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Sample records for survey sf-36 bodily

  1. Comparative Responsiveness of the PROMIS Pain Interference Short Forms, Brief Pain Inventory, PEG, and SF-36 Bodily Pain Subscale.

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    Kean, Jacob; Monahan, Patrick O; Kroenke, Kurt; Wu, Jingwei; Yu, Zhangsheng; Stump, Tim E; Krebs, Erin E

    2016-04-01

    To compare the sensitivity to change and the responsiveness to intervention of the PROMIS Pain Interference short forms, Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), 3-item PEG scale, and SF-36 Bodily Pain subscale in a sample of patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain of moderate severity. Standardized response means, standardized effect sizes, and receiver operating curve analyses were used to assess change between baseline and 3-month assessments in 250 participants who participated in a randomized clinical effectiveness trial of collaborative telecare management for moderate to severe and persistent musculoskeletal pain. The BPI, PEG, and SF-36 Bodily Pain measures were more sensitive to patient-reported global change than the PROMIS Pain Interference short forms, especially for the clinically improved group, for which the change detected by the PROMIS short forms was not statistically significant. The BPI was more responsive to the clinical intervention than the SF-36 Bodily Pain and PROMIS Pain Interference measures. Post hoc analyses exploring these findings did not suggest that differences in content or rating scale structure (number of response options or anchoring language) adequately explained the observed differences in the detection of change. In this clinical trial, the BPI and PEG measures were better able to detect change than the SF-36 Bodily Pain and PROMIS Pain Interference measures.

  2. Psychometric evaluation and establishing norms of Croatian SF-36 health survey: framework for subjective health research.

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    Maslić Sersić, Darja; Vuletić, Gorka

    2006-02-01

    To provide population norms and evaluate metric characteristics of the Croatian version of SF-36 Health Survey, an internationally used instrument for assessing subjective health. The questionnaire was administered to a representative sample of Croatian adult population (n=9070). Three standard techniques were used in data analysis: reliability tests, descriptive statistics, and factor analysis. The population norms were presented in two standard forms--the SF-36 Health Profile and percentile values for different age groups of men and women. The Croatian version of the SF-36 had generally acceptable metric characteristics including its construct validity. The internal consistency of the SF-36 scales ranged from 0.78 to 0.94. Pearson bivariate correlations showed moderate associations between SF-36 scales, and factor analysis provided one latent dimension underlying all SF-36 scales which explained 63.3% of the score variance. Less favorable results were obtained concerning its discriminative validity. All SF-36 scales showed negative asymmetry of score distributions, and some had high floor and ceiling effects--skewness estimations ranged from -0.12 to -0.91, with the highest floor effect of 30% and ceiling effect of 63%. Presented population norms for the Croatian version of SF-36 Health Survey showed that SF-36 may be used as a valid and reliable instrument in research in subjective health of Croatian population.

  3. [Survey on the applicability of SF-36 version-2 (SF-36v2) in assessment quality of life among urban residents in Chengdu city].

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    Zhao, Longchao; Liu, Zhijun; He, Yan; Li, Ningxiu; Liu, Danping

    2014-05-01

    To explore the psychometric performances and applicability of SF-36v2 in assessment quality of life among urban residents in Chengdu. During Oct. to Dec., 2012, 2 186 adult urban residents with clear mind and well self-express were recruited in the study by multistage stratified cluster sampling method in Chengdu urban area. The survey questionnaires included general health condition and quality of life, which was adopted the SF-36v2. Internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability and construct validity were all analyzed as indicators of the psychometric performance. The survey released 2 186 questionnaires, with 2 182 ones returned and 2 178(99.8%) met the data standard. The scores of 8 scales in SF-36v2, including physical function (PF), role-physical (RP), bodily pain (BP), general health (GH), vitality (VT), social function (SF), role-emotion (RE) and mental health (MH), were 89.15 ± 17.56, 85.18 ± 22.52, 76.64 ± 17.80, 64.13 ± 19.56, 70.39 ± 17.31, 86.43 ± 17.35, 87.79 ± 19.24 and 80.61 ± 13.49, respectively; the floor effects were 0.28%, 0.41%, 0.23%, 0.28%, 0.09%, 0.05%, 0.14% and 0.23%, respectively; and the ceiling effects were 51.38%, 60.60%, 58.08%, 0.83%, 2.94%, 50.32%, 64.00% and 3.95%, respectively. The item-convergent validities were all achieved the standard (r = 0.40) except the item MH5 (Have you been happy?), and the total scaling success rate of item-convergent validity was 97.14%. The scales' success rates of item-discriminant validities for the SF, VT and MH scales were 93.75%, 56.25% and 97.50% respectively, while the rates of others were 100.00% and the total success rate was 96.43%. The internal reliability ranged from 0.724 to 0.974 across all the scales, except for SF (r = 0.603) and VT (r = 0.697). The two-week test-retest reliability ranged from 0.610 to 0.845. Within factor analysis, two common factors were confirmed, separately representing physical health and mental health, altogether contributing 64.4% of the

  4. Measurement bias of the SF-36 Health Survey in older adults with chronic conditions.

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    Meng, Hongdao; King-Kallimanis, Bellinda L; Gum, Amber; Wamsley, Brenda

    2013-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the psychometric properties of the SF-36 in a sample of older adults with chronic conditions and to test whether measurement bias exists based on the levels of comorbidity. Participants included were 979 cognitively intact older adults with comorbidities who were interviewed at their homes. We examined the psychometric properties of the SF-36 and conducted confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to investigate the assumption of measurement invariance by the levels of comorbidity. Overall data quality was high and scaling assumptions were generally met with few exceptions. Floor and ceiling effects were present for the role-physical and role-emotional subscales. Using CFA, we found that a three-factor measurement model fits the data well. We identified two violations of measurement invariance. Results showed that participants with high comorbidity level place more emphasis on social functioning (SF) and bodily pain (BP) in relation to physical health-related quality of life (HRQoL) than those with low comorbidity level. Measurement bias was present for the SF and BP components of the SF-36 physical HRQoL measure. Researchers should be cautious when considering the use of SF-36 in clinical studies among older adults with comorbidities.

  5. Quality of Life in rural and urban populations in Lebanon using SF-36 Health Survey

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    Retel-Rude Nathalie

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring health status in a population is important for the evaluation of interventions and the prediction of health and social care needs. Quality of life (QoL studies are an essential complement to medical evaluation but most of the tools available in this area are in English. In order to evaluated QoL in rural and urban areas in Lebanon, the short form 36 health survey (SF-36 was adapted into Arabic. Methods SF-36 was administered in a cross-sectional study, to collect sociodemographic and environmental variables as well as self reported morbidity. We analysed a representative sample containing 1632 subjects, from whom we randomly picked 524 subjects aged 14 years and over. The translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the SF-36 followed the International Quality of Life Assessment methodology. Multivariate analysis (generalized linear model was performed to test the effect of habitat (rural on urban areas on all domains of the SF-36. Results The rate of missing data is very low (0.23% of items. Item level validation supported the assumptions underlying Likert scoring. SF-36 scale scores showed wide variability and acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha >0.70, factor analysis yielded patterns of factor correlation comparable to that found in the U.S.A and France. Patients resident in rural areas had higher vitality scores than those in urban areas. Older people reported more satisfaction with some domains of life than younger people, except for physical functioning. The QoL of women is poorer than men; certain symptoms and morbidity independently influence the domains of SF-36 in this population. Conclusion The results support the validity of the SF-36 Arabic version. Habitat has a minor influence on QoL, women had a poor QoL, and health problems had differential impact on QoL.

  6. Quality of Life in rural and urban populations in Lebanon using SF-36 Health Survey

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    Sabbah, Ibtissam; Drouby, Nabil; Sabbah, Sanaa; Retel-Rude, Nathalie; Mercier, Mariette

    2003-01-01

    Background Measuring health status in a population is important for the evaluation of interventions and the prediction of health and social care needs. Quality of life (QoL) studies are an essential complement to medical evaluation but most of the tools available in this area are in English. In order to evaluated QoL in rural and urban areas in Lebanon, the short form 36 health survey (SF-36) was adapted into Arabic. Methods SF-36 was administered in a cross-sectional study, to collect sociodemographic and environmental variables as well as self reported morbidity. We analysed a representative sample containing 1632 subjects, from whom we randomly picked 524 subjects aged 14 years and over. The translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the SF-36 followed the International Quality of Life Assessment methodology. Multivariate analysis (generalized linear model) was performed to test the effect of habitat (rural on urban areas) on all domains of the SF-36. Results The rate of missing data is very low (0.23% of items). Item level validation supported the assumptions underlying Likert scoring. SF-36 scale scores showed wide variability and acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha >0.70), factor analysis yielded patterns of factor correlation comparable to that found in the U.S.A and France. Patients resident in rural areas had higher vitality scores than those in urban areas. Older people reported more satisfaction with some domains of life than younger people, except for physical functioning. The QoL of women is poorer than men; certain symptoms and morbidity independently influence the domains of SF-36 in this population. Conclusion The results support the validity of the SF-36 Arabic version. Habitat has a minor influence on QoL, women had a poor QoL, and health problems had differential impact on QoL. PMID:12952543

  7. Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire: normative data for Wales.

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    Burholt, Vanessa; Nash, Paul

    2011-12-01

    The Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36) is used to indicate the health status of particular populations, to help with service planning and to measure the impact of clinical and social interventions. Culture-specific data are required to calculate SF-36 norm-based scores. Currently, in the UK normative sources are nearly two decades old, Anglocentric and lack data on the older population. We draw on raw data from the Welsh Health Survey (2007) to provide population norms for the eight SF-36 dimensions for Wales and its regions. We test the SF-36 dimensions for reliability and rating scaling assumptions and construct validity. We compare the Wales' norms to those reported in existing UK sources and examine the data between countries and by region. The scale is reliable and has content validity. The relationships found between the SF-36 domains and a range of variables known to be related to health also demonstrate construct validity. There are differences in population health norms between England and Wales and between the regions of Wales. The results suggest that it is imperative that the accurate normative data provided in this paper is used in population studies in Wales to provide an indication of the health status of particular populations.

  8. Health-related Quality of Life Assessment on 100 Tunisian Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis using the SF-36 Survey.

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    Azzouz, Dhouha; Ghannouchi, Mohamed Mehdi; Haouel, Manel; Kochbati, Samir; Saadellaoui, Kaouthar; Ben Hmida, Abdelmajid; Zouari, Béchir; Kchir, Mohamed Montacer

    2012-11-01

    The main objective of the study was to examine the self reported health status in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared with the general population and the secondary objective (in the AS group) was to study the association between health status, demographic parameters, and specific disease instruments in AS. A cross sectional study of 100 AS patients recruited between 2006 and 2009 at the Department of Rheumatology. Health status was assessed by using the SF-36 health questionnaire in patients with AS. Demographic characteristics and disease-specific instruments were also examined by the questionnaire. A sample of 112 healthy individuals was also surveyed using the SF-36 health questionnaire. This study showed a great impairment in the quality of life of patients with AS involving all scales. All male patients with AS reported significantly impaired health-related quality of life on all items of the SF-36 compared with the general population whereas female patients reported poorer health on three items only, namely physical functioning, general health and bodily pain. Mental health was mostly affected than physical role. The physical role was significantly higher in patients with high education level than in patients with low education level (p=0.01). Physical functioning was better in employed patients. All scales of SF-36 were correlated with BASFI, BASDAI and BAS-G. Only physical functioning and general health were correlated with BASMI. Impairment in the quality of life can be significant when suffering from AS, affecting mental health more than physical health. Among disease parameters, functional impairment, disease activity, mobility limitation, and spinal pain were the most associated factors resulting to the deterioration of quality of life.

  9. Health-related Quality of Life Assessment on 100 Tunisian Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis using the SF-36 Survey

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    Wafa Hamdi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The main objective of the study was to examine the self reported health status in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS compared with the general population and the secondary objective (in the AS group was to study the association between health status, demographic parameters, and specific disease instruments in AS.Methods: A cross sectional study of 100 AS patients recruited between 2006 and 2009 at the Department of Rheumatology. Health status was assessed by using the SF-36 health questionnaire in patients with AS. Demographic characteristics and disease specific instruments were also examined by the questionnaire. A sample of 112 healthy individuals was also surveyed using the SF-36 health questionnaire.Results: This study showed a great impairment in the quality of life of patients with AS involving all scales. All male patients with AS reported significantly impaired health-related quality of life on all items of the SF-36 compared with the general population whereas female patients reported poorer health on three items only, namely physical functioning, general health and bodily pain. Mental health was mostly affected than physical role. The physical role was significantly higher in patients with high education level than in patients with low education level (p=0.01. Physical functioning was better in employed patients. All scales of SF-36 were correlated with BASFI, BASDAI and BAS-G. Only physical functioning and general health were correlated with BASMI.Conclusion: Impairment in the quality of life can be significantwhen suffering from AS, affecting mental health more than physicalhealth. Among disease parameters, functional impairment,disease activity, mobility limitation, and spinal pain were the most associated factors resulting to the deterioration of quality of life.

  10. Measurement properties and normative data for the Norwegian SF-36: results from a general population survey.

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    Garratt, A M; Stavem, K

    2017-03-14

    The interpretation of the SF-36 in Norwegian populations largely uses normative data from 1996. This study presents data for the general population from 2002-2003 which has been used for comparative purposes but has not been assessed for measurement properties. As part of the Norwegian Level of Living Survey 2002-2003, a postal survey was conducted comprising 9,164 members of the general population aged 16 years and over representative for Norway who received the Norwegian SF-36 version 1.2. The SF-36 was assessed against widely applied criteria including data completeness and assumptions relating to the construction and scoring of multi-item scales. Normative data are given for the eight SF-36 scales and the two summary scales (PCS, MCS) for eight age groups and gender. There were 5,396 (58.9%) respondents. Item levels of missing data ranged from 0.6 to 3.0% with scale scores computable for 97.5 to 99.8% of respondents. All item-total correlations were above 0.4 and were of a similar level with the exceptions of the easiest and most difficult physical function items and two general health items. Cronbach's alpha exceeded 0.8 for all scales. Under 5% of respondents scored at the floor for five scales. Role-physical had the highest floor effect (14.6%) and together with role-emotional had the highest ceiling effects (66.3-76.8%). With three exceptions for the eight age groups, females had lower scores than males across the eight health scales. The two youngest age groups (SF-36 data meet necessary criteria for applications of normative data. The data is more recent, has more respondents including older people than the original Norwegian normative data from 1996, and can help the interpretation of SF-36 scores in applications that include clinical and health services research.

  11. Psychometric validation of the SF-36(®) Health Survey in ulcerative colitis: results from a systematic literature review.

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    Yarlas, Aaron; Bayliss, Martha; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Maher, Stephen; Bushmakin, Andrew G; Chen, Lea Ann; Manuchehri, Alireza; Healey, Paul

    2017-08-28

    To conduct a systematic literature review of the reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness of the SF-36(®) Health Survey (SF-36) in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). We performed a systematic search of electronic medical databases to identify published peer-reviewed studies which reported scores from the eight scales and/or two summary measures of the SF-36 collected from adult patients with UC. Study findings relevant to reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness were reviewed. Data were extracted and summarized from 43 articles meeting inclusion criteria. Convergent validity was supported by findings that 83% (197/236) of correlations between SF-36 scales and measures of disease symptoms, disease activity, and functioning exceeded the prespecified threshold (r ≥ |0.40|). Known-groups validity was supported by findings of clinically meaningful differences in SF-36 scores between subgroups of patients when classified by disease activity (i.e., active versus inactive), symptom status, and comorbidity status. Responsiveness was supported by findings of clinically meaningful changes in SF-36 scores following treatment in non-comparative trials, and by meaningfully larger improvements in SF-36 scores in treatment arms relative to controls in randomized controlled trials. The sole study of SF-36 reliability found evidence supporting internal consistency (Cronbach's α ≥ 0.70) for all SF-36 scales and test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥0.70) for six of eight scales. Evidence from this systematic literature review indicates that the SF-36 is reliable, valid, and responsive when used with UC patients, supporting the inclusion of the SF-36 as an endpoint in clinical trials for this patient population.

  12. Responsiveness of SF-36 Health Survey and Patient Generated Index in people with chronic knee pain commenced on oral analgesia: analysis of data from a randomised controlled clinical trial.

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    Papou, Alex; Hussain, Salma; McWilliams, Daniel; Zhang, Weiya; Doherty, Michael

    2017-03-01

    (1) To assess the responsiveness of the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and Patient Generated Index (PGI) in people with knee pain who were given oral analgesics; and (2) to perform content analysis of the SF-36 and PGI aiming to identify differences between the instruments and causes of different responsiveness. An observational study nested within a randomised controlled trial comparing oral paracetamol, ibuprofen or a combination of the two in 884 community-derived people with chronic knee pain. Each participant was given the SF-36 and PGI questionnaires to fill out at baseline, day 10, week 7 and week 13 after commencement on analgesia. Responsiveness was measured as a standardised response mean from baseline, and contents of the instruments were analysed. The PGI showed the greater responsiveness to analgesics than the SF-36 throughout the study period. Only the Bodily Pain Score of the SF-36 showed comparable responsiveness to the PGI. The standardised response mean of the PGI at 13 weeks was 0.61 (95% CI 0.51-0.72), and that of the Bodily Pain Score of the SF-36 was 0.49 (95% CI 0.39-0.58). Content analysis of the PGI identified multiple areas which are not represented in the SF-36 which may help explain its performance. Overall the PGI is more responsive than the SF-36 to commonly used oral analgesics taken for knee pain. The PGI is able to elicit areas of individualised health-related quality of life which are not captured by the SF-36.

  13. Thai SF-36 health survey: tests of data quality, scaling assumptions, reliability and validity in healthy men and women

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    Sleigh Adrian

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since its translation to Thai in 2000, the SF-36 Health Survey has been used extensively in many different clinical settings in Thailand. Its popularity has increased despite the absence of published evidence that the translated instrument satisfies scoring assumptions, the psychometric properties required for valid interpretation of the SF-36 summated ratings scales. The purpose of this paper was to examine these properties and to report on the reliability and validity of the Thai SF-36 in a non-clinical general population. Methods 1345 distance-education university students who live in all areas of Thailand completed a questionnaire comprising the Thai SF-36 (Version 1. Median age was 31 years. Psychometric tests recommended by the International Quality of Life Assessment Project were used. Results Data quality was satisfactory: questionnaire completion rate was high (97.5% and missing data rates were low ( Conclusion The summated ratings method can be used for scoring the Thai SF-36. The instrument was found to be reliable and valid for use in a general non-clinical population. Version 2 of the SF-36 could improve ceiling and floor effects in the role functioning scales. Further work is warranted to refine items that measure the concepts of social functioning, vitality and mental health to improve the reliability and discriminant validity of these scales.

  14. Validity and reliability of the Short Form 36 Health Surveys (SF-36) among patients with spondyloarthritis in Singapore.

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    Kwan, Yu Heng; Fong, Warren Weng Seng; Lui, Nai Lee; Yong, Si Ting; Cheung, Yin Bun; Malhotra, Rahul; Østbye, Truls; Thumboo, Julian

    2016-12-01

    The Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) is a popular health-related quality of life (HrQoL) tool. However, few studies have assessed its psychometric properties in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). We therefore aimed to assess the reliability and validity of the SF-36 in patients with SpA in Singapore. Cross-sectional data from a registry of 196 SpA patients recruited from a dedicated tertiary referral clinic in Singapore from 2011 to 2014 was used. Analyses were guided by the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments framework. Internal consistency reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Construct validity was assessed through 33 a priori hypotheses by correlations of the eight subscales and two summary scores of SF-36 with other health outcomes. Known-group construct validity was assessed by comparison of the means of the subscales and summary scores of the SF-36 of SpA patients and the general population of Singapore using student's t tests. Among 196 patients (155 males (79.0 %), median (range) age: 36 (17-70), 166 Chinese (84.6 %)), SF-36 scales showed high internal consistency ranging from 0.88 to 0.90. Convergent construct validity was supported as shown by fulfillment of all hypotheses. Divergent construct validity was supported, as SF-36 MCS was not associated with PGA, pain and HAQ. Known-group construct validity showed SpA patients had lower scores of 3.8-12.5 when compared to the general population at p SF-36 as a valid and reliable measure of HrQoL for use in patients with SpA at a single time point.

  15. A methodological review of the Short Form Health Survey 36 (SF-36) and its derivatives among breast cancer survivors.

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    Treanor, Charlene; Donnelly, Michael

    2015-02-01

    A systematic review of the validity, reliability and sensitivity of the Short Form (SF) health survey measures among breast cancer survivors. We searched a number of databases for peer-reviewed papers. The methodological quality of the papers was assessed using the COnsenus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN). The review identified seven papers that assessed the psychometric properties of the SF-36 (n = 5), partial SF-36 (n = 1) and SF-12 (n = 1) among breast cancer survivors. Internal consistency scores for the SF measures ranged from acceptable to good across a range of language and ethnic sub-groups. The SF-36 demonstrated good convergent validity with respective subscales of the Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment-General scale and two lymphedema-specific measures. Divergent validity between the SF-36 and Lymph-ICF was modest. The SF-36 demonstrated good factor structure in the total breast cancer survivor study samples. However, the factor structure appeared to differ between specific language and ethnic sub-groups. The SF-36 discriminated between survivors who reported or did not report symptoms on the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial Symptom Checklist and SF-36 physical sub-scales, but not mental sub-scales, discriminated between survivors with or without lymphedema. Methodological quality scores varied between and within papers. Short Form measures appear to provide a reliable and valid indication of general health status among breast cancer survivors though the limited data suggests that particular caution is required when interpreting scores provided by non-English language groups. Further research is required to test the sensitivity or responsiveness of the measure.

  16. Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey questionnaire: which normative data should be used? Comparisons between the norms provided by the Omnibus Survey in Britain, the Health Survey for England and the Oxford Healthy Life Survey.

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    Bowling, A; Bond, M; Jenkinson, C; Lamping, D L

    1999-09-01

    Population norms for the attributes included in measurement scales are required to provide a standard with which scores from other study populations can be compared. This study aimed to obtain population norms for the Short Form 36 (SF-36) Health Survey Questionnaire, derived from a random sample of the population in Britain who were interviewed at home, and to make comparisons with other commonly used norms. The method was a face-to-face interview survey of a random sample of 2056 adults living at home in Britain (response rate 78 per cent). Comparisons of the SF-36 scores derived from this sample were made with the Health Survey for England and the Oxford Healthy Life Survey. Controlling for age and sex, many of mean scores on the SF-36 dimensions differed between the three datasets. The British interview sample had better total means for Physical Functioning, Social Functioning, Mental Health, Energy/Vitality, and General Health Perceptions. The Health (interview) Survey for England had the lowest (worst) total mean scores for Physical Functioning, Social Functioning, Role Limitations (physical), Bodily Pain, and Health Perceptions. The postal sample in central England had the lowest (worst) total mean scores for Role Limitations (emotional), Mental Health and Energy/Vitality. Responses obtained from interview methods may suffer more from social desirability bias (resulting in inflated SF-36 scores) than postal surveys. Differences in SF-36 means between surveys are also likely to reflect question order and contextual effects of the questionnaires. This indicates the importance of providing mode-specific population norms for the various methods of questionnaire administration.

  17. Decomposition of sources of income-related health inequality applied on SF-36 summary scores: a Danish health survey

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    Lauridsen Jørgen

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background If the SF-36 summary scores are used as health status measures for the purpose of measuring health inequality it is relevant to be informed about the sources of the inequality in order to be able to target the specific aspects of health with the largest impact. Methods Data were from a Danish health survey on health status, health behaviour and socio-economic background. Decompositions of concentration indices were carried out to examine the sources of income-related inequality in physical and mental health, using the physical and mental health summary scores from SF-36. Results The analyses show how the different subscales from SF-36 and various explanatory variables contribute to overall inequality in physical and mental health. The decompositions contribute with information about the importance of the different aspects of health and off-setting effects that would otherwise be missed in the aggregate summary scores. However, the complicated scoring mechanism of the summary scores with negative coefficients makes it difficult to interpret the contributions and to draw policy implications. Conclusion Decomposition techniques provide insights to how subscales contribute to income-related inequality when SF-36 summary scores are used.

  18. Invariance Testing of the SF-36 Health Survey in Women Breast Cancer Survivors: Do Personal and Cancer-Related Variables Influence the Meaning of Quality of Life Items?

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    Mosewich, Amber D.; Hadd, Valerie; Crocker, Peter R. E.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2013-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is affected by issues specific to illness trajectory and thus, may differ, and potentially take on different meanings, at different stages in the cancer process. A widely used measure of QoL is the SF-36 Health Survey (SF-36; Ware 1993); therefore, support for its appropriateness in a given population is imperative. The…

  19. Translation, validation, and norming of the Dutch language version of the SF-36 Health Survey in community and chronic disease populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, NK; Muller, M; Cohen, PDA; Essink-Bot, ML; Fekkes, M; Sanderman, R; Sprangers, MAG; Velde, AT; Verrips, E

    1998-01-01

    The primary objectives of this research were to translate; validate, and generate normative data on the SF-36 Health Survey for use among Dutch-speaking residents of the Netherlands. Translation of the SF-36 into Dutch followed the stepwise, iterative procedures developed by the IQOLA Project.

  20. Translation, validation, and norming of the Dutch language version of the SF-36 Health Survey in community and chronic disease populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, N. K.; Muller, M.; Cohen, P. D.; Essink-Bot, M. L.; Fekkes, M.; Sanderman, R.; Sprangers, M. A.; te Velde, A.; Verrips, E.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objectives of this research were to translate, validate, and generate normative data on the SF-36 Health Survey for use among Dutch-speaking residents of the Netherlands. Translation of the SF-36 into Dutch followed the stepwise, iterative procedures developed by the IQOLA Project.

  1. Translation, validation, and norming of the Dutch language version of the SF-36 Health Survey in community and chronic disease populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaronson, N.K.; Muller, M.; Cohen, P.D.A.; Essink-Bot, M.-L.; Fekkes, M.; Sanderman, R.; Sprangers, M.A.G.; Velde, A. te; Verrips, E.

    1998-01-01

    The primary objectives of this research were to translate, validate, and generate normative data on the SF-36 Health Survey for use among Dutch- speaking residents of the Netherlands. Translation of the SF-36 into Dutch followed the stepwise, iterative procedures developed by the IQOLA Project.

  2. Translation in Arabic, adaptation and validation of the SF-36 Health Survey for use in Tunisia.

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    Guermazi, M; Allouch, C; Yahia, M; Huissa, T B A; Ghorbel, S; Damak, J; Mrad, M F; Elleuch, M H

    2012-09-01

    To translate into Arabic and validate the SF-36 quality of life index in a Tunisian Arabic population. No validated Arabic quality of life index is published. Arabic translation of the SF-36 scale was obtained by the "forward/backward translation" method. Adaptations were made after a pilot study involving 22 subjects from general population. Inter-rater reliability was assessed by use of intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman method. Construct validity was assessed by Spearman rank correlation coefficient (convergent and divergent validity), and factor analysis with Varimax rotation. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach alpha coefficient. We note that 130 Tunisian subjects were included in the validation study. No items were excluded. Inter-rater reliability was excellent (ICC=0.98). Cronbach alpha coefficient was 0.94 conferring to translated index a good internal consistency. Expected divergent and convergent validity results suggested good construct validity. Two main factors were extracted by factor analysis and explained 62.3% of the cumulative variance: the first factor represented mental component, the second physical component. The Cronbach alpha coefficient was 0.88 and 0.91 respectively for factor 1 and factor 2. We translated into Arabic language and adapted the SF-36 scale for use in Tunisian population. The Arabic version is reliable and valid. Although the scale was validated in a Tunisian population, we expect that it is suitable for other Arab populations, especially North Africans. Further studies are needed to confirm such a hypothesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Patient-reported functional health and well-being outcomes with drug therapy: a systematic review of randomized trials using the SF-36 health survey.

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    Frendl, Daniel M; Ware, John E

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the responsiveness of the SF-36 Health Survey in drug trials and to determine how often clinically efficacious treatments produce meaningful functional health changes across medical conditions. We conducted a systematic review of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled drug trials published from 1995 to 2011 that documented results for primary clinical endpoints and SF-36 outcomes. PubMed and a database of SF-36 publications were searched. We evaluated responsiveness as concordance (both statistically significant or both nonsignificant) between primary clinical and SF-36 outcomes. To determine how often SF-36 physical and mental component summary (PCS, MCS) score changes were of meaningful magnitude, mean net of placebo changes with treatment were compared against the developer's recommended 3-point threshold for a minimal important difference (MID) across groups of medical conditions. Of 805 screened trials, 185 met eligibility criteria. Primary clinical and SF-36 outcomes were concordant in 151 trials (82%). Among clinically efficacious trials, 58% reported net mean SF-36 improvements ≥MID threshold; however, SF-36 changes were often modest (PCS IQR, 1.6-4.1; MCS IQR, 0.8-3.5). Variations in treatment impact were apparent across conditions. Clinically efficacious therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, and psoriasis consistently achieved the largest SF-36 improvements, with 87% exceeding MID, whereas no efficacious therapies for peripheral arterial disease or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease achieved MID threshold. The SF-36 responds to treatment impact, distinguishing drug therapies that, on average, produce meaningful functional health benefits. Overall, just over half of clinically efficacious trials report meaningful functional health improvements, and results vary widely by medical condition.

  4. Usefulness of the SF-36 Health Survey in screening for depressive and anxiety disorders in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcham, Faith; Norton, Sam; Steer, Sophia; Hotopf, Matthew

    2016-05-23

    This study aimed to assess the accuracy of the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) mental health subscale (MH) and mental component summary (MCS) scores in identifying the presence of probable major depressive or anxiety disorder in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. SF-36 data were collected in 100 hospital outpatients with rheumatoid arthritis. MH and MCS scores were compared against depression and anxiety data collected using validated measures as part of routine clinical practice. Sensitivity and specificity of the SF-36 were established using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and area under the curve (AUC) compared the performance of the SF-36 components with the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9) for depression and the 7-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD7) questionnaire for anxiety. The MH with a threshold of ≤52 had sensitivity and specificity of 81.0 and 71.4 % respectively to detect anxiety, correctly classifying 73.5 % of patients with probable anxiety disorder. A threshold of ≤56 had sensitivity and specificity of 92.6 and 73.2 % respectively to detect depression, correctly classifying 78.6 % of patients, and the same threshold could also be used to detect either depression or anxiety with a sensitivity of 87.9 %, specificity of 76.9 % and accuracy of 80.6 %. The MCS with a threshold of ≤35 had sensitivity and specificity of 85.7 and 81.9 % respectively to detect anxiety, correctly classifying 82.8 % of patients with probable anxiety disorder. A threshold of ≤40 had sensitivity and specificity of 92.3 and 70.2 % respectively to detect depression, correctly classifying 76.3 % of patients. A threshold of ≤38 could be used to detect either depression or anxiety with a sensitivity of 87.5 %, specificity of 80.3 % and accuracy of 82.8 %. This analysis may increase the utility of a widely-used questionnaire. Overall, optimal use of the SF-36 for screening for mental disorder may be through using the MCS

  5. Is the SF-12 version 2 Health Survey a valid and equivalent substitute for the SF-36 version 2 Health Survey for the Chinese?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Elegance T P; Lam, Cindy L K; Fong, Daniel Y T; Huang, Wen Wei

    2013-02-01

    The scoring algorithm of the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-12) was revised in the second version (SF-12v2), but information on its psychometric properties is lacking. This study determined whether the SF-12v2 was a valid and equivalent substitute for the SF-36v2 Health Survey (version 2) for the Chinese. A total of 2410 Chinese adults in Hong Kong completed the SF-36 Health Survey by telephone. The SF-12v2 data were extracted from the SF-36 data. Internal consistency was assessed by Cronbach's alpha, and test-retest reliabilities were evaluated by intraclass correlation. Criterion validity and equivalence were assessed using the SF-36v2 scores as a gold standard. Construct validity and sensitivity were assessed by known-group comparison. Internal consistency and test-retest reliabilities were good (range 0.67-0.82) for all except three scales. The SF-12v2 summary scores explained >80% of the total variances of the SF-36v2 summary scores. Construct validity and sensitivity were confirmed by significantly lower SF-12v2 scores in people with chronic diseases than those without. Effect size differences were less than 0.3 and relative validities were greater than 0.7 between SF-12v2 and SF-36v2 scores for different groups. The SF-12v2 was valid, reliable and sensitive for the Chinese. It is an equivalent substitute for the SF-36v2 for the summary scales. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Improvement in health-related quality of life after therapy with omeprazole in patients with coronary artery disease and recurrent angina-like chest pain. A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of the SF-36 survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kłopocka Maria

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many patients with coronary artery disease (CAD have overlapping gastroenterological causes of recurrent chest pain, mainly due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER and aspirin-induced gastrointestinal tract damage. These symptoms can be alleviated by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. The study addressed whether omeprazole treatment also affects general health-related quality of life (HRQL in patients with CAD. Study 48 patients with more than 50% narrowing of the coronary arteries on angiography without clinically overt gastrointestinal symptoms were studied. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study design, patients were randomized to take omeprazole 20 mg bid or a placebo for two weeks, and then crossed over to the other study arm. The SF-36 questionnaire was completed before treatment and again after two weeks of therapy. Results Patients treated with omeprazole in comparison to the subjects taking the placebo had significantly greater values for the SF-36 survey (which relates to both physical and mental health, as well as for bodily pain, general health perception, and physical health. In comparison to the baseline values, therapy with omeprazole led to a significant increase in the three summarized health components: total SF-36; physical and mental health; and in the following detailed health concept scores: physical functioning, limitations due to physical health problems, bodily pain and emotional well-being. Conclusions A double dose of omeprazole improved the general HRQL in patients with CAD without severe gastrointestinal symptoms more effectively than the placebo.

  7. Comparisons of the Nottingham Health Profile and the SF-36 health survey for the assessment of quality of life in individuals with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Dinalva L; Laurentino, Glória E C; Damascena, Caroline G; Faria, Christina D C M; Melo, Priscilla G; Teixeira-Salmela, Luci F

    2012-01-01

    Appropriate instruments for the assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) domains are useful for planning therapeutic interventions for individuals with stroke. The generic quality of life (QOL) instruments, Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36) and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), have been frequently employed in the Brazilian literature. However, the literature is still scarce regarding their psychometric properties when applied to stroke individuals. To compare the Brazilian versions of the SF-36 and the NHP to verify which had better psychometric properties for the assessment of HRQOL in 120 individuals with chronic stroke. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to examine the comparable domains and total scores of the SF-36 and the NPH; Cronbach's alpha coefficients, to evaluate internal consistency; intra-class correlation coefficients, to assess reliability; and Bland-Altman plots, to assess the levels of agreement, with a significance level of 5%. Significant positive associations were observed between the common domains and the total scores of the SF-36 and the NPH. Ceiling effects were more frequent for the NPH. The total scores of both instruments achieved adequate reliability levels, and the agreement levels were within the normal limits in 95% of the cases. The SF-36 and the NPH were shown to measure similar constructs and proved to be useful measures for the assessment of QOL of chronic stroke subjects. However, the SF-36 yielded better results and appeared to be more appropriate.

  8. Comparison of Completion Rates for SF-36 Compared With SF-12 Quality of Life Surveys at a Tertiary Urban Wound Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul J; Kumar, Anagha; Elmarsafi, Tammer; Lehrenbaum, Hannah; Anghel, Ersilia; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K; Attinger, Christopher E

    Patient-reported outcome measures derived from quality of life instruments are an important tool in monitoring disease progression and treatment response. Although a number of validated instruments are available, the Short Form-36 (SF-36) quality of life survey is the most widely used. It is imperative that the patients answer all the questions in this instrument for appropriate analysis and interpretation. It has been hypothesized that fewer questions (i.e., the Short Form-12 [SF-12]), will result in greater survey completion rates. The present study was a randomized prospective study comparing the completion rates for the SF-36 and SF-12 quality of life surveys. Patients presenting with a chronic wound were asked to complete the SF-36 or SF-12 survey. After an a priori power analysis was performed, the completion rates, patterns of skipped questions, and demographic information were analyzed using t tests for continuous variables or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and both multivariate linear regression and logistic regression. A total of 59 subjects (30 completed the SF-12 and 29 completed the SF-36) participated in the present study. The SF-12 group had an 80% (24 of 30) completion rate compared with a 55% (16 of 29) completion rate for the SF-36 group (p SF-12 yields a higher total survey completion rate. However, completion appears independent of the shorter survey length. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic insomnia cases detection with the help of Athens Insomnia Scale and SF-36 health survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiewicz, P.; Skalski, M.; Fornal-Pawlowska, Malgorzata

    2011-10-01

    Standardization of the diagnostic process of insomnia is a highly important task in clinical practice, epidemiological considerations and treatment outcomes assessment. In this paper we describe standard surveys relationships within cluster groups with the same insomnia degrees.

  10. Comparison between telephone and self-administration of Short Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36 Estudio comparativo entre la encuesta telefónica y la autoaplicada del cuestionario de salud SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María García

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The characteristics of the 36 item Medical Outcome Short Form Health Study Survey (SF-36 questionnaire, designed as a generic indicator of health status for the general population, allow it to be self-administered or used in personal or telephone interviews. The main objective of the study was to compare the telephone and self-administered modes of SF-36 for a population from Girona (Spain. Methods: A randomized crossover administration of the questionnaire design was used in a cardiovascular risk factor survey. Of 385 people invited to participate in the survey, 351 agreed to do so and were randomly assigned to two orders of administration (i.e., telephone-self and self-telephone; 261 completed both questionnaires. Scores were compared between administration modes using a paired t test. Internal consistency and agreement between modalities were analyzed by respectively applying Chronbach's alpha and intraclass correlation coefficients. The effect of the order of administration on the test-retest difference was analyzed by one-way ANOVA for repeated measurements. Results: Physical function, physical role and social functioning received significantly lower scores when the self-administered questionnaire was used prior to the telephone survey. When the initial survey was conducted by telephone, all Chronbach's alpha coefficients (except social functioning scored over 0.70 in the self-administered modality. The intraclass correlation coefficient ranged from 0.41 to 0.83 for the telephone-self order and from 0.32 to 0.73 for the self-telephone order. No clinically significant effect was observed for the order of application. Conclusions: The results of the present study suggest that the telephone-administration mode of SF-36 is equivalent to and as valid as the self-administered mode.Objetivo: El cuestionario de salud SF-36 puede ser autoaplicado o utilizado en entrevistas personales o telefónicas. El objetivo principal de este trabajo

  11. Reliability and validity of the SF-36 Health Survey Questionnaire in patients with brain tumors: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Adomas

    2017-05-04

    Deterioration of health related quality of life (HRQoL) is common in brain tumor patients. This study evaluated validity and reliability of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form (SF-36) in patients with brain tumors. Two hundred and seventy-seven patients admitted for brain tumor surgery were evaluated for HRQoL (SF-36 questionnaire); depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory-II or BDI-II); and functional status (Barthel index or BI). Final histological diagnosis was obtained from pathology reports. Two-hundred and twenty-seven (completion rate of 82%) patients (69% women; mean age 55.8 ± 14.4 years) completed the SF-36 questionnaire. The most common brain tumor diagnosis was meningioma (40%), followed high-grade glioma (19%). Missing data rates were ≤4%. Internal consistency was adequate for all (Cronbach α ≥ .728) but Social Functioning (Cronbach α = .527) and General Health (Cronbach α = .693) subscales. Ceiling (≥36%) and floor (≥22%) effect rates were the greatest for the Role Limitations subscales. The SF-36 subscales pertaining physical health correlated the strongest with the BI score, while the SF-36 subscales pertaining emotional health correlated the strongest with the BDI-II score. Patients with mild-moderate depressive symptoms (BDI-II score ≥20) scored lower across all SF-36 subscales, and handicap patients (BI score SF-36 is a valid and reliable instrument in brain tumor patients and therefore can be reliably applied for evaluation of HRQoL in neuro-oncology setting. Further studies exploring other psychometric properties of the SF-36 in brain tumor patients across disease progression stages are warranted.

  12. Tests of data quality, scaling assumptions, reliability, and construct validity of the SF-36 health survey in people who abuse heroin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, En-Chi; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsi; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2014-04-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is considered an important outcome indicator in substances abuse studies. However, psychometric properties of HRQOL measures are largely unknown in people who abuse heroin. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine data quality, scaling properties, reliability, and construct validity of the 36-Item Short Form healthy survey (SF-36) in people who abuse heroin. A total of 469 people who abuse heroin participated in the study. Data quality was determined by data completeness. Scaling properties were evaluated by item frequency distribution, equivalence of item means and standard deviations, item-internal consistency, and item-discriminant validity (calculating scaling success). Internal consistency was examined using Cronbach's α. Construct validity was examined by investigating convergent validity and divergent validity among the eight scales of the SF-36. The results of data quality showed low missing rates (0.0-3.8%) and high completion rates in the scales (91.9-98.7%). The results of scaling assumptions showed good item frequency distribution on each item, roughly equivalent item means and standard deviations within a scale, good item-internal consistency (>0.4) and good scaling success rates (77.5-100%), except on the two scales of bodily pain (BP) and social functioning (SF). Three scales showed ceiling and/or floor effects [i.e., physical functioning (PF), role limitations due to physical problems (RP), and role limitations due to emotional problems (RE)]. Cronbach's α was acceptable (>0.7), except for the BP and SF scales. Construct validity was partially supported by the results of convergent validity and divergent validity. The results confirmed good data quality; satisfactory scaling assumptions and internal consistency (except for the BP and SF scales); and generally acceptable construct validity. However, the PF, RP, and RE scales showed ceiling and/or floor effects. Therefore, the BP, SF, PF, RP, and RE scales

  13. Assessing a Self-Report Health Measure for Non-English-Speaking Elders: Issues in Using the SF-36 Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan-Marsh, Maryalice; Cody, Michael; Silverstein, Merril; Chin, Soo-Young; Garcia, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Approved versions of the SF-36 Version 1.0 are used for limited-English-speaking individuals whose primary languages are Korean, Chinese, and Spanish to test the respective translations for use among immigrants to the United States. Method: Surveys are completed by an older adult and a nominated adult family caregiver (N = 132).…

  14. Validation of the Polish language version of the SF-36 Health Survey in patients suffering from lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosiński, Michał; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Kłosiński, Piotr; Skrzat, Janusz; Walocha, Jerzy A

    2014-01-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) questionnaires have become the standard measure for treatment effectiveness after spinal surgery. One of the most widely used generic PROs is the SF-36 Health Survey. The aim of this study was to specifically focus on validating the SF-36 Health Survey to confirm that the tool is an acceptable and psychometrically robust measure to collect HRQoL data in Polish patients with spinal stenosis. Patients were eligible if they were above 18 years of age and had been qualified for spine surgery of the lumbar region due to either discopathy or non-traumatic spinal stenosis. All patients filled-in the Polish version of the SF-36 and a demographic questionnaire. Standard validity and reliability analyses were performed. 192 patients (83 women--43.2%) agreed to take part in the study (mean age: 57.5±11.4 years). In 47 patients (24.5%), using MRI, ossification of the ligamenta flava were found. Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed positive internal consistency (0.70-0.92). Interclass correlations for the SF-36 ranged from 0.72-0.86 and proved appropriate test-retest reliability. Satisfactory convergent and discriminant validity in multi-trait scaling analyses was seen. The Polish version of the SF-36 is a reliable and valid tool for measuring HRQoL in patients with spinal stenosis. It can be recommended for use in clinical and epidemiological settings in the Polish population. However, caution is warranted when interpreting the results of the 'role limitations due to physical health problems' and the 'role limitations due to emotional problems' scales because of floor and ceiling effects.

