WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey students reported

  1. The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Based on responses from 20,000 college seniors nationwide, "The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report" gives you hard numbers "plus" the analysis you need to develop your college recruiting strategy and build your brand among college students. Align your recruiting strategies tactics with students' wants, needs, attitudes, and behaviors--you'll get…

  2. mba.com Prospective Students Survey. 2015 Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 "mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report" explores the motivations, career goals, preferred program types, financial choices, decision time lines, and intended study destinations of individuals interested in pursuing a graduate management education. Findings analyzed in the report represent responses from nearly 12,000…

  3. CAFES 2009 New Student Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speerstra, Mandy; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    During Academic Day, September 1, 2009, incoming freshmen and transfer students in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) were asked to complete a one-page questionnaire designed to find out: (1) how they learned about UW-River Falls as an option for their tertiary education; (2) what factors most influenced their…

  4. Reported Voice Difficulties in Student Teachers: A Questionnaire Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Carol; Richards, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As professional voice users, teachers are particularly at risk of abusing their voices and developing voice disorders during their career. In spite of this, attention paid to voice care in the initial training and further professional development of teachers is unevenly spread and insufficient. This article describes a questionnaire survey of 171…

  5. Report of a mental health survey among Chinese international students at Yale University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Han, Xuemei; Luo, Qianlai; Jacobs, Selby; Jean-Baptiste, Michel

    2013-01-01

    To examine the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in Chinese international students, to identify factors that might be associated with these 2 symptom complexes, and to investigate their perception of mental health issues and counseling services. Chinese students (N = 130) at Yale University. Participants completed an anonymous online survey in fall 2009. Forty-five percent reported symptoms of depression, and 29% reported symptoms of anxiety. A self-evaluation of poor current health, a poor relationship with one's advisor, and a low exercise regimen were associated with a higher prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms. Twenty-seven percent of responders were not aware of the availability of mental health and counseling services on campus. This study suggests that efforts should be made to improve the relationship between students and their advisors and to enhance the awareness of and the accessibility to mental health and counseling services to improve the mental health of Chinese international students.

  6. Survey of ethical issues reported by Indian medical students: basis for design of a new curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Anuradha; George, Kuryan; T, Arul Dhas; Pulimood, Anna Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Education in ethics is now a formal part of the undergraduate medical curriculum. However, most courses are structured around principles and case studies more appropriate to western countries. The cultures and practices of countries like India differ from those of western countries. It is, therefore, essential that our teaching should address the issues which are the most relevant to our setting. An anonymised, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional survey of medical students was carried out to get a picture of the ethical problems faced by students in India. The data were categorised into issues related to professional behaviour and ethical dilemmas. Unprofessional behaviour was among the issues reported as a matter of concern by a majority of the medical students. The survey highlights the need to design the curriculum in a way that reflects the structure of medical education in India, where patients are not always considered socio-culturally equal by students or the medical staff. This perspective must underpin any further efforts to address education in ethics in India.

  7. Self-Reported Mental Disorders and Distress by Sexual Orientation: Results of the Minnesota College Student Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przedworski, Julia M; VanKim, Nicole A; Eisenberg, Marla E; McAlpine, Donna D; Lust, Katherine A; Laska, Melissa N

    2015-07-01

    Sexual minority college students (i.e., those not identifying as heterosexual, or those reporting same-sex sexual activity) may be at increased risk of poor mental health, given factors such as minority stress, stigma, and discrimination. Such disparities could have important implications for students' academic achievement, future health, and social functioning. This study compares reports of mental disorder diagnoses, stressful life events, and frequent mental distress across five gender-stratified sexual orientation categories. Data were from the 2007-2011 College Student Health Survey, which surveyed a random sample of college students (N=34,324) at 40 Minnesota institutions. Data analysis was conducted in 2013-2014. The prevalence of mental disorder diagnoses, frequent mental distress, and stressful life events were calculated for heterosexual, discordant heterosexual, gay or lesbian, bisexual, and unsure students. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate the association between sexual orientation and mental health outcomes. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were more likely to report any mental health disorder diagnosis than were heterosexual students (pstudents were significantly more likely to report frequent mental distress compared to heterosexual students (OR range, 1.6-2.7). All sexual minority groups, with the exception of unsure men, had significantly greater odds of experiencing two or more stressful life events (OR range, 1.3-2.8). Sexual minority college students experience worse mental health than their heterosexual peers. These students may benefit from interventions that target the structural and social causes of these disparities, and individual-level interventions that consider their unique life experiences. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. What is it like to grow up to be bilingual?-A survey report on bilingual high school students-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Tamiya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this era of globalization, Japanese teachers as well as teachers in other areas of the world have increasing chances of encountering bilingual students such as returnees and immigrants. It is important to understand the development of these students. The authors conducted a survey about bilingualism on 60 bilingual high school students at an international school in Japan. The survey questions asked about the students’ background and their experiences as a bilingual. Twenty-nine students responded to the survey. The responses were classified according to whether the reported advantages/disadvantages were linguistic, socio-cultural or identity-related. Linguistic disadvantages as well as advantages were experienced by most students. Bilingual influences on identity were mostly favorable, but some difficulties were common. Despite these disadvantages, socio-cultural advantages were prominent. It was reassuring to see that many bilingual high school students felt they were socio-culturally advantaged and mostly felt secure about their identity as a bilingual. However, we should not dismiss linguistic difficulties experienced by many of them and some cases of insecure identity, as these are crucially related to the mental health and creation of self-identity that is typical of adolescence.

  9. Corporate Recruiters Survey: 2014 Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada Worthington, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Corporate Recruiters Survey Report examines the current hiring outlook for graduate business students and analyzes demand by industry and world region, salaries, job functions, and mobility in regional job placement. It also explores recruiter behavior, including recruitment practices and school and candidate selection criteria, and…

  10. Student Reports of Bullying: Results from the 2015 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Web Tables. NCES 2017-015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessne, Deborah; Yanez, Christina

    2016-01-01

    This document reports data from the 2015 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). The Web Tables show the extent to which students with different personal characteristics report being bullied. Estimates include responses by student characteristics: student sex, race/ethnicity, grade, and household income.…

  11. Student Reports of Bullying and Cyber-Bullying: Results from the 2011 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Web Tables. NCES 2013-329

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessne, Deborah; Harmalkar, Sayali

    2013-01-01

    This document reports data from the 2011 School Crime Supplement (SCS) of the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS). The Web Tables show the extent to which students with different personal characteristics report bullying and cyber-bullying. Estimates include responses by student characteristics: student sex, race/ethnicity, grade, and…

  12. Self-reported patient safety competence among Canadian medical students and postgraduate trainees: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Patricia; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G; Edge, Dana S; Ginsburg, Liane; Goldstein, David H

    2015-02-01

    Quality and patient safety (PS) are critical components of medical education. This study reports on the self-reported PS competence of medical students and postgraduate trainees. The Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey was administered to medical students and postgraduate trainees in January 2012. PS dimension scores were compared across learning settings (classroom and clinical) and year in programme. Sixty-three percent (255/406) of medical students and 32% (141/436) of postgraduate trainees responded. In general, both groups were most confident in their learning of clinical safety skills (eg, hand hygiene) and least confident in learning about sociocultural aspects of safety (eg, understanding human factors). Medical students' confidence in most aspects of safety improved with years of training. For some of the more intangible dimensions (teamwork and culture), medical students in their final year had lower scores than students in earlier years. Thirty-eight percent of medical students felt they could approach someone engaging in unsafe practice, and the majority of medical students (85%) and postgraduate trainees (78%) agreed it was difficult to question authority. Our results suggest the need to improve the overall content, structure and integration of PS concepts in both classroom and clinical learning environments. Decreased confidence in sociocultural aspects of PS among medical students in the final year of training may indicate that culture in clinical settings negatively affects students' perceived PS competence. Alternatively, as medical students spend more time in the clinical setting, they may develop a clearer sense of what they do not know. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Bullying and Victimization Trends in Undergraduate Medical Students - A Self-Reported Cross-Sectional Observational Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Shrea; Ajinkya, Shaunak; Jadhav, Pradeep R

    2016-02-01

    Bullying is a form of behaviour that can negatively impact a person. It can lead to several deleterious consequences like low self-confidence, drop in academic performance and depression. Studies have shown that bullying behaviour exists amongst medical students also. In the medical field, it is known to negatively impact dispensing of health care and attitudes of medical students towards becoming doctors. It is very difficult for medical students to cope with such a menace as they are already burdened with a vast curriculum and rigorous schedules. There exists paucity of studies regarding bullying amongst undergraduate medical students in Indian context. To study prevalence of peer-based bullying and victimization along with their associated factors in undergraduate medical students. Four hundred randomly chosen undergraduate medical students were included in the study. Socio-demographic and personal details including history of substance use were recorded in a self-designed case record form. Illinois Bullying Scale was used to assess bullying behaviours. Out of total 400 students, 383 completed the survey and this data was analysed. In this study, 98.69% participants self-reported to having indulged in bullying while 88.77% reported feeling victimized. Physical (pverbal (p=0.001) bullying was found to be of significantly greater severity in males as compared to females. Students of the third year of medical school indulged in significantly (p=0.034) greater severity of physical bullying than those of other years. Alcohol consumption (p=0.001) and cigarette smoking (p<0.001) were significantly associated with physical bullying. Peer-based bullying and victimization was found to be highly prevalent amongst undergraduate medical students. There is an urgent need for more detailed studies on bullying in medical students so that remedial measures can be initiated and steps to limit such behaviours can be looked at seriously.

  14. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 26: The technical communication practices of aerospace engineering students: Results of the phase 3 AIAA National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an engineer, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication practices, habits, and training of aerospace engineering students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of student members of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The survey was undertaken as a phase 3 activity of the NASA/DoD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance; use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign language technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  15. Are social norms associated with smoking in French university students? A survey report on smoking correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riou França Lionel

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of the correlates of smoking is a first step to successful prevention interventions. The social norms theory hypothesises that students' smoking behaviour is linked to their perception of norms for use of tobacco. This study was designed to test the theory that smoking is associated with perceived norms, controlling for other correlates of smoking. Methods In a pencil-and-paper questionnaire, 721 second-year students in sociology, medicine, foreign language or nursing studies estimated the number of cigarettes usually smoked in a month. 31 additional covariates were included as potential predictors of tobacco use. Multiple imputation was used to deal with missing values among covariates. The strength of the association of each variable with tobacco use was quantified by the inclusion frequencies of the variable in 1000 bootstrap sample backward selections. Being a smoker and the number of cigarettes smoked by smokers were modelled separately. Results We retain 8 variables to predict the risk of smoking and 6 to predict the quantities smoked by smokers. The risk of being a smoker is increased by cannabis use, binge drinking, being unsupportive of smoke-free universities, perceived friends' approval of regular smoking, positive perceptions about tobacco, a high perceived prevalence of smoking among friends, reporting not being disturbed by people smoking in the university, and being female. The quantity of cigarettes smoked by smokers is greater for smokers reporting never being disturbed by smoke in the university, unsupportive of smoke-free universities, perceiving that their friends approve of regular smoking, having more negative beliefs about the tobacco industry, being sociology students and being among the older students. Conclusion Other substance use, injunctive norms (friends' approval and descriptive norms (friends' smoking prevalence are associated with tobacco use. University-based prevention campaigns

  16. Exploring Online Students' Self-Regulated Learning with Self-Reported Surveys and Log Files: A Data Mining Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Moon-Heum; Yoo, Jin Soung

    2017-01-01

    Many researchers who are interested in studying students' online self-regulated learning (SRL) have heavily relied on self-reported surveys. Data mining is an alternative technique that can be used to discover students' SRL patterns from large data logs saved on a course management system. The purpose of this study was to identify students' online…

  17. Student- and faculty-reported importance of science prerequisites for osteopathic medical school: a survey-based study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binstock, Judith; Junsanto-Bahri, Tipsuda

    2014-01-01

    .... Preclinical osteopathic medical students and their basic science and OMM faculty from 3 colleges of osteopathic medicine were surveyed about the importance of specific science concepts, laboratories...

  18. Preparing to take the USMLE Step 1: a survey on medical students' self-reported study habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Andre D; Shah, Monisha K; Maley, Jason H; Evron, Joshua; Gyftopoulos, Alex; Miller, Chad

    2015-05-01

    The USA Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 is a computerised multiple-choice examination that tests the basic biomedical sciences. It is administered after the second year in a traditional four-year MD programme. Most Step 1 scores fall between 140 and 260, with a mean (SD) of 227 (22). Step 1 scores are an important selection criterion for residency choice. Little is known about which study habits are associated with a higher score. To identify which self-reported study habits correlate with a higher Step 1 score. A survey regarding Step 1 study habits was sent to third year medical students at Tulane University School of Medicine every year between 2009 and 2011. The survey was sent approximately 3 months after the examination. 256 out of 475 students (54%) responded. The mean (SD) Step 1 score was 229.5 (22.1). Students who estimated studying more than 8-11 h per day had higher scores (p2000 practice questions also obtained higher scores (pStudents who reported studying in a group, spending the majority of study time on practice questions or taking >40 preparation days did not achieve higher scores. Certain self-reported study habits may correlate with a higher Step 1 score compared with others. Given the importance of achieving a high Step 1 score on residency choice, it is important to further identify which characteristics may lead to a higher score. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  20. Report on 1986 Survey of New Jersey County Community College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Eagleton Inst. of Politics.

    In fall 1986, the Center for Public Interest Polling at the Eagleton Institute of Politics conducted a study of the educational objectives, attitudes, characteristics, and plans of students enrolled in New Jersey's 19 community and county colleges. Interviews were conducted with 2,100 randomly selected students. Study findings included the…

  1. Report of a Mental Health Survey among Chinese International Students at Yale University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Han, Xuemei; Luo, Qianlai; Jacobs, Selby; Jean-Baptiste, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of depression and anxiety symptoms in Chinese international students, to identify factors that might be associated with these 2 symptom complexes, and to investigate their perception of mental health issues and counseling services. Participants: Chinese students ("N" = 130) at Yale University.…

  2. Alumni Perspectives Survey, 2010. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sabeen

    2010-01-01

    During the months of April and September of 2009, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) conducted the Alumni Perspectives Survey, a longitudinal study of prior respondents to the Global Management Education Graduate Survey of management students nearing graduation. A total of 3,708 alumni responded to the April 2009 survey,…

  3. CalMHSA Student Mental Health Campus-Wide Survey. 2013 Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Roth, Elizabeth; Woodbridge, Michelle W.; Kase, Courtney Ann; Osilla, Karen Chan; D'Amico, Elizabeth; Jaycox, Lisa H.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2014-01-01

    Mental Health Problems among college and university students represent a significant public health issue in the United States. Mental disorders account for nearly one-half of the disease burden for young adults in the United States (World Health Organization, 2008), and most lifetime mental disorders have first onset by age 24 (Kessler et al.,…

  4. Field Report - Consumer Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian S.; Gwozdz, Wencke

    The present report outlines the purpose, scope, and methodology of a recently conducted four-country consumer survey that explored sustainable clothing consumption. The report also presents a sample of the descriptive findings from the survey (see Gwozdz, Nielsen & Müller, 2017 for further results...... foundation for upcoming deliverables relating to quality of life, acceptance of new business models, and consumer policy recommendations. The results presented in the report relate, specifically, to consumers’ general clothing consumption patterns, acceptance of new business models, and environmental...... purchasing outlets, and acceptance of new business models. Polish and American consumers purchased the most clothing items. Polish consumers also reported the lowest expenditures on clothing, whereas German consumers reported the highest expenditures. Only a limited proportion of consumers had previously...

  5. Dating Norms and Dating Violence among Ninth Graders in Northeast Georgia: Reports from Student Surveys and Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Patricia M.; Orpinas, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods study describes the norms supporting male-to-female and female-to-male dating violence in a diverse sample of ninth graders. The quantitative study, based on student surveys (n = 624), compared norms supporting dating violence by sex, race/ethnicity, and dating status, and it examined the relation between dating violence norms…

  6. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 27: The technical communication practices of engineering and science students: Results of the phase 3 academic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Hecht, Laura M.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate engineering science students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an engineer or a scientist, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication practices, habits, and training of engineers and science (Physics) students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of students enrolled in the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Bowling Green State University, and Texas A&M University. The survey was undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance, use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  7. Survey report: Eastern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, N

    1991-01-01

    Over 1 million people live on 8 small islands in the Eastern Caribbean: St. Kitts-Nevis, Montserrat, Grenada, St. Vincent, Antigua, Barbados, St. Lucia, and Dominica. Starting in 1985 the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region has carried out a series of contraceptive prevalence surveys in these countries. Current information is provided by these surveys in the areas of fertility levels and preferences, contraceptive knowledge and use. Also, socioeconomic, historical and demographic background and analysis such as fertility patterns, desire for additional children, and breastfeeding data; contraceptive awareness including family planning methods and sources; contraceptive use by method, source, and timing, satisfaction, and male attitudes are provided in the surveys, but not in the report abstracted here. The total fertility rate (TFR) and the contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) for the 8 islands are as follows: St. Kitts-Nevis (1984) 2.9 TFR, 40.6 CPR; St. Vincent (1988) 2.9 TFR, 58.3 CPR; Antigua (1988) 1.8 TFR, 52.6 CPR; Barbados (1988) not given, 55.0 CPR; St. Lucia (1988) 3.2 TFR, 47.3 CPR; Dominica (1987) 3.2 TFR, 49.8 CPR. The islands have unusual demographic patterns related to extensive out-migration.

  8. Business School Deans on Student Academic Dishonesty: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bob S.; Weible, Rick J.; Olmosk, Kurt E.

    2010-01-01

    While students and, to a lesser extent, faculty have been surveyed about the student academic dishonesty issue, deans have been virtually ignored. This paper reports the results of an online survey of business school deans on the issue. Deans' perceptions of the level of student academic dishonesty in their schools were much lower than the levels…

  9. Student- and faculty-reported importance of science prerequisites for osteopathic medical school: a survey-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binstock, Judith; Junsanto-Bahri, Tipsuda

    2014-04-01

    The relevance of current standard medical school science prerequisites is being reexamined. (1) To identify which science prerequisites are perceived to best prepare osteopathic medical students for their basic science and osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) coursework and (2) to determine whether science prerequisites for osteopathic medical school should be modified. Preclinical osteopathic medical students and their basic science and OMM faculty from 3 colleges of osteopathic medicine were surveyed about the importance of specific science concepts, laboratories, and research techniques to medical school coursework. Participants chose responses on a 5-point scale, with 1 indicating "strongly disagree" or "not important" and 5 indicating "strongly agree" or "extremely important." Participants were also surveryed on possible prerequisite modifications. Student responses (N=264) to the general statement regarding prerequisites were "neutral" for basic science coursework and "disagree" for OMM coursework, with mean (standard deviation [SD]) scores of 3.37 (1.1) and 2.68 (1.2), respectively. Faculty responses (N=49) were similar, with mean (SD) scores of 3.18 (1.1) for basic science coursework and 2.67 (1.2) for OMM coursework. Student mean (SD) scores were highest for general biology for basic science coursework (3.93 [1.1]) and physics for OMM coursework (2.5 [1.1]). Student mean (SD) scores were lowest for physics for basic science coursework (1.79 [1.2]) and organic chemistry for OMM coursework (1.2 [0.7]). Both basic science and OMM faculty rated general biology highest in importance (mean [SD] scores, 3.73 [0.9] and 4.22 [1.0], respectively). Students and faculty rated biochemistry high in importance for basic science coursework (mean [SD] scores of 3.66 [1.2] and 3.32 [1.2], respectively). For basic science coursework, students and faculty rated most laboratories as "important," with the highest mean (SD) ratings for general anatomy (students, 3.66 [1

  10. Survey report: Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, M M

    1988-02-01

    Senegal, situated on the west coast of Africa, has a history of high fertility and high infant mortality. Preliminary results of the 1986 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), administered by the Institute for Resource Development, Columbia, Md., indicate a slight decline in the birth rate and reveal a high prevalence of child health problems associated with poor sanitation and nutrition. Senegal's 7.1 million people (1987 estimate) are unevenly distributed throughout the country's dry, flat landscape. Some 40% of the population is urban, and about 1/2 of these urban residents live in the capital, Dakar. Heavy rural-to-urban migration has been encouraged by the high population growth rate--2.8% annually--and a poor standard of living in the countryside. With about 70% of the labor force dependent on agriculture, a drought-related drop in the yields of groundnuts and other cash crops contributed to the rural exodus and to growing unemployment in the capital. The 1986 survey of family planning and child health collected information from 4415 women 15-49 years of age, and measured the height and weight of their children between 6 and 36 months. The findings suggest that fertility may have fallen slightly since 1978. The Senegal DHS recorded a total fertility rate (TFR) of 6.5 average births/woman during the 1981 Senegal World Fertility Survey (WFS). The DHS also found that women at the end of their childbearing--age 45-49 in 1986--had borne 7.4 children on average, further evidence of a slight decline in births among the younger women. Senegalese women marry young. The average age at 1st marriage is only 16.1, according to the 1986 DHS, and family planning within marriage is not widely accepted. In 1986, 11.7% of the currently married women 15-49 used some form of birth control, but only 2.7% used a modern method. While this is a large increase over the 3.9% rate of contraceptive use recorded in the 1978 WFS, almost 3/4 of the gain was due to a higher reported use of

  11. Inconsistent reports of risk behavior among Brazilian middle school students: National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE 2009/2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandara de Oliveira Ramos

    Full Text Available Abstract: This study assessed the consistency of self-reports of risk behavior (overall and within four specific domains: alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use, and sexual activity in two editions of the Brazilian National School Based Survey of Adolescent Health (PeNSE: 2009 and 2012. The overall proportion of cases with at least one inconsistent response in the two editions was 11.7% (2.7% on the alcohol items, 2.1% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 3% for sexual activity and 22.7% (12.8% on alcohol items, 2.5% for drug use, 4.3% for cigarette use, 4.1% for sexual activity, respectively. Such inconsistency was more prevalent among males, delayed students, those who reported having experimented with drugs, and those who did not have a cellphone. Because inconsistent responses were more prevalent among the students who claimed to have engaged in risky activities, removing inconsistent responders affected the estimated prevalence of all risk behaviors in both editions of the survey. This study supports the importance of performing consistency checks of self-report surveys, following the growing body of literature on this topic.

  12. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  13. International student experience report

    OpenAIRE

    Comrie, C.

    2015-01-01

    In the light of growing numbers of international students coming to study at UWE this report analyses the relative performance of Overseas, EU and Home students and also comprises secondary research in the form of a literature review and primary research to consider the challenges faced by both international students and academic staff teaching mixed cohorts. A series of recommendations are made for both staff and international students.

  14. 2012 Global Management Education Graduate Survey. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Each year for the past 13 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. The Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating schools. The survey allows students to express their opinions about…

  15. Global Management Education Graduate Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    Each year for the past 12 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. This Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating business schools. The survey allows students to express their…

  16. Access to Microcomputing Equipment for Study Purposes--Undergraduate Students in 1986. Findings from the Costs/Access Survey, 1986. Report No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Adrian

    A survey of new and continuing undergraduate students was undertaken at the end of 1986 to obtain information on the related issues of costs of studying and access to equipment for study purposes. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 2,400 students at the Open University (OU)--1,200 students taking their first OU course and 1,200 continuing…

  17. Biodigester User Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandararot, K.; Dannet, L.

    2007-06-15

    In May 2005, SNV and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) agreed to a joint development of a National Biodigester Programme (NBP) in Cambodia as a way to create an indigenous, sustainable energy source in the country and to utilize the potential of biogas in the country. The overall objective of the first phase of the National Biodigester Programme is 'The dissemination of domestic biodigesters as an indigenous, sustainable energy source through the development of a commercial, market oriented, biodigester sector in selected provinces of Cambodia'. The program aims to support the construction of 17,500 biodigesters in at least 6 provinces over the period of 2006 to 2009. To gain insights and feedbacks on the impacts of their activities to date, NBP commissioned the Cambodia Institute of Development Study (CIDS) to carry out a Biodigester User Survey in January 2007. The purpose of the survey is to evaluate the effects of domestic biodigester installations, as supported by the program, on 100 households in 3 provinces in Cambodia- Kampong Cham, Kandal and Svay Rieng.

  18. Student-generated case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Christopher J

    2009-01-01

    When students create teaching materials, learning can be enhanced. Therefore, a project was designed based on the traditional clinical case report and the chiropractic technique and principles curriculum at the University of Bridgeport College of Chiropractic. The objectives were to increase mastery in a clinical topic, increase awareness of different patient presentations and management options, and enhance information technology skills. Following lectures about the components of a case report and neurological reflexes related to visceral comorbidities and subluxation and joint dysfunction, students created a case report based on a template provided by the instructor. A survey gathered student perspectives on the exercise. More than 70% of the surveyed students felt the project was at least moderately helpful in improving understanding of a case report, the condition investigated, their clinical reasoning, and the ability to integrate information. Most felt that they improved their understanding of neurological reflexes, use of the literature, and the practice of evidence-based care. The majority believed that they identified weakness in knowledge, improved self-learning skills, and increased confidence in managing patients. Most enjoyed it at least somewhat and 70% agreed that the project should be continued. Many believed that they were better prepared for national boards and had improved their writing skills.

  19. Medical student musculoskeletal education: an institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Nathan W; Tanaka, Miho J; Skelley, Logan M; LaPorte, Dawn M

    2012-10-03

    Since the 1910 Flexner Report, medical education continues to undergo curriculum and graduation guideline reform to meet the needs of physicians and patients. Our aims were to (1) assess the quality of musculoskeletal education at our institution's School of Medicine by reporting the results of the Freedman and Bernstein examination among our medical students across all four years of training, and (2) stratify results according to medical school year, educational module, and intended career. We surveyed the 460 2009-2010 School of Medicine students via e-mail. The survey contained a validated orthopaedic examination of musculoskeletal competency (passing grade, 70%), demographic questions (e.g., year in training, clinical area of interest, and time dedicated to musculoskeletal topics in medical school education), and a 10-point tool for determining confidence in assessing musculoskeletal disorders. There were 354 responses (77.0%); six were excluded for incompleteness, leaving 348 for analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between test scores and days spent studying musculoskeletal material. The unpaired Student t test was used to compare performance among areas of interest and training years, with p < 0.05 being considered significant. The mean score was 51.1%; only sixty-seven (19.3%) of the students passed. Fourth-year students scored significantly higher (59.0%) compared with first-year students (37.3%), but >65% of students in both groups failed. Only 34.2% of the graduating students had completed a musculoskeletal elective. Students who participated in elective musculoskeletal education had a higher pass rate (67.5%) than those who did not (43.9%, p < 0.001). A minimum of fifteen days dedicated to elective study of musculoskeletal medicine significantly increased the chance of passing this examination. First-year through fourth-year students ranked their level of confidence in dealing with musculoskeletal issues as 3.18, 3

  20. Summer student report

    CERN Document Server

    Peedo, Kreete

    2017-01-01

    This report is an overview of the work done in the course of the summer student program. Analysing different OPC-UA stacks. Implemented and evaluated using the OPC-UA Local Discovery Server. Tested the OPC-UA software for calibration curve fitting and analog signal quality measurements.

  1. Help-seeking behavior among Japanese school students who self-harm: results from a self-report survey of 18,104 adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furukawa TA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Norio Watanabe,1,* Atsushi Nishida,2,* Shinji Shimodera,3 Ken Inoue,4 Norihito Oshima,5 Tsukasa Sasaki,6 Shimpei Inoue,3 Tatsuo Akechi,1 Toshi A Furukawa,7 Yuji Okazaki81Department of Psychiatry and Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, 2Department of Schizophrenia Research, Tokyo Institute of Psychiatry, Tokyo, 3Department of Neuropsychiatry, Kochi Medical School, Kochi, 4Department Public Health, Fujita Health University School of Medicine, Aichi, 5Office for Mental Health Support, Division for Counseling and Support, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 6Health Service Center, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, 7Department of Cognitive-Behavioral Medicine, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine/School of Public Health, Kyoto, 8Department of Psychiatry, Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital, Tokyo, Japan *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with poor help-seeking among adolescents who self-harm and to explore the resources used for help.Methods: A cross-sectional survey using an anonymous questionnaire was conducted in 47 junior and 30 senior high schools in Japan. Adolescent self-harm was defined as an adolescent who had harmed himself or herself in the previous year, as in previous studies reported in Western countries. Poor help-seeking was defined as not consulting anyone despite reporting current psychological or somatic complaints. Information about sociodemographic and psychological factors possibly associated with help-seeking, such as suicidal thoughts, depression, anxiety, and psychotic-like experiences, was also collected. Regression analyses were performed to examine associated factors.Results: A total of 18,104 students (8620 aged 12–15 years, 9484 aged 15–18 years, accounting for 93% of all students in the relevant student classes, participated in the study. Two hundred and

  2. Pharmacy student perceptions of adverse event reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalari, Sirisha; Dormarunno, Matthew; Zvenigorodsky, Oleg; Mohan, Aparna

    2011-09-10

    To assess US pharmacy students' knowledge and perceptions of adverse event reporting. To gauge pharmacy students' impressions of adverse event reporting, a 10-question survey instrument was administered that addressed student perceptions of the reporting procedures of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and pharmaceutical manufacturers, as well as student understanding of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and its relationship to adverse event reporting. Two hundred twenty-eight pharmacy students responded to the survey. The majority of respondents believed that the FDA is more likely than a pharmaceutical company to take action regarding an adverse event. There were misconceptions relating to the way adverse event reports are handled and the influence of HIPAA regulations on reporting. Communication between the FDA and pharmaceutical manufacturers regarding adverse event reports is not well understood by pharmacy students. Education about adverse event reporting should evolve so that by the time pharmacy students become practitioners, they are well acquainted with the relevance and importance of adverse event reporting.

  3. FY 2002 Top 200 Users Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    conducted in FY 2000, FY 2001 and FY 2002. The Customer Satisfaction Survey was a random sample of all users not included in the Top 200 Survey...contains a report on overall customer satisfaction. This is derived from the Annual Survey Composite Data Report and reflects data from both the Top 200 Users Survey and the Customer Satisfaction Survey.

  4. The National Association of State Scholarship and Grant Programs, 23rd Annual Survey Report, 1991-1992 Academic Year. State Funded Scholarship/Grant Programs for Students To Attend Postsecondary Educational Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jerry S.; Heberle, Deborah

    This report describes the results of a survey of publicly funded grant programs for undergraduates and graduate/professional school students operated by the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico. It focuses on the grant program characteristics for 1991-92 and provides analysis of the trends of these programs. The analysis indicates…

  5. The Relationship of School-Based Parental Involvement with Student Achievement: A Comparison of Principal and Parent Survey Reports from PISA 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, James; Moon, Jeong-Mi; Cunningham, Matt

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores parental involvement using principal and parent survey reports to examine whether parents' involvement in their children's schools predicts academic achievement. Survey data from principals and parents of seven countries from the PISA 2012 database and hierarchical linear modelling were used to analyse between- and within-…

  6. Alumni Perspectives Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sabeen

    2011-01-01

    Since the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) first began conducting its Alumni Perspectives Surveys 11 years ago, several "truths" about graduate business school alumni have consistently stood the test of time: They are and remain eminently employable. They constantly rate the value of the degree highly. This year's results are…

  7. Prairie chicken lek survey 2012 : performance report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Performance report for the 2012 spring prairie chicken lek surveys in Kansas state. This survey was initiated in 1963, and is preformed on established survey routes....

  8. Student Reports of Bullying and Cyber-Bullying: Results from the 2009 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Web Tables. NCES 2011-336

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Jill; Murphy, Christina

    2011-01-01

    In school year 2008-09, some 7,066,000 U.S. students ages 12 through 18, or 28.0 percent of all such students, reported they were bullied at school, and about 1,521,000, or 6.0 percent, reported they were cyber-bullied anywhere (i.e., on or off school property). These Web Tables use data from the 2009 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National…

  9. Nonmedical drug use among adolescent students: highlights from the 1999 Ontario Student Drug Use Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Adlaf, E M; Paglia, A.; Ivis, F J; Ialomiteanu, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the 1990s, rates of nonmedical drug use among adolescents escalated. We assessed data from 5 cycles of the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey for overall trends in the proportion of students reporting illegal drug use between 1991 and 1999. METHODS: The survey is a repeated, cross-sectional, 2-stage cluster-design survey of students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13. Outcome measures were prevalence of use of 17 drugs, including alcohol and tobacco, over the 12 months precedi...

  10. Medical students' perception of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) discrimination in their learning environment and their self-reported comfort level for caring for LGBT patients: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nama, Nassr; MacPherson, Paul; Sampson, Margaret; McMillan, Hugh J

    2017-01-01

    Historically, medical students who are lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgendered (LGBT) report higher rates of social stress, depression, and anxiety, while LGBT patients have reported discrimination and poorer access to healthcare. The objectives of this study were: (1) to assess if medical students have perceived discrimination in their learning environment and; (2) to determine self-reported comfort level for caring for LGBT patients. Medical students at the University of Ottawa (N = 671) were contacted via email and invited to complete a confidential web-based survey. Response rate was 15.4% (103/671). This included 66 cis-gender heterosexuals (64.1%) and 37 LGBT students (35.9%). Anti-LGBT discrimination had been witnessed by 14.6% and heterosexism by 31.1% of respondents. Anti-LGBT discrimination most often originated from fellow medical students. Respondents who self-identified as LGBT were more likely to have perceived heterosexism (favoring opposite-sex relationships) (OR = 8.2, p students shared their status with all classmates (51.4%), they were more likely to conceal this from staff physicians (OR = 27.2, p = 0.002). Almost half of medical students (41.7%) reported anti-LGBT jokes, rumors, and/or bullying by fellow medical students and/or other members of the healthcare team. Still, most respondents indicated that they felt comfortable with and capable of providing medical care to LGBT patients (≥83.5%), and were interested in further education around LGBT health issues (84.5%). Anti-LGBT discrimination and heterosexism are noted by medical students, indicating a suboptimal learning environment for LGBT students. Nonetheless, students report a high level of comfort and confidence providing health care to LGBT patients.

  11. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Report 28: The technical communication practices of aerospace engineering and science students: Results of the phase 4 cross-national surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, Thomas E.; Hecht, Laura M.; Barclay, Rebecca O.; Kennedy, John M.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes similarities and differences between undergraduate and graduate aerospace engineering and science students in the context of two general aspects of the educational experience. First, we explore the extent to which students differ regarding the factors that lead to the choice of becoming an aerospace engineer or a scientist, current satisfaction with that choice, and career-related goals and objectives. Second, we look at the technical communication skills, practices, habits, and training of aerospace engineering and science students. The reported data were obtained from a survey of students enrolled in aerospace engineering and science programs at universities in India, Japan, Russia, and the United Kingdom. The surveys were undertaken as part of the NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Data are reported for the following categories: student demographics; skill importance, skill training, and skill helpfulness; collaborative writing; computer and information technology use and importance, use of electronic networks; use and importance of libraries and library services; use and importance of information sources and products; use of foreign language technical reports; and foreign language (reading and speaking) skills.

  12. The survey regarding sports and exercise of Keio University students

    OpenAIRE

    野口, 和行; 近藤, 明彦; 加藤, 大仁; 山内, 賢

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a survey of "College Students' Attitude toward Sports and Exercise" using students of all facilities and grades in Keio University. The purpose of this report is 1) to compare the amount of sports and exercise across facilities and grades, 2) to analyze frequencies, amount of time, and attitudes regarding different types of sports and exercise activities, 3) to examine attitudes toward and reasoning of no exercise, and 4) to examine their preference of activities in their free ti...

  13. Literature survey results: Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willson, W.G.; Ness, R.O.; Hendrikson, J.G.; Entzminger, J.A.; Jha, M.; Sinor, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    This report reviews mild gasification processes with respect to processing conditions and configurations. Special emphasis was placed on processes which could be commercialized within five years. Detailed market information was provided by J.E. Sinor concerning markets and economic considerations of the various processing steps. Processing areas studied include coal cleaning; mild gasification; and upgrading of the char, condensables, and hydrocarbon gases. Pros and cons in the different processing areas as well as ''gaps'' in pertinent data were identified and integrated into a detailed process development program. The report begins with a summary of the market assessment and an evaluation of the co-product. The impacts of feed materials and operating parameters--including coal rank, heating rate, pressure, agglomeration, temperature, and feed gas composition--on the co- products and processes were evaluated through a literature survey. Recommendations were made as to the preferred product specifications and operating parameters for a commercial plant. A literature review of mild gasification processes was conducted and evaluated with regard to product specification and operating parameters. Two candidate processes were chosen and discussed in detail with respect to scale-up feasibility. Recommendations were then made to process development needs to further consideration of the two processes. 129 refs., 33 figs., 16 tabs.

  14. Student Reports of Bullying and Cyber-Bullying: Results from the 2007 School Crime Supplement to the National Crime Victimization Survey. Web Tables. NCES 2011-316

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Jill; Murphy, Christina

    2011-01-01

    These Web Tables use data from the 2007 School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) to show the relationship between bullying and cyber-bullying victimization and other variables of interest such as the reported presence of gangs, guns, drugs, and alcohol at school; select school security measures; student…

  15. Student Engagement and Student Learning: Examining the Convergent and Discriminant Validity of the Revised National Survey of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilvinskis, John; Masseria, Anthony A.; Pike, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships between student engagement, represented by two versions of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and self-reported gains in learning. The study drew on institutional-level data from participating institutions in 2011 and 2013. The objective of the research was to compare evidence of…

  16. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed…

  17. Biodigester User Survey 2012 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Mansvelt, R.; Sras, Phanny; Pino, Mariela

    2012-03-15

    Based on a feasibility study executed in November 2004, The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of the Kingdom of Cambodia (MAFF) and The Netherlands Development Organisation (SNVCambodia) agreed to cooperate in the set-up and implementation of a National Biodigester Programme (NBP). The terms of this cooperation are laid down in a Memorandum of Understanding that was concluded in May 2005 and extended in January 2010 till December 2012. An implementation document for the programme period was compiled in early 2006 and agreed upon by MAFF and SNV during an official ceremony in March 2006. The duration of the first phase of the NBP is 7.5 years, of which the last 6 months of 2005 and the first 3 months of 2006 were used for preparation, and the years 2006-12 for implementation. The overall objective of the first phase of the NBP is 'The dissemination of domestic biodigesters as an indigenous, sustainable energy source through the development of a commercial, market oriented, biodigester sector in selected provinces of Cambodia'. The programme is currently (February 2012) operational in 14 provinces, of which 8 are to be surveyed, after being started in 3 provinces in April 2006. The programme supported the construction of 16,000 domestic biodigester plants at the time of report writing. In order to identify the level of satisfaction of the biodigester owners and the effects that the technology brings to the household, the NBP has undertaken a Biodigester User Survey (BUS) with three main objectives: (1) To evaluate the effect of domestic biodigester installations, as perceived by the user, by conducting a representative quantitative random survey of 150 households using biodigesters constructed under the NBP in 8 provinces in Cambodia; (2) To evaluate how the users have experienced the programme activities such as promotion, construction, quality assurance, training and after-sales service; (3) To evaluate the impact of the programme and how it

  18. The American College Student Cell Phone Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study of cell phone use among college students. This group is considered particularly important because college students tend to be among the first to try new technology, are the group most likely to innovate new ways of using existing technology, and are most vocal about what they need and/or want to see changed…

  19. Washington Center's Online Student Survey Validation Study: Surfacing Students' Individual and Collective Understanding of Their Learning Community Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malnarich, Gillies; Pettitt, Maureen A.; Mino, Jack J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a mixed-methods validation study of the "Online Survey of Students' Experiences of Learning in Learning Communities". In the quantitative part of the study, we found strong correlations among survey items related to faculty behaviors, student behaviors, and critical thinking. Factor analysis yielded…

  20. Methodology Report: Survey of Crafts-Artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, J. George; And Others

    Research concerning crafts-artists in the United States involved two phases: a survey of craft organizations and members and a survey of professional and subscriber crafts-artists. This report describes the sampling, data collection, and data processing procedures used in the surveys, describes the questionnaires and other materials sent to crafts…

  1. Educational Master Plan Student Survey: Perceptions of the San Diego Community College District. Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    In 1989, a survey was conducted in the San Diego Community College District to determine students' perspectives of the services offered at their college or continuing education site. The range of services evaluated included instruction, administration, student services, cafeteria, and facilities. A total of 246 classes taught at 13 campuses and…

  2. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  3. Nonmedical drug use among adolescent students: highlights from the 1999 Ontario Student Drug Use Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlaf, E M; Paglia, A; Ivis, F J; Ialomiteanu, A

    2000-06-13

    During the 1990s, rates of nonmedical drug use among adolescents escalated. We assessed data from 5 cycles of the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey for overall trends in the proportion of students reporting illegal drug use between 1991 and 1999. The survey is a repeated, cross-sectional, 2-stage cluster-design survey of students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13. Outcome measures were prevalence of use of 17 drugs, including alcohol and tobacco, over the 12 months preceding the survey. The rates of drug use increased between 1993 and 1999. The 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the differences in proportions between 1997 and 1999 indicated significant increases in the overall use of 6 drugs: alcohol (95% CIdiff 6.1, 1.9-10.3), cannabis (95% CIdiff 46.3, 0.2-8.4), glue (95% CIdiff 2.3, 1.3-3.3), other solvents (95% CIdiff 5.0, 3.1-6.3), barbiturates (95% CIdiff 1.9, 0.4-3.4) and hallucinogens such as mescaline and psilocybin (95% CIdiff 3.5, 0.8-6.9). Fewer grade 7 students in 1999 than in earlier cohorts reported using alcohol or cigarettes by age 9. The public health implications of the findings are mixed. On the positive side, there is no evidence of increases in early onset of drug use. On the negative side, the overall proportion of students reporting illegal drug use has continued to rise.

  4. App Use in Psychiatric Education: A Medical Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cecilia; Kolli, Venkata

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the study is to understand and appraise app use by medical students during their clerkships. Following Creighton University IRB approval, a voluntary and anonymous paper-based, 15-question survey was distributed to third-year medical students. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. Of 112 medical students available, 76.7% (86) participated in the survey. All participants owned a smartphone or tablet with 84.9% using Apple iOS, followed by 12.8% using Android platform. Students reported using the fewest number of apps during surgery, psychiatry, and obstetrics and gynecology clerkships. The largest number of apps were used during the internal medicine rotation (70.3%). The three most popular apps were Epocrates, UpToDate, and UWorld. The most common uses for these apps were as references during the clerkship, followed by improving knowledge, and test taking. Perceived major benefits included accessibility (96% of student respondents) and interactivity (39.5%). Common apps used during the psychiatry clerkship included UpToDate (71%), Epocrates (51%), and Medscape (43%). Despite less frequent app use during their psychiatry clerkship, 90% felt there was a utility for educational apps in psychiatric education. Consistent with the previous literature on medical students preferring educational apps, students suggest developers focus on question bank-type apps, followed by clinical support-focused and self-directed case-based learning apps for psychiatry clerkship learning. Educators should factor these modes of educational delivery into future educational app development. This survey shows a high degree of smartphone and tablet use among medical students, and they attest to mobile phone app utility in psychiatric education.

  5. Super-Diversity and Foreign-Born Students in Academic Libraries: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarillo, Frans

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey study of foreign-born students' use of academic and public libraries. The researcher administered the survey at a public liberal arts college in the fall of 2014. The analysis shows that foreign-born students use both public and academic libraries with great frequency for academic tasks. Variables such as…

  6. A survey of basic technical skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Charles W; Edwards, Janine C; Burdenski, Thomas K

    2004-09-01

    In 1998, the Medical Schools Objectives Project (MSOP) Report listed the minimum routine technical procedures that graduating medical students should be proficient to perform. The authors conducted a survey to determine to what extent basic technical skills are being taught formally and how student competence in these skills is being evaluated in U.S. medical schools. A questionnaire of five items, designed to supplement existing information in CurrMIT, the national curriculum database for medical schools, was transmitted electronically via the AAMC listserv to associate deans for academic affairs. Sixty-two of the 126 medical schools (52%) responded to the survey. Most agreed that graduating medical students should be proficient to perform basic technical skills. Fifty-five percent of the respondents required students to keep logs of procedures performed. A majority responded that their students were proficient to perform venipuncture, IV placement, suturing lacerations, Foley catheter placement, and arterial puncture. The responding schools stated that few students are proficient in thoracentesis and intubation of children and neonates. It is likely that half of the medical schools are not attaining the MSOP objective of rigorously teaching and evaluating technical procedures. Currently, more measures and more sophisticated measures of physicians' performance are being implemented in medical practice. The authors' findings call attention to this educational need and act as a stimulus to improve this aspect of medical education.

  7. Burrowing owl survey : 1994 report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report of burrowing owl nesting activity in the Central Region of Colorado in 1994, produced by the Colorado Division of Wildlife. There is little long term data on...

  8. Colorado School Health Education Survey 1992. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah Univ., Salt Lake City. Health Education Dept.

