were at an all-time low (50-51 per 1,000). In general, teen birth rates have declined more for younger teenagers (15-17 years) than for older teens (18-19 years). Among all race and ethnic groups, black teenagers have experienced the greatest declines in childbearing during the 1990s. From 1991 to 1997, the rate for black teens 15-19 years dropped 23 percent to the lowest level on record. A particularly noteworthy finding is that the birth rate for second births to all teenagers who have had a first birth (repeat childbearing) declined by 21 percent between 1991 and 1996. Despite the recent decline in teen births and birth rates, a growing number and proportion are to unmarried teens. Most teenagers giving birth in the 1990s are not married--78 percent overall in 1997. Teenage childbearing has important social and health consequences for the teenage mother herself and for her baby. Most teen births are unintended, the educational attainment of teen mothers is limited, teen mothers are less likely to receive timely prenatal care, and teens are more likely to smoke during pregnancy than are older women. As a consequence of these and other factors, babies born to teen mothers are at greater risk of preterm delivery and low birthweight. Teen pregnancy prevention has become a major focus of attention over the past several years, contributing to a wide variety of initiatives and strategies at the national, state and community level.

  8. A Comprehensive Survey on Cyberbullying Perceptions at a Major Metropolitan University--Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molluzzo, John C.; Lawler, James; Manneh, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents are featured daily in the news. The authors of this study examine the perceptions of faculty on cyberbullying at a major metropolitan university. From the findings of a survey distributed to faculty in all schools of the university, the authors learn of high…

  9. Wildland fire, risk, and recovery: results of a national survey with regional and racial perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Michael Bowker; Siew Hoon Lim; H. Ken Cordell; Gary T. Green; Sandra Rideout-Hanzak; Cassandra Y. Johnson

    2008-01-01

    We used a national household survey to examine knowledge, attitudes, and preferences pertaining to wildland fire. First, we present nationwide results and trends. Then, we examine opinions across region and race. Despite some regional variation, respondents are fairly consistent in their beliefs about assuming personal responsibility for living in fire-prone areas and...

  10. Perspectives on Young Boys' Reading: A Survey and Conversations with Early Childhood Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyers, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this multi-method study was to describe early childhood teachers' beliefs regarding what motivates and what presents barriers to reading for boys. This study used the two data collection strategies of an online survey and interviews. The research questions guiding this study were: (1) what do early childhood teachers believe boys…

  11. Nutrition education tools used in phenylketonuria: clinician, parent and patient perspectives from three international surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, L E; Helm, J R; Rocha, J C; Almeida, M F; Feillet, F; Link, R M; Gizewska, M

    2014-04-01

    Three international surveys were developed aiming to identify the current nutrition educational tools used in the management of phenylketonuria (PKU) and the perceived effectiveness of these tools by clinicians, parents and patients. The first two surveys were distributed through the Metabolic Dietitians ListServe (pno-metabl@listserv.cc.emory.edu), and the third survey was distributed by international clinics and the National PKU Alliance website (www.npkua.org). A total of 888 responses (S1, n = 88; S2, n = 81; S3, n = 719) were collected from all three surveys. The surveys represent participants from 17 countries, in Europe; North America (USA and Canada); Mexico; Argentina; Turkey; Australia; and Africa (Tunisia). A consistent decline in 'parents as role models' as an educational tool was observed starting at age 10 years. Patients responded they feel their families are the most effective form of education, whereas handouts were selected as the least effective educational tool by patients. Parents responded they feel the most effective educational tool is one-on-one counselling. Patients and parents show a desirable trend in wanting to attend group clinic, even in centres where this type of educational tool is not offered. There was a discrepancy between clinicians and patient views regarding the perceived effectiveness of the nutrition education tools. Future research is needed surrounding the impact nutrition education may have on improved dietary compliance in patients with PKU. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  12. The Prevention of the Workplace Harassment at Japanese Universities:The Perspective of the Research and the Findings from the Complete Count Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Tomoko

    2014-01-01

    This article shows the perspective of this research and the result of the complete count survey performed from October to November in 2013 to examine the attitude toward the prevention and the resolution of the workplace harassment at the Japanese universities. The questionnaire was distributed to 1131 universities, two years colleges, and…

  13. Public perspectives of fire, fuels, and the Forest Service in the Great Lakes Region: a survey of citizen-agency communication and trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce A. Shindler; Eric Toman; Sarah M. McCaffrey

    2009-01-01

    Relative to the western United States, where fire and fuel management programs have received greater emphasis, few community-based studies have focused on the Great Lakes region. The present paper describes public opinion research from counties surrounding National Forests inWisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan. Survey data address citizen perspectives on (1) fuel...

  14. A mixed-methods exploration of the contraceptive experiences of female teens with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manski, Ruth; Dennis, Amanda

    2014-09-01

    We explored the contraceptive experiences of female teens with epilepsy, including their knowledge and perceptions of interactions between antiepileptic drugs and hormonal contraception and contraceptive decision-making processes. From November 2012 to May 2013, we conducted one online survey (n=114) and 12 online focus group discussions (n=26) with female teens with epilepsy about their contraceptive experiences and unmet needs. Survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and focus group transcripts were analyzed thematically using modified grounded theory methods. Both survey and focus group participants reported believing that interactions between epilepsy medications and hormonal contraceptives could lead to reductions in contraceptive efficacy and seizure control. However, their knowledge about these types of medication interactions was often incomplete. Many study participants viewed contraceptive decision making as a difficult process, and some participants reported avoiding hormonal contraceptives because of potential interactions with antiepileptic drugs. Study participants reported relying on health care providers and parents for contraceptive decision-making support. Focus group participants also reported they wanted health care providers to provide more in-depth and comprehensive counseling about contraception, and that they desired peer support with contraceptive decisions. The ability to make informed contraceptive decisions is important for teens with epilepsy as interactions between anti-epileptic drugs and hormonal contraceptives can impact seizure occurrence and lead to an increased risk of unplanned pregnancy. Guidance for providers offering contraceptive care to this population is needed, as well as a contraceptive support tool that empowers teens with epilepsy to advocate for desired health care. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Ten Tips for Parents to Help Their Children Avoid Teen Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... experts in the field, as well as to teens and parents themselves. From these sources, it is clear that ... Tips for Parents to Help Their Children Avoid Teen Pregnancy (PDF) parents tips teen pregnancy research Trusted Adults Search Birth ...

  16. Parental responses to youths' reports of teen dating violence: Recommendations from parents and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Beverly; Preble, Kathleen

    2016-08-01

    Parental responses to teen dating violence (TDV) can influence children's behaviors. This qualitative study presents findings from focus groups analyzing parental responses to TDV. Thirty-one parents and 55 teens, recruited from local family service agencies located in southwestern part of the country, participated in separate focus groups that presented dating violence scenarios. Focus group results indicated that parents and teens both urge communication that included parents asking questions, educating the teen, sharing their personal experiences, and giving teens advice. Parental and teens' comments also focused on the importance of protecting teens, providing support for teens, refraining from overreacting and offering counseling services. Parents, more than teens, stressed the importance of educating teens; teens, more than parents, stressed the importance of parents supporting and providing comfort to teens while refraining from overreacting and yelling. Implications for programming with parents and future research are included. Copyright © 2016 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Survey of Strategies to Modulate the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Pathway: Current and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan W. Lowery

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs constitute the largest subdivision of the TGF-β family of ligands and are unequivocally involved in regulating stem cell behavior. Appropriate regulation of canonical BMP signaling is critical for the development and homeostasis of numerous human organ systems, as aberrations in the BMP pathway or its regulation are increasingly associated with diverse human pathologies. In this review, we provide a wide-perspective on strategies that increase or decrease BMP signaling. We briefly outline the current FDA-approved approaches, highlight emerging next-generation technologies, and postulate prospective avenues for future investigation. We also detail how activating other pathways may indirectly modulate BMP signaling, with a particular emphasis on the relationship between the BMP and Activin/TGF-β pathways.

  18. A Cafe Scientifique for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M.; Mayhew, M.

    2008-12-01

    It is well-known to those pursuing the quest to connect scientists to the public that an exceedingly hard-to- reach demographic is people of high school age. Typically, kids may tag along with their parents to museums until they reach adolescence, and then don't again appear in museums until they themselves have children. We have addressed this demographic challenge for free-choice-learning by developing a Cafe Scientifique program specifically for high school students. The Cafe Scientifique model for adults was developed in England and France, and has now spread like wildfire across the U.S. Typically, people come to a informal setting like a cafe, socialize and have food and drink, and then hear a short presentation by a scientist on a hot science topic in the news. This is followed by a period of lively discussion. We have followed this model for high school age students in four towns in northern New Mexico--Los Alamos, Santa Fe, Espanola, and Albuquerque--which represent a highly diverse demographic. We started this novel project with some trepidation, i.e. what if we build it and they don't come. But the program has proven popular beyond our expectations in all four towns. A part of the secret of success is the social setting, and-especially for this age group-the food provided. But we have also found that the kids are genuinely interested in the science topics, directing their own program, and interacting with scientists. We have often heard statements like, "I think it is important to be well-informed citizens". One of the most important aspects of the Cafes for the kids is to be able to discuss and argue about issues related to the science topic with the presenter and each other. It is an important part of the popularity that the Cafes do not involve school or parents, but also that we have strived to give the kids ownership of the program. Each town has a Youth Leadership Team-open to any teen-that discusses and prioritizes potential topics, conducts

  19. Perspectives of speech-language pathologists on the use of telepractice in schools: quantitative survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Janice K

    2012-01-01

    This research surveyed 170 school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) in one northeastern state, with only 1.8% reporting telepractice use in school-settings. These results were consistent with two ASHA surveys (2002; 2011) that reported limited use of telepractice for school-based speech-language pathology. In the present study, willingness to use telepractice was inversely related to age, perhaps because younger members of the profession are more accustomed to using technology. Overall, respondents were concerned about the validity of assessments administered via telepractice; whether clinicians can adequately establish rapport with clients via telepractice; and if therapy conducted via telepractice can be as effective as in-person speech-language therapy. Most respondents indicated the need to establish procedures and guidelines for school-based telepractice programs.

  20. Perspectives of Speech-Language Pathologists on the Use of Telepractice in Schools: Quantitative Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice K. Tucker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This research surveyed 170 school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs in one northeastern state, with only 1.8% reporting telepractice use in school-settings. These results were consistent with two ASHA surveys (2002; 2011 that reported limited use of telepractice for school-based speech-language pathology. In the present study, willingness to use telepractice was inversely related to age, perhaps because younger members of the profession are more accustomed to using technology.  Overall, respondents were concerned about the validity of assessments administered via telepractice; whether clinicians can adequately establish rapport with clients via telepractice; and if therapy conducted via telepractice can be as effective as in-person speech-language therapy. Most respondents indicated the need to establish procedures and guidelines for school-based telepractice programs.

  1. Public perspectives on nuclear security. US national security surveys, 1993--1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herron, K.G.; Jenkins-Smith, H.C. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). UNM Inst. for Public Policy

    1998-08-01

    This is the third report in a series of studies to examine how US attitudes about nuclear security are evolving in the post-Cold War era and to identify trends in public perceptions and preferences relevant to the evolution of US nuclear security policy. It presents findings from three surveys: a nationwide telephone survey of randomly selected members of the US general public; a written survey of randomly selected members of American Men and Women of Science; and a written survey of randomly selected state legislators from all fifty US states. Key areas of investigation included nuclear security, cooperation between US and Russian scientists about nuclear issues, vulnerabilities of critical US infrastructures and responsibilities for their protection, and broad areas of US national science policy. While international and US national security were seen to be slowly improving, the primary nuclear threat to the US was perceived to have shifted from Russia to China. Support was found for nuclear arms control measures, including mutual reductions in stockpiles. However, respondents were pessimistic about eliminating nuclear armaments, and nuclear deterrence continued to be highly values. Participants favored decreasing funding f/or developing and testing new nuclear weapons, but supported increased investments in nuclear weapons infrastructure. Strong concerns were expressed about nuclear proliferation and the potential for nuclear terrorism. Support was evident for US scientific cooperation with Russia to strengthen security of Russian nuclear assets. Elite and general public perceptions of external and domestic nuclear weapons risks and external and domestic nuclear weapons benefits were statistically significantly related to nuclear weapons policy options and investment preferences. Demographic variables and individual belief systems were systematically related both to risk and benefit perceptions and to policy and spending preferences.

  2. Do privacy and security regulations need a status update? Perspectives from an intergenerational survey

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Stacey; Robinson, Jill Oliver; Peoples, Hayley A.; Gutierrez, Amanda M.; Majumder, Mary A.; McGuire, Amy L.; Rothstein, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    Background The importance of health privacy protections in the era of the “Facebook Generation” has been called into question. The ease with which younger people share personal information about themselves has led to the assumption that they are less concerned than older generations about the privacy of their information, including health information. We explored whether survey respondents’ views toward health privacy suggest that efforts to strengthen privacy protections as health informatio...

  3. Implementation Evaluation of "Steering Teens Safe": Engaging Parents to Deliver a New Parent-Based Teen Driving Intervention to Their Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Yang, Jingzhen; Young, Tracy; Roth, Lisa; Garinger, Anne; Snetselaar, Linda; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Parents play a fundamental role in teaching their children safe driving skills to reduce risk of motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of death for teens. "Steering Teens Safe" is a new parent-based intervention that equips parents with communication skills to talk about, demonstrate, and practice safe driving behaviors and skills…

  4. UNDERSTANDING KIDS/TEENS' CONSTRUCTION OF POLICE AND CRIME CONCEPTS AS A COMMUNITY POLICING APPROACH: SOCIAL GROUNDED THEORY APPLIED

    OpenAIRE

    ÖNDER, MURAT

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing interest among academicians, researchers and policy-makers in promoting community policing as a modern way to deal with crimes and community problems. Community policing is a philosophy of policing based on the concept that police officers and citizens working together in creative ways to control crimes. The purpose of this research is to get the perspectives of kids/teens regarding crime and police since this segment of society is most vulnerable to crimes. This will...

  5. A Survey of Text Mining in Social Media: Facebook and Twitter Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said A. Salloum

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Text mining has become one of the trendy fields that has been incorporated in several research fields such as computational linguistics, Information Retrieval (IR and data mining. Natural Language Processing (NLP techniques were used to extract knowledge from the textual text that is written by human beings. Text mining reads an unstructured form of data to provide meaningful information patterns in a shortest time period. Social networking sites are a great source of communication as most of the people in today’s world use these sites in their daily lives to keep connected to each other. It becomes a common practice to not write a sentence with correct grammar and spelling. This practice may lead to different kinds of ambiguities like lexical, syntactic, and semantic and due to this type of unclear data, it is hard to find out the actual data order. Accordingly, we are conducting an investigation with the aim of looking for different text mining methods to get various textual orders on social media websites. This survey aims to describe how studies in social media have used text analytics and text mining techniques for the purpose of identifying the key themes in the data. This survey focused on analyzing the text mining studies related to Facebook and Twitter; the two dominant social media in the world. Results of this survey can serve as the baselines for future text mining research.

  6. The patients’ perspective: Results of a survey assessing knowledge about and attitudes toward depression in PD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Hegeman Richard

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Irene Hegeman Richard1, Kori A LaDonna1, Rosanne Hartman2, Carol Podgorski1, Roger Kurlan1, SAD-PD Study Group31University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY, USA; 2Canisius College, Buffalo, NY, USA; 3Please see Appendix for members of the SAD-PD Study GroupAbstract: We report results of a survey assessing patients’ knowledge about and attitudes towards depression in Parkinson’s disease (PD. 345 patients from 8 tertiary care centers responded (43% response rate. Overall, patients were relatively knowledgeable about depression and its occurrence in PD. However, many patients believed that depression is a normal reaction to the illness. While many respondents would be reluctant to initiate a discussion of depression during a clinical evaluation, most would feel comfortable talking about depression with their physician if he or she asked them questions about their mood. Based on the results of this survey, we recommend the following approach for physicians: (1 inform PD patients that, although a frequent occurrence, depression need not be accepted as a “normal reaction” to PD; and (2 routinely inquire about depressive symptoms rather than waiting for the patient to spontaneously report them.Keywords: depression, Parkinson’s disease, survey

  7. Mentorship in anesthesia: a survey of perspectives among Canadian anesthesia residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Suzan; Busse, Jason W; Wong, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Mentorship is important for professional and academic growth; however, the role of mentorship in anesthesia is still being defined. We surveyed Canadian anesthesia residents to explore their perceptions of mentorship relationships. We administered a 20-item cross-sectional survey to program directors and anesthesia residents in all Canadian departments of anesthesia. Program directors were asked about their mentorship programs, and residents were asked about their perceptions of benefits and barriers to effective mentoring. Sixteen of 17 (94%) program directors and 189 of 585 (32%) anesthesia residents responded to our survey. While 143 of 180 (79%) residents agreed that mentorship was beneficial to overall success as an anesthesiologist, only 11 of 16 (69%) program directors reported formal mentorship as part of their residency program, and only 119 of 189 (63%) residents reported access to a mentor. Barriers reported by residents included insufficient time with mentors, lack of formalized meeting times and objectives, mentor-mentee incompatibility (personal or professional), and lack of resident choice in mentor selection. Our study confirms that, despite positive perceptions among residents, mentorship remains underutilized in anesthesia programs. We identify barriers to effective mentorship, including the need to consider resident choice as a means to improve formal anesthesia mentorship programs.