  15. Reference values for the SF-36 in Canadian injured workers undergoing rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Douglas P; Algarni, Fahad S; Niemeläinen, Riikka

    2015-03-01

    The Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short Form Survey (SF-36) is a widely used measure of health-related quality of life and normative reference values have been published for the general population of several countries. Since injured workers often experience pain, disability and other health challenges, we evaluated SF-36 reference values for Canadian workers' compensation claimants undergoing rehabilitation. Descriptive cross-sectional design. Data were gathered as part of a study aimed at developing a tool for selecting rehabilitation programs. Data were available on a wide variety of measures, including the SF-36. We calculated age- and sex-adjusted reference values, and stratified analyses based on type of rehabilitation, employment status and diagnostic group. Data were available on 5,622 claimants undergoing rehabilitation. Claimants reported significant limitations on all SF-36 scales, but were especially limited on the Role Emotional and Bodily Pain scales (~3 standard deviations below typical Canadian norms). Unemployed, middle-aged claimants undergoing chronic pain programs reported the lowest health status, but SF-36 scores varied minimally across diagnoses. Claimant scores on the SF-36 were below population norms across all health scales and differed depending on age, employment status and type of rehabilitation. These data will be useful for assessing the health status of injured workers and evaluating the effect of rehabilitation interventions.

  16. Detecting short-term change and variation in health-related quality of life: within- and between-person factor structure of the SF-36 health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Amanda; Rush, Jonathan; Shafonsky, Eric; Hayashi, Allen; Votova, Kristine; Hall, Christine; Piccinin, Andrea M; Weber, Jens; Rast, Philippe; Hofer, Scott M

    2015-12-21

    A major goal of much aging-related research and geriatric medicine is to identify early changes in health and functioning before serious limitations develop. To this end, regular collection of patient-reported outcome measure (PROMs) in a clinical setting may be useful to identify and monitor these changes. However, existing PROMs were not designed for repeated administration and are more commonly used as one-time screening tools; as such, their ability to detect variation and measurement properties when administered repeatedly remain unknown. In this study we evaluated the potential of the RAND SF-36 Health Survey as a repeated-use PROM by examining its measurement properties when modified for administration over multiple occasions. To distinguish between-person (i.e., average) from within-person (i.e., occasion) levels, the SF-36 Health Survey was completed by a sample of older adults (N = 122, M age  = 66.28 years) daily for seven consecutive days. Multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was employed to investigate the factor structure at both levels for two- and eight-factor solutions. Multilevel CFA models revealed that the correlated eight-factor solution provided better model fit than the two-factor solution at both the between-person and within-person levels. Overall model fit for the SF-36 Health Survey administered daily was not substantially different from standard survey administration, though both were below optimal levels as reported in the literature. However, individual subscales did demonstrate good reliability. Many of the subscales of the modified SF-36 for repeated daily assessment were found to be sufficiently reliable for use in repeated measurement designs incorporating PROMs, though the overall scale may not be optimal. We encourage future work to investigate the utility of the subscales in specific contexts, as well as the measurement properties of other existing PROMs when administered in a repeated measures design. The

  17. Measurement characteristics for two health-related quality of life measures in older adults: The SF-36 and the CDC Healthy Days items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barile, John P; Horner-Johnson, Willi; Krahn, Gloria; Zack, Matthew; Miranda, David; DeMichele, Kimberly; Ford, Derek; Thompson, William W

    2016-10-01

    The Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Healthy Days items are well known measures of health-related quality of life. The validity of the SF-36 for older adults and those with disabilities has been questioned. Assess the extent to which the SF-36 and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Healthy Days items measure the same aspects of health; whether the SF-36 and the CDC unhealthy days items are invariant across gender, functional status, or the presence of chronic health conditions of older adults; and whether each of the SF-36's eight subscales is independently associated with the CDC Healthy Days items. We analyzed data from 66,269 adult Medicare advantage members age 65 and older. We used confirmatory factor analyses and regression modeling to test associations between the CDC Healthy Days items and subscales of the SF-36. The CDC Healthy Days items were associated with the SF-36 global measures of physical and mental health. The CDC physically unhealthy days item was associated with the SF-36 subscales for bodily pain, physical role limitations, and general health, while the CDC mentally unhealthy days item was associated with the SF-36 subscales for mental health, emotional role limitations, vitality and social functioning. The SF-36 physical functioning subscale was not independently associated with either of the CDC Healthy Days items. The CDC Healthy Days items measure similar domains as the SF-36 but appear to assess HRQOL without regard to limitations in functioning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A computerized adaptive version of the SF-36 is feasible for clinic and Internet administration in adults with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-Bowker, Diane M; Saris-Baglama, Renee N; DeRosa, Michael A; Giovannetti, Erin R; Jensen, Roxanne E; Wu, Albert W

    2012-01-01

    DYNHA SF-36 is a computerized adaptive test version of the SF-36 Health Survey. The feasibility of administering a modified DYNHA SF-36 to adults with HIV was evaluated with Johns Hopkins University Moore (HIV) Clinic patients (N=100) and Internet consumer health panel members (N=101). Participants completed the DYNHA SF-36, modified to capture seven health domains [(physical function (PF), role function (RF, without physical or emotional attribution), bodily pain (BP), general health, vitality (VT), social function (SF), mental health (MH)], and scored to produce two summary components [Physical Component Summary (PCS), Mental Component Summary (MCS)]. Item-response theory-based response consistency, precision, mean scores, and discriminant validity were examined. A higher percentage of Internet participants responded consistently to the DYNHA SF-36. For each domain, three standard deviations were covered with five items (90% reliability); however, RF and SF scores were less precise at the upper end of measurement (better functioning). Mean scores were slightly higher for the Internet sample, with the exception of VT and MCS. Clinic and Internet participants reporting an AIDS diagnosis had significantly lower mean PCS and PF scores than those without a diagnosis. Additionally, significantly lower RF and BP scores were found for Internet participants reporting an AIDS diagnosis. The measure was well accepted by the majority of participants, although Internet respondents provided lower ratings for the tool's usefulness. The DYNHA SF-36 has promise for measuring the impact of HIV and its treatment in both the clinic setting and through telemonitoring.

  19. Magnitude and meaningfulness of change in SF-36 scores in four types of orthopedic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchbinder Rachelle

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Outcomes General Health Survey (SF-36 is a widely used health status measure; however, limited evidence is available for its performance in orthopedic settings. The aim of this study was to examine the magnitude and meaningfulness of change and sensitivity of SF-36 subscales following orthopedic surgery. Methods Longitudinal data on outcomes of total hip replacement (THR, n = 255, total knee replacement (TKR, n = 103, arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM, n = 74 and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL, n = 62 were used to estimate the effect sizes (ES, magnitude of change and minimal detectable change (sensitivity at the group and individual level. To provide context for interpreting the magnitude of changes in SF-36 scores, we also compared patients' scores with age and sex-matched population norms. The studies were conducted in Sweden. Follow-up was five years in THR and TKR studies, two years in ACL, and three months in APM. Results On average, large effect sizes (ES≥0.80 were found after orthopedic surgery in SF-36 subscales measuring physical aspects (physical functioning, role physical, and bodily pain. Small (0.20–0.49 to moderate (0.50–0.79 effect sizes were found in subscales measuring mental and social aspects (role emotional, vitality, social functioning, and mental health. General health scores remained relatively unchanged during the follow-up. Despite improvements, post-surgery mean scores of patients were still below the age and sex matched population norms on physical subscales. Patients' scores on mental and social subscales approached population norms following the surgery. At the individual level, scores of a large proportion of patients were affected by floor or ceiling effects on several subscales and the sensitivity to individual change was very low. Conclusion Large to moderate meaningful changes in group scores were observed in all SF-36 subscales except General Health

  20. Modification of the SF-36 for a headache population changes patient-reported health status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Jane E; Riess, Constance M; Becker, Werner J

    2012-06-01

    Using standard quality of life and disability measures may not accurately capture these constructs in specific health populations such as headache patients. Modifying the wording of standard measures such as the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) should be considered in order to make them more applicable to specific patient populations. To investigate the possibility that headache patients may not consider their headaches when responding to SF-36 questions pertaining to health, physical health, pain, and bodily pain. The wording of several SF-36 questions were adapted for a headache population by making specific reference to "headaches" when asking people to rate the impact of health issues on their life. The results of the modified "Headache" SF-36 were compared with a similar population of transformed migraine patients who had completed the "Standard" SF-36. Significant differences were found between scores for the "Standard" SF-36 group and the "Headache" SF-36 group across all SF-36 variables except for "General Health." Misinterpretation of the concepts of "health,"physical health,"pain," and "bodily pain," although commonly used by the SF-36 in many populations, could influence responses on this measure, as respondents may not relate their head/headaches to these constructs. To ensure that accurate data are obtained in relation to the quality of life of headache patients, consideration should be given to using a form of the SF-36 that has been modified to allow appropriate interpretation of the questions completed by headache patients. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  1. Hereditary angioedema: health-related quality of life in Canadian patients as measured by the SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Nina Lakhani; Harniman, Elaine; Prior, Nieves; Perez-Fernandez, Elia; Caballero, Teresa; Betschel, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but serious condition characterized by recurrent spontaneous attacks of angioedema affecting superficial tissues of upper respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. The potentially fatal and disfiguring nature of HAE impacts the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with this condition. To assess the health-related quality of life of Canadian patients with HAE using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36v2). Twenty-one patients living in Canada over age 18 with known diagnosis of hereditary angioedema due to C1-INH deficiency (HAE), completed the SF-36v2 (generic HRQoL questionnaire). Results were compared to Canadian normative data by converting the SF-36 scores into z scores. The SF-36v2 showed a significant reduction in general health (p = 0.0063) in patients with HAE when compared with healthy Canadians. Percentage of patients with z scores below 0.8 (large effect) was 47.6% for general health subscale, 33.3% for bodily pain and vitality subscales and 28.6% for physical component scores. Mean scores of eight dimensions ranged from 57.7 to 88.9. Mean Physical and mental component scores were 49.1 and 50.4. Internal consistency of evaluation was demonstrated by Cronbach's alpha value above 0.7 for all scales. General perception of health was significantly different in these patients, compared to Canadian normative data. This study of Canadian patients with HAE shows that General Health is most frequently affected followed by Bodily Pain and Vitality, as measured by SF-36v2. The SF-36v2 offers valuable insight to assess quality of life in patients with HAE, however a larger number of Canadian patients and specific tools for assessment are needed for better evaluation.

  2. SF-36 Shows Increased Quality of Life Following Complete Reduction of Postmastectomy Lymphedema with Liposuction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffner, Mattias; Bagheri, Shirin; Hansson, Emma; Manjer, Jonas; Troëng, Thomas; Brorson, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    Abstracts Background: Arm lymphedema after breast cancer surgery affects women both from physical and psychological points of view. Lymphedema leads to adipose tissue deposition. Liposuction and controlled compression therapy (CCT) reduces the lymphedema completely. Sixty female patients with arm lymphedema were followed for a 1-year period after surgery. The 36-item short-form health survey (SF-36) was used to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Patients completed the SF-36 questionnaire before liposuction, and after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months. Preoperative excess arm volume was 1365 ± 73 mL. Complete reduction was achieved after 3 months and was sustained during follow-up. The adipose tissue volume removed at surgery was 1373 ± 56 mL. One month after liposuction, better scores were found in mental health. After 3 months, an increase in physical functioning, bodily pain, and vitality was detected. After 1 year, an increase was also seen for social functioning. The physical component score was higher at 3 months and thereafter, while the mental component score was improved at 3 and 12 months. Compared with SF-36 norm data for the Swedish population, only physical functioning showed lower values than the norm at baseline. After liposuction, general health, bodily pain, vitality, mental health, and social functioning showed higher values at various time points. Liposuction of arm lymphedema in combination with CCT improves patients HRQoL as measured with SF-36. The treatment seems to target and improve both the physical and mental health domains.

  3. Psychometrics of the Short Form 36 Health Survey Version 2 (SF-36v2) and the Quality of Life Scale for Drug Addicts (QOL-DAv2.0) in Chinese Mainland Patients with Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaina; Zhuang, Guihua; Zhang, Hongmei; Liang, Peifeng; Yin, Juan; Kou, Lingling; Hao, Mengmeng; You, Lijuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To test psychometrics of the Short Form 36 Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2) and the Quality of Life Scale for Drug Addicts (QOL-DAv2.0) in Chinese mainland patients with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Methods A total of 1,212 patients were recruited from two MMT clinics in Xi’an, China. Reliability was estimated with Cronbach’s α and intra-class correlation (ICC). Convergent and discriminant validity was assessed using multitrait-multimethod correlation matrix. Sensitivity was measured with ANOVA and relative efficiency. Responsiveness was evaluated by pre-post paired-samples t-test and standardized response mean based on the patients’ health status changes following 6-month period. Results Cronbach’s α of the SF-36v2 physical and mental summary components were 0.80 and 0.86 (eight scales range 0.73–0.92) and the QOL-DAv2.0 was 0.96 (four scales range: 0.80–0.93). ICC of the SF-36v2 two components were 0.86 and 0.85 (eight scales range: 0.72–0.87) and the QOL-DAv2.0 was 0.94 (four scales range: 0.88–0.92). Convergent validity was lower between the two instruments (γ SF-36v2 physical functioning and vitality scales; QOL-DAv2.0 except psychology scale). Responsiveness was acceptable in the improved health status change (SF-36v2 except vitality scale; QOL-DAv2.0 except psychology and symptoms scales) and deteriorated health status change (SF-36v2 except vitality, social functioning and mental health scales; QOL-DAv2.0 except society scale). Conclusions The SF-36v2 and the QOL-DAv2.0 are valid tools and can be used independently or complementary according to different emphases of health-related quality of life evaluation in patients with MMT. PMID:24278188

  4. Psychometric evaluation of the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF) for patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chia-Ting; Ng, Hong-Son; Yang, Ai-Lun; Lin, Chung-Ying

    2014-09-01

    Quality-of-life (QoL) instruments measure the overall health status of people with schizophrenia, for whom the activities of daily life are often difficult. However, information on the psychometric properties of scores from the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF), 2 commonly used generic QoL instruments in this population, is limited. Thus, we used a multitrait-multimethod analysis plus confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) to examine their psychometric properties. To test the reliability of their scores, we used methods of absolute reliability (standard error of measurement [SEM] and smallest real difference [SRD]) and relative reliability (i.e., intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]). We recruited 100 patients with schizophrenia from a psychiatric hospital in southern Taiwan. All participants filled out the SF-36 and the WHOQOL-BREF at baseline and 2 weeks later. The participants' QoL scores were lower than those of the Taiwan general population (ps SF-36 (comparative fit index [CFI] = .918; incremental fit index [IFI] = .919; Tucker-Lewis index [TLI] = .885) and the WHOQOL-BREF (CFI = .967; IFI = .967; TLI = .900) were acceptable. The SEM and SRD analyses suggested that the total scores of the SF-36 (SEM% = 10.03%; SRD% = 27.80%) and of the WHOQOL-BREF (SEM% = 5.55%; SRD% = 15.40%) were reliable. Also, our results demonstrated that the WHOQOL-BREF scores were more reliable and valid than the SF-36 scores for assessing people with schizophrenia. The scores of both questionnaires were valid and reliable and detected different aspects of QOL in the population with schizophrenia. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Comparisons of the Nottingham Health Profile and the SF-36 health survey for the assessment of quality of life in individuals with chronic stroke Comparação do perfil de saúde de Nottingham e SF-36 na avaliação da qualidade de vida de indivíduos com acidente vascular encefálico crônico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinalva L. Cabral

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Appropriate instruments for the assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQOL domains are useful for planning therapeutic interventions for individuals with stroke. The generic quality of life (QOL instruments, Short Form Health Survey-36 (SF-36 and Nottingham Health Profile (NHP, have been frequently employed in the Brazilian literature. However, the literature is still scarce regarding their psychometric properties when applied to stroke individuals. OBJECTIVES: To compare the Brazilian versions of the SF-36 and the NHP to verify which had better psychometric properties for the assessment of HRQOL in 120 individuals with chronic stroke. METHOD: Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated to examine the comparable domains and total scores of the SF-36 and the NPH; Cronbach's alpha coefficients, to evaluate internal consistency; intra-class correlation coefficients, to assess reliability; and Bland-Altman plots, to assess the levels of agreement, with a significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Significant positive associations were observed between the common domains and the total scores of the SF-36 and the NPH. Ceiling effects were more frequent for the NPH. The total scores of both instruments achieved adequate reliability levels, and the agreement levels were within the normal limits in 95% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: The SF-36 and the NPH were shown to measure similar constructs and proved to be useful measures for the assessment of QOL of chronic stroke subjects. However, the SF-36 yielded better results and appeared to be more appropriate.CONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: Instrumentos adequados para avaliar os vários domínios da qualidade de vida (QV relacionada à saúde (QVRS constituem uma importante abordagem para o planejamento terapêutico e, assim, melhor assistir os indivíduos acometidos pelo acidente vascular encefálico (AVE. Na literatura brasileira, os instrumentos genéricos Formulário Abreviado de Avaliação de Sa

  6. El Cuestionario de Salud SF-36 español: una década de experiencia y nuevos desarrollos The Spanish version of the Short Form 36 Health Survey: a decade of experience and new developments

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    Gemma Vilagut

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: El Cuestionario SF-36 es uno de los instrumentos de Calidad de Vida Relacionada con la Salud (CVRS más utilizados y evaluados. Tras una década de uso este artículo revisa críticamente el contenido, propiedades métricas y nuevos desarrollos de la versión española. Métodos: Revisión de los artículos indizados en Medline (PubMed y en las bases de datos IBECS e IME que han utilizado la versión española del cuestionario. Se seleccionaron los artículos con información sobre modelo de medida, fiabilidad, validez y sensibilidad al cambio del instrumento. Resultados: Se encontraron 79 artículos, 17 de los cuales describían características métricas del cuestionario. En el 96% las escalas superaron el estándar propuesto de fiabilidad (α de Cronbach de 0,7. Las estimaciones agrupadas obtenidas por metaanálisis fueron superiores a 0,7 en todos los casos. El SF-36 mostró buena discriminación entre grupos de gravedad, correlación moderada con indicadores clínicos y alta con otros instrumentos de CVRS. El SF-36 predijo mortalidad y detectó mejoría tras la angioplastia coronaria, la cirugía de hipertrofia prostática benigna o la ventilación domiciliaria no invasiva. Los nuevos desarrollos descritos (puntuaciones basadas en normas, la versión 2, el SF-12 y el SF-8 mejoraron sus propiedades métricas y su interpretación. Conclusiones: El SF-36, conjuntamente con las nuevas versiones desarrolladas, es un instrumento muy adecuado para su uso en investigación y en la práctica clínica.Objective: The Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36 is one of the most widely used and evaluated generic health-related quality of life (HRQL questionnaires. After almost a decade of use in Spain, the present article critically reviews the content and metric properties of the Spanish version, as well as its new developments. Methods: A review of indexed articles that used the Spanish version of the SF-36 was performed in Medline (PubMed, the

  7. Health-related quality of life: validity, reliability, and responsiveness of SF-36, 15D, EQ-5D [corrected] RAQoL, and HAQ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Louise; Sørensen, Jan; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare validity, reliability, and responsiveness of generic and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two samples of patients completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), EuroQol (EQ)-5D.......21-6.47). The longitudinal sample included 80% women, median age 60 years (22-82). Validity: all instruments discriminated between low, moderate, and high DAS28. Reliability: RAQoL and HAQ displayed good repeatability (ICC > 0.95) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > 0.90). Responsiveness: SF-36 bodily pain scale...... and VAS pain were responsive to both improvement and deterioration. CONCLUSION: All instruments were valid measures for HRQOL in RA. The RAQoL and HAQ displayed the best reliability, while the SF-36 bodily pain scale and VAS pain were the most responsive. The choice of instrument should depend...

  8. Longitudinal evaluation of the SF-36 quality of life questionnaire in patients with kidney stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnally, Chester J; Gupta, Amit; Bensalah, Karim; Tuncel, Altug; Raman, Jay; Pearle, Margaret S; Lotan, Yair

    2011-04-01

    Although the 36-Item Short-Form General Health Survey (SF-36) has been utilized to assess quality of life (QoL) in cross-sectional studies, no longitudinal studies have evaluated this instrument in stone formers. Hence, we evaluated the performance of the SF-36 over time in a group of stone formers. From January to May 2007, the SF-36 was administered by independent interviewers to 155 patients with a history of stones, and 96 individuals subsequently completed a second questionnaire at a median interval of 18 months (10.3-28.5 months). Subjects were asked to report changes in stone status, interval procedures, and significant non-stone related changes. Changes in individual and composite scores of SF-36 were compared. Among the 96 patients who completed two SF-36 surveys, 75 patients denied experiencing a stone episode within the month preceding their initial or follow-up SF-36 form. No statistically significant differences in any of the SF-36 domains or the aggregate physical or mental health composite scores over time were noted in these patients. A total of 18 patients reported a stone event within the month preceding completion of the initial questionnaire but no stone event prior to the follow-up survey. No clinically or statistically significant changes in any of the SF-36 domains between the first and follow-up questionnaire were seen among these 18 patients. The results show the stability of the SF-36 over time in patients with no change in their stone status. However, the absence of significant changes in the SF-36 despite a change in stone status suggests that the SF-36 may not be an adequate tool to monitor quality of life over time in stone patients. Validated, disease-specific questionnaires are needed to facilitate comparison of treatment strategies for stone disease.

  9. Reliability and Validity of the SF-36 Among Older Mexican Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, M. Kristen; Ray, Laura; Patel, Kushang; Stoebner-May, Diane; Ottenbacher, Kenneth J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) has been validated in many diverse samples. This measure of health-related quality of life, however, has not yet been examined among older Mexican Americans, a rapidly growing subset of the older population. Design and Methods: We address the validity of the SF-36 in a…

  10. The SF-36 and 6-Minute Walk Test are Significant Predictors of Complications After Major Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awdeh, Haitham; Kassak, Kassem; Sfeir, Pierre; Hatoum, Hadi; Bitar, Hala; Husari, Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    Major surgeries are associated with postoperative morbidity and mortality. Current preoperative evaluation fails to identify patients at increased risk of postoperative complications. This study is aimed to determine whether the Short Form-36 health survey (SF-36) and the 6-minute walk test (6-MWT) are useful predictors of postoperative complications after major surgery. All patients scheduled to undergo major surgery were eligible for the study. Major surgeries include patients undergoing thoracotomy, sternotomy, or upper abdominal laparotomy. The SF-36 health survey and 6-MWT were administered prior to surgery. Spirometry and other preoperative testing, ordered by the surgeon, like echocardiography were included in the study. Patients were then followed-up for postoperative complications for 30 days. One-hundred and seventeen subjects undergoing major surgery were recruited to the study. The mean age was 58 years and 66 (56.4%) were male. Physical Functioning as a component of the SF-36 positively correlated with decreased length of hospital stay (LOS). The 6-MWT had a negative correlation with LOS (p SF-36 (Physical Functioning) and 6-MWT are useful indicators for predicting postoperative complications and LOS. Patients undergoing major surgery answered SF-36 and performed 6-MWT. Physical Functioning as a component of the SF-36 correlated with LOS. The 6-MWT had a negative correlation with LOS and with complication grade. SF-36 and 6-MWT are useful predictors of postoperative complications.

  11. A longitudinal study of the SF-36 version 2 in Friedreich ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, G; Corben, L A; Yiu, E M; Delatycki, M B

    2017-07-01

    The Medical Outcomes Study 36 item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) is one of the most commonly used patient reported outcome measure. This study aimed to examine the relationship between SF-36 version 2 (SF-36V2) summary scores and Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) clinical characteristics, and to investigate the responsiveness of the scale, in comparison with the Friedreich Ataxia Rating Scale (FARS), over 1, 2 and 3 years. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the characteristics of the cohort at baseline and years 1, 2 and 3. Correlations between FRDA clinical characteristics and SF-36V2 summary scores were reported. Responsiveness was measured using paired t tests. We found significant correlations between the physical component summary (PCS) of the SF-36V2 and various FRDA clinical parameters but none for the mental component summary. No significant changes in the SF-36V2 were seen over 1 or 2 years; however, PCS scores at Year 3 were significantly lower than at baseline (-3.3, SD [7.6], P=.01). FARS scores were found to be significantly greater at Years 1, 2 and 3 when compared to baseline. Our findings suggest that despite physical decline, individuals with FRDA have relatively stable mental well-being. This study demonstrates that the SF-36V2 is unlikely to be a useful tool for identifying clinical change in FRDA therapeutic trials. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Outcome measurement in functional somatic syndromes: SF-36 summary scores and some scales were not valid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Andreas; Oernboel, Eva; Licht, Rasmus W; Sharpe, Michael; Fink, Per

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to test the validity of the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scales and summaries in patients with severe functional somatic syndromes (FSS), such as fibromyalgia and irritable bowel syndrome. One hundred twenty patients with severe FSS enrolled in a randomized controlled trial filled in the SF-36 questionnaire. We tested for data quality, central scaling assumptions, and agreement with the conceptual model. Most SF-36 scales were found to be valid; however, three scales (role physical, role emotional, and general health) did not satisfy predefined criteria for construct validity, internal consistency, or targeting to the sample. The correlations between SF-36 scales differed considerably from those reported in the general population. As a consequence, the SF-36 summaries, physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS), did not accurately reflect their underlying scales and were negatively correlated (r=-0.46, 95% CI [-0.60 to -0.31]). Although the SF-36 is a valuable instrument to assess perceived health in patients with severe FSS, there are problems with some of the scales and with the scoring procedure of the summaries. The SF-36 PCS may, therefore, not accurately measure the physical health status of these patients. Alternative summary measures are needed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychometric performance of the CAMPHOR and SF-36 in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twiss, James; McKenna, Stephen; Ganderton, Louise; Jenkins, Sue; Ben-L'amri, Mitra; Gain, Kevin; Fowler, Robin; Gabbay, Eli

    2013-07-12

    The Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) and the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) are widely used to assess patient-reported outcome in individuals with pulmonary hypertension (PH). The aim of the study was to compare the psychometric properties of the two measures. Participants were recruited from specialist PH centres in Australia and New Zealand. Participants completed the CAMPHOR and SF-36 at two time points two weeks apart. The SF-36 is a generic health status questionnaire consisting of 36 items split into 8 sections. The CAMPHOR is a PH-specific measure consisting of 3 scales; symptoms, activity limitations and needs-based QoL. The questionnaires were assessed for distributional properties (floor and ceiling effects), internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha), test-retest reliability and construct validity (scores by World Health Organisation functional classification). The sample comprised 65 participants (mean (SD) age = 57.2 (14.5) years; n(%) male = 14 (21.5%)). Most of the patients were in WHO class 2 (27.7%) and 3 (61.5%). High ceiling effects were observed for the SF-36 bodily pain, social functioning and role emotional domains. Test-retest reliability was poor for six of the eight SF-36 domains, indicating high levels of random measurement error. Three of the SF-36 domains did not distinguish between WHO classes. In contrast, all CAMPHOR scales exhibited good distributional properties, test retest reliability and distinguished between WHO functional classes. The CAMPHOR exhibited superior psychometric properties, compared with the SF-36, in the assessment of PH patient-reported outcome.

  14. Validity and reliability of the SF-36 in Chilean older adults: the ALEXANDROS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lera, Lydia; Fuentes-García, Alejandra; Sánchez, Hugo; Albala, Cecilia

    2013-06-01

    To validate short-form-36 health survey (SF-36) with specific scoring algorithm obtained in a large sample of Chilean older people and to associate quality of life in this sample with social and health related factors. A cross-sectional study on 2,143 community-living subjects aged 60-92 years (33 % men and 67 % women) conducted in Santiago, Chile. Scores in 8 scales of SF-36-physical function (PF), role physical (RP), bodily pain (BP), general health (GH), vitality (VT), social functioning (SF), role emotional (RE) and mental health (MH)-, were calculated. Factor analysis was used to extract two principal factors and logistic regression model was applied to estimate its association with socio-demographic and health variables. The internal consistency of scales was high (Cronbach's alpha 0.86-0.87). Factor analysis retained two factors: mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) components accounting for 65.3 % of total variance (55.3 and 10.0 % respectively). High correlations (0.61-0.94) between MCS and MH, V, RE and SF were obtained. PCS correlated highest (0.72-0.86) with RP, PF and BP. Self-perceived symptoms of depression (GDS-15 ≥5) was the main variable explaining low scores in both MCS and PCS (adjusted OR = 26.9; 95 % CI: 15.3-47.2; OR = 3.4; 95 % CI: 2.1-5.5, respectively). We have demonstrated the reliability and validity of SF-36 questionnaire to evaluate health related quality of life, reporting Chilean-Specific factor score coefficients for MCS and PCS based in national Chilean means and standard deviations for older people. After adjusting by age and gender, the main predictors of low health related QoL in Chilean older people were self-perceived symptoms of depression, the presence of two or more chronic diseases and illiteracy. Important gender inequalities were observed in all of these results, being consistently less favorable in women than in men.

  15. The discriminative properties of the SF-6D compared with the SF-36 and ODI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon, Leah Y; Berven, Sigurd H; Djurasovic, Mladen; Bratcher, Kelly R; Glassman, Steven D

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal cohort. To determine the discriminate validity of the Short Form-6D (SF-6D) compared with the SF-36 in a cohort of patients with lumbar degenerative disorders. Cost-utility studies are important for the demonstration of comparative effectiveness of treatments for lumbar degenerative disorders. Multidimensional patient-reported outcome tools including the SF-36 and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) may be limited to measuring the utility of specific health care states. The evaluation of utility is based on single-index preference-based health state scales, such as the SF-6D. The loss of discriminative properties using a single-index compared with a multidimensional score is unknown. The cohort studies included 1104 patients who had decompression and lumbar fusion with complete ODI, SF-36, and SF-6D data at baseline and 2-year follow-up. Discriminative properties of the 3 measures were compared by computing the effect size (ES) and the standardized response mean (SRM). The larger the ES and SRM, the more sensitive to change the measure is. The relative validity (RV) statistic for each measure was also determined with the SF-6D as reference. Measures that are more sensitive than the SF-6D would have RVs greater than 1.0, those that are less sensitive would have RVs less than 1.0. The ODI had the greatest ES at 0.93 followed by the SF-6D at 0.88 and the SF-36 Physical Composite Score (PCS) at 0.85. The ODI also had the greatest standardized response mean at 0.73 followed by the SF-6D at 0.70 and the SF-36 PCS at 0.57. The RV statistics for both the ODI (1.28) and the SF-36 PCS (1.32) were greater compared with the SF-6D. The SF-36 bodily pain domain had the greatest ES (1.42), SRM (0.81), and RV (1.50). The general health domain had the lowest ES (0.21) and SRM (0.23), whereas mental health domain had the lowest RV. In this cohort of patients, using the single-index SF-6D produces a loss of discriminative properties compared with the SF-36 and ODI. However

  16. Assessment of health-related quality of life using the SF-36 in Chinese cervical spondylotic myelopathy patients after surgery and its consistency with neurological function assessment: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yilong; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yu

    2015-03-26

    We aimed to calculate the responsiveness and statistically prove the reliability of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) in a prospective cohort study. We investigated the profile of mid-term health-related quality of life (QOL) outcome assessments after surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) and determined the consistency of the SF-36 assessments of neurological function. A total of 142 consecutive patients with CSM who underwent surgery were enrolled in the study. QOL and neurological assessments were evaluated before and at 3 months, 1 year, and more than 2 years postoperatively. We subsequently analyzed the reliability and responsiveness of the SF-36 and the QOL profile for its consistency regarding the neurological function assessment. (1) Cronbach's α ranged from 0.73 (for role-emotional) to 0.85 (for physical function). The effect size ranged from 0.57 to 0.93 for SF-36's eight scales. Minimum clinically important differences (MCIDs) in the physical scores (PCS) and mental scores (MCS) were 5.52 and 3.43, respectively. (2) The scores for all SF-36 scale sections indicated that patients with CSM were significantly impaired compared with healthy adults. SF-36 PCS and MCS peaked at 17.7 and 18.9 months after surgery, respectively. (3) At 3 months after surgery, improvements in the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scores significantly correlated only with patients' physical function and bodily pain scores. At 1 year after surgery, improvements in the mJOA scores significantly correlated with physical function, general health, social function, and role-emotional. At the final follow-up, improvements in the mJOA scores significantly correlated with physical function, vitality, and role-emotional. SF-36 is reliable and has moderate responsiveness for evaluating patients with CSM, with MCID at 5.52 for the PCS and at 3.43 for the MCS. The preoperative QOL of the CSM patients was severely impaired compared with

  17. Responsiveness of the SF-36 and WOMAC following periacetabular osteotomy for acetabular dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Darin; Yen, Yi-Meng; Jette, Alan M; Olarsch, Sippy; Kim, Young-Jo

    2011-12-07

    Periacetabular osteotomy is a relatively common reconstructive procedure for the adolescent or young adult with acetabular dysplasia. Although several measures have been used to characterize the outcome, the responsiveness of these measures in this population has not been determined. The purpose of this study was to estimate the responsiveness of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) in patients with acetabular dysplasia treated with periacetabular osteotomy. Eighty-three patients with acetabular dysplasia treated with periacetabular osteotomy between 2000 and 2005 completed the WOMAC and SF-36 both preoperatively and postoperatively. The scores on each domain of these outcome measures were calculated and analyzed to determine the parameters of responsiveness, including the minimal detectable change at the 90% confidence level. The mean duration of follow-up was 1.9 years. Comparison of the effect size, standardized response mean, and minimal detectable change for the SF-36 and WOMAC demonstrated that the WOMAC was more sensitive to change than the SF-36 was, particularly in the physical function domain (minimal detectable change, 9.1) and the pain domain (minimal detectable change, 5.5). Only one of the eight domains of the SF-36, bodily pain, demonstrated a change in outcome that exceeded the minimal detectable change, which was 2.38. Both the WOMAC and the SF-36 demonstrated adequate responsiveness to change over time in patients with acetabular dysplasia treated with periacetabular osteotomy, although the WOMAC was more sensitive to change. These results indicate that the WOMAC is sufficiently responsive to be used as a joint-specific measure for assessing changes following periacetabular osteotomy for the treatment of acetabular dysplasia.

  18. The impact of rheumatoid arthritis on quality-of-life assessed using the SF-36: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcham, Faith; Scott, Ian C; Rayner, Lauren; Hotopf, Matthew; Kingsley, Gabrielle H; Norton, Sam; Scott, David L; Steer, Sophia

    2014-10-01

    The assessment of health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is becoming increasingly common in both research and clinical practice. One of the most widely used tools for measuring HRQoL is the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). We conducted a systematic review examining the impact of RA on HRQoL, measured through the SF-36. MEDLINE and Embase were searched for observational studies reporting mean and standard deviation scores for each domain of the SF-36 in adult RA patients. Studies were reviewed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines, and a random-effects meta-analysis was performed. In total, 31 studies were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis, including 22,335 patients. Meta-analyses found that pooled mean HRQoL score for the SF-36 physical component summary was 34.1 (95% CI: 22.0-46.1) and mental component summary was 45.6 (95% CI: 30.3-60.8). Increased age was associated with reduced physical function and physical component summary (PCS) scores but improved mental health and mental component summary (MCS) scores. Female gender was associated with improved scores on role physical, bodily pain and PCS but reduced mental health and MCS scores. Longer disease duration was associated with improved MCS. Patients with RA have a substantially reduced HRQoL in comparison to both other physical illnesses and in comparison to normative datasets from UK and USA populations. RA has a substantial impact on HRQoL. This supports recent NICE guidelines stipulating that RA patients should be regularly assessed for the impact their disease has on HRQoL and appropriate management provided. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Normative data and discriminative properties of short form 36 (SF-36 in Turkish urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akvardar Yildiz

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SF-36 has been both translated into different languages and adapted to different cultures to obtain comparable data on health status internationally. However there have been only a limited number of studies focused on the discriminative ability of SF-36 regarding social and disease status in developing countries. The aim of this study was to obtain population norms of the short form 36 (SF-36 health survey and the association of SF-36 domains with demographic and socioeconomic variables in an urban population in Turkey. Methods A cross-sectional study. Face to face interviews were carried out with a sample of households. The sample was systematically selected from two urban Health Districts in Izmir, Turkey. The study group consisted of 1,279 people selected from a study population of 46,290 people aged 18 and over. Results Internal consistencies of the scales were high, with the exception of mental health and vitality. Physical health scales were associated with both age and gender. On the other hand, mental health scales were less strongly associated with age and gender. Women reported poorer health compared to men in general. Social risk factors (employment status, lower education and economic strain were associated with worse health profiles. The SF-36 was found to be capable of discriminating disease status. Conclusion Our findings, cautiously generalisable to urban population, suggest that the SF-36 can be a valuable tool for studies on health outcomes in Turkish population. SF-36 may also be a promising measure for research on health inequalities in Turkey and other developing countries.

  20. Psychometric evaluation of the SF-36 (v.2) questionnaire in a probability sample of Brazilian households: results of the survey Pesquisa Dimensões Sociais das Desigualdades (PDSD), Brazil, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguardia, Josué; Campos, Monica R; Travassos, Claudia M; Najar, Alberto L; Anjos, Luiz A; Vasconcellos, Miguel M

    2011-08-03

    In Brazil, despite the growing use of SF-36 in different research environments, most of the psychometric evaluation of the translated questionnaire was from studies with samples of patients. The purpose of this paper is to examine if the Brazilian version of SF-36 satisfies scaling assumptions, reliability and validity required for valid interpretation of the SF-36 summated ratings scales in the general population. 12,423 individuals and their spouses living in 8,048 households were selected from a stratified sample of all permanent households along the country to be interviewed using the Brazilian SF-36 (version 2). Psychometric tests were performed to evaluate the scaling assumptions based on IQOLA methodology. Data quality was satisfactory with questionnaire completion rate of 100%. The ordering of the item means within scales clustered as hypothesized. All item-scale correlations exceeded the suggested criteria for reliability with success rate of 100% and low floor and ceiling effects. All scales reached the criteria for group comparison and factor analysis identified two principal components that jointly accounted for 67.5% of the total variance. Role emotional and vitality were strongly correlated with physical and mental components, respectively, while social functioning was moderately correlated with both components. Role physical and mental health scales were, respectively, the most valid measures of the physical and mental health component. In the comparisons between groups that differed by the presence or absence of depression, subjects who reported having the disease had lower mean scores in all scales and mental health scale discriminated best between the two groups. Among those healthy and with one, two or three and more chronic illness, the average scores were inverted related to the number of diseases. Body pain, general health and vitality were the most discriminating scales between healthy and diseased groups. Higher scores were associated with

  1. Tests of data quality, scaling assumptions, and reliability of the Danish SF-36

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjorner, J B; Damsgaard, M T; Watt, T

    1998-01-01

    We used general population data (n = 4084) to examine data completeness, response consistency, tests of scaling assumptions, and reliability of the Danish SF-36 Health Survey. We compared traditional multitrait scaling analyses to analyses using polychoric correlations and Spearman correlations. ...... with chronic diseases excepted). Concerning correlation methods, we found interesting differences indicating advantages of using methods that do not assume a normal distribution of answers as an addition to traditional methods.......We used general population data (n = 4084) to examine data completeness, response consistency, tests of scaling assumptions, and reliability of the Danish SF-36 Health Survey. We compared traditional multitrait scaling analyses to analyses using polychoric correlations and Spearman correlations...... discriminant validity, equal item-own scale correlations, and equal variances) were satisfactory in the total sample and in all subgroups. The SF-36 could discriminate between levels of health in all subgroups, but there were skewness, kurtosis, and ceiling effects in many subgroups (elderly people and people...

  2. Construct validation of SF-36 Malay version among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Bee Wah; Jannoo, Zeinab; Razali, Nornadiah Mohd; Ghani, Nor Azura Md.; Lazim, Mohamad Alias

    2015-02-01

    The Short Form 36 (SF-36) is one of the most widely used generic health status measure. This study used the SF-36 Health Survey instrument to investigate the functional health and well-being of Malay Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients in Malaysia. The survey was carried out in three local hospitals in Selangor. The method of questionnaire administration was both self-administered and interviewer administered. A total of 354 questionnaires was returned, but only 295 questionnaires with no missing data were analyzed. Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) was used to confirm the first-order and third-order CFA models. The higher order analyses included a third-order CFA models with two second-order factors (physical and mental component) and three second-order factors (physical, general well-being and mental health) and both showed satisfactory model fit indices. This study confirmed the multidimensional factor structure of the SF-36.

  3. Demonstration of the validity of the SF-36 for measurement of the temporal recovery of quality of life outcomes in burns survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Dale; Dawson, Alana; Hankey, Genevieve; Phillips, Michael; Wood, Fiona

    2010-11-01

    Outcome assessment after burn is complex. Determination of quality of life is often measured using the Burns Specific Health Scale (BSHS), a validated tool in the burn population. The SF-36 is a generic quality of life questionnaire that is validated for numerous populations, but not in burns. The aim of the study was to examine the validity of SF-36, using the BSHS as a reference. 280 burn patients were recruited at Royal Perth Hospital. Each completed SF-36 and BSHS-B at regular intervals to 2 years after burn. Regression modelling was used to assess the temporal validity and the relative sensitivity of the measures. SF-36 domains and BSHS-B demonstrated significant associations at all time points (r=0.37-0.76, pSF-36 domains: role physical; bodily pain; social function and role emotional outperformed BSHS-B total score and domain scores. Greater measurement sensitivity was demonstrated in all SF-36 summary and subscales measures (except General Health) when compared to BSHS-B and sub-domains. This study demonstrated SF-36 as a valid measure of recovery of quality of life in the burn patient population. The data suggests that SF-36 components were more sensitive to change than the BSHS-B from ∼1 month after injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliability of the SF-36 in Japanese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and its associations with disease activity and damage: a two-consecutive year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, S; Katsumata, Y; Okamoto, Y; Kawaguchi, Y; Hanaoka, M; Kawasumi, H; Yamanaka, H

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to validate the reliability of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36) among Japanese patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Japanese patients with SLE ( n = 233) completed the SF-36 and other related demographic questionnaires, and physicians simultaneously completed the SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 (SLEDAI-2K) and the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics Damage Index (SDI). Patients were prospectively followed for a repeat assessment the following year. The SF-36 subscales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency (Cronbach's α of 0.85-0.89), and an overall good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.70). The average baseline SF-36 subscale/summary scores except for "bodily pain" were significantly lower than those of the Japanese general population ( p SF-36 subscale/summary scores except for "vitality" and "mental component summary" at baseline, whereas the SLEDAI-2K did not. In the second year, "social functioning" and "mental component summary" of the SF-36 deteriorated among patients whose SDI or SLEDAI-2K score increased (effect sizes SF-36 demonstrated acceptable reliability among Japanese patients with SLE. Health-related quality of life measured by the SF-36 was reduced in Japanese patients with SLE and associated with disease damage, rather than disease activity.

  5. Scoring the SF-36 in Orthopaedics: A Brief Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laucis, Nicholas C; Hays, Ron D; Bhattacharyya, Timothy

    2015-10-07

    The Short Form-36 (SF-36) is the most widely used health-related quality-of-life measure in research to date. There are currently two sources for the SF-36 and scoring instructions: licensing them from Optum, Inc., or obtaining them from publicly available documentation from the RAND Corporation. The SF-36 yields eight scale scores and two summary scores. The physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores were derived using an orthogonal-factor analytic model that forced the PCS and MCS to be uncorrelated, and it has been shown to contribute to an inflation of the MCS in patients with substantial physical disability. Oblique scoring can reduce this inflation of the MCS in orthopaedic studies. Spreadsheets to score the SF-36, along with a copy of the questionnaire, are provided. Copyright © 2015 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated.