    This report summarizes and interprets the results of the 1992 Colorado School Health Education Survey, which targets public secondary schools with grades 7 through 12. Results provide a basic sketch of the extent of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) prevention and health education being implemented in Colorado's secondary schools. The survey,…

  9. Caribou survey of northeastern Alaska: Preliminary report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report covers the Caribou survey of Northeastern Alaska. Objectives of the study are to determine the approximate total size of the caribou herd whose main...

  10. Summer Student Report

    CERN Document Server

    Yotov, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this report is to show in summary the work that we have done and what part I took in. Before that, I will shortly explain the main types of detector in CMS muon system and more specially the RPCs (Resistive Plate Chambers). Also, I will present what is GIF++ and its main purposes and what results were obtained during these two months.

  11. Summer Student Project Report

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Yiming

    2014-01-01

    In order to know the influence of penguin contribution to the measurement of CP violation phase in Bs to J/Psi phi. We need to measure it in Bs to J/Psi Kst. And we also need to know the ratio of these two branch ratios. To get the branch ratio of Bs to J/Psi phi, we use the data of Bs to J/Psi KK and correct it by a p-wave/s-wave factor. This report shows the results of this p-wave/s-wave correction ratio.

  12. Workplace violence experienced by nursing students: A UK survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Stephen; Üzar Özçetin, Yeter Sinem; Russell-Westhead, Michele

    2016-06-01

    To appreciate the nature and scope of workplace violence amongst a sample of the UK nursing student population during clinical placement and to recommend strategies universities can implement to successfully manage the impact. Workplace violence is defined as a violent act(s) directed toward workers and can include physical, psychological or verbal behaviour. It is prevalent in nursing and causes victims work-based stress that can affect not only the individual but also the quality of care. Similar negative experiences amongst students can have a direct impact on the development of future professional skills. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Questions were uploaded in the format of a commercial internet survey provider (SurveyMonkey.com) and distributed across a sample of nursing schools in the UK. The survey was voluntary and employed a validated tool to assess workplace violence and was based on a similar study in Australia. The number of respondents was 657. This paper reports on the quantitative results. Nearly half of the students (42.18%) indicated they had experienced bullying/harassment in the past year while on clinical placement. One-third (30.4%) had witnessed bullying/harassment of other students and 19.6% of incidents involved a qualified nurse. The unwanted behaviours made some students consider leaving nursing (19.8%). Some respondents said the standard of patient care (12.3%) and their work with others (25.9%) were negatively affected. Workplace violence can influence nursing students' attitude toward the profession and their level of satisfaction with the work. Whilst it was reassuring to note that the majority of the participants knew where/how to report, only one fifth had actively reported an episode of bullying/harassment. Current students are the nurses and leaders of the future and have a key role in shaping the culture of generations to come. Universities and clinical providers need to work together to reduce the

  13. Yavapai College Student Satisfaction Survey Conducted December 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavapai Coll., Prescott, AZ.

    Yavapai College, Arizona, conducted a telephone survey of current college students in December 2002. The survey provides data for future marketing efforts, as well as providing information to be used as part of an ongoing assessment of student opinions and needs. An independent telemarketing firm called students from a random list of 1,400 credit…

  14. Summer student final report

    CERN Document Server

    Guzik, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    During my time spent at CERN I worked under the Technology Department of CERN, in the Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity (MPE) Group. The MPE Group supports LHC operations and maintains state of the art technology for magnet circuit protection and interlock systems for the present and future accelerators, magnet test facilities and CERN hosted experiments[1]. As a member of Magnet Powering Interlocks & Software (TE-MPE-MS) section I was involved in three different projects and used not only CERN developed tools like FESA Framework, but also open source C++ frameworks, Google Test and Google Mock. I had a chance to work with Programmable Logic Controllers and real-time devices known as Front End Computers. I was part of a software developer team, and familiarized myself with the Scrum agile software development methodology. The description and results of my work are presented in three parts of this report. Each part describes a separate project created during my participation in the CERN Summer St...

  15. Analysis of Survey Data on First-Year Students at Our University (2)

    OpenAIRE

    木下, 栄二

    2014-01-01

    Through an annual survey of all freshmen at this university, we gather excellent data on our students. One purpose of this project is to analyze and utilize this data, which is useful for investigating changes among our students. Here, we have analyzed survey data gathered from 2004 to 2010. In this paper, we report on analysis results regarding changes in student economic situation and reading activity. We hope that this information will be helpful to our faculties and sections, and of use i...

  16. Quality of Life Among Dental Students: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Amanda; Pierre, Gaelle C; McAndrew, Maureen

    2017-10-01

    Quality of life is a complex construct that affects the overall life satisfaction, emotional well-being, and functioning of individuals. The aim of our study was to assess the quality of life of dental students at one U.S. dental school, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF, a multi-dimensional, cross-cultural, validated, and reliable survey instrument. Of the 1,437 students invited to participate, 401 students responded, but 17 were excluded because of missing data. The final sample consisted of 384 students for an overall response rate of 27%: response rates by year were first year 32.6%, second year 16.9%, third year 26.6%, and fourth year 24.0%. The results showed that the responding students rated their overall quality of life as good. The Physical Health domain had the highest mean score, while the Psychological domain had the lowest. Females reported higher quality of life than males in the Social Relationships domain. Single students were found to have a lower perceived quality of life than married students. Older students were found to have lower perceived quality of life in the Physical Health and Environment domains. Physical Health domain scores were significantly higher for fourth-year than first-year respondents, while Psychological domain scores were significantly lower for third-year than first-year respondents. Further research is needed to explore the effect of dental school on the quality of life of dental students. Targeted programs to impact students' quality of life at various points in the curriculum may be beneficial.

  17. Summer Student Programme – Report

    CERN Document Server

    Bellora, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This is the report on the studies about radiation damage on silicon strips detectors I've performed during my Summer Student Programme. A parameter to describe the damage amount has been defined, as well as his behaviour over time and absorbed dose.

  18. A Survey of Student and Professor Awareness of English Teaching and Learning at Toyohashi University of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 光彦; 尾碕, 一志; 加藤, 三保子; 田村, 真奈美; 西村, 政人; Levin, David; イトウ, ミツヒコ; オザキ, カズシ; カトウ, ミホコ; タムラ, マナミ; ニシムラ, マサヒト /; Mitsuhiko, Ito; Kazushi, Ozaki; Mihoko, Kato; Manami, Tamura

    2007-01-01

    This is a report based on a general survey given to undergraduate students and professors at Toyohashi University of Technology (TUT) about English education at TUT. Regarding students, the main purposes of the survey, conducted in the fall of 2005, were to find how students had studied English before enrolling in TUT, what the students thought of English teaching and learning at TUT, and how important they thought English was for their majors. As for the survey to professors, the main purpos...

  19. 2009 National Survey of First-Year Seminars: Ongoing Efforts to Support Students in Transition. Research Reports on College Transitions No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, Ryan D.; Keup, Jennifer R.

    2011-01-01

    Findings from the ninth triennial administration of the National Survey of First-Year Seminars, describing the nature and extent of first-year seminars on American college campuses. Drawn from a broad sample of colleges and universities from every institutional type, control, and size, the survey addresses topics including seminar characteristics…

  20. Kauffman Teen Survey. An Annual Report on Teen Health Behaviors: Use of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs among 8th-, 10th-, and 12th-Grade Students in Greater Kansas City, 1991-92 to 2000-01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, Kansas City, MO.

    The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation began surveying Kansas City area teens during the 1984-85 school year. The Kauffman Teen Survey now addresses two sets of issues for teens. Teen Health Behaviors, addressed in this report, have been a focus of the survey since its inception. The report focuses on teen use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in…

  1. Texas School Survey of Substance Use among Students on the Border, 1998: Grades 4-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; Wallisch, Lynn S.

    This report presents the results of a survey on drug and alcohol use among students in elementary and secondary schools. Schools in 15 counties along the Texas-Mexico border were oversampled so that substance use among students could be looked at in detail. A total of 63,292 students (grades 7-12) and 43,915 students (grades 4-6) were sampled.…

  2. Engineering surveying theory and examination problems for students

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2013-01-01

    Engineering Surveying: Theory and Examination Problems for Students, Volume 1, Third Edition discusses topics concerning engineering surveying techniques and instrumentations. The book is comprised of eight chapters that cover several concerns in engineering survey. Chapter 1 discusses the basic concepts of surveying. Chapter 2 deals with simple and precise leveling, while Chapter 3 covers earthworks. The book also talks about the theodolite and its applications, and then discusses optical distance measurement. Curves, underground and hydrographic surveying, and aspects of dimensional control

  3. The survey of American college students computer technology preferences & purchasing plans

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data from a survey of more than 400 American college students.  The report presents data on student computer ownership of both PCs and laptops, purchasing plans for PCs and laptops, as well as purchasing plans for cell phones and digital cameras.  The report also provides details on how student finance their computer purchases, how much money comes from parents or guardians, and how much from the student themselves, or from their parties.  In addition to data on PCs the report provides detailed info on use of popular word processing packages such as Word, WordPerfect and Open Office.

  4. Community-College Students Need Better Financial Advising, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    All the tutoring in the world cannot save students who run short of the money they need to pay for college. This year's Community College Survey of Student Engagement affirms as much. In the survey, known as Cessie, nearly half (45 percent) of respondents cited a lack of finances as a hardship that would likely cause them to withdraw from classes…

  5. INOPS Survey data report for Sweden

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Severin, Majbritt Christine

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Sweden. The statistics rely on data collected in the period from May 2015 to June 2015 through an online survey...... send to managers in all 290 municipalities in Sweden....

  6. INOPS Survey data report for Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Holt, Steffen

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Norway. The statistics relies on data collected in the period from April 2015 to October 2015 through an online...... survey send to managers in all 428 municipalities in Norway....

  7. Express Routing Transportation Surveys. Research Department Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter D.

    Express routing, under consideration by San Diego (California) Public Schools, is a form of bus transportation that picks up and drops off students at centralized points instead of driving through residential neighborhoods. This report examines other, similar districts' experiences in applying express routing in integration and other school…

  8. Recent findings from the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlaf, E M; Ivis, F J

    1998-09-08

    Every 2 years, the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario, a division of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, sponsors the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey. The results of the surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997 are presented here and compared with results from the early 1990s. Questionnaires were completed by 3870 and 3990 Ontario public school students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13 in 1995 and 1997 respectively. The outcome measures were prevalence of use of 20 types of drugs and other substances, including alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs, over the previous 12 months. For several drugs the prevalence of use in the previous 12 months had increased from 1993 to 1995, but from 1995 to 1997 there was a significant increase for only one type (hallucinogens such as mescaline and psilocybin). The inhalation of glue declined, and the use of the other 18 types of drugs remained stable. Recent data suggest that increases in adolescent student drug use reported earlier this decade have not continued. However, the stability in rates of drug use is not a justification for complacency in this important area of public health.

  9. A survey of alcohol and other drug use behaviors and risk factors in health profession students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, K A; Baldwin, J N; Scott, D M

    1994-05-01

    This survey assessed the alcohol and other drug (AOD) use habits and risk factors of health profession students at a midwestern university health science center. The authors administered a 75-item survey to 1,707 students in selected classrooms: 984 students responded for a return rate of 57.6%. In 1990, they found, alcohol use among the health profession students in the past year was comparable to that of undergraduate college students nationally (86%), although significantly fewer health profession students drank heavily (27% had five or more drinks in the past 2 weeks, compared with 41% of college students). The percentage of health profession students who reported using tobacco or illicit drugs was lower than the percentage of undergraduate students who used these substances. At the time of the study, 16% of the respondents may have had a potential current alcohol problem and 3.5% a potential drug problem. Pharmacy students most often reported negative consequences from their AOD use. Peer pressure influenced the drinking decisions of 55% of the respondents; students in dentistry and pharmacy experienced the least support from peers for their decisions to abstain from drinking. Family histories of alcohol problems were reported by 38% of the respondents, and family histories of drug use by 14.8%. Male health profession students, when compared with the female professional students, drank more and experienced more consequences of their drinking or drug use and were also more influenced by peers.

  10. A survey of energy drink consumption patterns among college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter-Aeby Tracy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Energy drink consumption has continued to gain in popularity since the 1997 debut of Red Bull, the current leader in the energy drink market. Although energy drinks are targeted to young adult consumers, there has been little research regarding energy drink consumption patterns among college students in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink consumption patterns among college students, prevalence and frequency of energy drink use for six situations, namely for insufficient sleep, to increase energy (in general, while studying, driving long periods of time, drinking with alcohol while partying, and to treat a hangover, and prevalence of adverse side effects and energy drink use dose effects among college energy drink users. Methods Based on the responses from a 32 member college student focus group and a field test, a 19 item survey was used to assess energy drink consumption patterns of 496 randomly surveyed college students attending a state university in the Central Atlantic region of the United States. Results Fifty one percent of participants (n = 253 reported consuming greater than one energy drink each month in an average month for the current semester (defined as energy drink user. The majority of users consumed energy drinks for insufficient sleep (67%, to increase energy (65%, and to drink with alcohol while partying (54%. The majority of users consumed one energy drink to treat most situations although using three or more was a common practice to drink with alcohol while partying (49%. Weekly jolt and crash episodes were experienced by 29% of users, 22% reported ever having headaches, and 19% heart palpitations from consuming energy drinks. There was a significant dose effect only for jolt and crash episodes. Conclusion Using energy drinks is a popular practice among college students for a variety of situations. Although for the majority of situations assessed, users consumed one

  11. A survey of energy drink consumption patterns among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Brenda M; Aeby, Victor G; Overton, Reginald F; Carpenter-Aeby, Tracy; Barber-Heidal, Kimberly

    2007-10-31

    Energy drink consumption has continued to gain in popularity since the 1997 debut of Red Bull, the current leader in the energy drink market. Although energy drinks are targeted to young adult consumers, there has been little research regarding energy drink consumption patterns among college students in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink consumption patterns among college students, prevalence and frequency of energy drink use for six situations, namely for insufficient sleep, to increase energy (in general), while studying, driving long periods of time, drinking with alcohol while partying, and to treat a hangover, and prevalence of adverse side effects and energy drink use dose effects among college energy drink users. Based on the responses from a 32 member college student focus group and a field test, a 19 item survey was used to assess energy drink consumption patterns of 496 randomly surveyed college students attending a state university in the Central Atlantic region of the United States. Fifty one percent of participants (n = 253) reported consuming greater than one energy drink each month in an average month for the current semester (defined as energy drink user). The majority of users consumed energy drinks for insufficient sleep (67%), to increase energy (65%), and to drink with alcohol while partying (54%). The majority of users consumed one energy drink to treat most situations although using three or more was a common practice to drink with alcohol while partying (49%). Weekly jolt and crash episodes were experienced by 29% of users, 22% reported ever having headaches, and 19% heart palpitations from consuming energy drinks. There was a significant dose effect only for jolt and crash episodes. Using energy drinks is a popular practice among college students for a variety of situations. Although for the majority of situations assessed, users consumed one energy drink with a reported frequency of 1 - 4 days per

  12. Shedding Light on District Issues. 1991-92 Surveys of Students, Staff, and Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Sedra G.

    In 1991-92, over 50,000 surveys were administered to high school students, elementary school and secondary school teachers and administrators, elementary school students' parents, and graduates from the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD). Parent responses are not published in this report, which discusses the following parameters:…

  13. Natural Language Thesaurus: A Survey of Student Research Skills and Research Tool Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a University of Canberra Library survey of student research knowledge, skills, tools and resources. Students are experiencing difficulties interrogating databases, the internet and library catalogues because of the lack of consistency in terminology and various methods of interrogation. This research was an…

  14. Sex and gender in medical education: a national student survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Marjorie R; Herrmann, Alyssa; Tashjian, Amanda; Ramineni, Tina; Ramakrishnan, Rithika; Raef, Donna; Rokas, Tracy; Shatzer, John

    2016-01-01

    Gender- and sex-specific medicine is defined as the practice of medicine based on the understanding that biology (dictated by sex chromosomes) and social roles (gender) are important in and have implications for prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment in men and women. In light of the many ways that sex and gender influence disease presentation and patient management, there have been various initiatives to improve the integration of these topics into medical education curriculum. Although certain schools may include the topics, their impact on the student body's knowledge has not been as fully studied. By studying the opinions of US allopathic and osteopathic-enrolled students on the extent to which their schools address these topics and their understanding of these topics, this study examined the role of gender specific medicine in the US medical school curriculum. An email solicitation with link to an anonymous survey was sent to approximately 35,876 student members of five US medical student organizations. The survey instrument consisted of yes/no, multiple choice, and attitude awareness questions. Data was analyzed as a complete data set to evaluate national trends and via subset analysis using chi-square, paired t test, and one-way anova. A total of 1097 students responded. The majority of respondents strongly agreed that sex and gender medicine (SGBM) improves patient management (96.0 %) and should be included as a part of the medical school curriculum (94.4 %). Only 2.4 % of participants agreed that SGBM is the same as Women's Health. When asked specifically about inclusion of an identified sex and gender-based medicine curriculum at their institution, students answered not sure at 40.8, 25.1, 19.1, and 20.3 % from first year to fourth year, respectively. Males reported a higher rate of exposure to SGBM content areas (in medical history taking, domestic violence) than women. Medical students recognize the differentiation between SGBM principles

  15. Students' Interpretations of the Meanings of Questionnaire Items in the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    In many countries the outputs from university student satisfaction surveys are used for a variety of educational management purposes. Within the United Kingdom, the main instrument employed by state authorities to measure student satisfaction is the National Student Survey (NSS). The issue investigated by the current research related to whether…

  16. SURVEYING WORKSHEETS TO PROMOTE STUDENT INVOLVEMENT IN SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyah Ririn Perwikasih Utari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Having students get involved actively in the classroom is a kind of teacher‘s expectation. The main purpose of teaching speaking, commonly known, is having them speak. Surveying worksheet is one of the ways to lead the students communicate interactively within the Survival English Class in English Education Department of Universitas Muria Kudus. The objectives of the study are: 1 considering the surveying worksheets based on the contextualized materials; 2 the effectiveness of the surveying worksheets in the classroom. Leading from the objectives, the appropriate research design is qualitative in which the data are analyzed descriptively. The research data are the surveying worksheets to promote student involvement in speaking class. The data sources are the students of Survival English class in English Education Department of Universitas Muria Kudus. The surveying worksheets created are based on the materials of knowing your friends, foods, shopping, and personal lifestyle. The components of the questions lead the students to ask and answer actively by documenting the answer on the worksheet. Through the observation, the students move to the every corner of the class, talk and laugh joyfully, there is almost no one silent when they do the survey and fulfill the worksheet. The research leads to the conclusion that surveying worksheets can be one of teachers‘ choices to have the students get involved in all activities planned.

  17. An International Survey of Veterinary Students to Assess Their Use of Online Learning Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Laura; Dale, Vicki H M; Powney, Sonya; Gaitskell-Phillips, Gemma H L; Short, Nick R M

    Today's veterinary students have access to a wide range of online resources that support self-directed learning. To develop a benchmark of current global student practice in e-learning, this study measured self-reported access to, and use of, these resources by students internationally. An online survey was designed and promoted via veterinary student mailing lists and international organizations, resulting in 1,070 responses. Analysis of survey data indicated that students now use online resources in a wide range of ways to support their learning. Students reported that access to online veterinary learning resources was now integral to their studies. Almost all students reported using open educational resources (OERs). Ownership of smartphones was widespread, and the majority of respondents agreed that the use of mobile devices, or m-learning, was essential. Social media were highlighted as important for collaborating with peers and sharing knowledge. Constraints to e-learning principally related to poor or absent Internet access and limited institutional provision of computer facilities. There was significant geographical variation, with students from less developed countries disadvantaged by limited access to technology and networks. In conclusion, the survey provides an international benchmark on the range and diversity in terms of access to, and use of, online learning resources by veterinary students globally. It also highlights the inequalities of access among students in different parts of the world.

  18. INOPS Survey data report for the UK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Nielsen, Alex Skøtt

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Denmark. The statistics rely on data collected in the period from September 2015 to November 2015 through an onl...... an online survey send to managers in all Local Authorities in the UK (England, Wales and Northern Ireland)....

  19. Defining Medical Student Patient Care Responsibilities Before Intern Year: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher J; Bolton, Andrew; Guerrasio, Jeannette; Trosterman, Adam

    2017-12-01

    Program directors have noted that first-year residents struggle with many of the patient care responsibilities they assume as they enter the US graduate medical education system. A national description of medical students' patient care experience in advance of graduation has not been published. We sought to describe the experience of US medical students during their clinical training by surveying the student representatives of each school. We developed a mixed-methods survey that was delivered to representatives of 82 schools via an e-mail link to an online survey. Our response rate was 54% (44/82). Of those responding, 28% reported that students do not write any patient care orders at their institution and 34% reported not receiving pages related to patient care. Only 26% of institutions provide an increased patient load to students during their final year of training. Students identified many areas to improve the role of fourth-year medical students, including writing patient care orders, answering pages, increasing autonomy, defining their role better, and providing them with a longer subinternship experience. Our survey suggests that students are graduating from the undergraduate medical education system and moving to the graduate medical education system in the United States without a guarantee of having answered a page related to patient care or having placed a patient care order. Further studies of students' experiences should be conducted to explore whether exposure to these skills improves first-year resident performance.

  20. Attitudes toward neurosciences in medical students in Wuhan, China: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Rimas V; Cooper, Brian; Morgan, Ivy; Brorson, James R; Dong, Hongmei; Sherer, Renslow

    2014-01-01

    Neurophobia is a well-described phenomenon among medical students in many countries. Little is reported concerning the perceptions of neurosciences among medical students in China. We surveyed senior medical students in Wuhan, China, on their perceptions of neuroscience. Students' self-assessments of knowledge in various specialties ranked neurology low, but not the lowest. Students' confidence in diagnosing neurological patients and managing neurological patients demonstrated significant correlation. A positive correlation was noted between confidence in these clinical parameters and the likelihood of specializing in neurology. Students reported bedside teaching and small group sessions as having the greatest value in learning neurology. The low, but not the lowest ranking of self-perceived knowledge in neurology by medical students in Wuhan, China, differs from findings reported in other countries. In this exploratory study the investigators hypothesize that the well-described phenomenon of neurophobia may exhibit a less pronounced influence in Wuhan, China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Students' Reports of Misbehavior in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cothran, Donetta J.; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine students' reports of misbehavior in physical education class. Secondary school participants (N = 2,309) completed a previously validated instrument designed to measure students' reports of 59 student behaviors occurring in classes that might affect class management (e.g., from talking to bringing weapons to…

  2. Evaluating off-campus student housing preferences: A pilot survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Noraini; Mohd, Thuraiya; Abdullah, Lizawati; Ahmad@Mohamed, Nurulanis; Sani, Suwaibatul Islamiah Abdullah

    2017-10-01

    In recent decades, the term student housing has been highlighted as a body of knowledge in housing studies. In providing better quality of life, student housing evolved into a critical agenda in developing higher education learning. This research paper aims to discuss on a pilot study examining student housing preferences among university and college students should they reside off-campus. The research aims at identifying the attributes of off-campus student housing preferences to give a significant input for the development of an off-campus student housing preferences conceptual framework. This research is a cross-sectional study in which survey participants are currently-enrolled students throughout the period of survey. During this pilot study, questionnaires were distributed among university students in Shah Alam, Selangor in Malaysia. A total of 86 survey questionnaires were collected, consisting of questions reflecting students' background, Likert scale questions to specify their preferences, and open-ended questions. This preliminary pilot result shows that the 46 variables student housing preferences have a good reliability and validity. The outcomes from this research provide insight into students' preferences on how off-campus housing should be developed. Since Selangor is divided into various districts with a plethora of different local contexts including different university campuses, there is a need for further study to avoid generalization.

  3. The Impact of Lottery Incentives on Student Survey Response Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A controlled experiment tested the effects of lottery incentives using a prospective college applicant Web survey, with emails sent to more than 9,000 high school students. Found minimal effect of postpaid incentives for increasing levels of incentive. (EV)

  4. Report on the Biodigester User Survey 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, U.W.; Jordan, A.

    2008-07-15

    Since April 2006, the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of the Kingdom of Cambodia (MAFF) and The Netherlands Development Organisation (SNV) are cooperating in the implementation of a National Biodigester Programme (NBP), the overall objective of which is 'the dissemination of domestic biodigesters as an indigenous, sustainable energy source through the development of a commercial, market oriented, biodigester sector in selected provinces of Cambodia'. In order to assess the socio-economic structure of beneficiary households, and reception, acceptance and impact of biodigesters, the Programme, which is currently operational in seven provinces, commissioned a Biodigester User Survey (BUS). The survey was carried out in March 2008 (including enumerator training, field testing and data entry), and data processing and reporting took place in April 2008.

  5. Recent findings from the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Adlaf, E M; Ivis, F J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Every 2 years, the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario, a division of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, sponsors the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey. The results of the surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997 are presented here and compared with results from the early 1990s. METHODS: Questionnaires were completed by 3870 and 3990 Ontario public school students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13 in 1995 and 1997 respectively. The outcome measures were prevalence of use of...

  6. Students' Motivations for Choosing (Or Not) to Study Portuguese: A Survey of Beginning-Level University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Blair E.; de Almeida Oliveira, Desirée

    2014-01-01

    Although previous literature has discussed ways of promoting the study of Portuguese, to our knowledge no study has ever directly surveyed students to ascertain why they chose to learn the language. This study reports on a survey of the motivations of first- and second-year Portuguese students to study the language, and contrasts their motivations…

  7. Citizenship Reporting in the American Community Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Van Hook

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Citizenship status among the foreign born is a crucial indicator of social and political incorporation, yet there are good reasons to suspect that citizenship status is inaccurately reported on U.S. surveys. OBJECTIVE This paper updates research carried out in the mid-1990s by Passel and Clark (1997 on the extent to which foreign-born noncitizen respondents in U.S. government-sponsored surveys misreport as naturalized citizens. METHODS We compare demographic estimates of the resident naturalized foreign-born population in 2010, based on administrative data, to estimates from the 2010 American Community Survey (ACS. RESULTS Similar to previous research, we find that misreporting in the ACS is especially high among immigrants from all countries/regions who report fewer than five years in the United States. We also find that among longer-term foreign-born residents, misreporting is concentrated only among those originating in Mexico, especially men of all ages and older women, a finding that diverges from Passel and Clark in that we find no evidence of overreporting among immigrants from Central America and the Caribbean. Finally, the estimated magnitude of misreporting, especially among longer-term Mexican-born men, is sensitive to assumptions about the rate of emigration in our administrative-based demographic estimates, and assumptions about coverage error in the ACS, though altering these assumptions does not change the conclusions drawn from the general patterns of the results. CONCLUSIONS For applications that use citizenship as an indicator of legal status, we recommend that self-reported data on citizenship be accepted at face value for all groups except those with fewer than five years of U.S. residence, Mexican men, and older Mexican women.

  8. A survey of drug abuse problems among students of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to survey drug abuse problems among students of selected secondary schools in Ile-Ife in Osun State. Specifically, the study was to find out the reasons for drug abuse among students. The major instrument used to collect needed information was the questionnaire which was distributed to ...

  9. The Online Student Connectedness Survey: Evidence of Initial Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Tekeisha; Nimon, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The Online Student Connectedness Survey (OSCS) was introduced to the academic community in 2012 as an instrument designed to measure feelings of connectedness between students participating in online degree and certification programs. The purpose of this study was to examine data from the instrument for initial evidence of validity and reliability…

  10. A Survey of Secondary School Students' Reading Strategy Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study tried to explore the reading strategy use of Grade 9 Students of four senior high schools in Jimma Zone as well as their English teachers' perceived use of reading strategies and awareness. A total of 152 students and 29 Grade 9 English teachers responded to a survey questionnaire with a five point Likert scale.

  11. Ego Network Analysis of Upper Division Physics Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of student networks derived from a survey of upper division physics students. Ego networks focus on the connections that center on one person (the ego). The ego networks in this talk come from a survey that is part of an overall project focused on understanding student retention and persistence. The theory underlying this work is that social and academic integration are essential components to supporting students continued enrollment and ultimately graduation. This work uses network analysis as a way to investigate the role of social and academic interactions in retention and persistence decisions. We focus on student interactions with peers, on mentoring interactions with physics department faculty, and on engagement in physics groups and how they influence persistence. Our results, which are preliminary, will help frame the ongoing research project and identify ways in which departments can support students. This work supported by NSF grant #PHY 1344247.

  12. Questionnaire Survey of Physical Therapy Students' View of General Education

    OpenAIRE

    日高, 正巳; 嶋田, 智明; 武政, 誠一; 篠原, 英記; 米田, 稔彦; 講武, 芳英; 松尾, 智; 松原, 貴子; 三木, 明徳; 平田, 総一郎; 石川, 斉

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze students' view of the relationship between general education and physical therapy education in the university. Fifty-six physical therapy students administered the questionnaire in this survey and completed it on their own. Nineteen subjects selected in general education were categorized into seven grades, indicating Grade 0 (no relation to physical therapy education) to Grade 6 (closest relation). It was characteristic that the students looked on the ...

  13. Teacher characteristics and student achievement: evidence from teacher surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Teachers and peers are believed to have a strong influence on student achievement, but the specific characteristics that affect student achievement are hard to identify. This paper utilizes teacher survey data to investigate teacher characteristics that are not usually available in administrative data, as well as more readily available attributes such as experience and education. Classroom fixed effects explain a large portion of within-student variation in test score growth, suggesting a pot...

  14. Library anxiety among university students: A survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McPherson, Marisa Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Library anxiety has been identified as a contributory factor to poor academic performance among students, and libraries are being challenged to give serious consideration to this phenomenon in order...

  15. Smoking behavior among student nurses: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, B P; O'Shea, R M; Dittmar, S S; Bahn, P; Mathewson, M; Smith, S; Brasure, J

    1986-01-01

    The study describes the smoking habits of student nurses and determines the correlates of smoking initiation, continuation, and cessation. The sample included 1,163 students attending 10 nursing schools in Buffalo, NY. Data were gathered by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Approximately 30 percent of the students were current smokers, 25 percent were exsmokers, and 45 percent had never smoked. More than half of the smokers (57 percent) expressed the desire to quit, and 81 percent had tried to do so in the past. Major reasons for trying to quit were to protect future health, save money, self-discipline, and pressure from significant others. Most (90 percent) of the students who had tried to quit had attempted to do so on their own and all at once. Knowledge of the health consequences of smoking was not significantly related to smoking behavior. These data suggest the need for health educators to promote personal health practices among their students that are congruent with the goals of the nursing profession of health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:3097747

  16. Factors influencing dental students' specialty choice: a survey of ten graduating classes at one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jane H; Kinnunen, Taru H; Zarchy, Marisa; Da Silva, John D; Chang, Brian Myung W; Wright, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to survey ten graduating classes at Harvard School of Dental Medicine regarding students' specialty choice and factors influencing that choice. Students were surveyed once in 2008 (for the Classes of 2007-11) and again in 2013 (for the Classes of 2012-16). A prior article reported results regarding students' interest in and experiences with prosthodontics; this article presents results regarding their interest in all dental specialties and factors influencing those interests. Of a total 176 students in the Classes of 2012-16, 143 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 81%, compared to a 95% response rate (167 of total 176 students) for the Classes of 2007-11. The results showed that orthodontics was the most popular specialty choice, followed by oral and maxillofacial surgery. From the 2008 to the 2013 survey groups, there was an increase in the percentages of students planning to pursue oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, and postdoctoral general dentistry. The educational debt these students expected to accrue by graduation also increased. The largest percentage of students chose "enjoyment of providing the specialty service" as the factor most influencing their specialty choice. "Prior dental school experience" and "faculty influence" were greater influences for students pursuing specialties than those pursuing postdoctoral general dentistry. Increased interest in particular disciplines may be driven by high debt burdens students face upon graduation. Factors related to mentoring especially influenced students pursuing specialties, demonstrating the importance of student experiences outside direct patient care for exposure to the work of specialists beyond the scope of predoctoral training. This finding suggests that dental schools should increase mentoring efforts to help students make career decisions based not on financial burden but rather on personal interest in the specialty, which is likely to have a

  17. [Questionnaire survey of musician's dystonia among students of a music college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaka, Kuni; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Musician's dystonia is known as a task specific dystonia. Though it is thought to occur during a long course of repetitive performance, the actual circumstances that precipitate this condition are not clear. According to factual reports this disease is not commonly known, probably because many of these patients may not have been visiting a hospital. We prepared a questionnaire and did a survey among the students of a music college. This is the first questionnaire survey aimed at finding out the prevalence of musician's dystonia among the students of music. Among the 480 participants of this survey, 29% of the students had knowledge of this disorder and 1.25% of the students had dystonia while performing music.

  18. Survey report: moose surveys in lower Chignik Unit, May 1999

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Federal Subsistence Board requested that moose surveys be flown in the area of the lower Chignik Unit proposed for closure to non-qualified moose hunters by the...

  19. Stress, Eustress and the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to explore the relationship between sources of stress and a range of coping behaviours on student satisfaction and motivation. Most research exploring sources of stress construes stress as distress, with little attempt to consider positive, good stress or "eustress" experiences. A cohort of first-year psychology students…

  20. The Survey of Jimma University Students Problems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Psychological Problems of Study Subjects at Jimma University, June 2002. Problems. No. of Students (%). Attention Problem. 69 (49.0). Anxiety. 58 (41.0). Memory Problem. 56 (40.0). Mood Oscillations. 27 (36.5). Learned Helplessness. 34 (24.0). Depression. 32 (23.0). Paranoid Thought. 26 (18.6). Drug /substance abuse.

  1. AED in Europe. Report on a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Jan; Bossaert, Leo; Handley, Anthony; Koster, Ruud; Vissers, Bart; Monsieurs, Koen

    2010-02-01

    Based on the strategies for community defibrillation defined by a joint policy conference of ESC and ERC, we have conducted a survey to identify the current status of AED programmes in Europe. All registered visitors to the website of the ERC were contacted by e-mail and invited to participate in a web-based survey. Of the 983 usable responses, 899 came from 36 European countries, representing a total of 748 million inhabitants. In 11 countries AED use by non-physicians has been implemented partially. All but 3 countries reported that first-tier ambulances are equipped with defibrillators. In 13 countries everybody is allowed to use an AED and in 11 countries anybody who has been trained. In 14 countries there are a few community responder programmes, in 14 countries there are hardly any, and in 7 countries there are none. Thirteen countries have implemented a few on-site responder programmes; in 16 countries there are hardly any such programmes, and in 7 countries none. Programmes for home responders can hardly be found in 19 countries; in-hospital programmes exist in 7 countries nearly everywhere. Only 1 country reported that epidemiologic and/or economic evaluations are carried out nearly everywhere when planning AED programmes. Nationwide registries to collect data from resuscitation attempts have been set up in 4 countries. In 27 countries inventories for AEDs can be found here and there. Much has been achieved concerning the provision and use of AEDs in Europe, but there is still a long way to go. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Summer Student Report - Project Kryolize

    CERN Document Server

    Drozdowski, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the work and results obtained by the author during his summer student internship at CERN. The author of this document was attached to the project Kryolize as a software developer, overtaking the job from a recently departed technical student.

  3. Students' epistemologies about experimental physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2015-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU) and elsewhere, we developed the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Previous work with this assessment has included establishing the accuracy and clarity of the instrument through student interviews and preliminary testing. Several years of data collection at multiple institutions has resulted in a growing national data set of student responses. Here, we report on results of the analysis of these data to investigate the statistical validity and reliability of the E-CLASS as a measure of students' epistemologies for a broad student population. We find that the E-CLASS demonstrates an acceptable level of both validi...

  4. Oxygen and pulse oximetry in childhood pneumonia: surveys of clinicians and student clinicians in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Gerth-Guyette, Emily; Mollis, Brenda; Gardner, Michelle; Chham, Samnang

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the availability of oxygen and pulse oximetry, barriers to use, clinician perceptions and practices regarding their role in the management of childhood pneumonia, and the formal education and training regarding these technologies received by student clinicians in Cambodia. In the clinician survey, we surveyed 81 clinicians practising at all national paediatric, provincial and district referral hospitals throughout Cambodia. Respondents were primarily physicians whose scope of practice included paediatrics, and most reported the presence of oxygen (93% (95% confidence interval (CI) [87, 98])) but less availability of pulse oximetry (51% (95% CI [39, 61])). Common barriers to use included a lack of policies and guidelines, as well as a lack of training. In the student clinician survey, 332 graduating medical and nursing students were surveyed, and most reported learning about oxygen (96% (95% CI [94, 98])) and pulse oximetry (72% (95% CI [67, 77])) during their training. Data from both surveys indicate that despite their utility, oxygen and pulse oximetry may be underused in Cambodia. The reported barriers and perceptions of the tools indicate a clear role for improved training for clinicians and students on the use of oxygen and pulse oximetry, the value of oxygen and pulse oximetry for managing childhood pneumonia, and the need for improved policies and guidelines governing their use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. FY2001 Customer Satisfaction Survey Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    ...? To ensure that we gain this requisite knowledge, the 2001 Customer Satisfaction Survey, Part 1 of the two part survey process, was specifically designed to meet the following knowledge objectives...

  6. The 1976 International Shorebird Survey Cooperators’ Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — 1976 was the third year of the International Shorebird Survey during Autumn migration. Seventy cooperators surveyed seventy-eight sites, from Massachusetts t o...

  7. Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Student Stress: A Survey of AAMFT Student Members

    OpenAIRE

    Klick, Patricia David

    2005-01-01

    Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Student Stress: A Survey of AAMFT Student Members Patricia David Klick Eric E. McCollum, Ph.D. (Committee Chair) Human Development Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine stress that MFT graduate students experience in their personal lives. The researcher developed a 31-item quantitative and qualitative questionnaire to identify factors that relate to stress experienced by MFT graduate students and coping resources and strategi...

  8. Self-reported tobacco smoking practices among medical students and their perceptions towards training about tobacco smoking in medical curricula: A cross-sectional, questionnaire survey in Malaysia, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeramareddy, Chandrashekhar T; Suri, Sushil; Menezes, Ritesh G; Kumar, H N Harsha; Rahman, Mahbubur; Islam, Md R; Pereira, Xavier V; Shah, Mohsin; Sathian, Brijesh; Shetty, Ullasa; Vaswani, Vina R

    2010-11-16

    Tobacco smoking issues in developing countries are usually taught non-systematically as and when the topic arose. The World Health Organisation and Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) have suggested introducing a separate integrated tobacco module into medical school curricula. Our aim was to assess medical students' tobacco smoking habits, their practices towards patients' smoking habits and attitude towards teaching about smoking in medical schools. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out among final year undergraduate medical students in Malaysia, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire included items on demographic information, students' current practices about patients' tobacco smoking habits, their perception towards tobacco education in medical schools on a five point Likert scale. Questions about tobacco smoking habits were adapted from GHPSS questionnaire. An 'ever smoker' was defined as one who had smoked during lifetime, even if had tried a few puffs once or twice. 'Current smoker' was defined as those who had smoked tobacco product on one or more days in the preceding month of the survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Overall response rate was 81.6% (922/1130). Median age was 22 years while 50.7% were males and 48.2% were females. The overall prevalence of 'ever smokers' and 'current smokers' was 31.7% and 13.1% respectively. A majority (> 80%) of students asked the patients about their smoking habits during clinical postings/clerkships. Only a third of them did counselling, and assessed the patients' willingness to quit. Majority of the students agreed about doctors' role in tobacco control as being role models, competence in smoking cessation methods, counseling, and the need for training about tobacco cessation in medical schools. About 50% agreed that current curriculum teaches about tobacco smoking but not systematically and should be included as a separate module

  9. Self-reported tobacco smoking practices among medical students and their perceptions towards training about tobacco smoking in medical curricula: A cross-sectional, questionnaire survey in Malaysia, India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Mohsin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoking issues in developing countries are usually taught non-systematically as and when the topic arose. The World Health Organisation and Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS have suggested introducing a separate integrated tobacco module into medical school curricula. Our aim was to assess medical students' tobacco smoking habits, their practices towards patients' smoking habits and attitude towards teaching about smoking in medical schools. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was carried out among final year undergraduate medical students in Malaysia, India, Nepal, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. An anonymous, self-administered questionnaire included items on demographic information, students' current practices about patients' tobacco smoking habits, their perception towards tobacco education in medical schools on a five point Likert scale. Questions about tobacco smoking habits were adapted from GHPSS questionnaire. An 'ever smoker' was defined as one who had smoked during lifetime, even if had tried a few puffs once or twice. 'Current smoker' was defined as those who had smoked tobacco product on one or more days in the preceding month of the survey. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results Overall response rate was 81.6% (922/1130. Median age was 22 years while 50.7% were males and 48.2% were females. The overall prevalence of 'ever smokers' and 'current smokers' was 31.7% and 13.1% respectively. A majority (> 80% of students asked the patients about their smoking habits during clinical postings/clerkships. Only a third of them did counselling, and assessed the patients' willingness to quit. Majority of the students agreed about doctors' role in tobacco control as being role models, competence in smoking cessation methods, counseling, and the need for training about tobacco cessation in medical schools. About 50% agreed that current curriculum teaches about tobacco smoking but not

  10. Non-Response in Student Surveys: The Role of Demographics, Engagement and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at participation across multiple surveys to understand survey non-response; by using multiple surveys we minimize the impact of survey salience. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use…

  11. Students' perceptions of their learning experiences: A repeat regional survey of healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshire, Claire; Barrett, Neil; Langan, Mark; Harris, Edwin; Wibberley, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Student experience is an international concern and recent research has focused on initiatives to improve students' learning experiences and ultimately reduce attrition levels. To determine similarities and differences between students' perceptions of their learning experiences between 2011 and 2015 in relation to campus-based learning, placement-based learning and personal circumstances. A repeat online survey in 2011 and 2015; using a questionnaire developed from thematic analysis of narrative interviews with a subsample of the target population. Nine universities in the North West of England. A total of 1080 students completed the survey in 2011 and 1983 students in 2015 from a target population of all students studying on commissioned pre-registration healthcare education programmes. An online survey was made available to all undergraduate students studying on Health Education funded programmes within the region and survey respondents were invited to give demographic information and rate their agreement to statements on four-point Likert-type responses. Responses to a repeat survey of healthcare studying in the North West of England in 2015 were strikingly similar overall to those of an original 2011 survey. Although the students were positive overall about their experiences, a number were dissatisfied with some aspects of their experiences - particularly in relation to initial support on campus and whilst studying on placement. Four years on from the original survey, despite a considerable investment in improving students' experiences across the region, there appears to be little change in students' perceptions of their learning experiences CONCLUSION: In the short-term monitoring of student experience needs to be continued; and links to attrition (potential or actual) noted and acted upon. However, given that attrition from these courses has been a long-term problem and the complexity of its resolution a recurrent finding in the literature; new ways of framing

  12. Charter School Facilities: Report from a National Survey of Charter Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bryan; Page, Barbara

    This report presents survey findings about the U.S. charter school system that were collected from 280 schools in 19 states with over 80,000 students. The two-part report examines the responses to a short list of questions about facility costs and growth plans, and it explores information provided by a subset of schools (118 institutions) that…

  13. Segmenting Student Markets with a Student Satisfaction and Priorities Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A market segmentation analysis of 872 university students compared 2 hierarchical clustering procedures for deriving market segments: 1 using matching-type measures and an agglomerative clustering algorithm, and 1 using the chi-square based automatic interaction detection. Results and implications for planning, evaluating, and improving academic…

  14. Quail, pheasant, & turkey brood survey 2012 : performance report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Performance report for the 2012 quail, ring-necked pheasant, and wild turkey statewide survey. This survey provides Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism...

  15. Findings From the INANE Survey on Student Papers Submitted to Nursing Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maureen Shawn; Newland, Jamesetta A; Owens, Jacqueline K

    Nursing students are often encouraged or required to submit scholarly work for consideration for publication but most manuscripts or course assignment papers do not meet journal standards and consume valuable resources from editors and peer reviewers. The International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE) is a group of nurse editors and publishers dedicated to promoting best practices in publishing in the nursing literature. In August 2014, editors at INANE's annual meeting voiced frustrations over multiple queries, poorly written student papers, and lack of proper behavior in following through. This article describes the findings of a survey distributed to INANE members to seek feedback about submissions by students. Fifty-three (53) members responded to an online anonymous survey developed by the INANE Student Papers Work Group. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for Likert-type questions and content analysis of open-ended questions. Quantitative data revealed that most editors reported problems with student papers across all levels of graduate programs. Six themes emerged from the qualitative data: submissions fail to follow author guidelines; characteristics of student submissions; lack of professional behavior from students; lack of professional behavior from faculty; editor responses to student submissions; and faculty as mentors. These themes formed the basis for recommendations and strategies to improve student scholarly writing. Overall, editors endorsed supporting new scholars in the publication process but faculty engagement was integral to student success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Surveying Medical Students to Gauge Library Use and Plan for a New Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Nell

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2015, a 45-question survey was e-mailed to 585 medical students at the University at Buffalo (UB) in order to gauge their use of library spaces, resources, equipment, and services at UB's Health Sciences Library and plan for a library space located within a new medical school building. Students' self-reported use of the library during the academic year is presented along with the features they would like to see in their ideal library space. The responses generated in the survey are a barometer of current use and will be used in the planning process.