  8. Perspectives on research evidence and clinical practice: a survey of Australian physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmer-Somers, Karen; Lekkas, Peter; Nyland, Leah; Young, Alexandra; Kumar, Saravana

    2007-09-01

    Physiotherapists' use of research evidence with clinical decision-making has interested researchers world-wide since 1980; however, little is known about such practices in Australia. The present survey sought information on Australian physiotherapists' perceptions of the importance of research, and barriers to uptake of evidence in clinical practice, when compared with an international cohort from 2001. An Australian-relevant version of an English (UK) National Health Service (NHS) survey instrument was used to canvass 453 physiotherapists, randomly selected from the South Australian Physiotherapy Registration Board 2004-2005 records. The first survey was mailed in August 2005, a reminder was sent two weeks later to non-responders and a follow-up survey was sent in April 2006 to non-responders whose addresses had changed since 2005. There was a 51% response rate. Of the non-responders, 12% were not contactable at their listed address, highlighting the mobility of Australian physiotherapists. Most respondents had undertaken research as students (59.5%) or as students and clinicians (11.5%). Of these, 37.1% were encouraged to embark on more research, and 20.5% were discouraged. The significant predictors of positive perceived importance of research were: previous research experience; being positive about undertaking further research; working in hospitals and holding a postgraduate degree. Clinicians working privately were significantly less likely than managers to be positive about research importance. The only significant predictor for not perceiving barriers to uptake of evidence was being positive about undertaking future research. The study identified constraints on uptake of evidence into practice that were related to accessing, reading and interpreting published research, and implementing findings. Found consistently across employment categories were barriers relating to lack of time, uncertainty about what the research reported, scepticism about the value of

  9. Survey of Chinese Medicine Students to Determine Research and Evidence-Based Medicine Perspectives at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Kligler, Benjamin; Cohen, Hillel W; Marantz, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Research literacy and the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) are important initiatives in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which requires cultural change within educational institutions for successful implementation. To determine the self-assessed research and EBM perspectives of Chinese medicine Masters degree students at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY). A survey with 17 close-ended questions and one open-ended question was administered through Survey Monkey to students at PCOM-NY. The survey was sent to 420 Masters students and 176 (41.9%) responded. Students in all four years of the Masters degree indicated a generally high degree of interest in, and support for the value of research. However, increasing years (one to four years) in the program was associated with lower interest in post-graduation research participation and entering the doctoral program, and the fourth year students reported low levels of interest in having greater research content and training in their Masters degree programs. Students who responded to the open-ended question (23% of respondents) expressed enthusiasm for research and concerns about the relevance of research in Chinese medicine. Consistent with findings in similar studies at CAM colleges, interest in research, and EBM of the PCOM-NY Masters students appeared to decline with increasing years in the program. Concerns around paradigm and epistemological issues associated with research and EBM among Chinese medicine students and practitioners warrants further investigation, and may be an important challenge for integrative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Teen Leadership Skill Development Through Participation in Leadership Training

    OpenAIRE

    Rothwell, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Teen leadership skill development programs are important to provide teens necessary skills for future success. Teen’s developmental needs have to be met, they need to be provided opportunities to engage in programs that are age appropriate and tailored to build their leadership skills. Thoughtful leadership programming becomes important during the time when 4-H youth membership begins to decrease. The project reported here aimed to determine if participation in teen leadership skill traini...

  11. Are cellular phone blocking applications effective for novice teen drivers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaser, Janet I; Edwards, Christopher J; Morris, Nichole L; Donath, Max

    2015-09-01

    Distracted driving is a significant concern for novice teen drivers. Although cellular phone bans are applied in many jurisdictions to restrict cellular phone use, teen drivers often report making calls and texts while driving. The Minnesota Teen Driver Study incorporated cellular phone blocking functions via a software application for 182 novice teen drivers in two treatment conditions. The first condition included 92 teens who ran a driver support application on a smartphone that also blocked phone usage. The second condition included 90 teens who ran the same application with phone blocking but which also reported back to parents about monitored risky behaviors (e.g., speeding). A third control group consisting of 92 novice teen drivers had the application and phone-based software installed on the phones to record cellular phone (but not block it) use while driving. The two treatment groups made significantly fewer calls and texts per mile driven compared to the control group. The control group data also demonstrated a higher propensity to text while driving rather than making calls. Software that blocks cellular phone use (except 911) while driving can be effective at mitigating calling and texting for novice teen drivers. However, subjective data indicates that some teens were motivated to find ways around the software, as well as to use another teen's phone while driving when they were unable to use theirs. Cellular phone bans for calling and texting are the first step to changing behaviors associated with texting and driving, particularly among novice teen drivers. Blocking software has the additional potential to reduce impulsive calling and texting while driving among novice teen drivers who might logically know the risks, but for whom it is difficult to ignore calling or texting while driving. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  12. Public health perspectives on household travel surveys active travel between 1997 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merom, Dafna; van der Ploeg, Hidde P; Corpuz, Grace; Bauman, Adrian E

    2010-08-01

    Active travel is beneficial to public health, but longitudinal population surveillance data on this behavior are limited. This study aims to monitor active travel at different health-enhancing thresholds and to identify trip purposes that contributed to health by using transport survey data. The continuous Sydney Greater Metropolitan Area Household Travel Survey (1997-2007) was analyzed in 2009. Each year, approximately 3250 households were randomly sampled (67% average response rate). All trips undertaken for a nominated 24-hour period were recorded for every household member during a face-to-face interview. Trips were coded by mode, purpose, duration, and street distance. The yearly prevalence and temporal change for adults (> or =15 years) were calculated for any walking and cycling (i.e., > or =1 trip per day) and by health-enhancing indicators dependent on trip duration (> or =10 minutes) and amount (i.e., > or =30 minutes/day). Significant increasing trends were observed for all walking indicators, with a peak in 2005, where 39.2% walked, 24.7% walked > or =1 trip of > or =10 minutes, and 14.3% or 17.8% achieved the recommended 30 minutes a day with or without stipulation on trip duration, respectively. Health-enhancing walking increased in most population subgroups. Cycling prevalence was low (Transportation surveys can be used to assess the contribution of active travel to changes in physical activity levels assessed by public health surveillance and to identify subgroups for active travel interventions. 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  13. IT process architectures for enterprises development: A survey from a maturity model perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Santana Tapia, R.G.

    2006-01-01

    During the last years much has been published about IT governance. Close to the success of many governance efforts are the business frameworks, quality models, and technology standards that help enterprises improve processes, customer service, quality of products, and control. In this paper we i) survey existing frameworks, namely ITIL, ASL and BiSL, ii) find relations with the IT Governance framework CobiT to determine if the maturity model of CobiT can be used by ITIL, ASL and BiSL, and (ii...

  14. The Military Leaders Survey: NATO Military Leaders’ Perspectives on Psychological Support on Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    France. E-mail: phil.arvers@free.fr Capt Psy José Puente Inspección General de Sanidad-Unidad de Psicologia [Joint Medical Office-Unit of...subgroup was to design a survey to be carried out by individual member nations to gather the opinions/attitudes of operational leaders with some...order to cope with any psychological or stress-related problems that might occur during the operation/mission? At least one individual from every

  15. Prenatal and postnatal cocaine exposure predict teen cocaine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney-Black, Virginia; Chiodo, Lisa M; Hannigan, John H; Greenwald, Mark K; Janisse, James; Patterson, Grace; Huestis, Marilyn A; Partridge, Robert T; Ager, Joel; Sokol, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Preclinical studies have identified alterations in cocaine and alcohol self-administration and behavioral responses to pharmacological challenges in adolescent offspring following prenatal exposure. To date, no published human studies have evaluated the relation between prenatal cocaine exposure and postnatal adolescent cocaine use. Human studies of prenatal cocaine-exposed children have also noted an increase in behaviors previously associated with substance use/abuse in teens and young adults, specifically childhood and teen externalizing behaviors, impulsivity, and attention problems. Despite these findings, human research has not addressed prior prenatal exposure as a potential predictor of teen drug use behavior. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relations between prenatal cocaine exposure and teen cocaine use in a prospective longitudinal cohort (n=316) that permitted extensive control for child, parent and community risk factors. Logistic regression analyses and Structural Equation Modeling revealed that both prenatal exposure and postnatal parent/caregiver cocaine use were uniquely related to teen use of cocaine at age 14 years. Teen cocaine use was also directly predicted by teen community violence exposure and caregiver negativity, and was indirectly related to teen community drug exposure. These data provide further evidence of the importance of prenatal exposure, family and community factors in the intergenerational transmission of teen/young adult substance abuse/use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. International note: Teen users' problematic online behavior: using panel data from South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Jinhee

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors of teen users' problematic online behaviors using data from the Korea Youth Panel Survey (KYPS) collected over a four-year period. Problematic online behaviors included unauthorized ID use, disguising one's age or gender while chatting online, and cursing/insulting someone in a chat room or on a bulletin board. Results from the panel data analyses showed that many adolescents explored and discontinued engaging in online delinquency as they got older. Respondents' offline behaviors and self-control were significantly associated with problematic online behaviors, supporting the importance of internal traits. Peer effects were consistently more important than parental effects on teen's online delinquency. Increases in time spent using a computer also contributed to the likelihood of problematic online behaviors. Copyright © 2015 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Brief report: Teen sexting and psychosocial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, Jeff R; Le, Vi Donna; van den Berg, Patricia; Ling, Yan; Paul, Jonathan A; Temple, Brian W

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines whether adolescents who report sexting exhibit more psychosocial health problems, compared to their non-sexting counterparts. Participants included 937 ethnically diverse male and female adolescents recruited and assessed from multiple high schools in southeast Texas. Measures included self-report of sexting, impulsivity, alcohol and drug use, and depression and anxiety symptoms. Teen sexting was significantly associated with symptoms of depression, impulsivity, and substance use. When adjusted for prior sexual behavior, age, gender, race/ethnicity, and parent education, sexting was only related to impulsivity and substance use. While teen sexting appears to correlate with impulsive and high-risk behaviors (substance use), we did not find sexting to be a marker of mental health. Copyright © 2013 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. VLSI systems energy management from a software perspective – A literature survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasada Kumari K.S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for ultra-low power electronic systems has motivated research in device technology and hardware design techniques. Experimental studies have proved that the hardware innovations for power reduction are fully exploited only with the proper design of upper layer software. Also, the software power and energy modelling and analysis – the first step towards energy reduction is complex due to the inter and intra dependencies of processors, operating systems, application software, programming languages and compilers. The subject is too vast; the paper aims to give a consolidated view to researchers in arriving at solutions to power optimization problems from a software perspective. The review emphasizes the fact that software design and implementation is to be viewed from system energy conservation angle rather than as an isolated process. After covering a global view of end to end software based power reduction techniques for micro sensor nodes to High Performance Computing systems, specific design aspects related to battery powered Embedded computing for mobile and portable systems are addressed in detail. The findings are consolidated into 2 major categories – those related to research directions and those related to existing industry practices. The emerging concept of Green Software with specific focus on mainframe computing is also discussed in brief. Empirical results on power saving are included wherever available. The paper concludes that only with the close co-ordination between hardware architect, software architect and system architect low energy systems can be realized.

  19. Is gerontology ready for anti-racist pedagogy? A survey of educators' practices and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasik, Rona J; Kishimoto, Kyoko

    2016-02-17

    The older population in the United States is becoming more diverse, bringing increasing attention to the ways in which diversity and multiculturalism are addressed in gerontological education. Although diversity and multiculturalism have long been recognized as important components of the aging experience, our approach to understanding their significance and impact continues to grow and change. Anti-racist pedagogy represents one catalyst to stimulate such change. To evaluate the potential for anti-racist pedagogy in gerontology, this study explored gerontological educators' (N = 121) current practices and perspectives regarding the inclusion of diversity content in their courses, as well as the extent to which they are familiar with and/or use anti-racist pedagogy in their classes. The findings suggest that greater attention to issues of race, ethnicity, and multicultural diversity throughout the gerontological curriculum is needed and wanted. Although respondents were generally unfamiliar with the name anti-racist pedagogy, many indicated that their current teaching practices employed select components of it. Overall, the findings point toward the need for continued exploration of how anti-racist pedagogy may be brought into the gerontological classroom, as well as its implications for future research, policy, and practice.

  20. Teens' images of smoking and smokers.

    OpenAIRE

    Luke, D.; Allen, P; Arian, G.; Crawford, M.; Headen, S.; Spigner, A. C.; Tassler, P.; Ureda, J.

    2001-01-01

    The authors used qualitative and quantitative data to identify and interpret specific images teens have about smoking and smokers. Qualitative data were collected in 1996 from 793 teenagers participating in 125 focus groups at eight different sites across the United States. Most focus groups were homogeneous with respect to gender, ethnicity, and smoking status. Ages ranged from 12 to 18 years, and about half of the participants were female. The majority of participants (62%) were white and A...

  1. Getting Teens to Really Work in Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauria de Gentile, Patricia; Leiguarda de Orue, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    Working with teenagers is not an easy task. This seems to be a notion shared by language teachers all over the world. While some instructors are very keen on working with this special age group, others are not fond of the challenge. The truth is that teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (ESL/EFL) to teens has never been easy. According to…

  2. Suicide survey in a London borough: primary care and public health perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ougrin, Dennis; Banarsee, Reetoo; Dunn-Toroosian, Valentine; Majeed, Azeem

    2011-09-01

    In order to achieve the national target of 20% reduction in suicide in the UK, many primary care trusts have developed local suicide prevention action plans. However, there is concern about a lack of a whole-system approach in some localities. Suicide surveys are a necessary component of any suicide reduction strategy. All deaths by suicides and open verdicts of a multi-ethnic, socio-economically diverse London Borough's residents between February 2005 and February 2008 were identified (n = 54). Health records of the identified subjects were analysed by two researchers. The annual rate of suicide in the study period was 6.8 per 100 000 inhabitants. Of the 54 cases of suicide in the study period, 45% had a psychiatric diagnosis and 18% were in current contact with mental health services. Hanging was the most frequent mode of suicide. Twenty-four per cent were not registered with a GP, most of whom were immigrants. Twenty-five per cent had seen their GP within a month of suicide. The rate of suicide in those born in Ireland was 17.7 per 100 000. Suicide survey is a feasible method of monitoring suicide, sharing data between key stakeholders and learning from the trends uncovered.

  3. Perspectives on Tobacco Product Waste: A Survey of Framework Convention Alliance Members’ Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanas Javadian

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette butts (tobacco product waste (TPW are the single most collected item in environmental trash cleanups worldwide. This brief descriptive study used an online survey tool (Survey Monkey to assess knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among individuals representing the Framework Convention Alliance (FCA about this issue. The FCA has about 350 members, including mainly non-governmental tobacco control advocacy groups that support implementation of the World Health Organization’s (WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC. Although the response rate (28% was low, respondents represented countries from all six WHO regions. The majority (62% have heard the term TPW, and nearly all (99% considered TPW as an environmental harm. Most (77% indicated that the tobacco industry should be responsible for TPW mitigation, and 72% felt that smokers should also be held responsible. This baseline information may inform future international discussions by the FCTC Conference of the Parties (COP regarding environmental policies that may be addressed within FCTC obligations. Additional research is planned regarding the entire lifecycle of tobacco’s impact on the environment.