  6. [Analysis on reliability and validity of SF-36 scale in urban residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Fan, Wenjie; Yu, Wanqi; Li, Jian; Xu, Dange; Cao, Hongyan; Xi, Ying; Li, Xiuyang

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the reliability and validity of SF-36 scale in urban residents, and provide reference for the selection of suitable health measure tools for urban residents. Multi-stage cluster stratified sampling was conducted to select the residents aged ≥18 years in three urbanized communities of Hangzhou. SF-36 scale was used for the measurement of the quality of life and Spearman-Brown and Cronbach' s α coefficients were used for the evaluation of split-half reliability and internal consistency reliability. The convergent and discriminative validity were evaluated by using the success rate of experiments and the criterion-related validity was evaluated with correlation analysis and non-parameter test. Structural equation modeling was used in the evaluation of contract validity. SF-36 scale had good split-half reliability (R=0.94) and internal-consistency reliability (except for bodily pain and vitality, Cronbach's α range: 0.70-0.91). The convergent validity (88.57%), discriminate validity (successful rates 90.61%) and the criterion-related validity (γs=0.56, the score was consistent with the self-reported health status) were good. Second-order confirmatory factor analysis model was not well-fitted (GFI= 0.721, AGFI= 0.682, CFI= 0.731, RMR= 0.084, RMSEA= 0.098), indicating that the construct validity was poor. The reliability, consolidation validity, discrimination validity and criterion-related validity of SF-36 scale were good, while the construct validity was poor. Improvement is needed when the scale is used for urban residents.

  7. Rasch validation of the SF-36 for assessing the health status of Korean older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hyung; So, Wi-Young

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] To verify, using Rasch analysis, the applicability of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) to elderly Koreans, as this instrument would be useful for determining elderly individuals' overall performance and providing them with health information. [Subjects and Methods] The SF-36 was administered to a sample of 510 individuals aged over 60 living in the Seoul and Gyeonggi areas of South Korea. When testing for goodness-of-fit, we considered items with infit and outfit indexes of over 1.30 or less than 0.70 to be incongruent. SF-36 factors that contained over three items, including physical functioning, role limitations (physical and emotional), mental health, vitality, and general health, were analyzed. Each factor was examined through step calibration of the response categories in the probability curve. [Results] The response categories were found to be appropriate because the adjustment values of each factor increased. We found five items in physical functioning, two items in role limitation-emotion, one item in mental health, and one item in general health to be incongruent; all items in the role limitation-physical and vitality factors were congruent. [Conclusion] We conclude that the SF-36 could be revised to more accurately measure the health status of elderly Koreans.

  8. Measuring Quality of Life in TMD: use of SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Deli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD occur frequently in the population and measuring health-related quality of life may prove to be a very useful complementary measure. The aim of our study was to evaluate both the correlation and the agreement between SF-36 and the Axis II of Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD in the assessment of health-related quality of life in TMD patients.

    Methods: This study was conducted on consecutives patients referred to our Department from 1 July 2007 to 31 January 2008. Each subject completed the Axis II and SF-36 questionnaires. Correlation of the SF-36 vs. the Axis II scales (graded chronic pain, depression, somatization with and without pain, jaw disability checklist was calculated using non-parametric Spearmen coefficient.

    Results: The examined sample was composed by 146 subjects (30 males, 116 females; mean age 35,2 ±14,38 years. There isn’t significant gender difference in age (p=0.083. All the considered Axis II scales are significantly inversely related with all the SF-36 domains.

    Conclusion: Due to the good agreement with Axis II, SF-36 can be used for measuring Health Related Qualit of Life in TMD patients.

  9. SF-36 total score as a single measure of health-related quality of life: Scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Liliane; Carvalho, Fernando Martins

    2016-01-01

    According to the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire developers, a global measure of health-related quality of life such as the "SF-36 Total/Global/Overall Score" cannot be generated from the questionnaire. However, studies keep on reporting such measure. This study aimed to evaluate the frequency and to describe some characteristics of articles reporting the SF-36 Total/Global/Overall Score in the scientific literature. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses method was adapted to a scoping review. We performed searches in PubMed, Web of Science, SCOPUS, BVS, and Cochrane Library databases for articles using such scores. We found 172 articles published between 1997 and 2015; 110 (64.0%) of them were published from 2010 onwards; 30.0% appeared in journals with Impact Factor 3.00 or greater. Overall, 129 (75.0%) out of the 172 studies did not specify the method for calculating the "SF-36 Total Score"; 13 studies did not specify their methods but referred to the SF-36 developers' studies or others; and 30 articles used different strategies for calculating such score, the most frequent being arithmetic averaging of the eight SF-36 domains scores. We concluded that the "SF-36 Total/Global/Overall Score" has been increasingly reported in the scientific literature. Researchers should be aware of this procedure and of its possible impacts upon human health.

  10. Sleep duration and health status self-assessment (SF-36) in the elderly: a population-based study (ISA-Camp 2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Margareth Guimarães; Barros, Marilisa Berti de Azevedo; Alves, Maria Cecília Goi Porto

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between sleep duration and health status among the elderly. A population-based study was carried out with 1,418 elderly individuals using data from the health survey of Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil (ISA-Camp 2008). Linear regression models were used to determine associations between the physical and mental components and subscales of the SF-36 and sleep duration. Elderly male individuals who slept ≤ 6 hours obtained lower mean SF-36 scores for the vitality and mental health scales and the mental component summary than those who slept for seven to eight hours. All scales were negatively associated with sleep duration ≥ 10 hours, except bodily pain. Scores for the mental health, vitality and role-emotional subscales were lower among women who slept for less than five hours. Mental health was negatively associated with ≥ 10 hours of sleep. Sleep deprivation and excessive sleep were associated with poorer health status, with differences between genders, principally in the long duration sleep categories.

  11. Parents' global rating of mental health correlates with SF-36 scores and health services satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Jean K; Tough, Suzanne; Fung, Thomas; Douglas-England, Kathleen; Verhoef, Marja

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys are often used to measure quality of care. However, patient satisfaction may not be a reliable indicator of service quality because satisfaction can be influenced by clients' characteristics such as their health status. Parents of children attending a pediatric neurology clinic completed the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and global ratings of their physical and mental health. They also completed the Client Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), the Measure of Processes of Care (MPOC), and the Family-Centered Care Survey (FCCS). 104 parents completed the survey. The correlation between the global rating of physical or mental health and their corresponding SF-36 scores was high. The majority (88%) of parents were satisfied, with a median CSQ score of 28 (IQR, 24 to 31) and a FCCS score of 4.7 (IQR, 4.2 to 4.9). Logistic regression identified parents' mental health as a significant predictor of client satisfaction (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.14). Given the positive association between parents' mental health and satisfaction with care, it is important to consider mental status as a covariate in interpreting satisfaction surveys. Parents' global rating of mental health appears to be a reasonable indicator of their SF-36 mental scores.

  12. Testing measurement equivalence of the SF-36 questionnaire across patients on hemodialysis and healthy people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra; Jafari, Peyman; Faghih, Marjan; Allahyari, Elahe; Dehesh, Tania

    2015-12-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) occurs when members from different groups respond differently to particular items in a health-related quality of life (HRQoL) questionnaire after controlling for underlying HRQoL construct. This study aimed to assess DIF in the SF-36 questionnaire and its effect on comparing HRQoL scores across patients on HD and healthy people. One hundred fifty patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD) and 642 healthy individuals filled out the Persian version of the SF-36 questionnaire. Multiple-group multiple-indicator multiple-causes (MG-MIMIC) model was used to assess DIF across patients on HD and healthy population. Sixteen out of 36 (44.4 %) items were flagged with DIF. Six out of 16 items (37.5 %) were flagged with uniform DIF, nine items (56.2 %) with non-uniform DIF, and one item (6.2 %) with both uniform DIF and non-uniform DIF. DIF items were associated with all subscales with the exception of the limitation due to physical problems and bodily pain subscales. The significant lower HRQoL scores of patients on HD in comparison with healthy people in the physical functioning and vitality subscales did not change after removing the items with uniform DIF. Our findings revealed that patients on HD and healthy people perceived the meaning of the items in SF-36 questionnaire differently. Although the impact of DIF is minimal, the cross-group comparison across patients on HD and healthy people should be performed with caution.

  13. Quality of life in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis: correlation between QUALEFFO 41 and SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Ferreira, Néville; Arthuso, Michael; da Silva, Raimunda; Pedro, Adriana Orcesi; Pinto Neto, Aarão Mendes; Costa-Paiva, Lucia

    2009-01-20

    To evaluate quality of life (QoL) in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis, correlating the QUALEFFO 41 with the short-form health survey 36 (SF-36) and evaluated some factors that can influenced the QoL of women with osteoporosis. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 220 postmenopausal women (ages ranging from 55 to 80 years). Of the total number, 110 women had osteoporosis and 110 women did not have osteoporosis and these women were age-matched (+/-3 years). Two questionnaires were administered to all subjects for evaluation of QoL: the quality of life questionnaire of the European foundation for Osteoporosis 41 (QUALEFFO 41) and the short-form health survey 36 (SF-36). For data analysis, a significance level of 5% was set (posteoporosis had a worse QoL both in the QUALEFFO 41 and in the SF-36, in all domains studied. Data was adjusted for BMI, race, school education and use of HT (p25 and sedentary lifestyle. In contrast, paid work was associated with a better QoL (CI=95%). Women with osteoporosis had an impaired QoL, especially relating to the physical, psychological and social aspects. The factors associated with QoL were obesity, sedentary lifestyle and paid work.

  14. Measuring Disparities: Bias in the SF-36v2 among Spanish-speaking Medical Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudano, Joseph J.; Perzynski, Adam; Love, Thomas E.; Lewis, Steven A.; Murray, Patrick M.; Huber, Gail; Ruo, Bernice; Baker, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Background Many national surveys have found substantial differences in self-reported overall health (SROH) between Spanish-speaking Hispanics and other racial/ethnic groups. However, because cultural and language differences may create measurement bias, it is unclear whether observed differences in SROH reflect true differences in health. Objectives This study uses a cross-sectional survey to investigate psychometric properties of the SF-36v2 for subjects across four racial/ethnic and language groups. Multi-group latent variable modeling was used to test increasingly stringent criteria for measurement equivalence. Subjects Our sample (N = 1281) included 383 non-Hispanic whites, 368 non-Hispanic blacks, 206 Hispanics interviewed in English and 324 Hispanics interviewed in Spanish recruited from outpatient medical clinics in two large urban areas. Results We found weak factorial invariance across the four groups. However, there was no strong factorial invariance. The overall fit of the model was substantially worse (change in CFI > .02, RMSEA change > .003) after requiring equal intercepts across all groups. Further comparisons established that the equality constraints on the intercepts for Spanish-speaking Hispanics were responsible for the decrement to model fit. Conclusions Observed differences between SF-36v2 scores for Spanish speaking Hispanics are systematically biased relative to the other three groups. The lack of strong invariance suggests the need for caution when comparing SF-36v2 mean scores of Spanish-speaking Hispanics with those of other groups. However, measurement equivalence testing for this study supports correlational or multivariate latent variable analyses of SF-36v2 responses across all four subgroups, since these analyses require only weak factorial invariance. PMID:21430580

  15. Making sense of ambiguity: evaluation in internal reliability and face validity of the SF 36 questionnaire in women presenting with menorrhagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, C; Peto, V; Coulter, A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the face validity and internal reliability of the short form 36 (SF 36) health survey questionnaire in women presenting with menorrhagia. DESIGN--Postal survey of women recruited by their general practitioners followed by interviews of a selected subsample. PATIENTS--348 women who had consulted their general practitioner with excessive menstrual bleeding and completed questionnaires after treatment. 49 women selected from this group were interviewed in depth about their health status, and requested to complete the SF 36 questionnaire. MAIN MEASURES--Subjective accounts of functioning and wellbeing as measured by the eight scales of the SF 36 questionnaire. RESULTS--Data from the postal survey indicated that the ¿general health perceptions¿ and ¿mental health¿ scales of the SF 36 questionnaire had lower internal reliability coefficients than documented elsewhere. In the follow up interviews several questions on the SF 36 questionnaire were commented on as inappropriate or difficult to answer for patients with heavy menstrual bleeding. CONCLUSIONS--Some questions on the SF 36 questionnaire were difficult to answer for this group of patients. Such problems can adversely effect the validity of the measure. It is suggested that comments of patients upon measures such as the SF 36 questionnaire could both determine the appropriateness of such measures for given studies and influence questionnaire design. PMID:10157276

  16. Methods for assessing the reliability of quality of life based on SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Barnhart, Huiman X

    2016-12-30

    The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) has been widely used to measure quality of life. Reliability has been traditionally assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), which is equivalent to Cronbach's alpha theoretically. However, it is a scaled assessment of reliability and does not indicate the extent of differences because of measurement error. In this paper, total deviation index (TDI) is used to interpret the magnitude of measurement error for SF-36, and a new formula for computing TDI for average item score is proposed. The interpretation based on TDI is simple and intuitive by providing, with a high probability, the expected difference that is because of measurement error. We also show that a high value of ICC does not always correspond to a smaller magnitude of measurement error, which indicates that ICC can sometimes provide a false sense of high reliability. The methodology is illustrated with reported SF-36 data from the literature and from real data in the Arthritis Self-Management Program. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. International SF-36 reference values in patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Alexandra; Oldridge, Neil; Höfer, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    International reference data for the SF-36 health survey (version 1) are presented based on a sample of 5508 adult patients with ischemic heart disease. Patients with angina, myocardial infarction and ischemic heart failure completed the SF-36. Data were analyzed by diagnosis, gender, age, region and country within region and presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD), minimum, maximum, 25th, 50th and 75th percentile of the physical (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) measures. Mean PCS scores were reported as being more than one SD below the normal range (standardized mean of 50 ± 10) by more than half of the patient subgroups (59 %) with all of the mean MCS scores falling within the normal range. Patients with angina and patients with ischemic heart failure reported the poorest mean PCS scores with both diagnoses reporting scores more than one SD below the standardized mean. Females, older patients (especially >70 years) and patients from Eastern Europe reported significantly worse mean PCS scores than male, younger and non-Eastern European patients. The cardiac diagnosis had no effect on the mean MCS scores; however, females, younger patients (especially SF-36 values for patients with IHD are useful for clinicians, researchers and health-policy makers when developing improved health services.

  18. Comparison of the short form-12 (SF-12) health status questionnaire with the SF-36 in patients with knee osteoarthritis who have replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Kate E; Feller, Julian A

    2016-08-01

    To investigate whether the performance of the short form-12 (SF-12) health survey is comparable with the longer version SF-36 for measuring health-related quality of life over time in patients with knee osteoarthritis who have joint replacement surgery. Four hundred and seven patients with knee osteoarthritis completed the SF-36 before surgery and at a minimum of 12 months following knee replacement. SF-12 item responses were obtained from the responses given to the SF-36 questionnaire. Correlation coefficients were calculated between SF-12 and SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores and the respective change in scores. Sensitivity to change was determined with the standardised response mean (SRM). PCS and MCS scores were highly correlated between SF-12 and SF-36 versions for both preoperative and post-operative measures (r = 0.90-0.96, p 1.0). Correlations above 0.7 were found between change scores for each SF-36 and SF-12 subscale except General Health (r = 0.55). The SF-12 summary measures and component scores replicate well with the SF-36 and show similar responsiveness to change. The SF-12 appears to be an adequate alternative for use in patients with knee osteoarthritis who undergo replacement surgery, and its brevity should be attractive for both clinicians and patients. I.

  19. Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Quality of Life: Comparison of the SAQLI, FOSQ, and SF-36 Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Graciela E; Goodwin, James L; Vana, Kimberly D; Quan, Stuart F

    2016-01-01

    The impact of sleep on quality of life (QoL) has been well documented; however, there is a great need for reliable QoL measures for persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We compared the QoL scores between the 36-Item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Survey (SF-36), Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI), and Functional Outcomes Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ) in persons with OSA. A total of 884 participants from the Sleep Heart Health Study second examination, who completed the SF-36, FOSQ, and SAQLI, and in-home polysomnograms, were included. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI) at 4% desaturation was categorized as no OSA (30 /hour). QoL scores for each questionnaire were determined and compared by OSA severity category and by gender. Participants were 47.6% male, 49.2% (n=435) had no OSA, 43.2% (n=382) had mild to moderate OSA, and 7.6% (n=67) had severe OSA. Participants with severe OSA were significantly older (mean age = 63.7 years, p SF-36 Physical Component scores (PCS) (45.1) than participants with no OSA (48.5) or those with mild to moderate OSA (46.5, p= .006). When analyzed according to gender, no significant differences were found in males for QoL by OSA severity categories. However, females with severe OSA had significantly lower mean scores for the SAQLI (5.4, p= .006), FOSQ (10.9, p= .02), and SF-36 PCS (37.7, pSF-36 PCS and Mental Component Scores (MCS) were correlated with the FOSQ and SAQLI (r=.37 PCS vs FOSQ; r=.31 MCS vs FOSQ; r=.42 PCS vs SAQLI; r=.52 MCS vs SAQLI; and r=.66 FOSQ vs SAQLI, p<.001 for all correlations). Linear regression analyses, adjusting for potential confounders, indicated that the impact of OSA severity on QoL is largely explained by the presence of daytime sleepiness. The impact of OSA on QoL differs between genders with a larger effect on females and is largely explained by the presence of daytime sleepiness. Correlations among QoL instruments are not high and various instruments may assess different aspects of

  20. Exploring differential item functioning in the SF-36 by demographic, clinical, psychological and social factors in an osteoarthritis population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Beth; Johnston, Marie; Dixon, Diane

    2013-12-11

    The SF-36 is a very commonly used generic measure of health outcome in osteoarthritis (OA). An important, but frequently overlooked, aspect of validating health outcome measures is to establish if items work in the same way across subgroup of a population. That is, if respondents have the same 'true' level of outcome, does the item give the same score in different subgroups or is it biased towards one subgroup or another. Differential item functioning (DIF) can identify items that may be biased for one group or another and has been applied to measuring patient reported outcomes. Items may show DIF for different conditions and between cultures, however the SF-36 has not been specifically examined in an osteoarthritis population nor in a UK population. Hence, the aim of the study was to apply the DIF method to the SF-36 for a UK OA population. The sample comprised a community sample of 763 people with OA who participated in the Somerset and Avon Survey of Health. The SF-36 was explored for DIF with respect to demographic, social, clinical and psychological factors. Well developed ordinal regression models were used to identify DIF items. DIF items were found by age (6 items), employment status (6 items), social class (2 items), mood (2 items), hip v knee (2 items), social deprivation (1 item) and body mass index (1 item). Although the impact of the DIF items rarely had a significant effect on the conclusions of group comparisons, in most cases there was a significant change in effect size. Overall, the SF-36 performed well with only a small number of DIF items identified, a reassuring finding in view of the frequent use of the SF-36 in OA. Nevertheless, where DIF items were identified it would be advisable to analyse data taking account of DIF items, especially when age effects are the focus of interest.

  1. Substitution of SF-36 by SF-12 Among Hong Kong Chinese Older Adults: Secondary Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Paul H; Wong, Frances K Y; Wang, Shao Ling; Chow, Susan K Y

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to examine the appropriateness of substituting the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) by its shortened version (SF-12) in measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in older Chinese population. Secondary analysis of two transitional care management programs, conducted from 2009 to 2012, were analyzed (n = 1188, aged 60-97). Participants were discharged patients with respiratory disease, type 2 diabetes, cardiac disease, and renal disease, and were classified according to number of chronic diseases. SF-36 was administered at baseline and 4-week follow-up. Both overestimations and underestimations of HRQoL by SF-12 were found. Most domain scores of SF-36 and SF-12 were highly correlated (Spearman correlation (ρ) > 0.85), with the exception of General Health (ρ = 0.64) and Vitality subscales (ρ = 0.82). Multiple linear regression adjusted for demographic characteristics showed that the four out of eight domains of SF-36 and SF-12 were equivalent in measuring the difference across numbers of chronic diseases (all p SF-36 survey 4 weeks after baseline showed that SF-12 overestimated the 4-week changes in most of the domains. The use of the Chinese version of SF-12v2 for reporting the change over time in quality of life among medical patients after hospital discharge may need to be interpreted with caution. The SF-12 tends to underestimate the difference when compared with the SF-36.

  2. Is there a relation between AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score and SF-36 in evaluation of Achilles ruptures treated by percutaneous technique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Francesco; Calderazzi, Filippo; Pedrazzi, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The percutaneous technique of Achilles tendon repair seems to offer satisfactory clinical and functional results, although these results have been evaluated mainly using objective rating scales. Recently, some "subjective" rating scales have been combined to evaluate the results of various surgical treatments. The purpose of the present study was to compare the results of a percutaneous Achilles tendon repair evaluated objectively using the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) ankle-hindfoot score and subjectively using the Medical Outcomes Study, short-form, 36-item questionnaire (SF-36) questionnaire. A total of 17 consecutive patients were treated for acute Achilles tendon rupture using the modified percutaneous Ma and Griffith technique. We reviewed all patients with a follow-up of 24 to 64 months (mean 45.5). At the final follow-up visit, the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score of each patient was compared with each 1 of the 8 domains of the SF-36 questionnaire, using the parametric Pearson correlation coefficient and the equivalent nonparametric Spearman rho correlation coefficient. The relation between the objective (AOFAS) and subjective (SF-36) results showed a significant correlation (Pearson's correlation coefficient) between the physical functioning (r = 0.597, p = .011) and bodily pain (r = 0.663, p = .004) SF-36 domains, and a nonstatistically significant correlation with the other SF-36 domains. Very similar results were found using the nonparametric Spearman rho correlation coefficient. These results suggest that regarding pain and function, the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score and SF-36 provide complementary information; therefore, we believe that the SF-36 questionnaire should be used with the AOFAS ankle-hindfoot score for a more complete evaluation of the outcome. Copyright © 2014 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Relationship between body mass index, fat mass and lean mass with SF-36 quality of life scores in a group of fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Laura; Canela, Miguel Angel; Rafecas, Magda

    2012-11-01

    Patients suffering from fibromyalgia (FM) had widespread musculoskeletal pain and stiffness, fatigue, sleep disorders, cognitive impairment and other symptoms, which seriously affects their quality of life (QoL), making it difficult to perform normal activities. Moreover, FM has been associated with a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity than in the general population. Weight reduction has been beneficial in both FM and other rheumatic patients. Obesity and overweight have been pointed as playing a relevant role in FM symptoms; however, it is necessary to find out more about this relationship. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI), fat mass (fM) and lean mass (lM) with quality of life in a group of FM patients. 103 women, with a mean age of 53.74 ± 7.81, and members of different FM patient associations from Spain participated in our study. Some anthropometric measures were taken like weight, height, BMI, body fat mass and lean mass. FM patients QoL was assessed by the Short-Form Health Survey, SF-36 questionnaire. Statistical reports were based on mean, standard deviation and correlation, but significance was tested by nonparametric methods. BMI, fM and lM correlated differently with the specific SF-36 scores. BMI had a high negative correlation with emotional role, fM with bodily pain and lM almost with all scores but specially with emotional role, vitality and physical role. The outcome of this study reveals some interesting relationships, which need to be further investigated to improve the management of FM patients.

  4. Qualidade de vida em pacientes com osteoporose: correlação entre OPAQ e SF-36 Quality of life in patients with osteoporosis: correlation between OPAQ and SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Davel Lemos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: correlacionar o instrumento de avaliação de qualidade de vida específico para osteoporose, o Osteoporosis Assessment Questionnaire (OPAQ, com o instrumento genérico, o The Medical Outcomes Study 36 - Item Short Form Health Survery (SF-36. PACIENTES E MÉTODOS: estudo observacional de corte transversal que incluiu 40 mulheres acima de 60 anos, diagnosticadas com osteoporose. Houve um momento para avaliação e um único examinador. Para a análise estatística foram utilizados coeficiente correlação de Pearson e análise fatorial do OPAQ. RESUTADOS: houve correlação entre os domínios e componentes finais do SF-36 com os domínios do OPAQ. Evidenciou-se que os coeficientes mais altos foram entre o OPAQ Sintomas e os seguintes domínios do SF-36: dor (r=-0,6, aspectos sociais (r=-0,6% e saúde mental (r=-0,5. Quase todos os aspectos do SF-36 se correlacionaram com o OPAQ Sintomas. E, ainda, por análise fatorial do OPAQ, observa-se que os seus 18 componentes representaram 63% de carga fatorial, ou seja, eles explicaram o valor total de impacto da osteoporose na qualidade de vida e agruparam-se em cinco fatores: fator 1 (mobilidade, cuidados próprios, independência e trabalho doméstico, fator 2 (flexibilidade, movimentação e sono, fator 3 (dor nas costas, dor relacionada à osteoporose, fadiga e humor, fator 4 (medo de cair, atividades sociais, apoio familiar e tensão e fator 5 (andar-inclinar, imagem corporal e trabalho. CONCLUSÃO: foi encontrada a correlação esperada entre SF-36 e OPAQ, que é um instrumento de avaliação específico com capacidade para avaliar aspectos específicos e gerais da qualidade de vida nesta população.OBJECTIVE: to correlate the quality of life assessment instrument, specific to osteoporosis, OPAQ (Osteoporosis Assessment Questionnaire, with the generic instrument SF-36 (Item Short Form Health Survey. PATIENTS AND METHODS: the cross sectional observational study included 40 female patients

  5. [Analysis on the correlation between SF-36 and QOL-35 in patients and coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Hua; Yan, Jian-Hua; Sun, Li-Xian; Li, Quan; Wang, Yan-Jie; Zhuang, Xun; Zhang, Ze-Feng; Fan, Zhong-Jie

    2010-11-01

    To analyze the correlation between SF-36 and QOL-35 and the consistency of the two kinds of life-quality questionnaires when evaluating the quality of life in patients with coronary heart disease. 781 in-hospital-patients, who underwent coronary angiography from June 2008 to April 2009, were included in this study. Quality of life was measured by the Chinese versions of SF-36 and QOL-35. Demographic and clinical information were collected. Correlation Analysis was done between SF-36 and QOL-35 in the patients with coronary artery disease. The total score of SF-36 was 62.63 ± 12.47 and the QOL-35 total score was 62.70 ± 9.69. Data from the simple correlation analysis showed that SF-36 and QOL-35 total scores (r = 0.725, P SF-36 physical functioning and QOL-35 independent living capacity (r = 0.933, P SF-36 mental health and QOL-35 mental health(r = 0.132, P SF-36 social function and QOL-35 social function score (r = 0.215, P SF-36 and QOL-35 (r = 0.946, P SF-36 and QOL-35 were consistent in the evaluation on the quality of life, at the overall level.

  6. Correlations Between the SF-36, the Oswestry-Disability Index and Rolland-Morris Disability Questionnaire in Patients Undergoing Lumbar Decompression According to Types of Spine Origin Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Sangbong; Chae, Seungbum

    2017-07-01

    Cross-sectional study. To determine the correlation between SF-36 (a measure for overall health status in patients) and Oswestry-Disability Index (ODI) or Rolland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) confined to spine according to the type of pain from the spine. Data showed moderate correlation between ODI and SF-36 Physical Component Score (PCS), Physical Functioning (PF) (r=-0.46), Physical Role Functioning (RP) (r=-0.284), Bodily Pain (BP) (r=-0.327), and Mental Component Score (MCS), Emotional Role Functioning (r=-0.250), Social Role Functioning (r=0.254), Vitality (r=0.296). Between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2013, a total of 69 patients were enrolled in this study. They were diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis and underwent decompression surgery such as laminotomy in this hospital. The 3 standardized questionnaires (ODI, RMDQ, and SF-36) were given to these patients, at least 1 year after the surgery. ODI and SF-36 had a statistically significant (P=0.001) and moderate correlation. Small correlations were also seen between Physical Functioning (r=-0.46), Physical Role Functioning (r=-0.284), and Bodily Pain (r=-0.327) of SF-36 PCS and ODI, and between Emotional Role Functioning (r=-0.250), Social Role Functioning (r=-0.254), and Vitality (r=-0.296) of SF-36 Mental Component Score and ODI. Items in ODI for the level of pain while standing and traveling were mostly related to axial back pain, while item of lifting was related to referred buttock pain. Sleeping disturbance section in the ODI was mainly caused by radiated leg pain. In addition, RMDQ was also associated to the 3 types of pain. Moderate correlation was found between ODI or RMDQ as a condition-specific outcome and the SF-36, indicating overall health status. ODI was found to be a more adequate measure to evaluate axial back pain rather than referred pain or radiating pain. RMDQ was adequate to measure the health status and to evaluate the 3 types of spine pain. These 3 instruments could

  7. Obstructive sleep apnea and quality of life: comparison of the SAQLI, FOSQ, and SF-36 questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva GE

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The impact of sleep on quality of life (QoL has been well documented; however, there is a great need for reliable QoL measures for persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We compared the QoL scores between the 36-Item Short Form of the Medical Outcomes Survey (SF-36, Calgary Sleep Apnea Quality of Life Index (SAQLI, and Functional Outcomes Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ in persons with OSA. Methods: A total of 884 participants from the Sleep Heart Health Study second examination, who completed the SF-36, FOSQ, and SAQLI, and in-home polysomnograms, were included. The apnea hypopnea index (AHI at 4% desaturation was categorized as no OSA (30 /hour. QoL scores for each questionnaire were determined and compared by OSA severity category and by gender. Results: Participants were 47.6% male, 49.2% (n=435 had no OSA, 43.2% (n=382 had mild to moderate OSA, and 7.6% (n=67 had severe OSA. Participants with severe OSA were significantly older (mean age = 63.7 years, p <.0001, had higher BMI (mean = 34.3 kg/m2, p <.0001 and had lower SF-36 Physical Component scores (PCS (45.1 than participants with no OSA (48.5 or those with mild to moderate OSA (46.5, p= .006. When analyzed according to gender, no significant differences were found in males for QoL by OSA severity categories. However, females with severe OSA had significantly lower mean scores for the SAQLI (5.4, p= .006, FOSQ (10.9, p= .02, and SF-36 PCS (37.7, p<.0001 compared to females with no OSA (6.0, 11.5, 44.6 and those with mild to moderate OSA (5.9, 11.4, 48, respectively. Females with severe OSA also had significantly higher mean BMI (41.8 kg/m2, than females with no OSA (26.5 kg/m2 or females with mild to moderate OSA (30.6 kg/m2, p<.0001. The SF-36 PCS and Mental Component Scores (MCS were correlated with the FOSQ and SAQLI (r=.37 PCS vs FOSQ; r=.31 MCS vs FOSQ; r=.42 PCS vs SAQLI; r=.52 MCS vs SAQLI; and r=.66 FOSQ vs SAQLI, p<.001 for all correlations. Linear regression analyses

  8. Comparison of the responsiveness of the SF-36, the Oxford Knee Score, and the Knee Society Clinical Rating System in patients undergoing total knee replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yu; Lo, Ngai-Nung; Yeo, Seng-Jin; Yang, Kuang-Ying; Yeo, William; Chong, Hwei-Chi; Thumboo, Julian

    2013-11-01

    To compare the responsiveness of the Knee Society (KS) Clinical Rating System, the general health status measure Short Form 36 (SF-36), and both the raw and Rasch-based scores of the condition-specific Oxford Knee Score (OKS) in patients undergoing total knee replacement (TKR) METHODS: Data were prospectively collected as part of routine care from adult patients who underwent TKR between 2001 and 2006. OKS data fit the Rasch partial credit model after removing items regarding limping and kneeling. Responsiveness was assessed using effect size (ES), standardised response mean (SRM), and relative validity (RV). Among 702 patients with complete data at baseline and two follow-ups, the pain subscale of the KS (KS-P), raw-OKS, and Rasch-OKS consistently had higher levels of responsiveness than all eight SF-36 and the other KS subscales. At 6-month follow-up, Rasch-OKS had the largest ES and KS-P had the largest SRM (2.7 and 2.0, respectively). When compared to raw-OKS, the RVs of KS-P, Rasch-OKS, SF-36 bodily pain, and SF-36 physical functioning were 1.1, 0.66, 0.49, and 0.36, respectively. A similar ordering of responsiveness was observed at 24-month follow-up. The OKS and KS-P are more responsive than most SF-36 subscales in TKR patients. Raw-OKS and Rasch-OKS have comparable responsiveness. Different responsiveness indices may give different results.

  9. Validation of the SF-36 as a measure of postoperative recovery after colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonescu, Ioana; Carli, Francesco; Mayo, Nancy E; Feldman, Liane S

    2014-11-01

    Surgery is evolving, and new techniques are introduced to improve "recovery." Postoperative recovery is complex, and evaluating the effectiveness of surgical innovations requires assessment of patient-reported outcomes. The Short-Form-36 (SF-36), a generic health-related quality of life questionnaire, is the most commonly used instrument in this context. The objective of this study was to contribute evidence for the validity of the SF-36 as a metric of postoperative recovery. Data from 128 patients undergoing planned colorectal surgery at one university hospital between 2005 and 2010 were analyzed. In the absence of a gold standard, the responsiveness and construct validity (known groups and convergent) of the SF-36 were evaluated. Standardized response means were computed for the former and non-parametric tests were used to assess the statistical significance of the changes observed. Multiple linear regression was used to determine whether the SF-36 discriminates between patients with versus without complications and between laparoscopic and open surgery (known groups); correlations between the SF-36 and the 6-min walk test, a measure of functional walking capacity (convergent) was investigated with Spearman's rank correlation. The SF-36 was sensitive to clinically important changes. Scores on six of eight domains and the physical component summary score deteriorated postoperatively (SRM 0.86 for the PCS, p SF-36 domains (with differences from -9 (-18, -1), p = 0.04 to -18 (-32, -2), p = 0.03), and scores on all subscales were lower than those in a healthy population (p SF-36 did not differentiate between laparoscopic and open surgery. Physical functioning scores correlated with 6MWT distance at 1 and 2 months (Spearman's r = 0.31 and 0.36, p SF-36 is responsive to expected physiological changes in the postoperative period, demonstrates construct validity, and thus constitutes a valid measure of postoperative recovery after planned colorectal surgery. The SF-36

  10. Bodiless Embodiment: A Descriptive Survey of Avatar Bodily Coherence in First-Wave Consumer VR Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Dooley Joel

    /or agency over their virtual actions even in the absence of visible avatar body parts. This informs research questions and hypotheses for future experimental enquiry into how bodily representation may interplay with user cognition, perceived virtual embodiment (body ownership illusion and sense of agency......This preliminary study surveys whether/which avatar body parts are visible in first-wave consumer virtual reality (VR) applications for the HTC Vive (n = 200). A simple coding schema for assessing avatar bodily coherence (ABC) is piloted and evaluated. Results provide a snapshot of ABC in popular...

  11. The factor structure of the SF-36 in adults with progressive neuromuscular disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Pauline; Martin, Colin R; Petty, Richard K H

    2012-02-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is an important consideration in the care of patients with chronic neuromuscular disorder (NMD). The current study sought to determine the factor structure of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36 (SF-36) version 2 in patients with NMD to determine the appropriateness of using this instrument to assess QoL in this clinical population. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on self-report SF-36 data from 245 individuals diagnosed with NMD. Six structural models of the SF-36 were evaluated against the participants' data. The underlying factor structure of the SF-36 in NMD was observed to be consistent with contemporary theoretical models of the instrument. However, the traditional measurement model of SF-36 performed comparatively poorly. The use of the SF-36 in individuals with NMD can be recommended when eight sub-scales are used and reported. However, the suggestion that the SF-36 can be usefully used as a two-sub-scale measure of physical health and mental health components in this clinical group was not supported because of model fit limitations. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Confiabilidad del cuestionario de salud sf-36 en pacientes post-infarto agudo del miocardio procedentes de Cartagena de Indias, Colombia Reliability of the SF-36 questionnaire in post acute myocardial infarction patients from the city of Cartagena de Indias, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Romero Massa

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Antecedentes: el cuestionario SF-36 es uno de los instrumentos genéricos más utilizados en estudios que miden el impacto sobre la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud en distintas poblaciones de pacientes. Sin embargo, no se conoce su consistencia interna en pacientes con infarto agudo del miocardio en diferentes grupos de edad y sexo de cuatro unidades de cuidado intensivo de Cartagena de Indias, Colombia. Objetivo: determinar la confiabilidad del cuestionario de salud SF-36, para evaluar la calidad de vida de los pacientes post-infarto agudo del miocardio, provenientes de cuatro unidades de cuidado intensivo de la ciudad en mención. Método: se diseñó un estudio metodológico que abordó el desarrollo, así como la validación y evaluación del instrumento. Un grupo de cien pacientes post-infarto diligenció el cuestionario SF-36. La confiabilidad se determinó mediante la prueba de alfa de Cronbach que mide la consistencia de las escalas por patrón de respuestas politómicas. Resultados: la confiabilidad del cuestionario SF-36 de salud obtuvo un coeficiente de alfa de Cronbach con valores que oscilan entre 0,74 a 0,93. Conclusiones: el cuestionario SF-36 es confiable para evaluar la calidad de vida en salud en pacientes que han sufrido un infarto agudo del miocardio.Background: the SF-36 survey questionnaire is one of the most widely used generic instruments in studies for measuring the impact on quality of life in relation to the health in different patient populations. However, its internal consistency in patients with acute myocardial infarction in different age and sex groups of four ICUs in the city of Cartagena, Colombia, is not known. Objective: to determine the reliability of the SF-36 health questionnaire in order to assess life quality in patients after acute myocardial infarct in four ICUs in the city of Cartagena. Method: we designed a methodological study that addressed the development as well as the validation and

  13. Ten-year health-related quality of life in cochlear implant recipients: prospective SF-36 data with SF-6D conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldner, Christoph; Lin, Vincent Y; Honeder, Clemens; Shipp, David; Nedzelski, Julian; Chen, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term impact of cochlear implantation on quality of life measured by the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Scores were also converted to the SF-6D to derive health utility scores. Prospective cohort study. Thirty-two patients undergoing cochlear implantation completed the SF-36 preoperatively, 1 year, and 10 years after cochlear implantation. SF-36 results showed improvements in seven of the eight attributes when preoperative scores where compared with 1- and 10-year results. Between 1 and 10 years postoperatively, six of eight domains deteriorated in scores. When converted to the SF-6D, the mean preoperative utility scores were 0.592 for standard gamble, 0.636 using the ordinal health state paradigm, and 0.579 using the Bayesian technique. Ten years postoperatively, health utility scores were 0.643 (standard gamble), 0.684 (ordinal health state), and 0.6 (Bayesian). Between preoperatively and 10-year postoperatively, improvements were therefore 0.051, 0.048, and 0.021 for standard gamble, ordinal health state, and Bayesian paradigm, respectively. This study establishes the long-term sustained benefits of cochlear implantation on quality of life. Nevertheless, both the SF-36 and SF-6D seem to underestimate the benefit accrued through this intervention. Our data are consistent with others regarding the unsuitability of the SF-36 in benefit assessment, notwithstanding that conversion to the SF-6D is feasible, and the SF-6D seemed to better depict possible benefits from cochlear implantation as compared to the SF-36. © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. PROMIS PF CAT Outperforms the ODI and SF-36 Physical Function Domain in Spine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodke, Darrel S; Goz, Vadim; Voss, Maren W; Lawrence, Brandon D; Spiker, William Ryan; Hung, Man

    2017-06-15

    The Oswestry Disability Index v2.0 (ODI), SF36 Physical Function Domain (SF-36 PFD), and PROMIS Physical Function CAT v1.2 (PF CAT) questionnaires were prospectively collected from 1607 patients complaining of back or leg pain, visiting a university-based spine clinic. All questionnaires were collected electronically, using a tablet computer. The aim of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of the PROMIS PF CAT with the ODI and SF36 Physical Function Domain in the same patient population. Evidence-based decision-making is improved by using high-quality patient-reported outcomes measures. Prior studies have revealed the shortcomings of the ODI and SF36, commonly used in spine patients. The PROMIS Network has developed measures with excellent psychometric properties. The Physical Function domain, delivered by Computerized Adaptive Testing (PF CAT), performs well in the spine patient population, though to-date direct comparisons with common measures have not been performed. Standard Rasch analysis was performed to directly compare the psychometrics of the PF CAT, ODI, and SF36 PFD. Spearman correlations were computed to examine the correlations of the three instruments. Time required for administration was also recorded. One thousand six hundred seven patients were administered all assessments. The time required to answer all items in the PF CAT, ODI, and SF-36 PFD was 44, 169, and 99 seconds. The ceiling and floor effects were excellent for the PF CAT (0.81%, 3.86%), while the ceiling effects were marginal and floor effects quite poor for the ODI (6.91% and 44.24%) and SF-36 PFD (5.97% and 23.65%). All instruments significantly correlated with each other. The PROMIS PF CAT outperforms the ODI and SF-36 PFD in the spine patient population and is highly correlated. It has better coverage, while taking less time to administer with fewer questions to answer. 2.

  15. Comparing SF-36® scores versus biomarkers to predict mortality in primary cardiac prevention patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoud, Rony; Chongthammakun, Vasutakarn; Wu, Yuping; Hawwa, Nael; Brennan, Danielle M; Cho, Leslie

    2017-06-15

    Risk stratification plays an important role in evaluating patients with no known cardiovascular disease (CVD). Few studies have investigated health-related quality of life questionnaires such as the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36®) as predictive tools for mortality, particularly in direct comparison with biomarkers. Our objective is to measure the relative effectiveness of SF-36® scores in predicting mortality when compared to traditional and novel biomarkers in a primary prevention population. 7056 patients evaluated for primary cardiac prevention between January 1996 and April 2011 were included in this study. Patient characteristics included medical history, SF-36® questionnaire and a laboratory panel (total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, ApoA, ApoB, ApoA1/ApoB ratio, homocysteine, lipoprotein (a), fibrinogen, hsCRP, uric acid and urine ACR). The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. A low SF-36® physical score independently predicted a 6-fold increase in death at 8years (above vs. below median Hazard Ratio [95% confidence interval] 5.99 [3.86-9.35], pSF-36® physical score had a c-index of 0.75, which was superior to that of all the biomarkers. It also carried incremental predictive ability when added to non-laboratory risk factors (Net Reclassification Index=59.9%), as well as Framingham risk score components (Net Reclassification Index=61.1%). Biomarkers added no incremental predictive value to a non-laboratory risk factor model when combined to SF-36 physical score. The SF-36® physical score is a reliable predictor of mortality in patients without CVD, and outperformed most studied traditional and novel biomarkers. In an era of rising healthcare costs, the SF-36® questionnaire could be used as an adjunct simple and cost-effective predictor of mortality to current predictors. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Correlation of SF-36 and SF-12 Component Scores in Patients With Diabetic Foot Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K.; Sambenedetto, Tresa L.; Mota, Natalie M.; Suder, Natalie C.; Rosario, Bedda L.