  17. Forms of Bullying Reported by Middle-School Students in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClanahan, Molly; McCoy, Stephanie M.; Jacobsen, Kathryn H.

    2015-01-01

    Nationally representative data from more than 25,000 middle-school students in 15 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS) between 2004 and 2009 were analyzed. The proportion of students by country who reported being the victim of a bully in the past month ranged from 17%…

  18. Measuring Graduate Students' Teaching and Research Skills through Self-Report: Descriptive Findings and Validity Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Joanna; Feldon, David

    2010-01-01

    This study extends research on graduate student development by examining descriptive findings and validity of a self-report survey designed to capture graduate students' assessments of their teaching and research skills. Descriptive findings provide some information about areas of growth among graduate students' in the first years of their…

  19. Stress and mental health problems in 1st year medical students: a survey of two medical colleges in Kanpur, India

    OpenAIRE

    Shivendra Jena; Harish Chandra Tiwari

    2015-01-01

    Background: Incidence of stress among medical students has been reported to be between high and very high. Medical students in pre-clinical phase are more likely to develop psychological distress than medical students in clinical phase. It may affect academic performance and lead to anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Methods: First year students of one government medical college and one private medical college of Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, India, were surveyed to find out stress and men...

  20. Student Evaluations of Teaching as 'Fact-Totems': The Case of the UK National Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Duna Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Taking the UK National Student Survey (NSS) as a case study of student evaluations of teaching (SET) which are now used widely in higher education, I argue that the production and consumption of such survey data have a symbolic value that exceeds, and is often independent of, any technical understanding of their statistical meaning. The NSS, in particular, has acquired significance that far outweighs its validity or intended use. This is evident in national policy where it has become the prim...

  1. Vision Survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Medical Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vision Survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe. University Medical Students. S. N. N. Nwosu, E. O. Nwobodo1, J. K. Ndulue2. Departments of Ophthalmology and 1Physiology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, 2Department of Surgery,. Anambra State University Teaching Hospital, Amaku Awka, Nigeria. ABSTRACT.

  2. A Survey of Gender Biases of Freshman Students toward Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Barbara; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 724 freshman engineering orientation students investigated the significance of 5 literature-cited barriers to women's success in engineering--sexual discrimination, financial concerns, academic comfort, career awareness, and locus of control. Significant main effects were found for gender but not ethnic group. The instrument is…

  3. University Students' Intentions to Report Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozencroft, Kelly; Campbell, Marilyn; Orel, Alexandria; Kimpton, Melanie; Leong, Eliza

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and less about whether they utilise anti-bullying policies. However, failure to report cyberbullying incidents to authorities would lessen the efficacy of these policies. This study investigated the prevalence of cyberbullying among university students and their…

  4. Sexual behaviour of adolescents in Nigeria: cross sectional survey of secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slap, Gail B; Lot, Lucy; Huang, Bin; Daniyam, Comfort A; Zink, Therese M; Succop, Paul A

    2003-01-04

    To determine whether family structure (polygamous or monogamous) is associated with sexual activity among school students in Nigeria. Cross sectional school survey with a two stage, clustered sampling design. 4218 students aged 12-21 years attending 39 schools in Plateau state, Nigeria. Responses from 2705 students were included in the analysis. Report of ever having had sexual intercourse. Variables of interest included sexual history, age, sex, religion, family polygamy, educational level of parents, having a dead parent, and sense of connectedness to parents and school. Overall 909 students (34%) reported ever having had sexual intercourse, and 1119 (41%) reported a polygamous family structure. Sexual activity was more common among students from polygamous families (42% of students) than monogamous families (28%) (chi2=64.23; Pforced sex. Secondary school students in Nigeria from a polygamous family structure are more likely to have engaged in sexual activity than students from a monogamous family structure. This effect is partly explained by a higher likelihood of marriage during adolescence and forced sex. Students' sense of connectedness to their parents and school, regardless of family structure, decreases the likelihood of sexual activity, and fostering this sense may help reduce risky sexual behaviour among Nigerian youth.

  5. Scottish Health Survey 2016: Volume 1: Main Report

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    The Scottish Health Survey 2016 report presents statistics on mental health, general health and caring, alcohol consumption, smoking, diet, physical activity, obesity, respiratory conditions, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

  6. A Survey of Psychostimulant Use among University Students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Substance use was prevalent among students. While previous studies suggested high prevalence of substance abuse, no study has been reported among university students in Sokoto north western Nigeria. Aim: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of psychoactive substance use among university ...

  7. Understanding Why Students Participate in Multiple Surveys: Who are the Hard-Core Responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at survey response across multiple surveys to understand who the hard-core survey responders and non-responders are. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use the number of surveys…

  8. FY 2004 Top 200 Users Survey Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    .... This survey has been administered annually by the Proactive Customer Advocacy Program (PROCAP) since 1999 to gather input from core users about DTIC's products and services that influence customer satisfaction...

  9. 2001 FEMP customer survey summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Nicholas P. [TecMRKT Works, Oregon, WI (United States); Reed, John H. [TecMRKT Works, Oregon, WI (United States); Riggert, Jeff [TecMRKT Works, Oregon, WI (United States); Oh, Andrew [TecMRKT Works, Oregon, WI (United States); Jordan, Gretchen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2002-04-01

    The study was targeted to collect information from the average FEMP customer. As a result, the respondents in this survey represent 27 different federal agencies and a group of private contractors who have contracts with one or more federal agencies

  10. Survey and Certification - Enforcement - 2567 Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This website provides high level results of the surveys conducted by the State Agencies captured by the ASPEN system. It provides deficiency information for Nursing...

  11. FY 2002 Customer Satisfaction Survey Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    .... In addition, the survey queried customers in six areas: Customer Service Experiences, Global Customer Service Performance, DTIC Products and Services, DTIC Online Services, User Demographics, Communication/Access and Information Requirements...

  12. A Survey of Undergraduate Student Perceptions and Use of Nutrition Information Labels in a University Dining Hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Olivia D.; Roberto, Christina A.; Kim, Jane H.; Schwartz, Marlene B.; Brownell, Kelly D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine undergraduate student perceptions and reported use of nutrition information labels in campus dining halls.Design: Paper surveys were administered to a convenience sample of undergraduates. Setting: This study was conducted at an urban United States university. Method: A survey about perceptions and use of nutrition…

  13. Blended learning in ethics education: a survey of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-05-01

    Nurses are experiencing new ethical issues as a result of global developments and changes in health care. With health care becoming increasingly sophisticated, and countries facing challenges of graying population, ethical issues involved in health care are bound to expand in quantity and in depth. Blended learning rather as a combination of multiple delivery media designed to promote meaningful learning. Specifically, this study was focused on two questions: (1) the students' satisfaction and attitudes as members of a scenario-based learning process in a blended learning environment; (2) the relationship between students' satisfaction ratings of nursing ethics course and their attitudes in the blended learning environment. In total, 99 senior undergraduate nursing students currently studying at a public nursing college in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted in this study. The participants were asked to fill out two Likert-scale questionnaire surveys: CAAS (Case Analysis Attitude Scale), and BLSS (Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale). The results showed what students felt about their blended learning experiences - mostly items ranged from 3.27-3.76 (the highest score is 5). Another self-assessment of scenario analysis instrument revealed the mean scores ranged from 2.87-4.19. Nearly 57.8% of the participants rated the course 'extremely helpful' or 'very helpful.' This study showed statistically significant correlations (r=0.43) between students' satisfaction with blended learning and case analysis attitudes. In addition, results testified to a potential of the blended learning model proposed in this study to bridge the gap between students and instructors and the one between students and their peers, which are typical of blended learning, and to create meaningful learning by employing blended pedagogical consideration in the course design. The use of scenario instruction enables students to develop critical

  14. Moose Survey-Inventory Progress Report : Unit 15B Soldotna

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the 1972 moose surveys on Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Game Management Unit 15(B). Harvest report returns indicate a hunter harvest of 73...

  15. A New Take on Student Lab Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Edmund

    2014-01-01

    The written lab report--a concise and accurate accounting of an experiment, including a summary of the procedure, presentation of the results, reasoned analysis, and thoughtful explanation--is essential to the scientific endeavor and a key expression and product of inquiry. Generally, however, students and teachers dislike these reports, the…

  16. Burnout risk in medical students in Spain using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Fernando; Sanmartín, Arturo; Polo, Juan; Giner, Lucas

    2011-04-01

    It is questionable whether the Maslach Burnout is suitable for studying burnout prevalence in preclinical medical students because many questions are patient-centered and the students have little or no contact with patients. Among factors associated with burnout in medical students, the gender shows conflicting results. The first aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the risk of burnout in medical students in preclinical and clinical years of training, using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, specifically designed and validated to assess the burnout in university students, and secondly, to investigate the association between gender and burnout subscales. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 270 Spanish medical students-176 (65%) in the third year and 94 (35%) in the sixth year of training-using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey questionnaire. Internal consistencies (Cronbach's alpha) for the three subscales on the whole sample were as follows: for exhaustion 0.78, cynicism 0.78, and efficacy 0.71. Moreover, the prevalence of burnout risk was significantly higher in sixth-year students 35 (37.5%) compared with students in third year of training 26 (14.8%) (χ(2) test, p burnout subscales. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey overcame difficulties encountered when students have little or no contact with patients. Our findings show that the risk of burnout prevalence doubled from the third year to sixth year of training and that gender was not significantly associated with any of the subscales of burnout.

  17. Minority Student Progress Report, 1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Porfirio R.; Luan, Jing

    This report offers a consolidated systemwide analysis of key issues and recommendations for improvement of minority recruitment and retention at Arizona State Universities and an evaluation of progress toward achieving Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) approved recruitment and graduation goals. A description of ABOR system goals notes three goals:…

  18. Robust resilience and substantial interest: a survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement among university students in the UK and Ireland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilina Singh

    Full Text Available Use of 'smart drugs' among UK students is described in frequent media reports as a rapidly increasing phenomenon. This article reports findings from the first large-scale survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE among students in the UK and Ireland. Conducted from February to September 2012, a survey of a convenience sample of 877 students measured PCE prevalence, attitudes, sources, purposes and ethics. Descriptive and logistic regression statistical methods were used to analyse the data. Lifetime prevalence of PCE using modafinil, methylphenidate or Adderall was under 10%, while past regular and current PCE users of these substances made up between 0.3%-4% of the survey population. A substantial majority of students was unaware of and/or uninterested in PCE; however about one third of students were interested in PCE. PCE users were more likely to be male, British and older students; predictors of PCE use included awareness of other students using PCEs, ADHD symptomatology, ethical concerns, and alcohol and cannabis use. The survey addresses the need for better evidence about PCE prevalence and practices among university students in the UK. We recommend PCE-related strategies for universities based on the survey findings.

  19. Robust resilience and substantial interest: a survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement among university students in the UK and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ilina; Bard, Imre; Jackson, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Use of 'smart drugs' among UK students is described in frequent media reports as a rapidly increasing phenomenon. This article reports findings from the first large-scale survey of pharmacological cognitive enhancement (PCE) among students in the UK and Ireland. Conducted from February to September 2012, a survey of a convenience sample of 877 students measured PCE prevalence, attitudes, sources, purposes and ethics. Descriptive and logistic regression statistical methods were used to analyse the data. Lifetime prevalence of PCE using modafinil, methylphenidate or Adderall was under 10%, while past regular and current PCE users of these substances made up between 0.3%-4% of the survey population. A substantial majority of students was unaware of and/or uninterested in PCE; however about one third of students were interested in PCE. PCE users were more likely to be male, British and older students; predictors of PCE use included awareness of other students using PCEs, ADHD symptomatology, ethical concerns, and alcohol and cannabis use. The survey addresses the need for better evidence about PCE prevalence and practices among university students in the UK. We recommend PCE-related strategies for universities based on the survey findings.

  20. Occupational Survey Report. Fabrication and Parachute

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    performed by more than 30 percent of the first-enlistment group not matched to the Plan of Instruction (POI). 5. Job Satisfacion Analysis: The job ...DISTRIBUTION FOR AFSC 2A7X4 OSR AND SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS ANL TNG JOB OSR EXT EXT INV AL/HRMM 2 ARMY OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY BRANCH I CCAF/AYX I DEFENSE...6 Overview of Specialty Jobs

  1. FY16 Uzbekistan Country Opinion Survey Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2016-01-01

    The Country Opinion Survey in Uzbekistan assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Uzbekistan perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Uzbekistan on 1) their views regarding the general enviro...

  2. FY15 Ethiopia Country Opinion Survey Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2015-01-01

    The Country Opinion Survey in Ethiopia assists the World Bank Group (WBG) in gaining a better understanding of how stakeholders in Ethiopia perceive the WBG. It provides the WBG with systematic feedback from national and local governments, multilateral/bilateral agencies, media, academia, the private sector, and civil society in Ethiopia on 1) their views regarding the general environment ...

  3. AED in Europe. Report on a survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bahr, Jan; Bossaert, Leo; Handley, Anthony; Koster, Ruud; Vissers, Bart; Monsieurs, Koen

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Based on the strategies for community defibrillation defined by a joint policy conference of ESC and ERC, we have conducted a survey to identify the current status of AED programmes in Europe. METHODS: All registered visitors to the website of the ERC were contacted by e-mail and

  4. International medical students--a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D; Junne, F; Zipfel, S; Duelli, R; Resch, F; Herzog, W; Nikendei, C

    2015-01-01

    Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties' perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  5. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D.; Junne, F.; Zipfel, S.; Duelli, R.; Resch, F.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential. PMID:25699112

  6. A national benchmarking survey of student counselling centres/units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most counselling centres/units offer psychotherapeutic services to students, and the main focus areas reported were crisis intervention (reported as a key focus area by all the centres/units), psychotherapy, substance abuse counselling, career counselling, study skills and generic skills workshops. The present study further ...

  7. Medical Student Experiences on Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Rotations: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Fremonta; Abbasi, Omair; Kasick, David; Lee, Kewchang; Pelic, Christine; Zinser, Jennifer; Harris, Thomas; Funk, Margo

    Consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry clerkship rotations may improve medical students' understanding of psychiatric principles relevant to the settings in which they will ultimately practice. This study aimed to characterize students' experiences on C-L rotations. This cross-sectional survey study, sponsored by the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine Subcommittee on Medical Student Education, was conducted at 5 US medical schools between 2012 and 2016. After the C-L rotation, students completed a voluntary 17-item survey. A total of 235 surveys were collected (mean response rate = 92%). The most frequently endorsed benefit of C-L was learning to manage psychiatric disorders in the context of medical illness (89%). The most frequently endorsed drawback was inconsistent/excessively variable workload (40%). Overall, 82% of respondents recommended C-L to other students; 80% reported that the ideal clerkship would include exposure to both C-L and inpatient psychiatry. Overall, 38% reported that their C-L experience increased their interest in psychiatry as a career. Effect of C-L on interest in psychiatry did not differ by study site, age, sex, clerkship length, or time spent on C-L. Respondents who noted more positive role-modeling on C-L compared to other clerkship rotations were more likely to report increased interest in a psychiatry career (odds ratio = 2.70). Most medical students perceive C-L rotations favorably. Positive role modeling may increase their consideration of psychiatry specialization. The findings that C-L rotation length did not correlate with attitudes and that most students preferred exposure to both inpatient and C-L psychiatry suggest that C-L exposure can beneficially be integrated into core clerkships containing other elements. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A comprehensive survey of current and former college students with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbar, Nicholas W; Shefyck, Allison; Reichow, Brian

    2015-03-01

    There is a paucity of research concerning individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) pursuing higher education. This study sought to augment this gap in the literature by surveying individuals with ASD who are currently college students or who have previously attended college. Thirty-five individuals completed an online survey. These individuals reported receiving extensive academic supports that enabled their academic success. Their reported difficulties in the social and emotional domains received less support. In addition, not all areas of campus life were supportive, as study abroad and career service offices were reported to not understand individuals with ASD. Overall, the results of this survey indicate the importance of self-advocacy and the need for institutions of higher education to provide comprehensive supports for individuals with ASD in the academic, social, and emotional domains in order to effectively integrate this group into the campus environment.

  9. Information-Seeking Behaviors of Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Aoife Marie; Westby, Erin Patricia; Dooley, Joseph; Gordon, Kevin E

    2015-06-29

    Medical students face an information-rich environment in which retrieval and appraisal strategies are increasingly important. To describe medical students' current pattern of health information resource use and characterize their experience of instruction on information search and appraisal. We conducted a cross-sectional web-based survey of students registered in the four-year MD Program at Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Saint John, New Brunswick, sites), Canada. We collected self-reported data on information-seeking behavior, instruction, and evaluation of resources in the context of their medical education. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Surveys were returned by 213 of 462 eligible students (46.1%). Most respondents (165/204, 80.9%) recalled receiving formal instruction regarding information searches, but this seldom included nontraditional tools such as Google (23/107, 11.1%), Wikipedia, or social media. In their daily practice, however, they reported heavy use of these tools, as well as EBM summaries. Accessibility, understandability, and overall usefulness were common features of highly used resources. Students identified challenges managing information and/or resource overload and source accessibility. Medical students receive instruction primarily on searching and assessing primary medical literature. In their daily practice, however, they rely heavily on nontraditional tools as well as EBM summaries. Attention to appropriate use and appraisal of nontraditional sources might enhance the current EBM curriculum.

  10. Injury risk behaviours among young Asian New Zealanders: a national survey of secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasanathan, Kumanan; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Tin Tin, Sandar; Robinson, Elizabeth; Chen, Janet; Young, Wilson; Watson, Peter D

    2008-02-01

    To investigate injury risk behaviours among young Asian New Zealanders. Secondary analysis of data from Youth2000, a nationwide cross-sectional youth health survey conducted in 2001 in a random sample of New Zealand (NZ) secondary schools using a multimedia, computer-assisted, self-administered interview. Of the 9,567 survey participants (aged 12 to 18 years), this study was restricted to students who identified with an 'Asian' ethnic category (n=922). Many young Asian New Zealanders report engaging in injury risk behaviours, including: not using helmets when cycling; dangerous drink and drug driving; and being intentionally physically harmed by others. NZ-born Asian students are more likely than overseas-born Asian students to report most of these risky behaviours. Chinese and Indian students are less likely to engage in most of these behaviours than their NZ European peers. While young Asian New Zealanders are a relatively healthy population, many engage in well-recognised injury risk behaviours. The lower levels of these risky behaviours in Indian and Chinese students compared with NZ European students, and the positive dose-response effect seen in relation to duration of residence in NZ, are likely to be due to the effect of acculturation. Injury prevention strategies for young people in NZ need to specifically consider the diversity, context and specific risk profiles of young Asian New Zealanders. Health promotion efforts for this group should target the use of safety equipment and risky driving behaviours and consider traditional cultural practices that may be protective.

  11. Construction and Validation of the Student-Athlete Environmental and Academic Orientation Survey (SEAOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullenbach, Lauren E.; Green, Gary T.

    2016-01-01

    Many surveys exist that measure environmental orientations, yet few measure learning outcomes, such as self-efficacy, and even fewer specifically target student-athletes. Hence, this study created a survey, named the Student-Athlete Environmental and Academic Orientation Survey (SEAOS), which measured student-athletes' environmental attitudes,…

  12. Reporting Guidelines for Survey Research: An Analysis of Published Guidance and Reporting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Carol; Khangura, Sara; Brehaut, Jamie C.; Graham, Ian D.; Moher, David; Potter, Beth K.; M. Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Background Research needs to be reported transparently so readers can critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the design, conduct, and analysis of studies. Reporting guidelines have been developed to inform reporting for a variety of study designs. The objective of this study was to identify whether there is a need to develop a reporting guideline for survey research. Methods and Findings We conducted a three-part project: (1) a systematic review of the literature (including “Instructions to Authors” from the top five journals of 33 medical specialties and top 15 general and internal medicine journals) to identify guidance for reporting survey research; (2) a systematic review of evidence on the quality of reporting of surveys; and (3) a review of reporting of key quality criteria for survey research in 117 recently published reports of self-administered surveys. Fewer than 7% of medical journals (n = 165) provided guidance to authors on survey research despite a majority having published survey-based studies in recent years. We identified four published checklists for conducting or reporting survey research, none of which were validated. We identified eight previous reviews of survey reporting quality, which focused on issues of non-response and accessibility of questionnaires. Our own review of 117 published survey studies revealed that many items were poorly reported: few studies provided the survey or core questions (35%), reported the validity or reliability of the instrument (19%), defined the response rate (25%), discussed the representativeness of the sample (11%), or identified how missing data were handled (11%). Conclusions There is limited guidance and no consensus regarding the optimal reporting of survey research. The majority of key reporting criteria are poorly reported in peer-reviewed survey research articles. Our findings highlight the need for clear and consistent reporting guidelines specific to survey research. Please see

  13. First year nursing students use of social media within education: Results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Ann M; Devis, Kate; LeMoine, Gayle; Crouch, Sarah; South, Nicole; Hossain, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Social media rapidly disseminates information but is a controversial learning platform in nurse education. This study aimed to explore how students viewed the use of Twitter, and other social media, in their first year of a nursing degree. The aim of this study was to evaluate first year student nurses' use of social media, before and after commencing a pre-registration programme, where Twitter was used in a module. A cross-sectional approach using a descriptive survey was completed. An online survey, that included Likert scale and open questions, was open for one month in 2016. All students on Nursing Undergraduate Degrees, in Adult, Child and Mental Health, who were in the first year of their programme were eligible to participate. 121 students took part with a response rate of 32%. Most students were positive about using social media as they found it an engaging way to promote discussion and share information. Students use of Twitter changed in the first year with 19.8% using it once or more per week on commencement of the programme which increased to 45.5%; other social media platforms remained static. Most students (57.8%) understood the purpose of using Twitter although 14% reported that it was not used within their module; thus, not all students gained experience of using the social media. 81% of students said that using Twitter had been beneficial to increase awareness of nursing issues within their course. However, there were areas that students found difficult such as time, and not knowing what to say. The study suggests that teaching about social media, and incorporating it into learning activities, may be beneficial for students. However, more research into the subject using an experimental design to assess changes over time would be useful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. DMPTuuli user survey report – Tuuli project

    OpenAIRE

    Salmi, Anna; Ahokas, Minna

    2016-01-01

    The questionnaire was planned and carried out by Tuuli office and Tuuli project’s User group. It was agreed that the questionnaire should focus on themes concerning the purpose of using DMPTuuli, usage, usability & technical features and DMP guidance offered in DMPTuuli. The questionnaire was carried out in October 2016 with an online analysis and survey tool Webropol. This software enables sending of electronic questionnaires and conducting both quantitative and qualitative analysis of t...

  15. Building 211 cyclotron characterization survey report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-30

    The Building 211 Cyclotron Characterization Survey includes an assessment of the radioactive and chemical inventory of materials stored within the facility; an evaluation of the relative distribution of accelerator-produced activation products within various cyclotron components and adjacent structures; measurement of the radiation fields throughout the facility; measurement and assessment of internal and external radioactive surface contamination on various equipment, facility structures, and air-handling systems; and an assessment of lead (Pb) paint and asbestos hazards within the facility.

  16. Coping with stress: a survey of Murdoch University veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sandy M; Arnold, Pauline K; Mills, Jennifer N

    2005-01-01

    Students in veterinary schools can experience stress in balancing the different demands on them-academic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and professional or work related-as well as managing potential conflict between animal and human interests. Practicing veterinarians report many similar stressors and reactions. Stressful stimuli produce stress reactions that can be inimical to physical and psychological well-being, and students' performance in veterinary programs can be adversely affected if they do not have coping resources. While there has been some research into stress among university students in general, and among medical students in particular, there is little on the experience of veterinary students. This article describes a study by the School of Psychology, commissioned by the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, at Murdoch University in Western Australia. It was designed to investigate the levels and causes of stress among, and the frequency and type of coping strategies used by, fourth- and fifth-year students. Results indicate that the students in this cohort faced frequent stressors and felt at least moderately stressed but did not routinely and systematically use a range of coping strategies. Academic stressors and perceived responsibilities attached to moving into practical or professional areas figured strongly and were associated with higher levels of stress in the students, in particular physical sequelae. Though the numbers were small, it is of concern that some students were using measures that were potentially harmful. Some recommendations are made here about measures that veterinary programs may be able to incorporate to address stress in their students. Information is included on current strategies within the curriculum to manage potential stressful situations as part of students' professional development.

  17. 78 FR 15800 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Student Survey ACTION: Notice of request for public... INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys. OMB Control Number: none. Type of...: SV2012-0007 (Foreign Exchange students) and SV2012-0010 (U.S. Exchange students). Respondents: Exchange...

  18. 77 FR 75251 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys ACTION: Notice of request for...: ] Title of Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request...: SV2012-0007 (Foreign Exchange students) and SV2012-0010 (U.S. Exchange students). Respondents: Exchange...

  19. Nursing students motivation toward their studies – a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Kerstin EL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study focuses on Swedish nursing students' motivation toward their studies during their three year academic studies. Earlier studies show the importance of motivation for study commitment and result. The aim was to analyze nursing students' estimation of their degree of motivation during different semester during their education and to identify reasons for the degree of motivation. Methods A questionnaire asking for scoring motivation and what influenced the degree of motivation was distributed to students enrolled in a nursing programme. 315 students who studied at different semesters participated. Analyzes were made by statistical calculation and content analysis. Results The mean motivation score over all semesters was 6.3 (ranked between 0–10 and differed significantly during the semesters with a tendency to lower score during the 5th semester. Students (73/315 with motivation score 6 reported positive opinions to becoming a nurse (125/234, organization of the programme and attitude to the studies. The mean score value for the motivation ranking differed significantly between male (5.8 and female (6.8 students. Conclusion Conclusions to be drawn are that nursing students mainly grade their motivation positive distributed different throughout their entire education. The main motivation factor was becoming a nurse. This study result highlights the need of understanding the students' situation and their need of tutorial support.

  20. Nursing students motivation toward their studies - a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Kerstin El; Warrén Stomberg, Margareta I

    2008-04-25

    This study focuses on Swedish nursing students' motivation toward their studies during their three year academic studies. Earlier studies show the importance of motivation for study commitment and result. The aim was to analyze nursing students' estimation of their degree of motivation during different semester during their education and to identify reasons for the degree of motivation. A questionnaire asking for scoring motivation and what influenced the degree of motivation was distributed to students enrolled in a nursing programme. 315 students who studied at different semesters participated. Analyzes were made by statistical calculation and content analysis. The mean motivation score over all semesters was 6.3 (ranked between 0-10) and differed significantly during the semesters with a tendency to lower score during the 5th semester. Students (73/315) with motivation score motivation score >6 reported positive opinions to becoming a nurse (125/234), organization of the programme and attitude to the studies. The mean score value for the motivation ranking differed significantly between male (5.8) and female (6.8) students. Conclusions to be drawn are that nursing students mainly grade their motivation positive distributed different throughout their entire education. The main motivation factor was becoming a nurse. This study result highlights the need of understanding the students' situation and their need of tutorial support.

  1. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Kitty; Lydall, Gregory J; Malik, Amit; Ndetei, David M; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2014-01-15

    Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students' career intentions, motivations, medical school teaching and exposure to psychiatry. We assessed students' attitudes and personality factors. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the joint effect of factors upon the main outcome. 2198 of 9135 (24%) of students responded (range 4 to 91%) across the countries. Internationally 4.5% of students definitely considered psychiatry as a career (range 1 to 12%). 19% of students (range 0 to 33%) were "quite likely", and 25% were "definitely not" considering psychiatry. Female gender, experience of mental/physical illness, media portrayal of doctors, and positive attitudes to psychiatry, but not personality factors, were associated with choosing psychiatry. Quality of psychiatric placement (correlation coefficient = 0.22, p students choosing psychiatry: importance of own vocation, odds ratio (OR) 3.01, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.91, p student selection and psychiatry teaching which affect career choice. Addressing these factors may improve recruitment to psychiatry internationally.

  2. Bat Acoustic Survey Report for ORNL: Bat Species Distribution on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, Kitty [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giffen, Neil R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Haines, Angelina [XCEL Engineering Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guge, B. J. [Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Evans, James W. [Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA), Nashville, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes results of a three-year acoustic survey of bat species on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The survey was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division and ORNL Facilities and Operations Directorate, Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency’s ORR wildlife manager, a student from Tennessee Technological University, and a technician contracted through Excel Corp. One hundred and twenty-six sites were surveyed reservation-wide using Wildlife Acoustics SM2+ Acoustic Bat Detectors.

  3. Report on the Policy Community Survey

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ferent types of information exchanges, South Asian and. Latin American stakeholders say databases / statisti- cal databanks and online/electronic publications and reports are most useful to their work. In Africa, data- bases / statistical databanks are also considered among the most useful, after print publications or reports.

  4. Clinical evaluation tools: a survey of doctors of chiropractic and students at one chiropractic college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansholt, Barbara A; Vining, Robert D

    2016-03-01

    The reliability and validity of many evaluation tools leading to clinical decision-making for spinal manipulation are varied. We surveyed senior students and DC employees at one chiropractic college regarding 1) which analysis tools should be used and 2) factors that influence their choices. The survey queried which tools should be used on a routine patient encounter. Clinical evaluation tools included palpation, skin temperature analysis, leg length analysis, and radiographs. Surveys were collected from 58 doctors of chiropractic (DCs) and 74 students. Respondents from both groups reported to most commonly use static palpation, followed by motion palpation and leg length analysis. DC respondents ranked evidence and personal experience high for rationale; student respondents frequently chose patient preference. DC and student respondents reported use of clinical evaluation tools consistently. However, some variations in rationale were noted. It is important for educators to provide a balanced presentation of the strengths and limitations of clinical analysis procedures to support the development of well-justified evidence-based clinical decision-making skills.

  5. IT Department User Survey PDF Usage Report

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Pete

    2017-01-01

    During 2016 the IT-CDA group carried out a study of IT users and their working environments and habits with the aim of understanding the user community better. This project involved interviews with users from different working backgrounds and an online survey containing questions of user devices and software preferences. A section of the questions was aimed at understanding how people handle PDF documents and this note analyses the responses to these. This analysis will help IT-CDA to better understand the PDF requirements and so help us to improve the services that rely on these documents.

  6. Teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students - A survey in German-speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Florian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a survey about teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students in German-speaking countries. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the 33 academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in Germany, Austria, and the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Results All departments responded. For teaching knowledge, the methods most commonly reported were lectures and case presentations. The most important skills to be taught were thought to be how to assess psychopathology in children and how to assess families. For elective courses, the departments reported using a wide range of teaching methods, many with active involvement of the students. An average of 34 hours per semester is currently allocated by the departments for teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to medical students. Required courses are often taught in cooperation with adult psychiatry and pediatrics. Achievement of educational objectives is usually assessed with written exams or multiple-choice tests. Only a minority of the departments test the achievement of skills. Conclusions Two ways of improving education in child and adolescent psychiatry are the introduction of elective courses for students interested in the field and participation of child and adolescent psychiatrists in required courses and in longitudinal courses so as to reach all students. Cooperation within and across medical schools can enable departments of child and adolescent psychiatry, despite limited resources, to become more visible and this specialty to become more attractive to medical students. Compared to the findings in earlier surveys, this survey indicates a trend towards increased involvement of academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in training medical students.

  7. Nursing Student Loan Debt: A Secondary Analysis of the National Student Nurses' Association Annual Survey of New Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeg, Veronica D; Mancino, Diane J

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe nursing student loan debt and financial choices from a secondary analysis of the National Student Nurses Association Annual New Graduate Survey. The findings in the secondary analysis show loan debt incurred by nursing students comparable to loan debt reported recently for all new college graduates in general. However, comparing types of programs and types of schools yielded clear variations. More than one-third of new graduates who reported having loans to repay were unemployed; more than one-quarter of those who worked part-time and one-quarter of those who worked full-time to finance their education were unemployed; and almost one-third of students whose parents had paid for their education were unemployed. New graduates from for-profit schools were more likely to report they had accumulated high debt to pay for school than all new graduates combined. Nursing students enter the job market with substantial financial debt that may impact their future. Educators and policymakers need to address these growing concerns to sustain a healthy supply of nurses.

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), conducted September 14 through 25, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Fermilab. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Fermilab, and interviews with site personnel. 110 refs., 26 figs., 41 tabs.

  9. Medical student illness and impairment: a vignette-based survey study involving 955 students at 9 medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Warner, Teddy D; Rogers, Melinda; Horwitz, Russell; Redgrave, Graham

    2005-01-01

    Physician impairment is defined by the presence of a physical, mental, or substance-related disorder that interferes with the ability to practice medicine competently and safely. The seeds of impairment may be sown early in adulthood, and medical students experience health issues that may receive insufficient attention in the context of a rigorous training period. Few empirical studies have examined the attitudes of medical students toward recognizing and acting upon signs of potentially impairing illnesses in peers. Medical students at 9 medical schools were invited to participate in a written survey exploring personal health care issues during training. As part of this larger project, students were asked to imagine their response in 3 situations to a medical student who is discovered to have serious symptoms and potential impairment secondary to mental illness, substance abuse, or diabetes. Responses were gathered from 955 students (52% overall response rate). For all of the vignettes, "tell no one but encourage him/her to seek professional help" was the most prevalent reaction (45%, 53%, and 49%, respectively) as opposed to seek advice (37%, 35%, and 42%) and notify the Dean's office (18%, 12%, and 9%). Willingness to report varied by school, and women were somewhat less likely to formally report medical student illness. This study suggests that medical students attach great importance to preserving the confidentiality of fellow medical students who may experience even very severe symptoms. This pattern may have important implications for the early recognition and treatment of potentially impairing disorders. Greater attention to these issues may help assure the health of early career physicians as well as the many patients whose safety and well-being are entrusted to their care.

  10. Student Progress Report: Summer 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Lucas P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-06

    The Los Alamos SOURCES 4C code has been benchmarked for alpha particle beam problems and common neutron source materials (e.g. those containing plutonium or beryllium), but little benchmarking has been performed for more exotic isotopic neutron sources or uranium mixtures. This work extends SOURCES 4C benchmarking effort. Experimental data was found in the literature for several isotopic neutron sources, namely Am/Be, Am/F, Am/B, Cm/Be, {sup 238}Pu/{sup 13}C, {sup 252}Cf, and Am/Li. SOURCES 4C simulations were run for each of these materials and the output was used to develop a source term for use in MCNP, which allowed other physical effects such as down scattering and multiplication to be accounted for. Neutron emission rate and energy spectra results were compared for these sources, generally yielding order-of-magnitude agreement for the neutron emission rate and qualitative agreement for the shape of the neutron energy spectra. An exception was the neutron energy spectrum calculated for {sup 238}Pu/{sup 13}C whose primary peak was calculated to be 1 MeV higher than was measured. The accuracy of SOURCES is highly dependent on an accurate material definition. This discrepancy is likely due to inhomogeneity of the source materials, which cannot be simulated by SOURCES or MCNP, and chemical impurities not reported by the experimentalist. The results of the Am/Li calculation demonstrate that even small impurities are capable of dramatically changing the results. The neutron emission rates of numerous uranium compounds were also calculated with SOURCES and benchmarked with experimentally determined values found in the literature. The calculated results were similar to the experimental results with less than 10% error for the following compounds: uranyl fluoride, uranyl nitrate, UO{sub 3}, UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}, UF{sub 4}, UF{sub 6}, and U-metal of less than 90% enrichment. This work demonstrates the robustness of SOURCES as a tool for calculating neutron emission rates

  11. [A survey on knowledge, attitude and practice related to evidence-based dentistry among dental students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhong-Fu; Zhu, Ce; Tao, Dan-Ying; Feng, Xi-Ping; Lu, Hai-Xia

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the knowledge, attitude and practice related to evidence-based dentistry among dental students, and to provide a reference for targeted evidence-based dentistry teaching and practice evidence-based dentistry in dental students. Dental students who attended the internship in Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital and Pudong People's Hospital were invited to attend this survey. Information on knowledge, attitude and practices related evidence-based dentistry was collected through questionnaires. SPSS 21.0 software package was used for data analysis. A total of 62 dental students attended this survey. Evidence-based dentistry related knowledge and attitude scores were 5.5±1.9 and 5.1±1.0, respectively. Over three quarters of students took courses on evidence-based medicine, while around half of students (56.5%) self-reported that they knew little about evidence-based medicine. 70.5% students practiced evidence-based dentistry less than once in the process of clinical decision making per week. The majority of students (80.3%) used MEDLINE or other databases to search for practice-related literature less than once per week. 63.9% students used practice guideline. The top three barriers to practice evidence-based dentistry were lack of information resources, insufficient time and lack of search skills. Evidence-based dentistry related knowledge and practice among dental students is deficient, whereas they hold positive attitude on practice. The top three barriers to practice evidence-based dentistry are lack of information resources, insufficient time and lack of search skills.

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  13. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE), Y-12 Plant, conducted November 10 through 21 and December 9 through 11, 1986. This Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Y-12 Plant. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Y-12, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Y-12 Plant Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Y-12 Plant Survey. 80 refs., 76 figs., 61 tabs.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, conducted August 18 through September 5, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Hanford Site. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Hanford Site, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the Hanford Site. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Hanford Site Survey. 44 refs., 88 figs., 74 tabs.

  15. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Kansas City Plant (KCP), conducted March 23 through April 3, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the KCP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations performed at the KCP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the KCP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the KCP Survey. 94 refs., 39 figs., 55 tabs.

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pantex Facility, Amarillo, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex Facility, conducted November 3 through 14, 1986.The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialist, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Pantex Facility. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Pantex Facility, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Pantex Facility Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey for the Pantex Facility. 65 refs., 44 figs., 27 tabs.

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), conducted August 11 through 22, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the RFP. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulations. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data observations of the operations carried on at RFP, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activates. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the RFP Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the RFP Survey. 75 refs., 24 figs., 33 tabs.

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS), conducted June 22 through July 10, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the NTS. The Survey covers all environment media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations and activities performed at the NTS, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by the Battelle Columbus Division under contract with DOE. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the NTS Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the NTS Survey. 165 refs., 42 figs., 52 tabs.

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the environmental survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), conducted June 16 through 27, 1986. The survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the FMPC. The survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at FMPC, and interviews with site personnel. The survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its onsite activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE national laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the FMPC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the FMPC survey. 41 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

  1. Report on Solar Water Heating Quantitative Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Focus Marketing Services

    1999-05-06

    This report details the results of a quantitative research study undertaken to better understand the marketplace for solar water-heating systems from the perspective of home builders, architects, and home buyers.

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) conducted December 7--11, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PETC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PETC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site Survey activities at PETC. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the Plan's results will be incorporated into the PETC Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 64 refs., 23 figs., 29 tabs.

  3. Polydrug use among college students in Brazil: a nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Garcia de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the frequency of polydrug use (alcohol and illicit drugs among college students and its associations with gender and age group. Methods: A nationwide sample of 12,544 college students was asked to complete a questionnaire on their use of drugs according to three time parameters (lifetime, past 12 months, and last 30 days. The co-use of drugs was investigated as concurrent polydrug use (CPU and simultaneous polydrug use (SPU, a subcategory of CPU that involves the use of drugs at the same time or in close temporal proximity. Results: Almost 26% of college students reported having engaged in CPU in the past 12 months. Among these students, 37% had engaged in SPU. In the past 30 days, 17% college students had engaged in CPU. Among these, 35% had engaged in SPU. Marijuana was the illicit drug mostly frequently used with alcohol (either as CPU or SPU, especially among males. Among females, the most commonly reported combination was alcohol and prescribed medications. Conclusions: A high proportion of Brazilian college students may be engaging in polydrug use. College administrators should keep themselves informed to be able to identify such use and to develop educational interventions to prevent such behavior.

  4. Maine Student Athlete Alcohol and Other Drug Use Assessment, 1991. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primmerman, William

    This report presents findings from the Maine Student Athlete Alcohol and Other Drug Use Assessment conducted in 1991. It is noted that the survey instrument was comprised of 155 questions and was completed by 2,891 junior and senior high school student athletes in grades 7 through 12. Results are presented in these areas: (1) percent of athletes…

  5. Survey of research reports in transportation modelling. Part 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, A.; Wamsteker-Andriessen, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of research reports in transportation modelling in two parts. Part one is devided in reports concerning economic development and car mobility, analyzing large transportation data files and transportation planning and spatial development. Part two consists of reserach reports concerning

  6. Survey of research reports in transportation modelling. Part 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijsse, A.; Wamsteker-Andriessen, S.J.

    1993-01-01

    A survey of research reports in transportation modelling in two parts. Part one is devided in reports concerning economic development and car mobility, analyzing large transportation data files and transportation planning and spatial development. Part two consists of reserach reports concerning

  7. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report shows the results of vegetation transect survey done by refuge staff of the North Marsh at Presquile National Wildlife Refuge in September of 1982. There...

  8. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report outlines the findings of the first wetland vegetation transect survey that was done at Presquile National Wildlife Refuge since 1973 when the refuge was...

  9. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report discusses the results of a vegetation transect line survey done in 1971 at the North Marsh of Prequile National Wildlife Refuge. No management had been...

  10. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a hand-written report outlining the results of a vegetation transect survey done in the North Marsh of Presquile National Wildlife Refuge in August of 1978.

  11. Anuran Survey Report 2003 Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of a few different studies conducted at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge between 1999-2002. It includes the Anuran Breeding Call Surveys...

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

  13. [Survey regarding mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Isao; Fujii, Chiyo; Fukuzawa, Ayako

    2013-01-01

    We administered a self-reporting questionnaire survey regarding the mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues. In addition, we discussed the requirements for high school students' mental health support system. The subjects were 3,312 students and 208 teachers in four Shizuoka prefectural public high schools in 2009. University Personality Inventory (UPI) is usually conducted to assess university students' mental state and is a questionnaire that high school students can answer easily. Therefore, we adopted UPI for this survey. UPI was composed of 56 unhealthy and 4 healthy condition items. High school students completed the UPI and determined the sum of unhealthy condition items; a higher score indicated a poorer mental health status. The average UPI score of all students (n = 3,312) was 12.7 points, and that of females (n = 1,217)was 15.2 points, which was significantly higher than the 11.3 points of males (n = 2,095). Those with scores > or = 30 points (7.5%), which was more than half of the maximum score, were designated as the High Score (HS) group and considered to have poor mental health. Those with scores of > or = 40 (1.4%) seemed to have very poor mental health, and there was concern that they may be suffering from psychosis. Our observations indicated that HS students were likely to avoid seeking help regarding mental health issues, which was especially true for male HS students. The majority of students chose their friends and parents as advisers, but HS students were significantly more likely to choose advisers who were engaged in jobs related to medical work. Students in both the HS and non-HS groups who did not wish to consult anyone else about their mental conditions wanted to be approached by those around them. High school teachers hesitated to intervene with mentally disturbed students and attempted to resolve problems within the school. Thus, it appears

  14. When Students Grade Their Teachers: A Validity Analysis of the Tripod Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhfeld, Megan

    2017-01-01

    This article develops a validity argument for the use of the Tripod student survey of instructional practices to assess teacher effectiveness in summative teacher evaluations and professional development decisions. This paper expands upon previous research in three ways: (a) it draws from current validity thinking to examine the evidence for…

  15. 77 FR 772 - International Services Surveys and Direct Investment Surveys Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... 0691-AA81, and referencing the agency name (Bureau of Economic Analysis), by any of the following... Bureau of Economic Analysis 15 CFR Parts 801, 806, and 807 RIN 0691-AA81 International Services Surveys and Direct Investment Surveys Reporting AGENCY: Bureau of Economic Analysis. ACTION: Proposed rule...

  16. Report on Survey of Industry Needs for Quality. Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neylon, Kevin; And Others

    The TAFE (Technical and Further Education) National Centre for Research and Development conducted a survey to determine industry needs for quality training in Australia. Interviews were conducted with managers in manufacturing and tourism/hospitality companies throughout Australia, especially with firms with a high reputation. Interview forms were…

  17. INOPS Survey data report for Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Andrej Christian; Hansen, Morten Balle; Østergaard, Jeppe

    This data report provides statistics on the organization, management and performance of different ways of providing maintenance services within the municipal park and road sector(s) in Denmark. The statistics rely on data collected in the period from November 2014 to February 2015 through an online...