  4. A survey of the neuroscience resource landscape: perspectives from the neuroscience information framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachat, Jonathan; Bandrowski, Anita; Grethe, Jeffery S; Gupta, Amarnath; Astakhov, Vadim; Imam, Fahim; Larson, Stephen D; Martone, Maryann E

    2012-01-01

    The number of available neuroscience resources (databases, tools, materials, and networks) available via the Web continues to expand, particularly in light of newly implemented data sharing policies required by funding agencies and journals. However, the nature of dense, multifaceted neuroscience data and the design of classic search engine systems make efficient, reliable, and relevant discovery of such resources a significant challenge. This challenge is especially pertinent for online databases, whose dynamic content is largely opaque to contemporary search engines. The Neuroscience Information Framework was initiated to address this problem of finding and utilizing neuroscience-relevant resources. Since its first production release in 2008, NIF has been surveying the resource landscape for the neurosciences, identifying relevant resources and working to make them easily discoverable by the neuroscience community. In this chapter, we provide a survey of the resource landscape for neuroscience: what types of resources are available, how many there are, what they contain, and most importantly, ways in which these resources can be utilized by the research community to advance neuroscience research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cosmetic dermatology training in residency: results of a survey from the residents' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group, Ashley; Philips, Rebecca; Kelly, Erica

    2012-12-01

    Dermatologists are expected to be experts in the evaluation and treatment of their patient's cosmetic concerns. It has been reported that some dermatology residents do not feel adequately trained in this field. To assess how dermatology residents are being trained in cosmetic dermatology. A survey was e-mailed to 473 third-year dermatology residents. One hundred eighteen surveys were returned (24.9%), representing 45% of programs. Most residents have assigned reading (70.7%) and lectures (81.4%) in cosmetic dermatology. To learn technical skills, 79.7% participate in formal training sessions, and 73% have an apprenticeship model. Most residents have the opportunity to perform botulinum toxin injections, laser surgery, fillers, chemical peels, and sclerotherapy. More than 58% of programs have an encouraging or somewhat encouraging attitude toward teaching cosmetics, whereas 22% were somewhat discouraging or discouraging. Most residents (75.4%) plan to incorporate cosmetics into their practice. Residents do not feel less prepared (94.9%) or less interested (97.4%) in medical dermatology as a result of their cosmetic training. Residents are being trained in cosmetic dermatology through a variety of methods. Residency programs should periodically assess and adapt their curricula to ensure adequate training in this field. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. HRS/NSA 2014 survey of atrial fibrillation and stroke: Gaps in knowledge and perspective, opportunities for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, David S; Parker, Sarah E; Rosenfeld, Lynda E; Gorelick, Philip B

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is substantial and increasing. Stroke is common in AF and can have devastating consequences. Oral anticoagulants are effective in reducing stroke risk, but are underutilized. We sought to characterize the impact of stroke on AF patients and their caregivers, gaps in knowledge and perspective between physicians and patients, and barriers to effective communication and optimal anticoagulation use. A survey was administered to AF patients with and without history of stroke, caregivers of stroke survivors, and physicians across the range of specialties caring for AF and stroke patients. While AF patients (n = 499) had limited knowledge about stroke, they expressed great desire to learn more and take action to reduce their risk. They were often dissatisfied with the education they had received and desired high-quality written materials. Stroke survivors (n = 251) had poor functional outcomes and often underestimated the burden of caring for them. Caregivers (n = 203) also wished they had received more information about reducing stroke risk before their survivor's event. They commonly felt overwhelmed and socially isolated. Physicians (n = 504) did not prescribe anticoagulants as frequently as recommended by guidelines. Concerns about monitoring anticoagulation and patient compliance were commonly reported barriers. Physicians may underestimate patient willingness to take anticoagulants. We identified significant knowledge gaps among patients, caregivers, and physicians in relation to AF and stroke. Furthermore, gaps in perspective often lead to suboptimal communication and decision making. Increased education and better communication between all stakeholders are needed to reduce the impact of stroke in AF. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society and National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Web-Based Versus Traditional Paper Questionnaires: A Mixed-Mode Survey With a Nordic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyshol, Heidi; Gissler, Mika; Jonsson, Stefan Hrafn; Petzold, Max; Obel, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Background Survey response rates have been declining over the past decade. The more widespread use of the Internet and Web-based technologies among potential health survey participants suggests that Web-based questionnaires may be an alternative to paper questionnaires in future epidemiological studies. Objective To compare response rates in a population of parents by using 4 different modes of data collection for a questionnaire survey of which 1 involved a nonmonetary incentive. Methods A random sample of 3148 parents of Danish children aged 2-17 years were invited to participate in the Danish part of the NordChild 2011 survey on their children’s health and welfare. NordChild was conducted in 1984 and 1996 in collaboration with Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden using mailed paper questionnaires only. In 2011, all countries used conventional paper versions only except Denmark where the parents were randomized into 4 groups: (1) 789 received a paper questionnaire only (paper), (2) 786 received the paper questionnaire and a log-in code to the Web-based questionnaire (paper/Web), (3) 787 received a log-in code to the Web-based questionnaire (Web), and (4) 786 received log-in details to the Web-based questionnaire and were given an incentive consisting of a chance to win a tablet computer (Web/tablet). In connection with the first reminder, the nonresponders in the paper, paper/Web, and Web groups were also present with the opportunity to win a tablet computer as a means of motivation. Descriptive analysis was performed using chi-square tests. Odds ratios were used to estimate differences in response rates between the 4 modes. Results In 2011, 1704 of 3148 (54.13%) respondents answered the Danish questionnaire. The highest response rate was with the paper mode (n=443, 56.2%). The other groups had similar response rates: paper/Web (n=422, 53.7%), Web (n=420, 53.4%), and Web/tablet (n=419, 53.3%) modes. Compared to the paper mode, the odds for response rate in the

  8. Steering teens safe: a randomized trial of a parent-based intervention to improve safe teen driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek-Asa, Corinne; Cavanaugh, Joseph E; Yang, Jingzhen; Chande, Vidya; Young, Tracy; Ramirez, Marizen

    2014-07-31

    Crashes are the leading cause of death for teens, and parent-based interventions are a promising approach. We assess the effectiveness of Steering Teens Safe, a parent-focused program to increase safe teen driving. Steering Teens Safe aimed to improve parental communication with teens about safe driving using motivational interviewing techniques in conjunction with 19 safe driving lessons. A randomized controlled trial involved 145 parent-teen dyads (70 intervention and 75 control). Intervention parents received a 45-minute session to learn the program with four follow-up phone sessions, a DVD, and a workbook. Control parents received a standard brochure about safe driving. Scores were developed to measure teen-reported quantity and quality of parental communication about safe driving. The main outcome measure was a previously validated Risky Driving Score reported by teens. Because the Score was highly skewed, a generalized linear model based on a gamma distribution was used for analysis. Intervention teens ranked their parent's success in talking about driving safety higher than control teens (p = 0.035) and reported that their parents talked about more topics (non-significant difference). The Risky Driving Score was 21% lower in intervention compared to control teens (85% CI = 0.60, 1.00). Interaction between communication quantity and the intervention was examined. Intervention teens who reported more successful communication had a 42% lower Risky Driving Score (95% CI = 0.37, 0.94) than control parents with less successful communication. This program had a positive although not strong effect, and it may hold the most promise in partnership with other programs, such as Driver's Education or Graduated Driver's License policies. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01014923. Registered Nov. 16, 2009.

  9. "Too much of that stuff can't be good": Canadian teens, morality, and fast food consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhail, Deborah; Chapman, Gwen E; Beagan, Brenda L

    2011-07-01

    Recently, public health agents and the popular media have argued that rising levels of obesity are due, in part, to "obesogenic" environments, and in particular to the clustering of fast food establishments in Western urban centers that are poor and working class. Our findings from a multi-site, cross-national qualitative study of teenaged Canadians' eating practices in urban and rural areas offer another perspective on this topic, showing that fast food consumption is not simply a function of the location of fast food outlets, and that Canadian teens engage in complex ways with the varied dimensions of choosing (or rejecting) fast foods. Drawing on evidence gleaned from semi-structured interviews with 132 teenagers (77 girls and 55 boys, ages 13-19 years) carried out between 2007 and 2009, we maintain that no easy relationship exists between the geographical availability of fast food and teen eating behaviors. We use critical obesity literature that challenges widely accepted understandings about obesity prevalence and etiology, as well as Lamont's (1992, 2000) concept of "moral boundary work," to argue that teen fast food consumption and avoidance is multifaceted and does not stem exclusively nor directly from spatial proximity or social class. Through moral boundary work, in which teens negotiated with moralistic notions of healthy eating, participants made and re-made themselves as "good" and successful subjects by Othering those who were "bad" in references to socially derived discourses of healthy eating. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Factors Contribute to Headache-Related Disability in Teens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Heyer, Geoffrey; Pakalnis, Ann; Binkley, Philip F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Our aim was to describe the relationship between risk factors, such as stress, depression, and anxiety and potentially protective factors against pediatric headache-related disability, such as mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion, and to determine teens’ interest in mind-body skills training to help reduce headache-related disability. Methods This was a cross-sectional survey among adolescents seen in an academic neurology clinic reporting four or more headaches monthly using standardized instruments to determine the relationship between putative risk and protective factors as well as physiologic markers of inflammation and vagal tone and headache-related disability. Results Among the 29 participants, 31% were male, the average age was 14.8 years, average headache frequency was 11.6 per month, and the most commonly reported trigger was stress (86%). The only risk or protective factor significantly associated with headache-related disability was depression (r=0.52, P=0.004). Depression was negatively correlated with mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion (Pheadache-related disability or depression. There was strong interest in learning skills like slow, deep breathing practices supported by a smart phone app to reduce stress and the negative impact of headaches on daily life. Discussion Among teens with frequent migraine headaches, depression is the strongest risk factor for headache-related disability. Stress is viewed as a headache trigger, and teens reported wanting to learn simple stress management strategies supported by a smart phone application to help reduce headache-related disability. PMID:26810775

  11. Maternal perspectives on the use of probiotics in infants: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgman, Sarah L; Azad, Meghan B; Field, Catherine J; Letourneau, Nicole; Johnston, David W; Kaplan, Bonnie J; Kozyrskyj, Anita L

    2014-09-29

    Probiotic products that may modify the intestinal microbiota are becoming increasingly available and known to consumers due to their potential to prevent or treat many pediatric health conditions. As scientific knowledge of the health benefits of probiotics increases, it is important to identify factors that may prevent their successful integration into patient care as well as to ensure effective translation of research findings. The aim of this study was to describe maternal perspectives on probiotics and their use in infants. Mothers with a child aged two years or younger enrolled in the Alberta Pregnancy Outcomes and Nutrition (APrON) study were invited by email to complete a 29 item self-administered web-based questionnaire. A total of 413 mothers of the 1327 contacted completed the questionnaire. The majority (99.3%) of respondents had heard of probiotics and were aware that they contained live bacteria (87.0%); 89.3% had used a product containing probiotics themselves but only 50.8% had given one to their infant. Most mothers indicated they believed that probiotics were beneficial (73.1%) and none thought they were harmful. Over a third of mothers did not feel informed enough to make a decision on whether probiotics were safe to use in infants (36.6%). The study demonstrates that awareness and understanding of probiotics is high among mothers in Alberta, Canada. However, there is still uncertainty regarding the benefit of probiotics as well as safety in infants which could be important factors determining therapeutic use in the future. Further studies that demonstrate beneficial effects and safety of probiotics in healthy infants as well as targeted knowledge translation should help to address these potential concerns.

  12. A Delphi Survey and Analysis of Expert Perspectives on One Health in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeling, Chris; Johnson, Jane; Ward, Michael; Wilson, Andrew; Gilbert, Gwendolyn

    2017-08-22

    One Health (OH) is an interdisciplinary approach aiming to achieve optimal health for humans, animals and their environments. Case reports and systematic reviews of success are emerging; however, discussion of barriers and enablers of cross-sectoral collaboration are rare. A four-phase mixed-method Delphi survey of Australian human and animal health practitioners and policymakers (n = 52) explored areas of consensus and disagreement over: (1) the operational definition of OH; (2) potential for cross-sectoral collaboration; and (3) key priorities for shaping the development of an OH response to significantly elevated zoonotic disease risk. Participants agreed OH is essential for effective infectious disease prevention and control, and on key priorities for outbreak responses, but disagreed over definitions and the relative priority of animal health and welfare and economic considerations. Strong support emerged among Australian experts for an OH approach. There was also recognition of the need to ensure cross-sectoral differences are addressed.

  13. How few countries will do? Comparative survey analysis from a Bayesian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop J.C.M. Hox

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Meuleman and Billiet (2009 have carried out a simulation study aimed at the question how many countries are needed for accurate multilevel SEM estimation in comparative studies. The authors concluded that a sample of 50 to 100 countries is needed for accurate estimation. Recently, Bayesian estimation methods have been introduced in structural equation modeling which should work well with much lower sample sizes. The current study reanalyzes the simulation of Meuleman and Billiet using Bayesian estimation to find the lowest number of countries needed when conducting multilevel SEM. The main result of our simulations is that a sample of about 20 countries is sufficient for accurate Bayesian estimation, which makes multilevel SEM practicable for the number of countries commonly available in large scale comparative surveys.

  14. Helping People Understand Soils - Perspectives from the US National Cooperative Soil Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Paul; Cheever, Tammy; Greene, Linda; Southard, Susan; Levin, Maxine; Lindbo, David L.; Monger, Curtis

    2017-04-01

    Throughout the history of the US National Cooperative Soil Survey (NCSS), soil science education has been a part of the mission to better understand one of our most precious natural resources: the Soil. The poster will highlight the many products and programs related to soils that USDA NRCS (soils.usda.gov) has developed over the years for K-12 and college/professional education. NRCS scientific publications covering topics on soil properties, soil classification, soil health and soil quality have become an important part of the university soil science curriculum. Classroom lesson plans and grade appropriate materials help K-12 teachers introduce soil concepts to students and include detailed instructions and materials for classroom demonstrations of soil properties. A Handbook for Collegiate Soils Contests support universities that conduct Collegiate Soil Judging contests.

  15. Perspectives on the Mission of the Social Work Profession: A Random Survey of NASW Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine N. Dulmus

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with MSW degrees and who were members of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW in the United States (N=862 were surveyed and asked what best represents the social work profession mission for them. They were provided with 7 pre-selected choices (i.e advocacy; lobbying; social justice; community organization; clinical work with individuals, families, and groups; advancement of the social work profession; or other from which to choose one response. Over 66% of those responding chose clinical work with individuals, families, and groups as the mission of the social work profession. With the complex problems facing societies today will social work be at the forefront of the challenge of have we turned away from our historical mission of promoting social justice? This paper focuses on the finding from this research study and discusses its implications for social work education and the social work profession, as well as those individuals whom social workers serve.

  16. Barriers to Regionalized Surgical Care: Public Perspective Survey and Geospatial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symer, Matthew M; Abelson, Jonathan S; Yeo, Heather L

    2017-10-23

    To describe public willingness to participate in regionalized surgical care for cancer. Improved outcomes at high-volume centers following complex surgery have driven a push to regionalize surgical care. Patient attitudes toward regionalization are not well described. As part of the Cornell National Social Survey, a cross-sectional telephone survey was performed. Participants were asked about their willingness to seek regionalized care in a hypothetical scenario requiring surgery. Their responses were compared with demographic characteristics. A geospatial analysis of hospital proximity was performed, as well as a qualitative analysis of barriers to regionalization. Cooperation rate was 48.1% with 1000 total respondents. They were an average of 50 years old (range 18 to 100 years) and 48.9% female. About 49.6% were unwilling to travel 5 hours or more to seek regionalized care for improved survival. Age >70 years [odds ratio (OR) 0.34, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.19-0.60] and perceived distance to a center >30 minutes (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.41-0.86) were associated with decreased willingness to seek regionalized care, while high income (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.39-3.16) was associated with increased willingness. Proximity to a major center was not associated with willingness to travel (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.67-1.22). Major perceived barriers to regionalization were transportation, life disruption, social support, socioeconomic resources, poor health, and remoteness. Americans are divided on whether the potential for improved survival with regionalization is worth the additional travel effort. Older age and lower income are associated with reduced willingness to seek regionalized care. Multiple barriers to regionalization exist, including a lack of knowledge of the location major centers.

  17. Pediatrician′s perspectives on dental trauma management: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H P Chanchala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pediatricians play a pivotal role in the provision of primary care following dental trauma, especially for population with limited access to dental care. The criticality of time and knowledge is very important in the success of dental trauma management. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and experience of pediatricians in the primary management of dental trauma. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey was conducted among 261 pediatricians from various regions of India who attended the National Pediatric Conference, Mysore 2015. The survey addressed demographic- and knowledge-related data concerned to dental trauma, experience in treating and witnessing dental trauma, diagnosis, preliminary management, and attitude of the pediatricians toward the same. The collected data were analyzed using the SPSS version 17. Results: Among 261 respondents analyzed, 65.5% of them had encountered dental trauma in their practice. Avulsed tooth can be saved as opined by 67.8% of pediatricians. A higher percentage of the pediatricians, 94.3% knew the significance of time lapse. Saline was preferred medium of transport by 90.8%, followed by ice-cold water (78.2%. A fair awareness of the emergency treatment protocol of the avulsed teeth was observed among 59.8% of the pediatricians. Conclusion: Among pediatricians, the knowledge regarding handling of avulsed tooth, medium of transportation, and significance of time lapse between avulsion and reimplantation were found to be at a good level. The knowledge regarding the type of tooth to be reimplanted, method of cleaning the tooth was lacking.