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of patient outcomes is becoming increasingly important in all areas of medicine, including foot and ankle surgery. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-item (SF-36) is widely used as a generic measure of quality of life; however, patients often find answering 36 questions cumbersome. Consequently, the Short Form 12 (SF-12) was developed. We hypothesized that the agreement between the SF-12 and SF-36 component scores would be substantial in patients with diabetic foot disease. We retrospectively reviewed the data from 300 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and foot and ankle pathology who completed the SF-36 questionnaire. Of the 300 patients, 155 (51.7%) had problems directly related to complications of DM and 145 (48.3%) had routine foot complaints that were unrelated to complications of DM. The 12 questions of the SF-12 were abstracted from the SF-36. The overall median score for the SF-36 physical component summary was 34.70 compared with the overall SF-12 physical component summary of 36.75 (p = .04). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93688. The overall median score for the SF-36 mental component summary was 52.40 compared with the overall SF-12 mental component summary of 51.25 (p = .34). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95449. Substantial agreement was observed when comparing the component scores of the SF-12 and the SF-36. From our study results of 300 patients with DM, it appears that the SF-36 and SF-12 are comparable outcome instruments for use with patients with diabetic foot disease. PMID:27052155

  17. Observed Agreement Problems between Sub-Scales and Summary Components of the SF-36 Version 2 - An Alternative Scoring Method Can Correct the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Graeme; Adams, Robert; Wilson, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose A number of previous studies have shown inconsistencies between sub-scale scores and component summary scores using traditional scoring methods of the SF-36 version 1. This study addresses the issue in Version 2 and asks if the previous problems of disagreement between the eight SF-36 Version 1 sub-scale scores and the Physical and Mental Component Summary persist in version 2. A second study objective is to review the recommended scoring methods for the creation of factor scoring weights and the effect on producing summary scale scores Methods The 2004 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey dataset was used for the production of coefficients. There were 3,014 observations with full data for the SF-36. Data were analysed in LISREL V8.71. Confirmatory factor analysis models were fit to the data producing diagonally weighted least squares estimates. Scoring coefficients were validated on an independent dataset, the 2008 South Australian Health Omnibus Survey. Results Problems of agreement were observed with the recommended orthogonal scoring methods which were corrected using confirmatory factor analysis. Conclusions Confirmatory factor analysis is the preferred method to analyse SF-36 data, allowing for the correlation between physical and mental health. PMID:23593428

  18. Health-related quality of life compared to life situation and incontinence in adults with myelomeningocele: is SF-36 a reliable tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu Minh Arnell, Magdalena; Seljee Svedberg, Katarina; Lindehall, Birgitta; Möller, Anders; Abrahamsson, Kate

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adults with myelomeningocele (MMC) measured by SF-36. All individuals (134) with MMC from western Sweden born before 1981, 69 with a median age of 34 years (range 27-50), participated in a telephone interview. Of these, 61 took part in SF-36 (short form 36 health questionnaire survey). The group overall had significant impairment of physical functioning (PF)***, role physical (RP)***, general health GH*** as well as a lower physical component summary (PCS)*** compared to the reference group, while the mental component summary (MCS) was significantly higher***. The comparison between life situation and PCS was favorable for individuals 20-29 years of age or employed. In individuals exhibiting dysphoria during the interview, PCS was negatively affected, however MCS was unaffected. MCS was higher in non-ambulatory individuals* and in those not able to name a negative life experience* (* SF-36 was unaffected by fecal incontinence, partnership and offspring. Our findings indicate that life situation and incontinence were not truly reflected by SF-36. A personal interview with a qualitative approach is likely to be a better tool. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. WOMAC and SF-36: instruments for evaluating the health-related quality of life of elderly people with total hip arthroplasty. A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampazo-Lacativa, Mariana Kátia; Santos, Ariene Angelini dos; Coimbra, Arlete Maria Valente; D'Elboux, Maria José

    2015-01-01

    Quality-of-life results have increasingly been evaluated among patients undergoing joint replacements. The objective of this study was to compare two assessment instruments for health-related quality of life (one generic and the other specific), among elderly patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. Cross-sectional descriptive study in a reference hospital in the region of Campinas. The subjects were 88 elderly outpatients aged 60 years or over who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty. Two instruments for assessing health-related quality of life were applied: the generic Medical Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the specific Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC). Cronbach's alpha and the ceiling and floor effects of the instruments were evaluated. The scores from both instruments showed that issues of a physical nature affected these elderly people's quality of life most. The pain and stiffness dimensions of WOMAC showed ceiling effects and only the functional capacity and pain dimensions of the SF-36 did not show the ceiling effect. The SF-36 presented floor effects in the dimensions of physical and emotional aspects. Cronbach's alpha was considered satisfactory in both instruments (α > 0.70). The floor and ceiling effects that were observed suggest that these instruments may present some limitations in detecting changes to the majority of the SF-36 dimensions, except for functional capacity and pain, and to the pain and stiffness dimensions of WOMAC, when applied to elderly people with total hip arthroplasty.

  20. Changes in quality of life in patients with acromegaly after surgical remission - A prospective study using SF-36 questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujio, Shingo; Arimura, Hiroshi; Hirano, Hirofumi; Habu, Mika; Bohara, Manoj; Moinuddin, F M; Kinoshita, Yasuyuki; Arita, Kazunori

    2017-01-30

    Patients with acromegaly have a compromised quality of life (QOL). Modern surgical techniques have improved the surgical cure rate. However, there are no prospective studies reporting postoperative changes in QOL among patients cured solely by surgery. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of surgery on QOL using the 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) questionnaire. SF-36 scores comprise 3 components: the physical component summary (PCS), the mental component summary (MCS) and role-social component summary (RCS). Included in this prospective cohort were 41 patients with acromegaly who underwent surgery alone and achieved postoperative normalization of insulin-like growth factor-1. All participants completed the SF-36 preoperatively and 1 year postoperatively. Preoperatively, RCS and 4 subscale scores (role physical, social functioning, role emotional, mental health) were below the set standards for the normal population. Postoperatively, the PCS and RCS scores did not change significantly, but the MCS score improved significantly (from 48.1 ± 11.3 to 51.7 ± 8.9, p=0.03). Further we compared the QOL of 26 patients whose nadir GH level was < 0.4 μg/L during postoperative oral glucose tolerance testing (complete remission group) with that of 15 patients whose nadir GH level was ≥ 0.4 μg/L (partial remission group). There were no significant differences between these groups in terms of PCS, MCS, RCS, or any subscale scores. In conclusion, surgical remission mostly improved the participants' mental condition. There was no difference in QOL between patients who achieved the new remission criteria and those who did not.

  1. [Study of quality of life in adults with common variable immunodeficiency by using the Questionnaire SF-36].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Patricia; Miranda-Novales, Guadalupe; Segura-Méndez, Nora Hilda; Del Rivero-Hernández, Leonel; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Cesar; Chávez-García, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life is a multidimensional concept that includes physical, emotional and social components associated with the disease. The use of tools to assess the Quality of Life Health Related (HRQOL) has increased in recent decades. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most commonly diagnosed primary immunodeficiency. To evaluate the quality of life in patients with CVID using the questionnaire SF -36. A descriptive cross-sectional survey included 23 patients diagnosed with CVID, belonging to the Immunodeficiency Clinic Service of Allergology and Clinical Immunology in CMN Siglo XXI, IMSS. The questionnaire SF- 36 validated in Spanish was applied. descriptive statistics with simple frequencies and percentages, inferential statistics: Fisher exact test and ANOVA to compare means. The study involved 23 patients, 14 women (60%) and 9 men (40%), mean age 38.6 ± 14.7 years. The highest score was obtained in 83% emotional role. Dimensions with further deterioration in both genders were: 54% general health, vitality 59% and physical performance 72%. No differences were found regarding gender. The only issue in which statistically significant differences were found in patients with more than 3 comorbidities was change in health status in the past year (p=0.007). Patients with severe comorbidities, such as haematologicaloncological (leukemias, lymphomas, neoplasms), and pulmonary (severe bronchiectasis) showed further deterioration in the aspects of physical performance 73% and 64% emotional role. 65% of patients reported an improvement in health status in 74% in the last year. Adult patients with CVID show deterioration in different dimensions, particularly in the areas of general health, vitality and physical performance. Patients with severe comorbidities such as leukemia, lymphomas, malignancies and severe bronchiectasis show further deterioration in some aspects of quality of life, especially in physical performance and emotional role. A higher number of

  2. Deriving utility scores from the SF-36 health instrument using Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Graeme; Densley, Konstancja; Pallant, Julie F; Mortimer, Duncan; Segal, Leonie

    2008-11-01

    Utility scores for use in cost-utility analysis may be imputed from the SF-36 health instrument using various techniques, typically regression analysis. This paper explored imputation using partial credit Rasch analysis. Data from the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQoL) instrument validation study were re-analysed (n = 996 inpatients, outpatients and a community sample). For each AQoL item, factor analysis identified those SF-36 items forming a unidimensional scale. Rasch analysis located scale logit scores for these SF-36 items. The logit scores were used to assign AQoL item scores. The standard AQoL scoring algorithm was then applied to obtain the utility scores. Many SF-36 items were limited predictors of AQoL items; some items from both instruments obtained disordered thresholds. All imputed scores were consistent with the AQoL model and fell within AQoL score boundaries. The explained variance between imputed and true AQoL scores was 61%. Rasch-imputed mapping, unlike many regression-based algorithms, produced results consistent with the axioms of utility measurement, while the proportion of explained variance was similar to regression-based modelling. Item properties on both instruments implied that some items should be revised using Rasch analysis. The methods and results may be used by researchers needing to impute utility scores from SF-36 health scores.

  3. Health-related quality of life assessed by LupusQoL questionnaire and SF-36 in Turkish patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz-Oner, Sibel; Oner, Can; Dogukan, Fatih Mert; Moses, Toklong Filam; Demir, Kubra; Tekayev, Nazar; Atagunduz, Pamir; Tuglular, Serhan; Direskeneli, Haner

    2016-03-01

    The LupusQoL is a disease-specific health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measure for patients with lupus. We conducted this study to compare the efficiency of LupusQoL-TR (validated Turkish version of the LupusQoL questionnaire) with the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), a generic quality of life (QoL) scale, in Turkish patients with lupus. Both questionnaires were conducted at a single visit to the clinic. Disease activity was measured with the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI). Associations between the LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 domains were examined while also examining age, disease duration, and disease activity for each questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Spearman's correlation coefficients, and Students t test were performed to analyze the data. A total of 113 consecutive patients with lupus (F/M 108:5, mean age 40.6 ± 11.9 years, mean disease duration 8.5 ± 7.0 years) were included, and 69 % of these were active. The median SLEDAI score was 2 (0-24), the mean global LupusQoL-TR score was 60.9 ± 23.3, and the mean SF-36 score was 41.2 ± 9.0. There was a significant correlation between LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 mean scores (r = 0.83; p SF-36 did not correlate with disease activity (r = -0.11; p = 0.244 and r = -0.03; p = 0.721, respectively). LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 questionnaires were beneficial instruments in evaluating HRQoL in Turkish lupus patients. However, LupusQoL-TR and SF-36 were not associated with SLEDAI scores, which suggested that QoL might be affected by other factors besides disease activity, especially in clinically inactive or mildly active patients.

  4. Can the anxiety domain of EQ-5D and mental health items from SF-36 help predict outcomes after surgery for lumbar degenerative disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreon, Leah Y; Djurasovic, Mladen; Dimar, John R; Owens, R Kirk; Crawford, Charles H; Puno, Rolando M; Bratcher, Kelly R; McGraw, Katlyn E; Glassman, Steven D

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Studies have shown that anxious or depressed patients may have poorer outcomes after lumbar fusion. These conclusions were drawn from questionnaires specifically designed to measure anxiety and depression. The objective of this study is to determine if responses to the EQ-5D anxiety/depression domain or the items used to calculate the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) Mental Component Summary (MCS) can predict outcomes after lumbar fusion surgery. METHODS Patients enrolled in the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database from a single center with 1-year follow-up were identified. The outcomes collected include the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), EQ-5D, SF-36, and the back- and leg-pain numeric rating scales (range 0-10). Linear regression modeling was performed to predict the 1-year ODI scores using the EQ-5D anxiety/depression domain and the 14 items used to calculate SF-36 MCS. RESULTS Complete data were available for 312 (88%) of 353 eligible patients. The mean patient age was 58.5 years, 175 (56%) patients were women, and 52 patients were smokers. After controlling for other factors, the item in the SF-36 that asks "Have you felt downhearted and depressed?" is the strongest predictor of the 1-year ODI score (r(2) = 0.191; p = 0.000) and 1-year EQ-5D score (r(2) = 0.205; p = 0.000). Neither the EQ-5D anxiety/depression domain nor the diagnoses of anxiety or depression were predictors of 1-year outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Patient responses to SF-36 item "Have you felt downhearted and depressed?" account for 20% of the variability of the 1-year ODI and EQ-5D scores and can be used by clinicians to screen for anxiety or depression in patients prior to lumbar fusion surgery. Clinicians may offer psychological support to these patients preoperatively in order to improve treatment outcomes.

  5. Quality of life in thalassemia major: Reliability and validity of the Persian version of the SF-36 questionnaire

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    Jafari H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The objective of this study was to determine the reliability and validity of the eight-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 questionnaire translated into Persian for use in Iranian patients with thalassemia major. Materials and Methods: Using a standard "forward-backward" translation procedure, the English language version of the questionnaire was translated into Persian. Two hundred patients with thalassemia major following up at the Thalassemia Center, Dastgheib Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, were enrolled in this study. Statistical Analysis: The reliability and internal consistency of the questionnaire were assessed by Cronbach′s alpha coefficient and Spearman′s correlation, respectively. Validity was assessed using convergent and discriminant validity. Results: The mean age of 200 subjects enrolled in the study was 19.81+/-4.07 years. Reliability analysis showed satisfactory results (Cronbach′s a coefficient = 0.915. The factor analysis showed that all items were in the same groups as previous studies with the exception of role emotional and general health that had been substituted. Most of the patients were in lower range of normal for both mental and physical summary status. Conclusions: The study finding showed that the Persian version of SF-36 questionnaire has a good structural characteristic and is a reliable and valid instrument for measuring the quality of life of patients with thalassemia major.

  6. Fatigue and physical function after hysterectomy measured by SF-36, ergometer, and dynamometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauszus, Finn F; Kallfa, Ervin; Madsen, Mogens R

    2016-07-01

    Information is limited on the early postoperative rehabilitation following hysterectomy. Our purpose was to evaluate the different perioperative modalities of fatigue, pain, quality of life, and physical performance and their time-related. A prospective, follow-up study of a cohort of women undergoing abdominal and vaginal hysterectomy at the Gynecology Department at Herning Hospital, Denmark. Data from 108 women with elective hysterectomy were compared pre- and postoperatively. The fatigue level was scored on a visual analogue scale and SF-36. Objective measurements were performed by dynamometer of hand grip, knee extension strength, and postural stability; further, by ergometer cycle work capacity and by impedance lean body mass. Quality of life was assessed using the SF-36 questionnaire. Patients were examined preoperatively and twice postoperatively. Women lost lean body mass 13 and 30 days after their hysterectomy (p SF-36 revealed that the modality of 'physical functioning' and 'role limitations due to physical problems' remained significantly decreased at the end of the study (p SF-36 30 days after surgery. No impairment of performance was found in physical tests at days 13 and 30 postoperatively.

  7. The Spanish SF-36 in Peru: factor structure, construct validity, and internal consistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Fernando Raul; Bernabé, Eduardo

    2015-03-01

    This study assessed the psychometric properties of the SF-36 questionnaire in a sample of 4344 Peruvian people aged 15 to 64 years. Internal consistency reliability was estimated using Cronbach's α coefficient, construct validity by known-groups comparison defined with respect to key sociodemographic characteristics, and factor structure by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) at item level. Cronbach's α coefficient for the full questionnaire was 0.82 and ranged between 0.66 and 0.92 by scales. The 8 scales discriminated well between sexes, age, and socioeconomic groups. CFA showed that a model with 8 first-order factors and 2 second-order factors (namely, physical and mental health) was a feasible representation of the SF-36 factor structure and had better fit to data than alternative factor structures. The SF-36 showed appropriate psychometric properties regarding internal consistency, construct validity, and factor structure when tested in Peru. Future studies should focus on testing other psychometric properties of the SF-36, such as convergent and discriminant validity, test-retest reliability, and sensitivity to change. © 2012 APJPH.

  8. Quality of life assessments with SF 36 in different musculoskeletal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Figen; Sahin, Fusun; Ergoz, Ernur; Deniz, Emel; Ercalik, Cem; Yucel, Serap Dalgic; Kuran, Banu

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate comparatively the life quality of patients with knee osteoarthritis (KO), shoulder impingement syndrome(SIS), fibromialgia(FM), or osteoporosis(OP) using SF 36 and establish the impact of these diseases on quality of life (QoL). A total of 193 patients with one of the above-mentioned different diagnoses completed SF 36 scale. The diseases were compared to each other with SF 36 subgroups scores. There were significant differences among patients with KO and SIS, SIS and FM with respect to all SF 36 subgroups scores. According to these assessments, QoL of KO and FM patients was worst than that of SIS. The QoL scores of KO patients were worse than those of FM patients considering the physical function, while QoL scores of FM patients were lower than those of KO patients with respect to their general well-being. Scores of physical function and pain in KO patients were lower than those of OP patients. In domains of social functioning, emotional role, energy, pain, and general health condition QoL of FM patients was worse than that of OP patients. Quality of life of SIS patients was less affected than the patients of the other disease groups. In spite of their young age, FM patients appear to be the group with the worst quality of life scores.

  9. Measuring Quality of Life in Pediatric Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Using the SF-36v2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Kershena S; Kwak, Paul E; Hewitt, Hazel; Hollas, Sarah; Ongkasuwan, Julina

    2017-07-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM) consists of intermittent adduction of the vocal folds during inspiration, resulting in stridor and worsened by anxiety and stress. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of PVFM on quality of life in our pediatric patient population. This is a prospective, descriptive survey study. Thirty-nine consecutive patients (ages 12-17 years) presenting with a PVFM diagnosis for respiratory retraining sessions with speech-language pathology were recruited. Patients completed a brief demographic questionnaire and the Short Form 36, version 2, a validated tool for measuring health-related quality of life. There were 31 (79%) girls and 8 (21%) boys with a mean age of 15.5 years. Subjects reported regular participation in competitive extracurricular activities, including track or cross country (30.8%), swimming (17.9%), and cheerleading or dancing (15.4%). Of the patients in the study, 46.2% were straight-A students. On the SF-36 (population averages normalized to a score of 50), the general health of patients with PVFM was better than that of the general population (53.27); however, their physical health limited their role activities more severely (42.82). In addition, a greater proportion of the group with PVFM was at risk for first-stage depression screening when compared with the general population (28% versus 18%). We demonstrate a measurable detrimental impact of PVFM on health-related quality of life. This is consistent with previously published literature showing a preponderance of females with PVFM, most of whom are high achievers academically and athletically. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comparison of SF-36 and SF-12 Composite Scores and Subsequent Hospitalization and Mortality Risks in Long-Term Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianglin; Lin, Shu-Fang; Dean, Sandie Guerra; Lazarus, J. Michael; Hakim, Raymond M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: The Short Form 12 (SF-12) has not been validated for long-term dialysis patients. The study compared physical and mental component summary (PCS/MCS) scores from the SF-36 with those from the embedded SF-12 in a national cohort of dialysis patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: All 44,395 patients who had scorable SF-36 and SF-12 from January 1, 2006, to December 31, 2006, and were treated at Fresenius Medical Care, North America facilities were included. Death and first hospitalization were followed for up to 1 year from the date of survey. Correlation and agreement were obtained between PCS-36 and PCS-12 and MCS-36 and MCS-12; then Cox models were constructed to compare associated hazard ratios (HRs) between them. Results: Physical and mental dimensions both exhibited excellent intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.94. Each incremental point for both PCS-12 and PCS-36 was associated with a 2.4% lower adjusted HR of death and 0.4% decline in HR for first hospitalization (both P 36, whereas both had similar 0.6% lower HR for hospitalization per point (all P SF-12 alone or as part of a larger survey is valid in dialysis patients. Composite scores from the SF-12 and SF-36 have similar prognostic association with death and hospitalization risk. Prospective longitudinal studies of SF-12 surveys that consider responsiveness to specific clinical, situational, and interventional changes are needed in this population. PMID:20019120

  11. Dimensionality and summary measures of the SF-36 v1.6: comparison of scale- and item-based approach across ECRHS II adults population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Mario; Nucera, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was twofold: 1) to confirm the hypothetical eight scales and two-component summaries of the questionnaire Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), and 2) to evaluate the performance of two alternative measures to the original physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS). We performed principal component analysis (PCA) based on 35 items, after optimal scaling via multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), and subsequently on eight scales, after standard summative scoring. Item-based summary measures were planned. Data from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey II follow-up of 8854 subjects from 25 centers were analyzed to cross-validate the original and the novel PCS and MCS. Overall, the scale- and item-based comparison indicated that the SF-36 scales and summaries meet the supposed dimensionality. However, vitality, social functioning, and general health items did not fit data optimally. The novel measures, derived a posteriori by unit-rule from an oblique (correlated) MCA/PCA solution, are simple item sums or weighted scale sums where the weights are the raw scale ranges. These item-based scores yielded consistent scale-summary results for outliers profiles, with an expected known-group differences validity. We were able to confirm the hypothesized dimensionality of eight scales and two summaries of the SF-36. The alternative scoring reaches at least the same required standards of the original scoring. In addition, it can reduce the item-scale inconsistencies without loss of predictive validity.

  12. Responsiveness of the cervical Northern American Spine Society questionnaire (NASS) and the Short Form 36 (SF-36) in chronic whiplash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Felix; Verra, Martin L; Lehmann, Susanne; Gysi, Françoise; Benz, Thomas; Aeschlimann, André

    2012-02-01

    To determine and compare the sensitivity to change of the condition-specific cervical Northern American Spine Society (NASS) and the generic Short Form 36 (SF-36). Prospective cohort study. One hundred and seventy five patients after whiplash injury. Four-week inpatient interdisciplinary pain management programme. MAIN MEASURES, ANALYSIS: Responsiveness of the NASS and the SF-36 was quantified by effect size and standardized response mean and compared within the same construct by the modified Jacknife test. Ability to detect improvement was compared using sensitivities determined from receiver operating characteristics curves. In pain, the NASS was comparable responsive to the SF-36 at the one-month follow-up (n = 175): effect sizes: 0.62 (NASS) versus 0.61 (SF-36), P = 0.914. The NASS was less responsive than the SF-36 in function: 0.23 versus 0.63, P SF-36), P = 0.234; function: 65% versus 80%, P = 0.002; pain+function: 68% versus 78%, P = 0.035. The six-month data were similar. The generic SF-36 was more responsive in function and equally responsive in pain when compared to the condition-specific NASS. The SF-36 can be recommended as a responsive instrument for measurement of pain and function in chronic whiplash syndrome.

  13. Health-related quality of life as measured with the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire in patients with recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu-Xia; Li, Ting; Fan, Shang-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Liang, Yi-Heng; Liu, Ping

    2016-04-29

    Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis (RVVC) has a poor therapeutic outcome and a severe impact on women and their partners, both physically and psychologically. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is significantly affected in patients with RVVC; however, little is known about HRQOL in patients with this disease. In this study, we aim to identify the clinical and mycological characteristics of women with RVVC and the effects of RVVC on women's HRQOL. We designed this study as a comparative cross-sectional study. The Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to measure HRQOL in 102 patients with RVVC and 101 women seeking general health care (controls). RVVC was defined as four or more episodes of proven VVC in the previous 12-month period. VVC was defined as vulvar itching, burning, erythema, vaginal discharge, pseudohyphae or blastoconidia on a wet 10 % potassium hydroxide (KOH)-treated vaginal slide and a positive Candida culture. Group comparisons were conducted with independent samples t test. Correlation analysis was performed on the variables. The mean age at first diagnosis of the patients with RVVC was 30.96 years (SD 5.38), and the mean age of the controls was 29.75 years (SD 5.83; p > 0.05). The duration of the patients' complaints varied from 6 months to 10 years, with a mean duration of 22.28 (±21.75) months. The most common complaints were increased vaginal discharge (102 cases, 100 %), itching (97 cases, 95.1 %), dyspareunia (65 cases, 63.7 %), burning (79 cases, 77.5 %) and erythema (25 cases, 24.5 %). C. albicans was the predominant Candida species (86 strains, 84.3 %) in the patients, followed by C. glabrata (12 strains, 11.8 %). C. parapsilosis (1 strain, 0.9 %), C. tropicalis (1 strain, 0.9 %), C. krusei (1 strain, 0.9 %) and C. lusitaniae (1 strain, 0.9 %). The mean SF-36 dimension scores for physical function, role physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social functioning, role emotional, and mental health were significantly

  14. Differential Item Functioning in the SF-36 Physical Functioning and Mental Health Sub-Scales: A Population-Based Investigation in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lix, Lisa M; Wu, Xiuyun; Hopman, Wilma; Mayo, Nancy; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Liu, Juxin; Prior, Jerilynn C; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Josse, Robert G; Towheed, Tanveer E; Davison, K Shawn; Sawatzky, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Self-reported health status measures, like the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36), can provide rich information about the overall health of a population and its components, such as physical, mental, and social health. However, differential item functioning (DIF), which arises when population sub-groups with the same underlying (i.e., latent) level of health have different measured item response probabilities, may compromise the comparability of these measures. The purpose of this study was to test for DIF on the SF-36 physical functioning (PF) and mental health (MH) sub-scale items in a Canadian population-based sample. Study data were from the prospective Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos), which collected baseline data in 1996-1997. DIF was tested using a multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC) method. Confirmatory factor analysis defined the latent variable measurement model for the item responses and latent variable regression with demographic and health status covariates (i.e., sex, age group, body weight, self-perceived general health) produced estimates of the magnitude of DIF effects. The CaMos cohort consisted of 9423 respondents; 69.4% were female and 51.7% were less than 65 years. Eight of 10 items on the PF sub-scale and four of five items on the MH sub-scale exhibited DIF. Large DIF effects were observed on PF sub-scale items about vigorous and moderate activities, lifting and carrying groceries, walking one block, and bathing or dressing. On the MH sub-scale items, all DIF effects were small or moderate in size. SF-36 PF and MH sub-scale scores were not comparable across population sub-groups defined by demographic and health status variables due to the effects of DIF, although the magnitude of this bias was not large for most items. We recommend testing and adjusting for DIF to ensure comparability of the SF-36 in population-based investigations.

  15. Quality of life after primary septorhinoplasty in deviated- and non-deviated nose measured with ROE, FROI-17 and SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, O C; Wallner, F; Hohenberger, R; Plinkert, P K; Baumann, I

    2017-03-01

    Quality of life measurements are gaining in importance. The present study was conducted with the aim to compare patient satisfaction after septorhinoplasty according to their preoperative nasal deformity. The patients completed two disease-specific questionnaires before their surgery: the Functional Rhinoplasty Outcome Inventory (FROI-17), the Rhinoplasty Outcome Evaluation (ROE) and as a general instrument, the Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). The second measurement was taken during an outpatient examination 12 months after their primary septorhinoplasty. Patients were grouped in nasal axis deviation (NAD), nasal hump deformity (NHD) and NAD plus NHD. Additionally the patients with preoperative NAD and NAD+NHD were combined as deviated nose and compared to the non-deviation group. One hundred and two patients (51 male and 51 female) underwent primary septorhinoplasty. The ROE- and the FROI-17 overall score including all three subgroups showed significant postoperative improvements. Regarding the SF-36, the postoperative score improved significantly only in two scales (role-functioning physical and mental health). Looking at the the different QoL questionnaires, there were significant postoperative differences in regards to deviated versus non-deviated nose in the FROI-17 overall- and FROI-17 subscores (nasal and general symptoms) and in three scales of the SF-36 (vitality, social functioning, role-functioning emotional), showing a greater postoperative satisfaction in the deviated-nose patient. Patients with and without nasal deviation showed improved QoL after their surgery, as measured with the ROE, the FROI-17 and the SF-36. The patients with a nasal deviation showed a significantly better outcome, as measured with the FROI-17, in comparison with the non-deviated group.

  16. Convergent validity between SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Costa Castro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE : To compare the reliability and convergent validity of instruments assessing quality of life in Brazilian older adults. METHODS : Cross-sectional study of 278 literate, community-dwelling older adults attending a municipal university for the elderly in Sao Carlos, SP, Southeastern Brazil between 2006 and 2008. The Brazilian versions of the SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF instruments to assess quality of life were compared. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to estimate reliability and Pearson’s correlation for comparison between the two scales. RESULTS : Most of participants were women (87.8% with a mean age of 63.83±7.22 years. Both scales showed an acceptable internal consistency – WHOQOL-BREF Cronbach’s alpha was 0.832 and SF-36 was 0.868. There was a weak (r ≤ 0.6 correlation between the related fields in the two questionnaires. CONCLUSIONS : The SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF are reliable instruments for clinical and research uses in Brazilian older women. To select one, researchers should consider which aspects of quality of life they aim to capture because of weak convergent validity signs. This study’s results indicate that WHOQOL-BREF may be more relevant to evaluate changes in the quality of life of older women because it prioritizes responses to the aging process and avoids focusing on impairment.

  17. Convergent validity between SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF in older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Paula Costa; Driusso, Patrícia; Oishi, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the reliability and convergent validity of instruments assessing quality of life in Brazilian older adults. METHODS Cross-sectional study of 278 literate, community-dwelling older adults attending a municipal university for the elderly in Sao Carlos, SP, Southeastern Brazil between 2006 and 2008. The Brazilian versions of the SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF instruments to assess quality of life were compared. Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was used to estimate reliability and Pearson’s correlation for comparison between the two scales. RESULTS Most of participants were women (87.8%) with a mean age of 63.83±7.22 years. Both scales showed an acceptable internal consistency – WHOQOL-BREF Cronbach’s alpha was 0.832 and SF-36 was 0.868. There was a weak (r ≤ 0.6) correlation between the related fields in the two questionnaires. CONCLUSIONS The SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF are reliable instruments for clinical and research uses in Brazilian older women. To select one, researchers should consider which aspects of quality of life they aim to capture because of weak convergent validity signs. This study’s results indicate that WHOQOL-BREF may be more relevant to evaluate changes in the quality of life of older women because it prioritizes responses to the aging process and avoids focusing on impairment. PMID:24789638

  18. Depression and anxiety in patients with AL amyloidosis as assessed by the SF-36 questionnaire: experience in 1226 patients().

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Janet; Lo, Stephen; Phillips, Margot; Sun, Fangui; Seldin, David C; Berenbaum, Isidore; Berk, John L; Sanchorawala, Vaishali

    2016-09-01

    Our study examines depression and anxiety in patients with immunoglobulin light chain (AL) amyloidosis, and determines the associations between the mental health problems and patient characteristics (age, gender, race, marital status, alcohol consumption, smoking status and cardiac involvement). Patients with AL amyloidosis who completed the 36-item Short Form General Health Survey (SF-36) during initial evaluation at a single center were studied. The SF-36 included assessments of depression, anxiety, role limitation due to emotional problems and the mental health subscale score. From 1226 patients with AL amyloidosis, 37.0% reported depression and 46.7% reported anxiety. Patients with cardiac amyloidosis reported more anxiety (odds ratio (OR) = 1.29, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.61) and role limitation due to emotional problems (OR = 1.32, 95%CI 1.05-1.65). No significant association between cardiac involvement and depression was found (OR = 1.22, 95%CI 0.97-1.54). Men reported less anxiety (OR = 0.72, 95%CI 0.57-0.91). Patients  ≥65 years experienced greater role limitation (OR = 1.36, 95%CI 1.08-1.71). Smokers (p = 0.019) and women (p = 0.006) scored lower on mental health subscales. Many patients with AL amyloidosis suffer from depression, anxiety and functional limitations. Psychiatric assessment and treatment is important, and further research is needed to clarify the long-term effects of depression and anxiety in AL amyloidosis. This current study was registered in ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00898235.

  19. Psychological factors related to physical, social, and mental dimensions of the SF-36: a population-based study of middle-aged women and men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evalill Nilsson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Evalill Nilsson1, Margareta Kristenson21Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; 2Department of Medicine and Health, Division of Community Medicine/Social Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, SwedenBackground: Measures of health-related quality of life (HRQoL are increasingly used as patient-reported outcome measures in routine health care. Research on determinants and correlates of HRQoL has, therefore, grown in importance. Earlier studies have generally been patient-based and few of them have examined differences between women and men. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between psychological factors and physical, social, and mental dimensions of HRQoL, as measured by the Medical Outcome Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36, in a normal population and to see if observed relations were the same for women and men.Methods: Relations between scale scores for the eight scales of SF-36 and scale scores for Self-esteem, Sense of Coherence, Perceived Control, Depressed Mood (CES-D, and Cynicism were assessed through partial correlation and multiple linear regression analyses on a sample of 505 women and 502 men (aged 45–69 years, stratified for sex and adjusted for effects of age, presence of disease, back pain, lifestyle, and social support.Results: All psychological factors tested, except Cynicism, were significantly correlated to all scales of the SF-36 for women and men (Pearson product-moment partial correlation coefficient, |r| = 0.11–0.63 and |r| = 0.11–0.60, respectively. The addition of psychological factors into regression models resulted in significant total explained variance (R2 changes in all scales of the SF-36 for both sexes. Any discrepancies between women and men pertained more to the strength of relationships rather than the significance of different psychological factors.Conclusion: In this population-based study

  20. [Analysis of quality of life using the generic SF-36 questionnaire in patients with heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Castro, J; Cid Conde, L; Fernández Rodríguez, V; Failde Garrido, J M; Almazán Ortega, R

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the major chronic diseases that affect health related quality of life. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of life in patients with New York Heart Association functional class I-III using the SF-36 on a cohort of survivors of the EPICOUR Study Group and compare the quality of life with the general Spanish population of the same sex and age group. A cohort study, observational, and prospective study was conducted on survivors of the EPICOUR Study Group, on whom a clinical-progression-outcome review was performed along with the SF-36. The quality of life was studied in 50 patients (60% male). The average age of men was 64.8 years and women 68.3. When analyzing the SF-36, it was observed that the results were lower in the physical dimensions than in the mental dimensions. The quality of life worsened with increasing functional class (statistically significant differences for scales of physical functioning, social functioning and borderline significance in mental health scale). When comparing patients with the general population of the same age and sex, patients with heart failure showed lower scores on all scales (significant differences in physical functioning, body pain, vitality, and social role for men, and physical function and emotional role for women). Heart failure causes a negative impact on quality of life, physical functioning, as well as psychosocial function, with the impairment becoming worse with increased functional class. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality of life after pulmonary embolism as assessed with SF-36 and PEmb-QoL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Josien; den Exter, Paul L; Kaptein, Ad A; Andela, Cornelie D; Erkens, Petra M G; Klok, Frederikus A; Douma, Renee A; Mos, Inge C M; Cohn, Danny M; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Huisman, Menno V; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2013-11-01

    Although quality of life (QoL) is recognized as an important indicator of the course of a disease, it has rarely been addressed in studies evaluating the outcome of care for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). This study primarily aimed to evaluate the QoL of patients with acute PE in comparison to population norms and to patients with other cardiopulmonary diseases, using a generic QoL questionnaire. Secondary, the impact of time period from diagnosis and clinical patient characteristics on QoL was assessed, using a disease-specific questionnaire. QoL was assessed in 109 consecutive out-patients with a history of objectively confirmed acute PE (mean age 60.4 ± 15.0 years, 56 females), using the generic Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the disease specific Pulmonary Embolism Quality of Life questionnaire (PEmb-QoL). The score of the SF-36 were compared with scores of the general Dutch population and reference populations with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), congestive heart failure (CHF), a history of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), derived from the literature. Scores on the SF-35 and PEmb-QoL were used to evaluate QoL in the short-term and long-term clinical course of patients with acute PE. In addition, we examined correlations between PEmb-QoL scores and clinical patient characteristics. Compared to scores of the general Dutch population, scores of PE patients were worse on several subscales of the SF-36 (social functioning, role emotional, general health (PSF-36 (P ≤ 0.004) and had scores comparable with patients with AMI the previous year. Comparing intermediately assessed QoL with QoL assessed in long-term follow-up, PE patients scored worse on SF-36 subscales: physical functioning, social functioning, vitality (P<0.05), and on the PEmb-QoL subscales: emotional complaints and limitations in ADL (P ≤ 0.03). Clinical characteristics did not correlate with QoL as measured by PEmb-QoL. Our study demonstrated an impaired QoL in patients after

  2. Comparison of Modes of Administration and Response Options in the Assessment of Subjective Health Using the First Question of SF-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Salome; Severo, Milton; Lopes, Carla

    2012-01-01

    To compare two modes of administration (self-administered; by interviewer) and two response options format (using words; images of "facial-expressions") of the first question of SF-36 (Q1SF-36), and to test its validity. We included 825 participants (20-90 years). Q1SF-36, using words or images, was included in a global questionnaire interview and…

  3. Correlation of SF-36 and SF-12 Component Scores in Patients With Diabetic Foot Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukich, Dane K; Sambenedetto, Tresa L; Mota, Natalie M; Suder, Natalie C; Rosario, Bedda L

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of patient outcomes is becoming increasingly important in all areas of medicine, including foot and ankle surgery. The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-item (SF-36) is widely used as a generic measure of quality of life; however, patients often find answering 36 questions cumbersome. Consequently, the Short Form 12 (SF-12) was developed. We hypothesized that the agreement between the SF-12 and SF-36 component scores would be substantial in patients with diabetic foot disease. We retrospectively reviewed the data from 300 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and foot and ankle pathology who completed the SF-36 questionnaire. Of the 300 patients, 155 (51.7%) had problems directly related to complications of DM and 145 (48.3%) had routine foot complaints that were unrelated to complications of DM. The 12 questions of the SF-12 were abstracted from the SF-36. The overall median score for the SF-36 physical component summary was 34.70 compared with the overall SF-12 physical component summary of 36.75 (p = .04). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.93688. The overall median score for the SF-36 mental component summary was 52.40 compared with the overall SF-12 mental component summary of 51.25 (p = .34). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.95449. Substantial agreement was observed when comparing the component scores of the SF-12 and the SF-36. From our study results of 300 patients with DM, it appears that the SF-36 and SF-12 are comparable outcome instruments for use with patients with diabetic foot disease. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Using structural equation modeling to detect response shifts and true change in discrete variables: an application to the items of the SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdam, Mathilde G E; Oort, Frans J; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2016-06-01

    The structural equation modeling (SEM) approach for detection of response shift (Oort in Qual Life Res 14:587-598, 2005. doi: 10.1007/s11136-004-0830-y ) is especially suited for continuous data, e.g., questionnaire scales. The present objective is to explain how the SEM approach can be applied to discrete data and to illustrate response shift detection in items measuring health-related quality of life (HRQL) of cancer patients. The SEM approach for discrete data includes two stages: (1) establishing a model of underlying continuous variables that represent the observed discrete variables, (2) using these underlying continuous variables to establish a common factor model for the detection of response shift and to assess true change. The proposed SEM approach was illustrated with data of 485 cancer patients whose HRQL was measured with the SF-36, before and after start of antineoplastic treatment. Response shift effects were detected in items of the subscales mental health, physical functioning, role limitations due to physical health, and bodily pain. Recalibration response shifts indicated that patients experienced relatively fewer limitations with "bathing or dressing yourself" (effect size d = 0.51) and less "nervousness" (d = 0.30), but more "pain" (d = -0.23) and less "happiness" (d = -0.16) after antineoplastic treatment as compared to the other symptoms of the same subscale. Overall, patients' mental health improved, while their physical health, vitality, and social functioning deteriorated. No change was found for the other subscales of the SF-36. The proposed SEM approach to discrete data enables response shift detection at the item level. This will lead to a better understanding of the response shift phenomena at the item level and therefore enhances interpretation of change in the area of HRQL.

  5. Exhaustion measured by the SF-36 vitality scale is associated with a flattened diurnal cortisol profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeberg, Sara I; Eek, Frida; Lindbladh, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The possible association between stress-related exhaustion and reduced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is increasingly in focus. The aim of the present study was to examine whether exhaustion measured in a non-patient population is associated with alterations in diurnal...... cortisol profile. The study population included 78 working individuals. The study group was dichotomised into exhausted and non-exhausted groups by means of the SF-36 vitality scale. Salivary cortisol was measured at three times during 1 workday: at awakening, 30min after awakening, and in the evening....... The results showed that diurnal cortisol variation was significantly reduced in exhausted individuals. The difference in cortisol variation was mainly due to lowered morning cortisol in the exhausted group. Differences in cortisol levels at each sampling time or in mean diurnal output of cortisol were...

  6. Validity and Reliability of the Indonesian Version of SF-36 Quality of Life Questionnaire on Patients with Permanent Pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Simon; Yamin, Muhammad; Alwi, Idrus; Setiati, Siti

    2017-01-01

    to construct and validate Indonesian version of SF-36. this is a cross-sectional study, which consist of 2 stages process: 1) language and cultural adaption; and 2) validity and reliability evaluation. We evaluated 32 pacemaker patients during language and cultural adaptation stage and 20 pacemaker patients during validity and reliability evaluation stages from September 2014 to August 2015. We followed cross-cultural adaptation guideline to produce Indonesian version of the questionnaire. The final translated questionnaire was checked by assessing the correlation of SF-36 and 6-minutes walking test (6MWT) and NT pro-BNP result. Indonesian version of SF-36 showed positive correlation between 6MWT result and physical functioning (PF) (r=0.363; p=0.001) and negative correlation between NT pro-BNP score with general health (GH) (r=-0.269; p=0.020) and mental health (MH) (r=-0.271; p=0.019). The internal consistency of Indonesian version of SF-36 questionnaire, which measured by Cronbach's alpha, was good with value of >0.70. Repeatability between day 1 and day 8 was good, with strong positive correlation (r=0.626; p=0.003). the Indonesian version of SF-36 could be used as a general questionnaire to assess quality of life in patients with permanent pacemaker.

  7. Health-related quality of life of patients with cystic fibrosis assessed by the SF-36 questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Jankowska-Polańska, Beata; Wleklik, Marta; Rosinczuk-Tonderys, Joanna; Dębska, Grażyna

    2014-01-01

    healthy individuals with the same sex ratio and similar age ratio as in the group of patients. The analysis of quality of life with the use of the SF-36 questionnaire showed that in general the quality of life of the assessed patients was low. The patients scored on average below 50 in the following subscales: Role Physical (RP), General Health (GP), Vitality (VT), Social Functioning (SF), Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS). In other subscales the results slightly exceeded 50. In women, low quality of life was found in the following subscales: Role Physical, Bodily Pain (BP), General Health (GH), Vitality (VT), Social Functioning (SF), Physical Component Summary (PCS) and Mental Component Summary (MCS). In men, average results below 50 were found in the following subscales: General Health (GH) and Vitality (VT). Moreover, in all subscales, the quality of life assessed by women was lower than that reported by men.Patients > 25 years assessed their quality of life as lower in all subscales except for the Role Emotional (RE) subscale. Statistically significant differences were identified with regards to Vitality (VT) and Mental Health (MH). The analysis of the influence of CF patients' age on their quality of life, conducted with the use of the SF-36 questionnaire, showed that there were statistically significant correlations (p SF), Mental Health (MH) and Physical Component Summary (PCS). The comparison between the QoL of patients with CF and those of a control group of individuals not suffering from CF demonstrated that there were statistically significant differences in all subscales. Patients' quality of life was significantly poorer than quality of life of individuals without CF. 1. Patients with CF generally perceive their quality of life as low.2. There are differences in the assessment of quality of life between women and men.3. The older the patients, the worse their quality of life assessment in most subscales.4. There are critical

  8. Differential Item Functioning in the SF-36 Physical Functioning and Mental Health Sub-Scales: A Population-Based Investigation in the Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Lix

    Full Text Available Self-reported health status measures, like the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (SF-36, can provide rich information about the overall health of a population and its components, such as physical, mental, and social health. However, differential item functioning (DIF, which arises when population sub-groups with the same underlying (i.e., latent level of health have different measured item response probabilities, may compromise the comparability of these measures. The purpose of this study was to test for DIF on the SF-36 physical functioning (PF and mental health (MH sub-scale items in a Canadian population-based sample.Study data were from the prospective Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos, which collected baseline data in 1996-1997. DIF was tested using a multiple indicators multiple causes (MIMIC method. Confirmatory factor analysis defined the latent variable measurement model for the item responses and latent variable regression with demographic and health status covariates (i.e., sex, age group, body weight, self-perceived general health produced estimates of the magnitude of DIF effects.The CaMos cohort consisted of 9423 respondents; 69.4% were female and 51.7% were less than 65 years. Eight of 10 items on the PF sub-scale and four of five items on the MH sub-scale exhibited DIF. Large DIF effects were observed on PF sub-scale items about vigorous and moderate activities, lifting and carrying groceries, walking one block, and bathing or dressing. On the MH sub-scale items, all DIF effects were small or moderate in size.SF-36 PF and MH sub-scale scores were not comparable across population sub-groups defined by demographic and health status variables due to the effects of DIF, although the magnitude of this bias was not large for most items. We recommend testing and adjusting for DIF to ensure comparability of the SF-36 in population-based investigations.

  9. How much does self-reported health status, measured by the SF-36, vary between electoral wards with different Jarman and Townsend scores?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, P; Carlisle, R; Avery, A J

    2000-08-01

    The best way for practices to determine the health status of patients living in areas with different socioeconomic characteristics is unclear. To see how much SF-36 health status varies between electoral wards, how much of this variation can be explained by census-derived Jarman and Townsend scores, and compare the performance of census scores with direct socioeconomic information. A postal questionnaire survey of 3000 randomly selected 18 to 75-year-olds residing in 15 electoral wards and registered with two urban practices. The response rate was 73%. Only two of the eight SF-36 domains were significantly associated with Jarman scores, whereas seven domains were associated with the Townsend score. Of the four socioeconomic variables derived directly from the survey, unemployment showed the weakest association, housing tenure was associated with seven domains, and car ownership and low income were associated with all eight. Income explained between 47% to 71% of the variation across the eight domains. The most accurate predictions about health status were made from direct socioeconomic information. Nonetheless, the association between Townsend score and health status was strong enough to be of practical importance. This study cautions against assuming the Jarman score of a population has a clear relationship with its health status.