  18. Astor Pass Seismic Surveys Preliminary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louie, John [UNR; Pullammanappallil, Satish [Optim; Faulds, James; Eisses, Amy; Kell, Annie; Frary, Roxanna; Kent, Graham

    2011-08-05

    In collaboration with the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) and Optim re-processed, or collected and processed, over 24 miles of 2d seismic-reflection data near the northwest corner of Pyramid Lake, Nevada. The network of 2d land surveys achieved a near-3d density at the Astor Pass geothermal prospect that the PLPT drilled during Nov. 2010 to Feb. 2011. The Bureau of Indian Affairs funded additional seismic work around the Lake, and an extensive, detailed single-channel marine survey producing more than 300 miles of section, imaging more than 120 ft below the Lake bottom. Optim’s land data collection utilized multiple heavy vibrators and recorded over 200 channels live, providing a state-of-the-art reflection-refraction data set. After advanced seismic analysis including first-arrival velocity optimization and prestack depth migration, the 2d sections show clear fault-plane reflections, in some areas as deep as 4000 ft, tying to distinct terminations of the mostly volcanic stratigraphy. Some lines achieved velocity control to 3000 ft depth; all lines show reflections and terminations to 5000 ft depth. Three separate sets of normal faults appear in an initial interpretation of fault reflections and stratigraphic terminations, after loading the data into the OpendTect 3d seismic visualization system. Each preliminary fault set includes a continuous trace more than 3000 ft long, and a swarm of short fault strands. The three preliminary normal-fault sets strike northerly with westward dip, northwesterly with northeast dip, and easterly with north dip. An intersection of all three fault systems documented in the seismic sections at the end of Phase I helped to locate the APS-2 and APS-3 slimholes. The seismic sections do not show the faults connected to the Astor Pass tufa spire, suggesting that we have imaged mostly Tertiary-aged faults. We hypothesize that the Recent, active faults that produced the tufa through hotspring

  19. German medical students´ exposure and attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotion: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahnke, Kristine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: Early contact of medical students with pharmaceutical promotion has been shown in many international studies. We assessed the frequency and places of contact of German medical students to pharmaceutical promotion and examined their attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotional activities.Methods: This cross-sectional survey was based on a self-developed questionnaire. It was distributed to all clinical students at the University of Goettingen Medical School in 2010. A 4-point rating scale was used to assess the attitudes toward different statements regarding pharmaceutical promotion.Results: The overall response rate was 55% (702/1287. The proportion of students with direct contact to pharmaceutical sales representatives increased from 21% in the first clinical year up to 77% in the final year. 60% were contacted during their elective clerkship. 80% had accepted promotional gifts. 86% stated their prescribing behavior to be unsusceptible to the influence of accepting promotional gifts. However, 35% of the unsusceptible students assumed doctors to be susceptible. Almost all (90% reported that dealing with pharmaceutical promotion was never addressed during lectures and 65% did not feel well prepared for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. 19% agreed to prohibit contacts between medical students and the pharmaceutical industry.Conclusions: German medical students get in contact with pharmaceutical promotion early and frequently. There is limited awareness for associated conflicts of interests. Medical schools need to regulate contacts and incorporate the topic in their curriculum to prepare students for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

  1. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Ames Laboratory, conducted April 18 through 22, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are being supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Ames Laboratory. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Ames Laboratory, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A plan is being developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When S A is completed, the results will be incorporated into the Ames Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 60 refs., 13 figs., 20 tabs.

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex, Piketon, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Complex (PUEC), conducted August 4 through August 15, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team specialists are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at PUEC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Argonne National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the PUEC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the PUEC Survey. 55 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  4. Experiences of Psychological Distress and Sources of Stress and Support During Medical Training: a Survey of Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Katherine M; Barrett, Tessa; Landine, Jeff; McLuckie, Alan; Soh, Nerissa Li-Weh; Walter, Garry

    2016-02-01

    The authors examine the prevalence of psychological distress, the stressors experienced, and the supports used by medical students and residents during their medical training at a Canadian university. This study used an online survey that included a standardized instrument to evaluate psychological distress (Kessler-10) and Likert-based survey items that examined stress levels related to family relationships, living accommodations, commuting, finances, and program requirements. Depressive symptoms, substance use, and suicidal ideation were also measured, as were supports accessed (e.g., counseling) and students' perceptions of the overall supportiveness of the university. Non-parametric descriptive statistics were used to examine the prevalence of psychological distress, sources of stress, and supports accessed. Surveys were received from 381 students (37% response). Most students (60%) reported normal levels of psychological distress on the K10 (M = 19.5, SD = 6.25), and a subgroup reported high to very high levels of psychological distress. A small number also reported substance use, symptoms of depression, and/or suicidal ideation. These results indicate that students experience psychological distress from a number of stressors and suggest that medical schools should act as key partners in supporting student well-being by promoting self-care, educating students on the risks of burnout, and developing programs to support at-risk students.

  5. SURVEY ON ACCOUNTING STUDENT SATISFACTION. EVIDENCE FROM A ROMANIAN UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile GORGAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, on the background of increased competition, changing demographics in the population and declining enrollments, a paradigm shift occurred in the higher education system where universities begin to realize the importance of student satisfaction and market-type mechanism have been introduced even in countries previously characterized by a high degree of government control. Our study aims to assess the satisfaction of students who graduated from the Faculty of Accounting and Management Information Systems of the Bucharest University of Economic with Bachelor's degrees in 2012 and 2013. A survey research was conducted aiming to assess the overall satisfaction through questions pertaining to global fulfilment of expectations related to undergraduate accounting program, the perceived value of the program and the willingness to recommend the accounting program to a close friend. The key determinants of the overall satisfaction level were analyzed and discussed.

  6. [Epidemiological evaluation of soft drinks consumption--students surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chłapowska, Joanna; Pawlaczyk-Kamieńska, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Non carious lesions, including erosion changes, are becoming increasingly apparent. There are multiple factors involved in the etiology of dental erosion i.a. acids in commercially available drinks. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of soft drink consumption that promote dental erosion among young adults. The 266 subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired questions about consumption of drinks favouring tooth erosion. The students declared frequent drinking of isotonic drinks, energetic drinks, fizzy drinks and coca-cola type drinks. On the basis of a survey of Poznań University of Medical Sciences students it can be determined, that they have relatively high risk of dental erosion. To minimize the risk of dental erosion occurrence in young population there is a need to disseminate knowledge about the etiology.

  7. Student experiences of participating in five collaborative blended learning courses in Africa and Asia: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Salla; Yan, Weirong; Meragia, Elnta; Mahomed, Hassan; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Skinner, Donald; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2016-01-01

    As blended learning (BL; a combination of face-to-face and e-learning methods) becomes more commonplace, it is important to assess whether students find it useful for their studies. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH (African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research; Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health) were unique capacity-building projects, focusing on developing BL in Africa and Asia on issues related to global health. We aimed to evaluate the student experience of participating in any of five ARCADE BL courses implemented collaboratively at institutions from Africa, Asia, and Europe. A post-course student survey with 118 students was conducted. The data were collected using email or through an e-learning platform. Data were analysed with SAS, using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. We focused on the associations between various demographic and experience variables and student-reported overall perceptions of the courses. In total, 82 students responded to the survey. In bivariate logistic regression, the course a student took [ p =0.0067, odds ratio (OR)=0.192; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.058-0.633], male gender of student ( p =0.0474, OR=0.255; 95% CI: 0.066-0.985), not experiencing technical problems ( p learning component to their studies. In contrast, perceiving the assessment as adequate was associated with a worse perception of overall usefulness. In a multiple regression, the course, experiencing no technical problems, and perceiving the discussion as adequate remained significantly associated with a more positively rated perception of the usefulness of the online component of the blended courses. The results suggest that lack of technical problems and functioning discussion forums are of importance during BL courses focusing on global health-related topics. Through paying attention to these aspects, global health education could be provided using BL approaches to student

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), conducted December 14 through 18, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SERI. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SERI, and interviews with site personnel. 33 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

  9. Quality of survey reporting in nephrology journals: a methodologic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Thomas, Sonia M; Farag, Alexandra; Duffett, Mark; Garg, Amit X; Naylor, Kyla L

    2014-12-05

    Survey research is an important research method used to determine individuals' attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors; however, as with other research methods, inadequate reporting threatens the validity of results. This study aimed to describe the quality of reporting of surveys published between 2001 and 2011 in the field of nephrology. The top nephrology journals were systematically reviewed (2001-2011: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, and Kidney International; 2006-2011: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology) for studies whose primary objective was to collect and report survey results. Included were nephrology journals with a heavy focus on clinical research and high impact factors. All titles and abstracts were screened in duplicate. Surveys were excluded if they were part of a multimethod study, evaluated only psychometric characteristics, or used semi-structured interviews. Information was collected on survey and respondent characteristics, questionnaire development (e.g., pilot testing), psychometric characteristics (e.g., validity and reliability), survey methods used to optimize response rate (e.g., system of multiple contacts), and response rate. After a screening of 19,970 citations, 216 full-text articles were reviewed and 102 surveys were included. Approximately 85% of studies reported a response rate. Almost half of studies (46%) discussed how they developed their questionnaire and only a quarter of studies (28%) mentioned the validity or reliability of the questionnaire. The only characteristic that improved over the years was the proportion of articles reporting missing data (2001-2004: 46.4%; 2005-2008: 61.9%; and 2009-2011: 84.8%; respectively) (Pnephrology journals remains suboptimal. In particular, reporting of the validity and reliability of the questionnaire must be improved. Guidelines to improve survey reporting and increase transparency are clearly needed. Copyright © 2014 by the

  10. Survey on the perception of urology as a specialty by medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojin; Farrokhyar, Forough; Braga, Luis H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Upon inquiring with medical students and urologists across Canada, it is evident that urology is perceived as a male-dominant specialty, among other stereotypes. These misperceptions may hamper the recruitment of the best and brightest trainees. With that in mind, we surveyed medical students at our institution to obtain an objective assessment of their perception of urology and to determine the cause for misperceptions. Methods: A 25-factor, validated, anonymous, cross-sectional, self-reported, electronic survey was sent to all medical students at McMaster University to assess their perception of urology. The survey was piloted among students and educational leaders to optimize face and content validity, and minimize measurement bias. Six variables (years in training, role model, a family member or friend in urology, gender, and exposure) were selected a priori and entered into a logistic regression model to determine factors associated with a positive impression of the specialty. Results: The overall response rate was 70%. Of the respondents, 66% had no exposure to urology and 61% found the amount of exposure to be inadequate. Urology staff and resident involvement in education was considered to be poor by over 30% of medical students. Over 70% perceived urology to be a specialty with a great gender imbalance. On multivariate analysis, exposure to urology was the most important factor (purology exposure and poor staff and resident involvement in undergraduate education were seen as potential causes for misperceptions of the specialty. Increasing exposure to urology, encouraging female students, constant effort to approach senior students, and providing mentorship are found to be important factors in establishing a positive perception of urology PMID:27800058

  11. Survey on the perception of urology as a specialty by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojin; Farrokhyar, Forough; Braga, Luis H

    2016-01-01

    Upon inquiring with medical students and urologists across Canada, it is evident that urology is perceived as a male-dominant specialty, among other stereotypes. These misperceptions may hamper the recruitment of the best and brightest trainees. With that in mind, we surveyed medical students at our institution to obtain an objective assessment of their perception of urology and to determine the cause for misperceptions. A 25-factor, validated, anonymous, cross-sectional, self-reported, electronic survey was sent to all medical students at McMaster University to assess their perception of urology. The survey was piloted among students and educational leaders to optimize face and content validity, and minimize measurement bias. Six variables (years in training, role model, a family member or friend in urology, gender, and exposure) were selected a priori and entered into a logistic regression model to determine factors associated with a positive impression of the specialty. The overall response rate was 70%. Of the respondents, 66% had no exposure to urology and 61% found the amount of exposure to be inadequate. Urology staff and resident involvement in education was considered to be poor by over 30% of medical students. Over 70% perceived urology to be a specialty with a great gender imbalance. On multivariate analysis, exposure to urology was the most important factor (pstudents' positive perception of the specialty, in addition to male gender, earlier years in training, and positive role models. Concerns regarding inadequate urology exposure and poor staff and resident involvement in undergraduate education were seen as potential causes for misperceptions of the specialty. Increasing exposure to urology, encouraging female students, constant effort to approach senior students, and providing mentorship are found to be important factors in establishing a positive perception of urology.

  12. Survey of college students' MP3 listening: Habits, safety issues, attitudes, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Alicia; Krishnamurti, Sridhar

    2010-06-01

    To survey listening habits and attitudes of typical college students who use MP3 players and to investigate possible safety issues related to MP3 player listening. College students who were frequent MP3 player users (N = 428) filled out a 30-item online survey. Specific areas probed by the present survey included frequency and duration of MP3 player use, MP3 player volume levels used, types of earphones used, typical environments in which MP3 player was worn, specific activities related to safety while listening to MP3 players, and attitudes toward MP3 player use. The majority of listeners wore MP3 players for less than 2 hr daily at safe volume levels. About one third of respondents reported being distracted while wearing an MP3 player, and more than one third of listeners experienced soreness in their ears after a listening session. About one third of respondents reported occasionally using their MP3 players at maximum volume levels. Listeners indicated willingness to (a) reduce volume levels, (b) decrease listening duration, and (c) buy specialized earphones to conserve their hearing. The study found concerns regarding the occasional use of MP3 players at full volume and reduced environmental awareness among some college student users.

  13. Use of surgical telescopes by senior dental students: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagge, Mark S

    2003-12-01

    This survey examined the use of surgical telescopes (STs) in a large senior dental student class. The percentage of students who purchased STs, factors that influenced those purchases, frequency/patterns of use, and purchase satisfaction were investigated. The survey return rate was 85.3% (128 of 150). Among the respondents, 86% had purchased STs and 14% had not. The most frequent motive for ST purchase was advice received from others (43%); ergonomic reasons were cited by 21% of users. Fixed-lens designs were selected more frequently (70%) than flip-down systems (30%). Nearly all ST purchases were made during the first year of dental school (95%), and low-power magnification (x 2-2.5) was chosen by 88% of purchasers. STs were used more often for operative dentistry, fixed prosthodontics, endodontics, and pediatric dentistry than for practice in other disciplines. ST users expressed a high level of satisfaction with their purchases (84%). The most common reason given for not purchasing STs was being able to see well enough without them (9 of 18; 50%).

  14. Instrument and Survey Analysis Technical Report: Program Implementation Survey. Technical Report #1112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical document provides guidance to educators on the creation and interpretation of survey instruments, particularly as they relate to an analysis of program implementation. Illustrative examples are drawn from a survey of educators related to the use of the easyCBM learning system. This document includes specific sections on…

  15. Consulting the Delphi: A New Idea for Collecting Student Feedback through the Two Survey Method (TSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelli, Cynthia J.; Wright, Mary C.; Pinder-Grover, Tershia

    2010-01-01

    The Two Survey Method (TSM) is a new time-efficient tool for gathering formative student feedback. Based on the Delphi technique, the TSM uses iterative surveys to develop student consensus about key strengths and suggestions for instruction. Evaluation data indicate that both faculty and students are satisfied with the method's efficiency and the…

  16. Pain and Pain Management Among University Students: Online Survey and Web-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Mimi Mun Yee; Tang, Angel; Budnick, Andrea; Ng, Shamay Sheung Mei; Yeung, Suey Shuk Yu

    2017-05-01

    Pain is common among university students. Unrelieved pain has adverse impacts on their quality of life. In this study, a pain management Web site was developed to distribute an online survey and provide Web-based pain education to university students. Participants were recruited from eight universities in Hong Kong using snowball sampling. The online survey included 37 items examining pain situations, pain management strategies, knowledge about self-medication, and demographic data of the participants. A total of 387 students participated and over 90 percent of them reported pain in the past 6 months. Around one-third of participants did not take any action to manage their pain. Pharmacological method was the most common strategy for students to relieve pain (37.2 percent). The use of over-the-counter (OTC) drug for pain relief was high (n = 214). However, OTC drug knowledge score was significantly higher among health-related group than nonhealth-related group (p online education than the health-related students (p online education program in the future.

  17. SY 2008-09 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten--12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  18. SY 2010-11 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten-12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  19. Survey of congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) knowledge among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baer, H R; McBride, H E; Caviness, A C; Demmler-Harrison, G J

    2014-07-01

    Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) is a leading cause of congenital infection worldwide and the most common congenital infection in the United States, affecting 30,000-40,000 US newborns each year and causing permanent disabilities in 8000-10,000. In contrast to how commonly it occurs, physicians and medical students have little knowledge of cCMV. To test the hypothesis medical students have little awareness about cCMV infection, and to collect data on medical students' knowledge about cCMV. The long-term goal of this project is to establish medical student awareness of cCMV infection and educate students about available treatments and strategies for prevention in at-risk populations. Medical students at one institution were surveyed by questionnaire to assess their knowledge of cCMV. Responses were described, quantified, and compared between groups. 751 surveys were sent and 422 completed responses were received. Respondents were well distributed over all 4 medical school (MS) class years. Only 34% MS1 had heard of cCMV compared to 100% MS2-4 (P<0.0001). All MS2-4 who reported being "very familiar" with CMV learned about it in medical school, 80% in one lecture. MS1 respondents were significantly less knowledgeable about cCMV than MS2-MS4 respondents. A baseline lack of knowledge about cCMV was documented in first year medical students. A sharp increase in knowledge of cCMV occurred between MS1 and MS2 years, likely due to preclinical medical student curriculum. However, significant knowledge gaps regarding transmission and treatment were observed in all MS years, representing opportunities for medical education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Health Policy Attitudes of American Medical Students: A Pilot Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Dugger

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known about American medical student's attitudes toward caring for the uninsured, limiting physician reimbursement and the role of cost-effectiveness data in medical decision-making. We assessed American medical student's attitudes regarding these topics as well as demographic predictors of those attitudes, and compared them to practicing physicians.A survey instrument was explicitly designed to compare medical student attitudes with those previously reported by physicians. Between December 1st 2010 and March 27th 2011 survey responses were collected from more than 2% of the total estimated 2010-2011 US medical student population enrolled at 111 of 159 accredited US medical schools within the 50 United States (n = 2414 of possible 98197. Medical students were more likely to object to reimbursement cuts, and more likely to object to the use of cost effectiveness data in medical decision making than current physicians according to the literature. Specialty preference, political persuasion, and medical student debt were significant predictors of health policy attitudes. Medical students with anticipated debt in excess of $200,000 were significantly less willing to favor limiting reimbursement to improve patient access (OR: 0.73 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.59-0.89], and significantly more likely to object to using cost effectiveness data to limit treatments (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.05-1.60 when compared to respondents with anticipated debt less than $200,000.When compared to physicians in the literature, future physicians may be less willing to favor cuts to physician reimbursements and may be more likely to object to the use of cost effectiveness data. Political orientation, specialty preference and anticipated debt may be important predictors of health policy attitudes among medical students. Early career medical providers with primary care ambitions and those who anticipate less debt may be more likely to support healthcare

  1. How Does Survey Context Impact Self-reported Fraud Victimization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Michaela E; Carr, Dawn C; Mottola, Gary R; Deevy, Martha J; Carstensen, Laura L

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the effect of survey context on self-reported rates of personal fraud victimization, and explores if the effect is influenced by age and gender. Participants (3,000U.S. adults) were randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 versions of a fraud victimization questionnaire: questions about fraud were identical across conditions, however, the context varies. One questionnaire asked about crime, one about consumer buying experiences, and a third focused only on fraud. Participants who were asked about fraud victimization in the context of crime reported significantly less victimization (p reports from those asked within the context of a consumer survey did not differ from the fraud-alone condition. The effect of the crime context interacted with age (p crime context on self-reported fraud victimization. These findings inform the production of new surveys and guide the development of effective social and health policies.

  2. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These

  3. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: Didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete one or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012–2013 academic year. The survey was composed of three main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results The survey response rate was 37% (70/188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. 27% of respondents (19/70) completed at least one clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent’s confidence to function as a first- year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum p = 0.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman’s rho p = 0.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman’s rho p = 0.43). Conclusions Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation

  4. Student experiences of participating in five collaborative blended learning courses in Africa and Asia: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla Atkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: As blended learning (BL; a combination of face-to-face and e-learning methods becomes more commonplace, it is important to assess whether students find it useful for their studies. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH (African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research; Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health were unique capacity-building projects, focusing on developing BL in Africa and Asia on issues related to global health. Objective: We aimed to evaluate the student experience of participating in any of five ARCADE BL courses implemented collaboratively at institutions from Africa, Asia, and Europe. Design: A post-course student survey with 118 students was conducted. The data were collected using email or through an e-learning platform. Data were analysed with SAS, using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. We focused on the associations between various demographic and experience variables and student-reported overall perceptions of the courses. Results: In total, 82 students responded to the survey. In bivariate logistic regression, the course a student took [p=0.0067, odds ratio (OR=0.192; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.058–0.633], male gender of student (p=0.0474, OR=0.255; 95% CI: 0.066–0.985, not experiencing technical problems (p<0.001, OR=17.286; 95% CI: 4.629–64.554, and reporting the discussion forum as adequate for student needs (p=0.0036, OR=0.165; 95% CI: 0.049–0.555 were found to be associated with a more positive perception of BL, as measured by student rating of the overall helpfulness of the e-learning component to their studies. In contrast, perceiving the assessment as adequate was associated with a worse perception of overall usefulness. In a multiple regression, the course, experiencing no technical problems, and perceiving the discussion as adequate remained significantly associated with a more positively rated perception of the

  5. UPGro Hidden Crisis Research Consortium. Survey 1 Country Report, Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Owor, M.; MacDonald, A.M.; Bonsor, H.C.; Okullo, J.; Katusiime, F.; Alupo, G.; Berochan, G.; Tumusiime, C.; Lapworth, D.; Whaley, L.; Lark, R.M.

    2017-01-01

    Statistics on the functionality of water points from the Hidden Crisis project in Uganda are presented. The survey, undertaken in 2016, was focussed on boreholes equipped with handpumps (HPBs) within the 112 districts of Uganda. A stratified two stage random sampling approach was adopted and 10 districts identified to sample. A tiered definition of functionality was applied, and all which enabled more nuanced definitions to be reported: The results from the survey indicate: • 55% of HPB...

  6. Sexual behaviour, drugs and alcohol use of international students at a British university: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivancos, R; Abubakar, I; Hunter, P R

    2009-09-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether international students have greater risk-taking behaviours that could lead to importing novel and resistant strains of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We conducted a cross-sectional web-based survey of university students' sexual behaviour, alcohol and drug use, and self-reported diagnosis of STIs and compared these between British and international students. In all, 827 students completed the survey, of whom 123 (15%) were international students. International students were less likely to have ever drunk alcohol (95.4% versus 87.8%, P = 0.002) and used drugs (56.4% versus 41.5%, P = 0.002). International students were on average almost two years older at first intercourse (18.7 versus 17 years; P international students. On a discriminant analysis model, international students were characterized by being older and from a non-white background, less likely to use cocaine, they drank alcohol less frequently and were more likely to have had unprotected intercourse with two or more partners in the previous year. In conclusion, international students tend to drink more moderately and use fewer recreational drugs than British students. However, they exhibit higher sexual risk behaviours that could lead to importing novel and resistant strains of STIs.

  7. [Puente Project Students' Performance.] Report on Spring 1988 Sabbatical Leave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucedo, Marcelino

    A study was undertaken to examine the performance of Puente Project students compared to that of Mexican-American students and Anglo-American students in community colleges. Surveys and interviews with Puente counselors were conducted to explore methods and techniques used to deal with potential dropouts. A comparison was made of the number of…

  8. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  9. Environmental survey preliminary report, Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Mound Plant, conducted August 18 through 29, 1986. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the Mound Plant. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at the Mound Plant, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey found no environmental problems at the Mound Plant that represent an immediate threat to human life. The environmental problems identified at the Mound Plant by the Survey confirm that the site is confronted with a number of environmental problems which are by and large a legacy from past practices at a time when environmental problems were less well understood. Theses problems vary in terms of their magnitude and risk, as described in this report. Although the sampling and analysis performed by the Mound Plant Survey will assist in further identifying environmental problems at the site, a complete understanding of the significance of some of the environmental problems identified requires a level of study and characterization that is beyond the scope of the Survey. Actions currently under way or planned at the site, particularly the Phase II activities of the Comprehensive Environmental Analysis and Response Program (CEARP) as developed and implemented by the Albuquerque Operations Office, will contribute toward meeting this requirement. 85 refs., 24 figs., 20 tabs.

  10. Career Preferences and Opinions on Animal Welfare and Ethics: A Survey of Veterinary Students in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Amelia R; Caspar, Georgina L; Collins, Teresa; Degeling, Christopher; Fawcett, Anne; Fisher, Andrew D; Freire, Rafael; Hazel, Susan J; Hood, Jennifer; Johnson, A Jane; Lloyd, Janice; Phillips, Clive J C; Stafford, Kevin; Tzioumis, Vicky; McGreevy, Paul D

    Historically, the veterinary profession has understood animal welfare primarily in terms of animal health and productivity, with less recognition of animals' feelings and mental state. Veterinary students' career preferences and attitudes to animal welfare have been the focus of several international studies. As part of a survey in Australia and New Zealand, this study reports on whether veterinary students prioritize animal welfare topics or professional conduct on the first day of practice and examines links between students' career preferences and their institution, gender, and year of study. The questionnaire was designed to explore the importance that students assign to topics in animal welfare and ethics. Of the 3,320 students invited to participate in the online survey, a total of 851 students participated, representing a response rate of 25.5%. Students' preferences increased for companion-animal practice and decreased for production-animal practice as they progressed through their studies. Females ranked the importance of animal welfare topics higher than males, but the perceived importance declined for both genders in their senior years. In line with previous studies, this report highlighted two concerns: (1) the importance assigned to animal welfare declined as students progressed through their studies, and (2) males placed less importance overall on animal welfare than females. Given that veterinarians have a strong social influence on animal issues, there is an opportunity, through enhanced education in animal welfare, to improve student concern for animal welfare and in turn improve animal care and policy making by future veterinarians.

  11. Bullying of medical students in Pakistan: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ahmer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies from other countries have shown that bullying, harassment, abuse or belittlement are a regular phenomenon faced not only by medical students, but also junior doctors, doctors undertaking research and other healthcare professionals. While research has been carried out on bullying experienced by psychiatrists and psychiatry trainees in Pakistan no such research has been conducted on medical students in this country. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire survey on final year medical students in six medical colleges of Pakistan. The response rate was 63%. Fifty-two percent of respondents reported that they had faced bullying or harassment during their medical education, about 28% of them experiencing it once a month or even more frequently. The overwhelming form of bullying had been verbal abuse (57%, while consultants were the most frequent (46% perpetrators. Students who were slightly older, males, those who reported that their medical college did not have a policy on bullying or harassment, and those who felt that adequate support was not in place at their medical college for bullied individuals, were significantly more likely to have experienced bullying. CONCLUSION: Bullying or harassment is faced by quite a large proportion of medical students in Pakistan. The most frequent perpetrators of this bullying are consultants. Adoption of a policy against bullying and harassment by medical colleges, and providing avenues of support for students who have been bullied may help reduce this phenomenon, as the presence of these two was associated with decreased likelihood of students reporting having being bullied.

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pinellas Plant, Largo, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, conducted May 11 through 22, 1987, at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. As a Preliminary Report, the contents are subject to revisions, which will be made in a forthcoming Interim Report, based on Albuquerque Operations Office review and comments on technical accuracy, the results of the sampling and analyses, and other information that may come to the Survey team's attention prior to issuance of the Interim Report. The Pinellas Plant is currently operated for DOE by the General Electric Company-Neutron Devices Department (GENDD). The Pinellas Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey effort announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems are areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities and to rank them on a DOE-wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct these problems. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. 55 refs., 37 figs., 37 tabs.

  13. Retention of indigenous nursing students in New Zealand: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Denise; McKinney, Caroline; Rapata-Hanning, Mereana

    2011-01-01

    Internationally the recruitment and retention of Indigenous and minority peoples into nursing is a persistent challenge, despite their participation being essential in reducing health disparities and improving health service quality for Indigenous and minority users. We aimed to identify Māori (Indigenous to New Zealand) nursing students' experiences of undertaking a nursing degree program. A non-experimental cross-sectional survey was undertaken with undergraduate nursing students identifying as Māori. The surveys were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. One hundred and eight students responded, with a career, stable income, and desire to make a difference in Māori health outcomes motivating most to embark on a nursing program. They reported numerous obstacles that compromised their academic advancement. However, affirming students' identities; providing academic support; accessing Indigenous role models, mentors and relevant clinical experiences; and, having supportive teaching and learning environments and the inclusion of Indigenous content in curricula; were identified as strategies that promoted retention in nursing programs.

  14. The Development and Validation of the "Academic Spoken English Strategies Survey (ASESS)" for Non-Native English Speaking Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Rui M.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on the three-year development and validation of a new assessment tool--the Academic Spoken English Strategies Survey (ASESS). The questionnaire is the first of its kind to assess the listening and speaking strategy use of non-native English speaking (NNES) graduate students. A combination of sources was used to develop the…

  15. Nursing students' clinical competencies: a survey on clinical education objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, C; Grugnetti, A M; Caruso, R; Gallotti, M L; Borrelli, P; Puci, M

    2017-01-01

    Developing clearly defined competencies and identifying strategies for their measurement remain unfortunately a critical aspect of nursing training. In the current international context, which continues to be characterised by deep economic crisis, universities have a fundamental role to play in redefining the educational goals to respond to the expectations of certain geographical areas of interest, as underscored in the Bologna Process (Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education Convened in Bologna 19 June 1999). The aim of this observational study was to examine the clinical learning context of nursing students using a tool developed by a team of teachers for the analysis of clinical learning. Redefinition of the clinical learning objectives with reference to the competencies set out in the questionnaire validated by Venturini et al. (2012) and the subsequent use of the tool created by the team of teachers for students in the first, second and third-year courses of the 2013/14 academic year, covering all the internships called for in those years. All nursing students enrolled in the first, second and third year of the nursing undergraduate degree program at the University of Pavia (no. 471) participated in this survey. A total of 1,758 clinical internships were carried out: 461 for the first year, 471 for the second year and 826 for the third year. Setting objectives, beginning with the educational offerings in the several clinical contexts, represents a strong point for this process. The results highlight a level of heterogeneity and complexity intrinsic to the University of Pavia educational system, characterized by clinical settings with different clinical levels (Research hospital and other traditional hospitals) that offering different levels of training. The use of the self-evaluation form for clinical learning made it possible to perform real-time observations of the training activities of the entire student body. An educational model

  16. Survey of ICT and Education in Africa : Algeria Country Report

    OpenAIRE

    Amr Hamdy

    2007-01-01

    This short country report, a result of larger Information for Development Program (infoDev)-supported survey of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in education in Africa, provides a general overview of current activities and issues related to ICT use in education in the country. Algeria is encouraging and fostering the use of ICT to enhance the development process in general ...

  17. Using independent nest survey data to validate changes in reporting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in 67% of cases the direction of change was the same using both surveys. These results suggest that comparisons in the reporting rates between SABAP 1 and SABAP 2 accurately reflect changes in the breeding population size of this species. Keywords: bird atlas, monitoring, population decline, protected area, raptor ...

  18. Survey of ICT and Education in Africa : Ethiopia Country Report

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    This short country report, a result of larger Information for Development Program (infoDev)-supported survey of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in education in Africa, provides a general overview of current activities and issues related to ICT use in education in the country. Leapfrogging is the word most technical people would use to describe the advancement, at least in ...

  19. Survey of ICT and Education in Africa : Niger Country Report

    OpenAIRE

    Tutu Agyeman, Osei

    2007-01-01

    This short country report, a result of larger Information for Development Program (infoDev) - supported survey of the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in education in Africa, provides a general overview of current activities and issues related to ICT use in education in the country. The Republic of Niger is mostly desert and it is the poorest country in the world. Subsisten...

  20. [Survey of hepatitis B and C in students of faculty of dentistry and dental hygienist school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yumiko; Chibo, Itsuo; Sata, Michio

    2004-07-01

    At present, in Japan, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection by blood transfusion rarely happens. However, according to the national survey, outbreak of sporadic acute hepatitis B and C is reported every year and viral hepatitis induced by iatrogenic infection is also reported. We think that education and enlightenmen for measures of infection control for hepatitis virus in dentisal medical care are important. Therefore, we carried out a questionnaire survey about measures of an infection control including hepatitis B and C for 352 students of a certain faculty of dentistry and a dental hygienist school. 35.5% of the total students thought the defense of oneself against infection was more important than defense of cross infection. Furthermore, the prevalence of the student who thought to permit recycle of a disposer glove and a disposer cartridge of a local anesthesia was 13.1% (46/352), 14.8% (52/352), respectively. The prevalence of students who recognized that HCV and HBV were detected from not only blood but also body fluid such as saliva remained in 65.3%. Consequently, the reality that knowledge of hepatitis virus and understanding about sterilization and disinfection of instruments were low became clear. In conclusion, immediate making of the guideline that aimed at standardization of prevention of hospital infection in domestic dental treatment and education to introduce the curriculum with a high regard for risk management of infection for students of dentistry will be required. In addition, it is an important problem to spread thoughts of standard precautions for dentistry.

  1. International Volunteer Programs for Dental Students: Results of 2009 and 2016 Surveys of U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodmansey, Karl F; Rowland, Briana; Horne, Steve; Serio, Francis G

    2017-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence and nature of international volunteer programs for predoctoral students at U.S. dental schools and to document the change over five years. Web-based surveys were conducted in 2009 and 2016. An invitation to participate in the study, along with a hyperlink to the survey, was emailed to the deans of all U.S. dental schools in the two years. In 2009, 47 of 58 dental school deans responded to the survey, for a response rate of 81%. In 2016, 48 of 64 dental school deans responded, for a response rate of 75%. From 2009 to 2016, the number of schools reporting dental student international experiences increased from 25 to 31. In 2016, 65% of responding schools offered dental student international experiences, an 11.5% increase over the results of the 2009 survey. Concomitantly, the number of deans reporting their students' participation in international opportunities not officially sanctioned by the school decreased from 41 to 34. These findings showed an increase in the number of dental schools providing international experiences for their students and established baseline data to assess trends in the future.

  2. Prevalence of Alcohol Consumption among University Students in Baghdad: A Cross-section survey from Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawa Jaafar Kadhim Al-Ameri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol consumption is a well-known public health problem, especially among university students. It was poorly studied in Middle East, especially in Iraq, due to religious and social taboos. This study conducted to throw a light on the prevalence of Alcohol consumption among university students in Baghdad. Subjects and methods: A survey conducted in three universities (Baghdad, Al-Mustansiriyah and Al-Nahrain from Baghdad city, in the duration between January and May 2015. A semi-structured questionnaire form used to collect the data from 1435 university students. The sample selected by multistage random sampling technique with probability proportion to size. Results: The average age (range of the studied sample was 19.8 (18 - 24 years; more than a half of them were females 760 (53%. Alcohol consumption was reported by 9.7% (95%CI: 8.2% - 11.2% of the participants (19.7% males vs. 0.8% females. Heavy Alcohol consumption was reported by 12.2% of consumers. Male students living out of their families or relatives and those of medical group colleges found to be risk factors for Alcohol consumption (PR= 2.65, 95% CI: 1.72 - 4.1 and (PR= 2.72, 95%CI: 1.48 - 5.01 respectively. No significant relations showed between demographic characters of female students and Alcohol consumption. Conclusions: Usage of Alcohol was relatively prevalent among university students in Baghdad, in spite of religious and social barriers in Iraq. Family and college staff supervision and education of the students with meetings targeting health risks and sequels of Alcohol hazardous consumption are the effective ways to control this practice.

  3. Parents' and students' reports of parenting: which are more reliably associated with college student drinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvil-Weld, Lindsey; Turrisi, Rob; Scaglione, Nichole; Mallett, Kimberly A; Ray, Anne E

    2013-03-01

    Recent efforts to reduce college student heavy episodic drinking have examined parental influences, with the goal of continually refining parent-based interventions (PBIs). This research has primarily relied on student-reported data, which is often cited as a methodological limitation although the degree to which parent- and student-reported data on parenting behaviors correspond is unknown. The goals of the present study were to assess the level of consistency between parent- and student-reported data for commonly examined parenting constructs and compare their associations with college student drinking. Data were collected from a sample of 145 parent-student dyads using a longitudinal design. At baseline, parents and students reported on parental monitoring, approval of light and moderate/heavy drinking, and permissiveness. At a 10-month follow up, students reported on their typical weekly drinking and consequences. Parents' and students' reports of parenting behavior at baseline were compared and their associations with student drinking and consequences at follow up were assessed. Agreement between parents' and students' reports of parenting was fair to moderate, with intraclass correlation coefficients ranging from .34 to .61. Student-reported data were more reliably associated with student drinking at follow up. Studies examining parent influences on college student drinking, including research on PBIs, do not appear to be limited by using student-reported data. Implications for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of conflict on medical education: a cross-sectional survey of students and institutions in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Vanes, Ashton; Hassounah, Sondus; Shawki, Marwan; Ismail, Omar Abdulkadir; Fung, Chi; Kedia, Tara; Rawaf, Salman; Majeed, Azeem

    2016-02-16

    This study surveyed all Iraqi medical schools and a cross-section of Iraqi medical students regarding their institutional and student experiences of medical education amidst ongoing conflict. The objective was to better understand the current resources and challenges facing medical schools, and the impacts of conflict on the training landscape and student experience, to provide evidence for further research and policy development. Deans of all Iraqi medical schools registered in the World Directory of Medical Schools were invited to participate in a survey electronically. Medical students from three Iraqi medical schools were invited to participate in a survey electronically. Primary: Student enrolment and graduation statistics; human resources of medical schools; dean perspectives on impact of conflict. Secondary: Medical student perspectives on quality of teaching, welfare and future career intentions. Of 24 medical schools listed in the World Directory of Medical Schools, 15 replied to an initial email sent to confirm their contact details, and 8 medical schools responded to our survey, giving a response rate from contactable medical schools of 53% and overall of 33%. Five (63%) medical schools reported medical student educational attainment being impaired or significantly impaired; 4 (50%) felt the quality of training medical schools could offer had been impaired or significantly impaired due to conflict. A total of 197 medical students responded, 62% of whom felt their safety had been threatened due to violent insecurity. The majority (56%) of medical students intended to leave Iraq after graduating. Medical schools are facing challenges in staff recruitment and adequate resource provision; the majority believe quality of training has suffered as a result. Medical students are experiencing added psychological stress and lower quality of teaching; the majority intend to leave Iraq after graduation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission

  5. A survey study of sedation training in advanced pediatric dentistry programs: thoughts of program directors and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Nathan, John E

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to survey program directors and students of advanced pediatric dentistry training programs in the United States on sedation issues. Surveys were sent to the target audiences. Questions contained response categories ranging from fill-in-the-blank, Likert-order scale style, and categorical. The surveys resided on SurveyMonkey. A cover letter emphasizing such issues as anonymity of responses was sent via e-mail to participants using the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry listserv. The responses were downloaded and subsequently analyzed using SPSS statistical software. Data were obtained from 49% of program directors and 17% of students. Experience with different routes of sedative administration varied from "none" (even with the oral route) to "significant." Oral midazolam was the most-often used route and sedative. Restraint was reportedly used by the majority of programs. Strategies should be developed to strengthen consistency of competencies in sedation practices across academic training programs.

  6. A survey of attitudes toward homosexuality in Hong Kong chinese medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Kam-lun Ellis; Leung, Ting-fan; Yau, Anthony Pak-yuen; Wu, Sze-man; Wan, Maxim; Chan, Hoi-yee; Yip, Wing-ki; Fok, Tai-fai

    2005-01-01

    Homosexuality is now considered an alternative lifestyle occurring with some regularity as a variant of human sexuality, rather than a pathological disorder. It is important to understand the attitudes of medical professionals toward homosexuality, as their attitudes may influence their approach to gay men and lesbians as patients. It is also important to understand the current attitudes of medical students who will be the future generation of health care providers. To study Chinese medical students' attitudes toward and personal experiences with homosexuality. A cross-sectional study was conducted at a university medical school. Medical students were asked 16 questions according to an anonymous survey questionnaire. Of the 780 medical students (42% male, 49% female, 10% sex anonymous) who received the questionnaire, 627 (80%) returned it. Of these students, 72% were age 18 to 22 years; 38% reported that they had homosexual friends. Only 16 students described themselves as homosexuals and 20 as bisexuals. A total of 249 students (40%) reported that they had a religion; 542 (86%) reported that they would accept their friends to be homosexuals. Two thirds thought that homosexual and heterosexual partners should have equal legal rights in terms of marriage, whereas slightly less than half (46%) thought they should have equal legal rights in adopting children. With regard to learning or working abilities, 93% thought homosexuals are not any different from heterosexuals. Two thirds thought homosexuals are not different from heterosexuals in terms of sexual behaviour such as promiscuity or loyalty. One fourth thought homosexuality is a psychological disorder that requires therapy. These findings did not differ significantly with seniority, but students with a religion held different attitudes than those without, and were more likely to believe that homosexuality is a psychological disorder, odds ratio (OR) = 2.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.59 .43, p homosexual

  7. Institution-Specific Victimization Surveys: Addressing Legal and Practical Disincentives to Gender-Based Violence Reporting on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalupo, Nancy Chi

    2014-07-01

    This review brings together both the legal literature and original empirical research regarding the advisability of amending the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act or creating new Department of Education regulations to mandate that all higher education institutions survey their students approximately every 5 years about students' experiences with sexual violence. Legal research conducted regarding the three relevant federal legal regimes show inconsistent incentives for schools to encourage victim reporting and proactively address sexual violence on campus. Moreover, the original research carried out for this article shows that the experience of institutions that have voluntarily conducted such surveys suggests many benefits not only for students, prospective students, parents, and the general public but also for schools themselves. These experiences confirm the practical viability of a mandated survey by the Department of Education. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Psychological distress and its correlates among dental students: a survey of 17 Colombian dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divaris, Kimon; Mafla, Ana Cristina; Villa-Torres, Laura; Sánchez-Molina, Marisol; Gallego-Gómez, Clara Liliana; Vélez-Jaramillo, Luis Fernando; Tamayo-Cardona, Julián Andrés; Pérez-Cepeda, David; Vergara-Mercado, Martha Ligia; Simancas-Pallares, Miguel Ángel; Polychronopoulou, Argy

    2013-06-26

    Links between the demanding nature of studies in the health sciences, students' personality traits and psychological distress have been well-established. While considerable amount of work has been done in medicine, evidence from the dental education arena is sparse and data from Latin America are lacking. The authors conducted a large-scale investigation of psychological distress among dental students in Colombia and sought to determine its curriculum and student-level correlates. The Spanish version of the Derogatis' Symptoms Checklist Revised (SCL-90-R) was administered to all students officially registered and attending classes or clinics in 17 dental schools in 4 geographic districts of Colombia between January and April 2012. Additional information was collected on participants' socio-demographic information and first career choice, as well as school's characteristics such as class size. The Global Severity Index (GSI) score, a measure of overall psychological distress, served as the primary analytical endpoint. Analyses relied on multilevel mixed-effects linear and log-binomial regression, accounting for study design and sample characteristics. A total of 5700 dental students completed the survey, a response rate of 67%. Pronounced gradients were noted in the association between socio-economic status and psychological distress, with students in higher strata reporting fewer problems. After adjustment for all important covariates, there was an evident pattern of increasing psychological distress corresponding to the transition from the didactic, to the preclinical and clinical phases of training, with few differences between male and female students. Independent of other factors, reliance on own funds for education and having dentistry as the first career choice were associated with lower psychological distress. Levels of psychological distress correlated with students' socio-economic and study-level characteristics. Above and beyond the influence of person

  9. Physical Activities of U.S. High School Students--2010 National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, MinKyoung; Carroll, Dianna D; Lee, Sarah M; Fulton, Janet E

    2015-06-16

    The 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines recommend youth participate in a variety of physical activities; however, few nationally representative studies describe the types and variety of youth activity. This study assessed the most frequently reported types and variety of activities among U.S. high school students, and examined the association between variety and meeting the 2008 Guidelines for aerobic activity (aerobic guideline). We analyzed data on 8628 U.S. high school students in grades 9-12 from the 2010 National Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey. Types of physical activity were assessed by identifying which activities each student reported in the past 7 days. Variety was assessed by the total number of different activities each student reported. Percentage (95% CI) of students who reported engaging in each activity was assessed. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between variety and meeting the aerobic guideline. Walking was the most frequently reported activity among U.S. high school students. On average, students reported participating in 6 different activities. Variety was positively associated with meeting the aerobic guideline. These findings support encouraging youth to participate in many physical activities and may be useful for developing interventions that focus on the most prevalent activities.

  10. An Analysis Report of 2014 CALA Self-Assessment Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Anna Xiong

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available On the occasion of CALA’s 40th anniversary in 2014, the 2013 Board of Directors appointed a Self-Assessment Task Force to conduct an assessment survey with special focuses on members’ awareness of CALA’s organizational structure and policies, its services to members, the extent of participation in events sponsored by CALA, and the level of satisfaction with CALA leadership. Although only one-fifth of the active members responded to the survey, the answers and feedback have identified areas for organizational improvement and have shown how active members view the current state of CALA. Some essential findings from the survey include: 1 the growth of overseas membership as a demographic trend, 2 a need to recruit student members, 3 a high percentage of CALA members not aware of CALA’s Mission/Vision/Goal, 4 conflicting data on CALA’s leadership, 5 discovery of low ratings (10-30% of respondents on eleven out of twelve rating questions, and 6 strong support for CALA as a representative organization of Chinese American librarians in North America. The findings of the survey will serve as a valuable reference for future strategic planning and for carrying out CALA’s long term goals.