  18. Clinical supervisors' perspectives on delivering work integrated learning: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey A; McKay, Angela; Allen, Penny

    2015-04-01

    Previous research has indicated a disconnect between academic nursing programmes and workplace learning environments. Nurse supervisors and clinical practitioners have reported inadequate information and training on how to support students of nursing to learn in the clinical setting. This study aimed to investigate the level of confidence that clinical supervisors have in relation to specific components of supporting student learning in the work place. Survey of clinical nurse supervisors. Simulation-based clinical reasoning workshops. Sixty participants: fifty nine registered nurses, including nurse managers and clinical nurse educators, and one allied health professional. Survey using Likert scales and free-text questions. The findings indicated that clinicians were confident in sharing their knowledge and experience with students and making them feel welcome in the work place, they were less confident about what were the significant learnings in relation to students' academic programme. Registered nurses supervising students were experienced clinicians with many role responsibilities, which were perceived as barriers to the role of clinical supervisor. Participants reported that they would like tools to assist them with developing links to the academic programme. They considered that these tools would support student learning and remediation in the work place. This study found that the abilities of supervisors to support student learning is an identified gap impacting on work integrated learning. The results indicated the need for a professional development workshop, to enable clinical supervisors to move beyond promoting a supervision model, towards a theoretical framework for assisting and guiding students to learn. Addressing this deficit will improve growth and change in student learning in the work place. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Trends in teen driver licensure, driving patterns and crash involvement in the United States, 2006-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shults, Ruth A; Williams, Allan F

    2017-09-01

    The Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey provides nationally-representative annual estimates of licensure and driving patterns among U.S. teens. A previous study using MTF data reported substantial declines in the proportion of high school seniors that were licensed to drive and increases in the proportion of nondrivers following the recent U.S. economic recession. To explore whether licensure and driving patterns among U.S. high school seniors have rebounded in the post-recession years, we analyzed MTF licensure and driving data for the decade of 2006-2015. We also examined trends in teen driver involvement in fatal and nonfatal injury crashes for that decade using data from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System and National Automotive Sampling System General Estimates System, respectively. During 2006-2015, the proportion of high school seniors that reported having a driver's license declined by 9 percentage points (11%) from 81% to 72% and the proportion that did not drive during an average week increased by 8 percentage points (44%) from 18% to 26%. The annual proportion of black seniors that did not drive was consistently greater than twice the proportion of nondriving white seniors. Overall during the decade, 17- and 18-year-old drivers experienced large declines in fatal and nonfatal injury crashes, although crashes increased in both 2014 and 2015. The MTF data indicate that licensure and driving patterns among U.S. high school seniors have not rebounded since the economic recession. The recession had marked negative effects on teen employment opportunities, which likely influenced teen driving patterns. Possible explanations for the apparent discrepancies between the MTF data and the 2014 and 2015 increases in crashes are explored. MTF will continue to be an important resource for clarifying teen driving trends in relation to crash trends and informing strategies to improve teen driver safety. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Trends in Alabama teen driving death and injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Kathy; Irons, Elizabeth; Crew, Marie; Norris, Jesse; Nichols, Michele; King, William D

    2014-09-01

    Motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in teens. Alabama has been in the Top 5 states for MVC fatality rate among teens in the United States for several years. Twelve years of teen MVC deaths and injuries were evaluated. Our hypothesis is that the teen driving motor vehicle-related deaths and injuries have decreased related to legislative and community awareness activities. A retrospective analysis of Alabama teen MVC deaths and injury for the years 2000 to 2011 was conducted. MVC data were obtained from a Fatality Analysis Reporting System data set managed by the Center for Advanced Public Safety at the University of Alabama. A Lowess regression-scattergram analysis was used to identify period specific changes in deaths and injury over time. Statistical analysis was conducted using True Epistat 5.0 software. When the Lowess regression was applied, there was an obvious change in the trend line in 2007. To test that observation, we then compared medians in the pre-2007 and post-2007 periods, which validated our observation. Moreover, it provided a near-even number of observations for comparison. The Spearman rank correlation was used to test for correlation of deaths and injury over time. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate median differences in deaths and injury comparing pre-2007 and post-2007 data. Alabama teen MVC deaths and injury demonstrated a significant negative correlation over the 12-year period (Rs for deaths and injury, -0.87 [p teen driver deaths and injury have decreased during the 12-year study period, most notably after 2006. Factors that may have contributed to this trend may include stricter laws for teen drivers (enacted in 2002 and updated in 2010), less teen driving because of a nationwide economic downturn, delayed licensing in teens, steady improvements in overall seat belt use, and heightened public awareness of risky behaviors in teen driving.

  1. Policy perspectives: international survey of nephrologists' perceptions of and attitudes towards rewards and compensation for kidney donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Gurch

    2013-06-01

    The challenge to resolve the gap between supply and demand for organs is a global phenomenon. The possible solutions can invariably involve a range of ethical and moral dilemmas. This is certainly the case when considering rewards and compensation for kidney donation. In their thought provoking study, Ghahramami et al. provide the perspectives of medical professionals on these issues. The views of nephrologists concerning rewards and compensation chime with views of the public, which have been highlighted in many previous studies. Rewards and compensation for organ donation are perceived, by some, as barriers to successful organ donation transplant programmes; whereas others view them as potential facilitators to increasing organ donation rates. It is interesting to note that two-thirds of survey respondents believe that introducing some kind of reward or offering compensation would lead to an increase in organ donation. This finding is not unique to this study and is evident in many public surveys where respondents have expressed a belief that offering some form of incentive would have a positive impact on organ donation rates. Disappointingly, the debates concerning the type of reward or compensation and its potential impact on donation rates continue to take place in a relatively 'evidence base-free' vacuum. What is abundantly clear is that many lives continue to be lost in many countries due to a lack of suitable organs for transplant. What is less clear is which forms of reward and compensation actually have an impact on donation rates and whether they positively impact the life experiences of donors, recipients and their families. This level of evidence- base is urgently required.

  2. School Counselors' Perspectives of a Web-Based Stepped Care Mental Health Service for Schools: Cross-Sectional Online Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Bridianne; King, Catherine; Subotic-Kerry, Mirjana; O'Moore, Kathleen; Christensen, Helen

    2017-11-20

    Mental health problems are common among youth in high school, and school counselors play a key role in the provision of school-based mental health care. However, school counselors occupy a multispecialist position that makes it difficult for them to provide care to all of those who are in need in a timely manner. A Web-based mental health service that offers screening, psychological therapy, and monitoring may help counselors manage time and provide additional oversight to students. However, for such a model to be implemented successfully, school counselors' attitudes toward Web-based resources and services need to be measured. This study aimed to examine the acceptability of a proposed Web-based mental health service, the feasibility of providing this type of service in the school context, and the barriers and facilitators to implementation as perceived by school counselors in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. This study utilized an online cross-sectional survey to measure school counselors' perspectives. A total of 145 school counselors completed the survey. Overall, 82.1% (119/145) thought that the proposed service would be helpful to students. One-third reported that they would recommend the proposed model, with the remaining reporting potential concerns. Years of experience was the only background factor associated with a higher level of comfort with the proposed service (P=.048). Personal beliefs, knowledge and awareness, Internet accessibility, privacy, and confidentiality were found to influence, both positively and negatively, the likelihood of school counselors implementing a Web-based school mental health service. The findings of this study confirmed that greater support and resources are needed to facilitate what is already a challenging and emotionally demanding role for school counselors. Although the school counselors in this study were open to the proposed service model, successful implementation will require that the issues outlined are carefully

  3. Perspectives on advance directives in Japanese society: A population-based questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slingsby Brian

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, discussion concerning advance directives (ADs has been on the rise during the past decade. ADs are one method proposed to facilitate the process of communication among patients, families and health care providers regarding the plan of care of a patient who is no longer capable of communicating. In this paper, we report the results of the first in-depth survey on the general population concerning the preferences and use of ADs in Japan. Method A self-administered questionnaire was sent via mail to a stratified random sampling of 560 residents listed in the residential registry of one district of Tokyo, Japan (n = 165,567. Association between correlating factors and specific preferences toward ADs was assessed using contingency table bivariate analysis and multivariate regression model to estimate independent contribution. Results Of the 560 questionnaires sent out, a total of 425 participants took part in the survey yielding a response rate of 75.9 %. The results of the present study indicate that: 1 the most important components to be addressed are the specifics of medical treatment at the end of life stage and disclosure of diagnosis and prognosis; 2 the majority of participants found it suitable to express their directives by word to family and/or physician and not by written documentation; 3 there is no strong need for legal measures in setting up an AD; 4 it is permissible for family and physician to loosely interpret one's directives; 5 the most suitable proxy is considered to be a family member, relative, or spouse. Multivariate analysis found the following five factors as significantly associated with preferences: 1 awareness regarding living wills, 2 experience with the use of ADs, 3 preferences for end-of-life treatment, 4 preferences for information disclosure, and 5 intentions of creating a will. Conclusions Written ADs might be useful in the Japanese setting when the individual either wishes: 1 to not

  4. Implementation evaluation of steering teens safe: engaging parents to deliver a new parent-based teen driving intervention to their teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Marizen; Yang, Jingzhen; Young, Tracy; Roth, Lisa; Garinger, Anne; Snetselaar, Linda; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2013-08-01

    Parents play a fundamental role in teaching their children safe driving skills to reduce risk of motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of death for teens. Steering Teens Safe is a new parent-based intervention that equips parents with communication skills to talk about, demonstrate, and practice safe driving behaviors and skills with their teens. This implementation evaluation focuses on a sample of 83 parents who delivered Steering Teens Safe to their teens. One-, 2- and 3-month follow-up assessments were conducted with intervention parents to evaluate the self-reported quantity and quality of talking about, demonstrating, and practicing safe driving goals with teens; perceived success and benefit of the program; and barriers to implementation. Over 3 months of follow-up, parents discussed driving goals with their teens for a median of 101.5 minutes. The most frequently addressed topics were general safety principles, including distracted driving, driving in bad weather, wearing a seat belt, and being a safe passenger. Parents spent a median of 30 minutes practicing safe driving skills such as changing lanes. Sixty-seven percent of parents talked to their children about rural road safety, but just 36% demonstrated and half practiced these skills with their teens. Barriers to implementation include time and opportunity barriers and resistant attitudes of their teens. However, barriers neither affected frequency of engagement nor parents' perceived benefit and comfort in delivering the program. Parents with time/opportunity barriers also had higher practice and demonstration times than parents without these barriers. Findings indicate high acceptability among parent implementers and promise for real-world delivery. Future studies are needed to assess intervention impact.

  5. Physical activity and anxiety: A perspective from the World Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Brendon; Koyanagi, Ai; Hallgren, Mats; Firth, Joseph; Richards, Justin; Schuch, Felipe; Rosenbaum, Simon; Mugisha, James; Veronese, Nicola; Lahti, Jouni; Vancampfort, Davy

    2017-01-15

    Despite the known benefits of physical activity (PA) among people with anxiety, little is known about PA levels in people with anxiety at the population level. This study explored the global prevalence of anxiety and its association with PA. Cross-sectional, community-based data from the World Health Survey was analyzed. Prevalence of anxiety was estimated for 237,964 individuals (47 countries). PA was categorized as low, moderate, and high based on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (short form). The association between PA and anxiety was assessed by multivariable logistic regression. The overall global prevalence of anxiety was 11.4% (47 countries). Across 38 countries with available data on PA, 62.5%, 20.2%, and 17.3% of the sample engaged in high, moderate, and low levels of PA respectively. The prevalence of low physical activity in those with and without anxiety was 22.9% vs. 16.6% (plower education and wealth, and depression were also associated with low PA. At the individual country level, there was a significant positive association between low PA and anxiety in 17 of the 38 countries. Low PA levels are associated with increased prevalence of anxiety. There is a need for longitudinal research to establish the directionality of the relationships observed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The burden of hepatitis C in Europe from the patients’ perspective: a survey in 5 countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vietri Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies have examined the impact of Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection on patient reported outcomes in Europe. This study was conducted to assess the burden of HCV infection in terms of work productivity loss, activity impairment, health-related quality of life, healthcare resource utilization, and associated costs. Methods The 2010 European National Health and Wellness Survey (n = 57,805 provided data. Patients reporting HCV infection in France, Germany, the UK, Italy, and Spain were matched to respondents without HCV using propensity scores. Outcome measures included the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment (WPAI questionnaire and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-12 (SF-12v2 questionnaire. Subgroup analyses focused on treatment-naïve patients. Results HCV Patients (n = 286 had more work impairment (30% vs. 18%, p p p p p n = 139 also reported higher work impairment (29% vs. 15%, p p p p  Conclusion HCV infection in Europe is associated with considerable economic and humanistic burden. This is also true of diagnosed patients who have never been treated for HCV.

  7. Inventory and perspectives of chronic disease management programs in Switzerland: an exploratory survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle; Burnand, Bernard

    2009-10-07

    To describe chronic disease management programs active in Switzerland in 2007, using an exploratory survey. We searched the internet (Swiss official websites and Swiss web-pages, using Google), a medical electronic database (Medline), reference lists of pertinent articles, and contacted key informants. Programs met our operational definition of chronic disease management if their interventions targeted a chronic disease, included a multidisciplinary team (>/=2 healthcare professionals), lasted at least six months, and had already been implemented and were active in December 2007. We developed an extraction grid and collected data pertaining to eight domains (patient population, intervention recipient, intervention content, delivery personnel, method of communication, intensity and complexity, environment, clinical outcomes). We identified seven programs fulfilling our operational definition of chronic disease management. Programs targeted patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, obesity, psychosis and breast cancer. Interventions were multifaceted; all included education and half considered planned follow-ups. The recipients of the interventions were patients, and healthcare professionals involved were physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists and case managers of various backgrounds. In Switzerland, a country with universal healthcare insurance coverage and little incentive to develop new healthcare strategies, chronic disease management programs are scarce. For future developments, appropriate evaluations of existing programs, involvement of all healthcare stakeholders, strong leadership and political will are, at least, desirable.

  8. Peripheral nerve injuries: an international survey of current treatments and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Thomas; Krichevsky, Alisa; Sumarto, Andrew; Jaffurs, Daniel; Wirth, Garrett A; Paydar, Keyianoosh; Evans, Gregory R D

    2009-07-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are a serious health concern and leave many patients with lifelong disabilities. There is little information about incidences, current practice, outcomes, and type of research that may help delineate new strategies. A questionnaire was designed to determine characteristics of peripheral nerve injuries and the need for alternative strategies and sent to 889 plastic, hand, trauma, and orthopedic surgeons in 49 countries; 324 completed surveys were collected and analyzed (total response rate of 36.45%). The majority of institutions treat more than 3000 patients annually. Trauma was the leading cause of injury with the majority located on the upper extremity. In most cases, a primary repair was achieved, but 2.52% were unrepairable. The overall outcome was linked to their Sunderland classification (SCL). A grade 1 nerve injury (SCL-1) reached a maximum outcome after 7.15 months. SCL-2, -3, -4, and -5 needed 10.69, 14.08, 17.66, and 19.03 months, respectively. Tissue engineering was considered the most important research field, resulting in a visual analogue scale of 8.6. Despite marked advances in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries, clinical outcomes still appear unsatisfactory. The importance of research in the field of tissue engineering should be emphasized as a pathway toward improving these outcomes.

  9. Inventory and perspectives of chronic disease management programs in Switzerland: an exploratory survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Peytremann-Bridevaux

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe chronic disease management programs active in Switzerland in 2007, using an exploratory survey. Methods: We searched the internet (Swiss official websites and Swiss web-pages, using Google, a medical electronic database (Medline, reference lists of pertinent articles, and contacted key informants. Programs met our operational definition of chronic disease management if their interventions targeted a chronic disease, included a multidisciplinary team (≥2 healthcare professionals, lasted at least six months, and had already been implemented and were active in December 2007. We developed an extraction grid and collected data pertaining to eight domains (patient population, intervention recipient, intervention content, delivery personnel, method of communication, intensity and complexity, environment, clinical outcomes. Results: We identified seven programs fulfilling our operational definition of chronic disease management. Programs targeted patients with diabetes, hypertension, heart failure, obesity, psychosis and breast cancer. Interventions were multifaceted; all included education and half considered planned follow-ups. The recipients of the interventions were patients, and healthcare professionals involved were physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists and case managers of various backgrounds. Conclusions: In Switzerland, a country with universal healthcare insurance coverage and little incentive to develop new healthcare strategies, chronic disease management programs are scarce. For future developments, appropriate evaluations of existing programs, involvement of all healthcare stakeholders, strong leadership and political will are, at least, desirable.

  10. Perspectives on marijuana use and effectiveness: A survey of NARCOMS participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cofield, Stacey S; Salter, Amber; Tyry, Tuula; Crowe, Christina; Cutter, Gary R; Fox, Robert J; Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2017-08-01

    Interest in and use of marijuana by persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) has increased. While potential benefits have been reported, so have concerns about potential risks. Few large studies have been conducted about the perceptions and current usage of marijuana and medical cannabinoids in persons with MS. Participants in the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) registry were surveyed in 2014 regarding legality and history of marijuana usage, both before and after diagnosis with MS. A total of 5,481 participants responded, with 78.2% female, 90% relapsing disease at onset, and a current mean age of 55.5 (10.2) years. Sixty-four percent had tried marijuana prior to their MS diagnosis, 47% have considered using for their MS, 26% have used for their MS, 20% have spoken with their physician about use, and 16% are currently using marijuana. Ninety-one percent think marijuana should be legal in some form. Men, those with higher disability, current and past nicotine smokers, and younger age were associated with a higher likelihood of current use. The majority of responders favor legalization and report high interest in the use of marijuana for treatment of MS symptoms, but may be reluctant to discuss this with health care providers. Health care providers should systematically inquire about use of marijuana.

  11. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  12. Análisis del Neuromarketing y su incidencia en los gustos y preferencias de los clientes de la línea Permalatex Teens de la empresa Pinturas Cóndor S.A, en Guayaquil.

    OpenAIRE

    Yépez Bravo, Ana Gabriela; Ulloa Patiño, Matilde Jazmín

    2014-01-01

    The Pinturas Condor's main activity is the manufacture and sales of paints, has a line called Permalatex Youth Teens, this line has colors in modern and pleasant tones for youth beth rooms. Currently Teens Permalatex line is not exploited at all in relation to the advertising of the brand by which a situational analysis of the company and survey was conducted to Condor customers to define their preferences. The needs of customers are becoming even more difficult to discern, that’s why ...