  10. [Comparison between risk behaviour for eating disorders and SF-36 and perceived stress among 16-29-year old Danish women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waaddegaard, Mette; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette

    2009-02-23

    To improve the early identification of eating disorders the study tested whether women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have lower health-related life quality and more perceived stress than women without risk behaviour. The study was a representative cross sectional survey of 16-29-year old women and was part of the Danish Health Interview Survey 2005. After the personal interviews, 487 returned the questionnaires, with a response rate of 53.3%. Participants responded to RiBED-8, a screening instrument for identification of risk behaviour for eating disorders and also to SF-36 and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have a lower score on all subscales of SF-36 than women without risk behaviour. The differences are significant for the subscales for mental health, vitality, social function and general health. They also have a higher mean score on PSS than women without risk behaviour. Women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have lower mental health-related life quality than women without risk behaviour. They also experience daily life as more unpredictable, stressful and difficult.

  11. Avaliação da qualidade de vida em pacientes com escoliose idiopática do adolescente após tratamento cirúrgico pelo questionário SF-36 Evaluación de la calidad de vida en pacientes con escoliosis idiopática del adolescente después del tratamiento quirúrgico por el cuestionario SF-36 Health-related quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after surgical treatment by SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Temporal Borges Cabral

    2009-09-01

    . RESULTS: statistical significant differences were noted in four domains of SF-36: physical functioning, bodily pain, role physical and social functioning. In the other four domains, general health, mental health, role emotional and vitality there were no statistical differences in the observed moments. CONCLUSION: in the present study, the patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, submitted to surgical procedures for deformity correction, had better results in the physical aspects assessed by SF-36.

  12. Quality of life assessment in Thai patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis using the SF-36 questionnaire (Thai version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnag, Chaweewan; Leurmarnkul, Watcharee; Jareoncharsri, Perapun; Tunsuriyawong, Prayuth; Assanasen, Paraya; Pawankar, Ruby

    2005-06-01

    The health related quality of life (QOL) of patients with allergic rhinitis and/or conjunctivitis (ARc) as measured by the SF-36 questionnaire, has been shown to be impaired in a similar way to that of asthmatic patients in France and several other countries. We used the SF-36 questionnaire (Thai version) to evaluate the QOL of Thai ARc patients compared to healthy subjects. The SF-36 questionnaire (Thai version) consists of 36 items covering 8 dimensions and one health transition report question. Higher scores indicated better QOL. The internal consistency reliability of the questionnaire was analysed using Cronbach's alpha-coefficient. A total of 705 healthy persons and 900 ARc patients were included in this study. The mean difference of the scores between healthy and ARc groups in each dimension showed higher scores in the healthy group. This difference was statistically significant (p Social Functioning dimension. The internal reliability of the SF-36 questionnaire was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha-coefficient which was above 0.7 for seven of the dimensions; the exception was the Social Functioning dimension. Men were shown to have higher scores than women in several dimensions. In conclusion, this study has confirmed that the SF-36 questionnaire is sensitive enough to discriminate ARc patients from healthy persons with high reliability. QOL of ARc patients was significantly more impaired than healthy persons and hypertensive patients in several dimensions. These findings were similar to reports from other countries using the same instruments. Therefore the SF-36 questionnaire (Thai version) can be a useful tool in evaluating the impact of ARc on a patient's QOL and the improvement in QOL after therapeutic intervention in Thai patients.

  13. Impact of Dentofacial Deformity on Quality of Life: Age and Gender Differences Evaluated Through OQLQ, OHIP and SF36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Carlos Bortoluzzi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to verify the impact of dentofacial deformity on quality of life and explore gender and age differences. Material and Methods: The impact of dentofacial deformity (DD on quality of life was evaluated through questionnaires; Short Form Health Survey (SF36, Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire (OHIP, Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire (OQLQ and a single question answered by a Visual Analogue Scale. Results: Significant differences between male and female patients were observed in domains of OQLQ (oral function, P = 0.006; awareness of facial deformity, P = 0.018; and facial aesthetics, P < 0.001 and OHIP (physical pain, P = 0.006; psychological discomfort, P = 0.007; psychological disability, P = 0.006; and handicap, P = 0.01. Conclusions: The impact of dentofacial deformity was more pronounced in female Brazilian population. Age of patients with dentofacial deformity produced impacts over quality of life in different ways and according to the applied questionnaire and the interaction between age and gender may also produce different impacts in patients with dentofacial deformity. The domains of Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire, Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire and Short Form Health Survey showed unaccepted distances in the pattern of answer rising doubts of their ability to assess quality of life as a generic and broad concept. There is a necessity to create a single quality of life instrument capable to measure impacts with sensitivity and specificity and from a generic concept to condition-specific health problem.

  14. Responsiveness of SF-36 and Lower Extremity Functional Scale for assessing outcomes in traumatic injuries of lower extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shin-Liang; Liang, Huey-Wen; Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Yeh, Tian-Shin

    2014-11-01

    To assess the responsiveness of one generic questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), and one region-specific outcome measure, Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS), in patients with traumatic injuries of lower extremities. A prospective and observational study of patients after traumatic injuries of lower extremities. Assessments were performed at baseline and 3 months later. In-patients and out-patients in two university hospitals in Taiwan. A convenience sample of 109 subjects were evaluated and 94 (86%) were followed. Not applicable. Assessments of responsiveness with distribution-based approach (effect size, standardized response mean [SRM], minimal detectable change) and anchor-based approach (receiver's operating curve analysis, ROC analysis). LEFS and physical component score (PCS) of SF-36 were all responsive to global improvement, with fair-to-good accuracy in discriminating between participants with and without improvement. The area under curve gained by ROC analysis for LEFS and SF-36 PCS was similar (0.65 vs. 0.70, p=0.26). Our findings revealed comparable responsiveness of LEFS and PCS of SF-36 in a sample of subjects with traumatic injuries of lower limbs. Either type of functional measure would be suitable for use in clinical trials where improvement in function was an endpoint of interest. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Are decisions using cost-utility analyses robust to choice of SF-36/SF-12 preference-based algorithm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walton Surrey M

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost utility analysis (CUA using SF-36/SF-12 data has been facilitated by the development of several preference-based algorithms. The purpose of this study was to illustrate how decision-making could be affected by the choice of preference-based algorithms for the SF-36 and SF-12, and provide some guidance on selecting an appropriate algorithm. Methods Two sets of data were used: (1 a clinical trial of adult asthma patients; and (2 a longitudinal study of post-stroke patients. Incremental costs were assumed to be $2000 per year over standard treatment, and QALY gains realized over a 1-year period. Ten published algorithms were identified, denoted by first author: Brazier (SF-36, Brazier (SF-12, Shmueli, Fryback, Lundberg, Nichol, Franks (3 algorithms, and Lawrence. Incremental cost-utility ratios (ICURs for each algorithm, stated in dollars per quality-adjusted life year ($/QALY, were ranked and compared between datasets. Results In the asthma patients, estimated ICURs ranged from Lawrence's SF-12 algorithm at $30,769/QALY (95% CI: 26,316 to 36,697 to Brazier's SF-36 algorithm at $63,492/QALY (95% CI: 48,780 to 83,333. ICURs for the stroke cohort varied slightly more dramatically. The MEPS-based algorithm by Franks et al. provided the lowest ICUR at $27,972/QALY (95% CI: 20,942 to 41,667. The Fryback and Shmueli algorithms provided ICURs that were greater than $50,000/QALY and did not have confidence intervals that overlapped with most of the other algorithms. The ICUR-based ranking of algorithms was strongly correlated between the asthma and stroke datasets (r = 0.60. Conclusion SF-36/SF-12 preference-based algorithms produced a wide range of ICURs that could potentially lead to different reimbursement decisions. Brazier's SF-36 and SF-12 algorithms have a strong methodological and theoretical basis and tended to generate relatively higher ICUR estimates, considerations that support a preference for these algorithms over the

  16. Violations of local stochastic independence exaggerate scalability in Mokken scaling analysis of the Chinese Mandarin SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger; Wang, Wenru; Thompson, David R

    2014-10-29

    Previous work using Mokken scaling analysis with the SF-36 has found subscales appearing to show excellent Mokken scaling properties. However, the values of scalability of the subscales are very large, raising the possibility that these are artificially high and this may result from violations of local stochastic independence between items. To analyse selected items from the Chinese Mandarin form of the SF-36 scale using Mokken scaling and to investigate if violations of local stochastic independence exaggerate scalability. Exploratory Mokken scaling analysis was run using the online public domain software R by entering 19 items from the Chinese Mandarin form of the SF-36 items into the analysis. The items in the resulting scales, judged by the size of Loevinger's coefficient, were analysed for violations of monotony, 95% confidence intervals and invariant item ordering, including inspection of item pair plots. Two Mokken scales were obtained, one including items from the Physical Functioning subscale, and one including items from the Mental Health subscale of the Chinese Mandarin form of the SF-36. The Physical Functioning scale was very strong according to Loevinger's coefficient with high invariant item ordering; the Mental Health scale was moderately strong with weak invariant item ordering. The strength of the Physical Functioning Mokken scale derived from the Chinese Mandarin form of the SF-36 is probably the result of an item chain and item overlap which violate local stochastic independence. This is due to the nature of the items in the Physical Functioning subscale, all of which relate to physical ability and some of which can only be achieved if previous items in the subscale have been achieved.

  17. Chinese SF-36 Health Survey: Translation, Cultural Adaptation, Validation, and Normalisation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L. Li; H. M. Wang; Y. Shen

    2003-01-01

    ...) for use in health related quality of life measurements in China. Design: A three stage protocol was followed including translation, tests of scaling construction and scoring assumptions, validation, and normalisation. Setting...

  18. Sleep duration and health status self-assessment (SF-36 in the elderly: a population-based study (ISA-Camp 2008 Duração do sono e estado de saúde autorreferido (SF-36 em idosos: estudo de base populacional (ISA-Camp 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth Guimarães Lima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the association between sleep duration and health status among the elderly. A population-based study was carried out with 1,418 elderly individuals using data from the health survey of Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil (ISA-Camp 2008. Linear regression models were used to determine associations between the physical and mental components and subscales of the SF-36 and sleep duration. Elderly male individuals who slept > 6 hours obtained lower mean SF-36 scores for the vitality and mental health scales and the mental component summary than those who slept for seven to eight hours. All scales were negatively associated with sleep duration Avaliar a associação da duração do sono com o estado de saúde autorreferido em idosos. Estudo de base populacional que utilizou dados do Inquérito de Saúde de Campinas, São Paulo, Brasil (ISA-Camp 2008, com 1.418 idosos. Modelos de regressão linear foram usados para verificar a associação entre as escalas do SF-36 versão 2 e os dois componentes de medida, com a duração do sono. Homens idosos que dormem 6 horas ou menos apresentam as menores médias dos escores do SF-36, comparando com os que dormem 7 a 8 horas, nos domínios de vitalidade e saúde mental. Todas as escalas apresentaram associação negativa com a duração do sono de 10 horas ou mais, exceto em dor. Nas mulheres, o tempo de sono > 5 horas se associou à pior situação nas escalas de saúde mental, aspectos emocionais e vitalidade. Saúde mental se associou negativamente com a duração do sono de 10 horas ou mais nessa população. A privação do sono e o excesso se associaram ao pior estado de saúde nos idosos, de maneira diferente entre os sexos, principalmente considerando o sono longo.

  19. Health-related quality of life: validity, reliability, and responsiveness of SF-36, 15D, EQ-5D RAQoL, and HAQ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, L.; Sørensen, J.; Østergaard, Morten

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare validity, reliability, and responsiveness of generic and disease specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) instruments in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Two samples of patients completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), EuroQol (EQ)-5D......, 15D, Rheumatoid Arthritis Quality of Life Scale (RAQoL), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and visual analog scales (VAS) for pain, fatigue, and global RA. Validity (convergent, discriminant, and known-groups) was evaluated in a cross-section of 200 patients. Reliability was evaluated...... questionnaires (at 2 weeks and 6 months) included questions about changes in health status since baseline. RESULTS: The cross-sectional sample included 77% women, median age 57 years (range 19-87), disease duration 6 years (0-58), with Disease Activity Score 28-joint count (DAS28) of 3.10 (1...

  20. Beware of the origin of numbers: Standard scoring of the SF-12 and SF-36 summary measures distorts measurement and score interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagell, Peter; Westergren, Albert; Årestedt, Kristofer

    2017-08-01

    The 12-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) is a generic health rating scale developed to reproduce the Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (PCS and MCS, respectively) of a longer survey, the SF-36. The standard PCS/MCS scoring algorithm has been criticized because its expected dimensionality often lacks empirical support, scoring is based on the assumption that physical and mental health are uncorrelated, and because scores on physical health items influence MCS scores, and vice versa. In this paper, we review the standard PCS/MCS scoring algorithm for the SF-12 and consider alternative scoring procedures: the RAND-12 Health Status Inventory (HSI) and raw sum scores. We corroborate that the SF-12 reproduces SF-36 scores but also inherits its problems. In simulations, good physical health scores reduce mental health scores, and vice versa. This may explain results of clinical studies in which, for example, poor physical health scores result in good MCS scores despite compromised mental health. When applied to empirical data from people with Parkinson's disease (PD) and stroke, standard SF-12 scores suggest a weak correlation between physical and mental health (rs .16), whereas RAND-12 HSI and raw sum scores show a much stronger correlation (rs .67-.68). Furthermore, standard PCS scores yield a different statistical conclusion regarding the association between physical health and age than do RAND-12 HSI and raw sum scores. We recommend that the standard SF-12 scoring algorithm be abandoned in favor of alternatives that provide more valid representations of physical and mental health, of which raw sum scores appear the simplest. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Quality of Life in Persons Living With an Ostomy Assessed Using the SF36v2: Mental Component Summary: Vitality, Social Function, Role-Emotional, and Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Thom R

    The purpose of this study was to assess the Mental Health Component of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in community-dwelling persons with ostomies residing in the United States. Cross-sectional descriptive study. Two thousand three hundred twenty-nine participants completed the survey for a response rate of 14.9% and a margin of error of 2.03%. Study respondents were geographically distributed throughout the United States, representing all 50 states. Fifty-three percent of study respondents were male. Respondents had a median age of 65 years. Forty percent have colostomies, 44% are living with ileostomies, and 13% have urostomies. The remaining 3% are living with multiple stomas or they indicated that they were uncertain as to the type of stoma. The SF36v2 was used to assess HRQOL. This instrument was selected because it has the ability to measure HRQOL in a target population and it allows comparison with the general population. Potential participants were randomly selected from an electronic database of 15,591 persons with ostomies. They were contacted by e-mails and provided with an electronic nontransferable link to the survey. This is a secondary analysis of findings from the Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the SF36v2. Persons who have undergone ostomy surgery did not score as well as the general population when components of the MCS were compared. While overall differences were identified, they differed based on age and cumulative MCS score levels. Analysis of individuals found to have significant impairment in MCS scores (cumulative soccer ostomies as lower than scores generated from the general population. However, these findings varied based on age and cumulative MCS score.

  2. A simple visual analog scale for pain is as responsive as the WOMAC, the SF-36, and the EQ-5D in measuring outcomes of revision hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampelis, Vasilis; Ornstein, Ewald; Franzén, Herbert; Atroshi, Isam

    2014-04-01

    Little is known about the comparative performance of patient-reported outcome measures in revision hip arthroplasty. We compared the performance of the WOMAC, the SF-36, the EQ-5D, and a pain-related visual analog scale (VAS) in revision hip arthroplasty. 45 patients with aseptic prosthetic loosening following primary hip arthroplasty completed the WOMAC, the SF-36, the EQ-5D, and a VAS for pain-at baseline and 2 years after revision. Responsiveness of the measures was compared with the effect size (with ≥ 0.8 being considered large). Agreement between scales measuring the same type of outcome (pain or physical function) was assessed with the Bland-Altman method. The mean preoperative scores for the pain and physical function scales of WOMAC and SF-36, EQ-5D index, and VAS for pain improved statistically significantly 2 years after revision. The effect size for the WOMAC pain was 1.7, that for SF-36 pain was 1.4, that for WOMAC physical function was 1.6, that for SF-36 physical function was 0.8, and that for EQ-5D index was 1.2. The VAS for pain had an effect size of 2.1, which was larger than that for SF-36 pain and for the EQ-5D index (p ≤ 0.03) but not for WOMAC pain (p = 0.2). The limits of agreement between WOMAC pain, SF-36 pain, and the VAS scale measuring pain-and between the WOMAC and SF-36 scales measuring physical function-were wide. Internal-consistency reliability was high for the WOMAC and SF-36 scales but low for the EQ-5D. In patients with first-time revision hip arthroplasty done for aseptic loosening, the WOMAC, SF-36, and EQ-5D showed high responsiveness in measuring patient-reported outcomes and the simple VAS for pain performed equally well.

  3. A comparison of the discriminative and evaluative properties of the SF-36 and the SF-6D index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutebi, Alex; Brazier, John E; Walters, Stephen J

    2011-11-01

    To examine whether the move from the multidimensional SF-36 patient-reported outcome measure to the single-index preference-based SF-6D entails a loss in discriminative and evaluative properties, the magnitude of that loss and whether it matters. Retrospective analysis of data from studies that used the SF-36 and the derived SF-6D. The discriminative and evaluative properties of the two measures were compared by calculating effect size (ES), standardized response mean (SRM), and relative validity (RV) statistics using the SF-6D as the reference. Data were available from seven studies and 8,522 subjects. At least one SF-36 scale was always more sensitive than the index. Cross-sectional pooled results showed that physical functioning (RV = 0.19 and ES = 0.13) and PCS (RV = 0.18 and ES = 0.13) were generally most sensitive compared to the index (RV = 0.16 and ES = 0.12). Longitudinal pooled results showed that PCS (RV = 0.20), MCS (RV = 0.17), general health (RV = 0.18), and social functioning (RV = 0.17) were generally more sensitive than the index (RV = 0.14) based on RVs. Longitudinal pooled SRMs were all very small in magnitude. No scale/dimension consistently had the largest RV, ES, or SRM across all conditions studied. Moving from the SF-36 to SF-6D entails losses of a small magnitude in discriminative and evaluative properties.

  4. Validation of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO-DAS II) in Greek and its added value to the Short Form 36 (SF-36) in a sample of people with or without disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenouli, Georgia; Xenoulis, Kostis; Sarafis, Pavlos; Niakas, Dimitris; Alexopoulos, Evangelos C

    2016-07-01

    There is controversy and ongoing interest on the measurement of functionality in the personal and social level. (1) to validate the Greek version of the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule (WHO DAS II) and (2) to determine its added value to the physical and psychological health subscales of the Short Form 36 (SF-36). In a cross-sectional design, data were collected between December 2014 and March 2015 by using three questionnaires (WHO DAS II, SF-36, PSS-14) in a sample of people with disabilities (n = 101) and without disabilities (n = 109) in Athens, Greece. WHO DAS II internal consistency, construct and criterion-related validity were assessed by Cronbach alpha, exploratory factor analysis and correlations; its added value by multivariable linear regression. Cronbach Alpha's were satisfactory for the WHO DAS II, PSS-14 and SF-36 (0.85, 0.88 and 0.96 respectively). Exploratory factor analysis confirmed the existence of one or two factors in people with or without disabilities, respectively. WHO DAS II score showed significant negative correlation with the physical and mental health scale of SF-36 score, especially strong for physical health while was positively related to PSS-14 score. In multivariate analysis mental health appraisal was related to perceived stress in both groups. This study support the validity of the Greek version of WHO DAS II and warranted its use in assessment and follow up of people with disabilities, contributing to the development of suitable policies to cover their needs and providing comparable data with other surveys using the same instrument. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of the quality of life through the SF-36 questionnaire in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Marta Lúcia Guimarães Resende; Brasil-Neto, Joaquim Pereira

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QL) with the use of the SF-36 Questionnaire in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNLBP). Thirty patients with CNLBP were randomly assigned to one of three groups (Iso group (Isostretching), GPR group (Global Postural Reeducation), and the Iso+GPR group. Patients underwent physical therapy assessment with the use of the Vertebral Spine Assessment, the Visual Analog Scale of Pain (VASP), and the SF-36 life quality questionnaire before the first session (first assessment), after three months of treatment (second assessment) and reassessed two months after the final session in the follow-up (third assessment). The results indicated that both physical therapy techniques reduced pain (p<0.001); when the techniques (Iso+GPR) were combined, the reduction in pain was significantly greater; and, in the follow-up assessment, the GPR method was more efficient. As for the QL, physical therapy techniques were effective after the interventions (p<0.001), and the Iso method was more effective when patients were reassessed in the follow-up. We conclude that the physical therapy techniques used in this study were efficient to treat CNLBP in the patients since they reduced pain and increased QL according to the results of the SF-36 questionnaire. Level of Evidence II, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

  6. SF-36 preoperative interest of predicting improvement of quality of life after laparoscopic management of minimal endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, L; Canis, M; Pouly, J-L; Lasnier, C; Jaffeux, P; Aublet-Cuvelier, B; Bourdel, N

    2017-02-01

    To study preoperative thresholds of the SF-36 components above which we can predict a high risk of failure in order to improve the quality of life after surgery for patients with minimal endometriosis. Design: prospective and multicenter observational study between February 2004 and 2011. 167 patients with operated minimal endometriosis. for the Physical Component Summary (PCS) or the Mental Component Summary (MCS) subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire, an improvement defined by an increase of 5 points. evaluation by the SF-36 questionnaire the week before and one year after surgery. Success of surgery measured by an improvement in both components. We found significantly different initial variables between patients with improvement and those without: initial MCS score (P=0.0003), initial PCS score (PSF-36, 50 for PCS and 40 for MCS: above there is a very high risk of failure (86% of failure in our population). Under, the risk of failure remains high (54.3%). Evidence obtained from well-designed cohort or case-control studies, preferably from more than one center or research group. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Health-related quality of life: validity, reliability, and responsiveness of SF-36, 15D, EQ-5D [corrected] RAQoL, and HAQ in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Louise; Sørensen, Jan; Ostergaard, Mikkel

    2008-01-01

    by agreement (intraclass correlation coefficient; baseline to 2 weeks) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha); and responsiveness by the standardized response mean stratified on improvement, status quo, or deterioration in health status after 6 months in 150 patients followed longitudinally. Followup...... questionnaires (at 2 weeks and 6 months) included questions about changes in health status since baseline. RESULTS: The cross-sectional sample included 77% women, median age 57 years (range 19-87), disease duration 6 years (0-58), with Disease Activity Score 28-joint count (DAS28) of 3.10 (1.......21-6.47). The longitudinal sample included 80% women, median age 60 years (22-82). Validity: all instruments discriminated between low, moderate, and high DAS28. Reliability: RAQoL and HAQ displayed good repeatability (ICC > 0.95) and internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha > 0.90). Responsiveness: SF-36 bodily pain scale...

  8. Measuring health-related quality of life in patients with conservatively managed stage 5 chronic kidney disease: limitations of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36: SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erez, Gilli; Selman, Lucy; Murtagh, Fliss E M

    2016-11-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) negatively affects health-related quality of life (HRQoL), which is often measured using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire. However, the adequacy of SF-36 in this population has not been reported. We aimed to determine floor and ceiling effects and responsiveness to change of SF-36 in patients with conservatively managed stage 5 CKD. SF-36 data were collected prospectively. Floor and ceiling effects were estimated for each SF-36 scale and summary measure based on raw scores. The minimal clinically important difference (MCID) was estimated using a combination of anchor-based and distribution-based methods. Responsiveness to change was assessed by comparing MCID for each scale and summary measure to its smallest detectable change. SF-36 data were available for 73 of the 74 study participants. Using baseline data, floor and/or ceiling effects were detected for 3 of the 8 SF-36 scales. The anchor-based estimation of MCID based on differences in baseline functional status yielded the most reliable results. For the physical component summary, MCID was estimated at 5.7 points. Whilst the two SF-36 summary measures were responsive to change and free of floor and/or ceiling effects, six of the eight scales were not. This small study of patients with conservatively managed stage 5 CKD found that only the summary measures of SF-36 and 2 of its 8 scales can be used to assess changes in HRQoL over time. These findings suggest that in this population, alternative HRQoL assessment tools should be considered for future studies.

  9. Health-related quality of life in Brazil: normative data for the SF-36 in a general population sample in the south of the country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Luciane Nascimento; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida; Oliveira, Michele Rosana; Camey, Suzi Alves; Hoffmann, Juliana Feliciati; Bagattini, Angela Maria; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to provide normative SF-36 scores in a general population sample in Brazil and to describe differences in mean scores according to socio-demographic characteristics. The SF-36 questionnaire was distributed to a randomly selected sample of the general population of Porto Alegre in the State of Rio Grande do Sul. The response rate was 68% and 755 subjects were included (38% male, 62% female). Lower health status was revealed among females in the 30 to 44 year age bracket, from the lower income class, with less education and self-reported chronic medical conditions. The results and percentiles of scores of the SF-36 are reported as normative data for the general population. The SF-36 was an acceptable and practical instrument for measuring health-related quality of life in a sample of Brazilians. The results of this study can be useful for researchers using the SF-36 questionnaire in other groups to compare the scores with normative data. The SF-36 may prove a valuable tool for discovering vulnerable groups in epidemiological studies due to the ability to discriminate between different population subgroups.

  10. Examining unidimensionality and improving reliability for the eight subscales of the SF-36 in opioid-dependent patients using Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Yu; Shih, Ching-Lin; Yu, Wan-Hui; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsi; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2015-02-01

    The Medical Outcome Study Short Form 36 (SF-36) is one of the most commonly used questionnaires for monitoring the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) of opioid-dependent patients. However, the unidimensionality and reliability of the SF-36 have not been verified in opioid-dependent patients. The aim of this study was to examine the unidimensionality and to improve the test reliability of the SF-36 for use in opioid-dependent patients. A total of 583 opioid-dependent patients were recruited in the study. Unidimensionality was examined by conducting unidimensional Rasch analysis. Item fit statistics and principle component analysis were used to check the item-model fit in each of the eight subscales of the SF-36. Reliability was evaluated by applying both unidimensional and multidimensional Rasch analyses. After three misfitting items were excluded, the remaining items of each subscale in the SF-36 represented a single construct. The test reliabilities (0.80-0.87) yielded by the multidimensional approach were much higher than those (0.68-0.82) produced by the unidimensional approach. The remaining 32 items of the SF-36 are appropriate for evaluating the HRQOL in opioid-dependent patients in terms of unidimensionality. Additionally, the test scores produced by the multidimensional approach were more accurate than those obtained by the unidimensional approach.

  11. A study of two generic health-related quality of life questionnaires--Nottingham Health Profile and Short-Form 36 Health Survey--and of coping in patients with sensory hyperreactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Ternesten-Hasséus, Ewa

    2013-10-29

    Sensory hyperreactivity (SHR) is one explanation for airway symptoms induced by chemicals and scents. Little is known about health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and coping, in this group of patients. A study was done in patients with SHR to (1) compare the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) and the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) in regard to their suitability, validity, reliability, and acceptability; (2) evaluate how the patients cope with the illness; (3) assess whether there are differences between women and men with respect to HRQOL and coping; and (4) assess whether there are differences between patients and normative data with respect to HRQOL and coping. A total of 115 patients (91 women) with SHR were asked to answer five questionnaires: a study-specific questionnaire, the Chemical Sensitivity Scale for Sensory Hyperreactivity (CSS-SHR), the NHP, the SF-36, and the Jalowiec Coping Scale-60. Eighty-three patients (72%; 70 women) completed all questionnaires. The SF-36 scores were less skewed and more homogeneously distributed and showed fewer floor and ceiling effects than the NHP scores. The SF-36 was also discriminated better between patients with high and low CSS-SHR scores. The reliability standard for both questionnaires was satisfactory. There were no gender differences in HRQOL. Patients with SHR had significantly lower HRQOL scores than the normative data in comparable domains of the NHP and the SF-36: emotional reactions/mental health, energy/vitality, physical mobility/functioning, and pain/bodily pain. In social isolation/functioning, the results were different; the NHP scores were similar to the normative data and the SF-36 scores were lower. The most commonly used coping styles were optimistic, self-reliant, and confrontational. Women used optimistic coping more than men. Compared with the normative group, patients with SHR used confrontational and optimistic coping more and emotive coping less. The current findings showed that both the NHP

  12. The use of bootstrap methods for analysing health-related quality of life outcomes (particularly the SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL measures are becoming increasingly used in clinical trials as primary outcome measures. Investigators are now asking statisticians for advice on how to analyse studies that have used HRQoL outcomes. HRQoL outcomes, like the SF-36, are usually measured on an ordinal scale. However, most investigators assume that there exists an underlying continuous latent variable that measures HRQoL, and that the actual measured outcomes (the ordered categories, reflect contiguous intervals along this continuum. The ordinal scaling of HRQoL measures means they tend to generate data that have discrete, bounded and skewed distributions. Thus, standard methods of analysis such as the t-test and linear regression that assume Normality and constant variance may not be appropriate. For this reason, conventional statistical advice would suggest that non-parametric methods be used to analyse HRQoL data. The bootstrap is one such computer intensive non-parametric method for analysing data. We used the bootstrap for hypothesis testing and the estimation of standard errors and confidence intervals for parameters, in four datasets (which illustrate the different aspects of study design. We then compared and contrasted the bootstrap with standard methods of analysing HRQoL outcomes. The standard methods included t-tests, linear regression, summary measures and General Linear Models. Overall, in the datasets we studied, using the SF-36 outcome, bootstrap methods produce results similar to conventional statistical methods. This is likely because the t-test and linear regression are robust to the violations of assumptions that HRQoL data are likely to cause (i.e. non-Normality. While particular to our datasets, these findings are likely to generalise to other HRQoL outcomes, which have discrete, bounded and skewed distributions. Future research with other HRQoL outcome measures, interventions and populations, is required to

  13. Reliability and Validity of the Japanese Version of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire: A Comparison with the DASH and SF-36 Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Takashi; Abe, Yukio; Katsumi, Yasukazu; Ohi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Toshiyasu; Inagaki, Katsunori

    2016-02-01

    The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) has shown reliability, validity and responsiveness and has been used to assess surgical outcomes mainly in North America. We established a Japanese version of the MHQ and evaluated its reliability and validity compared with both the short-form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire in a Japanese-speaking population. The MHQ was cross-culturally adapted to a Japanese version according to guidelines. Sixty-eight patients with hand conditions were enrolled in this study and answered the MHQ, DASH questionnaire and SF-36 questionnaire. The MHQ was completed again with an interval of one or two weeks. Reproducibility and internal consistency were statistically assessed by the test-retest method and calculating Cronbach's alpha. Spearman's rank correlation was calculated to assess associations between the MHQ and the SF-36 questionnaire as well as the DASH questionnaire. The intraclass correlation coefficients of MHQ subscales ranged from 0.68 to 0.93. Aesthetics subscale of the left hand showed the lowest intraclass correlation but still a good correlation. Cronbach's alpha values of the MHQ ranged from 0.81 to 0.96 for all subscales. The absolute values of Spearman's rank correlation coefficient between MHQ subscales and DASH function/symptoms scores ranged from 0.49 to 0.82. Spearman's correlation coefficients of the MHQ total score to subscales of the SF-36 questionnaire ranged from 0.42 to 0.68. The strongest correlations were found between work performance of the MHQ and rolephysical of the SF-36 questionnaire. The Japanese version of the MHQ has adequate instrument properties for assessing hand outcomes compared with the SF-36 questionnaire as well as the DASH questionnaire.

  14. Quality of life in patients with juvenile arthritis (according to the data of the SF-36 questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tat'yana Andreevna Shelepina

    2011-01-01

    Subjects and methods. Two groups of patients including 85 adolescents with JA (Group 1 and 34 apparently healthy individuals of their age (Group 2; controls were examined. There were 63% of females among the patients. Systemic, polyarticular, oligoarticular, and juvenile ankylosing spondylosis JA (JAS were diagnosed in 16 (19%, 34 (40%, 24 (28%, and 11 (13% patients, respectively. The examinees' mean age was 15.2±1.1 years (range 14-17 years; the mean disease duration was 6.1±4.6 years (range 1-15 years. The control group comprised 73% of females; the mean age was 15.2+1.1 years (range 14-17 years; the adolescents went to school, they had neither musculoskeletal diseases nor release from physical training classes. The SF-36 questionnaire validated for those older than 14 years was used. Results. In Group 1, physical functions, physical activity, body pain, general health condition, and social functions were significantly worse than those in the controls. At the same time, viability, mental health, and emotional activity proved to be (statistically insignificantly better in Group 1 than in the controls. In Group 1, the boys had better values of functional functions, physical activity, viability, and mental development while the girls had better values of body pain, general health condition, social functions, and emotional activity. In the control group, all these parameters were lower in the girls than in the boys. In Group 1 boys, all the parameters were significantly worse than those in the healthy peers (controls. Group 1 girls with JA had worse physical functions, physical activity, and pain, but better general health and social functions than the controls. Differences were found in the groups of patients with different types of JA: the parameters were significantly worse in those with systemic and oligoarticular types and better in those with JAS. Conclusion. The application of the SF-36 questionnaire could reveal significantly reduced physical functions in

  15. Effect of Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction on Quality of Life (SF-36) and Spirometry Parameters, in Chemically Pulmonary Injured Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    AREFNASAB, Zahra; GHANEI, Mostafa; NOORBALA, Ahmad Ali; ALIPOUR, Ahmad; BABAMAHMOODI, Farhang; BABAMAHMOODI, Abdolreza; SALEHI, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies have shown that Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) has positive effect on physical and psychological dimensions of chronic illnesses. In this study for the first time we examine the effect of this new technique on quality of life and pulmonary function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans who have chronic pulmonary problem, psychological problems and low quality of life. Methods Forty male pulmonary injured veterans were randomly replaced in two groups with 20 participants (MBSR and control Wait List (WL)). Then MBSR group received 8-weekly sessions intervention. We evaluate quality of life (used SF-36 questionnaire) and Spirometry parameters two times; before and after intervention in two group. We used “mixed factorial analyses of variance” test for analyzing data in each dependent variables. Then if we have significant interactional effect, we used –paired- sample t-test” for comparing before and after intervention data of each group, and “Independent-Sample t-test” for comparing after intervention data of two groups. Results The MBSR compare to WL group improved SF-36 total score, (F (1, 38) =12.09, P=0.001), “Role limitations due to physical problems”(F(1,38)= 6.92, P=0.01), “Role limitations due to emotional problems”(F(1,38)= 7.75, P=0.008), “Social functioning”(F(1,38)= 9.89, P=0.003), “Mental health”(F(1,38)= 15.93, P=0), “Vitality”(F(1,38)= 40.03, P≤0.001), and “Pain”(F(1,38)= 27.60, P≤0.001). MBSR had no significant effect on “FEV1” (F (1, 38) = 0.03, P=0.85),”FVC” (F (1, 38) = 0.16, P=0.69) and “FEV1/FVC” (F (1, 38) = 2.21, P=0.14). Conclusion MBSR can improve individual’s quality of life but not lung function in chemically pulmonary injured veterans. PMID:26060664

  16. Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life after TBI: Comparison of a Disease-Specific (QOLIBRI) with a Generic (SF-36) Instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Von Steinbuechel (Nicole); A. Covic (Amra); S. Polinder (Suzanne); T. Kohlmann (Thomas); U. Cepulyte (Ugne); H. Poinstingl (Herbert); J. Backhaus (Joy); W. Bakx (Wilbert); M. Bullinger (Monika); A.-L. Christensen (Anne-Lise); R. Formisano (Rita); H. Gibbons (Henning); S. Höfer (Stefan); S. Koskinen (Sanna); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); E. Neugebauer; J. Powell (Jane); J. Sarajuuri (Jaana); N. Sasse (Nadine); S. Schmidt (Silke); H. Mühlan (Holger); K. Von Wild (Klaus); G. Zitnay (George); J.-L. Truelle (Jean-Luc)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPsychosocial, emotional, and physical problems can emerge after traumatic brain injury (TBI), potentially impacting health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Until now, however, neither the discriminatory power of disease-specific (QOLIBRI) and generic (SF-36) HRQoL nor their correlates

  17. Cross-diagnostic validity of the SF-36 physical functioning scale in patients with stroke, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a study using Rasch analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dallmeijer, Annet J.; de Groot, Vincent; Roorda, Leo D.; Schepers, Vera P. M.; Lindeman, Eline; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Beelen, Anita; Dekker, Joost

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate unidimensionality and differential item functioning of the SF-36 physical functioning scale (PF10) in patients with various neurological disorders. Patients: Patients post-stroke (n = 198), with multiple sclerosis (n = 151) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  18. Are there meaningful longitudinal changes in health related quality of life--SF36, in cardiac rehabilitation patients?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKee, Gabrielle

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: This study aimed to observe changes in quality of life and minimal clinical important differences of quality of life over time in cardiac rehabilitation patients and to compare these with published normal data. METHODS: In this non-randomised study, SF36 questionnaires were completed by 187 patients recruited to a Phase III cardiac rehabilitation multidisciplinary outpatient programme. Data was collected at beginning, end and six months after Phase III cardiac rehabilitation programme. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in physical functioning, role limitation due to physical function, pain and general health perception scales, over the above time frame, from both a statistically and a mean clinical important difference point of view. These improvements occurred mainly during the cardiac rehabilitation programme phase. CONCLUSIONS: These improvements meant that patients six months post-cardiac rehabilitation were only 5% below the quality of life for an aged matched normal group. However patients still had significant deficits in physical role and emotional role limitations. Suitable measurement of quality of life on an individual basis, supported by normal values is needed. This would facilitate the identification of shortfalls in patient quality of life and the subsequent tailoring of care to address these individualised patient needs.

  19. The SF-36 Offers a Strong Measure of Mental Health Symptoms in Survivors of Acute Respiratory Failure. A Tri-National Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfoh, Elizabeth R; Chan, Kitty S; Dinglas, Victor D; Cuthbertson, Brian H; Elliott, Doug; Porter, Richard; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Hopkins, Ramona O; Needham, Dale M

    2016-08-01

    Survivors of acute respiratory failure commonly experience long-term psychological sequelae and impaired quality of life. For researchers interested in general mental health, using multiple condition-specific instruments may be unnecessary and inefficient when using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form (SF)-36, a recommended outcome measure, may suffice. However, relationships between the SF-36 scores and commonly used measures of psychological symptoms in acute survivors of respiratory failure are unknown. Our objective is to examine the relationship of the SF-36 mental health domain (MH) and mental health component summary (MCS) scores with symptoms of depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) evaluated using validated psychological instruments. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1,229 participants at 6- and 12-month follow-up assessment using data from five studies from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Symptoms were assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, the Davidson Trauma Scale, Impact of Event Scale (IES), and IES-Revised (IES-R). At 6-month assessment there were moderate to strong correlations of the SF-36 MH scores with HADS depression and anxiety symptoms (r = -0.74 and -0.79) and with IES-R PTSD symptoms (r = -0.60) in the pooled analyses. Using the normalized population mean of 50 on the SF-36 MH domain score as a cut-off, positive predictive values were 16 and 55% for substantial depression; 20 and 68% for substantial anxiety (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and HADS, respectively); and 40, 44, and 67% for substantial PTSD symptoms (IES-R, IES, and Davidson Trauma Scale, respectively). Negative predictive values were high. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve of the SF-36 MH score was high for depression, anxiety, and PTSD symptoms (0.88, 0.91, and 0.84, respectively). All results were consistent for the MCS

  20. Health related quality of life in Mexican women with systemic lupus erythematosus: a descriptive study using SF-36 and LupusQoL(C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, M; Mendoza-Pinto, C; Cardiel, M H; Méndez-Martínez, S; García-Villaseñor, A; Jiménez-Hernández, C; Alonso-García, N E; Briones-Rojas, R; Ramos-Álvarez, G; López-Colombo, A

    2012-10-01

    The LupusQoL© questionnaire is a disease-specific health related quality of life (HRQOL) instrument for adults with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The Short Form-36 (SF-36) is a generic instrument that captures the physical, psychological, and social impact. We conducted a descriptive study of women aged ≥ 18 years attending our Lupus Clinic. HRQOL was assessed by applying the LupusQoL© and SF-36. Lupus activity was measured using the Mexican Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index (Mex-SLEDAI) and chronic damage using the Systemic Lupus Collaborative Clinics Damage Index (SDI). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, the chi-square test and Pearson's product moment correlation coefficient. A total of 127 patients were included with a mean age of 40.5 ± 12.6 years. The mean disease duration was 8.2 ± 5.6 years, the mean disease activity score was 2.4 ± 3.0, and the mean SDI score 0.77 ± 1.06. The mean SF-36 score was 58.1 ± 21.1 and the mean LupusQoL© score was 69 ± 22.7. The correlation between global scores of the SF-36 and LupusQoL© was rho = 0.73 (p SF-36 and the LupusQoL© was -0.26 (p = 0.003) and -0.25 (p = 0.004), respectively. The correlation between the SDI and the SF-36 and the LupusQoL© was -0.28 (p = 0.001) and -0.38 (p SF-36 were useful instruments in assessing HRQOL in Mexican lupus female patients. The usefulness of the LupusQoL© should be evaluated in lupus patients with moderate to severe disease activity.

  1. Effect of Preoperative Brace Treatment on the Mental Health Scores of SRS-22 and SF-36 Questionnaire in Surgically Treated Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Wang, Yipeng; Qiu, Guixing; Shen, Jianxiong; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-06-01

    Retrospective study. The aim of this study was to analyze whether there were differences in mental health scores of Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) questionnaire and Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire between adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients with/without preoperative brace treatment. Mental health is an important domain of SRS-22 and SF-36 questionnaire. There are few studies focused on the effect of preoperative brace treatment on mental health in surgically treated AIS patients. The SRS-22 and SF-36 questionnaires of 211 AIS patients who underwent posterior correction surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The average age of the patients was 14.4 years (range, 11-18 y), and the patients were classified into 2 groups: with preoperative brace treatment (group BS-32 cases, 5 male and 27 female) and without preoperative brace treatment (group S-179 cases, 23 male and 156 female). The radiographic data and mental health scores of SRS-22 and SF-36 questionnaires were compared between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference in terms of height, rib hump, the mean preoperative coronal Cobb angle or apical vertebral translation of the major curve, sagittal thoracic kyphosis, or coronal trunk balance between group BS and group S (all P>0.05). The average and total mental health scores of SRS-22 between group BS and group S were 3.6±0.7 and 3.7±0.5, and 18.1±3.5 and 18.3±2.6, respectively. The total mental health scores of SF-36 between group BS and group S were 71.1±8.7 and 68.7±11.5, respectively. There was no significant difference with regard to the mental health scores of SRS-22 and SF-36 questionnaires between group BS and group S (all P>0.05). Preoperative brace treatment did not have obvious influence on the mental health scores of SRS-22 and SF-36 questionnaires in surgically treated AIS patients.