  11. Food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university: results of an online survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Courtney

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foodborne diseases are an important public health issue, and young adults are an important demographic to target with food safety education. Our objective was to assess the food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university, to identify potential areas for such education. Methods In February 2015, we conducted an online survey of 485 undergraduate students at a university in Ontario, Canada. We assessed various food-related factors, including cooking frequency and prior food handling or preparation education. We then modeled the relationship between ‘overall knowledge score’ and the demographic and food skills/cooking experience predictors using multivariable log-binomial regression, to determine factors associated with relatively higher proportions of correct responses. Results Respondents were, on average, 20.5 years old, and the majority (64.8 % lived off campus. Students cooked from basic ingredients infrequently, with 3 in 4 doing so a few times a year to never. Students averaged 6.2 correct answers to the 11 knowledge questions. Adjusting for other important covariates, older age and being a current food handler were associated with relatively higher knowledge, whereas working/volunteering in a hospital and infrequent cooking were associated with relatively lower knowledge. Males in the Faculty of Science had relatively higher knowledge than females in the Faculty of Science, both of whom had relatively higher knowledge than all students in other Faculties. Among students who had never taken a food preparation course, knowledge increased with self-reported cooking ability; however, among students who had taken such a course, knowledge was highest among those with low self-reported cooking ability. Conclusions Consistent with other similar studies, students in Faculties outside of the Faculty of Science, younger students, and those who cook infrequently could benefit from food safety education

  12. Food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university: results of an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Sarah M; Majowicz, Shannon E; Dubin, Joel A

    2016-11-09

    Foodborne diseases are an important public health issue, and young adults are an important demographic to target with food safety education. Our objective was to assess the food safety knowledge of undergraduate students at a Canadian university, to identify potential areas for such education. In February 2015, we conducted an online survey of 485 undergraduate students at a university in Ontario, Canada. We assessed various food-related factors, including cooking frequency and prior food handling or preparation education. We then modeled the relationship between 'overall knowledge score' and the demographic and food skills/cooking experience predictors using multivariable log-binomial regression, to determine factors associated with relatively higher proportions of correct responses. Respondents were, on average, 20.5 years old, and the majority (64.8 %) lived off campus. Students cooked from basic ingredients infrequently, with 3 in 4 doing so a few times a year to never. Students averaged 6.2 correct answers to the 11 knowledge questions. Adjusting for other important covariates, older age and being a current food handler were associated with relatively higher knowledge, whereas working/volunteering in a hospital and infrequent cooking were associated with relatively lower knowledge. Males in the Faculty of Science had relatively higher knowledge than females in the Faculty of Science, both of whom had relatively higher knowledge than all students in other Faculties. Among students who had never taken a food preparation course, knowledge increased with self-reported cooking ability; however, among students who had taken such a course, knowledge was highest among those with low self-reported cooking ability. Consistent with other similar studies, students in Faculties outside of the Faculty of Science, younger students, and those who cook infrequently could benefit from food safety education. Supporting improved hand hygiene, in particular clarifying hand

  13. A Survey of Secondary School Students' Perceptions of and Attitudes Toward Use of Drugs by Teenagers. Part I, Part II, Part III.; A Survey of Secondary School Teachers' Perceptions of the Role of the Schools in Dealing with Teenage Drug Use. A General Overview of Survey Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County Public Schools, Rockville, MD.

    Three volumes report the findings of a student survey among a random sample of 2,777 junior high and senior high school students. Volume one presents the overall findings: the typical student believes that drug use and experimentation are not common, except for marihuana, alcohol, cigarettes, and glue; believes that drug use is increasing; is not…

  14. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deane RP

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard P Deane, Deirdre J Murphy Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Coombe Women & Infants University Hospital, Dublin, Republic of Ireland  Background: Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN. Methods: Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. Results: The response rate was 87% (n=128/147 among students and 80% (n=8/10 among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84% and staff (n=8/8, 100%. Most students (n=95/128, 74% and staff (n=7/8, 88% recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%, but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%. Students (n=94/128, 73% and staff (n=6/8, 75% reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although

  15. Characteristics of students participating in collegiate recovery programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudet, Alexandre B; Harris, Kitty; Kimball, Thomas; Winters, Ken C; Moberg, D Paul

    2015-04-01

    Relapse rates are high among individuals with substance use disorders (SUD), and for young people pursuing a college education, the high rates of substance use on campus can jeopardize recovery. Collegiate Recovery Programs (CRPs) are an innovative campus-based model of recovery support that is gaining popularity but remains under-investigated. This study reports on the first nationwide survey of CRP-enrolled students (N = 486 from 29 different CRPs). Using an online survey, we collected information on background, SUD and recovery history, and current functioning. Most students (43% females, mean age =26) had used multiple substances, had high levels of SUD severity, high rates of treatment and 12-step participation. Fully 40% smoke. Many reported criminal justice involvement and periods of homelessness. Notably, many reported being in recovery from, and currently engaging in multiple behavioral addictions-e.g., eating disorders, and sex and love addiction. Findings highlight the high rates of co-occurring addictions in this under-examined population and underline the need for treatment, recovery support programs and college health services to provide integrated support for mental health and behavioral addictions to SUD--affected young people. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Error patterns in children's age reports in retrospective sample surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, S; Becker, S

    1984-12-01

    Age misreporting distorts age distributions as well as affects fertility and mortality estimates in a population. Reported ages in Bangladesh are often inaccurate because respondents do not know their exact ages; ages must be estimated by the interviewer. This paper attempts to validate reports of children's ages in retrospective sample surveys by comparing them to the actual ages recorded in a vital registration system in Matlab Thana, Bangladesh. In 1 of 2 field surveys in 1980, 2076 women aged 15-50 reported on their 3859 living children. 19% of the children's ages were reported within 1 month of their true age. The ages of 34% were overreported, and the ages of 46% were underreported. Incorrect ages were, on average, off by 14 months. Women less than 30 years old correctly reported the ages of 28% of their living children, twice the percentage of women over30 years old. Women with 3 or fewer live births were more likely to report their children's ages correctly than women with more than 3 live births. In general, as a woman grew older and had more children, not only did she report incorrect ages for a higher proportion of her living children, but the errors were largerin magnitude and mostly negative in sign. Correct ages were reported equally often for male and female children. Overstatement of age was more common for children under 5 years old. It was also found that the quality of age data deteriorated significantly with the progress of field work.

  17. Handheld Multi-Gas Meters Market Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Gustavious [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Wald-Hopkins, Mark David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Obrey, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Akhadov, Valida Dushdurova [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-23

    Handheld multi-gas meters (MGMs) are equipped with sensors to monitor oxygen (O2) levels and additional sensors to detect the presence of combustible or toxic gases in the environment. This report is limited to operational response-type MGMs that include at least four different sensors. These sensors can vary by type and by the chemical monitored. In real time, the sensors report the concentration of monitored gases in the atmosphere near the MGM. To provide emergency responders with information on handheld multi-gas meters, the System Assessment and Validation for Emergency Responders (SAVER) Program conducted a market survey. This market survey report is based on information gathered between November 2015 and February 2016 from vendors, Internet research, industry publications, an emergency responder focus group, and a government issued Request for Information (RFI) that was posted on the Federal Business Opportunities website.

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP), located at Aiken, South Carolina. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The following topics are discussed: general site information; air, soil, surface water and ground water; hydrogeology; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; release of tritium oxides; radioactivity in milk; contamination of ground water and wildlife; pesticide use; and release of radionuclides into seepage basins. 149 refs., 44 figs., 53 tabs.

  19. CAREER PLANS OF GRADUATES OF A CANADIAN DENTAL SCHOOL: PRELIMINARY REPORT OF A 5-YEAR SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Usama; Fairbanks, Connor; Flores-Mir, Carlos; Kilistoff, Alan; Easton, Rick

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive data on the characteristics and opinions of graduating dental students in Canada are lacking. Specifically, only minimal information is available on graduates' immediate career plans and factors that may influence their decisions regarding these plans. Our aim was to gather such data to allow better understanding of this issue and improve the design of future studies on this topic. The Career Development Committee at the school of dentistry, University of Alberta, designed a short survey to be administered to graduating students over 5 years to gain insight into their immediate career plans and opinions on career services at the school. Preliminary results from 2012-2014 are reported here. With a response rate of close to 90% (n = 99/111), the data reveal considerable differences in immediate career plans between the surveyed students and those in other schools in Canada and the United States. Of the students, 89% were planning to work in a general dental practice and only 9% were planning to enroll in advanced education, including general practice residency training. More research is needed to better understand the factors affecting career path decisions of students.

  20. College students lack knowledge of standard drink volumes: implications for definitions of risky drinking based on survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Aaron M; Kraus, Courtney L; Flom, Julie D; Kestenbaum, Lori A; Mitchell, Jamie R; Shah, Kunal; Swartzwelder, H Scott

    2005-04-01

    College students tend to pour single servings of beer and liquor that are larger than commonly used standards. The reasons for this are unknown. Students might overpour because they lack knowledge of standard serving sizes. Alternatively, they might know how much alcohol to pour but simply have difficulty pouring the correct amounts. Misperceptions of standard serving sizes could lead to inaccuracies in self-reported consumption. If this is the case, then the validity of students' responses on alcohol surveys and the definitions of risky drinking that are based on them would be called into question. This study examined how college students define standard drinks, whether their definitions are similar to the definitions commonly used by alcohol researchers and government agencies, and whether their definitions of standard drinks are related to the sizes of the drinks that they pour. The study also examined whether feedback regarding the accuracy of their definitions of standard drinks leads students to alter their self-reported levels of consumption. Students (N = 133) completed an alcohol survey and performed tasks that required them to free-pour a single beer, glass of wine, shot of liquor, or the amount of liquor in a mixed drink. Roughly half of the students received feedback regarding their definitions of standard drinks. All students then were resurveyed about their recent levels of consumption. With the exception of beer, students incorrectly defined the volumes of standard servings of alcohol, overestimating the appropriate volumes. They also overestimated appropriate volumes when asked to free-pour drinks. Positive relationships existed between students' definitions of standard drinks and the sizes of the drinks that they free-poured. Feedback regarding misperceptions of standard drink volumes led to an increase in levels of self-reported consumption, suggesting that students' original estimates of their alcohol consumption were too low. Despite the recent

  1. Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program threatened and endangered species survey: Progress report. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.L.; Awl, D.J.; Gabrielsen, C.A.

    1994-09-01

    The Endangered Species Act (originally passed in 1973) is a Federal statute that protects both animal and plant species. The Endangered Species Act identifies species which are, without careful management, in danger of becoming extinct and species that are considered threatened. Along with the designation of threatened or endangered, the Endangered Species Act provides for the identification of appropriate habitat for these species. Since 1993, the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program has supported a program to survey the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) for threatened and endangered species. The Environmentally Sensitive Areas Surveys Program initiated vascular plant surveys during fiscal year 1993 and vertebrate animal surveys during fiscal year 1994 to determine the baseline condition of threatened and endangered species on the ORR at the present time. Data collected during these surveys are currently aiding Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Remedial Investigations on the ORR. They also provide data for ER and Waste Management decision documents, ensure that decisions have technical and legal defensibility, provide a baseline for ensuring compliance with principal legal requirements and will increase public confidence in DOE`s adherence to all related environmental resources rules, laws, regulations, and instructions. This report discusses the progress to date of the threatened and endangered species surveys of the ORR.

  2. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Student

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- student dataset contains individual level information from a sample of college students on GLS funded campuses. These data include student demographics,...

  3. Dietetics students perceive themselves as leaders and report they demonstrate leadership in a variety of contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Susan W; Gregoire, Mary B

    2014-05-01

    A leadership survey was designed and administered to undergraduate dietetics students (n=283) at eight universities to examine leadership actions reported most frequently, the context of these leadership actions, and students' reported perceptions of themselves as leaders. The majority of students perceive themselves as leaders in all context areas. The leadership practice, "Enabling Others to Act," was the most frequently reported. There were no significant differences in leadership behaviors based on college classification status and supervisory experience. Leadership behaviors were more prevalent in students who had previous leadership coursework, were older, or who had previous leadership experience. Dietetics students perceive they demonstrate leadership and do so in a variety of contexts, most frequently in class. Therefore, classroom activities may help strengthen leadership abilities of future dietetics professionals. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The fourteenth report on survey of adverse reaction to radiopharmaceuticals; The 17th survey in 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report deals with adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals occurring during the period from April 1, 1991 through March 31, 1992. Questionnaires were sent to 1,150 facilities, and 906 (78.8%) responded. Twenty one cases of adverse reactions and 7 cases of drug defects were reported from a total of 19 facilities (2.1%), giving an annual incidence of 2.0 and 0.7 cases, respectively, for 100,000 administered cases. The ratio of the occurrence in the 17th survey to that in the 16th survey was 1.18 for adverse reactions and 0.39 for drug defects. The occurrence of drug defects in this survey was lowest compared with that in the previous five surveys. According to radiopharmaceuticals, the incidence of adverse reactions was as follows: I-131-6[beta]-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol>I-123 orthoiodohippurate>I-131 orthoiodohippurate>Tc-99m DMSA>Tc-99m DTPA>Tc-99m MAA>Ga-67 citrate>Tc-99m MDP>Tc-99m HMDP. Adverse reactions included reactions to the vagus nerves (n=9), allergic reactions (n=3), and others (n=9). Radiopharmaceuticals reported as drug defects were as follows: Tc-99m pertechnetate, Tc-99m MDP, Tc-99m HMDP, Tc-99m phytate, and Tl-201 chloride. (N.K.).

  5. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane, Richard P; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators. In addition, there is little published evidence available to medical educators regarding the use of attendance monitoring systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate the opinions of students and staff about the use of a paper-based student logbook to record student attendance across all clinical and classroom-based learning activities within an undergraduate clinical rotation in obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN). Each student undertaking the clinical rotation in OBGYN was required to complete a paper-based logbook in a booklet format that listed every clinical and classroom-based activity that the student was expected to attend. A cross-sectional survey evaluating the acceptability, practicality, and effect on access to learning opportunities of using the logbook was undertaken. The survey was conducted among all medical students who completed their OBGYN rotation over a full academic year and staff who taught on the program. The response rate was 87% (n=128/147) among students and 80% (n=8/10) among staff. Monitoring attendance was widely acceptable to students (n=107/128, 84%) and staff (n=8/8, 100%). Most students (n=95/128, 74%) and staff (n=7/8, 88%) recommended that attendance should be mandatory during rotations. Almost all staff felt that attendance should contribute toward academic credit (n=7/8, 88%), but students were divided (n=73/128, 57%). Students (n=94/128, 73%) and staff (n=6/8, 75%) reported that the use of the logbook to record attendance with tutor signatures was a satisfactory system, although students questioned the need for recording attendance at every classroom-based activity. Most students felt that the logbook facilitated access to learning experiences during the rotation (n=90/128, 71%). Staff felt that the process of signing

  6. The Psychometric Characteristics of Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey: A Study Students of Isfahan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Rostami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to fill the gap of tool for measurement of student burnout in Iran, this study was performed on the 238 female students of Isfahan university that were selected by simple random sampling. Materials and Methods: The inventory is including 15 items and three subscales. Data were presented by analytical and descriptive statistic and draw table. In order to determine reliability of MBI-SS were used internal consistency method and test-retest. Results: Coefficient Cronbach's alpha for the exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively was 88, 90, 84 (p<0.05 and showed good internal consistency. Also test-retest reliability about 4 weeks later, obtaining a reliability coefficient of 89, 84 and 67 (p<0.01 respectively for exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy. Principle component factor analysis with exploration method with warimax rotation was used to determine construct validity. In order to check the concurrent validity and divergent validity of this inventory were used respectively from the University Student Depression Inventory and the researcher made of scale interest to academic filed and coefficients for the exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively were obtained -21, -53, -32 (p<0.01. Also concurrent validity for exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively were obtained 74, 68 and 50 (p<0.01. Conclusion: This finding was that the Maslach burnout inventory-student survey is a valid and reliable instrument to measure academic burnout girls.

  7. Mail surveys among college students: do initial responders score differently from nonresponders on the 16PF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J S; Mowrer, R R

    2000-06-01

    A single experiment is reported which investigated possible personality differences between college students who responded to a mail survey and those who did not. 208 college students completed the 16PF as part of a class assignment. Then each student was mailed a survey dealing with either a national or local issue (environmental, media, or sports). Multivariate analysis of the 16 subscales of the 16PF yielded a significant interaction between sex and response type. Subsequent protected univariate analyses identified significant sex x response type interactions on scales Q2 (Self-reliance), F (Liveliness), and O (Apprehension). Mean differences on the Self-reliance and Apprehension were sex differences rather than personality differences between responders and nonresponders. The only mean difference for response type was on Liveliness and applied only to men; responders scored lower than nonresponders. Multivariate analysis of the global scales of the 16PF yielded a significant interaction between sex and response type. Protected univariate analyses indicated a significant interaction between sex and response type on the Extraversion scale and a sex difference; female nonresponders scored higher than male nonresponders. No other comparisons were significant.

  8. CERN Summer Student Programme 2017 Report

    CERN Document Server

    Mari, Tomoo

    2017-01-01

    This report describes the work done during my CERN Summer Student Programme 2017. A set-up has been implemented to perform studies on possible aging effects caused by different materials and eventually to validate new components for future application at the LHC gas systems. The effects are studied with a Single Wire Proportional Chamber (SWPC), which is very sensitive to pollutants and gas mixture variations. In particular, we evaluate a new flow-meter (OMRON MEMS Mass Flow Sensor) and the effect of plastic pipe on detector gain and O$_2$ and H$_2$O variations. with Single Wire Proportional Chamber (SWPC). Chapter 1 describes the characterization of the SWPC. Chapter 2 focuses on the evaluation test of the flow-meter while Chapter shows the effects of the addition of a plastic pipe in the set-up.

  9. Peer Assessment for Construction Management and Quantity Surveying Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McLaughlin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Students undertaking the Bachelor of ConstructionManagement degree course at RMIT University, Melbourne,qualify for registration with the Australian Institute ofQuantity Surveyors (AIQS and the Australian Institute ofBuilding (AIB upon graduation. Over the past decade thedegree course has been constantly upgraded and altered inline with recommendations from professional bodies such asthese and other industry partners. In 1994 the Departmentof Building and Construction Economics re-assesseda range of subjects including the first year technologysubjects. Out of the review a problem-based integratedlearning unit was developed and tested. This unit has nowbeen in place for ten years.Quantity surveying and construction management likemost other professions in the construction industryrequire teamwork and advanced consultation skills. Theseskills may be learnt through experience but there isconsiderable evidence that these skills can be taught in theundergraduate years. Therefore in line with team-basedapproaches used in industry and professional constructionsettings, this year a new assessment model - peerassessment - will be applied to the problem-based learningunit. This paper describes the procedures and processesused to introduce the change and examines the theoreticalbase upon which the model was developed.

  10. An exploratory survey of eating behaviour patterns in adolescent students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, A; Battini, V; Chiorri, C; Masini, B

    2010-12-01

    Empirical research has always treated adolescents' eating habits from a variable-centered perspective, but this approach may miss the configurations of eating behaviours that uniquely describe discrete groups of individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate prototypical patterns of eating habits in a large sample of Italian adolescents and their behavioural and psychological correlates. Data were gathered from 1388 students (F=60%, mean age 14.90±1.34 yrs), who were asked to fill in an original questionnaire surveying dietary habits, body weight attitudes, body image, sport activities and sources of information about food. Perfectionism, self-esteem, self-efficacy and care for food were also assessed as well-known psychological risk factors for Eating Disorders. Five prototypical eating behaviour patterns were identified through cluster analysis. Cluster membership was associated (peating habits patterns revealed a large range of wrong eating attitudes and behaviours among Italian adolescents. Such data suggest the need to develop and implement adequate prevention programs.

  11. Self-Reported Sexual Behavior in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, Annette; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to determine the actual behaviors or problems which college students are experiencing, as opposed to their general attitudes concerning sexuality. The study surveys sexual behavior in college students, including usage of sexual enhancements (such as pornography, provocative dress, and sadomasochism), "safe…

  12. A Health Assessment Survey of Veteran Students: Utilizing a Community College-Veterans Affairs Medical Center Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra-Hebert, Anita D; Santurri, Laura; DeChant, Richard; Watts, Brook; Sehgal, Ashwini R; Aron, David C

    2015-10-01

    To assess health status among student veterans at a community college utilizing a partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college. Student veterans at Cuyahoga Community College in Cleveland, Ohio, in January to April 2013. A health assessment survey was sent to 978 veteran students. Descriptive analyses to assess prevalence of clinical diagnoses and health behaviors were performed. Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess for independent predictors of functional limitations. 204 students participated in the survey (21% response rate). Self-reported depression and unhealthy behaviors were high. Physical and emotional limitations (45% and 35%, respectively), and pain interfering with work (42%) were reported. Logistic regression analyses confirmed the independent association of self-reported depression with functional limitation (odds ratio [OR] = 3.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-7.8, p student veterans at a community college. A partnership between a Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a community college can be utilized to help understand the health needs of veteran students. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Probing University Students' Pre-Knowledge in Quantum Physics with QPCS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the use of Quantum Physics Conceptual Survey (QPCS) in probing student understanding of quantum physics. Altogether 103 Finnish university students responded to QPCS. The mean scores of the student responses were calculated and the test was evaluated using common five indices: Item difficulty index, Item discrimination…

  14. Student Experiences at Off-Campus Parties: Results from a Multicampus Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, Rick C.; Silver, Blake R.; Molasso, William

    2014-01-01

    The need to understand the settings in which students drink represents an ongoing challenge for universities. Undergraduate students (N = 2,146) completed an online multicampus survey to capture the perceptions of off-campus party guests regarding common party behaviors and events. Results indicate that students frequently attend off-campus…

  15. A Survey of the English Reading Habits of EFL Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftanti, Erna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read…

  16. Adapting the Survey of Attitudes towards Statistics (SATS-36) for Estonian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommik, Carita; Luik, Piret

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt the Survey of Attitudes Towards Statistics (SATS-36) for Estonian secondary school students in order to develop a valid instrument to measure students' attitudes within the Estonian educational context. The SATS-36 was administered to Estonian-speaking secondary school students before their compulsory…

  17. 2015 Military Investigation and Justice Experience Survey (MIJES). Overview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    other member of the Armed Forces who reports a criminal offense. The section further requires that violation of those regulations be punishable under...2016 Military Investigation and Justice Experience Survey (MIJES) DMDC | iii Executive Summary The Department of Defense (DoD) has a strong...did not result in a criminal investigation by a Military Criminal Investigator (MCIO), whose alleged perpetrator was not a military member, and who

  18. Suicidal Behavior, Negative Affect, Gender, and Self-Reported Delinquency in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhinrichsen-Rohling, Jennifer; Arata, Catalina; Bowers, David; O'Brien, Natalie; Morgan, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The associations among suicidal behavior, negative affect, and delinquency were assessed via an anonymous self-report survey administered to male and female college students ( N = 383). Contrary to our hypothesized results, there were no gender differences in rates of suicidal ideation and attempts. Confirming our hypotheses about gender…

  19. Extent of availability and utilization of law reports by law students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the extent of availability and utilization of law reports by final year lawstudents in the Universities of Uyo and Calabar law libraries. Survey research design was adopted for the study. A total of 450 under graduate final year Law students projects were examined to determine thefrequencyofcitations of ...

  20. Reports of Associated Women Students Commission on the Status of Women, 1969-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas Univ., Lawrence.

    This report contains 3 studies made by the Commission on the Status of Women at Kansas University. The first is a survey of the number of female students and faculty members in 7 historically male-dominated schools--Architecture, Business, Engineering, Journalism, Law, Pharmacy, and Social Welfare. The Deans and Assistant Deans of these schools…

  1. Who Struggles Most in Making a Career Choice and Why? Findings from a Cross-Sectional Survey of Australian High-School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galliott, Natal'ya; Graham, Linda J.; Sweller, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from an empirical study examining the influence of student background and educational experiences on the development of career choice capability. Secondary school students attending Years 9-12 (N = 706) in New South Wales, Australia, were invited to participate in an online survey that sought to examine factors…

  2. Visiting medical student elective and clerkship programs: a survey of US and Puerto Rico allopathic medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beckman Thomas J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No published reports of studies have provided aggregate data on visiting medical student (VMS programs at allopathic medical schools. Methods During 2006, a paper survey was mailed to all 129 allopathic medical schools in the United States and Puerto Rico using a list obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Contents of the survey items were based on existing literature and expert opinion and addressed various topics related to VMS programs, including organizational aspects, program objectives, and practical issues. Responses to the survey items were yes-or-no, multiple-choice, fill-in-the-blank, and free-text responses. Data related to the survey responses were summarized using descriptive statistics. Results Representatives of 76 schools (59% responded to the survey. Of these, 73 (96% reported their schools had VMS programs. The most common reason for having a VMS program was "recruitment for residency programs" (90%. "Desire to do a residency at our institution" was ranked as the leading reason visiting medical students choose to do electives or clerkships. In descending order, the most popular rotations were in internal medicine, orthopedic surgery, emergency medicine, and pediatrics. All VMS programs allowed fourth-year medical students, and approximately half (58% allowed international medical students. The most common eligibility requirements were documentation of immunizations (92%, previous clinical experience (85%, and successful completion of United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 (51%. Of the programs that required clinical experience, 82% required 33 weeks or more. Most institutions (96% gave priority for electives and clerkships to their own students over visiting students, and a majority (78% reported that visiting students were evaluated no differently than their own students. During academic year 2006-2007, the number of new resident physicians who were former visiting medical

  3. "Sleepiness" is serious in adolescence: two surveys of 3235 Canadian students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Edward S; Powles, A C Peter; Thabane, Lehana; O'Brien, Susan; Molnar, Danielle Sirriani; Trajanovic, Nik; Ogilvie, Robert; Shapiro, Colin; Yan, Mi; Chilcott-Tanser, Lisa

    2006-05-02

    Evidence is growing that sleep problems in adolescents are significant impediments to learning and negatively affect behaviour, attainment of social competence and quality of life. The objectives of the study were to determine the level of sleepiness among students in high school, to identify factors to explain it, and to determine the association between sleepiness and performance in both academic and extracurricular activities A cross-sectional survey of 2201 high school students in the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board and the Near North District School Board in Ontario was conducted in 1998/9. A similar survey was done three years later involving 1034 students in the Grand Erie District School Board in the same Province. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) was used to measure sleepiness and we also assessed the reliability of this tool for this population. Descriptive analysis of the cohort and information on various measures of performance and demographic data were included. Regression analysis, using the generalised estimating equation (GEE), was utilized to investigate factors associated with risk of sleepiness (ESS>10). Seventy per cent of the students had less than 8.5 hours weeknight sleep. Bedtime habits such as a consistent bedtime routine, staying up late or drinking caffeinated beverages before bed were statistically significantly associated with ESS, as were weeknight sleep quantity and gender. As ESS increased there was an increase in the proportion of students who felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness, were late for school, were often extremely sleepy at school, and were involved in fewer extracurricular activities. These performance measures were statistically significantly associated with ESS. Twenty-three percent of the students felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness. Most students (58-68%) reported that they were "really sleepy" between 8 and 10 A.M. Sleep deprivation and excessive daytime sleepiness were common

  4. "Sleepiness" is serious in adolescence: Two surveys of 3235 Canadian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogilvie Robert

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence is growing that sleep problems in adolescents are significant impediments to learning and negatively affect behaviour, attainment of social competence and quality of life. The objectives of the study were to determine the level of sleepiness among students in high school, to identify factors to explain it, and to determine the association between sleepiness and performance in both academic and extracurricular activities Methods A cross-sectional survey of 2201 high school students in the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board and the Near North District School Board in Ontario was conducted in 1998/9. A similar survey was done three years later involving 1034 students in the Grand Erie District School Board in the same Province. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS was used to measure sleepiness and we also assessed the reliability of this tool for this population. Descriptive analysis of the cohort and information on various measures of performance and demographic data were included. Regression analysis, using the generalised estimating equation (GEE, was utilized to investigate factors associated with risk of sleepiness (ESS>10. Results Seventy per cent of the students had less than 8.5 hours weeknight sleep. Bedtime habits such as a consistent bedtime routine, staying up late or drinking caffeinated beverages before bed were statistically significantly associated with ESS, as were weeknight sleep quantity and gender. As ESS increased there was an increase in the proportion of students who felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness, were late for school, were often extremely sleepy at school, and were involved in fewer extracurricular activities. These performance measures were statistically significantly associated with ESS. Twenty-three percent of the students felt their grades had dropped because of sleepiness. Most students (58–68% reported that they were "really sleepy" between 8 and 10 A

  5. Survey of college students on iPod use and hearing health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L; Johnson, Carole E; Byrd, Anne; DeGood, Laura; Meuel, Caitlin; Pecile, Angela; Koch, Lindsey L

    2009-01-01

    The popularity of personal listening devices (PLDs) including iPods has increased dramatically over the past decade. PLDs allow users to listen to music uninterrupted for prolonged periods and at levels that may pose a risk for hearing loss in some listeners, particularly those using earbud earphones that fail to attenuate high ambient noise levels and necessitate increasing volume for acoustic enjoyment. Earlier studies have documented PLD use by teenagers and adults, but omitted college students, which represent a large segment of individuals who use these devices. This study surveyed college students' knowledge about, experiences with, attitudes toward, and practices and preferences for hearing health and use of iPods and/or other PLDs. The study was designed to help determine the need, content, and preferred format for educational outreach campaigns regarding safe iPod use to college students. An 83-item questionnaire was designed and used to survey college students' knowledge about, experiences with, attitudes toward, and practices/preferences for hearing health and PLD use. The questionnaire assessed Demographics and Knowledge of Hearing Health, iPod Users' Practices and Preferences, Attitudes toward iPod Use, and Reasons for iPod Use. Generally, most college students were knowledgeable about hearing health but could use information about signs of and how to prevent hearing loss. Two-thirds of these students used iPods, but not at levels or for durations that should pose excessive risks for hearing loss when listening in quiet environments. However, most iPod users could be at risk for hearing loss given a combination of common practices. Most of these college students should not be at great risk of hearing loss from their iPods when used conscientiously. Some concern is warranted for a small segment of these students who seemed to be most at risk because they listened to their iPods at high volume levels for long durations using earbuds, and reported that

  6. 2016 Service Academy Gender Relations Survey: Overview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    alcohol involvement; bystander intervention; effects on academic and personal life caused by the unwanted situation; whether behaviors were reported...all the DoD Academies. These areas include student perceptions of effective training on these issues, bystander intervention against unwanted sexual...assault and sexual harassment; and the availability and effectiveness of sexual assault and sexual harassment training. In March and April 2016, an OPA

  7. Mental Health Issues Facing a Diverse Sample of College Students: Results from the College Student Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soet, Johanna; Sevig, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been increased attention given to mental health issues on college and university campuses across the country. However, few research efforts have been conducted to systematically investigate the mental health of college students. The College Student Mental Health Survey was undertaken as a first step towards gaining…

  8. Stress in chiropractic education: a student survey of a five-year course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Hilary; Cunliffe, Christina; Hunnisett, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objective : Stress encompasses academic issues, such as time management, increased work load, and new subject matter, but cannot be separated from stressors, such as social adjustment and financial pressure. Our study investigated whether perceived level of academic or practical attainment and the method of study were associated with the amount of perceived stress during students" studies. Methods : A semi-structured self-administered questionnaire was piloted and distributed to 134 students at a chiropractic college at the end of a lecture. Results : The survey had a response rate of 81%. Students in their fourth year consistently reported the highest perceived levels of stress, with 81% feeling that their ability to study was affected by their financial situation and 56% felt overwhelmed at their ability to cope with their college workload. All year groups were stressed during their course of studies, but the stressor varies depending on the year of study. Conclusions : Year 4 consistently demonstrated the highest levels of stress. All students, regardless of year group, experienced varying degrees of stress while studying and the central stressor changed depending on the time position within the course.

  9. Use of Electronic Versus Print Textbooks by Chilean Dental Students: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Pedro Christian; Schulz, Karen; Parra, Annemarie; Perez-Rojas, Francisco; Rosas, Cristian; Cartes-Velásquez, Ricardo

    2017-03-01

    Electronic textbooks have become available in recent decades as replacements or alternatives for print versions. The aim of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to evaluate the use of electronic versus print textbooks by Chilean dental students. The target population was students from 14 Chilean dental schools. The questionnaire was adapted and translated to Spanish from a previous survey used in a similar study. It consisted of the following variables: preferred type, type used, frequency of use, source, electronic devices used to read, and disposal after use. The use of textbooks was analyzed and compared by gender and course (p≤0.05). The final sample consisted of 3,256 students (21.38±2.5 years of age, 50.8% women). Most of the participants reported using both types of texts, with most (63.9%) preferring print over electronic texts, including significantly more women (ptextbooks was the Internet (43.8%). A personal computer was the most widely used device for reading electronic texts (95.0%), followed by a cell phone (46.4%) and a tablet (24.5%). Overall, these Chilean dental students preferred print over electronic textbooks, despite having available electronic devices.

  10. Survey of student attitudes towards digital simulation technologies at a dental school in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Q; Wang, Y; Zheng, Q; Ye, L; Zhou, X D; Zhang, L L

    2017-08-01

    Digital simulation technologies have become widespread in healthcare education, especially in dentistry; these technologies include digital X-ray images, digital microscopes, virtual pathology slides and other types of simulation. This study aimed to assess students' attitudes towards digital simulation technologies at a large, top-ranked dental school in China, as well as find out how students compare the digital technologies with traditional training methods. In April 2015, a custom-designed questionnaire was distributed to a total of 389 students who had received digital technology and simulation-based training in West China Dental School during 2012-2014. Results of a cross-sectional survey show that most students accept digital simulation technology; they report that the technology is stimulating and facilitates self-directed and self-paced learning. These findings, together with the objective advantages of digital technology, suggest that digital simulation training offers significant potential for dental education, highlighting the need for further research and more widespread implementation. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Surveying Turkish high school and university student attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Balta, Nuri; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Student attitudes and approaches to problem solving can impact how well they learn physics. Prior research in the US using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expert-like than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the average...

  12. Public health financial management needs: report of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costich, Julia F; Honoré, Peggy A; Scutchfield, F Douglas

    2009-01-01

    The work reported here builds on the identification of public health financial management practice competencies by a national expert panel. The next logical step was to provide a validity check for the competencies and identify priority areas for educational programming. We developed a survey for local public health finance officers based on the public health finance competencies and field tested it with a convenience sample of officials. We asked respondents to indicate the importance of each competency area and the need for training to improve performance; we also requested information regarding respondent education, jurisdiction size, and additional comments. Our local agency survey sample drew on the respondent list from the National Association of County and City Health Officials 2005 local health department survey, stratified by agency size and limited to jurisdiction populations of 25,000 to 1,000,000. Identifying appropriate respondents was a major challenge. The survey was fielded electronically, yielding 112 responses from 30 states. The areas identified as most important and needing most additional training were knowledge of budget activities, financial data interpretation and communication, and ability to assess and correct the organization's financial status. The majority of respondents had some postbaccalaureate education. Many provided additional comments and recommendations. Health department finance officers demonstrated a high level of general agreement regarding the importance of finance competencies in public health and the need for training. The findings point to a critical need for additional training opportunities that are accessible, cost-effective, and targeted to individual needs.

  13. Status report on the survey and alignment activities at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshinowo, Babatunde O' Sheg; /Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    The surveying and alignment activities at Fermilab are the responsibility of the Alignment and Metrology Group. The Group supports and interacts with physicists and engineers working on any particular project, from the facility construction phase to the installation and final alignment of components in the beam line. One of the goals of the Alignment and Metrology Group is to upgrade the old survey networks in the tunnel using modern surveying technology, such as the Laser Tracker for tunnel networks and GPS for the surface networks. According to the job needs, all surveys are done with Laser Trackers and/or Videogrammetry (V-STARS) systems for spatial coordinates; optical and electronic levels are used for elevations, Gyro-Theodolite for azimuths, Mekometer for distances and GPS for baseline vectors. The group has recently purchased two new API Laser Trackers, one INCA3 camera for the V-Stars, and one DNA03 digital level. This report presents the projects and major activities of the Alignment and Metrology Group at Fermilab during the period of 2000 to 2004. It focuses on the most important current projects, especially those that have to be completed during the currently scheduled three-month shutdown period. Future projects, in addition to the status of the current projects, are also presented.

  14. The relationship between use of school-based health centers and student-reported school assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Susan; Whitaker, Kelly; Anyon, Yolanda; Shields, John P

    2013-10-01

    To examine the relationship between student-reported, school-based health center utilization and two outcomes: (1) caring relationships with program staff; and (2) school assets (presence of caring adults, high behavioral expectations, and opportunities for meaningful participation) using a school district-wide student survey. These relationships were also explored across schools. Using student-reported data from a customized version of the California Healthy Kids Survey from the San Francisco Unified School District (n = 7,314 students in 15 schools), propensity scoring methods were used to adjust for potential bias in the observed relationship between student utilization of services and outcomes of interest. Estimates generally pointed to positive relationships between service utilization and outcome domains, particularly among students using services ≥10 times. Exploratory analyses indicate that these relationships differ across schools. Use of school-based health centers appears to positively relate to student-reported caring relationships with health center staff and school assets. Future research is needed to confirm the robustness of these observed relationships. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Attitude and Intention Regarding Pain Management among Chinese Nursing Students: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liang-Yu; Xu, Yin-Chuan; Lin, Dan-Ni; Jin, Jing-Feng; Yan, Min

    2017-08-01

    Optimal pain management is a priority in effective nursing care. Lack of sufficient pain knowledge associated with inadequate pain management has been proved. However, the intention, defined as the predictor of behavior, regarding pain management remains unknown. Therefore, the study was to determine the attitude and intention regarding pain management among Chinese nursing students and investigate the underlying determinants and their interactions in terms of intention toward pain management. The Pain Management Survey Questionnaire, comprising the key determinants of the theory of planned behavior-that is, direct attitude, belief-based intention, subjective norm, direct control, and indirect control-was used to collect data from 512 nursing students who undertook clinical rotation in an affiliated hospital of a medical college in China. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent sample t test, Pearson correlation analysis, or structural equation modeling analysis. Chinese nursing students reported negative attitudes and behavioral intentions toward pain management. Direct control, subjective norm, belief-based attitude, and indirect control independently predicted nursing students' intention to treat patients with pain. Direct control was the strongest predictor. Structural equation modeling analysis further revealed 39.84% of the variance associated with intention that could be explained by determinants of the theory of planned behavior. Additionally, educational school level and previous pain management training had great effects on pain management intention. Overall, this study identified intention as an important factor in effective pain treatment. Chinese nursing students have negative attitudes and insufficient intention to pain management. Therefore, hospitals and universities in China should manage these factors to improve nursing students' practice regarding pain management. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing

  16. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. Methods Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students’ career intentions, motivations, medical school teaching and exposure to psychiatry. We assessed students’ attitudes and personality factors. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the joint effect of factors upon the main outcome. Results 2198 of 9135 (24%) of students responded (range 4 to 91%) across the countries. Internationally 4.5% of students definitely considered psychiatry as a career (range 1 to 12%). 19% of students (range 0 to 33%) were “quite likely”, and 25% were “definitely not” considering psychiatry. Female gender, experience of mental/physical illness, media portrayal of doctors, and positive attitudes to psychiatry, but not personality factors, were associated with choosing psychiatry. Quality of psychiatric placement (correlation coefficient = 0.22, p psychiatry clubs), experience of acutely unwell patients and perceived clinical responsibility were all associated with choice of psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression revealed six factors associated with students choosing psychiatry: importance of own vocation, odds ratio (OR) 3.01, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.91, p psychiatry before medical school, OR 10.8 (5.38 to 21.8, p psychiatry special study module, OR 1.45 (1.05 to 2.01, p = 0.03) or elective OR 4.28 (2.87- 6.38, p psychiatry club, OR 3.25 (2.87 to 6.38, p psychiatry teaching which affect career choice. Addressing these factors may improve recruitment to psychiatry internationally. PMID

  17. South African marine pollution survey report 1974-1975

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cloete, CE

    1976-09-01

    Full Text Available A national marine pollution survey was initiated in 1974 to determine and assess pollution around the coast of South Africa. Impact area surveys, coastal (including estuarine) reference surveys and oceanic reference surveys were undertaken...

  18. PVMapper: Report on the Second Public Opinion Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, Juliet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Joe, Jeffrey [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kane, Stephanie [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Koehler, Dave [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Solan, David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-06-24

    This report has been developed as an integral part of the PVMapper project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s SunShot program. The objective of the SunShot program is to reduce the total costs of solar energy systems. The scope of PVMapper is to develop a geographic information system (GIS) based project planning tool to identify optimal utility-scale solar facility sites. The specific objectives of the project are to 1) develop the software on an open-source platform; 2) integrate the appropriate data sets and GIS layers; 3) include a measure of social risk and public acceptance; 4) enable customization of variable weights; 5) provide a free and accessible platform for software download; and 6) provide a sustainability plan to ensure future relevance of the software. When completed, PVMapper is intended to be used by solar developers, Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJs), and other interested parties. This project supports SunShot’s objective by reducing the non-hardware balance of system costs (“soft costs”) for utility-scale solar project development. In order to accomplish the third project objective – including a measure of social risk and public acceptance within PVMapper – the project team has developed a time-series public opinion survey, administered yearly over the course of the three-year project. This report highlights the results and preliminary analyses from the second survey in this series. While the results of this survey are valuable to both PVMapper and future utility-scale solar development, the time-series design is extremely important. The completion of the series enables the extension of the dataset to much richer information. For example, the research team altered this iteration to sharpen the focus on specific topics (those posing potentially higher risks) and target specific locations in the oversample (such as communities near existing facilities). Using similar

  19. Attitudes towards fibromyalgia: A survey of Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical therapy and occupational therapy students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badwall Parminder

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequent use of chiropractic, naturopathic, and physical and occupational therapy by patients with fibromyalgia has been emphasized repeatedly, but little is known about the attitudes of these therapists towards this challenging condition. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to 385 senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students in their final year of studies, that inquired about attitudes towards the diagnosis and management of fibromyalgia. Results 336 students completed the survey (response rate 87%. While they disagreed about the etiology (primarily psychological 28%, physiological 23%, psychological and physiological 15%, unsure 34%, the majority (58% reported that fibromyalgia was difficult to manage. Respondants were also conflicted in whether treatment should prioritize symptom relief (65% or functional gains (85%, with the majority (58% wanting to do both. The majority of respondents (57% agreed that there was effective treatment for fibromyalgia and that they possessed the required clinical skills to manage patients (55%. Chiropractic students were most skeptical in regards to fibromyalgia as a useful diagnostic entity, and most likely to endorse a psychological etiology. In our regression model, only training in naturopathic medicine (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.33; 95% confidence interval = 0.11 to 0.56 and the belief that effective therapies existed (unstandardized regression coefficient = 0.42; 95% confidence interval = 0.30 to 0.54 were associated with greater confidence in managing patients with fibromyalgia. Conclusion The majority of senior Canadian chiropractic, naturopathic, physical and occupational therapy students, and in particular those with naturopathic training, believe that effective treatment for fibromyalgia exists and that they possess the clinical skillset to effectively manage this disorder. The majority place high priority

  20. Student Engagement: Developing a Conceptual Framework and Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Gerald F.; Heller, Nathan A.; Burch, Jana J.; Freed, Rusty; Steed, Steve A.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is considered to be among the better predictors of learning, yet there is growing concern that there is no consensus on the conceptual foundation. The authors propose a conceptualization of student engagement grounded in A. W. Astin's (1984) Student Involvement Theory and W. A. Kahn's (1990) employee engagement research where…

  1. On the survey of students of internship in sports buisiness

    OpenAIRE

    森, 喬夫; 浦田, 憲二; 太田, あや子; 文谷, 知明; 河合, 一武; 杉山, 仁志; 桂, 和仁; 星川, 秀利; 浜田, 琴美; Takao, Mori; Kenji, URATA; Ayako, Urata; Tomoaki, BUNYA; Kazutake, Kawai; Hitosi, Sugiyama

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the this paper is to clarify our students needs to course of internship in sports buiseness. Students responded to questionnaire, which has 20 items. We examined the results. 1 Many studenst want to get information of their enterprises which accept them before their pracuticum. 2 Many students are satisfied with their internship and they recommnded this course for their juniors.