  13. Graduate entry nurses' initial perspectives on nursing: Content analysis of open-ended survey questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Brooks, Ingrid; Vanderheide, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Graduate entry nursing courses offer individuals with prior degrees the opportunity to gain nursing qualifications and facilitate career change. While it is known that accelerated graduate entry courses are increasingly popular, the perceptions of nursing held by such individuals and the influence this has on those seeking to enter the profession are less clearly understood. To explore graduate entry nursing students' perceptions of nursing on entering their pre-registration course. A descriptive design utilising cross-section survey with two open-ended questions: What do you believe the role of the nurse is? What things have influenced that view? were asked. Demographic data were analysed using descriptive frequencies, while the two open-ended questions were analysed using summative content analysis. One university-based postgraduate graduate entry nursing course in Australia PARTICIPANTS: Eight cohorts (n=286) commencing students with prior degrees other than nursing. The course attracts students from diverse backgrounds. Exposure to nursing and nurses, either as a consumer of health care or other health care role, plays a primary role in influencing career change. However, similar to those found with school leavers, there remains much misinformation about nurses' roles for students in these courses. Most identify the role of caring in nursing. For some, media representations are the only information sources. Graduate entry courses offer opportunities to attract new nurses and contribute to addressing workforce shortages. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of nursing roles among students on entry. More work is required by the profession to ensure nursing is accurately and positively represented to the community. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A survey of the burden of allergic rhinitis in Hungary from a specialist’s perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szilasi Mária

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The casual and severity distribution of allergic rhinitis (AR in Hungary is unknown. The aim of this survey was to evaluate symptom perception, disease severity, concomitant asthma frequency and the impact of AR on everyday life activities in a cross-sectional, multicenter study in Hungary under the supervision of Hungarian Respiratory Society. Methods Data were recorded by 933 AR patients (65.93% women and their treating specialists. The perceptions of patients regarding the symptoms (nasal, ocular and others of AR and its severity, together with its impact on everyday life were assessed. Physicians recorded data regarding the diagnosis and severity of AR, and comorbidities. Results 52.5% of patients suffered from seasonal AR, 35.1% from perennial AR. A large proportion of patients had moderate to severe disease (MS-AR (57.34%, persistent disease (98.0% and concomitant asthma (53.32% in the mild, 57.52% in the MS-AR group. MS-AR was more frequent among women. Despite the treatment used, in MS-AR the proportions of patients reporting moderate to severe rhinorrhoea, nasal obstruction, ocular itching/redness, watering, itchy throat and sneezing were as high as 52.0%, 54.0%, 33.8%, 26.5%, 44.0% and 31.2%, respectively. Overall, there was a poor agreement between disease severity reported by patients and specialists. The adherence to oral antihistamines and intranasal corticosteroids was found to be between 50 and 65%; mostly depending on the dosage form. Conclusions AR remains a significant health problem in Hungary because of the burden of symptoms, high rate of concomitant asthma and the significant proportion of MS-AR affecting general well being.

  15. The Impact of Chronic Urticaria from the Patient's Perspective: A Survey in Five European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balp, Maria-Magdalena; Vietri, Jeffrey; Tian, Haijun; Isherwood, Gina

    2015-12-01

    Chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU) is associated with considerable burden, but data from European patients are limited. This study is a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of National Health and Wellness Survey data from the five largest EU countries (5EU: France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK) collected between 2010 and 2013. Burden of disease for patients with CSU was estimated by comparing individuals currently treated for chronic urticaria (proxy CSU cases) with controls selected from respondents without chronic urticaria. Matching and regression models were used to quantify the impact of chronic urticaria on health-related quality of life, self-reported psychological complaints, work and activity impairment, and healthcare use. The sample included 175,923 respondents. Prevalence of diagnosed chronic urticaria was 0.5 and 0.2% were treating the condition with a prescription. Cases (N = 369) had substantially lower (worse) regression-adjusted mean Mental Component Summary (40.2 vs. 45.4), Physical Component Summary (44.6 vs. 49.9), and SF-6D health utility scores (0.63 vs. 0.71; all p sleep difficulties were approximately twice as prevalent among those currently receiving treatment for chronic urticaria (all p activities (42 vs. 26%; all p < 0.01) relative to controls. Physician visits (9.1 vs. 4.9), emergency room visits (0.8 vs. 0.3), and hospitalizations (0.3 vs. 0.2) were more frequent than in controls (all p < 0.01). This research adds to the existing evidence showing significant burden of CSU.

  16. Resonant Messages to Prevent Prescription Drug Misuse by Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twombly, Eric C.; Holtz, Kristen D.; Agnew, Christine B.

    2011-01-01

    Prescription drug misuse is a major health problem, particularly among teens. A key step in curbing misuse is the development of effective prescription drug prevention messages. This paper explores the elements of prescription drug misuse prevention messages that resonate with teens using data from focus groups with seventh and eighth grade…

  17. '12-Step' Strategy Boosts Success of Teen Drug Abuse Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 167650.html '12-Step' Strategy Boosts Success of Teen Drug Abuse Program Messages from recovering peers made an ... 7, 2017 MONDAY, Aug. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Drug and alcohol abuse treatment for teens and young adults may be more effective when ...

  18. Teen Birth Rate. Facts at a Glance, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papillo, Angela Romano, Comp.; Franzetta, Kerry, Comp.; Manlove, Jennifer, Comp.; Moore, Kristin Anderson, Comp.; Terry-Humen, Elizabeth, Comp.; Ryan, Suzanne, Comp.

    This publication reports trends in teen childbearing in the nation, in each state, and in large cities using data from the 2001 National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). Rates of teenage childbearing continue to steadily decline, and the 2001 rates are historic lows for each age group. NCHS data showed that almost 80% of teen births nationwide…

  19. Geographic and racial variation in teen pregnancy rates in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layde, Molly M; Remington, Patrick L

    2013-08-01

    Despite recent declines in teen birth rates, teenage pregnancy remains an important public health problem in Wisconsin with significant social, economic, and health-related effects. Compare and contrast teen birth rate trends by race, ethnicity, and county in Wisconsin. Teen (ages 15-19 years) birth rates (per 1000 teenage females) in Wisconsin from 2001-2010 were compared by racelethnicity and county of residence using data from the Wisconsin Interactive Statistics on Health. Teen birth rates in Wisconsin have declined by 20% over the past decade, from 35.5/1000 teens in 2001 to 28.3/1000 teens in 2010-a relative decline of 20.3%. However, trends vary by race, with declines among blacks (-33%) and whites (-26%) and increases among American Indians (+21%) and Hispanics (+30%). Minority teen birth rates continue to be 3 to 5 times greater than birth rates among whites. Rates varied even more by county, with an over 14-fold difference between Ozaukee County (7.8/1000) and Menominee County (114.2). Despite recent declines, teen pregnancy continues to be an important public health problem in Wisconsin. Pregnancy prevention programs should be targeted toward the populations and counties with the highest rates.

  20. Teens Reflect on Their Sources of Contraceptive Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel K.; Biddlecom, Ann E.; Hebert, Luciana; Mellor, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Based on semistructured interviews with a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 58 U.S. high school students, this study examines teens' exposure to contraceptive information from a range of sources and the extent to which they trust this information. Teens report exposure to contraceptive information from many individuals and places, most…

  1. Teen Pregnancy and the Achievement Gap among Urban Minority Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Charles E.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To outline the prevalence and disparities of teen pregnancy among school-aged urban minority youth, causal pathways through which nonmarital teen births adversely affects academic achievement, and proven or promising approaches for schools to address this problem. Methods: Literature review. Results: In 2006, the birth rate among 15-…

  2. Teens' Knowledge of Risk Factors for Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Cynthia W.

    2004-01-01

    Youth participation in sports has increased greatly over the past 20 years. Consequently, there has been a rise in the number of sports injuries. A study was conducted to determine teen's level of physical activity, knowledge about risk factors for sports injuries, use of protective equipment, and parental involvement. Two groups of teens, one of…

  3. Am I in a Healthy Relationship? (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Search Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs ... when it involves mean, disrespectful, controlling, or abusive behavior. Some people live in homes with parents who fight a lot or abuse ...

  4. Do Mothers' Opinions Matter in Teens' Sexual Activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingerson, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Using the Add Health data (N = 9,530 dyads), this study explores sexual socialization in the family using the theory of reasoned action by assessing how mothers' opinions are associated with their childrens' sexual behavior. Findings suggest that the more sexually liberal teens think their mothers are, the more likely the teens are to have higher…

  5. Runaway with Words: Teaching Poetry to At-Risk Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Joann

    1993-01-01

    Reports on "Runaway with Words," a poetry workshop for at-risk teens in Florida's runaway shelters. Describes how, through various exercises, oral recitations, and conversations, troubled teens learn basic writing skills that help them gain control over their emotions. (SR)

  6. Reducing the Teen Birth Rate. KIDS COUNT Indicator Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, Rima; Shore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Teen childbearing affects young people at both ends of childhood. When teens have children, their own health may be jeopardized and their chances to build productive lives are often diminished. Compared to women who postpone childbearing until they are older, teenage mothers are more likely to drop out of school and to live in poverty. At the same…

  7. Vital Signs – Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This podcast is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  8. Teens Having Babies: The Unexplored Role of Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raphael, Jody

    2005-01-01

    Although the negative effects of witnessing domestic violence are finally becoming acknowledged, many young girls are already victims of violence within their own dating relationships. Research studies uniformly find that, on average, about 25% of teen dating relationships contain violent elements. Research with pregnant and parenting teens show…

  9. Pregnant Teens: Differential Pregnancy Resolution and Treatment Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, Maxine L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Grouped pregnant teens in a social services agency according to those who: (1) followed through with a parenting plan; (2) followed through with an adoption plan; and (3) switched from an adoption to a parenting plan. Teens who switched (one-third of the population) were identified as high-risk in terms of health histories and psychosocial…

  10. Confessions of Former Teen Program Participants: Two Decades Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Fabrizio; Wyrick, Gabrielle; Zwicky, Calder

    2014-01-01

    As a companion to more data-driven articles and studies that consider the long-term impact of art museum teen programs on alumni, this article takes the form of a person to person interview with two founding teen members of important programs that emerged in the 1990s. Talking candidly about the impact of their program participation, Calder Zwicky…

  11. Using Film Clips to Teach Teen Pregnancy Prevention: "The Gloucester 18" at a Teen Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrman, Judith W.; Moore, Christopher C.; Anthony, Becky

    2012-01-01

    Teaching pregnancy prevention to large groups offers many challenges. This article describes the use of film clips, with guided discussion, to teach pregnancy prevention. In order to analyze the costs associated with teen pregnancy, a film clip discussion session based with the film "The Gloucester 18" was the keynote of a youth summit. The lesson…

  12. Clinical trials from the patient perspective: survey in an online patient community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DasMahapatra, Pronabesh; Raja, Priya; Gilbert, Jeremy; Wicks, Paul

    2017-02-27

    Developing new medicines relies on the successful conduct of clinical trials. As trial protocols become more arduous, it becomes harder to recruit and retain patient volunteers, although recent efforts such as OMERACT and I-SPY2 show that partnering with patients can be beneficial. We sought to describe drivers and barriers to trial participation, as well as condition-specific trial preferences. An online survey was fielded via the patient-powered research network PatientsLikeMe to 1,621 members living with nine selected chronic health conditions. Questions included demographics, trial experience, reasons for non-participation, questions relating to aspects of trial design, and an adaptation of the Net Promoter Score (NPS) for trial satisfaction. Mean age of respondents was 55 years; most patients were white (93%), female (67%), and living in the United States (72%). Primary conditions were MS (21%), Parkinson's (20%), fibromyalgia (15%), ALS (10%), type 2 diabetes (10%), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 8%), epilepsy (8%), major depressive disorder (MDD, 5%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, 3%). Most patients had not discussed a trial with their physician and only 21% had ever enrolled, with rates highest in ALS (36%), Parkinson's disease (36%) and MS (20%) and lowest among SLE (9%), MDD (11%) and Fibromyalgia (11%). Common reasons for non-participation were eligibility criteria, inconvenience of travel and concerns about side effects. NPS suggested that many patients were unsatisfied; patients with lupus, epilepsy, RA, and fibromyalgia reported negative scores, i.e. they would dissuade other patients like them from taking part in trials. The most important considerations in trial participation were the opportunity to improve one's own health and that of others, the reputation of the institution, and having medical bills covered in case of injury. Least important were remuneration and possibility of receiving a placebo. ALS patients were more willing to tolerate

  13. A teen's guide to creating web pages and blogs

    CERN Document Server

    Selfridge, Peter; Osburn, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Whether using a social networking site like MySpace or Facebook or building a Web page from scratch, millions of teens are actively creating a vibrant part of the Internet. This is the definitive teen''s guide to publishing exciting web pages and blogs on the Web. This easy-to-follow guide shows teenagers how to: Create great MySpace and Facebook pages Build their own unique, personalized Web site Share the latest news with exciting blogging ideas Protect themselves online with cyber-safety tips Written by a teenager for other teens, this book leads readers step-by-step through the basics of web and blog design. In this book, teens learn to go beyond clicking through web sites to learning winning strategies for web design and great ideas for writing blogs that attract attention and readership.

  14. Translation to Primary Care of an Effective Teen Safe Driving Program for Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, Jean T; Zakrajsek, Jennifer S; Finch, Stacia; Bingham, C Raymond; O'Neil, Joseph; Yano, Stephen; Wasserman, Richard; Simons-Morton, Bruce

    2016-10-01

    Addressing teen driver crashes, this study adapted an effective Checkpoints(TM) program for parents of teen drivers for dissemination by primary care practitioners (PCPs) and the web; distributed the PCP/web program through pediatric practices; and examined dissemination to/implementation by parents. The website, youngDRIVERparenting.org, and brief intervention protocol were developed. PCPs delivered interventions and materials to parents, referred them to the website, and completed follow-up surveys. Google Analytics assessed parents' website use. Most PCPs reported delivering interventions with fidelity, and thought the program important and feasible. Brief interventions/website referrals, averaging 4.4 minutes, were delivered to 3465 (87%) of 3990 eligible parents by 133 PCPs over an 18-week average. Website visits (1453) were made by 42% of parents, who spent on average 3:53 minutes viewing 4.2 topics. This program costs little (its website, training and promotional materials are available) and could be one component of a comprehensive approach to reducing teen driver crashes. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Child passenger injury risk in sibling versus non-sibling teen driver crashes: a US study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senserrick, Teresa M; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2007-06-01

    Several international jurisdictions allow family exemptions to graduated driver licensing passenger restrictions. The objective of this research was to examine differences in injury risk to US child passengers in crashes involving sibling versus non-sibling teen drivers, and to compare outcomes with crashes involving adult drivers. Insurance claim and telephone survey data were collected on 16 233 child passengers (representing 289 329 children) in 17 US jurisdictions. There was a trend toward higher restraint non-use by child passengers in the non-sibling group than in the sibling group (9.6% vs 4.7%; p = 0.08). Children in the sibling group had a 40% lower risk of injury than those in the non-sibling group (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.90); however, injury risk was higher in the sibling group than in children traveling with adults (adjusted OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.26). Child passengers riding with sibling teen drivers may be safer than those riding with non-sibling teens, but not as safe as those riding with adult drivers.

  16. What Factors Contribute to Headache-Related Disability in Teens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Kathi J; Heyer, Geoffrey; Pakalnis, Ann; Binkley, Philip F

    2016-03-01

    Our aim was to describe the relationship between risk factors, such as stress, depression, and anxiety, and potentially protective factors against pediatric headache-related disability, such as mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion, and to determine teens' interest in mind-body skills training to help reduce headache-related disability. This was a cross-sectional survey among adolescents seen in an academic neurology clinic reporting four or more headaches monthly using standardized instruments to determine the relationship between putative risk and protective factors as well as physiologic markers of inflammation and vagal tone and headache-related disability. Among the 29 participants, 31% were male, the average age was 14.8 years, average headache frequency was 11.6 per month, and the most commonly reported trigger was stress (86%). The only risk or protective factor significantly associated with headache-related disability was depression (r = 0.52, P = 0.004). Depression was negatively correlated with mindfulness, resilience, and self-compassion (P anxiety (P teens with frequent migraine headaches, depression is the strongest risk factor for headache-related disability. Stress is viewed as a headache trigger, and teens reported wanting to learn simple stress management strategies supported by a smart phone application to help reduce headache-related disability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Research trends in teens' health information behaviour: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Un; Syn, Sue Yeon

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to examine trends in studies of teens' health information behaviour. Eighty-two articles published between 2000 and 2012 were selected and analysed in various aspects: health topics by year, information sources, data collection methods, use of theories and models, collaborative and interdisciplinary efforts and published journals. Fifty-seven per cent of the studies focused on specific health topics, such as sexual health, while the rest covered general health topics. Almost half of the studies examined how teens search for and use health information on the Internet. Surveys were the most popular data collection technique. Only 12.2% were based on a theory or model. About 42% were conducted collaboratively by authors from multiple disciplines. With the increasing attention to specific health topics and online resources, the health information behaviour of teens has been examined more frequently since the mid-2000s. Its interdisciplinary nature was evidently shown from various disciplines that the authors were affiliated with and the journals of the published studies represented. This study suggests that there should be efforts to reflect new technology tools, apply mixed methods and increase the engagement level of collaboration to evolve this research domain. © 2014 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2014 Health Libraries Group.