  2. Assessment of health-related quality of life in antiviral-treated Taiwanese chronic hepatitis C patients using SF-36 and CLDQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Chuan; Yang, Sheng-Shun; Chang, Chiu-Chun; Lin, Chun-Che; Chung, Yueh-Chin; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2014-06-18

    Interferon (IFN) therapy can cause significant side effects in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients; however, the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of antiviral-treated CHC patients has not been established in Taiwan. This study evaluated domains and the degree to which antiviral treatment affects the HRQOL in CHC patients and identifies factors associated with variations between patients. Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was assessed using the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaire (CLDQ) in 108 antiviral-treated CHC patients. Eight scales and two summary scales of the SF-36 were compared with 256 age- and gender-matched population norms and 64 age- and gender-matched CHC patients without antiviral therapy. Descriptive statistic measures, one-way ANOVA, and regression analysis were used for data analysis. (1) CHC patients receiving antiviral treatment displayed significantly lower scores in six scales, the Physical Component Summary (PCS), and the Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the SF-36, when compared to the population norms and patients without antiviral therapy (p SF-36 subscales significantly correlated with all CLDQ subscales, with the greatest correlation coefficients shown between fatigue and vitality and mental health of SF-36. (4) Antiviral therapy had a greater negative impact on females in the CLDQ, on all patients during treatment weeks 9-16 in the PCS and on patients with a monthly income of less than NT$10,000 in the CLDQ, PCS, and MCS. This study highlighted impairments in the quality of life of chronic hepatitis C patients treated with IFN-based therapy. The significant factors associated with HRQOL include gender, income, and treatment duration. The results of this study might provide nurses with a comprehensive understanding of HRQOL and its determining factors in antiviral-treated CHC patients. The findings can serve as a useful reference for nursing personnel in developing instructions for upgrading the

  3. The use of the SF-36 questionnaire in adult survivors of childhood cancer: evaluation of data quality, score reliability, and scaling assumptions

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    Winter David L

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SF-36 has been used in a number of previous studies that have investigated the health status of childhood cancer survivors, but it never has been evaluated regarding data quality, scaling assumptions, and reliability in this population. As health status among childhood cancer survivors is being increasingly investigated, it is important that the measurement instruments are reliable, validated and appropriate for use in this population. The aim of this paper was to determine whether the SF-36 questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument in assessing self-perceived health status of adult survivors of childhood cancer. Methods We examined the SF-36 to see how it performed with respect to (1 data completeness, (2 distribution of the scale scores, (3 item-internal consistency, (4 item-discriminant validity, (5 internal consistency, and (6 scaling assumptions. For this investigation we used SF-36 data from a population-based study of 10,189 adult survivors of childhood cancer. Results Overall, missing values ranged per item from 0.5 to 2.9 percent. Ceiling effects were found to be highest in the role limitation-physical (76.7% and role limitation-emotional (76.5% scales. All correlations between items and their hypothesised scales exceeded the suggested standard of 0.40 for satisfactory item-consistency. Across all scales, the Cronbach's alpha coefficient of reliability was found to be higher than the suggested value of 0.70. Consistent across all cancer groups, the physical health related scale scores correlated strongly with the Physical Component Summary (PCS scale scores and weakly with the Mental Component Summary (MCS scale scores. Also, the mental health and role limitation-emotional scales correlated strongly with the MCS scale score and weakly with the PCS scale score. Moderate to strong correlations with both summary scores were found for the general health perception, energy/vitality, and social functioning

  4. Health-Related Quality of Life and Associated Factors of Frontline Railway Workers: A Cross-Sectional Survey in the Ankang Area, Shaanxi Province, China

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    Xiaona Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available After validation of the widely used health-related quality of life (HRQOL generic measure, the Short Form 36 version 2 (SF-36v2, we investigated the HRQOL and associated factors of frontline railway workers in China. Ground workers, conductors, and train drivers were selected from Ankang Precinct by using a stratified cluster sampling technique. A total of 784 frontline railway workers participated in the survey. The reliability and validity of SF-36v2 was satisfactory. The physical component summary (PCS scores of three subgroups attained the average range for the USA general population, whereas the mental component summary (MCS scores were well below the range. Most domains scored below the norm, except for the physical functioning (PF domain. Among three subgroups, train drivers reported significantly lower scores on MCS and six health domains (excluding PF and bodily pain (BP. After controlled confounders, conductors had significantly higher PCS and MCS scores than ground workers. There is heterogeneity on risk factors among three subgroups, but having long or irregular working schedules was negatively associated with HRQOL in all subgroups. SF-36v2 is a reliable and valid HRQOL measurement in railway workers in China. The frontline railway workers’ physical health was comparative to American norms, whilst mental health was relatively worse. Long or irregular working schedules were the most important factors.

  5. Sammenhænge mellem risikoadfærd for spiseforstyrrelser og SF-36 samt selvoplevet stress for yngre danske kvinder, 16-29 år

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaddegaard, Mette; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: To improve the early identification of eating disorders the study tested whether women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have lower health-related life quality and more perceived stress than women without risk behaviour. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was a representative...... disorders and also to SF-36 and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). RESULTS: Women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have a lower score on all subscales of SF-36 than women without risk behaviour. The differences are significant for the subscales for mental health, vitality, social function and general...... health. They also have a higher mean score on PSS than women without risk behaviour. CONCLUSION: Women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have lower mental health-related life quality than women without risk behaviour. They also experience daily life as more unpredictable, stressful and difficult...

  6. Sammenhænge mellem risikoadfærd for spiseforstyrrelser og SF-36 samt selvoplevet stress for yngre danske kvinder, 16-29 år

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waaddegaard, Mette; Davidsen, Michael; Kjøller, Mette

    2009-01-01

    disorders and also to SF-36 and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). RESULTS: Women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have a lower score on all subscales of SF-36 than women without risk behaviour. The differences are significant for the subscales for mental health, vitality, social function and general...... health. They also have a higher mean score on PSS than women without risk behaviour. CONCLUSION: Women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have lower mental health-related life quality than women without risk behaviour. They also experience daily life as more unpredictable, stressful and difficult......INTRODUCTION: To improve the early identification of eating disorders the study tested whether women with risk behaviour for eating disorders have lower health-related life quality and more perceived stress than women without risk behaviour. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was a representative...

  7. Estimating utilities for chronic kidney disease, using SF-36 and SF-12-based measures: challenges in a population of veterans with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Mangala; Lai, Kuan-Chi; Tseng, Chin-Lin; Qian, Shirley; Selim, Alfredo; Kazis, Lewis; Pogach, Leonard; Sinha, Anushua

    2013-02-01

    Using transformations of existing quality-of-life data to estimate utilities has the potential to efficiently provide investigators with utility information. We used within-method and across-method comparisons and estimated disutilities associated with increasing chronic kidney disease (CKD) severity. In an observational cohort of veterans with diabetes (DM) and pre-existing SF-36/SF-12 responses, we used six transformation methods (SF-12 to EQ-5D, SF-36 to HUI2, SF-12 to SF-6D, SF-36 to SF-6D, SF-36 to SF-6D (Bayesian method), and SF-12 to VR-6D) to estimate unadjusted utilities. CKD severity was staged using glomerular filtration rate estimated from serum creatinines, with the modification of diet in renal disease formula. We then used multivariate regression to estimate disutilities specifically associated with CKD severity stage. Of 67,963 patients, 22,273 patients had recent-onset DM and 45,690 patients had prevalent DM. For the recent-onset group, the adjusted disutility associated with CKD derived from the six transformation methods ranged from 0.0029 to 0.0045 for stage 2; -0.004 to -0.0009 for early stage 3; -0.017 to -0.010 for late stage 3; -0.023 to -0.012 for stage 4; -0.078 to -0.033 for stage 5; and -0.012 to -0.001 for ESRD/dialysis. Disutility did not increase monotonically as CKD severity increased. Differences in disutilities estimated using the six different methods were found. Both findings have implications for using such estimates in economic analyses.

  8. Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life after TBI: Comparison of a Disease-Specific (QOLIBRI with a Generic (SF-36 Instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole von Steinbuechel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial, emotional, and physical problems can emerge after traumatic brain injury (TBI, potentially impacting health-related quality of life (HRQoL. Until now, however, neither the discriminatory power of disease-specific (QOLIBRI and generic (SF-36 HRQoL nor their correlates have been compared in detail. These aspects as well as some psychometric item characteristics were studied in a sample of 795 TBI survivors. The Shannon H' index absolute informativity, as an indicator of an instrument’s power to differentiate between individuals within a specific group or health state, was investigated. Psychometric performance of the two instruments was predominantly good, generally higher, and more homogenous for the QOLIBRI than for the SF-36 subscales. Notably, the SF-36 “Role Physical,” “Role Emotional,” and “Social Functioning” subscales showed less satisfactory discriminatory power than all other dimensions or the sum scores of both instruments. The absolute informativity of disease-specific as well as generic HRQoL instruments concerning the different groups defined by different correlates differed significantly. When the focus is on how a certain subscale or sum score differentiates between individuals in one specific dimension/health state, the QOLIBRI can be recommended as the preferable instrument.

  9. Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life after TBI: Comparison of a Disease-Specific (QOLIBRI) with a Generic (SF-36) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Steinbuechel, Nicole; Covic, Amra; Polinder, Suzanne; Kohlmann, Thomas; Cepulyte, Ugne; Poinstingl, Herbert; Backhaus, Joy; Bakx, Wilbert; Bullinger, Monika; Christensen, Anne-Lise; Formisano, Rita; Gibbons, Henning; Höfer, Stefan; Koskinen, Sanna; Maas, Andrew; Neugebauer, Edmund; Powell, Jane; Sarajuuri, Jaana; Sasse, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Mühlan, Holger; von Wild, Klaus; Zitnay, George; Truelle, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial, emotional, and physical problems can emerge after traumatic brain injury (TBI), potentially impacting health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Until now, however, neither the discriminatory power of disease-specific (QOLIBRI) and generic (SF-36) HRQoL nor their correlates have been compared in detail. These aspects as well as some psychometric item characteristics were studied in a sample of 795 TBI survivors. The Shannon H ' index absolute informativity, as an indicator of an instrument's power to differentiate between individuals within a specific group or health state, was investigated. Psychometric performance of the two instruments was predominantly good, generally higher, and more homogenous for the QOLIBRI than for the SF-36 subscales. Notably, the SF-36 “Role Physical,” “Role Emotional,” and “Social Functioning” subscales showed less satisfactory discriminatory power than all other dimensions or the sum scores of both instruments. The absolute informativity of disease-specific as well as generic HRQoL instruments concerning the different groups defined by different correlates differed significantly. When the focus is on how a certain subscale or sum score differentiates between individuals in one specific dimension/health state, the QOLIBRI can be recommended as the preferable instrument. PMID:27022207

  10. Measuring health-related quality of life in adolescents and young adults: Swedish normative data for the SF-36 and the HADS, and the influence of age, gender, and method of administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Essen Louise

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a paucity of research about health-related quality of life (HRQL among adolescents, as studies have to a large extent focused on adults. The main aim was to provide information for future studies in this growing field by presenting normative data for the Short Form 36 (SF-36 and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS for Swedish adolescents and young adults. Additionally, the influence of age and gender, as well as method of administration, was investigated. Methods A sample of 585 persons aged 13–23 was randomly chosen from the general population, and stratified regarding age group (young adolescents: 13–15 years; older adolescents: 16–19 years, and young adults: 20–23 years and gender (an equal amount of males and females. Within each stratum, the participants were randomized according to two modes of administration, telephone interview and postal questionnaire, and asked to complete the SF-36 and the HADS. Descriptive statistics are presented by survey mode, gender, and age group. A gender comparison was made by independent t-test; and one-way ANOVA was conducted to evaluate age differences. Results Effects of age and gender were found: males reported better health-related quality of life than females, and the young adolescents (13–15 years old reported better HRQL than the two older age groups. The older participants (16–23 years old reported higher scores when interviewed over the telephone than when they answered a postal questionnaire, a difference which was more marked among females. Interestingly, the 13–15-year-olds did not react to the mode of administration to the same extent. Conclusion The importance of taking age, gender, and method of administration into consideration, both when planning studies and when comparing results from different groups, studies, or over time, is stressed.

  11. Bodily maps of emotions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nummenmaa, Lauri; Glerean, Enrico; Hari, Riitta; Hietanen, Jari K.

    2014-01-01

    Emotions are often felt in the body, and somatosensory feedback has been proposed to trigger conscious emotional experiences. Here we reveal maps of bodily sensations associated with different emotions using a unique topographical self-report method. In five experiments, participants (n = 701) were shown two silhouettes of bodies alongside emotional words, stories, movies, or facial expressions. They were asked to color the bodily regions whose activity they felt increasing or decreasing while viewing each stimulus. Different emotions were consistently associated with statistically separable bodily sensation maps across experiments. These maps were concordant across West European and East Asian samples. Statistical classifiers distinguished emotion-specific activation maps accurately, confirming independence of topographies across emotions. We propose that emotions are represented in the somatosensory system as culturally universal categorical somatotopic maps. Perception of these emotion-triggered bodily changes may play a key role in generating consciously felt emotions. PMID:24379370

  12. Establishing a Common Metric for Physical Function: Linking the HAQ-DI and SF-36 PF Subscale to PROMIS(®) Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalet, Benjamin D; Revicki, Dennis A; Cook, Karon F; Krishnan, Eswar; Fries, Jim F; Cella, David

    2015-10-01

    Physical function (PF) is a common health concept measured in clinical trials and clinical care. It is measured with different instruments that are not directly comparable, making comparative effectiveness research (CER) challenging when PF is the outcome of interest. Our goal was to establish a common reporting metric, so that scores on commonly used physical function measures can be converted into PROMIS scores. Following a single-sample linking design, all participants completed items from the NIH Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS®) Physical Function (PROMIS PF) item bank and at least one other commonly used "legacy" measure: the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) or the Short Form-36 physical function ten-item PF scale (SF-36 PF). A common metric was created using analyses based on item response theory (IRT), producing score cross-walk tables. Participants (N = 733) were part of an internet panel, many of whom reported one or more chronic health conditions. PROMIS PF, SF-36 PF, and the HAQ-Disability Index (HAQ-DI). Our results supported the hypothesis that all three scales measure essentially the same concept. Cross-walk tables for use in CER are therefore justified. HAQ-DI and SF-36 PF results can be expressed on the PROMIS PF metric for the purposes of CER and other efforts to compare PF results across studies that utilize any one of these three measures. Clinicians seeking to incorporate PROs into their clinics can collect patient data on any one of these three instruments and estimate the equivalent on the other two.

  13. The health-related quality of life of ankylosing spondylitis patients assessed by SF-36: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Fan, Dazhi; Xia, Qing; Wang, Mengmeng; Zhang, Xu; Li, Xiaona; Cai, Guoqi; Wang, Li; Xin, Lihong; Xu, Shengqian; Pan, Faming

    2016-11-01

    The main purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the impact of ankylosing spondylitis on the health-related quality of life assessed by the Medical Outcomes Short-Form-36 questionnaire (SF-36). A systematic literature search was performed on PubMed and Web of Science until January 22, 2016 to obtain eligible studies. Random effect model was performed to summarize the scores of each domain. The radar chart was used to compare the scores of AS patients with other health conditions. Spearman's correlation analysis and meta-regression were used to explore the related factors. STATA (version 11.0) and SPSS (version 13.0) were adopted in this meta-analysis. Thirty-eight studies were included in this study, which were all reliable to summarize the scores of the SF-36. Pooled mean scores of the physical health domains ranged from 45.93 to 58.17, with the RP and PF domains being the lowest and the highest, respectively. Pooled mean scores of the mental health domains ranged from 47.49 to 62.52, with the VT and SF domains being the lowest and the highest, respectively. Besides, the physical component summary was lower than the mental component summary. BASDAI and BASFI were negatively associated with some domains of the SF-36 significantly. Patients with AS had a substantial impaired HRQoL in comparison with the general population. AS could adversely affect the HRQoL of patients. Measuring HRQoL should be considered as an essential part of the overall assessment of health status of AS patients, which would provide valuable clues for improving the management of disease and making decisions regarding treatment.

  14. External validation of the SF-36 quality-of-life questionnaire in Italian and Brazilian populations to select patients with colorectal endometriosis for surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, Enora; Zacharopoulou, Chrysoula; Montanari, Giulia; Seracchioli, Renato; Abrão, Mauricio S; Bassi, Marco A; Ballester, Marcos; Daraï, Emile

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the external validity of the validated French model of the quality-of-life questionnaire (QOL) SF-36 in predicting improvement after colorectal resection for endometriosis. Italian and Brazilian cohort studies (Canadian Task Force classification II-3). Tertiary referral university hospital in Brazil and expert center in endometriosis in Italy. Patients with colorectal endometriosis from an Italian population (n = 63) and a Brazilian population (n = 151). Laparoscopic colorectal resection for treatment of endometriosis. Preoperative and postoperative evaluations of the Physical Component Summary (PCS) and the Mental Component Summary (MCS) of the SF-36 were performed. Substantial improvement in PCS and MCS was observed after colorectal resection in both populations. In the Brazilian population, the receiver operating curve (ROC) (area under the curve [AUC]) was 0.83 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77-0.89) for MCS and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.71-0.83) for PCS, demonstrating good discrimination performance. The mean difference between the predicted and calibrated probabilities was 19.6% for MCS and 32.8% for PCS. In the Italian population, the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.65 (95% CI, 0.52-0.78) for PCS and 0.67 (95% CI, 0.55-0.78) for MCS. The model demonstrated poor discrimination and calibration performance for PCS (p SF-36, our results underline the limits of this tool in selection of patients for colorectal resection due to underestimation of predicted quality of life, possibly because of variations in epidemiologic characteristics of the populations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Constituting children's bodily integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, B Jessie

    2015-04-01

    Children have a constitutional right to bodily integrity. Courts do not hesitate to vindicate that right when children are abused by state actors. Moreover, in at least some cases, a child's right to bodily integrity applies within the family, giving the child the right to avoid unwanted physical intrusions regardless of the parents' wishes. Nonetheless, the scope of this right vis-à-vis the parents is unclear; the extent to which it applies beyond the narrow context of abortion and contraception has been almost entirely unexplored and untheorized. This Article is the first in the legal literature to analyze the constitutional right of minors to bodily integrity within the family by spanning traditionally disparate doctrinal categories such as abortion rights; corporal punishment; medical decisionmaking; and nontherapeutic physical interventions such as tattooing, piercing, and circumcision. However, the constitutional right of minors to bodily integrity raises complex philosophical questions concerning the proper relationship between family and state, as well as difficult doctrinal and theoretical issues concerning the ever-murky idea of state action. This Article canvasses those issues with the ultimate goal of delineating a constitutional right of bodily security and autonomy for children.

  16. The impact of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome severity on physical performance and mental health. The use of SF-36 questionnaire in sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkoulias, K; Lykouras, D; Sampsonas, F; Karaivazoglou, K; Sargianou, M; Drakatos, P; Spiropoulos, K; Assimakopoulos, K

    2013-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a common disorder defined by repeated episodes of airflow cessation (apneas)leading to arterial hypoxemia and sleep disruption. OSAS has been associated with increased morbidity, mortality and diminished quality of life so far. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the impact of OSAS on patients' Quality of Life, as measured by the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36). Two hundred and forty five subjects referred to the sleep laboratory and underwent full polysomnography overnight. Prior to sleep study onset, we registered height and weight, medical history, smoking habit, drug consumption. Afterwards, each patient completed the SF-36. Eighty subjects not diagnosed with sleep apnea [apnea hypopnea index (AHI associated with lower performance in role limitations due to physical problems (p = 0.005). Additionally, RDI was the only factor associated with decreased vitality (p = 0.014) and mental health scores (p = 0.047). In the same patient subgroup, body mass index (BMI) and age were associated with poorer scores in physical functioning (p health (p = 0.006), social functioning (p = 0.025) and role limitations due to emotional problems (p = 0.004).

  17. The effect of obesity upon Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL: A comparison of the AQoL-8D and SF-36 instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Ahmed Khan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to describe and measure the loss of health related quality of life (HRQoL associated with obesity using two generic instruments. The first of these, the SF-36, is the most widely used and validated HRQoL instrument worldwide. However, it does not provide utility weights and cannot be used to measure quality adjusted life years (QALYs, an increasingly common unit for comparing the effect of health states in economic evaluation studies. The second, the AQoL-8D, is a multi-attribute utility (MAU instrument which was developed to increase sensitivity of previous MAU instruments to psycho-social dimensions of a health state and to allow the calculation of QALYs. Since the two instruments differ, an important additional objective of the study was to determine the validity of the AQoL-8D as judged by the SF-36, and therefore the confidence which might be placed upon its use in the context of obesity.METHODS: Data were obtained from patients waiting for bariatric surgery who had completed both the SF-36 and AQoL-8D quality of life instruments and a general questionnaire including height, weight, demographic and socio-economic information. For comparative purposes, scores were standardized using results from a representative sample of the general population. The content validity of the AQoL-8D was assessed by comparing it with the dimension scores from the SF-36 and the summary component (physical and mental scores. Overall scores from the SF-36 and AQoL-8D instruments were regressed upon patient BMI and the results from the AQoL-8D used to estimate the effect of overweight and obesity upon utility and lost QALYs.RESULTS: The comparison of the instruments indicated that the AQoL-8D has good convergent, concurrent and content validity. Using both instruments, obesity was significantly associated with lower scores for 14 of their 16 dimensions. AQoL-8D, in particular, identified a significant decrease in

  18. Bodily Distress Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budtz-Lilly, Anna; Vestergaard, Mogens; Moth, Grete

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Medically unexplained or functional symptoms and disorders are common in primary care. Empirical research has proposed specific criteria for a new unifying diagnosis for functional disorders and syndromes: Bodily Distress Syndrome (BDS). This new diagnosis is expected to be integrated...

  19. Examining the Health-Related Quality of Life after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Iran via SF-36 and SAQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourolhoda Fakhrzad

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiovascular Disease (CVD is one of the major concerns all around the world. It is caused by mass of atherosclerotic plaques in the walls of coronary arteries, which ends in narrowing of veins, heart failure, angina, and Myocardial Infarction (MI. The growing need for therapeutic interventions in CVD patients illustrates the importance of paying special attention to these patients’ Quality of Life (QoL and the vital interventions for their treatment. Objectives: This research aimed to evaluate patients’ QoL after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting (CABG and Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI using Seattle Angina Questionnaire (SAQ and Short Form-36 (SF-36. Patients and Methods: This six-month cohort study aimed to evaluate the QoL among CAD patients in Shiraz, Iran via SAQ and SF-36. The study population included all the patients who had undergone CABG and PCI in the hospitals of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from May to December 2014. A total of 200 patients were selected for each intervention. After gaining the patients’ consent to take part in the research, 200 patients who applied for CABG and 198 patients who applied for PCI agreed to participate in the study. Pre-intervention data were gathered through a demographic data form and two valid and reliable questionnaires for QoL. The post-intervention data were also gathered six months after the treatment using the same questionnaires. Then, the data were entered in to the SPSS statistical software, version 20 and were analyzed using paired sample t-test, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, ANOVA, and Spearman and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: Intervention was proved to be the most effective factor in changing the patients’ QoL (P = 0.04, mean ± SD = 4.65 ± 22.02 for PCI and 8.25 ± 22.97 for CABG using SF36; P = 0.002, mean ± SD = 10.54 ± 17.14 for PCI and 15.47 ± 16.81 for CABG using SAQ. Moreover, both intervention types boosted the patients

  20. Baseline HAQ and SF-36 questionnaire scores cannot predict clinical remission, radiographic progression or the need for biological therapy in a three-year prospective study of a Brazilian early rheumatoid arthritis cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Dos Santos Neto, Leopoldo Luiz; Oliveira, Ana Cristina V; Pereira, Ivânio Alves; Burlingame, Rufus W; Ménard, Henri A; Laurindo, Ieda Maria Magalhães

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluates prospectively whether baseline scores [Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) and SF-36] can predict clinical and radiographic evolution in a cohort of early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during a 3-year follow-up. Forty consecutive early RA patients were followed for 3 years, while receiving standardized treatment according to a pre-established protocol. HAQ and SF-36 were administered at the initial evaluation and at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24 and 36 months. Hands and feet radiographs were obtained at the initial evaluation and at 12, 24 and 36 months. Preselected outcomes were the occurrence of radiographic erosions, the achievement of an EULAR remission, low disease activity status and the need for biological therapy. The mean age at onset was 45 years with a 90% female predominance. Erosions were found in 42% of patients at T0 and in 70% after 3 years (P SF-36 domains showed significant improvement except for general state and vitality. Biological therapy was deemed necessary in 22.5% of patients. The initial HAQ and SF-36 scores were not associated with clinical remission, bone erosions or the need for biological therapy at 36 months. The HAQ and SF-36 scores measured at baseline could not predict at 3 years, the preselected outcomes in a Brazilian cohort.

  1. What do bodily symptoms in African psychiatric patients mean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To review the various bodily symptoms presented by African psychiatric patients and attempt to understand them. Method: The literature on bodily (somatic) symptoms is surveyed with special reference to Africans and examples are drawn from a focused group discussion in one African rural community.

  2. Calidad de vida relacionada con la salud en Medellín y su área metropolitana, con aplicación del SF-36 / Health-related quality of life (QOL in Medellín and its metropolitan area, with the implementation of the SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor I. García G

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La calidad de vida (cv relacionada con la salud es el componente de esta que se refiere a la percepción que tienen las personas sobre su capacidad para tener una vida útil y desarrollar sus potencialidades y en especial sobre su salud global y el impacto de las enfermedades y tratamientos sobre ella. Para evaluarla se han creado diversas escalas, una de las más usadas es el SF-36, con la cual se han estimado valores de referencia poblacionales útiles en investigaciones clínicas y poblacionales, para monitorear la cven el tiempo, entre otros. En Colombia no se han calculado aún estos valores. Objetivo: obtener valores aproximados de cv con el Cuestionario de Salud SF-36 en Medellín y su área metropolitana. Metodología: estudio integrativo cuantitativo con datos de 18 investigaciones que usaron la versión colombiana del SF-36. Resultados: el 54,4% eran hombres quienes presentaron puntuaciones más altas que las mujeres en todas las dimensiones de la cv. Las puntuaciones variaron entre 64,1 (de: 22,5 en salud mental y 40,8 (de: 35,5 en desempeño físico. Al aumentar la edad la puntuación disminuye en la mayoría de los dominios, excepto en cuanto a función social y a salud mental. Conclusión: los valores de referencia estimados en estas poblaciones son menores en todas las dimensiones de la cv a los de México (excepto en salud general, Estados Unidos y Canadá, y están disponibles para ser usados en la evaluación de intervenciones colectivas, seguimiento de tratamientos a pacientes y para comparaciones nacionales e internacionalesHealth-related quality of life (qol is the component which refers to the perception people have of their ability to lead a useful life and to develop their potential and, especially, of their overall health and the impact of disease and treatments on it. In order to evaluate the qol diverse scales were created. One of the most used of these is the SF-36, with which useful population-based reference values

  3. Psychometric analysis of measuring functional outcomes in tibial plateau fractures using the Short Form 36 (SF-36), Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) and the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattani, R; Slobogean, G P; O'Brien, P J; Broekhuyse, H M; Blachut, P A; Guy, P; Lefaivre, K A

    2013-06-01

    Patients participating in a modern prospective orthopaedic trauma database may be asked to complete many functional outcome measures, adding to the burden of study participation. This prospective study assessed the utility and responsiveness of the generic Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the disease specific Short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (SMFA) and the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) questionnaires in 55 patients treated operatively for tibial plateau fractures with the goal of determining if there was clear benefit of using multiple measures in a lower extremity peri-articular fracture population. There was very good correlation between all three scores at 6 and 12 months, indicating they are measuring similar factors. Responsiveness was assessed using the standard response mean (SRM), proportion of patients attaining the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) between 6 and 12 months, and floor and ceiling effects. The SRM for the SF-36 was statistically higher than the SRM for the SMFA or the WOMAC. Significantly more patients were found to have a MCID between 6 and 12 months post-surgery based on the SF-36 than the other two functional scores. There was no floor effect found on any of the 3 functional scores evaluated; however, a significant ceiling effect was noted with the WOMAC but not with the SF-36 or the SMFA. These results, along with the usefulness of the SF-36 for comparing disease burden across populations, favour the SF-36 as the instrument of choice in assessing functional outcome in patients with tibial plateau fractures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Do Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Quality-Of-Life (AAQoL) scale and the SF-36 scale measure the same construct of health-related quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Roghaye; Jafari, Peyman; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad

    2017-03-01

    It has never been investigated whether the assessment tools of Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Quality-of-Life (AAQoL) scale and the SF-36 measure the same construct. The participants were 101 parents of children with ADHD and 243 parents of school children. The parents completed both the Persian version of the AAQoL and the SF-36 questionnaires. The present study revealed that the Persian version of both AAQoL and SF-36 for the assessment of HRQoL in parents of children with ADHD has convergent and discriminant validity and internal consistency. Multitrait-multimethod correlation matrix showed that the domains of two questionnaires were moderately correlated. Current results support that AAQoL and SF-36 in parents of children with ADHD measure the same HRQoL constructs. Hence, for assessing the HRQoL of parents of children with ADHD, one of the two questionnaires can be used regard to the objective of study. The Persian version of the AAQoL loaded on four domains which were in line with the original version. HRQoL of parents of children with ADHD is markedly less than the community sample of children.

  5. Changing ideas of bodily cleanliness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quitzau, Maj-Britt

    2004-01-01

    About historical shifts in ideas of bodily cleanliness and what impacts this have on the possibility of implementing more ecological toilets.......About historical shifts in ideas of bodily cleanliness and what impacts this have on the possibility of implementing more ecological toilets....

  6. The case for using country-specific scoring coefficients for scoring the SF-12, with scoring implications for the SF-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Graeme; Adams, Robert; Wilson, David

    2016-02-01

    To examine the validity of using the same scoring coefficients across countries for the SF-12. We test the equality of scoring coefficients derived for a contraction of the SF-36, the Short Form 12 (SF-12), using a large international database drawn from nine countries, to test equality between Australia and twelve other country/language groups. First, we checked that the theoretical structure of the SF-12 as set out by Ware and colleagues, but including a correlation between physical and mental health, provided an adequate fit to the data for each country/language group in a confirmatory factor analysis. We then compared Australia to all of these country/language groups in multiple-group models to assess whether a model producing common factor score coefficients provided an adequate fit to the data. We also derived Chi-squared tests for the differences between the restricted and unrestricted models, to test the equality of the factor score coefficients across countries. We found that the theoretical structure of the SF-12, with a correlation between physical and mental health, provides an adequate fit to the data for all country/language groups except Hungary. Further, all the unrestricted multiple-group models provide an adequate fit to the data. In contrast, none of the multiple-group models restricted to common parameters provide an adequate fit to the data. The significance tests confirm that the constraints on parameter values produce significantly different models to the unrestricted models. We conclude that researchers should derive their own country-specific scoring coefficients for physical and mental health summary scores.

  7. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and psychometric evaluation of yoruba version of the short-form 36 health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbada, Chidozie Emmanuel; Adeogun, Gafar Atanda; Ogunlana, Michael Opeoluwa; Adedoyin, Rufus Adesoji; Akinsulore, Adesanmi; Awotidebe, Taofeek Oluwole; Idowu, Opeyemi Ayodiipo; Olaoye, Olumide Ayoola

    2015-09-14

    The Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) is a valid quality of life tool often employed to determine the impact of medical intervention and the outcome of health care services. However, the SF-36 is culturally sensitive which necessitates its adaptation and translation into different languages. This study was conducted to cross-culturally adapt the SF-36 into Yoruba language and determine its reliability and validity. Based on the International Quality of Life Assessment project guidelines, a sequence of translation, test of item-scale correlation, and validation was implemented for the translation of the Yoruba version of the SF-36. Following pilot testing, the English and the Yoruba versions of the SF-36 were administered to a random sample of 1087 apparently healthy individuals to test validity and 249 respondents completed the Yoruba SF-36 again after two weeks to test reliability. Data was analyzed using Pearson's product moment correlation analysis, independent t-test, one-way analysis of variance, multi trait scaling analysis and Intra-Class Correlation (ICC) at p Yoruba SF-36 ranges between 0.636 and 0.843 for scales; and 0.783 and 0.851 for domains. The data quality, concurrent and discriminant validity, reliability and internal consistency of the Yoruba version of the SF-36 are adequate and it is recommended for measuring health-related quality of life among Yoruba population.

  8. Avaliação retrospectiva por meio do questionário SF-36 de pacientes submetidos à estabilização dinâmica pedicular para o tratamento de doenças degenerativas lombares Evaluación retrospectiva empleando el cuestionario SF-36 en pacientes sometidos a estabilización dinámica pedicular para el tratamiento de la enfermedad degenerativa lumbar Retrospective evaluation by means of SF-36 questionnaires of patients submitted to pedicular dynamic stabilization for degenerative lumbar diseases treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Fonseca Rodrigues

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: a estabilização dinâmica pedicular tem sido utilizada desde os anos 1990 para o tratamento da doença lombar degenerativa como uma alternativa aos métodos de fusão. Devido às suas características de não-fusão, estes implantes tendem a reduzir a carga nos discos intervertebrais adjacentes e na coluna posterior, com o objetivo de não prejudicar a biomecânica da coluna, diminuindo assim a chance de degeneração do disco adjacente. OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo retrospectivo foi avaliar, por meio do questionário SF-36, os resultados dos pacientes que se submeteram à estabilização dinâmica pedicular para o tratamento da patologia degenerativa lombar. MÉTODOS: foram avaliados 31 pacientes que se submeteram à estabilização dinâmica pedicular, de abril de 2004 a junho de 2008, por meio do questionário de qualidade de vida SF-36. RESULTADOS: o SF-36 mostrou um índice de melhora na qualidade de vida desses pacientes durante o período de acompanhamento, variando de 33,15% no pré-operatório, para 75,99% no pós-operatório, correspondente a uma diferença de 129% no resultado final, que é significativo estatisticamente de acordo com o teste t de student (pINTRODUCCIÓN: la estabilización dinámica pedicular ha sido empleada desde los años 1990 en el tratamiento de la enfermedad degenerativa lumbar y como una alternativa a los métodos de fusión. Debido a sus características de no requerir fusión, estos implantes tiendes a reducir la carga sobre los disco intervertebrales adyacentes y sobre la columna posterior, con el propósito de no afectar la biomecánica vertebral. Por lo tanto, disminuye la degeneración de discos adyacentes. OBJETIVO: esto estudio retrospectivo tiene la finalidad de evaluar los resultados obtenidos al emplear el cuestionario SF-36, en pacientes que han presentado estabilización dinámica pedicular durante el tratamiento de la patología degenerativa da columna lumbar. M

  9. Physical and Mental Health Status of Staff Working for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: Measurement with the 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Sheng-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Little explicit attention has been given to the generic health profile of staff working for people with intellectual disability in institutions. This study aimed to provide a profile of physical and mental health of staff working in disability welfare institutions, and to examine the possible demographic and organizational factors that explain an…

  10. Bodily Synchronization Underlying Joke Telling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Schmidt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock-knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily dance occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this dance is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction.

  11. Testing whether patients with diabetes and healthy people perceive the meaning of the items in the Persian version of the SF-36 questionnaire similarly: a differential item functioning analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Zahra; Jafari, Peyman; Mahmoodi, Marzieh; Dabbaghmanesh, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-04-01

    It has been rarely studied whether observed disparity in health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) scores between patients with diabetes and healthy individuals is due to differential item functioning (DIF) or a true difference in the underlying construct. This study aimed to examine DIF in the SF-36 questionnaire and its effect on comparing HRQoL scores between patients with diabetes and healthy people. The sample consisted of 230 patients with type 2 diabetes and 642 healthy individuals who filled out the Persian version of the SF-36 questionnaire. To detect DIF across patients with diabetes and healthy individuals, multiple-group multiple-indicator multiple-causes model was used. In addition, item calibration strategy was used to determine whether the effect of item-level DIF was transferred to the scale level. Nine out of thirty-six (25 %) items were detected as DIF, of which one item (11 %) was flagged as uniform and eight items (89 %) as non-uniform DIF. Most of the DIF items were detected in the mental health component which includes vitality, perceived mental health and social functioning subscales rather than in physical health component. Moreover, nonsignificant latent mean differences for general health perception and social functioning subscales became significant after DIF calibration. The findings of the present study show that patients with diabetes and healthy individuals perceived some items in the SF-36 questionnaire differently. More importantly, in some subscales, the effect of item-level DIF was transferred to the scale level. Consequently, considerable caution should be taken in comparing HRQoL scores between patients with diabetes and healthy individuals.

  12. "Análise dos instrumentos de avaliação de qualidade de vida WHOQOL-bref e SF-36: confiabilidade, validade e concordância entre pacientes de Unidades de Terapia Intensiva e seus familiares"

    OpenAIRE

    Suely Sueko Viski Zanei

    2006-01-01

    Este estudo teve como objetivos: analisar as propriedades psicométricas dos instrumentos de avaliação de qualidade de vida WHOQOL-bref e SF-36 aplicados a pacientes adultos após a internação em Unidades de Terapia Intensiva e a seus familiares e, avaliar a concordância entre pacientes e familiares como seus substitutos. A amostra foi composta por 71 pares paciente-famíliar. A confiabilidade foi avaliada pela consistência interna através do Coeficiente Alfa de Cronbach. A validade convergente ...

  13. Hypertension Impact on Health-Related Quality of Life: A Cross-Sectional Survey among Middle-Aged Adults in Chongqing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a major risk factor of cardiovascular disease in China, and yet little is known about health-related quality of life (HRQOL and its associations with demographic and social-economic characteristics in middle-aged patients with hypertension. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in Chongqing, China, using a multistage stratified random sampling methodology. Data was collected on 1,224 eligible adults, aged between 45 and 53 years, including the Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form-36 to measure HRQOL. Hypertension was associated with poor state of physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, and social function (p<0.05 for all. In multivariable analyses, education level, job conditions, average monthly income, smoking status, sleep quality, perception of relationship with family, childhood breastfeeding history, and body mass index were associated with domains of SF36 among those with hypertension (p<0.05 for all. Hypertensive respondents with high education, marital status, breastfeeding, higher incomes, good quality of sleep, positive relationship with family, and higher body mass index have better HRQOL in middle-aged people with hypertension. Those unemployed had a better state of general health and had a poorer state of social function. Nonsmokers had a poorer state of bodily pain than smokers. This study provides detailed information of the implications for health care providers to gain a more complete picture of their hypertension patients’ health.

  14. Comparison of Blood Transfusion Plus Chelation Therapy and Bone Marrow Transplantation in Patients with β-Thalassemia: Application of SF-36, EQ-5D, and Visual Analogue Scale Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Javanbakht

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: β-Thalassemia is a prevalent genetic disease in Mediterranean countries. The most common treatments for this disease are blood transfusion plus iron chelation (BTIC therapy and bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Patients using these procedures experience different health-related quality of life (HRQoL. The purpose of the present study was to measure HRQoL in these patients using 2 different multiattribute quality of life (QoL scales. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, data were gathered using 3 instruments: a socio-demographic questionnaire, EQ-5D, and SF-36. A total of 196 patients with β-thalassemia were randomly selected from 2 hospitals in Shiraz (Southern Iran. Data were analyzed using logistic regression and multiple regression models to identify factors that affect the patients’ HRQoL. Results: The average EQ-5D index and EQ visual analog scale (VAS scores were 0.86 (95% CI: 0.83–0.89 and 71.85 (95% CI: 69.13–74.58, respectively. Patients with BMT reported significantly higher EQ VAS scores (83.27 vs 68.55, respectively. The results showed that patients who lived in rural area and patients with BMT reported higher EQ VAS scores (rural; β=10.25, P=.006 and BMT; β=11.88, P=.000. As well, SF-36 between 2 groups of patients were statistically significant in physical component scale (PCS. Conclusion: Patients in the BMT group experienced higher HRQoL in both physical and mental aspects compared to those in the BTIC group. More studies are needed to assess the relative cost-effectiveness of these methods in developing countries.

  15. Bodily Deviations and Body Image in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilhjalmsson, Runar; Kristjansdottir, Gudrun; Ward, Dianne S.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescents with unusually sized or shaped bodies may experience ridicule, rejection, or exclusion based on their negatively valued bodily characteristics. Such experiences can have negative consequences for a person's image and evaluation of self. This study focuses on the relationship between bodily deviations and body image and is based on a…

  16. Symptoms and syndromes of bodily distress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Per; Toft, Tomas; Hansen, Morten Steen

    2007-01-01

    that they are different manifestations of a common latent phenomenon. Inclusion of a group of five additional general, unspecific symptoms in latent class analysis allowed construction of clinical diagnostic criteria for 'bodily distress disorder' dividing patients into three classes: nonbodily distress (n = 589), modest...... diagnoses. Bodily distress may be triggered by stress rather than being distinct diseases of noncerebral pathology....

  17. Bodily integrity and male and female circumcision.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, W.J.M.; Hoffer, C.; Wils, J.-P.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the ambiguous notion of bodily integrity, focusing on male and female circumcision. In the empirical part of the study we describe and analyse the various meanings that are given to the notion of bodily integrity by people in their daily lives. In the philosophical part we

  18. Qualidade de vida de pacientes com insuficiência renal crônica em hemodiálise avaliada através do instrumento genérico SF-36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castro Mônica de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Qualidade de vida é um conceito novo na área de saúde e existem controvérsias na aplicação da prática clínica. No Brasil, trabalhos foram realizados na área de nefrologia, indicando a necessidade de maiores estudos. OBJETIVOS: Analisar a qualidade de vida dos pacientes com diferentes tempos de hemodiálise. MÉTODOS: O estudo constou de uma entrevista com aplicação do SF-36, coleta de dados demográficos e socioeconômicos, obtenção das principais características clínicas e coleta de dados bioquímicos. RESULTADOS: Foram estudados 184 pacientes, sendo 63% do sexo masculino, com idade de 46±15anos (X±DP, tempo em hemodiálise 30±36 meses, 48% com escolaridade até quatro anos e 53% pertenciam às classes D e E. Constatou-se comprometimento nas diferentes dimensões analisadas, sendo que os menores resultados foram nos aspectos físicos e vitalidade. Verificou-se correlação negativa entre idade e capacidade funcional, aspectos físicos, dor e vitalidade; entre tempo de hemodiálise e aspectos emocionais. Por outro lado, constatou-se correlação positiva entre escolaridade e aspecto emocionais e entre hemoglobina e vitalidade. Além disso, observou-se que os pacientes diabéticos, quando comparados aos não diabéticos, eram mais idosos e apresentavam menores valores nas dimensões capacidade funcional e estado geral de saúde. CONCLUSÕES: O SF-36 foi um bom instrumento para avaliar qualidade de vida de pacientes em hemodiálise. A população estudada apresentou comprometimento em várias dimensões analisadas. A presença de doença crônica, a necessidade de tratamento contínuo por um longo período, idade avançada, assim como a presença de co-morbidades são fatores que podem interferir na qualidade de vida dessa população.

  19. Bodily action penetrates affective perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantoni, Carlo; Rigutti, Sara; Gerbino, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Fantoni & Gerbino (2014) showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP), they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015) would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer's internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification) task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer's internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions), in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top-down effect on

  20. Bodily action penetrates affective perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fantoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fantoni & Gerbino (2014 showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP, they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015 would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer’s internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer’s internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions, in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top

  1. Bodily integrity and male and female circumcision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Wim; Hoffer, Cor; Wils, Jean-Pierre

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the ambiguous notion of bodily integrity, focusing on male and female circumcision. In the empirical part of the study we describe and analyse the various meanings that are given to the notion of bodily integrity by people in their daily lives. In the philosophical part we distinguish (1) between a person-oriented and a body-oriented approach and (2) between four levels of interpretation, i.e. bodily integrity conceived of as a biological wholeness, an experiential wholeness, an intact wholeness, and as an inviolable wholeness. We argue that bodily integrity is a prima facie principle in its own right, closely connected with, but still fundamentally different from, the principle of personal autonomy, that is, autonomy over the body.

  2. From facial expressions to bodily gestures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to determine to what extent photographic practices in psychology, psychiatry and physiology contributed to the definition of the external bodily signs of passions and emotions in the second half of the 19th century in France. Bridging the gap between recent research in the history of emotions and photographic history, the following analyses focus on the photographic production of scientists and photographers who made significant contributions to the study of expressions and gestures, namely Duchenne de Boulogne, Charles Darwin, Paul Richer and Albert Londe. This article argues that photography became a key technology in their works due to the adequateness of the exposure time of different cameras to the duration of the bodily manifestations to be recorded, and that these uses constituted facial expressions and bodily gestures as particular objects for the scientific study. PMID:26900264

  3. Bodily-material resources in CSCL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Ryberg, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Within CSCL language is often perceived as the primary vehicle for knowledge building and collaboration, whereas bodily-material resources are explored to a lesser extent. In this data session we explore the importance of gestures and body movements as bodily-material resources in relation...... to communication, learning and collaboration and how they are used to organise intra- and inter-psychological processes. By presenting two short video excerpts of children working with the concept of scale around a touchscreen, we want to facilitate a discussion on what can be gained theoretically...