  2. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  3. Student Reports of Peer Threats of Violence: Prevalence and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekvasil, Erin K.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2012-01-01

    Authorities in education and law enforcement have recommended that schools use a threat-assessment approach to prevent violence, but there is relatively little research on characteristics and outcomes of threats among students. The current study examined student reports of threat experiences in a sample of 3,756 high school students. Approximately…

  4. Peer Assessment of Student-Produced Mechanics Lab Report Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott S.; Aiken, John M.; Lin, Shih-Yin; Greco, Edwin F.; Alicea-Muñoz, Emily; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-01-01

    We examine changes in students' rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers' physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings…

  5. Chiropractic identity, role and future: a survey of North American chiropractic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliedt, Jordan A; Hawk, Cheryl; Anderson, Michelle; Ahmad, Kashif; Bunn, Dinah; Cambron, Jerrilyn; Gleberzon, Brian; Hart, John; Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Perle, Stephen M; Ramcharan, Michael; Sullivan, Stephanie; Zhang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The literature pertaining to chiropractic students' opinions with respect to the desired future status of the chiropractic physician is limited and is an appropriate topic worthy of study. A previous pilot study was performed at a single chiropractic college. This current study is an expansion of this pilot project to collect data from chiropractic students enrolled in colleges throughout North America. The purpose of this study is to investigate North American chiropractic students' opinions concerning professional identity, role and future. A 23-item cross-sectional electronic questionnaire was developed. A total of 7,455 chiropractic students from 12 North American English-speaking chiropractic colleges were invited to complete the survey. Survey items encompassed demographics, evidence-based practice, chiropractic identity and setting, and scope of practice. Data were collected and descriptive statistical analysis was performed. A total of 1,247 (16.7% response rate) questionnaires were electronically submitted. Most respondents agreed (34.8%) or strongly agreed (52.2%) that it is important for chiropractors to be educated in evidence-based practice. A majority agreed (35.6%) or strongly agreed (25.8%) the emphasis of chiropractic intervention is to eliminate vertebral subluxations/vertebral subluxation complexes. A large number of respondents (55.2%) were not in favor of expanding the scope of the chiropractic profession to include prescribing medications with appropriate advanced training. Most respondents estimated that chiropractors should be considered mainstream health care practitioners (69.1%). Several respondents (46.8%) think that chiropractic research should focus on the physiological mechanisms of chiropractic adjustments. The chiropractic students in this study showed a preference for participating in mainstream health care, report an exposure to evidence-based practice, and desire to hold to traditional chiropractic theories and practices. The

  6. Report on the Kiso cometary dust trail survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, M.; Sarugaku, Y.; Nishihara, S.; Nakada, Y.; Nishiura, S.; Soyano, T.; Tarusawa, K.; Mukai, T.; Kwon, S. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Usui, F.; Ueno, M.

    2009-03-01

    Cometary dust trails were first observed by IRAS; they are widely known to be the origins of meteoric showers. A new window has been opened for the study of dust trails, using ground-based observations. We succeeded in obtaining direct images of the 22P/Kopff dust trail with the Kiso 1.05-m Schmidt telescope. Following this initial success, we have continued to perform a dust trail survey at Kiso. As a result of this survey, we have detected dust trails along the orbit of six periodic comets, between February 2002 and March 2004. The optical depth of these dust trails are 10-9 to 10-8, which is consistent with IRAS measurements. In this paper, we describe the observations and data reduction procedures, and report the brief result obtained between February 2002 and March 2004.

  7. College Freshmen Students' Perspectives on Weight Gain Prevention in the Digital Age: Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Courtney M; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Larsen, Chelsea A; Magradey, Karen; Brandt, Heather M; Wilcox, Sara; Sundstrom, Beth; West, Delia Smith

    2017-10-12

    College freshmen are highly vulnerable to experiencing weight gain, and this phenomenon is associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases and mortality in older adulthood. Technology offers an attractive and scalable way to deliver behavioral weight gain prevention interventions for this population. Weight gain prevention programs that harness the appeal and widespread reach of Web-based technologies (electronic health or eHealth) are increasingly being evaluated in college students. Yet, few of these interventions are informed by college students' perspectives on weight gain prevention and related lifestyle behaviors. The objective of this study was to assess college freshmen students' concern about weight gain and associated topics, as well as their interest in and delivery medium preferences for eHealth programs focused on these topics. Web-based surveys that addressed college freshmen students' (convenience sample of N=50) perspectives on weight gain prevention were administered at the beginning and end of the fall 2015 semester as part of a longitudinal investigation of health-related issues and experiences in first semester college freshmen. Data on weight gain prevention-related concerns and corresponding interest in eHealth programs targeting topics of potential concern, as well as preferred program delivery medium and current technology use were gathered and analyzed using descriptive statistics. A considerable proportion of the freshmen sample expressed concern about weight gain (74%, 37/50) and both traditional (healthy diet: 86%, 43/50; physical activity: 64%, 32/50) and less frequently addressed (stress: 82%, 41/50; sleep: 74%, 37/50; anxiety and depression: 60%, 30/50) associated topics within the context of behavioral weight gain prevention. The proportion of students who reported interest in eHealth promotion programs targeting these topics was also generally high (ranging from 52% [26/50] for stress management to 70% [35/50] for eating a

  8. 2002 Status of the Armed Forces Survey - Workplace and Gender Relations: Report on Scales and Measures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ormerod, Alayne

    2003-01-01

    ...: Workplace and Gender Relations Survey (2002 WGR). This report describes advances from previous surveys and presents results on scale development as obtained from 19,960 respondents to this survey...

  9. EPA utility FGD survey: July-September 1980. Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.; Melia, M.; Gregory, N.; Groeber, M.

    1980-10-01

    This report is the last of three supplements updating the October-December 1979 report (PB-80-176811) and should be used in conjunction with it. The report, which is generated by a computerized data base system, presents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, operational domestic particle scrubbers, and Japanese coal-fired utility boiler FGD installations. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, process suppliers, regulatory agencies, and consulting engineering firms. Domestic FGD systems are tabulated alphabetically by development status (operational, under construction, or in planning stages), utility company, process supplier, process and waste disposal practice. It presents data on boiler design, FGD system design, fuel characteristics, and actual performance. It includes unit by unit dependability parameters and discusses problems and solutions associated with the boilers and FGD systems. Process flow diagrams and FGD system economic data are appended.

  10. Predictors of health of pre-registration nursing and midwifery students: Findings from a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Christine; Coughlan, Barry; Pironom, Julie; Jourdan, Didier; Mannix-McNamara, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Student nurses/midwives evidence less than exemplary lifestyle habits and poor emotional health, despite exposure to health education/promotion during their educational preparation. Knowledge of the factors that predict nursing/midwifery students' health could inform strategies to enhance their health and increase their credibility as future health promoters/educators. To establish the predictors of nursing/midwifery student emotional health. Cross-sectional survey. The research took place at a university in Ireland. We involved a total sample (n=473) student nurses/midwives. Participants completed the General Health Questionnaire, Lifestyle Behaviour Questionnaire and Ways of Coping Questionnaire to determine their self-reported emotional health, lifestyle behaviour and coping processes. Multivariate regression was performed to identify the predictors of student emotional health (dependent variable). The independent variables were demographics, coping, lifestyle behaviour and students' perceptions of determinants of their health. Many respondents reported significant emotional distress (48.71%) and unhealthy lifestyle behaviours including smoking (27.94%), physical inactivity (34.29%), alcohol consumption (91.7%) and unhealthy diet (28.05%). Multivariate regressions indicated that the predictors of emotional distress included gender, year of study, smoking, passive coping and beliefs that their student life was stressful or/and that worry stress and boredom adversely impacted their diet. Targeting student's beliefs regarding influences upon their health, promotion of positive lifestyles and adaptive coping is necessary to facilitate health gain of future health professionals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Weight-Control Strategies Among US High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheaton, Anne G.; Perry, Geraldine S.; Chapman, Daniel P.; Croft, Janet B.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine if self-reported sleep duration was associated with weight-control behaviors among US high school students. Design: National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Setting: United States, 2007. Participants: US high school students (N = 12,087). Measurements: Students were asked if they had engaged in several weight-control behaviors during the 30 days before the survey to lose or maintain weight. Self-reported sleep duration categories included very short (≤ 5 h), short (6 or 7 h), referent moderate (8 or 9 h), and long (≥ 10 h). Sex-specific logistic regression analyses with race/ethnicity, grade, and body mass index category as covariates were conducted using SUDAAN to account for complex study design. Results: Approximately half the students reported short sleep duration (51.8% of males and 54.3% of females), whereas very short sleep durations were reported by another 14.8% of males and 16.9% of females. Among males, very short sleepers were significantly (P sleep duration was associated with dieting and three unhealthy weight-control behaviors in this population. If our findings are confirmed, intervention studies should be conducted to examine the effect of educational interventions. Citation: Wheaton AG; Perry GS; Chapman DP; Croft JB. Self-reported sleep duration and weight-control strategies among US high school students. SLEEP 2013;36(8):1139-1145. PMID:23904673

  12. Report - Results of survey on child care needs - 2017

    CERN Document Server

    Guinot, Genevieve; Weymaere, Emeline; Trilhe, Philippe; Palluel, Stephanie; Mangiorou, Maria-Anna; Mondlane, Bruna; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2017-01-01

    In June 2016, a working group reporting to the Director for Finance and Human Resources was established to study the sustainability of CERN nursery and school services. Among actions taken by the working group, a survey was carried out to achieve a better understanding of the needs of CERN families for child care and educational structures, to identify which services are in highest demand (e.g. crèche or early years, primary schooling) and to understand the expectations and preferences of CERN families regarding these services.

  13. Children's Poetry Preferences: A National Survey of Upper Elementary Grades. NCTE Research Report No. 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Ann

    The responses of 422 fourth, fifth, and sixth grade students were analyzed in a survey that sought (1) to determine what poems selected for the survey were most enjoyed by the students; (2) to analyze the most popular poems considering such characteristics as the form, content, certain poetic elements, and age of the poem; and (3) to determine any…

  14. Impact of timing of sex education on teenage pregnancy in Nigeria: cross-sectional survey of secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiogu, Ifeoma N; Miettola, Juhani; Ilika, Amobi L; Vaskilampi, Tuula

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether the time at which sex education was provided had any impact on reported cases of unintended pregnancies. A cross-sectional survey of secondary school students and their teachers was conducted using self-administered questionnaires. The participants were 1,234 students aged 14-17 years and 46 teachers in 5 secondary schools in South Eastern Nigeria. The outcome measures were reported pregnancies within the last 3 years by type of school and class level; class level at the time of receiving sex education at school; and age at the time of receiving sex education at home. In all schools, sex education was provided at all the junior and senior secondary school levels (JSS and SSS, respectively). Overall, reported cases of unintended pregnancies were highest among the junior students. In the private schools, four in ten teachers reported pregnancies among JSS 3 students. Almost four in ten teachers in public schools reported pregnancies among JSS 2 students. Of all the students, about three in ten reported pregnancies among JSS 2 and 3 students respectively. At home, sex education was provided at the mean age of 16 years (SD ± 2.2). All participants cited financial need and marital promise as major predisposing factors. About four in ten students did not use contraceptives during their first sexual experience. This study highlights the need to introduce sex education much earlier, possibly before the JSS levels. At home, sex education may have greater impact if provided before the age of 14 years. Efforts should be made to address the factors predisposing to teenage pregnancy.

  15. A Grounded Theory of Counseling Students Who Report Problematic Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lindy K.; Chang, Catherine Y.; Corthell, Kimere K.; Walsh, Maggie E.; Brack, Greg; Grubbs, Natalie K.

    2014-01-01

    All counselors, including students, are responsible for intervening when a colleague shows signs of impairment. This grounded theory study investigated experiences of 12 counseling students who reported problematic peers. An emergent theory of the peer reporting process is presented, along with implications for counselor educators and suggestions…

  16. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    Lydia de Haan,1 Hein A de Haan,2,3 Berend Olivier,1 Joris C Verster11Utrecht University, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Tactus Addiction Treatment, Deventer, The Netherlands; 3Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Ne...

  17. Survey of Chinese Medicine Students to Determine Research and Evidence-Based Medicine Perspectives at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Belinda J; Kligler, Benjamin; Cohen, Hillel W; Marantz, Paul R

    2016-01-01

    Research literacy and the practice of evidence-based medicine (EBM) are important initiatives in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), which requires cultural change within educational institutions for successful implementation. To determine the self-assessed research and EBM perspectives of Chinese medicine Masters degree students at Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, New York campus (PCOM-NY). A survey with 17 close-ended questions and one open-ended question was administered through Survey Monkey to students at PCOM-NY. The survey was sent to 420 Masters students and 176 (41.9%) responded. Students in all four years of the Masters degree indicated a generally high degree of interest in, and support for the value of research. However, increasing years (one to four years) in the program was associated with lower interest in post-graduation research participation and entering the doctoral program, and the fourth year students reported low levels of interest in having greater research content and training in their Masters degree programs. Students who responded to the open-ended question (23% of respondents) expressed enthusiasm for research and concerns about the relevance of research in Chinese medicine. Consistent with findings in similar studies at CAM colleges, interest in research, and EBM of the PCOM-NY Masters students appeared to decline with increasing years in the program. Concerns around paradigm and epistemological issues associated with research and EBM among Chinese medicine students and practitioners warrants further investigation, and may be an important challenge for integrative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Survey of Substance Use for Cognitive Enhancement by University Students in the Netherlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Johanna Schelle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:Pharmacological cognitive enhancement, using chemicals to change cellular processes in the brain in order to enhance one’s cognitive capacities, is an often discussed phenomenon. The prevalence among Dutch university students is unknown.Methods:The study set out to achieve the following goals: (1 give an overview of different methods in order to assess the prevalence of use of prescription, illicit and lifestyle drugs for cognitive enhancement (2 investigate whether polydrug use and stress have a relationship with cognitive enhancement substance use (3 assessing opinions about cognitive enhancement prescription drug use. A nationwide survey was conducted among 1572 student respondents of all government supported Dutch universities. Results:The most detailed level of analysis ─ use of specific substances without a prescription and with the intention of cognitive enhancement ─ shows that prescription drugs, illicit drugs and lifestyle drugs are respectively used by 1.7%, 1.3% and 45.6% of the sample. The use of prescription drugs and illicit drugs is low compared to other countries. We have found evidence of polydrug use in relation to cognitive enhancement. A relation between stress and the use of lifestyle drugs for cognitive enhancement was observed. We report the findings of several operationalizations of cognitive enhancement drug use to enable comparison with a wider variety of previous and upcoming research.Conclusions:Results of this first study among university students in the Netherlands revealed a low prevalence of cognitive enhancement drug use compared to other countries. Multiple explanations, such as a difference in awareness of pharmacological cognitive enhancement among students, accessibility of drugs in the student population and inclusion criteria of enhancement substances are discussed. We urge enhancement researchers to take the different operationalizations and their effects on the prevalence numbers into

  19. Prioritizing Student Skill Development in the Small College Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalata, Kristianne

    2016-01-01

    This essay describes the successes and challenges of skills-based literature survey courses in the small liberal arts college setting of Westminster College (New Wilmington, PA). It considers the overall purpose of the survey in the skills-based English curriculum and then focuses on the integration of literary theory and creative writing as means…

  20. A survey of graduate students' knowledge, views, and behavior with respect to reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X

    1997-01-01

    This study examines knowledge, attitude, and reproductive health behavior among unmarried and married graduate students from 18 universities and colleges in eight Chinese cities (Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Dalian, Changchun, Suzhou, Wuhan, and Nanjing). Data were obtained from a 1994 survey conducted among 2730 graduate students, who account for about 2.56% of the graduate students nationwide. Most married graduate students were aged 25-30 years, but only 60.6% of unmarried graduate students were similarly aged. 50% of students had parents who were intellectuals or professionals. The next highest proportion were students who had parents who were farmers. Single students tended to live in dormitories. 16.4% of married students lived at home with their parents or independently. 45.3% of married students had at least one child. Graduate students are not allowed to marry while in school. Romantic involvement of any kind is discouraged. Most graduate students valued chastity as a Chinese cultural virtue, but 25% did not respond to this question. Chastity was not as favored among unmarried students. Male students were more likely to favor premarital sex under all circumstances. Both genders similarly accepted premarital sex based on love and commitment. Over 50% (more women than men) were aware of safe abortion within the first 2 months of pregnancy; only 25% of unmarried students were aware of the safe abortion period. 16.5% of married students and 50% of unmarried students did not know the impregnation-prone period. Few students learned about reproductive health from their parents. Married students were more likely to read about reproductive health. 72.9% of married student used contraception, usually obtained from pharmacies. 38.6% of married students had an abortion. 10.9% of unmarried students had premarital sex. Most favored college courses in reproductive health.

  1. National survey of separate collection programs. Survey report, July-September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, D.M.

    1979-07-01

    The report presents the results of a national telephone survey of 205 separate collection programs, defined as a scheduled collection of separated recyclable materials from residences and/or commercial establishments. It details national and regional trends in separate collection program growth. It describes trends in separate collection program design markets for recovered materials, publicity, collection practices, and ordinances and determines which aspects of separate collection program design encourage high resident participation and high solid waste diversion rates. It informs municipalities interested in starting a separate collection program how communities are presently operating programs and reviews practices used by communities to sell recyclable materials.

  2. Multiple race reporting for children in a national health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, J D; Lucas, J B

    2000-01-01

    The 1997 standard for race and ethnicity data from the Office of Management and Budget requires the collection of data for multiple race groups. The aims of this study were to compare characteristics of multiple race children and describe race reporting for children within interracial and multiple race families. Descriptive statistics were estimated using the 1993-1995 National Health Interview Surveys. In this time period, 2.6% of children had more than one race reported. Multiple race children were a diverse group who differed from each other and their single race counterparts. For example, the percent of children reported as both Black and White who lived in a two-parent household (58.9%), was significantly less than the corresponding percents for other multiple race children (65.8%-79.6%), and between the corresponding percents for single race Black (42.7%) and single race White children (83.2%). The relationships between parental race and child's race varied. Although 3.1% of children in two-parent households lived with interracial parents, fewer than half of these children had more than one race reported. Sociodemographic variables were not associated with child's reported race among interracial families. These findings indicate that generalizations about multiple race children for research or policy purposes will be problematic.

  3. Medicinal plants used as home remedies: a family survey by first year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewani-Rusike, Constance R; Mammen, Marykutty

    2014-01-01

    There is a hierarchical organisation of knowledge in the use of medicinal plants in communities. Medicinal use knowledge starts in the home and is passed on to family members. Next in the hierarchy are neighbours, village elders and finally, traditional healers being the most knowledgeable. For primary health care this hierarchy is actively followed in seeking remedies for ailments. This study was a survey of medicinal plant knowledge from family members of 1(st) year medical students registered at Walter Sisulu University. A total of 206 first year medical students participated in this study in 2010 and 2011. Results revealed 47 species used as home remedies, 32% of which are food plants. Leaves and roots were reported as most commonly used. The top five ailments managed at home were gastrointestinal problems (25 plants), wounds (19 plants), respiratory tract problems (19 plants), infections, including sexually transmitted diseases (19 plants) and pain including headaches (19 plants). Chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, cancer and reproductive ailments also formed a large group of diseases self-managed at home (29 plants). Family members hold knowledge of medicinal plant use. From this study, first year medical students were made aware of the relationship between common ailments and associated home remedies. This study forms a basis for further study of medicinal plants to validate their use as medicinal remedies.

  4. Painful Symptomatology Reported by Dentistry Students at a Brazilian University

    OpenAIRE

    Cunha, Cristiane Assunção da Costa; Costa, I. C. C.; Roncalli, A. G.; Souza, Dyego Leandro Bezerra de; Andrade, Fábia Barbosa de; Medeiros Júnior, A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Identification of the level of knowledge on ergonomics principles, and application of these by dentistry students to investigate whether painful symptomatology was experienced. An-other objective is the expansion of discussions on occupational health in academic settings. Study Design and Settings: Dentistry students of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil (n = 148) were surveyed using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire to determine the severity of musculosk...

  5. Counseling Programs' Informed Consent Practices: A Survey of Student Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease-Carter, Cheyenne; Minton, Casey A. Barrio

    2012-01-01

    This study examined 115 master's-level counseling students' preferences for content, timing, and method of programmatic informed consent. Students rated the majority of items as moderately or extremely important to receive, and they indicated a desire for the informed consent to be facilitated through a combination of both oral and written methods…

  6. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We investigated the sexual practices of medical students as they are positioned to serve as peer educators in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Methods: This was a cross sectional study, where self- administered questionnaires were distributed to consenting 4th to 6th year medical students in Jos, Nigeria with a view of ...

  7. Stress, Positive Psychology and the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to explore the predictive ability of sources of stress and a range of dispositional and coping behaviours on student satisfaction and motivation. Most research exploring sources of stress and coping in students construes stress as psychological distress, with little attempt to consider positive experiences of stress. A questionnaire…

  8. Vision survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the ocular problems of 1st‑year preclinical medical students at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: All registered 1st‑year preclinical medical students were examined in October 2008. Ocular investigation included filling out self‑administered ...

  9. College Student Engagement Surveys: Implications for Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratch-Lindauer, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Librarians have led the way for information literacy skills and abilities to be more integrated throughout the curriculum, and students are expected to demonstrate competency in finding, evaluating, and using information at many colleges and universities as part of the institution's curricular requirements and student learning outcomes. As part of…

  10. Developing skills versus reinforcing concepts in physics labs: Insight from a survey of students' beliefs about experimental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-06-01

    Physics laboratory courses have been generally acknowledged as an important component of the undergraduate curriculum, particularly with respect to developing students' interest in, and understanding of, experimental physics. There are a number of possible learning goals for these courses including reinforcing physics concepts, developing laboratory skills, and promoting expertlike beliefs about the nature of experimental physics. However, there is little consensus among instructors and researchers interested in the laboratory learning environment as to the relative importance of these various learning goals. Here, we contribute data to this debate through the analysis of students' responses to the laboratory-focused assessment known as the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Using a large, national data set of students' responses, we compare students' E-CLASS performance in classes in which the instructor self-reported focusing on developing skills, reinforcing concepts, or both. As the classification of courses was based on instructor self-report, we also provide additional description of these courses with respect to how often students engage in particular activities in the lab. We find that courses that focus specifically on developing lab skills have more expertlike postinstruction E-CLASS responses than courses that focus either on reinforcing physics concepts or on both goals. Within first-year courses, this effect is larger for women. Moreover, these findings hold when controlling for the variance in postinstruction scores that is associated with preinstruction E-CLASS scores, student major, and student gender.

  11. On the Potential Implications of Reports of Fictitious Drug Use for Survey Research on Juvenile Delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Ryan Charles; Piquero, Alex R

    2015-08-01

    A variety of methodological issues have been raised over self-reports of delinquency and its correlates. In this study, we call attention to the provision of untruthful information and provide an investigation of this issue using a survey item that assesses a respondent's use of a fictitious drug in relation to reports of delinquency and traditional criminological correlates. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted based on data drawn from a probability sample of middle and high school students in Florida. Results show (a) there are important differences on key criminological variables between respondents who report use of a fictitious drug and those who do not; (b) the internal consistency of a variety index of delinquency is particularly sensitive to the inclusion of respondents reporting the use of a fictitious drug; and (c) the effect size of some criminological variables on delinquency may be sensitive to controlling for reports of fictitious drug use. Overall, the inclusion of fictitious drug use items within etiological models may serve as a useful approach to further establishing the reliability and validity of information provided by survey respondents. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  13. Surveys Assessing Students' Attitudes toward Statistics: A Systematic Review of Validity and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Meaghan M.; Beran, Tanya; Hecker, Kent G.

    2012-01-01

    Students with positive attitudes toward statistics are likely to show strong academic performance in statistics courses. Multiple surveys measuring students' attitudes toward statistics exist; however, a comparison of the validity and reliability of interpretations based on their scores is needed. A systematic review of relevant electronic…

  14. University Students and AIDS: Some Findings from Three Surveys--1989, 1990 and 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ineke; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents three surveys conducted at the University of Puerto Rico concerning college students' AIDS knowledge and their sexual and preventive behaviors. Findings show students had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, but they also harbored misconceptions about ways the disease can spread. These misconceptions coupled with the machismo attitude…

  15. School Selection by Students. First Results from the GMAC's New Matriculants Survey. GMAC Occasional Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Ross M.; Giarrusso, Roseann

    A description of the Graduate Management Admission Council's New Matriculants Survey focusing on school selection by Masters of Business Administration students is presented. Four sections are as follows: (1) reasons for applying and enrolling (including student differences in reasons for applying); (2) who applies to more than one school (e.g.,…

  16. Surveying Turkish High School and University Students' Attitudes and Approaches to Physics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and…

  17. A Comprehensive Survey on Student Perceptions of Cyberbullying at a Major Metropolitan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Molluzzo, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents are featured daily in the news. The authors of this study examine the perceptions of students on cyberbullying at a major metropolitan university. From the findings of a student survey, the authors learn of high levels of perceptions on incidents as an issue but…

  18. A Questionnaire Survey On Use Of The Internet By Students Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to examine use of Internet by students of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria\\'s premier higher educational institution. Adopting a sample survey research design, systematic sampling was used to select 560 students who are resident in the main campus hostels, and data was collected from the ...

  19. A Survey of the Reading Habit of Exchange Students of Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this paper is on "a survey of the reading habit of exchange students of Government Secondary School and Queen Elizabeth School, Ilorin Kwara State". The students were drawn from seventeen states in Northern Nigeria. Causes of the low reading habit were identified, highlighted and the effects on their ...

  20. A New Measurement and Ranking System for the UK National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, John

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous criticisms of the UK National Student Survey (NSS) institutional managers still strongly support its use in informing student choice, quality and assurance and quality enhancement activities. This article outlines a granular and nuanced benchmarking system for the NSS which provides both a "raw" score (weighted student…

  1. Social Networking in School Psychology Training Programs: A Survey of Faculty and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.; Goforth, Anisa N.; Segool, Natasha; Burt, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of social networking sites has become an emerging focus in school psychology training, policy, and research. The purpose of the current study is to present data from a survey on social networking among faculty and graduate students in school psychology training programs. A total of 110 faculty and 112 graduate students in school…

  2. The Arizona Home Language Survey: The Identification of Students for ELL Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Claude; Rutherford-Quach, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Assuring that English language learners (ELLs) receive the services to which they have a right requires accurately identifying those students. Virtually all states identify ELLs in a two-step process. First, parents fill out a home language survey. Second, students in whose homes a language other than English is spoken and who therefore might…

  3. International Students in Rehabilitation Counseling Education Programs: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanan; Degeneffe, Charles Edmund

    2011-01-01

    A national sample of 21 international students in Rehabilitation Counseling Education (RCE) programs was surveyed on their connection to their programs, the stressors they experienced during graduate studies, and their recommendations for RCE programs to better support international students. Participants engaged in limited social activities due…

  4. Estimating adolescent sleep patterns: parent reports versus adolescent self-report surveys, sleep diaries, and actigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Short MA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Michelle A Short,1,2 Michael Gradisar,1 Leon C Lack,1 Helen R Wright,1 Alex Chatburn21School of Psychology, Flinders University, 2Centre for Sleep Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia, AustraliaBackground: In research and clinical contexts, parent reports are often used to gain information about the sleep patterns of their adolescents; however, the degree of concordance between parent reports and adolescent-derived measures is unclear. The present study compares parent estimates of adolescent sleep patterns with adolescent self-reports from surveys and sleep diaries, together with actigraphy.Methods: A total of 308 adolescents (59% male aged 13–17 years completed a school sleep habits survey during class time at school, followed by a 7-day sleep diary and wrist actigraphy. Parents completed the Sleep, Medical, Education and Family History Survey.Results: Parents reported an idealized version of their adolescent's sleep, estimating significantly earlier bedtimes on both school nights and weekends, significantly later wake times on weekends, and significantly more sleep than either the adolescent self-reported survey, sleep diary, or actigraphic estimates.Conclusion: Parent reports indicate that the adolescent averages a near-optimal amount of sleep on school nights and a more than optimal amount of sleep on weekends. However, adolescent-derived averages indicate patterns of greater sleep restriction. These results illustrate the importance of using adolescent-derived estimates of sleep patterns in this age group and the importance of sleep education for both adolescents and their parents.Keywords: concordance, parent, sleep, sleep measurement, survey, actigraphy

  5. Graduate Student Report: First-Year Physics and Astronomy Students, 2004. R-207.35

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvey, Patrick J.; Tesfaye, Casey Langer

    2006-01-01

    This report will document the changes in the number and citizenship of incoming graduate physics and astronomy students. It will provide student characteristics, such as gender, age, and the type of program in which they are enrolled. It will also discuss the educational backgrounds of the incoming students, highlighting differences between US and…

  6. Teacher Reports of Student Health and Its Influence on Students' School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tara C.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Hollo, Alexandra; Robertson, Rachel E.; Maggin, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    Physical health may be an important variable that influences students' behavioral and academic performance in school settings. Poor health status is hypothesized to negatively influence student performance even in the presence of evidence-based practices. In this study, teachers reported their perceptions of students' health status as well as…

  7. Physical educators' beliefs and self-reported behaviors toward including students with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beamer, Jennifer A; Yun, Joonkoo

    2014-10-01

    With an increase in the presence of students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the general physical education (GPE) classroom, understanding the current state of GPE teachers' beliefs and behaviors for including these students is warranted. The current study aimed to examine the beliefs and self-reported behaviors of GPE teachers' inclusion of students with ASD. In addition, the study examined potential factors affecting their inclusion behaviors. Using a national stratified random sample, participants were 142 current GPE teachers who submitted surveys anonymously online. Results from a regression analysis indicate that teachers' experience, graduate coursework in adapted physical education (APE), and perceptions of strength in undergraduate training in APE significantly predicted their self-reported behavior for including students with ASD. Although the participant response rate is considerably low, this study provides some support toward the importance of teacher education programs for inclusion training.

  8. A SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH READING HABITS OF EFL STUDENTS IN INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Erna Iftanti

    2012-01-01

    This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read English since elementary school, they do not indicate to have good English reading habits. Only few of them are identified to have good English reading ha...

  9. Probing University Students' Pre-Knowledge in Quantum Physics with QPCS Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Asikainen Mervi A

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the use of Quantum Physics Conceptual Survey (QPCS) in probing student understanding of quantum physics. Altogether 103 Finnish university students responded to QPCS. The mean scores of the student responses were calculated and the test was evaluated using common five indices: Item difficulty index, Item discrimination index, Item point biserial index, Kuder-Richardson Formula 21, and Ferguson’s delta. The results show that QPCS is not well suitable for probing Finnish ...

  10. Aerial remote sensing surveys, geophysical characterization. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labson, V.F.; Pellerin, L.; Anderson, W.L.

    1998-06-01

    The application of helicopter electromagnetic (HEM) and magnetic methods to the requirements of the environmental restoration of the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) demand the use of advanced, nontraditional methods of data acquisition, processing and interpretation. The cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and University of California (UCB) has resulted in the planning and supervision of data acquisition, the development of tools for data processing and interpretation, and an intensive application of the methods developed. This final report consists of a series of publications which the USGS collaborated with the ORNL technical staff. These reports represent the full scope of the USGS assistance. Copies of the reports and papers are included in the Appendix. The primary goals of this effort were to quantify the effectiveness of the geophysical methods applied in the survey of the ORR for the identification of buried waste, hydrogeologic pathways by which contamination could migrate through or off the site, and for the more accurate geologic mapping of the ORR. The objectives in buried waste identification are the accurate description of the source of the geophysical anomaly and the determination of the limits of resolution of the geophysical methods to acknowledge what we might have missed. The study of hydrogeologic pathways concentrated on the identification of karst features in the limestone underlying much of the ORR. Work in this study has indicated to the ORNL staff that these karst features can be located from the airborne geophysics. The defining characteristic of this helicopter geophysical study is the collaborative nature of the effort. Each task in which the USGS was involved has included a designated staff member from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. A Survey of Teacher-Student Relations in Secondary Schools.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    Abstract. This paper examined teacher-student relationship in ... trustworthy than individual decisions because the basis of judgment is broad ended. Also as we share in making .... Teacher Characteristics and Teacher Job Performance.

  12. Human Genetic Engineering: A Survey of Student Value Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sara McCormack; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Assesses the values of high school and college students relative to human genetic engineering and recommends that biology educators explore instructional strategies merging human genetic information with value clarification techniques. (LS)

  13. A survey of energy-drink consumption among medical students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Tanriover, Ozlem; Unaldi, Sule; Sulun, Serdar; Karavus, Melda

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of energy drink consumption among medical school students, their knowledge of its effects and side effects and to see its relation with alcohol and cigarette usage...

  14. A survey of energy drink consumption patterns among college students

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter-Aeby Tracy; Overton Reginald F; Aeby Victor G; Malinauskas Brenda M; Barber-Heidal Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Energy drink consumption has continued to gain in popularity since the 1997 debut of Red Bull, the current leader in the energy drink market. Although energy drinks are targeted to young adult consumers, there has been little research regarding energy drink consumption patterns among college students in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink consumption patterns among college students, prevalence and frequency of energy drink use for six...

  15. Biodigester User Survey 2009-2010. Draft report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Mansvelt, R.

    2011-02-15

    The Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries of the Kingdom of Cambodia (MAFF) and The Netherlands Development Organisation (SNV-Cambodia) have agreed on cooperating in the set-up and implementation of a National Biogas Programme. The programme officially started after the launching ceremony in March 2006. The objective the National Biodigester Programme (NBP) is 'The dissemination of domestic biodigesters as an indigenous, sustainable energy source through the development of a commercial, market oriented, biodigester sector in selected provinces of Cambodia'. To evaluate the effectiveness of the NBP a Biodigester User Survey has been undertaken with two specific objectives, being: (1) To evaluate the effect of domestic biodigester installations, as perceived by the user, by conducting a representative quantitative random survey of 120 households constructed till 31/08/2010 under the NBP in 8 provinces in Cambodia as well as how the users have experienced the programme activities such as promotion, construction, quality assurance, training and after-sales service; and (2) To evaluate the impact of the program on sustainable development and on a number of GHG emission causing activities, such as fossil and fuel wood consumption and manure management practices. The results of which are presented in this report. Since the beginning of 2006 the National Biodigester Programme (NBP) has supported the construction of over 8,000 biodigesters by July 2010. This Biodigester User Survey (BUS) aimed to evaluate the effect of domestic biodigester installations by conducting research with selected representatives to obtain a sample with a confidence level of 95%. The sample size was 120 with a two-step random selection, the selection was made from households in the NBP database. First, 12 out of 82 districts with were randomly selected, and secondly 120 households were randomly selected from these 12 districts, which cover 7 of the 8 provinces in which NBP

  16. A survey of energy-drink consumption among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Tanriover, Ozlem; Unaldi, Sule; Sulun, Serdar; Karavus, Melda

    2013-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of energy drink consumption among medical school students, their knowledge of its effects and side effects and to see its relation with alcohol and cigarette usage. The descriptive analytical study was conducted at Marmara University Medical School, Istanbul, Turkey from October 2011 and January 2012. A semi-structured questionnaire was filled by students who were asked about their socio-demographic status and their energy drink consumption. SPSS 12 was used for statistical analysis. The mean age of the 390 students in the study was 20.98+/-1.96 years (range:16-27). Of them, 204 (52.3%) were females and 186 (47.7%) were males. Overall 52(13.3%) were smoking regularly at least one cigarette per day; 122(31.3%) were consuming alcohol; 127 (32.6%) had consumed energy drinks at least once and 73(18.8%)more than once. In terms of perception, 110(28.2%) students said energy drinks were similar to sports drinks, while only 121(41.1%) named the brands correctly; 96 (24.6%) students did not answer this particular question. Although consumption of energy drinks was common among medical students, the knowledge of ingredients and knowledge of health risks of energy drinks among them was unsatisfactory.

  17. Examining Student Attitudes in Introductory Physics via the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Deborah; Eichenlaub, Mark; Losert, Wolfgang; Redish, Edward F.

    2017-01-01

    Student often face difficulties with using math in science, and this exploratory project seeks to address the underlying mechanisms that lead to these difficulties. This mixed-methods project includes the creation of two novel assessment surveys, the Mathematical Epistemic Games Survey (MEGS) and the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX). The MAX, a 30-question Likert-scale survey, focuses on the attitudes towards using mathematics of the students in a reformed introductory physics course for the life sciences (IPLS) which is part of the National Experiment in Undergraduate Education (NEXUS/Physics) developed at the University of Maryland (UMD). Preliminary results from the MAX are discussed with specific attention given to students' attitudes towards math and physics, opinions about interdisciplinarity, and the usefulness of physics in academic settings as well as in professional biological research and modern medicine settings.

  18. Students and Drugs at NCSU: 1977-1978 Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Earl H.

    A survey conducted in 1977 at North Carolina State University on drugs was designed to measure usage rates for four types of drugs: marijuana, hallucinogens (such as LSD, mescaline, and psilocybin); amphetamines and barbituates; and narcotics (heroin, opium, and morphine). The questionnaire was also designed to determine student attitudes on…

  19. Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) survey report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, Laurence R.; Jordan, Danyelle N.; Bauer, Travis L.; Elmore, Mark T. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Treadwell, Jim N. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Homan, Rossitza A.; Chapman, Leon Darrel; Spires, Shannon V.

    2005-02-01

    The large number of government and industry activities supporting the Unit of Action (UA), with attendant documents, reports and briefings, can overwhelm decision-makers with an overabundance of information that hampers the ability to make quick decisions often resulting in a form of gridlock. In particular, the large and rapidly increasing amounts of data and data formats stored on UA Advanced Collaborative Environment (ACE) servers has led to the realization that it has become impractical and even impossible to perform manual analysis leading to timely decisions. UA Program Management (PM UA) has recognized the need to implement a Decision Support System (DSS) on UA ACE. The objective of this document is to research the commercial Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining (KDDM) market and publish the results in a survey. Furthermore, a ranking mechanism based on UA ACE-specific criteria has been developed and applied to a representative set of commercially available KDDM solutions. In addition, an overview of four R&D areas identified as critical to the implementation of DSS on ACE is provided. Finally, a comprehensive database containing detailed information on surveyed KDDM tools has been developed and is available upon customer request.

  20. The NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey: A Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, M. R.; McLean, I. S.; Prato, L.; Burgasser, A.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    The major goal of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey (BDSS - McLean et al. 2000, ApJ, 533, L45) is to obtain a complete sample of low resolution (R 2000) spectra spanning the M, L, and T dwarf sub-classes in order to extend spectral classification schemes to near-infrared wavebands and to investigate the spectral signatures of temperature, gravity, and composition by comparison to theoretical models. Additional goals include the acquisition of higher resolution spectra (R 25,000) of a sub-sample of the survey for detailed comparison with models and to search for radial velocity variations. Our approach is to observe two objects per sub-class at J-band at low resolution, with one object per sub-class observed from 0.9-2.5 microns to produce a complete, flux-calibrated spectrum overlapping with previously obtained Keck LRIS data from 0.5-1.0 microns. Several of the brighter sources have also been observed at high resolution at J-band. To date, over 50 objects have been studied including 7 M dwarfs, 30 L dwarfs and 15 T dwarfs. Correlations of the strength of spectral features with spectral type are shown. We also report on the probable identification of weak methane features in the K-band spectra of L7 and L8 dwarfs.

  1. Microgrid Controller and Advanced Distribution Management System Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Starke, Michael R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herron, Andrew N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    A microgrid controller, which serves as the heart of a microgrid, is responsible for optimally managing the distributed energy resources, energy storage systems, and responsive demand and for ensuring the microgrid is being operated in an efficient, reliable, and resilient way. As the market for microgrids has blossomed in recently years, many vendors have released their own microgrid controllers to meet the various needs of different microgrid clients. However, due to the absence of a recognized standard for such controllers, vendor-supported microgrid controllers have a range of functionalities that are significantly different from each other in many respects. As a result the current state of the industry has been difficult to assess. To remedy this situation the authors conducted a survey of the functions of microgrid controllers developed by vendors and national laboratories. This report presents a clear indication of the state of the microgrid-controller industry based on analysis of the survey results. The results demonstrate that US Department of Energy funded research in microgrid controllers is unique and not competing with that of industry.

  2. Changes in medical students' exposure to and attitudes about drug company interactions from 2003 to 2012: a multi-institutional follow-up survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierles, Frederick S; Kessler, Kenneth H; Mintz, Matthew; Beck, Gary; Starr, Stephanie; Lynn, D Joanne; Chao, Jason; Cleary, Lynn M; Shore, William; Stengel, Terrie L; Brodkey, Amy C

    2015-08-01

    To ascertain whether changes occurred in medical student exposure to and attitudes about drug company interactions from 2003-2012, which factors influence exposure and attitudes, and whether exposure and attitudes influence future plans to interact with drug companies. In 2012, the authors surveyed 1,269 third-year students at eight U.S. medical schools. Items explored student exposure to, attitudes toward, and future plans regarding drug company interactions. The authors compared 2012 survey data with their 2003 survey data from third-year students at the same schools. The 2012 response rate was 68.2% (866/1,269). Compared with 2003, in 2012, students were significantly less frequently exposed to interactions (1.6/month versus 4.1/month, P students (65.0%) reported private outpatient offices were the main location of exposure to pharmaceutical representatives, despite spending only 18.4% of their clerkship-rotation time there. In 2012, 310/703 students (44.1%) were unaware their schools had rules restricting interactions, and 467/837 (55.8%) planned to interact with pharmaceutical representatives during residency. Students in 2012 had less exposure to drug company interactions and were more likely to have skeptical attitudes than students in 2003. These changes are consistent with national organizations' recommendations to limit and teach about these interactions. Continued efforts to study and influence students' and physician role models' exposures to and attitudes about drug companies are warranted.

  3. A Comparison of Occupational Stress Correlates as Reported by Teachers of Mentally Retarded and Nonmentally Retarded Handicapped Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimian, Michael J.

    1983-01-01

    The statewide (Connecticut) survey of 365 teachers of mentally retarded (MR) and nonretarded handicapped (non-MR) students indicated such results as that MR teachers reported stress source levels comparable to or less than levels of non-MR teachers, but reported stress manifestation levels comparable to or greater than those of non-MR teachers.…

  4. Surveys on Reporting Guideline Usage in Dental Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, F; Walsh, T; Glenny, A-M; Worthington, H

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to find out if and how authors and peer reviewers for dental journals are encouraged to use reporting guidelines (RGs); 2) to identify factors related to RG endorsement; and 3) to assess the knowledge, opinions, and future plans of dental journal editors in chief (EICs) on RGs. A total of 109 peer-reviewed and original research-oriented dental journals that were indexed in the MEDLINE and/or SCIE database in 2015 were included. The "instructions to authors" and "instructions to reviewers" of these journals were identified and retrieved from journals' official websites. Any mention of RGs or other related policies were sought and extracted. In addition, an anonymous survey of the EICs of the included journals was conducted with a validated questionnaire. All 109 journals provided "instructions to authors," among which 55 (50.5%) mentioned RGs. Only the CONSORT (45.0%), PRISMA (13.8%), and STROBE (12.8%) guidelines were mentioned by >10% of the included journals. Statistical analyses suggest that RGs were more frequently mentioned by SCIE-indexed journals (P journals (P = 0.002), and journals that endorsed the ICMJE recommendations (P journals (8.3%), 3 of which mentioned RGs. For the EIC survey, the response rate was 32.1% (35 of 109). Twenty-six editors (74.3%) stated that they knew what RGs were before receiving our questionnaire. Twenty-four editors (68.6%) believed that RGs should be adopted by all refereed dental journals where appropriate. RGs are important tools for enhancing research reporting and reducing avoidable research waste, but currently they are not widely endorsed by dental journals. Joint efforts by all stakeholders to further promote RG usage in dentistry are needed. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  5. The Effects of Survey Timing on Student Evaluation of Teaching Measures Obtained Using Online Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Teaching evaluations are an important measurement tool used by business schools in gauging the level of student satisfaction with the educational services delivered by faculty. The growing use of online teaching evaluations has enabled educational administrators to expand the time period during which student evaluation of teaching (SET) surveys…

  6. Can Student Populations in Developing Countries Be Reached by Online Surveys? The Case of the National Service Scheme Survey (N3S) in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Arnim; Meuleman, Bart; Oshodi, Abdul-Gafar Tobi; Schroyens, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    This article tackles the question whether it is a viable strategy to conduct online surveys among university students in developing countries. By documenting the methodology of the National Service Scheme Survey conducted in Ghana, we set out to answer three questions: (1) How can a sample of university students be obtained? (2) How can students…

  7. Culturally diverse health care students' experiences with teaching strategies in Finland: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Pitkala, Kaisu

    2013-06-01

    All over the world, current health care students come from a variety of cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds. Their expectations and learning needs vary, yet little is known about how our current education system meets their needs. The purpose of this study was to explore culturally diverse health care students' experiences of teaching strategies in polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland. Specifically, we aimed to compare how international students and Finnish students experience the same curriculum. A cross sectional survey. Ten polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland offering English-Language-Taught Degree Programmess (ELTDPs). 283 students studying nursing, public health nursing, or physiotherapy in English. Of these, 166 were international students and 112 were Finnish students. The data were collected using a questionnaire designed specifically for this study. The survey included items grouped into seven dimensions: 1. concreteness of theoretical instruction, 2. encouragement of student activity, 3. use of skills labs, 4. variation among teaching strategies, 5. assessment, 6. interaction in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes, and 7. approach to diversity in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes. The most positive experiences for all students were with the approach to cultural diversity and the concreteness of theoretical instruction, whereas the most negative experiences were with assessment. International students' experiences were more positive than Finnish students' in the following dimensions: encouragement of student activity (p=0.005), variation among teaching strategies (p<0.001), and assessment (p<0.001). Compared to the Finnish students, more than double the number of international students were dissatisfied with their lives (p<0.001). The implications for education include the strengthening teachers' leadership role in small group activities, providing individual and detailed feedback, and ensuring

  8. Brief Report: Self-Reported Academic, Social, and Mental Health Experiences of Post-Secondary Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Scott L J; Hart, Logan; Brown, Jane Thierfeld; Volkmar, Fred R

    2017-10-11

    Increasing numbers of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are enrolling in post-secondary academic institutions. However, research indicates that post-secondary students with ASD are struggling more than their typically developing peers, with high rates of loneliness, anxiety, depression, and an increased incidence of dropping-out before completion of their degrees. The current study utilized an online survey to gain insight into the self-reported academic, social, and mental health experiences of post-secondary students with ASD. Participants reported high levels of academic comfort, but struggled with issues of isolation/loneliness and high levels of stress, anxiety, and depression. Of greatest concern, were the nearly three-quarters of participants who reported lifetime suicidal behaviors. Further analysis on collected data and implications of findings are discussed.