  18. Child passenger injury risk in sibling versus non‐sibling teen driver crashes: a US study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senserrick, Teresa M; Kallan, Michael J; Winston, Flaura K

    2007-01-01

    Several international jurisdictions allow family exemptions to graduated driver licensing passenger restrictions. The objective of this research was to examine differences in injury risk to US child passengers in crashes involving sibling versus non‐sibling teen drivers, and to compare outcomes with crashes involving adult drivers. Insurance claim and telephone survey data were collected on 16 233 child passengers (representing 289 329 children) in 17 US jurisdictions. There was a trend toward higher restraint non‐use by child passengers in the non‐sibling group than in the sibling group (9.6% vs 4.7%; p = 0.08). Children in the sibling group had a 40% lower risk of injury than those in the non‐sibling group (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.40 to 0.90); however, injury risk was higher in the sibling group than in children traveling with adults (adjusted OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.26). Child passengers riding with sibling teen drivers may be safer than those riding with non‐sibling teens, but not as safe as those riding with adult drivers. PMID:17567980

  19. Cohort Profile: The Nicotine Dependence in Teens (NDIT) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Jennifer; Dugas, Erika N; Brunet, Jennifer; DiFranza, Joseph; Engert, James C; Gervais, Andre; Gray-Donald, Katherine; Karp, Igor; Low, Nancy C; Sabiston, Catherine; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Tyndale, Rachel F; Auger, Nathalie; Auger, Nathalie; Mathieu, Belanger; Tracie, Barnett; Chaiton, Michael; Chenoweth, Meghan J; Constantin, Evelyn; Contreras, Gisèle; Kakinami, Lisa; Labbe, Aurelie; Maximova, Katerina; McMillan, Elizabeth; O'Loughlin, Erin K; Pabayo, Roman; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène; Tremblay, Michèle; Wellman, Robert J; Hulst, Andraeavan; Paradis, Gilles

    2015-10-01

    The Nicotine Dependence in Teens (NDIT) study is a prospective cohort investigation of 1294 students recruited in 1999-2000 from all grade 7 classes in a convenience sample of 10 high schools in Montreal, Canada. Its primary objectives were to study the natural course and determinants of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence in novice smokers. The main source of data was self-report questionnaires administered in class at school every 3 months from grade 7 to grade 11 (1999-2005), for a total of 20 survey cycles during high school education. Questionnaires were also completed after graduation from high school in 2007-08 and 2011-12 (survey cycles 21 and 22, respectively) when participants were aged 20 and 24 years on average, respectively. In addition to its primary objectives, NDIT has embedded studies on obesity, blood pressure, physical activity, team sports, sedentary behaviour, diet, genetics, alcohol use, use of illicit drugs, second-hand smoke, gambling, sleep and mental health. Results to date are described in 58 publications, 20 manuscripts in preparation, 13 MSc and PhD theses and 111 conference presentations. Access to NDIT data is open to university-appointed or affiliated investigators and to masters, doctoral and postdoctoral students, through their primary supervisor (www.nditstudy.ca). © The Author 2014; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  20. Teen Cyberbullying Investigated: Where Do Your Rights End and Consequences Begin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    The Internet age has led to a different kind of teen bullying: cyberbullying. What is cyberbullying and what can teens do about it? In "Teen Cyberbullying Investigated," Judge Tom Jacobs presents a powerful collection of landmark court cases involving teens and charges of cyberbullying and cyberharassment. This riveting, informative guide will…

  1. Attachment and Emotion Regulation during Mother-Teen Problem Solving: A Control Theory Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobak, R. Rogers; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Correlated teens' strategies for regulating their attachment to their mothers as measured by the Adult Attachment Interview, and emotion regulation during teen-mother problem solving. Teens with secure strategies engaged in problem-solving discussions characterized by less dysfunctional anger and less avoidance of problem solving than other teens.…

  2. Halfway There: A Prescription for Continued Progress in Preventing Teen Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    This report offers findings and recommendations by the National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Nearly one million teens become pregnant annually. The teen birth rate increased 24 percent between 1986-91 and has fallen 20 percent since then. Overall, too many parents and adult leaders do not take a strong stand against teen pregnancy. Strident…

  3. A Survey of the Students' Perspectives of Open-Book Examinations in the Histology/Embryology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Mahmoudzadeh-Sagheb

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: An open-book exam permits the examinees to consult some specific selected reference sources or materials while answering the exam questions. This study focused on the students' perspectives of open-book examinations in the histology/embryology courses, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences (ZUMS, Zahedan, Iran. Methods: The survey was conducted via a questionnaire after open-book examinations had been conducted in the histology and embryology courses, between 2009 and 2010. Of the 254 students who entered the new education system, 160 students were selected at random. Results: The results revealed that 72% of the students preferred the open-book type to the closed-book kind of examinations. Most of the students voiced that this type of examination was more suited to test high cognitive learning skills and solving real life situation problems, involving less stress while preparing for and taking the exam. They also mentioned that their marks in these examinations were not higher than those from the closed-book examinations. The overall satisfaction scores of the students of the biological sciences were significantly (p<0.001 higher than those of the medical sciences students (16.28±4.17 vs. 12.65±5.16; in the government run university students it was significantly (P<0.001 higher than in the international university students (14.93±4.53 vs. 10.24±5.08; the embryology course results were significantly (p<0.001 higher than the histology course (15.23 ± 4.07 vs. 12.79±5.4 and among the MD students it was significantly (p<0.001 lower than those of the BSc students (12±5.1 vs. 15.93±4.29. There was a positive correlation between the scores they acquired in their course and the overall satisfaction scores with the open-book type of examinations (r=0.46, p value=0.01. Conclusions: The finding of a positive response towards the open-book examination augurs well for extending such a type of examination to other subjects in

  4. Effects of a Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program on Teens' Attitudes toward Sexuality: A Latent Trait Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Charles L.; Dimitrov, Dimiter M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of program interventions in a school-based teen pregnancy program on hypothesized constructs underlying teens' attitudes toward sexuality. An important task related to this purpose was the validation of the constructs and their stability from pre- to postintervention measures. Data from 1,136…

  5. The Rate of Cyber Dating Abuse among Teens and How It Relates to Other Forms of Teen Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Janine M.; Dank, Meredith; Yahner, Jennifer; Lachman, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    To date, little research has documented how teens might misuse technology to harass, control, and abuse their dating partners. This study examined the extent of cyber dating abuse--abuse via technology and new media--in youth relationships and how it relates to other forms of teen dating violence. A total of 5,647 youth from ten schools in three…

  6. Teen pregnancy and abortion among high school students of the urban district of Antananarivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidiniaina Mamy Randriantsarafara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teen pregnancy and abortion phenomena take an ever-growing magnitude in poor countries. Lack of knowledge about reproductive health could aggravate these problems. Methods: Across-sectional survey has been conducted in public, private and denominational high schools of the urban district of Antananarivo, Madagascar, on a sample of 248 students during schoolyear 2012-2013. Data was collected during the third quarter of the schoolyear. Results: Good knowledge about pregnancy and abortion was found in 14.5%, 95% CI [10.4% -19.5%] of students. The media represent almost 60% of the sources of information. Access to care is limited in 48% of cases by feeling shame. Nearly 11% would resort to abortion if an unplanned pregnancy happens. Nearly 6.5%, 95% CI [3.6% - 10.3%] had teen pregnancy problems: 9.6% of boys and 4.1% of girls came encountered these and all cases have ended in induced abortion among girls. The students from the denominational schools and the female gender have more knowledge of about sexuality. The level of knowledge does not significantly influence pregnancy. Female students (p = 0.07 are less prone to teen pregnancy, whereas dating a fixed boyfriend (p <10-4, a large sibship (p = 0.03 and parents in consensual union (p = 0.02 encourage its occurrence. Conclusions: Abortion does not actually represent a remedy in case of pregnancy. Nevertheless, prevention of teen pregnancy is suggested. The control strategy should be multidisciplinary and multisectoral, and focused on targeted information. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2015; 14(3.000: 240-246

  7. Associations between parenting styles and teen driving, safety-related behaviors and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Kenneth R; Durbin, Dennis R; García-España, J Felipe; Kalicka, Ewa A; Winston, Flaura K

    2009-10-01

    The goal was to explore the association between parenting style and driving behaviors. The 2006 National Young Driver Survey gathered data on driving safety behaviors from a nationally representative sample of 5665 ninth-, 10th-, and 11th-graders. A parenting style variable was based on adolescent reports and separated parents into 4 groups, (1) authoritative (high support and high rules/monitoring), (2) authoritarian (low support and high rules/monitoring), (3) permissive (high support and low rules/monitoring), and (4) uninvolved (low support and low rules/monitoring). Associations between parenting style and driving behaviors and attitudes were assessed. One half of parents were described as authoritative, 23% as permissive, 8% as authoritarian, and 19% as uninvolved. Compared with teens with uninvolved parents, those with authoritative parents reported one half the crash risk in the past year (odds ratio [OR]: 0.47 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.26-0.87]), were 71% less likely to drive when intoxicated (OR: 0.29 [95% CI: 0.19-0.44]), and were less likely to use a cellular telephone while driving (OR: 0.71 [95% CI: 0.50-0.99]). Teens with authoritative or authoritarian parents reported using seat belts nearly twice as often (authoritative: OR: 1.94 [95% CI: 1.49 -2.54]; authoritarian: OR: 1.85 [95% CI: 1.08 -3.18]) and speeding one half as often (authoritative: OR: 0.47 [95% CI: 0.36-0.61]; authoritarian: OR: 0.63 [95% CI: 0.40-0.99]) as teens with uninvolved parents. No significant differences in crash risk or seat belt use were found between permissive and uninvolved parents. Clinicians should encourage parents to set rules and to monitor teens' driving behaviors, in a supportive context.

  8. Myths about oral contraceptives. Does OC availability result in increased sexual activity among teens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney

    1993-11-01

    Parents, educators, public health officials, health-care providers, religious organizations, and advocacy groups are very concerned about the rise in teenage pregnancy and the increase in sexually transmitted diseases among the young. Some say the increased availability and acceptance of oral contraceptives is directly related to an increase in sexual activity among teens. Less than 50% of women use a contraceptive method at first intercourse. Use is much lower in Hispanic and African-American women than among White women; women with low socioeconomic status, living in one-parent households, or having sex at an early age are the least likely to use a contraceptive method at first intercourse. According to the National Survey of Family Growth, teens engaging in sexual intercourse for the first time, who use a contraceptive method, typically choose the condom. Oral contraceptive use is very low and use at first intercourse has not increased over time. It is only after the establishment of routine sexual intercourse that the pill becomes the preferred method. The use of a condom has more than doubled for the period from 1982 to 1988. Adolescents under age 16 are at greatest risk for unintended pregnancies because this group is the least likely to use any method of contraception. The increase in teen sexual activity over the years does not coincide with an increase in pill use. Education must begin in elementary schools, stressing abstinence, but also include facts about sex, contraception, and disease prevention, because 40% of teens are sexually active by 9th grade. Skills can focus on changing behavior, such as learning to delay intercourse, building self-esteem as well as proper use of contraceptives. Easy, nonthreatening access to medical care can prevent many unintended pregnancies and the spread of sexually transmitted diseases.

  9. Do State-Based Policies Have an Impact on Teen Birth Rates and Teen Abortion Rates in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevrette, Marianne; Abenhaim, Haim Arie

    2015-10-01

    The United States has one of the highest teen birth rates among developed countries. Interstate birth rates and abortion rates vary widely, as do policies on abortion and sex education. The objective of our study is to assess whether US state-level policies regarding abortion and sexual education are associated with different teen birth and teen abortion rates. We carried out a state-level (N = 51 [50 states plus the District of Columbia]) retrospective observational cross-sectional study, using data imported from the National Vital Statistics System. State policies were obtained from the Guttmacher Institute. We used descriptive statistics and regression analysis to study the association of different state policies with teen birth and teen abortion rates. The state-level mean birth rates, when stratifying between policies protective and nonprotective of teen births, were not statistically different-for sex education policies, 39.8 of 1000 vs 45.1 of 1000 (P = .2187); for mandatory parents' consent to abortion 45 of 1000, vs 38 of 1000 when the minor could consent (P = .0721); and for deterrents to abortion, 45.4 of 1000 vs 37.4 of 1000 (P = .0448). Political affiliation (35.1 of 1000 vs 49.6 of 1000, P teen births. Lower teen abortion rates were, however, associated with restrictive abortion policies, specifically lower in states with financial barriers, deterrents to abortion, and requirement for parental consent. While teen birth rates do not appear to be influenced by state-level sex education policies, state-level policies that restrict abortion appear to be associated with lower state teen abortion rates. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethical issues associated with in-hospital emergency from the Medical Emergency Team's perspective: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrini, Luca; Giannini, Alberto; Pintaudi, Margherita; Semeraro, Federico; Radeschi, Giulio; Borga, Sara; Landoni, Giovanni; Troiano, Herbert; Luchetti, Marco; Pellis, Thomas; Ristagno, Giuseppe; Minoja, Giulio; Mazzon, Davide; Alampi, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Medical Emergency Teams (METs) are frequently involved in ethical issues associated to in-hospital emergencies, like decisions about end-of-life care and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. MET involvement offers both advantages and disadvantages, especially when an immediate decision must be made. We performed a survey among Italian intensivists/anesthesiologists evaluating MET's perspective on the most relevant ethical aspects faced in daily practice. A questionnaire was developed on behalf of the Italian scientific society of anesthesia and intensive care (SIAARTI) and administered to its members. Decision making criteria applied by respondents when dealing with ethical aspects, the estimated incidence of conflicts due to ethical issues and the impact on the respondents' emotional and moral distress were explored. The questionnaire was completed by 327 intensivists/anesthesiologists. Patient life-expectancy, wishes, and the quality of life were the factors most considered for decisions. Conflicts with ward physicians were reported by most respondents; disagreement on appropriateness of ICU admission and family unpreparedness to the imminent patient death were the most frequent reasons. Half of respondents considered that in case of conflicts the final decision should be made by the MET. Conflicts were generally recognized as causing increased and moral distress within the MET members. Few respondents reported that dedicated protocols or training were locally available. Italian intensivists/anesthesiologists reported that ethical issues associated with in-hospital emergencies are occurring commonly and are having a significant negative impact on MET well-being. Conflicts with ward physicians happen frequently. They also conveyed that hospitals don't offer ethics training and have no protocols in place to address ethical issues.

  11. Comparing importance and performance from a patient perspective in English general practice: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirdifield, Coral; Godoy Caballero, Ana; Windle, Karen; Jackson, Christine; McKay, Stephen; Schäfer, Willemijn; Siriwardena, A Niroshan

    2016-04-01

    Patient experience and satisfaction are important indicators of quality in health care. Little is known about where to prioritize efforts to improve patient satisfaction. To investigate patient satisfaction with primary care, as part of the Quality and Costs of Primary Care in Europe study in England, identifying areas where improvements could be made from patients' perspectives. We conducted a questionnaire survey of general practice patients in three English regions. Patient Values questionnaires assessed what patients thought was important, and Patient Experience questionnaires rated performance of primary care. Fifteen attributes of care were compared using Importance Performance Analysis, a method that simultaneously represents data on importance and performance of a service, enabling identification of its strengths and weaknesses. Patients rated both 'relational' and 'functional' aspects of care as important. Satisfaction with general practice could be improved by concentrating on specific aspects of access (ensuring that patients know how to access out-of-hours services and find it easy to get an appointment), and one aspect of empowerment (after their visit, patients feel able to cope better with their health problem/illness). However, for other attributes (e.g. proximity of the practice to a patient's house or, a short waiting time when contacting the practice), investing additional resources is not likely to increase patient satisfaction. Attributes needing most improvement concerned access to primary care and patient empowerment. More research is needed to identify how to improve access without generating unnecessary additional demand or compromising continuity of care. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Early Teen Marriage and Future Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAHL, GORDON B.

    2010-01-01

    Both early teen marriage and dropping out of high school have historically been associated with a variety of negative outcomes, including higher poverty rates throughout life. Are these negative outcomes due to preexisting differences, or do they represent the causal effect of marriage and schooling choices? To better understand the true personal and societal consequences, in this article, I use an instrumental variables (IV) approach that takes advantage of variation in state laws regulating the age at which individuals are allowed to marry, drop out of school, and begin work. The baseline IV estimate indicates that a woman who marries young is 31 percentage points more likely to live in poverty when she is older. Similarly, a woman who drops out of school is 11 percentage points more likely to be poor. The results are robust to a variety of alternative specifications and estimation methods, including limited information maximum likelihood (LIML) estimation and a control function approach. While grouped ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates for the early teen marriage variable are also large, OLS estimates based on individual-level data are small, consistent with a large amount of measurement error. PMID:20879684

  13. National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse VI: Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    This report describes research undertaken to assess the attitudes of teenagers and those who most influence them--their parents, teachers, and school principals. The research attempted to identify factors that could increase or diminish the likelihood teenagers would use cigarettes, alcohol, or illegal drugs. Parents were identified as the key to…

  14. Are supervisors using theoretical perspectives in their work? A descriptive survey among Swedish-approved clinical supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Agneta; Kisthinios, Marianne

    2007-11-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the theoretical perspectives in use by approved clinical nursing supervisors in Sweden. For the time being, we know little of the theoretical perspectives in use on a daily basis by the clinical nursing supervisors in Sweden. A questionnaire (n = 49) and follow-up telephone interviews (n = 14) were used. Data analysis was made by descriptive statistics and qualitative content analysis. The result from the questionnaire showed that the supervisors often used and combined different theoretical perspectives with origins in nursing, education and psychology. Surprisingly, one-fourth of the respondents did not state any nursing theoretical perspective in use during clinical nursing supervision. The result from the interviews revealed that the theory of Katie Eriksson (1987) was the most commonly used nursing perspective. As the overall aim for clinical nursing supervision is to improve nursing for the patient/family, the supervisor's competence in nursing is essential. Given this fact, and that only three-quarters of the approved clinical nursing supervisors stated a use of theoretical nursing perspective when supervising, there is obviously a need for further investigations in this area. In addition, there is also a need for approved Swedish clinical nursing supervisors, to further become aware of the theoretical perspective in use that supports their clinical nursing supervision. Clinical nursing supervision is a multifaceted activity that needs to be supported by different nursing theoretical perspectives including physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual as well as socio-cultural aspects.