  4. Reliability, validity and responsiveness of a Norwegian version of the Chronic Sinusitis Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Røssberg Edna

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Chronic Sinusitis Survey (CSS is a valid, disease-specific questionnaire for assessing health status and treatment effectiveness in chronic rhinosinusitis. In the present study, we developed a Norwegian version of the CSS and assessed its psychometric properties. Methods In the pooled data set of 65 patients from a trial of treatment for chronic sinusitis with long-standing symptoms and signs of sinusitis on computed tomography (CT, we assessed the reliability, validity and responsiveness of the CSS. Results Test-retest reliability of the two CSS scales and the total scale ranged 0.87–0.92, while internal consistency reliability ranged 0.31–0.55. CSS subscale scores were associated with other items on sinusitis symptoms, and with the Mental health and Bodily pain scale of the SF-36. There was little association of the CSS scale scores with sinus CT findings. The patients with chronic sinusitis had worse scores on all three CSS scales than a healthy reference population (n = 42 (p Conclusion The Norwegian version of the CSS had acceptable test-retest reliability, but lower internal consistency reliability than the accepted standard criteria. The results support the construct validity of the measure and the sinusitis symptoms subscale and the total scales were responsive to change. This supports the use of the questionnaire in interventions for chronic sinusitis, but points at problems with the internal consistency reliability.

  5. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 2. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Do Parasites and the Immune System Choose their Dances? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 2 February 1997 pp 17-24 ...

  6. The Immune System and Bodily Defence

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. The Immune System and Bodily Defence How Does the Immune System Organize Itself so as to Connect Target Recognition to Expected Functions? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 6 June 1997 pp 25-38 ...

  7. Minimal Clinically Important Difference based on Clinical Judgment and Minimally Detectable Measurement Difference: A rationale for the SF-36 Physical Function scale in the SPORT Intervertebral Disc Herniation Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Kevin F.

    2010-01-01

    Design A proof of concept case study. Objective To introduce and evaluate a method for identifying what constitutes a minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in the SF-36 Physical Function scale at the patient level. Background MCID has become increasingly important to researchers interested in evaluating patient care. Over the last 30 years, an array of approaches for assessing MCID has evolved with little consensus on which approach applies in any given situation. Methods Three approaches for estimating standard errors of measurement (se) and a 30% change approach for establishing MCID were evaluated for the PF scale with SPORT patients in the IDH cohort. MCIDs for each se approach were then developed based on 1) these standard errors and 2) clinically relevant factors including: a) baseline PF score, and b) acceptable risk for type I error. Results IDH patients (N=996) identified from the SPORT database met inclusion criteria. The se for the CTT-based test level approach was 9.66. CTT-score-level and IRT-pattern-level standard errors varied depending on the score, and ranged from (2.73–7.17) and (5.96–16.2), respectively. As predicted, CTT-score-level se values were much smaller than IRT-pattern-level se values at the extreme scores and IRT-pattern-level se values were slightly smaller than CTT score-level se values in the middle of the distribution. Across follow-up intervals, the CTT-score-based approach consistently demonstrated greater sensitivity for identifying patients who were Improved or Worsened. Comparisons of CTT-based-score-level se and 30% improvement rule MCID estimates were as hypothesized: MCID values for 30%-gains demonstrated substantially lower sensitivity to change for baseline PF scores in the 0–50 range but were similar to CTT-score-level-based MCIDs when baseline scores were above 50. Conclusion The CTT-based-score-level approach for establishing MCID based on the clinical relevance of the baseline PF score and the tolerance

  8. Bodily ownership and self-location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serino, Andrea; Alsmith, Adrian John Tetteh; Costantini, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    Recent research on bodily self-consciousness has assumed that it consists of three distinct components: the experience of owning a body (body ownership); the experience of being a body with a given location within the environment (self-location); and the experience of taking a first-person, body....... We examine these results and consider them in relation to clinical evidence from patients with altered body perception and work on a variety of multisensory, body-related illusions, such as the rubber hand illusion, the full body illusion, the body swap illusion and the enfacement illusion. We...... conclude by providing a preliminary synthesis of the data on bodily self-consciousness and its neural correlates....

  9. Maps and Paths: bodily practices and transculturality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Antonio Mencarelli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Grotowski’s interest in practices from different cultures had special importance during his transition from the Paratheatre phase (1969-1978 to the so-called Theatre of Sources (1976-1982. This article deals with the way this occurred and how was conceived this experience in its transcultural dimension based on bodily practices present in different cultures and which are transmitted as embodied knowledge.

  10. Bodily-visual practices and turn continuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Cecilia E; Thompson, Sandra A; Drake, Veronika

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers points in turn construction where conversation researchers have shown that talk routinely continues beyond possible turn completion, but where we find bodily-visual behavior doing such turn extension work. The bodily-visual behaviors we examine share many features with verbal turn extensions, but we argue that embodied movements have distinct properties that make them well-suited for specific kinds of social action, including stance display and by-play in sequences framed as subsidiary to a simultaneous and related verbal exchange. Our study is in line with a research agenda taking seriously the point made by Goodwin (2000a, b, 2003), Hayashi (2003, 2005), Iwasaki (2009), and others that scholars seeking to account for practices in language and social interaction do themselves a disservice if they privilege the verbal dimension; rather, as suggested in Stivers/Sidnell (2005), each semiotic system/modality, while coordinated with others, has its own organization. With the current exploration of bodily-visual turn extensions, we hope to contribute to a growing understanding of how these different modes of organization are managed concurrently and in concert by interactants in carrying out their everyday social actions.

  11. Short form 36-Item Health Survey test result on the empty nest elderly in China: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Ling; Jiang, Yu-Hong; Sun, Ye-Huan; Ren, Ci-Zao; Sun, Chen-Yu; Sun, Liang; Wu, Zhen-Qiang; Zhao, Xue

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of life of the empty nest elderly in China using meta-analytic techniques. Electronic databases were searched for studies concerning the quality of life of the empty nest elderly published before December 2011. Pooled weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated with fixed and random effect models. Subgroup analyses, sensitivity analyses and publication bias were also performed. Ten studies (6948 empty nesters and 4560 non-empty nesters) were included in this meta-analysis. Vitality (WMD -1.946; 95% CI -3.183 to -0.708), role emotional (WMD -6.084; 95% CI -8.545 to -3.623) and mental health (WMD -2.606; 95% CI -3.964 to -1.249) were statistically significantly low in the empty nest elderly whereas physical functioning, role physical, bodily pain, general health, and social functioning showed no statistical significance. Subgroup analyses showed a statistical significance with WMD of role emotional and mental health in urban area, that of role physical, bodily pain, vitality, role emotional and mental health in rural area, and that of vitality, social functioning, role emotional and mental health in mix area. This meta-analysis indicated that among eight dimensions of the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36), only vitality, role emotional and mental health (mental components) were statistically significantly low in the empty nest elderly. More studies are needed to confirm this finding. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Kinship Care: Analysis of the Health and Well-Being of Grandfathers Raising Grandchildren Using the Grandparent Assessment Tool and the Medical Outcomes Trust SF-36 TM Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okagbue-Reaves, Janet

    2005-01-01

    As more and more children are being separated from their biological parents because of AIDS, substance abuse, mental and physical illness, incarceration, and child abuse and neglect, child welfare agencies are relying more often on kinship care as a viable option for out-of-home placements. In many cases, kinship care falls on the grandparents.…

  13. Bodily distalization of molars with absolute anchorage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keles, Ahmet; Erverdi, Nejat; Sezen, Serdar

    2003-08-01

    Palatal implants have been used over the last two decades to eliminate headgear wear and to establish stationary anchorage. In this case report, the stability of a palatal implant for distalization of molars bodily and for anchorage maintenance was assessed. The implant was a stepped screw titanium (4.5 mm diameter x 8 mm length), and it was placed in the palatal region for orthodontic purposes. A surgical template containing a metal drill housing was prepared. Angulation of the drill housing was controlled according to the radiologic tracing of the maxilla transferred to a plaster cast section in the paramedian plane. The implant was placed using a noninvasive technique (incision, flap, and suture elimination) and left transmucosally to facilitate the surgical procedure and to reduce the number of operations. The paramedian region was selected (1) to avoid the connective tissues of the palatine suture and (2) because it is considered to be a suitable host site for implant placement. After three months of healing, the implant was osseointegrated and orthodontic treatment was initiated. For molar distalization, the Keles Slider appliance was modified and, instead of a Nance button, a palatal implant was used for anchorage. The results showed that the molars were distalized bodily at five months, and no anchorage loss was observed. At the end of the treatment, the smile was improved, and an ideal Class I molar and canine relationship, an ideal overbite, and an ideal overjet were all achieved. In conclusion, palatal implants can be used effectively for anchorage maintenance and in space-gaining procedures. Use of a three-dimensional surgical template eliminated implant placement errors, reduced chair time, minimized trauma to the tissues, and enhanced osseointegration. This method can be used effectively to achieve distalization of molars bodily without anchorage loss.

  14. Resonance and Transcendence of a Bodily Presence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rikke Munck; Farsø, Mads

    2018-01-01

    This article elucidates how film may offer itself as ‘resonance tool’ for both representation and conception of space that can strengthen an alternative, phenomenological and haptic position of transcendence in architecture, a position from which landscapes and cities are thought, planned...... films the article points to the film media as a sensory amplifier and its ability to present a subject’s awareness of its bodily presence and a ”feeling into” space based on Gernot Bohme’s Den Raum leiblicher Anwesenheit (Böhme 2006) and Giuliana Bruno’s concept of resonance (Bruno 2014). How film...

  15. Injectible bodily prosthetics employing methacrylic copolymer gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Anderson, Brian C.

    2007-02-27

    The present invention provides novel block copolymers as structural supplements for injectible bodily prosthetics employed in medical or cosmetic procedures. The invention also includes the use of such block copolymers as nucleus pulposus replacement materials for the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and spinal injuries. The copolymers are constructed by polymerization of a tertiary amine methacrylate with either a (poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) polymer, such as the commercially available Pluronic.RTM. polymers, or a poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether polymer.

  16. Evolução dos questionários Oswestry 2.0 e do componente físico (PCS do SF-36 durante o primeiro ano de pós-operatório de artrodese da coluna lombar em doenças degenerativas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Henrique Silveira Bechara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a melhora clínica dos pacientes submetidos a descompressão e artrodese lombar póstero-lateral por doença degenerativa, avaliando a evolução dos escores do questionário Oswestry 2.0 e pelo componente físico (PCS da escala SF-36. MÉTODOS: Estudo prospectivo com 19 pacientes consecutivos com diagnóstico de doença degenerativa de disco (hérnia de disco, estenose lombar ou espondilolistese degenerativa submetidos à descompressão e artrodese póstero-lateral. Todos os pacientes incluídos em nosso estudo responderam aos questionários Oswestry 2.0 e SF-36 em cinco momentos diferentes: no período pré-operatório e após 45, 90, 180 e 360 dias de cirurgia. RESULTADOS: Os escores dos questionários Oswestry 2.0 e do componente físico (PCS do SF-36 dos 19 pacientes mostraram melhora significativa (p<0,001 e p=0,004 respectivamente ao longo de um ano de seguimento pós-operatório. Não houve diferença significativa de melhora desses escores quando feita comparação entre os diagnósticos (hérnia de disco, estenose lombar ou espondilolistese degenerativa, o sexo dos pacientes e entre os indivíduos com idade até cinquenta anos e aqueles acima de cinquenta anos. CONCLUSÃO: Houve uma melhora dos escores nos questionários de Oswestry 2.0 e do componente físico (PCS do SF-36 nos pacientes com doença degenerativa da coluna lombar sem resposta ao tratamento conservador, que foram submetidos a tratamento cirúrgico com descompressão e artrodese após um ano de seguimento pós-operatório.

  17. Suspect Subjects: Affects of Bodily Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Henne

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of academic literature that scrutinises the effects of technologies deployed to surveil the physical bodies of citizens. This paper considers the role of affect; that is, the visceral and emotive forces underpinning conscious forms of knowing that can drive one’s thoughts, feelings and movements. Drawing from research on two distinctly different groups of surveilled subjects – paroled sex offenders and elite athletes – it examines the effects of biosurveillance in their lives and how their reflections reveal unique insight into how subjectivity, citizenship, harm and deviance become constructed in intimate and public ways vis-à-vis technologies of bodily regulation. Specifically, we argue, their narratives reveal cultural conditions of biosurveillance, particularly how risk becomes embodied and internalised in subjective ways.

  18. Therapeutic bodily assistive devices and paralympic athlete expectations in winter sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbring, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    To ascertain the impact of therapeutic bodily assistive devices that enable beyond-the-normal body abilities on sport in general and the Paralympics and Olympics in particular. Cross-sectional survey. Online. Members of the National Council on Rehabilitation Education (United States). Distribution of online survey link to membership. The survey used a combination of 37 simple yes or no, Likert scale, and opinion rating scale questions. This article is based on 4 of the 37 questions that focus on the impact of therapeutic enhancements on various aspects of sport. Whether respondents felt that there is an impact of therapeutic bodily assistive devices that enable beyond-the-normal body abilities on the participation of people with disabilities in sport of all levels and the self-identity of athletes with disabilities. Secondary outcome measure was what the respondents felt the impact may be. The respondents indicated that therapeutic bodily assistive devices, which enable beyond-the-normal body abilities, will have an impact on participation of people with disabilities in sport at all levels and on the self-identity of athletes with disabilities. Given the result that the respondents felt that therapeutic enhancements will impact various aspects of sport, it may be prudent to initiate a broader discourse around therapeutic enhancement and to revise codes of ethics so that they give guidance on this topic.

  19. [Bodily excellence and education: ambiguities of performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queval, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The notion of excellence contains an ambivalence: to aim at the "good" and/or to aim at the "best". This ambivalence exists particularly in the physical effort and in the history of bodily practices, shared between gymnastics, physical education and sports. In the second part of the XXth century, the notion of performance became "worship of performance", "infinite perfectibility". In this context, high level sports became the human improvement laboratory, thanks to the sophistication of its technical means and the its practices intensity. However this "high" questions: about physical and psychological consequences of intensive practices ; about doping and its medical and ethical perspectives; about the increasing precociousness and the potential exploitation of the baby champions. It questions about the nature of familial, social, economical norms transmitted by education: about articulation between constraint and self-government. This is the question about the "price" of excellence. In this sense it appears that the excellence of champion spreads out the margins of an ethics which would be meant to be regulating and universal, indeed this excellence is perhaps, in the same capacity as genius is and in spite of the attachment of sports to a "ethics of the rule", un-ethical.

  20. Unconscious integration of multisensory bodily inputs in the peripersonal space shapes bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Roy; Noel, Jean-Paul; Łukowska, Marta; Faivre, Nathan; Metzinger, Thomas; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2017-09-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the role of multisensory integration as a key mechanism of self-consciousness. In particular, integration of bodily signals within the peripersonal space (PPS) underlies the experience of the self in a body we own (self-identification) and that is experienced as occupying a specific location in space (self-location), two main components of bodily self-consciousness (BSC). Experiments investigating the effects of multisensory integration on BSC have typically employed supra-threshold sensory stimuli, neglecting the role of unconscious sensory signals in BSC, as tested in other consciousness research. Here, we used psychophysical techniques to test whether multisensory integration of bodily stimuli underlying BSC also occurs for multisensory inputs presented below the threshold of conscious perception. Our results indicate that visual stimuli rendered invisible through continuous flash suppression boost processing of tactile stimuli on the body (Exp. 1), and enhance the perception of near-threshold tactile stimuli (Exp. 2), only once they entered PPS. We then employed unconscious multisensory stimulation to manipulate BSC. Participants were presented with tactile stimulation on their body and with visual stimuli on a virtual body, seen at a distance, which were either visible or rendered invisible. We found that participants reported higher self-identification with the virtual body in the synchronous visuo-tactile stimulation (as compared to asynchronous stimulation; Exp. 3), and shifted their self-location toward the virtual body (Exp.4), even if stimuli were fully invisible. Our results indicate that multisensory inputs, even outside of awareness, are integrated and affect the phenomenological content of self-consciousness, grounding BSC firmly in the field of psychophysical consciousness studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality of life assessed with the medical outcomes study short form 36-item health survey of patients on renal replacement therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.S. Liem (Ylian Serina); J.L. Bosch (Johanna); L.R. Arends (Lidia); M.H. Heijenbrok-Kal (Majanka); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: The Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36) is the most widely used generic instrument to estimate quality of life of patients on renal replacement therapy. Purpose of this study was to summarize and compare the published literature on quality of

  2. The role of religiosity, religious norms, subjective norms, and bodily integrity in signing an organ donor card.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Michael T; Morgan, Susan E; Roberts-Perez, Samaria D; Harrison, Tyler; Afifi, Walid; Long, Shawn D

    2008-09-01

    This article examines the influence of religiosity, religious norms, subjective norms, and bodily integrity (the extent to which people think the body should remain unaltered after death) on intent to donate organs postmortem. A total of 4,426 participants from 6 universities completed surveys for this study. The results indicate that religiosity and religious norms had a nonsignificant effect on willingness to donate. In addition, attitudes toward donation had a weak positive relationship on intent to donate, whereas subjective norms exerted a modest positive relationship on intent to donate. Finally, the results reveal a strong direct and indirect effect of bodily integrity on intent to donate.

  3. Bodily ownership and self-location: components of bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Andrea; Alsmith, Adrian; Costantini, Marcello; Mandrigin, Alisa; Tajadura-Jimenez, Ana; Lopez, Christophe

    2013-12-01

    Recent research on bodily self-consciousness has assumed that it consists of three distinct components: the experience of owning a body (body ownership); the experience of being a body with a given location within the environment (self-location); and the experience of taking a first-person, body-centered, perspective on that environment (perspective). Here we review recent neuroimaging studies suggesting that at least two of these components-body ownership and self-location-are implemented in rather distinct neural substrates, located, respectively, in the premotor cortex and in the temporo-parietal junction. We examine these results and consider them in relation to clinical evidence from patients with altered body perception and work on a variety of multisensory, body-related illusions, such as the rubber hand illusion, the full body illusion, the body swap illusion and the enfacement illusion. We conclude by providing a preliminary synthesis of the data on bodily self-consciousness and its neural correlates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Bodily shame as a mediator between abusive experiences and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, B

    1995-05-01

    The role of bodily shame as a mediator between sexual or physical abuse and depression was investigated in a community sample of 101 women who had been followed for 8 years. In general, childhood and adult abuse were related to the occurrence of depression in the study period but when both were considered together, only adult abuse showed an independent association. However, childhood and adult abuse were both independently related to chronic or recurrent depression. Bodily shame was related to childhood abuse, and this association could not be accounted for by bodily dissatisfaction or low self-esteem. Bodily shame, but not childhood abuse, was related to chronic or recurrent depression when both factors were considered together and current depressive symptoms were controlled.

  5. Proteomics analysis of bodily fluids in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Sheng; Brentnall, Teresa A; Chen, Ru

    2015-08-01

    Proteomics study of pancreatic cancer using bodily fluids emphasizes biomarker discovery and clinical application, presenting unique prospect and challenges. Depending on the physiological nature of the bodily fluid and its proximity to pancreatic cancer, the proteomes of bodily fluids, such as pancreatic juice, pancreatic cyst fluid, blood, bile, and urine, can be substantially different in terms of protein constitution and the dynamic range of protein concentration. Thus, a comprehensive discovery and specific detection of cancer-associated proteins within these varied fluids is a complex task, requiring rigorous experiment design and a concerted approach. While major challenges still remain, fluid proteomics studies in pancreatic cancer to date have provided a wealth of information in revealing proteome alterations associated with pancreatic cancer in various bodily fluids. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Behavioral, Neural, and Computational Principles of Bodily Self-Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanke, Olaf; Slater, Mel; Serino, Andrea

    2015-10-07

    Recent work in human cognitive neuroscience has linked self-consciousness to the processing of multisensory bodily signals (bodily self-consciousness [BSC]) in fronto-parietal cortex and more posterior temporo-parietal regions. We highlight the behavioral, neurophysiological, neuroimaging, and computational laws that subtend BSC in humans and non-human primates. We propose that BSC includes body-centered perception (hand, face, and trunk), based on the integration of proprioceptive, vestibular, and visual bodily inputs, and involves spatio-temporal mechanisms integrating multisensory bodily stimuli within peripersonal space (PPS). We develop four major constraints of BSC (proprioception, body-related visual information, PPS, and embodiment) and argue that the fronto-parietal and temporo-parietal processing of trunk-centered multisensory signals in PPS is of particular relevance for theoretical models and simulations of BSC and eventually of self-consciousness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Reindeer & Wolves: Exploring Sensory Deprivation in Multiplayer Digital Bodily Play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnegan, Daniel; Velloso, Eduardo; Mitchell, Robb

    2014-01-01

    Games designed around digital bodily play involve bodily movement and expression to create engaging gameplay experiences. Most feedback in these games takes the form of visual stimuli. To explore the gameplay mechanics afforded by depriving players from these visual cues, we designed Reindeer & W...... & Wolves, a role-playing game where blindfolded players capture other players relying on their hearing alone. Based on our design and play testing, we devised four strategies for designing games that incorporate sensory deprivation as an element of the core mechanic.......Games designed around digital bodily play involve bodily movement and expression to create engaging gameplay experiences. Most feedback in these games takes the form of visual stimuli. To explore the gameplay mechanics afforded by depriving players from these visual cues, we designed Reindeer...

  8. Evaluation of patient-perceived health status using the Medical Outcomes Survey Short-Form 36 in an intensive care unit population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, C H; Thompson, K; Long-Krug, S

    1999-08-01

    Baseline patient functional status as assessed by providers is correlated with mortality after intensive care unit (ICU) admission. We wanted to see if patient self-perception of health status before admission to an ICU correlated with functional outcome. Prospective survey on a convenience sample. Single urban university-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medial Center. One hundred ninety-nine patients in surgical and medical/coronary ICUs. None. Patient-assessed baseline health status was monitored with the Medical Outcome Survey Short-Form 36 (SF-36), consisting of 36 questions that evaluate eight health status concepts. In addition, baseline functional status (Zubrod scale) was determined and severity of illness (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation [APACHE] II) data were collected. Zubrod functional status, which includes mortality, was determined 6 wks and 6 months after ICU admission, and correlation coefficients were calculated. We found it feasible to collect SF-36 health status data on a 9% sample in this setting. Less than 1% of responses were completed by proxy. The SF-36 data were internally consistent, and several of its scales including general health perception and physical functioning correlated with patient Zubrod functional status (r2 = .08, p vitality (r2 = .04, p measurement. The five-question general health evaluation portion correlated almost as well with outcome as the more extensive 36-item questionnaire. Use of the SF-36 may define patient populations for comparison across hospitals. It may also target individuals with needs for additional posthospitalization care, including rehabilitation services or nursing home placement.

  9. Survey on the Prevalence of Allergic Rhinitis and its Effect on the Quality of High School Students’ Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Amizadeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Allergic rhinitis (AR is a common airway disease. In order to study  the  prevalence of  AR in high school students  in  Kerman, the Score for Allergic Rhinitis (SFAR was used and the quality of life  in  the  students  affected  by  rhinitis was  evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire.   Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, analytical, descriptive study, based on the SFAR scale. Quality of life in students with AR was evaluated using the SF-36 questionnaire.   Results: From 1511 students who completed the SFAR questionnaire, 291 (52.6%, girls; 47.4%, boys  had AR. Domestic dust was the most common cause of the disease. The most common symptoms of AR were rhinorrhea (76.6%, epiphora (76.3%, nasal congestion (64.3%, and itching (54.3%. According to the ARYA scale, (Allergic Rhinitis and its Impact on Asthma, 41.9% of students had moderate-to-severe rhinitis and 58.1% had mild rhinitis. A total of 43.1% of patients with moderate-to-severe rhinitis had a persistent condition and 56.9% had an intermediate condition. Results of the SF-36 questionnaire among students with AR showed a significant difference in physical functioning and bodily pain in comparison with healthy students.   Conclusion:  The results of this study show that the prevalence of AR among Kerman high school students is 19.3%. Because of the effect of this disease on the life quality of high school students in terms of both physical functioning and bodily pain, efforts should be made to reduce allergen levels as far as possible.

  10. Congruent bodily arousal promotes the constructive recognition of emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kever, Anne; Grynberg, Delphine; Vermeulen, Nicolas

    2017-08-01

    Considerable research has shown that bodily states shape affect and cognition. Here, we examined whether transient states of bodily arousal influence the categorization speed of high arousal, low arousal, and neutral words. Participants realized two blocks of a constructive recognition task, once after a cycling session (increased arousal), and once after a relaxation session (reduced arousal). Results revealed overall faster response times for high arousal compared to low arousal words, and for positive compared to negative words. Importantly, low arousal words were categorized significantly faster after the relaxation than after the cycling, suggesting that a decrease in bodily arousal promotes the recognition of stimuli matching one's current arousal state. These findings highlight the importance of the arousal dimension in emotional processing, and suggest the presence of arousal-congruency effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acquisition of a bodily-tactile language as first language

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ask Larsen, Flemming

    2013-01-01

    towards Tactile Sign Language (TSL). The access to participation in complex TSL culture is crucial for language acquisition. We already know how to transfer the patterns of social interaction into the bodily-tactile modality. This is the fundation on which to build actual linguistic participation. TSL......Language acquisition in the bodily-tactile modality is difficult to understand, describe, and support. This chapter advocates a reinterpretation of the gestural and idiosyncratic bodily-tactile communication of people with congenital deafblindness (CDB) in terms of early language acquisition...... as a first language is presently a theoretic possibility. We need more research on how to accommodate TSL to language Development and on how to fit TSL into participation in complex cultural activities....

  12. Truthfulness in science teachers’ bodily and verbal actions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Peer

    2013-01-01

    actions. The analysis shows how science teachers engage truthfully in pupil relations through an effort of applying classroom management, among other things. In all, this indicates that if science education research wants to understand science teachers’ personal relations to teaching science it could......A dramaturgical approach to teacher’s personal bodily and verbal actions is applied through the vocabulary of truthfulness. Bodily and verbal actions have been investigated among Danish primary and lower secondary school science teachers based on their narratives and observations of their classroom...... be beneficial to address the truthfulness of science teachers’ narratives and actions....

  13. The Curvilinear Effect of BMI on Functional Health - Evidence of the Long-Running German Ageing Survey

    OpenAIRE

    André Hajek; Hans-Helmut König

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed at determining the effect of BMI on functional health among older Germans longitudinally. Methods: Data from four waves (2002-2014) of the German Ageing Survey (‘Deutscher Alterssurvey'; DEAS), a representative sample of community-dwelling individuals aged 40 years and above, were used. Functional health was quantified by the subscale ‘physical functioning' of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Fixed effects regressions were used to estimate the predictors of functio...

  14. an embodied spirituality: perspectives for a bodily pastoral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ad vo cate the importance of construing a more bodily theological anthropology .... it is important in describing its meaning for pastoral theology to take the view ..... aHNer, g. 2007. Business ethics. Making a life, not just a living. New York: Orbis Books. BeNeFieL, M. 2005. Soul at work. Spiritual leadership in organizations.

  15. Bodily disintegration and successful ageing in Body Bereft by Antjie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... body in a small selection of poems from this collection in relation to the unavoidable reality of bodily decay and what is referred to in gerontological theory as 'successful ageing'. This tension dominates large parts of the gerontological field, and can be seen in Krog's ambivalent representation of older age in Body Bereft.

  16. New procedure for declaring accidents resulting in bodily injuries

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The HR Department would like to remind members of personnel that, according to Administrative Circular No. 14 (Rev. 3), entitled “Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and incapacity for work”, accidents resulting in bodily injuries and presumed to be of an occupational nature should, under normal circumstances, be declared within 10 working days of the accident having occurred, accompanied by a medical certificate. In an effort to streamline procedures, occupational accident declarations should be made via EDH using the “declaration of occupational accident” electronic form. For the declaration of non-occupational accidents resulting in bodily injuries of members of the CERN Health Insurance Scheme (CHIS), a new paper form has been elaborated that can be downloaded from the CHIS website and is also available from the UNIQA Helpdesk in the Main Building. If you encounter technical difficulties with these new ...

  17. Bodily skill and internal representation in sensorimotor perception

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, David

    2017-01-01

    The sensorimotor theory of perceptual experience claims that perception is constituted by bodily interaction with the environment, drawing on practical knowledge of the systematic ways that sensory inputs are disposed to change as a result of movement. Despite the theory’s associations with enactivism, it is sometimes claimed that the appeal to ‘knowledge’ means that the theory is committed to giving an essential theoretical role to internal representation, and therefore to a form of orthodox...

  18. Modifying Action Sounds Influences People's Emotional Responses and Bodily Sensations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Miletto Tonetto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We report an experiment designed to investigate the effect of modifying the sound of high-heeled shoes on women's self-reported valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as any changes to a variety of measures of bodily sensation. We also assessed whether self-evaluated personality traits and the enjoyment associated with wearing heels were correlated with these effects. Forty-eight women walked down a “virtual runway” while listening to four interaction sounds (leather- and polypropylene-soled high-heeled shoes contacting ceramic flooring or carpet. Analysis of the questionnaires that the participants completed indicated that the type of sonic interaction impacted valence, arousal, and dominance scores, as well as the evaluated bodily sensations. There were also correlations between these scores and both self-evaluated personality traits and the reported enjoyment associated with wearing high heels. These results demonstrate the effect that the sound of a woman's physical interaction with the environment can have, especially when her contact with the ground while walking makes a louder sound. More generally, these results demonstrate that the manipulation of product extrinsic sounds can modify people's evaluation of their emotional outcomes (valence, arousal, and dominance, as well as their bodily sensations.

  19. Is cigarette smoking associated with impaired physical and mental functional status? An office-based survey of primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, S H; Rothemich, S F; Johnson, R E; Marsland, D W

    1999-08-01

    To examine the relationship between cigarette smoking and self-reported physical and mental functional status. Cross-sectional survey of 837 patients visiting 2 family-practice centers. Patients completed a self-administered survey about functional status, tobacco use, and demographic characteristics while waiting to be called back for their appointments. An inner-city family practice clinic in Richmond, Virginia, and a more affluent suburban practice outside Washington, DC. Physical and mental functional status, as measured by the SF-36 (Medical Outcomes Trust, Boston, MA); current and former cigarette use; and demographic variables (age, gender, education, income). Among current smokers, self-reported functional status scores were significantly lower than those of nonsmokers in all SF-36 domains (p < or = 0.02), a pattern that was more dramatic for mental functional status domains (social function, vitality, emotional role limitations, mental health). In several SF-36 domains, a dose-response relationship between smoking and functional status was noted. After multivariate adjustment for demographic confounders and practice site, the statistical significance of these differences diminished considerably, but it remained significant for certain domains and for the overall difference across all domains (MANCOVA p = 0.017). Current smokers report lower functional status than nonsmokers, in physical and especially in mental domains. The meaning of this cross-sectional relationship is unclear without further longitudinal study. Smoking may be associated with other variables that have a causal role.

  20. Praising as bodily practice: the neocharismatic culture of celebration

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    Tuija Hovi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic body movements and dancing, as well as singing, have been used as a means and inspiration for both individual and communal spiritual experience throughout the history of religions. This article takes a tentative look at the contemporary neocharismatic culture of celebration as a means of aiming at religious experience through collective bodily practice; namely praising, which is generally understood to take the form of singing but is, in fact, expressed also in bodily movements such as dancing. In the neocharismatic context, a celebration means a certain type of a meeting with a special focus on contemplative worship and prayer, accompanied with lively music of praise. First, the historical background of the neo­charismatic branch is outlined shortly. Secondly, the tradition of praise itself within this context is described – what are the insider definitions and what kinds of forms praise in the culture of celebration actually includes, especially in Finland. The description is basically based on internet material and the author's previous field experiences in the Word of Life congregational meetings and other charismatic Christian events. In conclusion, acts of praise as a source of religious experience are discussed.

  1. Unseen facial and bodily expressions trigger fast emotional reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamietto, Marco; Castelli, Lorys; Vighetti, Sergio; Perozzo, Paola; Geminiani, Giuliano; Weiskrantz, Lawrence; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2009-10-20

    The spontaneous tendency to synchronize our facial expressions with those of others is often termed emotional contagion. It is unclear, however, whether emotional contagion depends on visual awareness of the eliciting stimulus and which processes underlie the unfolding of expressive reactions in the observer. It has been suggested either that emotional contagion is driven by motor imitation (i.e., mimicry), or that it is one observable aspect of the emotional state arising when we see the corresponding emotion in others. Emotional contagion reactions to different classes of consciously seen and "unseen" stimuli were compared by presenting pictures of facial or bodily expressions either to the intact or blind visual field of two patients with unilateral destruction of the visual cortex and ensuing phenomenal blindness. Facial reactions were recorded using electromyography, and arousal responses were measured with pupil dilatation. Passive exposure to unseen expressions evoked faster facial reactions and higher arousal compared with seen stimuli, therefore indicating that emotional contagion occurs also when the triggering stimulus cannot be consciously perceived because of cortical blindness. Furthermore, stimuli that are very different in their visual characteristics, such as facial and bodily gestures, induced highly similar expressive responses. This shows that the patients did not simply imitate the motor pattern observed in the stimuli, but resonated to their affective meaning. Emotional contagion thus represents an instance of truly affective reactions that may be mediated by visual pathways of old evolutionary origin bypassing cortical vision while still providing a cornerstone for emotion communication and affect sharing.

  2. Prospectively surveying health-related quality of life and symptom relief in a lot-based sample of medical cannabis-using patients in urban Washington State reveals managed chronic illness and debility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, S K; Carter, G T; Sullivan, M D; Zumbrunnen, C; Morrill, R; Mayer, J D

    2013-09-01

    To characterize health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in medical cannabis patients. Short Form 36 (SF-36) Physical Health Component Score and Mental Health Component Score (MCS) surveys as well has CDC (Centers for Disease Control) HRQoL-14 surveys were completed by 37 qualified patients. Mean SF-36 PCS and MCS, normalized at 50, were 37.4 and 44.2, respectively. Eighty percent of participants reported activity/functional limitations secondary to impairments or health problems. Patients reported using medical cannabis to treat a wide array of symptoms across multiple body systems with relief ratings consistently in the 7-10/10 range. The HRQoL results in this sample of medical cannabis-using patients are comparable with published norms in other chronically ill populations. Data presented provide insight into medical cannabis-using patients' self-rated health, HRQoL, disease incidences, and cannabis-related symptom relief.

  3. The vestibular body: Vestibular contributions to bodily representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular signals are integrated with signals from other sensory modalities. This convergence could reflect an important mechanism for maintaining the perception of the body. Here we review the current literature in order to develop a framework for understanding how the vestibular system contributes to body representation. According to recent models, we distinguish between three processes for body representation, and we look at whether vestibular signals might influence each process. These are (i) somatosensation, the primary sensory processing of somatic stimuli, (ii) somatoperception, the processes of constructing percepts and experiences of somatic objects and events and (iii) somatorepresentation, the knowledge about the body as a physical object in the world. Vestibular signals appear to contribute to all three levels in this model of body processing. Thus, the traditional view of the vestibular system as a low-level, dedicated orienting module tends to underestimate the pervasive role of vestibular input in bodily self-awareness.

  4. American style or Turkish chair: the triumph of bodily comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çevik, Gülen

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the reciprocal influence of Ottoman Turkish and American interiors in the development of seating furniture. Seating furniture is unique because it involves a direct and physical interaction between the piece of furniture and the body, while at the same time it is part of a public space where social interactions occur. I will argue that the interactions between the Ottoman Turks and Americans are reflected in the way these traditions modified their seating furniture as they sought to mediate cultural, political and social differences between them. The concept of bodily comfort will serve as a common thread in understanding the origin of the expression "American style" (Amerikan stili or Amerikan tarzı) in modern Turkish language, the "Turkish chairs" in Victorian America in the late nineteenth century and the English language use of words such as sofa, ottoman and divan.

  5. When the mind forms fear: embodied fear knowledge potentiates bodily reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterwijk, S.; Topper, M.; Rotteveel, M.; Fischer, A.H.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, the authors tested whether conceptual fear knowledge can (a) evoke bodily reactions and (b) enhance subsequent bodily reactions to fearful stimuli. Participants unscrambled neutral or fear sentences and subsequently viewed fearful and neutral pictures in combination with

  6. Bodily Sensory Inputs and Anomalous Bodily Experiences in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Evaluation of the Potential Effects of Sound Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajadura-Jiménez, Ana; Cohen, Helen; Bianchi-Berthouze, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Neuroscientific studies have shown that human's mental body representations are not fixed but are constantly updated through sensory feedback, including sound feedback. This suggests potential new therapeutic sensory approaches for patients experiencing body-perception disturbances (BPD). BPD can occur in association with chronic pain, for example in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). BPD often impacts on emotional, social, and motor functioning. Here we present the results from a proof-of-principle pilot study investigating the potential value of using sound feedback for altering BPD and its related emotional state and motor behavior in those with CRPS. We build on previous findings that real-time alteration of the sounds produced by walking can alter healthy people's perception of their own body size, while also resulting in more active gait patterns and a more positive emotional state. In the present study we quantified the emotional state, BPD, pain levels and gait of twelve people with CRPS Type 1, who were exposed to real-time alteration of their walking sounds. Results confirm previous reports of the complexity of the BPD linked to CRPS, as participants could be classified into four BPD subgroups according to how they mentally visualize their body. Further, results suggest that sound feedback may affect the perceived size of the CRPS affected limb and the pain experienced, but that the effects may differ according to the type of BPD. Sound feedback affected CRPS descriptors and other bodily feelings and emotions including feelings of emotional dominance, limb detachment, position awareness, attention and negative feelings toward the limb. Gait also varied with sound feedback, affecting the foot contact time with the ground in a way consistent with experienced changes in body weight. Although, findings from this small pilot study should be interpreted with caution, they suggest potential applications for regenerating BDP and its related bodily feelings in

  7. Bodily Sensory Inputs and Anomalous Bodily Experiences in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: Evaluation of the Potential Effects of Sound Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tajadura-Jiménez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientific studies have shown that human's mental body representations are not fixed but are constantly updated through sensory feedback, including sound feedback. This suggests potential new therapeutic sensory approaches for patients experiencing body-perception disturbances (BPD. BPD can occur in association with chronic pain, for example in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS. BPD often impacts on emotional, social, and motor functioning. Here we present the results from a proof-of-principle pilot study investigating the potential value of using sound feedback for altering BPD and its related emotional state and motor behavior in those with CRPS. We build on previous findings that real-time alteration of the sounds produced by walking can alter healthy people's perception of their own body size, while also resulting in more active gait patterns and a more positive emotional state. In the present study we quantified the emotional state, BPD, pain levels and gait of twelve people with CRPS Type 1, who were exposed to real-time alteration of their walking sounds. Results confirm previous reports of the complexity of the BPD linked to CRPS, as participants could be classified into four BPD subgroups according to how they mentally visualize their body. Further, results suggest that sound feedback may affect the perceived size of the CRPS affected limb and the pain experienced, but that the effects may differ according to the type of BPD. Sound feedback affected CRPS descriptors and other bodily feelings and emotions including feelings of emotional dominance, limb detachment, position awareness, attention and negative feelings toward the limb. Gait also varied with sound feedback, affecting the foot contact time with the ground in a way consistent with experienced changes in body weight. Although, findings from this small pilot study should be interpreted with caution, they suggest potential applications for regenerating BDP and its related

  8. Validity and reliability of the Self-Reported Physical Fitness (SRFit) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, NiCole R; Clark, Daniel O; Stump, Timothy E; Miller, Douglas K; Callahan, Christopher M

    2014-05-01

    An accurate physical fitness survey could be useful in research and clinical care. To estimate the validity and reliability of a Self-Reported Fitness (SRFit) survey; an instrument that estimates muscular fitness, flexibility, cardiovascular endurance, BMI, and body composition (BC) in adults ≥ 40 years of age. 201 participants completed the SF-36 Physical Function Subscale, International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), Older Adults' Desire for Physical Competence Scale (Rejeski), the SRFit survey, and the Rikli and Jones Senior Fitness Test. BC, height and weight were measured. SRFit survey items described BC, BMI, and Senior Fitness Test movements. Correlations between the Senior Fitness Test and the SRFit survey assessed concurrent validity. Cronbach's Alpha measured internal consistency within each SRFit domain. SRFit domain scores were compared with SF-36, IPAQ, and Rejeski survey scores to assess construct validity. Intraclass correlations evaluated test-retest reliability. Correlations between SRFit and the Senior Fitness Test domains ranged from 0.35 to 0.79. Cronbach's Alpha scores were .75 to .85. Correlations between SRFit and other survey scores were -0.23 to 0.72 and in the expected direction. Intraclass correlation coefficients were 0.79 to 0.93. All P-values were 0.001. Initial evaluation supports the SRFit survey's validity and reliability.

  9. [Emotions and bodily experience in Hidradenitis Suppurative-Acne Inversa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, S; Bettoli, V; Agnoli, C; Caracciolo, S

    2016-01-01

    Hidradenitis Suppurative-Acne Inversa is one of the most debilitating chronic skin diseases. It seriously affects the emotional and relational life of the patient, it has a significant psychiatric comorbidity and it impairs the quality of life. We present the report of a clinical situation with onset of the illness in a young woman during pregnancy, a case characterized by particular evolution, severe systemic involvement, strong psycho-emotional impact on the patient and impairment of subjective well-being of the caregiver. The clinical evaluation highlights mainly the relevance of the bodily experience, that stands out as a central issue in the sufference of the patient. She feels an uncanny foreignness to herself and a lacerating wound of her identity, related to her desirability, her femininity and her motherhood. Specific personality factors, which are likely to have influenced and guided the experience of illness and the quality of the relationship with the treatment team, are also evaluated. This case exemplifies, at different levels, the clinical complexity of Hidradenitis Suppurative-Acne Inversa and its impact on individual subjectivity. This disease requires an integrated intervention by a multidisciplinary team, providing for the assessment, the treatment and the evaluation of outcomes. It is necessary an effective operational link between different competences, in order to promote the patient compliance and to activate and develop the best care and the right psychological support.

  10. Neuroscience robotics to investigate multisensory integration and bodily awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duenas, J; Chapuis, D; Pfeiffer, C; Martuzzi, R; Ionta, S; Blanke, O; Gassert, R

    2011-01-01

    Humans experience the self as localized within their body. This aspect of bodily self-consciousness can be experimentally manipulated by exposing individuals to conflicting multisensory input, or can be abnormal following focal brain injury. Recent technological developments helped to unravel some of the mechanisms underlying multisensory integration and self-location, but the neural underpinnings are still under investigation, and the manual application of stimuli resulted in large variability difficult to control. This paper presents the development and evaluation of an MR-compatible stroking device capable of presenting moving tactile stimuli to both legs and the back of participants lying on a scanner bed while acquiring functional neuroimaging data. The platform consists of four independent stroking devices with a travel of 16-20 cm and a maximum stroking velocity of 15 cm/s, actuated over non-magnetic ultrasonic motors. Complemented with virtual reality, this setup provides a unique research platform allowing to investigate multisensory integration and its effects on self-location under well-controlled experimental conditions. The MR-compatibility of the system was evaluated in both a 3 and a 7 Tesla scanner and showed negligible interference with brain imaging. In a preliminary study using a prototype device with only one tactile stimulator, fMRI data acquired on 12 healthy participants showed visuo-tactile synchrony-related and body-specific modulations of the brain activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex.