  9. Surveying Turkish high school and university students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-06-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration, and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expertlike than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the averages of the groups on many items. For example, on average, the university students demonstrated less expertlike attitudes about the role of equations and formulas in problem solving, in solving difficult problems, and in knowing when the solution is not correct, whereas they displayed more expertlike attitudes and approaches on items related to metacognition in physics problem solving. A principal component analysis on the data yields item clusters into which the student responses on various survey items can be grouped. A comparison of the responses of the Turkish and American university students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses shows that on more than half of the items, the responses of these two groups were statistically significantly different, with the U.S. students on average responding to the items in a more expertlike manner.

  10. Can smartphones measure momentary quality of life and participation? A proof of concept using experience sampling surveys with university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jacki; Wishink, Anna; Springfield, Liz; Gustafsson, Louise; Ireland, David; Silburn, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Understanding quality of life and participation is a key aspect of occupational therapy research. The use of smartphones to deliver experience-sampling surveys may provide an accessible way to monitor these outcomes. This study used smartphone-based experience sampling methods (ESM) to investigate factors influencing momentary quality of life (mQOL) of university students. A convenience sample of students at an Australian university participated. Using a custom smartphone application, ESM surveys were sent six to eight times, every second day, over a week. Participants indicated their mQOL, occupational participation, occupational enjoyment, social context and location via surveys and provided demographic and health information in a single self-report questionnaire. The relationship between mQOL and variables was analysed at the survey level using logistic regression. Forty students completed 391 surveys. Higher mQOL was significantly related to participation in productive occupations (z = 3.48; P = 0.001), moderate (z = 4.00; P < 0.001) or high occupational enjoyment (z = 7.06; P < 0.001), being with someone (z = 2.15, P = 0.031), being at home (z = 2.49; P = 0.013) and an excellent self-rated health status (z = 2.35; P = 0.019). The magnitude of differences in mQOL was small. This study suggests that mQOL amongst university students relates to personal, environmental and occupational factors. The use of smartphone-based ESM appears to be a practical approach for investigating participation and QOL. Further research utilising a more diverse sample, analysing at the individual level, and using ESM in conjunction with other methodologies is recommended. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  11. Perceptions of mumps and MMR vaccination among university students in England: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton-Maggs, Diane; Conrad, David; Keenan, Alex; Lamden, Ken; Ghebrehewet, Sam; Vivancos, Roberto

    2012-07-20

    Mumps is easily preventable through vaccination. Investigation of a number of recent mumps outbreaks in universities in the North West of England, however, found that affected students were either not vaccinated or only partially vaccinated. An online survey of students (n=2456) attending five universities in the region was undertaken during 2010 to establish MMR vaccination status, knowledge of mumps and willingness to take up vaccination if offered. Regression analysis was undertaken to identify characteristics of unimmunized students to ascertain likely target groups for future vaccination campaigns. Students least likely to be fully vaccinated with MMR included males; those not registered with a GP; first year students; mature students; and those with poor knowledge of mumps. A high proportion of students were willing to accept MMR vaccination if offered at university. Those least likely to take up vaccination included students not registered with a GP; mature students; and those who did not consider mumps to be a serious disease. The survey also highlighted that misconceptions remain about both the MMR vaccine safety and perceptions of risk/benefit of the vaccine. Encouraging registration with a GP and awareness raising should be a key part of campaigns to improve vaccination uptake among university students. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Abortion education in the medical curriculum: a survey of student attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Ogburn, Tony; Leeman, Larry; Nguyen, Tina; Gill, Geoff

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate student attitudes toward the inclusion of abortion education in the preclinical and clinical medical school curriculum. All students completing the OB-GYN rotation from May 2004 through January 2005 (n=118) were asked to complete a 21-item survey. Survey questions focused on students' attitudes about the appropriateness of abortion education, reasons for participation or nonparticipation in the abortion care experiences in the clinical curricula and the value of abortion education. One hundred students completed the survey for a response rate of 85%. Nearly all respondents indicated that abortion education was appropriate in the preclinical and clinical curricula (96%). Fifty-three percent of students participated in a clinical abortion care experience. The majority of these students rated it as valuable (84%) and would recommend it to a friend (73%). Most students who planned a career in Family Medicine and OB-GYN preferred the integration of abortion training into the residency curriculum (74%). Abortion education is acceptable and valued by medical students and should be integrated into the curricula of all medical schools.

  13. Knowledge of medical students on National Health Care System: A French multicentric survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feral-Pierssens, A-L; Jannot, A-S

    2017-09-01

    Education on national health care policy and costs is part of our medical curriculum explaining how our health care system works. Our aim was to measure French medical students' knowledge about national health care funding, costs and access and explore association with their educational and personal background. We developed a web-based survey exploring knowledge on national health care funding, access and costs through 19 items and measured success score as the number of correct answers. We also collected students' characteristics and public health training. The survey was sent to undergraduate medical students and residents from five medical universities between July and November 2015. A total of 1195 students from 5 medical universities responded to the survey. Most students underestimated the total amount of annual medical expenses, hospitalization costs and the proportion of the general population not benefiting from a complementary insurance. The knowledge score was not associated with medical education level. Three students' characteristics were significantly associated with a better knowledge score: male gender, older age, and underprivileged status. Medical students have important gaps in knowledge regarding national health care funding, coverage and costs. This knowledge was not associated with medical education level but with some of the students' personal characteristics. All these results are of great concern and should lead us to discussion and reflection about medical and public health training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Recess Reports: Self-Identification of Students with Friendship Difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Beth; Murphy, Patrick

    Students' relationships with peers is fundamental to their mental health. A 3-month study presented here investigated the nature and frequency of students' self-reported recess problems and the degree to which these were concomitant with two often-used measures of children's social competence: peer acceptance and mutual friendships. Seven specific…

  15. Web based view of SBA beamline status (summer student report)

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156364

    2016-01-01

    Summer student project report by Branislav Jenco. The document starts with some general opinions on the summer student program as well as the lectures, continues with a detailed work log and finally finishes with several appendices of technical documentation which make up the bulk of the material.

  16. Homework Emotion Management Reported by High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong

    2005-01-01

    This article links student and family characteristics, along with perceived purposes for doing homework, to homework emotion management as reported by 205 high school students in grades 9-10. The results revealed that adolescents' management of their emotions was not related to grade level and amount of parental education. However, girls and…

  17. Statistical Report: Academic Year 2014-15. Student Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report covers fall 2014 enrollments for WUE [Western Undergraduate Exchange], WRGP [Western Regional Graduate Program], and PSEP [Professional Student Exchange Program]. It details the funds that flow between students' home states and the enrolling PSEP institutions that receive them. This newly expanded format gives detailed enrollment for…

  18. A survey of final year medical students at University College, Galway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M; Leonard, B E

    1993-01-01

    The results of this survey of final year medical students at a provincial Irish university showed that over three-quarters came from families in which at least one parent was in a professional or semi-professional occupation. The majority of the students had repeated their Leaving Certificate examination. Most students expressed dissatisfaction with the career guidance counselling they received during their second level education. All the students came from secondary schools. While the majority expressed satisfaction with their choice of University course, approximately one-third had considered withdrawing from the course, particularly during the pre-clinical years. The main reasons given were financial difficulties, personal problems and difficulties with the course. Despite the provision of student counsellors and academic staff members to assist such students, the majority did not consult any staff member for help. Most students expected they would have to obtain employment outside of Ireland.

  19. Engaging Students in Survey Design and Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Marla A.

    2015-01-01

    Every day, people use data to make decisions that affect their personal and professional lives, trusting that the data are correct. Many times, however, the data are inaccurate, as a result of a flaw in the design or methodology of the survey used to collect the data. Researchers agree that only questions that are clearly worded, unambiguous, free…

  20. Perceived Immune Status and Sleep : A Survey among Dutch Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donners, Anouk A M T; Tromp, Marilou D P; Garssen, Johan; Roth, Thomas; Verster, Joris C

    2015-01-01

    Reduced immune functioning may have a negative impact on sleep and health, and vice versa. A survey among Dutch young adults (18-35 years old) was administered to collect information on perception of reduced immunity and its relationship to sleep disorders, sleep duration, and quality. Sleep

  1. Conducting Sanitary Surveys of Water Supply Systems. Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    This workbook is utilized in connection with a 40-hour course on sanitary surveys of water supply systems for biologists, chemists, and engineers with experience as a water supply evaluator. Practical training is provided in each of the 21 self-contained modules. Each module outlines the purpose, objectives and content for that section. The course…

  2. Well-being of medical students and their awareness on substance misuse: a cross-sectional survey in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Saman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate psychological well-being and substance abuse among medical students in Pakistan. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey was conducted in six medical colleges across Pakistan. Final-year medical students were interviewed by either a postgraduate trainee in psychiatry or a consultant psychiatrist. Results A total of 540 medical students were approached; 342 participated and the response rate was 64.5%. Mean age was 23.73 years (SD 2.45 years; 52.5% were male and 90% single. Two out of every five respondents reported that work/study at medical school affected their personal health and well-being. A considerable proportion of students were aware of alcohol and smoking as coping strategies for stress in medical students. The main factors causing stress were heavy workload (47.4%, relationship with colleagues (13.5% and staff (11.9%. A total of 30% reported a history of depression and 15% among them had used an antidepressant. More than half were aware of depression in colleagues. The majority of respondents said that teaching provided on substance misuse in the areas of alcohol and illegal drugs, management/treatment of addiction, and models of addiction was poor. There was significant association (p = 0.044 between stress and awareness about alcohol as a coping strategy for stress among medical students. A significant negative association was also found between medical colleges in public sector (p = 0.052, female gender (p = 0.003 and well-being. Conclusion The majority of the medical students reported a negative impact of heavy workload on their psychological well-being. Significant numbers of medical students think that substance misuse is a coping strategy for stress. Teaching on addiction/addictive substances is poor at undergraduate level in Pakistani medical colleges.

  3. Assessment of burnout in veterinary medical students using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educational Survey: a survey during two semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Boudreaux, Karen A; Ilkiw, Jan E

    2014-11-28

    Burnout among veterinary students can result from known stressors in the absence of a support system. The objectives of this study were to evaluate use of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educator Survey (MBI-ES) to assess burnout in veterinary students and evaluate the factors that predict the MBI-ES scores. The MBI-ES was administered to first (Class of 2016) and second year (Class of 2015) veterinary medical students during the 2012-2013 academic year in the fall and spring semesters. Factor analysis and test reliability for the survey were determined. Mean scores for the subscales determining burnout namely emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and lack of personal accomplishment (PA) were calculated for both classes in the 2 semesters. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate other factors that predict the MBI-ES scores. A non-probability sampling method was implemented consisting of a voluntary sample of 170 and 123 students in the fall and spring semesters, respectively. Scores for EE, DP and PA were not different between the 2 classes within the same semester. Mean ± SD scores for EE, DP and PA for the fall semester were 22.9 ± 9.6, 5.0 ± 4.8 and 32.3 ± 6.7, respectively. Mean ± SD scores for EE, DP and PA the spring semester were 27.8 ± 10.7, 6.5 ± 6.1and 31.7 ± 6.8, respectively. The EE score was higher in spring compared to fall while DP and PA scores were not different between the 2 semesters. Living arrangements specifically as to whether or not a student lived with another veterinary medical students was the only variable significantly associated with the MBI-ES scores. Students in this study had moderate levels of burnout based on the MBI-ES scores. The MBI-ES was an acceptable instrument for assessing burnout in veterinary medical students. The EE scores were higher in the spring semester as compared to the fall semester. Thus students in the first and second years of veterinary school under the current curriculum

  4. How do medical student journals fare? A global survey of journals run by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have made significant contributions to the medical and scientific fields in the past. Today, medical students still contribute to biomedical research; however, they often face disappointment from journals when trying to publish their findings. This led to the development of medical student journals, which take a more "student-friendly" approach. This article reviews the current medical student journals published in English and sheds light on current trends and challenges.

  5. Report of radioactivity survey research in fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    In National Institute of Radiological Sciences, a survey was made on radioactivities in the environment due to the substances released from nuclear installations and radioactive fall-out brought out by nuclear explosion tests since 1959. As the marked progress of non-military utilization of nuclear energy the national concern on environmental radioactivity has been increasing in Japan and thus it has become more and more important to make a survey research of radioactivities, which might affect the environment and human health. In these situations, the institute attempted to make the following six surveys in the fiscal year of 1996; `a survey on radioactive levels in environment, foods and human bodies`, `survey on the radioactive level in the regions around nuclear installations`, `works in radioactive data center`, `fundamental survey on the evaluation of the results from radioactivity survey`, `workshop for technical experts of environmental radioactivity monitoring` and `survey research on the measurement and countermeasures for emergency exposure`. (M.N.)

  6. 2007 motor vehicle occupant safety survey. Volume 1, Methodology report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    The 2007 Motor Vehicle Occupant Safety Survey was the sixth in a series of periodic national telephone surveys on occupant protection issues conducted for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Data collection was conducted by Sc...

  7. Student and instructor perceptions of the use of inquiry practices in a Biology Survey Laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, Lisbeth Ann

    The level of inquiry in science education has been the subject of a great deal of research by organizations such as The National Resource Council, The National Science Teachers Association, and The National Science Resources Center. Although inquiry has been promulgated as best practice, most colleges have not included inquiry science instruction in their coursework. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of the level of inquiry, which students and instructors in a Biology Survey Laboratory I course consider the most supportive of student learning at a small, rural, Midwestern university. A survey instrument developed using the Inquiry Level Rubric designed by Buck et al., (2008) and the Likert Scale (1932) was used to collect data from 192 Biology Survey Laboratory I course students and their two instructors. The instrument consisted of 36 five-point Likert scale items followed by four demographic questions. A total of 190 (99.0%) students' surveys contained usable information for statistical analyses. Semi-structured instructor interviews were completed after the survey. Descriptive statistics including means and standard deviations were analyzed to determine the perceptions of students and their instructors regarding the best level of inquiry to learn biology. Inferential statistical analysis with independent t tests were utilized to determine if there were statistically significant differences between education majors and non-education majors, underrepresented groups and students typically represented in the science fields, and students with high versus low inquiry experience K--12. Qualitative phenomenological data were collected and analyzed from instructor interviews. Descriptive analyses revealed that students perceived that they would learn best with Open or Authentic inquiry levels, while instructors' perceptions leaned towards Open or Guided inquiry levels in the Biology Survey Laboratory I course (Buck et al., 2008). Inferential data

  8. Perceptions of Professional Counselors: Survey of College Student Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Numerous sources of information influence how individuals perceive professional counselors. The stressors associated with entering college, developmental differences, and factors associated with service fees may further impact how college students view mental health professionals and may ultimately influence when, for what issues, and with whom…

  9. Pharmacy Students' Attitude and Future Career Choices: A survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacy as a health profession has major responsibilities and contributions in maintaining health of the society. Thus, pharmacists have to maintain professional behaviour and attitude that is worthy of the respect the public has for the profession. Studies on pharmacy students' attitude and career choice are important to ...

  10. Student Entrepreneurship in Hungary: Selected Results Based on GUESSS Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S. Gubik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigates students’ entrepreneurial activities and aims to answer questions regarding to what extent do students utilize the knowledge gained during their studies and the personal connections acquired at universities, as well as what role a family business background plays in the development of students’ business start-ups. Research Design & Methods: This paper is based on the database of the GUESSS project investigates 658 student entrepreneurs (so-called ‘active entrepreneurs’ who have already established businesses of their own. Findings: The rate of self-employment among Hungarian students who study in tertiary education and consider themselves to be entrepreneurs is high. Motivations and entrepreneurial efforts differ from those who owns a larger company, they do not necessarily intend to make an entrepreneurial path a career option in the long run. A family business background and family support play a determining role in entrepreneurship and business start-ups, while entrepreneurial training and courses offered at higher institutions are not reflected in students’ entrepreneurial activities. Implications & Recommendations: Universities should offer not only conventional business courses (for example, business planning, but also new forms of education so that students meet various entrepreneurial tasks and problems, make decisions in different situations, explore and acquaint themselves with entrepreneurship. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides literature overview of youth entrepreneurship, describes the main characteristics of students’ enterprises and contributes to understanding the factors of youth entrepreneurship.

  11. A Survey on Literacy Instruction for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durando, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals with Disabilities Improvement Education Act of 2004 stress the importance of giving every child access to the general education curriculum. The Reading First program, under the No Child Left Behind Act, aimed to establish evidence-based literacy instruction for all students in kindergarten…

  12. The German fibromyalgia consumer reports - a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuser, Winfried; Jung, Eva; Erbslöh-Möller, Brigitte; Gesmann, Mechthild; Kühn-Becker, Hedi; Petermann, Franz; Langhorst, Jost; Thoma, Reinhard; Weiss, Thomas; Wolfe, Frederick; Winkelmann, Andreas

    2012-05-18

    Consumer surveys provide information on effectiveness and side effects of medical interventions in routine clinical care. A report of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) consumers has not been carried out in Europe. The study was carried out from November 2010 to April 2011. Participants diagnosed with FMS rated the effectiveness and side effects of pharmacological and non-pharmacological FMS interventions on a 0 to 10 scale, with 10 being most efficacious (harmful). The questionnaire was distributed by the German League for people with Arthritis and Rheumatism and the German Fibromyalgia Association to their members and to all consecutive FMS patients of nine clinical centers of different levels of care. 1661 questionnaires (95% women, mean age 54 years, mean duration since FMS diagnosis 6.8 years) were analysed. The most frequently used therapies were self-management strategies, prescription pain medication and aerobic exercise. The highest average effectiveness was attributed to whole body and local warmth therapies, thermal bathes, FMS education and resting. The highest average side effects were attributed to strong opioids, local cold therapy, gamma-amino-butyric acid analogues (pregabalin and gabapentin), tramadol and opioid transdermal systems. The German fibromyalgia consumer reports highlight the importance of non-pharmcological therapies in the long-term management of FMS, and challenges the strong recommendations for drug therapies given by FMS-guidelines.

  13. A survey of the environmental literacy of high school junior and senior science students from a southeast Texas school district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Audrey Lynn

    The purpose of this study was to assess the environmental literacy of upper-level high school science students from a southeast Texas school district. The Secondary School Environmental Literacy Instrument (SSELI), an instrument designed to ascertain environmental literacy among high school students, was used to address research questions concerning (1) students, knowledge of ecology and environmental science; (2) students' attitudes towards the environment; (3) students, beliefs about the most critical environmental problems; (4) students, abilities to apply a number of issue-related skills within a particular environmental issue-oriented scenario; (5) students' perceived knowledge of and skills in the use of action strategies, and (6) students' behaviors in environmental actions over a six month period. The subject population surveyed consisted of 125 high school junior and senior science students from a southeast Texas school district. These students had completed at least two years of high school science. Since the data reflected behaviors that were self-reported by students and not actually observed, the quality of students, responses may have been compromised and thus considered a limitation. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Correlational statistics were applied to the data. On average, 58% of the items on the knowledge test on ecology and environmental science were answered correctly; more than 65% of the respondents answered more than half of the items correctly. Students possessed a slightly positive attitude toward environmental concerns and protection but exhibited limited awareness of environmental problems. Students demonstrated moderate issue-related skill development. Students exhibited a readiness for and engagement in action but tended to limit their participation to two action areas (ecomanagement and consumer action). Students exhibited: (a) limited knowledge of ecological principles and environmental science, (b) a slightly

  14. HIV health literacy, sexual behaviour and self-reports of having tested for HIV among students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Saloshni; Taylor, Myra

    2015-01-01

    The HIV prevalence among young South African adults makes it important to understand their HIV knowledge, sexual behaviour and HIV counselling and testing (HCT) behaviour in this group. This paper presents the demographics, knowledge, sexual behaviour and cues to action as reported by sexually active students' who had HCT. A cross-sectional study conducted in 10 high schools in the eThekwini and Ugu districts, KwaZulu-Natal, surveyed students' HIV knowledge, sexual behaviour and HCT behaviour. Complete information was available from 1 114 (97.9%) students who participated in the survey. Of these, 378 (33.9%) were sexually active and were included in this analysis. Logistic regression models tested for significant associations between the independent and the dependent variables under study, nesting the students within schools and controlling for age, sex, grade and school location (urban/rural).The median age of students was 17 years (range: 14-23 years) with most being male (n=287; 75.9%). The lifetime median number of sexual partners of students was 3 (range: 1-27). Students who used condoms with their regular partners were more likely to have had counselling for HIV (OR :1.79; 95% CI: 1.06-3.01). Those students who were more likely to have been tested for HIV were female (OR: 44.90; 95% CI: 7.77-259.38), those who had always used a condom with their non-regular partner (OR: 2.75; 95% CI: 1.01-7.47), and those who knew a person who had tested for HIV (OR: 15.28; 95% CI: 5.16-45.23). Targeting students, especially males early in adolescence and reinforcing safe sex behaviour messages through their high school years, can encourage HCT among students.

  15. A survey of health professions students for knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about tuberculosis, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catanzaro Antonino

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003 the NIH perceived a need to strengthen teaching about tuberculosis (TB to health professions students. The National Tuberculosis Curriculum Consortium (NTCC was funded to meet this need. The purpose of this study was to survey students enrolled in NTCC schools prior to NTCC-developed educational materials being made available to faculty. Methods A self-administered survey for students in NTCC schools to establish a baseline level of knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about tuberculosis. Results 1480/2965 (50% students in 28 programs in 20 NTCC schools completed the survey. If public health students are eliminated from totals (only 61 respondents of 765 public health students, the overall response proportion for the seven clinically-related disciplines was 64.5%. The majority (74% were in schools of medicine (MD/DO, undergraduate nursing (BSN, and pharmacy (PharmD; others were in programs for physician assistants (PA, advanced practice nursing (NP/APN, respiratory therapy (RT, clinical laboratory sciences (MT/CLS, and public health (MPH. Almost 90% had attended at least one lecture about TB. Although 91.4% knew TB was transmitted via aerosols, about one-third did not know the method for administering tuberculin, or that Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG vaccine was not a contraindication to TB skin testing. Fewer than two-thirds knew that about 10% of people in the U.S.A. who have latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI and a normal immune system will develop TB disease, or that BCG is not part of the routine vaccination program in the U.S.A. because it complicates surveillance for new TB infection. Conclusion There is room for improvement in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about TB by health professions students surveyed. The NTCC-developed educational products may be used by faculty to improve student performance to be assessed with future surveys.

  16. Science Lab Report Writing in Postsecondary Education: Mediating Teaching and Learning Strategies between Students and Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaskas, Anthony Bacaoat

    The lab report is a genre commonly assigned by lab instructors and written by science majors in undergraduate science programs. The teaching and learning of the lab report, however, is a complicated and complex process that both instructors and students regularly contend with. This thesis is a qualitative study that aims to mediate the mismatch between students and instructors by ascertaining their attitudes, beliefs, and values regarding lab report writing. In this way, this thesis may suggest changes to teaching and learning strategies that lead to an improvement of lab report writing done by students. Given that little research has been conducted in this area thus far, this thesis also serves as a pilot study. A literature review is first conducted on the history of the lab report to delineate its development since its inception into American postsecondary education in the late 19th century. Genre theory and Vygotsky's zone of proximal development (ZPD) serve as the theoretical lenses for this thesis. Surveys and interviews are conducted with biology majors and instructors in the Department of Biology at George Mason University. Univariate analysis and coding are applied to elucidate responses from participants. The findings suggest that students may lack the epistemological background to understand lab reports as a process of doing science. This thesis also finds that both instructors and students consider the lab report primarily as a pedagogical genre as opposed to an apprenticeship genre. Additionally, although instructors were found to have utilized an effective piecemeal teaching strategy, there remains a lack of empathy among instructors for students. Collectively, these findings suggest that instructors should modify teaching strategies to determine and address student weaknesses more directly.

  17. Do Veterinary Students See a Need for More In-Course Discussion? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Cindy; Haimerl, Peggy; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Arlt, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rather than merely transferring information, veterinary education should stimulate and motivate students and encourage them to think. Currently in veterinary education, most curricula use the method of frontal teaching (e.g., in lectures). A student-centered critical approach to information is rarely used. Our research sought to determine if students consider in-course discussion useful and if sufficient possibilities for discussion are provided and supported by their lecturers. In December 2013, we conducted a survey of fourth-year students. Specifically, we wanted to know if students consider in-course discussion about course content useful for successful learning and if students wish to have more opportunities for discussion during class time. Finally, we wanted to identify barriers that limit the students' motivation and ability to engage in discussion of course content. In total, 105 students completed the survey. The majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that clinical topics should be discussed during class time. Frequently stated reasons were improved learning (85.7%) and the opportunity to look at topics from different perspectives (92.4%). In conclusion, we found a considerable dearth of and request for discussion within veterinary education. In light of these findings, we emphasize the need for new teaching strategies that promote independent thinking and critical questioning. We suggest the implementation of more discussion opportunities in well considered and moderated settings in veterinary teaching.

  18. Attitudes towards mental illness of nursing students in a Baccalaureate programme in Jamaica: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J; Stennett, R

    2015-10-01

    There is longstanding evidence of nurses demonstrating negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Student nurses' fear or discomfort with mentally ill patients results in poorer outcomes for patients and students' dissatisfaction with their experience of mental health nursing. There is evidence of negative attitudes towards mental illness in the Jamaican society; however, no studies have explored whether these attitudes are held by nursing students. The aim of the study was to examine the attitudes of nursing students towards mental illness. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 143 third-year nursing students who were enrolled in a baccalaureate programme. Data were collected using the Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale (ATAMHS). A response rate of 71% was achieved for the survey. The findings indicated that the student nurses held an overall negative attitude towards mental illness, with a general perception that mentally ill people are dangerous. The student nurses were divided in their opinions in a number of areas, suggesting a possible conflict of opinions. Negative attitudes towards mental illness impact client outcomes and the career choices made by nurses. This study provides baseline data within the Jamaican context that adds to the evidence on nursing students' attitude to mental illness. Further research is needed to explore whether nursing education and clinical experience enables student nurses in Jamaica to develop a more positive attitude towards mental illness and mental health nursing and whether cultural factors contribute to negative attitudes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. 2016 Service Academy Gender Relations Survey: Overview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    students from other Academies and foreign nationals. 9 Prior to 2014, all female students at all Academies and a sample of men at USMA, USNA, and USAFA...Gore, & Schell, 2014). 37 Two groups of students were excluded: visiting students from other Academies and foreign nationals. 38 Starting in 2014... stigma (Ullman, 2007). Findings from this section can help inform policies, programs, and treatment options. Specific breakouts for Total DoD

  20. Peer assessment of student-produced mechanics lab report videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott S.; Aiken, John M.; Lin, Shih-Yin; Greco, Edwin F.; Alicea-Muñoz, Emily; Schatz, Michael F.

    2017-12-01

    We examine changes in students' rating behavior during a semester-long sequence of peer evaluation laboratory exercises in an introductory mechanics course. We perform a quantitative analysis of the ratings given by students to peers' physics lab reports, and conduct interviews with students. We find that peers persistently assign higher ratings to lab reports than do experts, that peers begin the semester by giving high ratings most frequently and end the semester with frequent middle ratings, and that peers go through the semester without much change in the frequency of low ratings. We then use student interviews to develop a model for student engagement with peer assessment. This model is based on two competing influences which appear to shape peer evaluation behavior: a strong disinclination to give poor ratings with a complementary preference to give high ratings when in doubt, and an attempt to develop an expertlike criticality when assessing peers' work.

  1. Eating habits reported by secondary school students in a city of west Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erenoglu, Nazan; Ayranci, Unal; Son, Osman

    2006-11-01

    The prevalence of obesity and underweight has increased in recent years due to the fact that eating and drinking habits have changed all over the world. This survey was conducted to estimate the prevalence of both obesity and underweight, as well as to understand the eating and drinking habits of a group of Turkish students. 1044 students completed the survey. Responses were analyzed, using Chi-square (chi2) test and percent (%) ratios, according to gender. Differences were considered significant for pstudents (123/1044, 11.8%) were underweight, most of them were male. Most students (868/1044, 83.1%) were of the correct weight. A small percentage of the students (52/1044, 4.9%) were overweight, with just one obese student, boy. Compared to boys, girls significantly obtained higher scores when questioned on preference of bran bread (62.0% vs. 38.0%, respectively), taking pains to not gain excess weight in order not to get fat (55.6% vs. 44.4%, respectively), doing physical exercise if they felt they were gaining too much weight (54.85% vs. 45.2%, respectively), and reducing food consumption when they felt that they were gaining weight (55.0% vs. 45.0%, respectively). For most people the importance of diet was obvious. This was especially reflected in the females' reports, since they reported a continual increase in their dieting and exercise behavior in an attempt to attain the contemporary ideal of being thin and physically fit.

  2. Medical students' perceptions of an emergency medicine clerkship: an analysis of self-assessment surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avegno, Jennifer L; Murphy-Lavoie, Heather; Lofaso, Daryl P; Moreno-Walton, Lisa

    2012-05-31

    No studies have been performed that evaluate the perceptions of medical students completing an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship. Given the variability of exposure to EM in medical schools nationwide, assessment of the student rotation may inform the structure and content of new and existing clerkships, particularly in relation to student's acquisition of the core competencies. To investigate whether undergraduate medical students rotating through an EM clerkship improved their understanding and abilities in core content areas and common procedural skills; to evaluate whether improvement was affected by rotation length. All students participating in an EM clerkship over a 12-month period were asked to complete an anonymous voluntary pre- and post-rotation survey. Confidence with patient assessment, diagnosis, and management plans; trauma and medical resuscitations; formal and informal presentations; basic procedure skills and understanding of the modern practice of EM were self assessed using a Likert scale. Group mean scores on each question on the pre- and post-clerkship surveys were calculated and compared. The mean scores on each survey item, both pre- and post-clerkship, were compared between 2- and 4-week clerkship rotation groups. Two hundred thirty-nine students participated in the rotation during the 12 months of the study. One hundred sixty-one (161), or 67.4%, completed the pre-rotation survey, and 96 (40.2%) completed the post-rotation survey. Overall, students showed significant mean gains in confidence with initial patient assessment, diagnosis, and management plans (p skills (p skills (p = 0.01), where the 4-week students demonstrated a statistically significant advantage. The 2-week clerkship participants were significantly less confident in all procedures except EKG interpretation, splinting, and venipuncture (p = 0.28, 0.22, 0.05). Regardless of rotation length, students generally felt they had sufficient exposure to patients and

  3. Medical students' experiences of moral distress: development of a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggleton, Catherine; Petrusa, Emil; Loomis, Kim; Tarpley, John; Tarpley, Margaret; O'Gorman, Mary Lou; Miller, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    To develop an instrument for measuring moral distress in medical students, measuring the prevalence of moral distress in a cohort of students, and identifying the situations most likely to cause it. Moral distress, defined as the negative feelings that arise when one knows the morally correct thing to do but cannot act because of constraints or hierarchies, has been documented in nurses but has not been measured in medical students. The authors constructed a survey consisting of 55 items describing potentially distressing situations. Responders rated the frequency of these situations and the intensity of distress that they caused. The survey was administered to 106 fourth-year medical students during a three-week period in 2007; the response rate was 60%. Each of the situations was experienced by at least some of the 64 respondents, and each created some degree of moral distress. On average, students witnessed almost one-half of the situations at least once, and more than one-third of the situations caused mild-to-moderate distress. The survey measured individual distress (Cronbach alpha = 0.95), which varied among the students. Whereas women witnessed potentially distressing situations significantly more frequently than did men (P = .04), men tended to become more distressed by each event witnessed (P = .057). Medical students frequently experience moral distress. Our survey can be used to measure aspects of the learning environment as well as individual responses to the environment. The variation found among student responses warrants further investigation to determine whether students at either extreme of moral distress are at risk of burnout or erosion of professionalism.

  4. Public attitudes toward practice by medical students: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kyoko; Sakuma, Mio; Seki, Susumu; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    It is essential for medical students to interact directly with patients. However, patients may be reluctant to be seen by medical students in settings in which they may also be seen by senior staff. To understand patients' attitudes toward practice by medical students and consider the factors involved in obtaining patients' cooperation, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey. We randomly selected 2,400 adult participants from all over Japan. Trained research assistants inquired about participants' experiences and attitudes toward practice by medical students using a questionnaire. We compared differences in attitudes between participants who were accepting of practice by medical students and those who were not, as well as differences between participants who had experienced practice by a medical student versus those who had not. A total of 1,109 (46%) participants were included in the study. Eleven percent (117/1109) of the participants had experienced practice by a medical student. One fourth of participants were accepting of practice by medical students, and experienced participants were significantly more likely to be accepting of practice by medical students than inexperienced participants (45% vs. 24%, pmedical students among accepting participants with previous experiences included "polite," "kind," and "hard-working." Fifty-nine percent (637/1088) of participants indicated that they would request a senior staff member's supervision when being seen by a medical student. The present nationwide survey suggests that education emphasizing bedside manner may be effective in promoting patients' cooperation of medical students. In addition, providing information to patients about medical students and efforts to increase supervision during clinical clerkship should be emphasized to foster the public's cooperation.

  5. Development and Validation of the Online Student Connectedness Survey (OSCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris U Bolliger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With the growth of online courses and programs in higher education, considerable concerns emerge about student feelings of isolation and disconnectedness in the online learning environment. A research study was conducted to develop and validate an instrument that can be used to measure perceptions of connectedness of students enrolled in online programs or certification programs in higher education. The instrument consists of 25 items and has four scales: (a community, (b comfort, (c facilitation, and (d interaction and collaboration. One hundred and forty-six online learners who were enrolled in courses at a Turkish university completed the online questionnaire. Results of a factor and reliability analysis confirmed that the instrument is a valid and reliable measure of students’ perceived connectedness in an online certificate program.

  6. Family meal traditions. Comparing reported childhood food habits to current food habits among university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Charlotte J S

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate if reported childhood food habits predict the food habits of students at present. Questions addressed are: does the memory of childhood family meals promote commensality among students? Does the memory of (grand)parents' cooking influence students' cooking? And, is there still a gender difference in passing on everyday cooking skills? Using a cross-sectional survey, 104 students were asked about their current eating and cooking habits, and their eating habits and the cooking behavior of their (grand)parents during their childhood. Results show that frequencies in reported childhood family meals predict frequencies of students' commensality at present. The effects appear for breakfast and dinner, and stay within the same meal: recalled childhood family breakfasts predict current breakfast commensality, recalled childhood family dinners predict current dinner commensality. In terms of recalled cookery of (grand)parents and the use of family recipes a matrilineal dominance can be observed. Mothers are most influential, and maternal grandmothers outscore paternal grandmothers. Yet, fathers' childhood cooking did not pass unnoticed either. They seem to influence male students' cookery. Overall, in a life-stage of transgression students appear to maintain recalled childhood food rituals. Suggestions are discussed to further validate these results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Internet addiction in Greek medical students: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Spachos, Dimitris; Kokkali, Stamatia; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Dardavesis, Theodoros; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia

    2015-06-01

    The authors investigated the prevalence of Internet addiction (IA) in undergraduate medical students to identify possible associations with sociodemographics and Internet habits. All students at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Greece, were invited to complete the online Internet Addiction Test (IAT) along with sociodemographics and preferences on Internet activities. The authors received 585 responses after three reminders (23.5 % response rate). Mild IA was found in 24.5 %, moderate in 5.4 %, and severe in 0.2 %. In multivariable analysis, the odds to develop IA were increased with visits in Internet cafes (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.49, 95 % Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.45, 8.46), the use of Facebook (OR 2.43, 95 % CI: 1.35, 4.38), Twitter (OR 2.45, 95 % CI: 1.37, 4.39), and online games (OR 1.95, 95 % CI: 1.29, 2.94). Using e-mails seemed to be protective against IA (OR 0.59, 95 % CI: 0.37, 0.94). This is the first IA prevalence study in a European medical school. Early-detection systems and other ways to help students with pathological behaviors should be developed.

  8. Musculoskeletal pain reports among Mashhad dental students, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahhed, Taraneh; Ajami, Behjatalmolook; Soltani, Mostafa; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Dehghani, Mahboobe

    2013-01-15

    Dental practitioners are susceptible to Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs). The symptoms may begin from education courses. The aim of this study was to assess prevalence of musculoskeletal pain reports and correlated factors among the Mashhad Dental School students, Iran. A total of 177 undergraduate and postgraduate dental students, who were involved in educational clinical training, completed a questionnaire focusing on pain reports of different body anatomical regions. Variables such as gender, academic grade, academic year, clinical working hour, regular exercise times and also pain characteristics including pain duration intensity and frequency were evaluated. As results 82% of undergraduate students and 90% of postgraduate students reported body pain in at least one region. The most prevalent pain locations were: chest/shoulder (46.9%), head/neck (41.8%), middle back (33.9%) and right hand (25.4%). Severity of reported pain was increased due to performing dental work, increased working stress and working fatigue. Regular exercise was associated with alleviated some pain characteristics. As conclusions musculoskeletal pain reports were highly prevalent among dental students. Attention to prevention of musculoskeletal disorders should be considered as priority in dental schools. For dental students exercise training courses for strengthening muscles of shoulder/chest, neck and back are necessary.

  9. Prevalence and correlates for self-reported sleep problems among nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelone, A M; Mattei, A; Sbarbati, M; Di Orio, F

    2011-12-01

    University students report significantly worse sleep quality than the general population. Sleep problems are related to increased health concerns, irritability, depression, fatigue, attention and concentration difficulties, along with poor academic performance. The aim of this paper is to conduct a survey based on a questionnaire that would characterize night time and daytime habits in nursing students to estimate the prevalence of chronic insomnia, sleep disturbance and their correlates. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 364 nursing students of the University of L'Aquila, in Italy. Self-reported sleep data were derived from Sleep and Daytime Habits Questionnaire" (S&DHQ) that covered sleep and daytime habits and academic progress. Anxiety and depression symptoms were assessed by the Mental Health Inventory-5 (MHI-5) questionnaire. A supplement includes information about lifestyle, health status and physical activity. The overall prevalence of insomnia was 26.7%. It increased significantly from 10.3% for students aged 40 years. The prevalence of sleep problems were 9.4% for disorders of initiating sleep, 8.3% for disrupted sleep, 7.7% for early morning awakening and subjectively poor quality of sleep 22.3%. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that greater age was significantly associated with an increased risk of insomnia. Other risk predictors of insomnia were headache, severe depression and self perception of poor quality of life. Daytime sleepiness and morning tiredness were significantly associated with current smoking habit and painful physical condition. The risk of unsatisfactory academic progress increased significantly in students reported poor sleep quality. Our study demonstrates that sleep problems are very common among students, and supports the need to assess sleep problems and identify students at risk regarding school achievement.

  10. Quality of nursing doctoral education in seven countries: survey of faculty and students/graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Park, Chang Gi; McKenna, Hugh; Ketefian, Shake; Park, So Hyun; Klopper, Hester; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Gregg, Misuzu F; Daly, John; Coetzee, Siedine; Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Murashima, Sachiyo; Keeney, Sinead; Khan, Shaheen

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the findings of the quality of nursing doctoral education survey across seven countries and discuss the strategic directions for improving quality. No comparative evaluation of global quality of nursing doctoral education has been reported to date despite the rapid increase in the number of nursing doctoral programmes. A descriptive, cross-country, comparative design was employed. Data were collected from 2007-2010 from nursing schools in seven countries: Australia, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Thailand, UK and USA. An online questionnaire was used to evaluate quality of nursing doctoral education except for Japan, where a paper version was used. Korea and South Africa used e-mails quality of nursing doctoral education was evaluated using four domains: Programme, Faculty (referring to academic staff), Resource and Evaluation. Descriptive statistics, correlational and ordinal logistic regression were employed. A total of 105 deans/schools, 414 faculty and 1149 students/graduates participated. The perceptions of faculty and students/graduates about the quality of nursing doctoral education across the seven countries were mostly favourable on all four domains. The faculty domain score had the largest estimated coefficient for relative importance. As the overall quality level of doctoral education rose from fair to good, the resource domain showed an increased effect. Both faculty and students/graduates groups rated the overall quality of nursing doctoral education favourably. The faculty domain had the greatest importance for quality, followed by the programme domain. However, the importance of the resource domain gained significance as the overall quality of nursing doctoral education increased, indicating the needs for more attention to resources if the quality of nursing doctoral education is to improve. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The Psychometric Characteristics of Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey: A Study Students of Isfahan University

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeinab Rostami; Mohammad Reza Abedi; Willmar B Schaufeli; S. Ahmad Ahmadi; Amir Hossein Sadeghi

    2014-01-01

    Background: In order to fill the gap of tool for measurement of student burnout in Iran, this study was performed on the 238 female students of Isfahan university that were selected by simple random sampling...

  12. Medical Student--Reported Outcomes of a Radiation Oncologist--Led Preclinical Course in Oncology: A Five-Year Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ankit; Koottappillil, Brian; Shah, Bhartesh; Ahuja, Divya; Hirsch, Ariel E

    2015-07-15

    There is a recognized need for more robust training in oncology for medical students. At our institution, we have offered a core dedicated oncology block, led by a radiation oncologist course director, during the second year of the medical school curriculum since the 2008-2009 academic year. Herein, we report the outcomes of the oncology block over the past 5 years through an analysis of student perceptions of the course, both immediately after completion of the block and in the third year. We analyzed 2 separate surveys. The first assessed student impressions of how well the course met each of the course's learning objectives through a survey that was administered to students immediately after the oncology block in 2012. The second was administered after students completed the oncology block during the required radiology clerkship in the third year. All questions used a 5-level Likert scale and were analyzed by use of a Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Of the 169 students who took the oncology course in 2012, 127 (75.1%) completed the course feedback survey. Over 73% of students agreed or strongly agreed that the course met its 3 learning objectives. Of the 699 medical students who took the required radiology clerkship between 2010 and 2013, 538 participated in the second survey, for a total response rate of 77%. Of these students, 368 (68.4%) agreed or strongly agreed that the course was effective in contributing to their overall medical education. Student perceptions of the oncology block are favorable and have improved across multiple categories since the inception of the course. Students self-reported that a dedicated preclinical oncology block was effective in helping identify the basics of cancer therapy and laying the foundation for clinical electives in oncology, including radiation oncology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Segmenting Business Students Using Cluster Analysis Applied to Student Satisfaction Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new application of cluster analysis to segment business school students according to their degree of satisfaction with various aspects of the academic program. The resulting clusters provide additional insight into drivers of student satisfaction that are not evident from analysis of the responses of the student body as a…

  14. A survey on the potential relationships between TMD, possible sleep bruxism, unilateral chewing, and occlusal factors in Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçın Yeler, Defne; Yılmaz, Nurbengu; Koraltan, Melike; Aydın, Ezgi

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether there is a relationship between possible sleep bruxism (PSB), temporomandibular disorders (TMD), unilateral chewing (UC), and occlusal factors in university students recruited from Cumhuriyet University in Turkey. For this cross-sectional survey, 519 (223 males, mean age 21.57 ± 2.3 years, 296 females, mean age 21.02 ± 2 years) university students who admitted to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology of the Faculty of Dentistry, Cumhuriyet University for dental care between 2012 and 2014 were selected randomly. Students were asked to complete a questionnaire form including questions about TMD, PSB and UC. Presence and direction of malocclusion were recorded during clinical examination. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis. It was found that 96.6% of the students with PSB had TMD (p prevalence of severe TMD was high among students with PSB. There was a significant association between UC, PSB and TMD (p  0.05). Sleep bruxism, which heavily depends on self-report, is significantly associated with TMD. Unilateral chewing seems to be a common factor for development of SB and TMD. However, further studies are needed to corroborate this finding. Additionally, this study supports the hypothesis that occlusal factors are not related to self-reported sleep bruxism.