  15. Hispanic Teen Pregnancy and Birth Rates: Looking Behind the Numbers. Child Trends Research Brief. Publication #2005-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Suzanne; Franzetta, Kerry; Manlove, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This research brief focuses on the birth, pregnancy, contraceptive, and relationship behaviors of Hispanic teens because they represent an important risk group. Teen pregnancy and birth rates for U.S. teens have declined dramatically in recent years. Yet for Hispanic teens, reductions in teen pregnancy and childbearing have lagged behind that of…

  16. Opportunity, community, and teen pregnancy in an Appalachian state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, R; Weaver, S; Williams, T; Lange, L

    1997-01-01

    This study examines female adolescents' responses to opportunities, costs, and community in West Virginia. It is posited that adolescent women's responses to structurally determined contextual factors will be the most important determinant of the teen birth rate. It is posited that girls avoid becoming pregnant and work to stay in school as a wise investment in their future. The variation in males' participation in contributing to teen pregnancy is not considered due to data limitations. West Virginia is a state with low teen abortion rates and limited teen mobility out of state. Community is construed as having a positive sense of affiliation and value for adolescents. Community is measured by school size and a range of 7 measures of community social organization: percentage of urban population in the district, percentage Black, percentage neither Black nor White, level of educational attainment, percentage of college preparatory students, percentage of college students, and percentage of service employees. The 7 factors were reduced with principal component analysis to a measure of modernity. Findings indicate that the birth rate increased by 8% for every increase of 100 students in average school size. The modern variable, which indicates departures from traditional patterns of community organization, was positively, statistically significantly related to the teenage birth rate. The college degree variable was related to increased teen pregnancy as a departure from traditional norms and decreased teen pregnancy as a measure of opportunity. Findings contrast with traditional interpretations of teen pregnancy. Findings indicate that teen pregnancy reflects a lack of opportunity, a decline in traditional community patterns, and the replacement of traditional social relations by shifting labor market relations. Teen births are consequences of disadvantage and disruption as context-driven factors.

  17. Evaluation of modified patient health questionnaire-9 teen in South African adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Shilpa Aggarwal; Lian Taljard; Zane Wilson; Michael Berk

    2017-01-01

    Background: This report describes the findings of the survey conducted by South African Depression and Anxiety Group (SADAG) in a cohort of disadvantaged South African adolescent scholars in which PHQ-9 teen version was modified and adapted (PHQ-9M) to improve the response rate. Method: PHQ-9M was administered to 2025 secondary students of 35 schools over 2 years in Gauteng Province, South Africa. Results: The mean age was 15.8 years. 23% of respondents scored 9 or above, 26.7% reported suici...

  18. Gaming Against Violence: A Grassroots Approach to Teen Dating Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecente, Drew

    2014-08-01

    Teen dating violence is a pervasive problem that affects millions of adolescents worldwide. Although there have been various approaches to addressing this problem, using videogames had not been employed before 2008, when Jennifer Ann's Group, an Atlanta, GA-based nonprofit organization, created an annual competition. The Life.Love. Game Design Challenge rewards game developers for creating videogames about teen dating violence without using any violence in the games themselves. The resulting videogames have increased awareness about teen dating violence and provided educational information to assist adolescents, parents, and teachers in identifying abusive relationships.

  19. "I Won't Out Myself Just to Do a Survey": Sexual and Gender Minority Adolescents' Perspectives on the Risks and Benefits of Sex Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macapagal, Kathryn; Coventry, Ryan; Arbeit, Miriam R; Fisher, Celia B; Mustanski, Brian

    2017-07-01

    Sexual and gender minority (SGM) adolescents under age 18 are underrepresented in sexual health research. Exclusion of SGM minors from these studies has resulted in a lack of knowledge about the risks and benefits youth experience from sexual health research participation. Institutional Review Boards' (IRB) overprotective stances toward research risks and requirements for guardian consent for SGM research are significant barriers to participation, though few have investigated SGM youth's perspectives on these topics. This study aimed to empirically inform decisions about guardian consent for sexuality survey studies involving SGM youth. A total of 74 SGM youth aged 14-17 completed an online survey of sexual behavior and SGM identity, and a new measure that compared the discomfort of sexual health survey completion to everyday events and exemplars of minimal risk research (e.g., behavioral observation). Youth described survey benefits and drawbacks and perspectives on guardian permission during an online focus group. Participants felt about the same as or more comfortable completing the survey compared to other research procedures, and indicated that direct and indirect participation benefits outweighed concerns about privacy and emotional discomfort. Most would not have participated if guardian permission was required, citing negative parental attitudes about adolescent sexuality and SGM issues and not being "out" about their SGM identity. Findings suggest that sexual health survey studies meet minimal risk criteria, are appropriate for SGM youth, and that recruitment would not be possible without waivers of guardian consent. Decreasing barriers to research participation would dramatically improve our understanding of sexual health among SGM youth.

  20. School Survey Lists Sensitive Issues to Pursue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jack

    1988-01-01

    Reports on a high school survey, conducted by the school's newspaper staff, concerning issues of importance in students' lives. Notes that drug/alcohol abuse was the most frequently cited issue; other issues included AIDS, teen sex, college, and peer pressure. Provides a table of survey results. (MM)

  1. The Current State of Dermatologists' Familiarity and Perspectives of Biosimilars for the Treatment of Psoriasis: A Global Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manalo, Iviensan F; Gilbert, Kathleen E; Wu, Jashin J

    2017-04-01

    BACKGROUND: Biologic patent expiration, accelerated approval pathways, and business interests of third party payers and the biopharmaceutical industry are driving the development of biosimilars to treat immune-mediated disorders like psoriasis. No studies have investigated dermatologists' familiarity and perspectives of biosimilars. OBJECTIVES: To assess: (1) dermatologists' familiarity with biosimilars and interchangeability and (2) their perspectives toward biosimilar properties, including interchangeability, indication extrapolation, and immunogenicity risk. METHODS: For this prospective survey study, we distributed electronic and paper questionnaires to dermatologists from selected societies and attendees at the 73rd annual American Academy of Dermatology meeting between March 20, 2015 and May 30, 2015. Primary outcome was dermatologists' familiarity with biosimilars. Secondary aims included dermatologists' confidence in biosimilar efficacy and safety, familiarity concerning the concept of interchangeability and perspectives regarding indication extrapolation, interchangeability, and immunogenicity risk. RESULTS: Of the 116 total dermatologists who completed the questionnaire, 73 (62.9%) were slightly to very unfamiliar with biosimilars. On a 5-point Likert scale, dermatologists were somewhat to very concerned with the practice of interchangeability (3.4±1.1) and slightly uncomfortable to fairly comfortable in prescribing biosimilars for an extrapolated indication (3.3±1.0). CONCLSUIONS: Our survey identified that the majority of dermatologists were unfamiliar with biosimilars. Dermatologists were consistently concerned regarding safety issues surrounding the practice of interchangeability without provider knowledge. J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(4):336-343..

  2. Engagement with the TeenDrivingPlan and diversity of teens' supervised practice driving: lessons for internet-based learner driver interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Flaura K; Mirman, Jessica H; Curry, Allison E; Pfeiffer, Melissa R; Elliott, Michael R; Durbin, Dennis R

    2015-02-01

    Inexperienced, less-skilled driving characterises many newly licensed drivers and contributes to high crash rates. A randomised trial of TeenDrivingPlan (TDP), a new learner driver phase internet-based intervention, demonstrated effectiveness in improving safety relevant, on-road driving behaviour, primarily through greater driving practice diversity. To inform future learner driver interventions, this analysis examined TDP use and its association with practice diversity. Posthoc analysis of data from teen/parent dyads (n=107), enrolled early in learner phase and assigned to treatment arm in randomised trial. Inserted software beacons captured TDP use data. Electronic surveys completed by parents and teens assessed diversity of practice driving and TDP usability ratings at 24 weeks (end of study period). Most families (84%) used TDP early in the learner period; however, the number of TDP sessions in the first week was three times higher among dyads who achieved greater practice diversity than those with less. By week five many families still engaged with TDP, but differences in TDP use could not be detected between families with high versus low practice diversity. Usability was not a major issue for this sample based on largely positive user ratings. An engaging internet-based intervention, such as TDP, can support families in achieving high practice diversity. Future learner driver interventions should provide important information early in the learner period when engagement is greatest, encourage continued learning as part of logging practice drives, and incorporate monitoring software for further personalisation to meet family needs. NCT01498575. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Pregnant teens in prison. Prevalence, management, and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuner, C C; Farrow, J A

    1995-01-01

    To estimate the number of pregnant and parenting teens currently incarcerated and to assess the correctional health care and social services provided to this target population, we surveyed 430 juvenile detention and long-term correctional facilities in the United States that incarcerate adolescent girls. Of these, 261 (61%) institutions responded and are included in the analysis. Of these facilities, 68% estimated that they were holding 1 to 5 pregnant adolescents on a given day, with a reported yearly (September 1991 to September 1992) census of 2,000 pregnant teenagers and 1,200 teenaged mothers. Nearly half of the facilities (45%) continue to incarcerate after it is determined that a youth is pregnant. Of those institutions that incarcerate pregnant adolescents, 31% provide no prenatal services and 70% provide no parenting classes. Of these facilities, 60% reported at least 1 obstetric complication in their pregnant population. A substantial number of pregnant and parenting adolescents are in custody in the United States. General community standards of health and social services for pregnant and parenting teenagers are not being met by the institutions that incarcerate them. PMID:7747498

  4. Patients' perspectives in the management of psoriasis: the Italian results of the Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisondi, Paolo; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2017-08-01

    The perspective of patients with psoriasis about medical care treatment goals and strategies is receiving increasing attention. Here, we performed a country-based analysis of the Multinational Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (MAPP) survey, in order to provide specific information on patients' perspective of treatment of psoriasis in Italy. This was a systematic household telephone survey recruiting subjects by random digit dialing. Household members ≥18 years were included if they had ever been diagnosed with psoriasis. About 12,785 households were screened in Italy. 132 patients were ineligible for the analysis, including patients with psoriatic arthritis. 359 patients were surveyed. About half of the patients had very mild disease with less than 1 palm skin involvement, and 38% had 1-10 palm skin disease. It is noteworthy that 48% of patients with widespread disease were not taking any medication. Patients indicated the relief of symptoms, including itching (54.9%), as the main goal for their current therapy, whereas 14.2% reported no specific expectation from their medication. Overall, 70% of patients declared to be satisfied by their therapy, in terms of primary goal reached. Our findings suggest that most psoriasis patients have mild/moderate disease in Italy, and that a portion of patients with severe disease does not receive an adequate treatment.

  5. Teen Screen: Take a Walk on the Wild Side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Sarah

    2002-01-01

    Reviews seven videos that involve some aspect of extreme sports, feature loud rock music, and are popular with teens. Includes snowboarding, Gravity Games, BMX bikes, skateboarding, and skydiving. (LRW)

  6. 10 Ways to Help Your Teen Succeed in High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Encourage your teen to do practice problems in math or science. If the material is beyond your ... can get involved by: serving as a grade-level chairperson organizing and/or working at fundraising activities ...

  7. Teen Drivers Take More Chances as Senior Year Begins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common as teen drivers got older, including: Changing music via phone or app: Seniors, 40 percent; juniors, ... feel more like adults," he said. "As a result, it is even more important for parents and ...

  8. Teen Sexual Health: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Partner about Condoms (Nemours Foundation) Also in Spanish Teaching Teens To Use Condoms Faithfully (American Academy of Pediatrics) Also in Spanish Virginity: A Very Personal Decision (Nemours Foundation) Also ...

  9. Vaccinations for Preteens and Teens, Age 11-19 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations for Preteens and Teens, Age 11–19 Years Getting immunized is a lifelong, life-protecting job. ... to be sure you’ve had all the vaccinations you need. Vaccine Do you need it? Chickenpox ( ...

  10. Teen dating violence: building a research program through collaborative insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulford, Carrie F; Blachman-Demner, Dara R

    2013-06-01

    The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) has an emerging portfolio of research in the area of teen dating violence (also known as adolescent relationship abuse). This article begins with a discussion of the developments that prompted NIJ to focus on teen dating violence. Next, the article highlights specific accomplishments and contributions that NIJ has made to helping develop knowledge and scientific understanding of adolescent relationship abuse, particularly around the prevention of teen dating violence perpetration and victimization. This is followed by a presentation of some of the key findings from NIJ-funded research. We then move to a discussion of some of the complex issues around definition, measurement and research methods and how NIJ has been involved in addressing those issues. The article concludes with some thoughts about the intersection of teen dating violence research, policy, and practice and highlights several research gaps that are in need of additional attention.

  11. Heavy Teens May Be Setting Themselves Up for A Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166923.html Heavy Teens May Be Setting Themselves Up for a Stroke But ... investigators noted that excessive weight gain during puberty may lead to elevated blood pressure, a strong risk ...

  12. Sex Education: Talking to Your Teen about Sex

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.acog.org/Patients/FAQs/You-and-Your-Sexuality-Especially-for-Teens. Accessed May 4, 2017. Conversation tools. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. https://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah/resources- ...

  13. Teens with ADHD Face a Higher Crash Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166507.html Teens With ADHD Face a Higher Crash Risk Study found they ... family car, new research shows that adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are even more likely than their peers ...

  14. Hearing Loss Rates Holding Steady for U.S. Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167456.html Hearing Loss Rates Holding Steady for U.S. Teens: Study Vaccine ... via earphones than ever before, but rates of hearing loss have not increased. Still, "the overall take-home ...

  15. Distracted Driving in Teens with and without ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    To determine the effect cell phone conversation or text messaging has on motor : vehicle collision-related injury risk in teens with or without Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity : Disorder Combined Type (ADHD-C) and whether a computerized cognitive...

  16. Pregnancy resolutions among pregnant teens: termination, parenting or adoption?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loke, Alice Yuen; Lam, Pui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    .... In-depth interviews were conducted among a purposive sample of Hong Kong Chinese women recruited from a Maternal and Child Health Centre, who had a history of being pregnant in their teens and out of wedlock...

  17. Pregnancy resolutions among pregnant teens: termination, parenting or adoption?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loke, Alice Yuen; Lam, Pui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    ... do about their pregnancy. In-depth interviews were conducted among a purposive sample of Hong Kong Chinese women recruited from a Maternal and Child Health Centre, who had a history of being pregnant in their teens and out of...

  18. Residential Program Serves Pregnant Teens and Young Mothers in Iowa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Edward J.

    1990-01-01

    Describes the Adolescent Pregnancy Program for pregnant adolescents and teen mothers who cannot live with their families because of dysfunctional or abusive relationships. The program provides a safe, nurturing place to live and vocational and educational services. (PCB)

  19. Isokinetic trunk muscle performance in pre-teens and teens with and without back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, J-C; Boudokhane, S; Pujol, A; Chaléat-Valayer, E; Le Blay, G; Deceuninck, J

    2014-02-01

    To assess with an isokinetic dynamometer the force and endurance of the spinal flexor and extensor muscles in pre-teens or teens aged 11 to 13 and 14 to 16 years with and without low back pain (LBP). The control group and the LBP group were homogeneous in terms of age, weight, height and Body Mass Index (BMI). Assessment was carried out with the isokinetic dynamometer Cybex Norm®. The spinal flexors and extensors were explored concentrically at speeds of 60°, 90° and 120°/sec. The parameters chosen were: maximal moment of force (MMF), mean power (MP), total work (TW), F/E ratios (between the flexors and the extensors for the aforesaid parameters). In the LBP groups, clinical information (pain, extensibility of the spinal and sub-pelvic muscles, sports practice) and sagittal radiological data were all measured. While no significant difference in isokinetic performance was found between asymptomatic and LBP children in the 11-to-13-year-old group, the isokinetic performances of the LBP children were influenced positively by BMI value, number of hours of physical activity and radiologic value of the lumbar lordosis. As regards these pre-teens, assessment with an isokinetic dynamometer does not highlight muscle characteristics that might explain LBP occurrence. As regards the 14-to-16-year-old group, muscle strength has been found to be correlated with age. LBP teens were showed to have weaker extensors and stronger flexors than the healthy teens. It is with regard to this age group that assessment with an isokinetic dynamometer clearly yields interesting results. Since we have yet to standardize our evaluation criteria (working speed, number of trials…), it is difficult to compare our results with those reported in the literature. This is a preliminary study involving a relatively low number of patients. That said, given the fact that numerous parameters are connected with the age and height of the subjects, assessment with an isokinetic dynamometer can be

  20. Teen experiences following a suicide attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Carrie; Vandermause, Roxanne

    2015-06-01

    Teen suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-24year olds. A clear understanding of what the experience of being suicidal means to adolescents living the phenomenon has not been clearly addressed in the literature. The aim of this research was to generate a comprehensive interpretation of the experiences of six adolescents who visited the ED following a suicide attempt, using hermeneutic phenomenological methodology. Participants ranged in age from 15 to 19years old, and all had been hospitalized for their attempt. Two patterns emerged: attempting as communicating and attempting as transforming. Underlying themes are described in detail. The findings have implications for nursing practice including how to assess and intervene with adolescent suicide attempters. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. State policy and teen childbearing: a review of research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltz, Martha A; Sacks, Vanessa H; Moore, Kristin A; Terzian, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Teen childbearing is affected by many individual, family, and community factors; however, another potential influence is state policy. Rigorous studies of the relationship between state policy and teen birth rates are few in number but represent a body of knowledge that can inform policy and practice. This article reviews research assessing associations between state-level policies and teen birth rates, focusing on five policy areas: access to family planning, education, sex education, public assistance, and access to abortion services. Overall, several studies have found that measures related to access to and use of family planning services and contraceptives are related to lower state-level teen birth rates. These include adolescent enrollment in clinics, minors' access to contraception, conscience laws, family planning expenditures, and Medicaid waivers. Other studies, although largely cross-sectional analyses, have concluded that policies and practices to expand or improve public education are also associated with lower teen birth rates. These include expenditures on education, teacher-to-student ratios, and graduation requirements. However, the evidence regarding the role of public assistance, abortion access, and sex education policies in reducing teen birth rates is mixed and inconclusive. These conclusions must be viewed as tentative because of the limited number of rigorous studies that examine the relationship between state policy and teen birth rates over time. Many specific policies have only been analyzed by a single study, and few findings are based on recent data. As such, more research is needed to strengthen our understanding of the role of state policies in teen birth rates. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Teen Pregnancy - What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-05

    This 60 second PSA is based on the April, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Having a child during the teen years comes at a high cost to the young mother, her child, and the community. Get tips to help break the cycle of teen pregnancy.  Created: 4/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/5/2011.

  3. Teenagers’ Public Library Needs are Difficult to Determine. A Review of: Howard, V. (2011. What do young teens think about the public library? The Library Quarterly, 81(3, 321-344. URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/660134

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To discover the attitudes of twelve to fifteen year-olds toward the public library.Design – Mixed methodology consisting of a survey and focus groups.Setting – An Eastern Canadian regional municipality.Subjects – Twelve to fifteen year-old middle school students.Methods – Using a disproportionate stratified sample and multistage clustering, the author mailed 900 surveys to middle school students; 249 surveys were completed and usable. Those students who completed the survey and who also indicated they would be willing to participate in a focus group were randomly selected to participate in nine focus groups with between 7 to 12 students in each group.Main Results – Discrepancies exist between the teens’ level of satisfaction with the library indicated on the survey (high and expressed in the focus groups (low. Teens seldom use the public library due to: their non-existent relationship with library staff, although teens who were “active readers” used the library more; lack of appealing programs and program promotion; no teen-focused website; poor teen facilities within the library; and an overall failure of the public libraries to include teenagers.Conclusion – Public libraries need to be more responsive to teen needs to attract teens to use the library. To uncover these needs, libraries should use mixed methods of discovery.

  4. How are restrictive abortion statutes associated with unintended teen birth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Mandy S; Makino, Kevin K; Stanwood, Nancy L; Dozier, Ann; Klein, Jonathan D

    2010-08-01

    Legislation that restricts abortion access decreases abortion. It is less well understood whether these statutes affect unintended birth. Given recent increases in teen pregnancy and birth, we examined the relationship between legislation that restricts abortion access and unintended births among adolescent women. Using 2000-2005 Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data, we examined the relationship between adolescent pregnancy intention and policies affecting abortion access: mandatory waiting periods, parental involvement laws, and Medicaid funding restrictions. Logistic regression controlled for individual characteristics, state-level factors, geographic regions, and time trends. Subgroup analyses were done for racial, ethnic, and insurance groups. In our multivariate model, minors in states with mandatory waiting periods were more than two times as likely to report an unintended birth, with even higher risk among blacks, Hispanics, and teens receiving Medicaid. Medicaid funding restrictions were associated with higher rates of unwanted birth among black teens. Parental involvement laws were associated with a trend toward more unwanted births in white minors and fewer in Hispanic minors. Mandatory waiting periods are associated with higher rates of unintended birth in teens, and funding restrictions may especially affect black adolescents. Policies limiting access to abortion appear to affect the outcomes of unintended teen pregnancy. Subsequent research should clarify the magnitude of such effects, and lead to policy changes that successfully reduce unintended teen births. (c) 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Get the Message: A Teen Distracted Driving Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeola, Ruth; Omorogbe, Ashleigh; Johnson, Abree

    Elimination of distracted driving is becoming a public health priority. Each day, an average of 8 people are killed due to a distracted driver in the United Sates. Although all drivers are at risk, research has indicated that teenage drivers are overrepresented in motor vehicle crashes due to distracted driving. Teenage drivers are hindered by limited driving experience, and the illusion of invincibility is a common phase in social and cognitive adolescent development. "Get the Message: A Teenage Distracted Driving Program" was established at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center to identify, define, and measure the factors that contribute to distracted driving in teens. A convenience sample of 1,238 teenagers in this study represented all 50 states in the United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Canada, and 21 other countries. At the beginning of each program, a presurvey is administered to assess baseline behavior, attitude, and knowledge regarding distracted driving. After completing the program, teens complete a postsurvey to measure proposed changes in driving behaviors, attitude, and knowledge. The program employs the use of a slide presentation, hospital tour, video, and survivor's testimony to influence teen driving behaviors and increase knowledge. Research has indicated that an increase in the Health Belief Model constructs may enhance engagement in health-promoting behaviors, such as safe driving practices in teens. Based on the postsurvey results, the reduction in projected phone use while driving in this teen population indicates the effectiveness of this hospital-based teen distracted driving program.

  6. Exploring African-American and Latino Teens? Perceptions of Contraception and Access to Reproductive Health Care Services

    OpenAIRE

    Galloway, Charlotte T.; Duffy, Jennifer L.; Dixon, Rena P.; Fuller, Taleria R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Reducing disparities in teen pregnancy and birth rates among African American and Latina teens is a central focus of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative implemented by the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. Disparities in teen pregnancy and birth rates are driven, in part, by differential access to contraception and reproductive health care services. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand African American and Latino teens? 1) preferen...

  7. An International Survey of Transport Airplane Pilots’ Experiences and Perspectives of Lateral/Directional Control Events and Rudder Issues in Transport Airplanes (Rudder Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    movement of rudder, aileron , and elevator controls. Survey results indicated: 1) Rudder is reported to be used more than the Rudder Survey Team expected...resulting from a loss of air- plane control have been, and continue to be, a major contributor to fatalities in the worldwide commercial aviation...about: • moving the rudder, aileron , and elevator controls within their full range of motion and back again or to the op- position position. We also

  8. Association of environmental indicators with teen alcohol use and problem behavior: Teens' observations vs. objectively-measured indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Hilary F; Miller, Brenda A; Morrison, Christopher N; Wiebe, Douglas J; Woychik, Marcie; Wiehe, Sarah E

    2017-01-01

    Most prior studies use objectively measured data (e.g., census-based indicators) to assess contextual risks. However, teens' observations might be more important for their risk behavior. 1) determine relationships between observed and objective indicators of contextual risks 2) determine relations of observed and objective indicators with teen alcohol use and problem behavior. Teens aged 14-16 (N=170) carried GPS-enabled smartphones for one month, with locations documented. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) measured teens' observations via texts regarding risk behaviors and environmental observations. Objective indicators of alcohol outlets and disorganization were spatially joined to EMAs based on teens' location at the time of the texts. Observed and objective disorganization, and objective indicators of alcohol outlets were related to alcohol use. Observed disorganization was related to problem behavior, while objective indicators were unrelated. Findings suggest the importance of considering teens' observations of contextual risk for understanding influences on risk behavior and suggest future directions for research and prevention strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterizing mobility from the prosthetic limb user's perspective: Use of focus groups to guide development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Morgan, Sara J; Abrahamson, Daniel C; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Input from target respondents in the development of patient-reported outcome measures is necessary to ensure that the instrument is meaningful. To solicit perspectives of prosthetic limb users about their mobility experiences and to inform development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility. Qualitative study. Four focus groups of lower limb prosthesis users were held in different regions of the United States. Focus group transcripts were coded, and themes were identified. Feedback from participants was used to develop a framework for measuring mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Focus group participants (N = 37) described mobility as a confluence of factors that included characteristics of the individual, activity, and environment. Identified themes were defined as individual characteristics, forms of movement, and environmental situations. Prosthetic mobility was conceptualized as movement activities performed in an environmental or situational context. Respondent feedback used to guide development of Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility established a foundation for a new person-centered measure of mobility with a prosthetic limb. Perspectives of target respondents are needed to guide development of instruments intended to measure health outcomes. Focus groups of prosthetic limb users were conducted to solicit experiences related to mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Results were used to inform development of a clinically meaningful, person-centered instrument. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  10. Teen pregnancy and the achievement gap among urban minority youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Charles E

    2011-10-01

    To outline the prevalence and disparities of teen pregnancy among school-aged urban minority youth, causal pathways through which nonmarital teen births adversely affects academic achievement, and proven or promising approaches for schools to address this problem. Literature review. In 2006, the birth rate among 15- to 17-year-old non-Hispanic Blacks (36.1 per 1000) was more than three times as high, and the birth rate among Hispanics (47.9 per 1000) was more than four times as high as the birth rate among non-Hispanic Whites (11.8 per 1000). Compared with women who delay childbearing until age 30, teen mothers' education is estimated to be approximately 2 years shorter. Teen mothers are 10-12% less likely to complete high school and have 14-29% lower odds of attending college. School-based programs have the potential to help teens acquire the knowledge and skills needed to postpone sex, practice safer sex, avoid unintended pregnancy, and if pregnant, to complete high school and pursue postsecondary education. Most students in US middle and high schools receive some kind of sex education. Federal policies and legislation have increased use of the abstinence-only-until-marriage approach, which is disappointing considering the lack of evidence that this approach is effective. Nonmarital teen births are highly and disproportionately prevalent among school-aged urban minority youth, have a negative impact on educational attainment, and effective practices are available for schools to address this problem. Teen pregnancy exerts an important influence on educational attainment among urban minority youth. Decisions about what will be taught should be informed by empirical data documenting the effectiveness of alternative approaches. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  11. Predictors of repeat pregnancy in a program for pregnant teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfitzner, Mark A; Hoff, Charles; McElligott, Kathleen

    2003-04-01

    To describe repeat pregnancy among adolescents and to compare those who experienced a repeat pregnancy to those who did not. Retrospective case control of all adolescents who entered and exited the Teen Mother & Child Program, a multidisciplinary clinic for pregnant and parenting teens and their children, between 1985 and 2000. Repeat pregnancy. Over the 16-yr study period, 1838 teens entered and exited the program with the mean time in the program of 1.9 yrs. 194 (10.6%) teens went on to have a second pregnancy, and 4 of those had a third pregnancy. Ninety-two percent (n=175) of these pregnancies resulted in a live birth. The mean interval between delivery of the initial child and delivery of the second child was 21.8 months (range 5.4-53.2). Teens repeating (R) were compared to those who did not repeat (NR). R were younger at entry and older at exit from the program (both Pteen pregnancy program experienced a repeat pregnancy while in the program. Compared to nonrepeaters, adolescents who experienced a repeat pregnancy were younger, were more frequently Hispanic, and were more likely to be in a stable relationship with the baby's father. Many of the program's clients have psychosocial factors reported in the literature to be associated with repeat pregnancy. A history of suicide gestures/attempts and a significant psychiatric history were more common in those who had a repeat pregnancy. Disappointingly, only about 25% of the adolescents completed high school by the time they exited the program whether they experienced a repeat pregnancy or not. Although directing interventions (e.g., mental health services, counseling those who miscarried) to teens who appear to be at highest risk for a repeat pregnancy may decrease their risk of repeating, all teens in our program would likely benefit from such services.

  12. Effects of a school-based sexuality education program on peer educators: the Teen PEP model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jennings, J M; Howard, S; Perotte, C L

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the impact of the Teen Prevention Education Program (Teen PEP), a peer-led sexuality education program designed to prevent unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections...

  13. Many U.S. Teens Still Denied 'Morning After' Pill at Pharmacies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health News on Birth Control Teen Sexual Health Teenage Pregnancy Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Birth Control Teen Sexual Health Teenage Pregnancy About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get ...

  14. A parent-teacher view of teens behaviors in nuclear and joint family systems in Pakistan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baig, Noor-ul-Ain; Rehman, Rana Rashid; Mobeen, Noor

    2014-01-01

    .... Therefore, this paper focuses the sample of parents and teachers of the teens in the postmodern urban society and tried to better point out the eminent changes in the attitudes and behaviors of teens...

  15. The needs of people with dementia living at home from user, caregiver and professional perspectives: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda-Castillo Claudia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few reports have been published about differences in perspectives on perceived needs among community-residing people with dementia, their family caregivers, and professionals. The aim of this study was to compare these perspectives. Method During 2006 and 2007, one-hundred and fifty two interviews of people with dementia and their caregivers about the needs of the person with dementia were performed by four professionals using The Camberwell Assessment of Need for the Elderly (CANE. Professionals’ views on met and unmet needs of people with dementia were obtained for the total sample, family caregivers’ perspectives were gained for 125 people with dementia, and people with dementia’s views on their own needs were obtained for 125 persons with dementia. Results People with dementia reported fewer needs compared with the reports of their caregivers and the professionals. The most frequent unmet needs reported by people with dementia, caregivers and professionals were in the areas of daytime activities, company, and psychological distress; however, people with dementia rated psychological distress as the commonest unmet need. Conclusions Since the priorities of people with dementia can be different from those of caregivers and professionals, it is important to consider all perspectives when making care plans. Thus, compliance with treatment of people with dementia and also their quality of life could be potentially improved by a more collaborative partnership with them.

  16. Personal Dignity in the Terminally Ill from the Perspective of Caregivers: A Survey among Trained Volunteers and Physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, G.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Pasman, H.R.W.; Deliens, L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although dignity is increasingly considered a goal of palliative care, little research has evaluated the understanding of dignity at the end of life from a caregiver's perspective. Objective: The study objective was to investigate and compare the views of trained volunteers and SCEN

  17. Substance use and teen pregnancy in the United States: evidence from the NSDUH 2002-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P; Vaughn, Michael G; Ugalde, Jenny; Todic, Jelena

    2015-06-01

    Few, if any, studies have systematically examined the relationship between substance use and teen pregnancy using population-based samples. We aim to provide a comprehensive examination of substance use among pregnant adolescents in the United States. Employing data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health between 2002 and 2012 (n=97,850), we examine the prevalence of the past 12-month and the past 30-day substance use and substance use disorders among pregnant and non-pregnant adolescents (ages 12-17). We also examine psychosocial and pregnancy-related correlates of current substance use among the subsample of pregnant adolescents (n=810). Pregnant teens were significantly more likely to have experimented with a variety of substances and meet criteria for alcohol (AOR=1.65, 95% CI=1.26-2.17), cannabis (AOR=2.29, 95% CI=1.72-3.04), and other illicit drug use disorders (AOR=2.84, 95% CI=1.92-4.19). Pregnant early adolescents (ages 12-14; AOR=4.34, 95% CI=2.28-8.26) were significantly more likely and pregnant late adolescents (ages 15-17; AOR=0.71, 95% CI=0.56-0.90) significantly less likely than their non-pregnant counterparts to be current substance users. Study findings point not only to a relationship between pregnancy and prior substance use, but also suggest that substance use continues for many teens during pregnancy. We found that substance use is particularly problematic among early adolescents and that the prevalence of substance use attenuates dramatically as youth progress from the first to the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Substance Use and Teen Pregnancy in the United States: Evidence from the NSDUH 2002-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Wright, Christopher P.; Vaughn, Michael G.; Ugalde, Jenny; Todic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Few, if any, studies have systematically examined the relationship between substance use and teen pregnancy using population-based samples. We aim to provide a comprehensive examination of substance use among pregnant adolescents in the United States. Method Employing data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health between 2002 and 2012 (n = 97,850), we examine the prevalence of past 12-month and past 30-day substance use and substance use disorders among pregnant and non-pregnant adolescents (ages 12-17). We also examine psychosocial and pregnancy-related correlates of current substance use among the subsample of pregnant adolescents (n = 810). Results Pregnant teens were significantly more likely to have experimented with a variety of substances and meet criteria for alcohol (AOR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.26-2.17), cannabis (AOR = 2.29, 95% CI = 1.72-3.04), and other illicit drug use disorders (AOR = 2.84, 95% CI = 1.92-4.19). Pregnant early adolescents (ages 12-14; AOR = 4.34, 95% CI = 2.28-8.26) were significantly more likely and pregnant late adolescents (ages 15-17; AOR = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.56-0.90) significantly less likely than their non-pregnant counterparts to be current substance users. Conclusions Study findings point not only to a relationship between pregnancy and prior substance use, but also suggest that substance use continues for many teens during pregnancy. We found that substance use is particularly problematic among early adolescents that the prevalence of substance use attenuates dramatically as youth progress from the first to the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. PMID:25706068

  19. UCITS and tax risk management - A survey on the disclosure of tax affairs from the perspective of investors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Raymond; Bouwman, Jan; Groefsema, Nineke; Grooten, Willemein

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the current state of the tax information disclosed by UCITS to (invited) investors is investigated. It concerns a survey of the prospectus, KID and annual reports of UCITS located in Luxembourg. For this survey, Luxembourg has been chosen, as approximately 33% of the UCITS are located

  20. Workshop Synthesis: Stated Preference Surveys and Experimental Design, an Audit of the Journey so far and Future Research Perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta; Hensher, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is a synthesis of the discussions and ideas that were generated during the workshop on “Stated preference surveys and experimental design” at the 2014 Travel Survey Methods Conference in Leura (Australia). The workshop addressed the challenges related to the design and implementation...