  15. Report of an innovative research program for baccalaureate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheil, E P; Crain, H

    1992-10-01

    In summary, an innovative low-cost way to teach undergraduate students about research and to socialize students into attending research conferences has been developed. It is not perfect yet, but with time, critical students, and responsive research-productive faculty, each program should improve. It is not surprising that sophomore students do not achieve the objectives at the same level as older students. As students move closer to the "real" world of nursing practice and develop increasing sophistication about nursing in general and research in particular, they are, hopefully, more knowledgeable consumers of nursing research. What is particularly satisfying to the planners of those Research Days is that through the experience of attending Undergraduate Research Day at various points in their educational progress, students are socialized into discussing research. Additionally, they seemed to develop some degree of comfort with this aspect of their future nursing role. The RN and former student panel participants normalized research involvement for the student attendees. Panel member stories about their mistakes and successes made students realize that nursing investigations need not be the sole property of those with doctoral degrees. A serendipitous outcome of these programs was an increased awareness by students of the specific research project in which their teachers were engaged. Students informally reported a feeling of pride and reflected accomplishment. The importance of timing in offering such programs should not have been a surprise at this urban commuter university. Unwittingly, in scheduling the Friday afternoon program the planners ignored the initial consideration that the program not impose financial hardship on students.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Simulation in Medical Student Education: Survey of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Fitch; Michael Smith; Raymond Ten Eyck; Corey Heitz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to identify (1) the current role of simulation in medical student emergency medicine (EM) education; (2) the challenges to initiating and sustaining simulationbased programs; and (3) educational advances to meet these challenges. Methods: We solicited members of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) e-mail list to complete a Web-based survey addressing the use of simulation in both EM clerkships and preclinical EM curricula. Survey ...

  17. Simulation in Medical Student Education: Survey of Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Heitz, Corey; Eyck, Raymond Ten; Smith, Michael; Fitch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to identify (1) the current role of simulation in medical student emergency medicine (EM) education; (2) the challenges to initiating and sustaining simulation-based programs; and (3) educational advances to meet these challenges. Methods We solicited members of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) e-mail list to complete a Web-based survey addressing the use of simulation in both EM clerkships and preclinical EM curricula. Survey el...

  18. Food safety knowledge, attitudes and self-reported practices among Ontario high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majowicz, Shannon E; Diplock, Kenneth J; Leatherdale, Scott T; Bredin, Chad T; Rebellato, Steven; Hammond, David; Jones-Bitton, Andria; Dubin, Joel A

    2016-03-16

    To measure the food safety knowledge, attitudes and self-reported practices of high school students in Ontario. We administered a school-wide paper survey to the student body (n = 2,860) of four Ontario high schools. We developed the survey by selecting questions from existing, validated questionnaires, prioritizing questions that aligned with the Canadian Partnership for Consumer Food Safety Education's educational messages and the food safety objectives from the 2013 Ontario High School Curriculum. One in five students reported currently handling food in commercial or public-serving venues; of these, 45.1% had ever taken a course that taught them how to prepare food (e.g., food and nutrition classes, food handler certification). Food safety knowledge among respondents was low. For example, 17.3% knew that the best way to determine whether hamburgers were cooked enough to eat was to measure the temperature with a food thermometer. Despite low knowledge, most respondents (72.7%) reported being confident that they could cook safe, healthy meals for themselves and their families. Safe food handling practices were frequently self-reported. Most students (86.5%) agreed that being able to cook safe, healthy meals was an important life skill, although their interest in learning about safe food handling and concern about foodborne disease were less pronounced. Our findings suggest that food safety knowledge is low, yet confidence in preparing safe, healthy meals is high, among high school students. Because work and volunteer opportunities put students in contact with both the public and food, this group is important to target for increased education about safe food handling.

  19. Trends in drug use among students in Brazil: analysis of four surveys in 1987, 1989, 1993 and 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galduróz J.C.F.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of psychotropic drugs among Brazilian secondary school students was examined by comparing data from four surveys using a questionnaire adapted from the WHO's Program on Research and Reporting on the Epidemiology of Drug Dependence. Students filled out the form in their classrooms without the presence of teachers. The target population consisted of 10-18-year-old students (on average, 15,000 students responded to each survey in Brazil's ten largest state capitals: Belém, Belo Horizonte, Brasília, Curitiba, Fortaleza, Porto Alegre, Recife, Rio de Janeiro, Salvador, and São Paulo. Among the legal drugs, lifetime use (use at least once during life of tobacco was increased in seven cities (the exceptions were Brasília, Porto Alegre and Rio de Janeiro. There was also a significant increase in frequent use of alcohol (six times or more per month in 6 of the cities, from an average of 9.2% in 1987 to 15.0% in 1997. With respect to illegal drugs, there was a significant increase in lifetime use of marijuana (a 3-fold increase from 2.8% in 1987 to 7.6% in 1997. Cocaine use increased 4-fold over the survey period (0.5% in 1987 to 2.0% in 1997. Lifetime use of cocaine significantly increased in eight capitals (except Recife and Rio de Janeiro. However, frequent cocaine use increased in only three capitals (Belém, Fortaleza and Porto Alegre, from an average of 1.0% in 1987 to 3.6% in 1997. Lifetime use of medications such as anxiolytics and amphetamines increased 2-fold on average over the survey period. Comparing the four studies, the main conclusion is that there were significant increases in the frequencies for lifetime use, frequent use and heavy use of many drugs.

  20. A survey of perceived stress among undergraduate dental students in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Tanti Irawati; Abdul Rahman, Roslan; Abdul Rahman, Siti Ruhaini; Ramli, Roszalina

    2005-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the sources of stress among undergraduate dental students, and to compare the sources of stress among the 5 years of undergraduate study, between gender, and with other studies done elsewhere. A total of 325 students across the 5 academic years (88.8% response rate) of the Faculty of Dentistry, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, completed the modified Dental Environment Stress questionnaire. All respondents reported that they experienced some form of stress. The preclinical students reported that examinations and fear of failure caused the most stress. The main stressor for clinical students was clinical training, particularly factors relating to meeting clinical requirements. Female students perceived more stress generally than male students. However, male students were more stressed when faced with factors related to clinical training.

  1. Validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey for Estimating Burnout in Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Company, José María; Subirats-Roig, Cristian; Flores-Martí, Pau; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) as a tool for assessing the prevalence and level of burnout in dental students in Spanish universities. The survey was adapted from English to Spanish. A sample of 533 dental students from 15 Spanish universities and a control group of 188 medical students self-administered the survey online, using the Google Drive service. The test-retest reliability or reproducibility showed an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of 0.95. The internal consistency of the survey was 0.922. Testing the construct validity showed two components with an eigenvalue greater than 1.5, which explained 51.2% of the total variance. Factor I (36.6% of the variance) comprised the items that estimated emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Factor II (14.6% of the variance) contained the items that estimated personal accomplishment. The cut-off point for the existence of burnout achieved a sensitivity of 92.2%, a specificity of 92.1%, and an area under the curve of 0.96. Comparison of the total dental students sample and the control group of medical students showed significantly higher burnout levels for the dental students (50.3% vs. 40.4%). In this study, the MBI-HSS was found to be viable, valid, and reliable for measuring burnout in dental students. Since the study also found that the dental students suffered from high levels of this syndrome, these results suggest the need for preventive burnout control programs.

  2. The Relevance of Teaching Traditional Measurement Techniques to Undergraduate Quantity Surveying Students.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonnell, Fiacra P.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of quantities is a core skill which must be inherent in all graduates from Quantity Surveying courses. Many students find this subject difficult to grasp, and the learning experience can be problematic especially in the first semester of first year. This is not unique to measurement as in many cases first year students are in the process of adapting to a new stage in their life, along with attempting to master many new subjects (Cottrell, 2008). This is reinforced by Johnston (201...

  3. Global Masters in Microfinance: An International Survey Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pacheco Cueva, Vladimir; Picquenot, Aude; Weldegiorgis, Fitsum

    The Foundation for Development Cooperation conducted a survey investigating the need for the development of a Global Masters degree in Microfinance. This survey was undertaken from 30 November 2009 to 7 January 2010, following two years of extensive desk research. This survey sought to; 1. Gauge ...... the level of interest for a postgraduate microfinance qualification within the global microfinance industry; and 2. Identify features of such a program of study which were deemed to be relevant or preferred by the sample group....

  4. 2016 Military Investigation and Justice Experience Survey: Overview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    former Director of the Defense Research, Surveys, and Statistics Center for Health and Resilience (RSSC[H& R ]) and Ms. Kristin Williams, acting...Research, Surveys, and Statistics Center (RSSC) within the Office of People Analytics (OPA) was tasked with this effort. The 2016 MIJES focuses...2014). The Defense Research, Surveys, and Statistics Center (RSSC), within the Office of People Analytics (OPA), was tasked with this effort. 7 For

  5. 2015 American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) student affairs committee survey of neuropsychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M; Butts, Alissa M; Hahn-Ketter, Amanda E; Osborn, Katie; Towns, Stephanie J; Barisa, Mark; Santos, Octavio A; Smith, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Surveys of practicing neuropsychologists have been conducted for years; however, there have been no comprehensive surveys of neuropsychology trainees, which may result in important issues being overlooked by the profession. This survey assessed trainees' experiences in areas such as student debt, professional development, and training satisfaction. Survey items were written by a task force of the AACN Student Affairs Committee (SAC), and neuropsychology trainees were recruited via neuropsychology-focused listservs. In total, 344 trainees completed the survey (75% female) and included participants from every region of the US and Canada. Based on the survey questions, nearly half of all trainees (47%) indicated financial factors were the greatest limitation in their training. Student debt had a bimodal distribution; 32.7% had minimal debt, but 45% had debt >$100,000. In contrast, expected starting salaries were modest, but consistent with findings ($80-100,000). While almost all trainees intended to pursue board certification (97% through ABPP), many were 'not at all' or only 'somewhat' familiar with the process. Results indicated additional critical concerns beyond those related to debt and lack of familiarity with board certification procedures. The results will inform SAC conference programming and the profession on the current 'state of the trainees' in neuropsychology.

  6. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences. PMID:23118547

  7. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences.

  8. An international survey of tissue banking: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Peter; Wondergem, Jan; Pynda, Yaroslav; Phillips, Glyn O

    2013-06-01

    International Atomic Energy Agency is currently carrying out a survey on the tissue banking activities from the tissue banking organisations worldwide. The purpose of the survey is to establish regional and global overview of the current tissue banking activities and practices in order to assist the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide further guidance about the use of radiation technology to sterilise tissues as well as to promote better collaboration between the regional tissue banking associations. The survey is an on-going exercise and the preliminary data is presented here. This exercise is not completed and the authors urge the remaining tissue banks to participate in the survey.

  9. Snowmass 2013 Young Physicists Science and Career Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, J. [Fermilab; Asaadi, J. [Syracuse U.; Carls, B. [Fermilab; Cotta, R. [UC, Irvine; Guenette, R. [Yale U.; Kiburg, B. [Fermilab; Kobach, A. [Northwestern U.; Lippincott, H. [Fermilab; Littlejohn, B. [Cincinnati U.; Love, J. [Argonne; Penning, B. [Fermilab; Santos, M. Soares [Fermilab; Strauss, T. [thomas.strauss@lhep.unibe.ch; Szelc, A. [Yale U.; Worcester, E. [Brookhaven; Yu, F. [Fermilab

    2013-07-30

    From April to July 2013 the Snowmass Young Physicists (SYP) administered an online survey collecting the opinions and concerns of the High Energy Physics (HEP) community. The aim of this survey is to provide input into the long term planning meeting known as the Community Summer Study (CSS), or Snowmass on the Mississippi. In total, 1112 respondents took part in the survey including 74 people who had received their training within HEP and have since left for non-academic jobs. This paper presents a summary of the survey results including demographic, career outlook, planned experiments and non-academic career path information collected.

  10. Nursing education and beliefs towards tobacco cessation and control: a cross- sectional national survey (GHPSS among nursing students in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Charles W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the healthcare system, nurses have the ability to influence their patients' smoking habits through counselling. Therefore, it is of great importance to appropriately train health professionals on smoking cessation strategies with the aim to help them provide advice to their patients. In light of the above, the objective of this study was to assess the association between Greek nursing students' beliefs towards tobacco control/smoking cessation and the professional training received. Methods During February 2009, we conducted a cross sectional national survey among all 3rd year nursing students of the two university based nursing departments in Greece (University of Athens, University of the Peloponnese. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS questionnaire was applied and following written informed consent 73% provided a completed questionnaire (n = 192/263 enrolled students. Results Overall, 33% were current active smokers, while 74% reported ever to experiment smoking. In regards to their beliefs towards tobacco control policies, non smokers were more positive in regards to banning smoking in restaurants (94% vs. 61%, p Conclusions Resources should be invested in improving the quality of undergraduate education in nursing departments in Greece with respect to tobacco control and smoking cessation.

  11. Participation of Student Authors in Reports on Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeps, Andreas; Hemmer, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Since 2012, the University of Eichstaett-Ingolstadt has been publishing an annual report on sustainability as part of its whole institution approach (WIA). This study aims to examine the participation in writing this report as it is experienced by the student stakeholders involved. The overall goal is to gain expertise concerning further…

  12. College Student Reporting Responses to Hypothetical and Actual Safety Concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Brandon A.; Scalora, Mario J.; Hoff, Sarah M.; Hodges, Heath J.; Marquez, Allissa

    2017-01-01

    Campus violence prevention often includes proactively reducing crime through noticing and resolving concerning situations. Within these efforts, interventions aimed at enhancing reporting have been considered necessary. The current study explored several reporting influences on college students' responses to hypothetical and actual campus safety…

  13. Factors affecting UK medical students' decision to train in urology: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Nithish; Ahmed, Kamran; Challacombe, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to understand the specific factors which influence medical students' choice to train in urology, in order to attract the best and the brightest into the specialty during a challenging time for surgical training in the United Kingdom A cross-sectional web-based survey was generated to evaluate: 1) perceptions of urology; 2) attitudes about urology as a career; 3) exposure to urology at medical school; and 4) proficiency in common urological procedures. The survey was sent to all 33 medical schools in the UK and advertised to all medical students. The survey received 488 responses were received from 14 medical schools; 59.8% of respondents did not consider a career in urology. Factors affecting a career choice in urology included: 1) year of study; 2) male gender; 3) favorable perceptions of urology; 4) favorable attitudes about urology as a career; 5) more hours of urology teaching in preclinical years; 6) attendance at urology theatre sessions; 7) confidence in performing urological procedures; and 8) more attempts at male catheterization. The commonest reason for not considering urology was inadequate exposure to urology. Students in Year 3 were more likely to consider urology than final-year students, due to multifactorial reasons. Year of study is a novel factor affecting students' consideration of urology as a career. This paper clearly shows that early and sustained exposure to urology positively correlated with considering a career in urology. Urologists must be more active in promoting the specialty to medical students.

  14. The Metropolitan Life Survey of the American Teacher, 1996. Students Voice Their Opinions On: Violence, Social Tension and Equality among Teens. Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This report, the first in a series of four 1996 releases of students' opinions, represents a continued effort by MetLife to provide insight and understanding to the issues of violence and social tension in American public schools. The survey focuses on the social climate of the nation's public schools from the perspective of public school students…

  15. Sleep disorders, depression, anxiety and satisfaction with life among young adults: a survey of university students in Auckland, New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaranayake, Chinthaka B; Arroll, Bruce; Fernando, Antonio T

    2014-08-01

    Sleep symptoms, depression and anxiety often coexist and tertiary students are a population group that are increasingly recognised to be at risk. However the rates of these conditions in the New Zealand population are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to determine the rates of sleep disorders, depression and anxiety, and identify correlations between satisfactions with life among university students in Auckland. Auckland Sleep Questionnaire (ASQ) was administered to undergraduate students from six schools of The University of Auckland. The different types of sleep disorders were calculated for the students who reported a significant sleep problem lasting more than 1 month. The rate of depression, anxiety and substance use as well as the satisfaction with life scale scores were also calculated for the whole cohort. A total of 1933 students were invited to participate and 66.8% completed the questionnaire. The median age was 20 years (range 16-38) and women represented 63.9% of the total group. A total of 39.4% of the students surveyed reported having significant sleep symptoms lasting longer than 1 month. The most prevalent causes for sleep symptoms were depression and anxiety. Delayed sleep phase disorder was found in 24.9% of students and parasomnias were reported by 12.4%. Depression and anxiety were present in 17.3% and 19.7% of the total group respectively, and 7.3% of students had thoughts of "being better off dead" or self-harm. A total of 15.5% students were found to have a CAGE score greater than or equal to 2 and 9.3% reported using recreational drugs in the last 3 months. Moderate negative correlations between SWLS scores and depression and anxiety were found (r=-0.45 and r=-0.37 respectively). A large number of university students are suffering from significant sleep symptoms. Mood disorders, substance use, and circadian rhythm disorders can greatly contribute to sleep difficulties in this population group. The study also showed that harmful

  16. 2015 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Reserve Component Members: Statistical Methodology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    completion use the same methodology as Step 1 (CHAID and logistic model).  Step 3: Create final weights – The weights were poststratified to match...2015 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Reserve Component Members Statistical Methodology Report Additional copies of this report...RESERVE COMPONENT MEMBERS: STATISTICAL METHODOLOGY REPORT Defense Research, Surveys, and Statistics Center (RSSC) Defense Manpower Data Center

  17. Report of radioactivity survey research in fiscal year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-01

    In National Institute of Radiological Sciences, a survey was made on radioactivities in the environment due to the substances released from nuclear installations and radioactive fall-out brought out by nuclear explosion tests since 1959. As the marked progress of non-military utilization of nuclear energy the national concern on environmental radioactivity has been increasing in Japan and thus it has become more and more important to make a survey research of radioactivities, which might affect the environment and human health. In these situations, the institute attempted to make the following six surveys in the fiscal year of 1998; 'a survey on radioactive levels in environment, foods and human bodies', 'survey on the radioactive level in the regions around nuclear installations', 'works in radioactive data center', 'fundamental survey on the evaluation of the results from radioactivity survey', 'workshop for technical experts of environmental radioactivity monitoring' and 'survey research on the measurement and countermeasures for emergency exposure'. (J.P.N.)

  18. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2011 Membership Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2013-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to gather information on general demographics, employment-related characteristics, licensing, and professional affiliations. The surveys are used in the development of national media opportunities and public policy initiatives to help increase recognition for the field of…

  19. The 2015 CASE Asia-Pacific Alumni Relations Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Judith A.; Bakerman, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) launched the volunteer-led Asia-Pacific Alumni Relations Survey in 2014 to provide a resource for alumni relations professionals to benchmark performance internally and against fellow institutions of higher education. That was the first survey CASE has done on alumni relations programmes…

  20. American Art Therapy Association, Inc.: 2013 Membership Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, David E.; Deaver, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    The American Art Therapy Association (AATA) surveys its members biennially to collect data regarding membership demographics as well as variables concerning the work environment for art therapists. These surveys can provide a detailed description of these characteristics and how they may change over time. This article statistically compares the…

  1. 1981 beached animal and plastic litter surveys report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A total of 119.63 km of beach were walked in 41 surveys (Appendix 1.). Birds and mammals were found on 16 of these surveys. There were 0.03 birds/km beach walked,...

  2. College students with and without ADHD: comparison of self-report of medication usage, study habits, and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advokat, Claire; Lane, Sean M; Luo, Chunqiao

    2011-11-01

    To examine the relationship between ADHD medications, study habits, and academic achievement of ADHD-diagnosed undergraduates. A total of 92 students with a self-reported ADHD diagnosis and a current prescription for ADHD medication were compared with 143 control students in a survey of academic performance. Most ADHD students took stimulant medication and said the drugs helped them, yet believed they were worse than other students at planning and completing assignments and avoiding distractions. Although most study habits of ADHD students did not differ from controls, their high school and college GPA (grade point average), and ACT scores were significantly lower, and they withdrew from significantly more classes than did control students. Interestingly, preliminary data suggested that good study habits alone, even without stimulants, could overcome the achievement disparity of ADHD students. As previously shown for children and adolescents, stimulant medications alone did not eliminate the academic achievement deficit of ADHD undergraduates.

  3. ARM User Survey Report: Data Access, Quality, and Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, JH; Roeder, LR; Sivaraman, C

    2012-06-28

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to determine how users of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Data Archive interact with the more than 2000 available types of datastreams. The survey also gathered information about data discovery and data quality. The Market and Competitive Analysis group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory worked with web administrators to develop a landing page from which users could access the survey. A survey invitation was sent by ARM via email to about 6100 users on February 22, 2012. The invitation was also posted on the ARM website and Facebook page. Reminders were sent via e-mail and posted on Facebook while the survey was open, February 22-March 23, 2012.

  4. Sexual and reproductive health risk behaviours among South African university students: results from a representative campus-wide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Susie; Levasseur, Michael; Mantell, Joanne E; Beksinska, Mags; Mabude, Zonke; Ngoloyi, Claudia; Kelvin, Elizabeth A; Exner, Theresa; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Pillay, Lavanya; Smit, Jennifer A

    2017-03-01

    Among South African university students, HIV prevalence is lower than in age-peers, but at 3.8% it is not negligible. We examined prevalence of factors potentially associated with HIV risk, focusing on partnership characteristics and consistent condom use. We hypothesised that contraceptive-related factors, for example, desire to prevent pregnancy and not using hormonal contraceptives, would be positively associated with consistent condom use. Data were drawn from a representative interviewer-administered survey of 2nd to 4th year students conducted during registration at a university campus in KwaZulu-Natal. Of 576 students, 218 (83 women, 135 men) reported vaginal intercourse in the past 2 months. Of these, 7% of women and 43% of men reported past-year concurrent partnerships, and 24% knew/ suspected partner non-monogamy. Although reported condom use at last intercourse was 90%, 2-month consistent use was 53% (women) and 73% (men). Reported hormonal contraception use was low (women: 36.8%; men: 16.7%), and 68% used condoms for dual protection. In gender-stratified multivariable analyses, consistent condom use was higher for men who reported their partner did not use (vs. used) hormonal contraception (aOR = 5.84; 95%CI = 2.71, 12.57; p women. Sexual partnership characteristics potentially place sexually active university students at high HIV risk and should be investigated further. Among men, but not women, contraceptive concerns were associated with consistent condom use. Promoting condoms for dual protection may resonate with students and should be continued.

  5. Student beliefs and learning environments: Developing a survey of factors related to conceptual change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Mary

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents a model for the type of classroom environment believed to facilitate scientific conceptual change. A survey based on this model contains items about students' motivational beliefs, their study approach and their perceptions of their teacher's actions and learning goal orientation. Results obtained from factor analyses, correlations and analyses of variance, based on responses from 113 students, suggest that an empowering interpersonal teacher-student relationship is related to a deep approach to learning, a positive attitude to science, and positive self-efficacy beliefs, and may be increased by a constructivist approach to teaching.

  6. CDAC Student Report: Summary of LLNL Internship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herriman, Jane E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-10

    Multiple objectives motivated me to apply for an internship at LLNL: I wanted to experience the work environment at a national lab, to learn about research and job opportunities at LLNL in particular, and to gain greater experience with code development, particularly within the realm of high performance computing (HPC). This summer I was selected to participate in LLNL's Computational Chemistry and Material Science Summer Institute (CCMS). CCMS is a 10 week program hosted by the Quantum Simulations group leader, Dr. Eric Schwegler. CCMS connects graduate students to mentors at LLNL involved in similar re- search and provides weekly seminars on a broad array of topics from within chemistry and materials science. Dr. Xavier Andrade and Dr. Erik Draeger served as my co-mentors over the summer, and Dr. Andrade continues to mentor me now that CCMS has concluded. Dr. Andrade is a member of the Quantum Simulations group within the Physical and Life Sciences at LLNL, and Dr. Draeger leads the HPC group within the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC). The two have worked together to develop Qb@ll, an open-source first principles molecular dynamics code that was the platform for my summer research project.

  7. Student-reported satisfaction with academic enhancement services at an academic health science center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughf, Natalie White; Foster, Penni Smith; Williams, Dara A

    2014-01-01

    Although support services are needed to address students' concerns associated with academic demands, there is little research exploring these interventions within health sciences education. The current study examined students' perceptions of academic enhancement services at an academic health science center. Academic enhancement services provided to students included assessment of learning approaches and problems interfering with academic performance. Specific services may have addressed the transition to professional school, study skills assessment and training, time management and organization, testing strategies, clarifying career goals and interests, increasing self-confidence and coping with self-doubt, coping with depression and/or anxiety, stress management, relationship issues, and/or loss and bereavement. All students receiving academic enhancement services received a survey for programmatic improvement at the end of each semester. The online survey was voluntary and anonymous and solicited feedback about the students' experiences. Sixty-three percent of respondents (N = 104; 62% female, 38% male; 62% White, 27% Black/African American, 10% Asian; 2% Hispanic) reported receiving a one-session intervention, while 34% received 2-6 sessions. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that academic enhancement services improved their situation and 89% reported overall satisfaction. The individual services rated as most helpful addressed time management, study skills training, increasing self-confidence, and testing strategies. It is recommended that health science centers (i) consider providing brief-term academic enhancement services to students addressing time management/organization, study skills, self-confidence, and testing strategies and (ii) engage in empirical investigations of these academic interventions.

  8. Student Success Survey: Supporting Academic Success for At-Risk Nursing Students Through Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Rhonda M; Fifolt, Matthew; Dawson, Martha A; Su, Wei; Milligan, Gary; Davis, Sandra; Hites, Lisle

    Diversity in the nursing workforce has a positive impact on the quality of care provided to minority patients. Although the number of students from diverse backgrounds entering nursing programs has increased, the attrition rate of these students remains high. This study assessed the construct validity of a self-assessment tool that can be used by faculty advisors to determine individual academic needs of students.

  9. [Exposure to tobacco advertisement and promotion programs among Chinese middle school students: a cross-sectional survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lin; Yang, Jingqi; Zhao, Luhua; Jiang, Yuan; Chen, Xinyue

    2015-04-01

    To exam the exposure status to tobacco advertisement and promotion programs in Chinese middle school students. Stratified multi-stage cluster sampling was used to select participated grade 7-9 middle school students in 31 provinces (n = 155 117). A self-administrated questionnaire was used in which questions related to behavior on tobacco use, exposure to second-hand smoking (SHS), access to tobacco products and prices, tobacco control advocacy, exposure to tobacco advertisement, and promotion as well as attitude and knowledge towards tobacco, etc. Data was weighted and analyzed, using the complex survey module of SAS 9.3 software. In the past 30 days, 48.5% of the students had a chance to see advertisement or promotion programs on tobacco. Tobacco advertisement or promotion were most frequently seen on TV (21.3%) among students, followed by outdoor billboard (20.1%), at the stands for sale (17.5%), and Internet (15.6%). In addition, 4.6% of the students reported having kept the items related to brand logos of tobacco products; 2.0% reported having been offered a free tobacco product by tobacco company representatives; 69.7% reported having seen scenes related to smoking on TV/videos/movie screens. Twenty five point two percent of the student smokers reported buying individual sticks at last purchase. Among those students who had never been exposed to tobacco, the ones who had been exposed to tobacco advertisement and promotion programs reported that they were more likely to feel smoking attractive than those who had not. They also reported that if a cigarette was offered by friends, they might try to smoke within the next 12 months, feeling that smoking would make him/her comfortable, and finally to feel that they might enjoy smoking (P Students who had been exposed to tobacco advertisement or promotions were more likely to express positive attitude to tobacco use. It is urgent to make amendments to China's Advertising Law to completely prohibit tobacco

  10. Whether or wither some specialties: a survey of Canadian medical student career interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Fraser R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the looming shortage of physicians in Canada, we wished to determine how closely the career preference of students entering Canadian medical schools was aligned with the current physician mix in Canada. Methods Career choice information was collected from a survey of 2,896 Canadian medical students upon their entry to medical school. The distribution of career choices of survey respondents was compared to the current physician speciality mix in Canada. Results We show that there is a clear mismatch between student career choice at medical school entry and the current specialty mix of physicians in Canada. This mismatch is greatest in Urban Family Medicine with far fewer students interested in this career at medical school entry compared to the current proportion of practicing physicians. There are also fewer students interested in Psychiatry than the current proportion of practicing physicians. Conclusion This mismatch between the student interest and the current proportion of practicing physicians in the various specialities in Canada is particularly disturbing in the face of the current sub-optimal distribution of physicians. If nothing is done to correct this mismatch of student interest in certain specialities, shortages and misdistributions of physicians will be further amplified. Studies such as this can give a window into the future health human resources challenges for a nation.

  11. Survey Finds Mismatch in Student Achievement and Parents' College Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The Education Department released a report last week, "Parent Expectations and Planning for College," that offers new insights into the factors influencing whether parents expect their children to enroll at four-year colleges. It suggests that many young people who could succeed at such institutions are not being encouraged by their families or…

  12. Well-being and self-efficacy in a sample of undergraduate nurse students: A small survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priesack, Anneken; Alcock, John

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports findings from a survey which aimed to explore well-being and self-efficacy and test measures of those constructs with a sample of nurse students in a University setting in the United Kingdom. Evidence indicates that undergraduate nurse programmes combine academic work and clinical placement experience in a mix that can potentially lead to stress and impact on health and well-being. Self-efficacy is known to be a resource that contributes to well-being, resilience and academic achievement and therefore relevant for investigation. A cross-sectional survey approach was used to obtain data using a paper questionnaire including the BBC Well-being Scale and Generalised Self-efficacy Scale. A total of n=108 undergraduate preregistration nurse students participated in this small study from a potential population of 450. The majority of participants (86%) were female, and the majority (75%) were aged 17-35years old. Mean and subscale scores were calculated for both instruments and inferential analyses were carried out using non-parametric techniques. Exploratory factor analyses of the BBC Well-being Scale indicated a three factor structure consistent with validation study findings. Cronbach's alpha was α=.92 for the BBC Well-being Scale and α=.85 for the GSE suggesting that the instruments are valid and reliable measures for nurse education research. Nurse students indicated higher scores on the BBC Well-being Scale and the GSE compared with previously studied populations and a small but significant positive correlation was found between psychological well-being and self-efficacy. Cluster analysis indicated discrete student communities in this sample that varied in their Well-being and GSE scale and subscale scores. Self-efficacy and general well-being in nurse students are worthy of further study and relevant to contemporary nurse education given current interest in interventions to promote student retention and resilience post-registration. Copyright

  13. Tobacco Use Among Students Aged 13-15 Years in South Korea: The 2013 Global Youth Tobacco Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sunhye; Kim, Yoonjung; Lee, Jihye; Kashiwabara, Mina; Oh, Kyungwon

    2017-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke among middle-school students in Korea using the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) in 2013. The GYTS in Korea was conducted between July and August 2013 by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Data were collected using a self-administered anonymous questionnaire from a nationally representative sample of middle-school students aged 13-15 years in sampled classrooms. The GYTS in Korea was completed by 4235 students aged 13-15 years in 43 middle schools. Approximately one in five of the students (17.8%) reported that they had tried cigarettes in the past, while 5.2% reported currently being cigarette smokers. Current cigarette smoking was higher in boys (7.5%) than in girls (2.6%). Of the students, 29.7% had been exposed to secondhand smoke at home, 47.4% inside enclosed public places, and 53.9% in outdoor public places. Of the current cigarette smokers, 25.7% bought their cigarettes from a store despite a law prohibiting this. Additionally, 58.0% of students noticed point-of-sale tobacco advertisements or promotions, 66.8% of current cigarette smokers wanted to stop smoking, and 70.9% of students had been taught about the dangers of tobacco use in school. These findings provide an opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a comprehensive tobacco control policy. The results suggest that youth have relatively easy access to cigarettes and are regularly exposed to secondhand smoke in public places, as well as to point-of-sale tobacco advertisements and promotions. Strict enforcement of the ban on tobacco sales to youth, expanding smoke-free areas, and advertising bans are needed to reduce tobacco use among youth.

  14. French validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye-Dumanget, Christine; Carré, Julie; Le Borgne, Margaux; Boudoukha, Pr Abdel Halim

    2017-06-27

    Several international studies have been conducted on student burnout. To contribute to the clinical examination as well as research on the mental health of students, the MBI-SS (Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey) has been validated and used in different countries but not in French. The aim of this study is to examine the validity of the 3-dimensional model of the French version of the MBI-SS, which is characterized by emotional "Emotional Exhaustion" (EE); "Cynicism" (CY); and low scores in "Academic Efficacy" (AE). A total of 667 university students were questioned to study the 3-dimensional structure of the French translation of the MBI-SS. The results validate the 3-dimensional structure of the MBI-SS and indicate satisfactory psychometric values. It is concluded that the MBI-SS can be used to assess burnout in French students. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Exploring Student-to-Workforce Transitions with the National Geoscience Exit Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    In 2011, the American Geological Institute (AGI) launched the first pilot of a National Geoscience Exit Survey in collaboration with 32 geoscience university departments. The survey collects data about demographics, high school and community college coursework, university degrees, financial aid, field and research experiences, internships, and when and why the student chose to pursue a geosciences degree. Additionally, the survey collects information about students' future academic and career plans, and gives participants the option to take part in a longitudinal survey to track long-term career trajectories of geosciences graduates. The survey also provides geoscience departments with the ability to add customized questions to collect data about important departmental-level topics. The National Geoscience Exit Survey will be available to all U.S. geoscience programs at two- and four-year colleges and universities by the end of the 2011-2012 academic year. We use the results of the National Geoscience Exit Survey to examine student preparation and transition into geosciences and non-geoscience careers. Preliminary results from the pilot survey indicated future academic and career trajectories for geoscience Bachelor's degree recipients included graduate school (53%) and pursuit of a geoscience career (45%), with some undergraduates keeping their options open for either trajectory. Twelve percent of Bachelor's degree recipients already accepted job offers with geoscience employers. For geoscience Master's degree recipients, 17% planned to continue in graduate school, 35% were seeking a geoscience job, and 42% had already accepted job offers with geoscience employers. Furthermore, the majority of those geoscience graduates who already accepted geoscience job offers had also interned previously with the employer.

  16. A survey on education in cariology for undergraduate dental students in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte, A.G.; Buchalla, W.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Amaechi, B.T.; Sampaio, F.; Vougiouklakis, G.; Pitts, N.B.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the survey was to collect relevant information about education in cariology for dental undergraduate students in Europe. The ORCA/ADEE cariology curriculum group prepared a questionnaire that was mailed in 2009 to 179 European dental schools. One hundred and twenty-three dental schools

  17. Survey Regarding the Competence and Interest towards Research of Romanian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demjén, Beátrix-Aletta; Ciascai, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the respondents' opinion regarding their abilities and interest towards research. The survey was carried out on a sample of 51 respondents that are involved in research activities in the universities of origin. The participants are students from Faculties of Real and Applied Sciences. The results highlight…

  18. The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey: An Analysis of University Students' Performance, and Recommendations for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2017-01-01

    The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey (MWCS), presented in 2009, is the most important test to date that has been designed to evaluate university students' understanding of four main topics: propagation, superposition, reflection, and standing waves. In a literature review, we detected a significant need for a study that uses this test as an…

  19. Exploring E-Learning Acceptance among University Students in Thailand: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Ruangrit, Nammon; Khlaisang, Jintavee; Thammetar, Thapanee; Sunphakitjumnong, Kobkul

    2014-01-01

    This study surveys the e-learning acceptance of university students in Thailand. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-one (1,981) participants completed the E-Learning Acceptance Measure (Teo, 2010) which measures three constructs that predict e-learning acceptance (tutor quality, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions). Data analysis…

  20. Teaching Quality Assessment in University Studies: Possibilities for Application of Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Audrone; Pileicikiene, Nora

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to reveal possibilities for teaching quality assessment when data from student survey are used. To achieve this aim, the conception of teaching in a higher education institution was reviewed and criteria of teaching quality were distinguished in the theoretical part. In the empirical part of the research, validity of teaching…

  1. Be My Guest: A Survey of Mass Communication Students' Perception of Guest Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Patrick F.; Craig, Clay

    2017-01-01

    The use of guest speakers as a pedagogical technique across disciplines at the college level is hardly novel. However, empirical assessment of journalism and mass communication students' perceptions of this practice has not previously been conducted. To fill this gap, this article presents results from an online survey specifically administered to…

  2. A Nationwide Survey of Financing Health-Related Services for Special Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, Jack; Weill, Kenny; Driscoll, Margaret; Fenton, Terry; Alpert, Hillel; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Palfrey, Judith S.

    1999-01-01

    Surveys of directors of special education, Medicaid, and public health departments in all 50 states examined the financing arrangements covering health-related services for students with special health care needs in the schools. Results indicated that schools tapped traditional health resources to supplement educational dollars in paying for…

  3. Engaging Students in Survey Research Projects across Research Methods and Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovekamp, William E.; Soboroff, Shane D.; Gillespie, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    One innovative way to help students make sense of survey research has been to create a multifaceted, collaborative assignment that promotes critical thinking, comparative analysis, self-reflection, and statistical literacy. We use a short questionnaire adapted from the Higher Education Research Institute's Cooperative Institutional Research…

  4. The Non-Participation Survey: Understanding Why High School Students Choose Not to Eat School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to develop and validate a survey that will enable school nutrition (SN) directors and managers to identify and address issues affecting the non-participation of high school students in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The research was conducted in two phases. Qualitative data…

  5. Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Van Bruggen, Jan; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Gorissen, P., Van Bruggen, J., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2012). Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education. Research In Learning Technology, 20(3). doi:10.3402/rlt.v20i0.17299

  6. Awareness and knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer in female students: A survey (with a cautionary note)

    OpenAIRE

    Sherman, SM; Nailer, E; Minshall, C; Coombes, R; Cooper, J.; Redman, CW

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a survey to explore levels of awareness and knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in 170 female students and whether mode of data collection (online vs. paper) affected the results. 27% of women named HPV as a cause of cervical cancer with online respondents more likely to do so. 75% of women had heard of HPV. More online respondents had heard of HPV than paper respondents. 127 women reported having heard of HPV, with a mean knowledge score of 2.989 (standar...

  7. Health, Dietary Habits, and Achievement Motivation in College Students With Self-Reported ADHD Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkt, Julia; Gawrilow, Caterina

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to investigate aspects of health and motivation in a subpopulation of college students with ADHD. Seventy-seven college students with self-reported ADHD (49 women; M age = 25.82, SD = 4.62) and 120 college students without ADHD (65 women; M age = 25.17, SD = 5.41) participated in an online survey assessing their health, dietary habits, and achievement motivation. College students with ADHD showed impairment in psychological functioning, impairment in their mental health, and reported more ambition and less self-control. Furthermore, we found gender differences: Women with ADHD reported worse psychological functioning, and the gender differences in obsessive-compulsive behavior and compensatory effort were mediated by the timing of diagnosis. College students, especially women, with ADHD struggle with health-related issues. Some of these gender differences might be due to under diagnosis of girls in childhood. Differences in achievement motivation might indicate compensatory mechanisms. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  9. A Status Report on Hunger and Homelessness in America's Cities: 1990. A 30-City Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waxman, Laura DeKoven; Reyes, Lilia M.

    To assess the status of hunger and homelessness in urban America during 1990, the U.S. Conference of Mayors surveyed the 30 major cities whose mayors are members of its Task Force on Hunger and Homelessness. This report summarizes survey findings. The survey sought information from each city on the following questions: (1) the demand for emergency…

  10. Medical Students' Empathy for Vulnerable Groups: Results From a Survey and Reflective Writing Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline; Saunders, Pamela A; Kureshi, Sarah; Visconti, Adam

    2017-12-01

    As medical education curricula increasingly acknowledge the contributions of the social determinants of health to individual health, new methods of engaging students in the care of vulnerable groups are needed. Empathy is one way to connect students with patients, but little is known about how to nurture students' empathy on behalf of populations. This study examined the relationship between individual and social empathy as groundwork for cultivating students' empathy for vulnerable groups. In 2014-2015, first-year medical students completed the Social Empathy Index at the start and end of a two-semester population health course, and they completed a reflective writing assignment exploring the challenges of caring for vulnerable patients. Pre- and posttest mean survey scores were compared, and reflective writing assignments were analyzed for themes concerning social empathy. Data from 130 students were analyzed. Scores for the contextual understanding of systemic barriers domain increased significantly. There was a trend toward increased cumulative social empathy scores that did not reach statistical significance. Students' essays revealed three themes relating to individual empathy as the foundation for social empathy; civic and moral obligations; and the role of institutional practices in caring for vulnerable groups. This study extends understanding of empathy beyond care for the individual to include care for vulnerable groups. Thus, social empathy may function as a valuable concept in developing curricula to support students' commitment to care for the underserved. Educators first need to address the many barriers students cited that impede both individual and social empathy.

  11. Facilitators' influence on student PBL small group session online information resource use: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Elizabeth

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In problem-based learning curricular research has focused on the characteristics of good facilitators and how they influence student performance and satisfaction. Far less frequently addressed has been the question of how PBL facilitators influence the small group session activity of students. We investigated the impact that facilitators' encouragement of use or non-use of the Internet would have on the students' use of online information resources. Methods Survey of student and facilitator perceptions of facilitator behavior and student use of online information resources. Results Students who used online information resources rated their facilitators' behavior as more encouraging, while students in groups who didn't use online information resources during problem-based learning small group sessions rated their facilitators' behavior as less encouraging. This result was statistically significant. Conclusions Our study supports the role of the facilitator as an influence on medical students in small groups, particularly with respect to facilitator verbal behavior encouraging or discouraging student use of information technology in the problem-based learning small group session.

  12. Sex Survey about university students of UPF (from 20 to 27 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maté

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present survey was to assess the level of sexual knowledge, attitudes and practice of university students, adult young people from 20 to 27 years old and to identify if there was any significant difference in terms of age and sexual activity with other surveys. The survey was undertaken in which data were collected from 838 students who attended the third and four course of their graduate in Humanities. Differences between answers by sex were tested using Pearson’s χ2 test. The study established that behaviour, knowledge, attitudes and practice of the universitary students vary by sex in some regards. The fi rst sexual relationships is around they have 15,4 years old and no statistically significant difference was found between sex. The average of the starter interesting about sex is around 13,5 years old and a statistically signifi cant difference was found between sex, the average of boys is 12,7 years old and girls 13,7. People who were sexually active are satisfi ed and show is so important to their wellbeing. Majority use contraceptive methods in the last relationship and the same percentage use the condom in order to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. The study confirmed that there are 21% the students don’t use any method to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. Our conclusion is both, the knowledge and attitudes of students necessarily required appropriate sex education in the secondary school.

  13. Exploring midwifery students' views and experiences of caseload midwifery: A cross-sectional survey conducted in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Kate; Newton, Michelle; Forster, Della; McLachlan, Helen

    2015-02-01

    in Australia, models of maternity care that offer women continuity of care with a known midwife have been promoted. Little is known about the intentions of the future midwifery workforce to work in such models. This study aimed to explore midwifery students' views and experiences of caseload midwifery and their work intentions in relation to the caseload model following graduation. cross-sectional survey. Victoria, Australia. 129 midwifery students representing all midwifery course pathways (Post Graduate Diploma, Bachelor of Midwifery, Bachelor of Nursing/Bachelor of Midwifery) in Victoria. midwifery students from all course pathways considered that continuity of care is important to women and indicated that exposure to continuity models during their course was very positive. Two-thirds of the students (67%) considered that the continuity experiences made them want to work in a caseload model; only 5% reported that their experiences had discouraged them from continuity of care work in the future. Most wanted a period of consolidation to gain experience as a midwife prior to commencing in the caseload model. Perceived barriers to caseload work were being on-call, and challenges in regard to work/life balance and family commitments. midwifery students in this study were very positive about caseload midwifery and most would consider working in caseload after a period of consolidation. Continuity of care experiences during students' midwifery education programmes appeared to provide students with insight and understanding of continuity of care for both women and midwives. Further research should explore what factors influence students' future midwifery work, whether or not their plans are fulfilled, and whether or not the caseload midwifery workforce can be sustained. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Turking Statistics: Student-Generated Surveys Increase Student Engagement and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Cameron T.; Dietz, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Thirty years ago, Hubert M. Blalock Jr. published an article in "Teaching Sociology" about the importance of teaching statistics. We honor Blalock's legacy by assessing how using Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) in statistics classes can enhance student learning and increase statistical literacy among social science gradaute students. In…

  15. Comparative Analysis of Student Surveys on International Student Experience in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Leonid; Skaines, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to contribute to the current discourse on internationalisation of higher education in Australia and to understanding and managing the increasing diversity of the student body. Its specific concern is a comparison of international versus domestic student experience regarding a range of a university's academic and general services…

  16. Study on Life Education for College Students--A Survey on Students in Guangzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xingyan

    2008-01-01

    Due to the social environment of China's reform and opening up, as well as China's education system with knowledge impartation as its focus, some college students lack the humanistic care and education of value and significance of life. Universities should plan effective activities to make students realize the importance of life. They should…

  17. Herpetile survey report: USFWS – Benton Lake NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A preliminary survey was conducted to investigate the species occurrence and relative abundance of herpetiles on Benton Lake NWR (BLNWR). A few species of concern...

  18. Fish survey report of selected impoundments in September 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A fish survey of the following Carolina Sandhills NWR impoundments; Pool L, Lake Bee, Lake 16, Pool G, Mays Lake, Oxpen 1, was conducted in late September of 2004....

  19. 2001 FEMP customer survey study report: April 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Nicholas P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Talerico, Thomas P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reed, John H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Riggert, Jeff [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Oh, Andrew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jordan, Gretchen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2002-04-01

    This summary presents the key findings and recommendations from the 2001 FEMP customer survey. The key findings presented in this summary are a condensed presentation of the more detailed findings presented in each of the chapters.

  20. Macro-invertebrate and Avian Species Survey : Biological Summary Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This was a survey effort to determine species diversity and density of macro-invertebrates and avian species inhabiting playa systems located in SW regions of Baca...