  11. Bodily attractiveness and egalitarianism are negatively related in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Michael E; Brown, Stuart; Dukes, Amber; Kang, Jinsheng

    2015-02-09

    Ancestrally, relatively attractive individuals and relatively formidable males may have had reduced incentives to be egalitarian (i.e., to act in accordance with norms promoting social equality). If selection calibrated one's egalitarianism to one's attractiveness/formidability, then such people may exhibit reduced egalitarianism ("observed egalitarianism") and be perceived by others as less egalitarian ("perceived egalitarianism") in modern environments. To investigate, we created 3D body models of 125 participants to use both as a source of anthropometric measurements and as stimuli to obtain ratings of bodily attractiveness and perceived egalitarianism. We also measured observed egalitarianism (via an economic "dictator" game) and indices of political egalitarianism (preference for socialism over capitalism) and "equity sensitivity." Results indicated higher egalitarianism levels in women than in men, and moderate-to-strong negative relationships between (a) attractiveness and observed egalitarianism among men, (b) attractiveness and perceived egalitarianism among both sexes, and (c) formidability and perceived egalitarianism among men. We did not find support for two previously-reported findings: that observed egalitarianism and formidability are negatively related in men, and that wealth and formidability interact to explain variance in male egalitarianism. However, this lack of support may have been due to differences in variable measurement between our study and previous studies.

  12. Fear modulates visual awareness similarly for facial and bodily expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard M.C. Stienen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundSocial interaction depends on a multitude of signals carrying information about the emotional state of others. Past research has focused on the perception of facial expressions while perception of whole body signals has only been studied recently. The relative importance of facial and bodily signals is still poorly understood. In order to better understand the relative contribution of affective signals from the face only or from the rest of the body we used a binocular rivalry experiment. This method seems to be perfectly suitable to contrast two classes of stimuli to test our processing sensitivity to either stimulus and to address the question how emotion modulates this sensitivity. We report in this paper two behavioral experiments addressing these questions.MethodIn the first experiment we directly contrasted fearful, angry and neutral bodies and faces. We always presented bodies in one eye and faces in the other simultaneously for 60 seconds and asked participants to report what they perceived. In the second experiment we focused specifically on the role of fearful expressions of faces and bodies.ResultsTaken together the two experiments show that there is no clear bias towards either the face or body when the expression of the body and face are neutral or angry. However, the perceptual dominance in favor of either the face of the body is a function of the stimulus class expressing fear.

  13. Bodily Knowledge beyond Motor Skills and Physical Fitness: A Phenomenological Description of Knowledge Formation in Physical Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, Jaana; Aromaa, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    Bodily knowledge has attracted significant attention within the humanities and other related fields over the last two decades. Although theoretical discussion on bodily knowledge in the context of physical education has been active over the past 10 years, these discussions lack clear conceptual analyses of bodily knowledge. Using a…

  14. Quality of life and discriminating power of two questionnaires in fibromyalgia patients: fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey A qualidade de vida e o poder de discriminação de dois questionários em pacientes com fibromialgia: fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire e Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Assumpção

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a painful syndrome characterized by widespread chronic pain and associated symptoms with a negative impact on quality of life. OBJECTIVES: Considering the subjectivity of quality of life measurements, the aim of this study was to verify the discriminating power of two quality of life questionnaires in patients with fibromyalgia: the generic Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36 and the specific Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 150 participants divided into Fibromyalgia Group (FG and Control Group (CG (n=75 in each group. The participants were evaluated using the SF-36 and the FIQ. The data were analyzed by the Student t-test (α=0.05 and inferential analysis using the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC Curve - sensitivity, specificity and area under the curve (AUC. The significance level was 0.05. RESULTS: The sample was similar for age (CG: 47.8±8.1; FG: 47.0±7.7 years. A significant difference was observed in quality of life assessment in all aspects of both questionnaires (pCONTEXTUALIZAÇÃO: A fibromialgia é uma síndrome dolorosa caracterizada por dor espalhada e crônica e sintomas associados com um impacto negativo na qualidade de vida. OBJETIVOS: Considerando a subjetividade da mensuração de qualidade de vida, o objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o poder de discriminação de dois questionários que avaliam a qualidade de vida de pacientes com fibromialgia: o genérico Medical Short Form Healthy Survey (SF-36 e o específico Questionário do Impacto da Fibromialgia (QIF. MÉTODOS: Foi conduzido um estudo transversal com 150 indivíduos, divididos em dois grupos: grupo fibromialgia (FM e grupo controle (GC (n=75 em ambos. Os pacientes foram avaliados pelo SF-36 e pelo QIF. Na análise dos dados, utilizou-se o teste "t de Student" com α=0,05 e a Curva ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve. RESULTADOS: As amostras

  15. Influence of facilities of ski preparation on the bodily condition of teenagers 11-12 years.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vorona V.V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The indexes of bodily condition of teenagers were determined. A dynamics and increase of the explored indexes were analyzed in the process of ski preparation in the system of lessons of the physical culture of schoolchildren. The 156 teenagers at the age 11-12 years old took part in the experiment. The positive effect of ski training in the bodily condition of the investigated teenagers is proved. Reliable intercommunication was determined between the ski movements and indexes of bodily condition, which characterize work of the cardiovascular system.

  16. Heart transplants: Identity disruption, bodily integrity and interconnectedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauthner, Oliver E; De Luca, Enza; Poole, Jennifer M; Abbey, Susan E; Shildrick, Margrit; Gewarges, Mena; Ross, Heather J

    2015-11-01

    Of heart transplant recipients, 30 per cent report ongoing or episodic emotional issues post-transplant, which are not attributable to medications or pathophysiological changes. To this end, our team theorized that cardiac transplantation introduces pressing new questions about how patients incorporate a transplanted heart into their sense of self and how this impacts their identity. The work of Merleau-Ponty provided the theoretical underpinning for this project as it rationalizes how corporeal changes affect one's self and offer an innovative framework to access these complex aspects of living with a transplanted heart. We used visual methodology and recorded 25 semi-structured interviews videographically. Both visual and verbal data were analyzed at the same time in an iterative process. The most common theme was that participants expressed a disruption to their own identity and bodily integrity. Additionally, participants reported interconnectedness with the donor, even when the transplanted heart was perceived as an intruder or stranger. Finally, transplant recipients were very vivid in their descriptions and speculation of how they imagined the donor. Receiving an anonymous donor organ from a stranger often leaves the recipient with questions about who they themselves are now. Our study provides a nuanced understanding of heart transplant recipients' embodied experiences of self and identity. Insights gained are valuable to educate transplant professionals to develop new supportive interventions both pre- and post-transplant, and to improve the process of informed consent. Ultimately, such insights could be used to enable heart transplant recipients to incorporate the graft optimally over time, easing distress and improving recovery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  17. My face, my heart: cultural differences in integrated bodily self-awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maister, Lara; Tsakiris, Manos

    2014-01-01

    Body-awareness is produced by an integration of both interoceptive and exteroceptive bodily signals. However, previous investigations into cultural differences in bodily self-awareness have only studied these two aspects in isolation. We investigated the interaction between interoceptive and exteroceptive self-processing in East Asian and Western participants. During an interoceptive awareness task, self-face observation improved performance of those with initially low awareness in the Western group, but did not benefit the East Asian participants. These results suggest that the integrated, coherent experience of the body differs between East Asian and Western cultures. For Western participants, viewing one's own face may activate a bodily self-awareness which enhances processing of other bodily information, such as interoceptive signals. Instead, for East Asian individuals, the external appearance of the self may activate higher-level, social aspects of self-identity, reflecting the importance of the sociocultural construct of "face" in East Asian cultures.

  18. Appearance concerns among women with neurofibromatosis: examining sexual/bodily and social self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kelly B; Wang, Daphne L; Plotkin, Scott R; Park, Elyse R

    2013-12-01

    Neurofibromatosis (NF) 1 and 2 have distinct appearance effects, yet little research has examined patients' appearance concerns. We assessed appearance concerns and self-consciousness, self-esteem, and loneliness among women with NF. Women with NF1 (n = 79) and NF2 (n = 48) completed the Derriford Appearance Scale to assess appearance concerns and sexual/bodily and social self-consciousness, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and UCLA Loneliness Scale. Women's appearance concerns were coded to determine whether they were NF-related and whether psychosocial factors contributed to the concerns. A total of 85% of women reported appearance concerns, many of which were NF-related and attributed to psychosocial factors. Women with NF1 reported significantly more sexual/bodily self-consciousness but similar levels of social self-consciousness compared with women with NF2. Significantly higher sexual/bodily self-consciousness was found among married/cohabiting women regardless of NF group. Compared with general population norms and breast cancer survivors (BCS), women with NF1 reported significantly greater sexual/bodily and social self-consciousness. Women with NF2 reported less sexual/bodily self-consciousness compared with population norms, yet tended to report greater sexual/bodily self-consciousness than BCS. Women with NF2 reported significantly greater social self-consciousness compared with population norms and BCS. For both NF1 and NF2, higher levels of sexual/bodily and social self-consciousness were related to lower self-esteem and higher levels of social self-consciousness to more loneliness. Appearance concerns are prevalent, and social self-consciousness is high, among women with NF1 and NF2. Women with NF1 compared with NF2 experience more sexual/bodily self-consciousness. Providers should assess the impact of NF on women's self-perceptions and address sexual, body image, and social concerns. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Extraneous bodily movements and irrelevant vocalizations by dyslexic and non-dyslexic boys during calculation tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Ellis, S A; Miles, T R; Wheeler, T J

    2009-05-01

    Thirty dyslexic boys, aged between 9 and 15 years, and 30 age-matched controls were tested on a series of sums involving division, subtraction and addition. During the testing a record was kept of any bodily movements or verbal utterances (vocalizations) irrelevant to the task in hand. It was found that the dyslexics produced many more extraneous bodily movements and many more irrelevant vocalizations than did the controls. Possible reasons for these findings are tentatively suggested.

  20. Identifying Features of Bodily Expression As Indicators of Emotional Experience during Multimedia Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Riemer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The importance of emotions experienced by learners during their interaction with multimedia learning systems, such as serious games, underscores the need to identify sources of information that allow the recognition of learners’ emotional experience without interrupting the learning process. Bodily expression is gaining in attention as one of these sources of information. However, to date, the question of how bodily expression can convey different emotions has largely been addressed in research relying on acted emotion displays. Following a more contextualized approach, the present study aims to identify features of bodily expression (i.e., posture and activity of the upper body and the head that relate to genuine emotional experience during interaction with a serious game. In a multimethod approach, 70 undergraduates played a serious game relating to financial education while their bodily expression was captured using an off-the-shelf depth-image sensor (Microsoft Kinect. In addition, self-reports of experienced enjoyment, boredom, and frustration were collected repeatedly during gameplay, to address the dynamic changes in emotions occurring in educational tasks. Results showed that, firstly, the intensities of all emotions indeed changed significantly over the course of the game. Secondly, by using generalized estimating equations, distinct features of bodily expression could be identified as significant indicators for each emotion under investigation. A participant keeping their head more turned to the right was positively related to frustration being experienced, whereas keeping their head more turned to the left was positively related to enjoyment. Furthermore, having their upper body positioned more closely to the gaming screen was also positively related to frustration. Finally, increased activity of a participant’s head emerged as a significant indicator of boredom being experienced. These results confirm the value of bodily

  1. Identifying Features of Bodily Expression As Indicators of Emotional Experience during Multimedia Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Valentin; Frommel, Julian; Layher, Georg; Neumann, Heiko; Schrader, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The importance of emotions experienced by learners during their interaction with multimedia learning systems, such as serious games, underscores the need to identify sources of information that allow the recognition of learners' emotional experience without interrupting the learning process. Bodily expression is gaining in attention as one of these sources of information. However, to date, the question of how bodily expression can convey different emotions has largely been addressed in research relying on acted emotion displays. Following a more contextualized approach, the present study aims to identify features of bodily expression (i.e., posture and activity of the upper body and the head) that relate to genuine emotional experience during interaction with a serious game. In a multimethod approach, 70 undergraduates played a serious game relating to financial education while their bodily expression was captured using an off-the-shelf depth-image sensor (Microsoft Kinect). In addition, self-reports of experienced enjoyment, boredom, and frustration were collected repeatedly during gameplay, to address the dynamic changes in emotions occurring in educational tasks. Results showed that, firstly, the intensities of all emotions indeed changed significantly over the course of the game. Secondly, by using generalized estimating equations, distinct features of bodily expression could be identified as significant indicators for each emotion under investigation. A participant keeping their head more turned to the right was positively related to frustration being experienced, whereas keeping their head more turned to the left was positively related to enjoyment. Furthermore, having their upper body positioned more closely to the gaming screen was also positively related to frustration. Finally, increased activity of a participant's head emerged as a significant indicator of boredom being experienced. These results confirm the value of bodily expression as an indicator of

  2. Meanings and experiential outcomes of bodily care in a specialist palliative context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Öhlén, Joakim

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to enhance the depth of existing knowledge about meanings and experiential outcomes of bodily care in the context of an inpatient specialist palliative setting. Interpretative phenomenology was chosen as the study sought to explore individuals' lived experiences related to bodily care. Nine participants (five women, four men) of various ages and with various metastasized cancers and bodily-care needs, all from one specialist palliative care ward, participated. Data were collected with repeated narrative interviews and supplementary participating observations. Analysis was informed by van Manen's approach. The following meanings and experiential outcomes of bodily care were revealed by our study: maintaining and losing body capability, breaching borders of bodily integrity, being comforted and relieved in bodily-care situations, and being left in distress with unmet needs. These meanings overlap and shape the nature of each other and involve comforting and distressing experiences related to what can be described as conditional dimensions: the particular situation, one's own experiences of the body, and healthcare professionals' approaches. The results, based on specialist palliative care patients' experiences, outline the meanings and outcomes that relate to the quintessence and complexity of palliative care, deriving from dying persons' blend of both basic and symptom-oriented bodily-care needs. Moreover, the results outline how these two dimensions of care equally influence whether comfort and well-being are facilitated or not. Considering this, specialist palliative care may consider how to best integrate and acknowledge the value of skilled basic nursing care as part of and complementary to expertise in symptom relief during the trajectories of illness and dying.

  3. Transient Modulations of Neural Responses to Heartbeats Covary with Bodily Self-Consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyeong-Dong; Bernasconi, Fosco; Bello-Ruiz, Javier; Pfeiffer, Christian; Salomon, Roy; Blanke, Olaf

    2016-08-10

    Recent research has investigated self-consciousness associated with the multisensory processing of bodily signals (e.g., somatosensory, visual, vestibular signals), a notion referred to as bodily self-consciousness, and these studies have shown that the manipulation of bodily inputs induces changes in bodily self-consciousness such as self-identification. Another line of research has highlighted the importance of signals from the inside of the body (e.g., visceral signals) and proposed that neural representations of internal bodily signals underlie self-consciousness, which to date has been based on philosophical inquiry, clinical case studies, and behavioral studies. Here, we investigated the relationship of bodily self-consciousness with the neural processing of internal bodily signals. By combining electrical neuroimaging, analysis of peripheral physiological signals, and virtual reality technology in humans, we show that transient modulations of neural responses to heartbeats in the posterior cingulate cortex covary with changes in bodily self-consciousness induced by the full-body illusion. Additional analyses excluded that measured basic cardiorespiratory parameters or interoceptive sensitivity traits could account for this finding. These neurophysiological data link experimentally the cortical mapping of the internal body to self-consciousness. What are the brain mechanisms of self-consciousness? Prominent views propose that the neural processing associated with signals from the internal organs (such as the heart and the lung) plays a critical role in self-consciousness. Although this hypothesis dates back to influential views in philosophy and psychology (e.g., William James), definitive experimental evidence supporting this idea is lacking despite its recent impact in neuroscience. In the present study, we show that posterior cingulate activities responding to heartbeat signals covary with changes in participants' conscious self-identification with a body

  4. The bodily experience of apraxia in everyday activities: a phenomenological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntzen, Cathrine; Elstad, Ingunn

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore apraxia as a phenomenon in everyday activities, as experienced by a group of stroke patients. Some consequences for clinical practice are suggested. In this phenomenological hermeneutical study, six persons with apraxia were followed from 2 to 6 months, from the early phase of stroke rehabilitation. ADL-situations and interactions with therapists were observed and videotaped repeatedly during the rehabilitation trajectory, to provide access to and familiarity with the participant's apractic difficulties over time. Two in-depth interviews were conducted with each participant. Interviews and video observations were analyzed together, taking Merleau-Ponty's concept of bodily intentionality as basis for analysis and his phenomenology as the main theoretical perspective of the study. Five types of altered bodily intentionality were described by the participants [ 1 ]: Gap between intention and bodily action [ 2 ], Fragmented awareness in action [ 3 ], Peculiar actions and odd bodies [ 4 ], Intentionality on the loose, and [ 5 ] Fighting against tools. These were recognized as characteristics typical of the apraxia experience. The phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty, and his concept of bodily intentionality in particular, elucidate the way specific apractic difficulties come into being and may thus render apraxia less incomprehensible. The apraxia phenomenon appears as characteristic fragmentations of anticipation inherent in action performance, thereby "slackening" the bodily intentionality. Identifying apractic changes of intentionality may help health professionals to adjust and individualize therapy, and facilitate patients' acting competence in everyday life.

  5. A health survey of a colonia located on the west Texas, US/Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Robert L; Olson, Thomas; Robinson, Kris; Wiebe, John; DiGregorio, Rena; Guillermina, Mina; Albrechtsen, Justin; Bean, Nathaniel H; Ortiz, Melchor

    2010-06-01

    Little is known about how health disparities affect the health status and general health perceptions of Hispanics living in Texas colonias. The purpose of this study was to conduct a health survey of residents (n = 216) of a colonia community on the border between El Paso, Texas and Juarez, Mexico. Instruments used in this study included a researcher developed demographic questionnaire, the Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics (SASH), Cutting down, Annoyance by criticism, Guilty feeling and Eye-openers (CAGE) for alcohol consumption, and the Short Form version 2 (SF36v2) health survey. Study findings show the average participant was approximately 42 years old, attained an average of 9.6 years of education, earned an average annual household income of $17,575 and had an average SASH score of 25.4. SASH scores range from 12 to 60, with higher scores suggesting higher levels of American acculturation. Findings from this health survey suggest the average resident of the colonia may have health disadvantages when compared to residents from other parts of El Paso and Texas. Binge drinking was self-reported by 13.4% of all participants; with 5.6% having a CAGE score greater than 2 (indicating an increased propensity towards problems with alcohol). The self-report rates of diabetes, depression and anxiety were 15.3%, 20.4% and 16.7% respectively. The SF36v2 composite functional health status scores mirrored the national norms.

  6. Game Mechanics and Bodily Interactions: Designing Interactive Technologies for Sports Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller

    Advancements in wearable and ubiquitous computing technologies have radically increased the possibilities for designing full-body human-computer interactions. Among this multitude of new bodily interaction possibilities are sports training technologies and bodily games. In terms of sports training...... to identify and avoid the pitfalls and challenges that emerge in the process. It further explores how competition can be facilitated in bodily games and how it affects players. These explorations are done by designing, developing and evaluating innovative interactive sports training games. The results......, and facilitating competition between mismatched players using technology. In order to assess the proposed tools, this dissertation contains a case study, where ICT Product Design students apply the conceptual frameworks for designing and developing interactive sports training prototypes. The case study indicates...

  7. A neuroscientific account of how vestibular disorders impair bodily self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe eLopez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The consequences of vestibular disorders on balance, oculomotor control and self-motion perception have been extensively described in humans and animals. More recently, vestibular disorders have been related to cognitive deficits in spatial navigation and memory tasks. Less frequently, abnormal bodily perceptions have been described in patients with vestibular disorders. Altered forms of bodily self-consciousness include distorted body image and body schema, disembodied self-location (out-of-body experience, altered sense of agency, as well as more complex experiences of dissociation and detachment from the self (depersonalization. In this article, I suggest that vestibular disorders create sensory conflict or mismatch in multisensory brain regions, producing perceptual incoherence and abnormal body and self perceptions. This hypothesis is based on recent functional mapping of the human vestibular cortex, showing vestibular projections to the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex and in several multisensory areas found to be crucial for bodily self-consciousness.

  8. Bodily systems and the spatial-functional structure of the human body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barry; Munn, Katherine; Papakin, Igor

    2004-01-01

    The human body is a system made of systems. The body is divided into bodily systems proper, such as the endocrine and circulatory systems, which are subdivided into many sub-systems at a variety of levels, whereby all systems and subsystems engage in massive causal interaction with each other and with their surrounding environments. Here we offer an explicit definition of bodily system and provide a framework for understanding their causal interactions. Medical sciences provide at best informal accounts of basic notions such as system, process, and function, and while such informality is acceptable in documentation created for human beings, it falls short of what is needed for computer representations. In our analysis we will accordingly provide the framework for a formal definition of bodily system and of associated notions.

  9. Biotypology, regionalism, and the construction of a plural Brazilian bodily identity, 1930s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimieiro-Gomes, Ana Carolina

    2016-12-01

    This article investigates regional biotypological studies and the construction of biological deterministic discourses about the Brazilian identity in the 1930s. Biotypological research was undertaken to determine the normal body type of the Brazilian man, using its peculiar classificatory lexicon. Studies into the bodily profile of specific regions, like the northeast and São Paulo state, featured in this research. In the context of the contemporary debates about race, miscegenation, and national identity, these investigations were geared towards biological determinism and the influence of the environment and social and cultural aspects on the bodily development of Brazilians. It is shown how regional biotypological studies echoed racial, normalizing, exclusive viewpoints and contributed to the construction of a miscegenated Brazilian bodily identity.

  10. Leg muscle vibration modulates bodily self-consciousness: integration of proprioceptive, visual, and tactile signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palluel, Estelle; Aspell, Jane Elizabeth; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-05-01

    Behavioral studies have used visuo-tactile conflicts between a participant's body and a visually presented fake or virtual body to investigate the importance of bodily perception for self-consciousness (bodily self-consciousness). Illusory self-identification with a fake body and changes in tactile processing--modulation of visuo-tactile cross-modal congruency effects (CCEs)--were reported in previous findings. Although proprioceptive signals are deemed important for bodily self-consciousness, their contribution to the representation of the full body has not been studied. Here we investigated whether and how self-identification and tactile processing (CCE magnitude) could be modified by altering proprioceptive signals with 80-Hz vibrations at the legs. Participants made elevation judgments of tactile cues (while ignoring nearby lights) during synchronous and asynchronous stroking of a seen fake body. We found that proprioceptive signals during vibrations altered the magnitude of self-identification and mislocalization of touch (CCE) in a synchrony-dependent fashion: we observed an increase of self-identification and CCE magnitude during asynchronous stroking. In a second control experiment we studied whether proprioceptive signals per se, or those from the lower limbs in particular, were essential for these changes. We applied vibrations at the upper limbs (which provide no information about the position of the participant's body in space) and in this case observed no modulation of bodily self-consciousness or tactile perception. These data link proprioceptive signals from the legs that are conveyed through the dorsal column-medial lemniscal pathway to bodily self-consciousness. We discuss their integration with bodily signals from vision and touch for full-body representations.

  11. Asthma control assessed in the EGEA epidemiological survey and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroux, Valérie; Boudier, Anne; Bousquet, Jean; Vignoud, Lucile; Gormand, Frédéric; Just, Jocelyne; Le Moual, Nicole; Leynaert, Bénédicte; Nadif, Rachel; Pison, Christophe; Scheinmann, Pierre; Vervloet, Daniel; Anto, Josep Maria; Kauffmann, Francine; Pin, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    The aims were to assess 1) the relationship of asthma control assessed by combining epidemiological survey questions and lung function to Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQL) and 2) whether individuals with controlled asthma reach similar generic HRQL levels as individuals without asthma. The analysis included 584 individuals without asthma and 498 with asthma who participated in the follow-up of the Epidemiological study on Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). Asthma control was assessed from survey questions and lung function, closely adapted from the 2006-2009 Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines. The Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ, scores range:1-7) and the generic SF-36 (scores range: 0-100) were used. Adjusted mean total AQLQ score decreased by 0.5 points for each asthma control steps (6.4, 5.9 and 5.4 for controlled, partly-controlled and uncontrolled asthma respectively, p < 0.0001). The differences in SF-36 scores between individuals with controlled asthma and those without asthma were minor and not significant for the PCS (-1, p = 0.09), borderline significant for the MCS (-1.6, p = 0.05) and small for the 8 domains (<5.1) although statistically significant for 4 domains. These results support the discriminative properties of the proposed asthma control grading system and its use in epidemiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sexuality and subjectivity: erotic practices and the question of bodily sensations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spronk, R.

    2014-01-01

    Although the history of anthropology shows various shifts in the way sexuality has been theorised, studies of the relation between sexuality and bodily sensations have remained limited. In this article I explore the concept of body-sensorial knowledge to understand the relation between the social

  13. The Immune System and Bodily Defence-How Does the Immune ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 1. The Immune System and Bodily Defence - How Does the Immune System Live With a Randomly Generated Repertoire? Vineeta Bal Satyajit Rath. Series Article Volume 3 Issue 1 January 1998 pp 15-20 ...

  14. An analysis of the bodily spatial power relations in Agaat by Marlene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article is to explore the power relations portrayed through the bodily spatial interaction of the characters of Milla and Agaat in Marlene van Niekerk's 2004 novel, Agaat. This interaction is analysed according to the theory of Thirding-as- Othering posited by Henri Lefebvre and Edward Soja in terms of the body ...

  15. Becoming a normal guy: Men making sense of long-term bodily changes following bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groven, Karen Synne; Galdas, Paul; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, research on bodily changes following bariatric surgery has focused predominantly on women, leaving the long-term experience of men relatively unexplored. In this paper, we draw on interviews with men who have undergone an irreversible gastric bypass procedure to explore their bodily changes more than 4 years post-surgery. We apply a phenomenological framework that draws on Leder's perspectives on the “disappearing” and “dys-appearing” body, combined with a gender-sensitive lens that draws on Connell's theory of hegemonic masculinity and Robertson's conceptions of embodied masculinity. Findings Our principal finding was that the men negotiated their bodily changes following bariatric surgery in profoundly ambivalent ways. Although they enthusiastically praised the surgery for improving their health, self-esteem, and social functioning, they also emphasized their efforts to cope with post-surgical side effects and life-threatening complications. Our analysis elaborates on their efforts to adjust to and come to terms with these changes, focusing on episodes of hypoglycemia, severe pain and internal herniation, and the significance of physical activity and exercise. Conclusions Our findings point to the need to acknowledge men's ways of making sense of profound and ongoing bodily changes following bariatric surgery and how these negotiations are closely intertwined with masculine ideals of embodiment and social value. PMID:26641203

  16. Japanese Children's and Adults' Reasoning about the Consequences of Psychogenic Bodily Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Noriko

    2011-01-01

    Four experiments were conducted with Japanese children and adult participants to assess their awareness of the effectiveness of biological and psychological treatments for psychogenic bodily reactions. Study 1 had 116 participants, composed of 4-year-olds (17), 5-year-olds (20), 7-year-olds (24), 10-year-olds (20), and college students (35). The…

  17. Illusory own body perceptions: case reports and relevance for bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydrich, Lukas; Dieguez, Sebastian; Grunwald, Thomas; Seeck, Margitta; Blanke, Olaf

    2010-09-01

    Neurological disorders of body representation have for a long time suggested the importance of multisensory processing of bodily signals for self-consciousness. One such group of disorders--illusory own body perceptions affecting the entire body--has been proposed to be especially relevant in this respect, based on neurological data as well as philosophical considerations. This has recently been tested experimentally in healthy subjects showing that integration of multisensory bodily signals from the entire body with respect to the three aspects: self-location, first-person perspective, and self-identification [corrected], is crucial for bodily self-consciousness. Here we present clinical and neuroanatomical data of two neurological patients with paroxysmal disorders of full body representation in whom only one of these aspects, self-identification, was abnormal. We distinguish such disorders of global body representation from related but distinct disorders and discuss their relevance for the neurobiology of bodily self-consciousness. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Police Bodies and Police Minds: Professional Learning through Bodily Practices of Sport Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Ola; Rantatalo, Oscar; Stenling, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature concerned with bodily perspectives on professional learning by reporting on a study of Swedish police officers' sport participation as a form of occupational learning. The study seeks to answer how ideals of work practice and sport participation intersect, how professional learning is…

  19. Features of the formation of the bodily aspect of gender identity in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harlanova M.M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the peculiarities of the bodily aspect of gender identity in men. The urgency of this work due to the fact that currently in Russia to study the influence of the bodily aspect to the whole structure of gender identity is given little attention. At the present time the problem of studying the physicality involved in domestic psychologists: Arina G. A., V. V. Nikolaev, A. S. Kostov, A. N. Borojevic, B. T. Sokolov, V. Yu., Baskakov, who agree in opinion on the necessity to study the influence of the morpho-biological patterns of gender identity, her social and personal "add-on" – of sex-role stereotypes, perceptions, behavior, preferences. However, studies supporting their interaction was not performed [7]. In the paper the following definitions: "gender identity", "gender", "differential socialization", "the Adonis complex". Produced comprehensive analysis of foreign sources for a detailed understanding of the studied phenomenon; analysis of the structural components and characteristics of the formation of the bodily aspect of gender identity in men with the help of specifically chosen tutorials. Discovered the distinctive features of the formation of the bodily aspect of gender identity in men and their reflection in sex-role behavior. We assume that men who are not satisfied with the perception of his own body, prone to distorted perceptions of sex-role images. The data obtained can provide the basis and prospects for development of programs of prevention, diagnostics and correction.

  20. Spiritual and Bodily Freedom : Christian Liberty in Early Modern Reformed Theology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Belt, Henk

    2015-01-01

    The notion of Christian liberty is essential for the understanding of the Reformed concept of the law. Early modern protestant theology, however, made a sharp distinction between spiritual and bodily liberty. This distinction originated from Luther’s concept of the two kingdoms. It enabled John

  1. Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence and Dance Education: Critique, Revision, and Potentials for the Democratic Ideal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld-Jones, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers a way of rethinking Howard Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences. The bodily-kinesthetic intelligence is used as the point of critique. The author provides a detailed discussion of the act of dancing as counterpoint to Gardner's understanding of the intelligence. The author critiques Gardner's exemplar and evolutionary…

  2. Bodily mood expression : Recognize moods from functional behaviors of humanoid robots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Broekens, J.; Hindriks, K.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Our goal is to develop bodily mood expression that can be used during the execution of functional behaviors for humanoid social robots. Our model generates such expression by stylizing behaviors through modulating behavior parameters within functional bounds. We have applied this approach to two

  3. Effects of bodily mood expression of a robotic teacher on students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Broekens, J.; Hindriks, K.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports our investigation into the effects of bodily mood expression of a humanoid robot in a scenario close to real life. To this end, we used the NAO robot to perform as a lecturer in a university class. To display either a positive or a negative mood, we modulated 41 co-verbal gestures

  4. Body-Reflexive Pleasures: Exploring Bodily Experiences within the Context of Sport and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of sport and physical activity in achieving wellbeing has received much attention in relation to children and adults, although consideration of the physical aspects of bodily pleasure have tended to be ignored in favour of developing health related measures. In physical education, the physical body has been further "disembodied"…

  5. Bodily alignment of the lateral incisor spring: Blocked-out laterals unraveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Dixit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bodily alignment of teeth that are blocked out of the arch specially in cases of a palatally placed lateral incisor, is often time consuming and difficult. Though several treatment methods are available for accomplishing this, these approaches have some drawbacks. To overcome these shortcomings, the BALI (Bodily Alignment of Lateral Incisor spring was designed to achieve bodily movement of palatally blocked-out lateral incisors in preadjusted edgewise appliance therapy. Methods: This spring in the form of figure of eight (8 is made with 0.017” X 0.025” TMA wire. It is engaged into the lateral incisor bracket and tied to the base archwire after sufficient space has been created for the blocked-out tooth. Conclusion: The BALI spring is an efficient and versatile auxiliary which can be effectively used for the bodily alignment of palatally placed lateral incisors. It is easy to fabricate and engage, prevents distortion of the archwire and applies light forces to the tooth.

  6. Becoming a normal guy: Men making sense of long-term bodily changes following bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groven, Karen Synne; Galdas, Paul; Solbrække, Kari Nyheim

    2015-01-01

    To date, research on bodily changes following bariatric surgery has focused predominantly on women, leaving the long-term experience of men relatively unexplored. In this paper, we draw on interviews with men who have undergone an irreversible gastric bypass procedure to explore their bodily changes more than 4 years post-surgery. We apply a phenomenological framework that draws on Leder's perspectives on the "disappearing" and "dys-appearing" body, combined with a gender-sensitive lens that draws on Connell's theory of hegemonic masculinity and Robertson's conceptions of embodied masculinity. Our principal finding was that the men negotiated their bodily changes following bariatric surgery in profoundly ambivalent ways. Although they enthusiastically praised the surgery for improving their health, self-esteem, and social functioning, they also emphasized their efforts to cope with post-surgical side effects and life-threatening complications. Our analysis elaborates on their efforts to adjust to and come to terms with these changes, focusing on episodes of hypoglycemia, severe pain and internal herniation, and the significance of physical activity and exercise. Our findings point to the need to acknowledge men's ways of making sense of profound and ongoing bodily changes following bariatric surgery and how these negotiations are closely intertwined with masculine ideals of embodiment and social value.

  7. Becoming a normal guy: Men making sense of long-term bodily changes following bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Synne Groven

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To date, research on bodily changes following bariatric surgery has focused predominantly on women, leaving the long-term experience of men relatively unexplored. In this paper, we draw on interviews with men who have undergone an irreversible gastric bypass procedure to explore their bodily changes more than 4 years post-surgery. We apply a phenomenological framework that draws on Leder's perspectives on the “disappearing” and “dys-appearing” body, combined with a gender-sensitive lens that draws on Connell's theory of hegemonic masculinity and Robertson's conceptions of embodied masculinity. Findings: Our principal finding was that the men negotiated their bodily changes following bariatric surgery in profoundly ambivalent ways. Although they enthusiastically praised the surgery for improving their health, self-esteem, and social functioning, they also emphasized their efforts to cope with post-surgical side effects and life-threatening complications. Our analysis elaborates on their efforts to adjust to and come to terms with these changes, focusing on episodes of hypoglycemia, severe pain and internal herniation, and the significance of physical activity and exercise. Conclusions: Our findings point to the need to acknowledge men's ways of making sense of profound and ongoing bodily changes following bariatric surgery and how these negotiations are closely intertwined with masculine ideals of embodiment and social value.

  8. Polysomnographic Measurement of Sleep Duration and Bodily Pain Perception in the Sleep Heart Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingarten, Jeremy A; Dubrovsky, Boris; Basner, Robert C; Redline, Susan; George, Liziamma; Lederer, David J

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether total sleep time (TST) and specific sleep stage duration are associated with bodily pain perception and whether sex, age, or subjective sleepiness modifies this relationship. Data from adults ages 39-90 y (n = 5,199) who took part in the Sleep Heart Health Study Exam 1 were analyzed. TST, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep time, and slow wave sleep (SWS) time were measured by unattended, in-home nocturnal polysomnography. Bodily pain perception was measured via the Short Form-36 questionnaire bodily pain component. We used logistic regression to examine associations between total and individual sleep stage durations and bodily pain perception controlling for age, sex, race, body mass index, apnea-hypopnea index, antidepressant use, and important cardiovascular conditions (smoking [pack-years], history of diabetes, and history of percutaneous coronary intervention and/or coronary artery bypass graft). In the fully adjusted model, REM sleep time and SWS time were not associated with "moderate to severe pain," whereas TST was: Each 1-h decrement in TST was associated with a 7% increased odds of "moderate to severe pain" (odds ratio 1.07, 95% confidence interval 1.002, 1.14). Due to modification of the association between SWS time and "moderate to severe pain" by sex (P for interaction = 0.01), we performed analyses stratified by sex: Each 1-h decrement in SWS time was associated with a 20% higher odds of "moderate to severe pain" among men (odds ratio 1.20, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.42) whereas an association was not observed among women. Shorter TST among all subjects and shorter SWS time in men was associated with "moderate to severe pain." REM sleep time was not associated with bodily pain perception in this cohort. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  9. Life with an unwelcome guest - caring in a context of protracted bodily pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Camilla; Aho, Sonja; Nyholm, Linda

    2016-12-01

    Protracted bodily pain is a phenomenon that often affects a human being's whole life. Care of human beings with protracted pain is challenging because pain is not always measureable, and the experiences of pain are subjective, unique and shapeshifting. Therefore, the aim is to highlight what protracted bodily pain signifies for the human being, and human beings' experiences of what is caring in a context of protracted bodily pain. Four informants with protracted bodily pain took part in a focus group interview. The interview was analysed by using a qualitative content analysis with a hermeneutic approach. The findings show that protracted pain renders human beings speechless, limits and robs them of their lives. The pain is described as a domineering, unpleasant and unwelcome guest. The pain can change the human being's personality and creates feelings of guilt. Uncertainty about the origin of the pain as well as a nonchalant treatment or not being believed intensifies the pain. Human being experience mastering the pain, encounters with caregivers who can ease the burden, community with others and finding that little something extra in everyday life is experienced as caring. From a caring science perspective, the relation between protracted pain and suffering is obvious. Suffering emerges as illness suffering, as life suffering and as suffering caused by care. Professional as well as natural caring is important in a context of protracted bodily pain. The human being longs to encounter caregivers who are courageous enough to lay themselves on the line. Community with people who are prepared to share the burden eases the heavy burden that pain brings to life, it brings hope and relief. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Validity of EQ-5D in general population of Taiwan: results of the 2009 National Health Interview and Drug Abuse Survey of Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sheng-Tsung; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Yao, Kai-Ping; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Hurng, Baai-Shyun

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the validity of the EuroQOL five dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) using a nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) through comparison with short-form 36 (SF-36). Data for this study came from the 2009 NHIS in Taiwan. The study sample was the 4007 participants aged 20-64 years who completed the survey. We used SUDAAN 10.0 (SAS-Callable) to carry out weighed estimation and statistical inference. The EQ index was estimated using norm values from a Taiwanese study as well as from Japan and the United Kingdom (UK). The SF-36 score was standardized using American norm values. In terms of concurrent validity, the EQ-5D met the five hypotheses. The results did not fulfill hypothesis that women would have lower visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) scores. In terms of discriminant validity, the EQ-5D fulfilled two hypotheses. Our results approached but did not fulfill hypothesis that there would be a weak association between the physical and psychological dimensions of the EQ-5D and the mental component summary score of the SF-36. Results were comparable regardless of whether the Japanese or UK norm value sets were used. We were able to fulfill many, not all of our validity hypotheses regardless of whether the established Japanese or UK norm value sets or the Taiwanese norm values were used. The EQ-5D is an effective and simple instrument for assessing health-related quality of life of general population in Taiwan.

  11. "Without bodily autonomy we are not free": exploring women's concerns about future access to contraception following the 2016 US presidential election.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Colleen P; Wolgemuth, Tierney E; Hamm, Megan E; Borrero, Sonya

    2017-11-01

    Following the 2016US presidential election, social media posts and news stories amplified concerns about the potential for reduced access to contraception under the incoming administration and urged women to seek long-acting reversible contraception. We aimed to describe women's concerns about future access to contraception, in their own words. A social-media-based, anonymous online survey assessing thoughts and concerns about future access to contraception was distributed to reproductive-aged US women for 1 week in mid-January 2017. Participants who were concerned about future access to contraception could share their thoughts and feelings in an open-ended comments box. We qualitatively analyzed 449 written responses for content and themes, with the goal of characterizing key concerns. Women who provided written comments had a mean age of 28years; 85% were white, 88% had at least a college degree, and 93% identified as Democratic or Democratic-leaning. Women were highly concerned about future affordability of contraceptive methods due to potential loss of insurance, reduced insurance coverage for contraceptive methods and reduced access to low-cost care at Planned Parenthood. Many also worried about increased restrictions on abortion. Participants' concerns regarding access to contraception and abortion centered around themes of reproductive and bodily autonomy, which women described as fundamental rights. Women in this study expressed considerable fear and uncertainty regarding their future access to contraception and abortion following the 2016US presidential election. The potential for restricted access to affordable contraception and abortion was viewed as an unacceptable limitation on bodily autonomy. As the future of US health care policy is debated, many women are concerned about the impact of policy changes on their ability to access affordable contraception and abortion, which many view as essential to the preservation of bodily and reproductive autonomy

  12. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  13. Senses, bodily knowledge, and autoethnography: unbeknown knowledge from an ICU experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uotinen, Johanna

    2011-10-01

    In this article, I discuss the possibilities and limits of bodily knowledge for research. The text is based on my personal experiences as a patient in an intensive care unit (ICU). It seems that through my senses I unconsciously gained knowledge of the time I spent in the ICU. To describe this specific form of bodily knowledge, I introduce the concept of "unbeknown" knowledge, and suggest that autoethnography is a useful method for analyzing this knowledge. In conclusion, I maintain that there is a certain hierarchy for both senses and knowledge and, in spite of the possible vagueness and fuzziness of the concept, unbeknown knowledge both enhances recovery and can be used for research purposes.

  14. Physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences in patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyboe, Lene; Moeller, Marianne K.; Vestergaard, Claus H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Low physical activity is strongly correlated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and poor physical health. Although the prevalence of MetS is high in patients with first-episode schizophrenia (FES), little is still known about the level of and possible barriers for physical activity in FES.......  Aim: The purpose of the study was to compare physical activity in patients with FES with healthy controls; to investigate changes in physical activity over 1 year of follow-up; and to explore the correlations of physical activity and anomalous bodily experiences reported by patients with FES.  Methods......: Both physical activity and aerobic fitness were measured. Anomalous bodily experiences were measured by selected items from the Examination of Anomalous Self-Experience and The Body Awareness Scale. Psychopathological data comprising negative and positive symptoms and data on psychotropic medication...

  15. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the “I”. Self- consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self- consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibul...

  16. Bodily labializing lateral incisors: 3D analysis using finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geramy, Allahyar

    2013-01-01

    Among all tooth types and movements, bodily labializing the upper lateral incisors is a challenging one. The main goal of this study is to introduce and analyze a method to labialize palatally erupted lateral incisors. Five three dimensional finite element models were designed in SolidWorks 2010 of a segment of maxilla containing the upper left anterior teeth (with the lateral incisor in palatal position), their brackets, their PDLs, the spongy and cortical bone. A segment of 0.016 wire passing through the central incisor and canine brackets (bypassing the lateral incisor bracket) and a designed hook in the lateral incisor bracket (which comprises an inventory approach/design to treat a palatally erupted tooth). The hook and vertical bypassed segment height were 8, 10, 11.5 (stage 1), 9.5 (stage 2) and 9.45 mm (stage 3). Two equal forces (0.15 N each) were applied. Tooth displacements were recorded. A hook length of 8 mm resulted in a tipping movement (apical = -7.78 × 10(-5) mm; incisal = 3.8 × 10(4) mm). The other two caused root movement. Stage 2 (hook = 9.5 mm) resulted in root movement (-1.4 × 10(-4) mm in incisal; 1.58 × 10(4) mm in apical area). Hook length = 9.45 produced bodily movement (incisal = 7.1 × 10(5) mm; apical = 6.9 × 10(5) mm). A definite length of the hook was shown to produce bodily movement. This definite length of hook in combination with the same length of bypassed wire can be applied to produce bodily movement of the lateral incisor. An intrusive component can also be added.

  17. The structure of conscious bodily self-perception during full-body illusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobricki, Martin; de la Rosa, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that bodily self-identification, bodily self-localization, agency, and the sense of being present in space are critical aspects of conscious full-body self-perception. However, none of the existing studies have investigated the relationship of these aspects to each other, i.e., whether they can be identified to be distinguishable components of the structure of conscious full-body self-perception. Therefore, the objective of the present investigation is to elucidate the structure of conscious full-body self-perception. We performed two studies in which we stroked the back of healthy individuals for three minutes while they watched the back of a distant virtual body being synchronously stroked with a virtual stick. After visuo-tactile stimulation, participants assessed changes in their bodily self-perception with a custom made self-report questionnaire. In the first study, we investigated the structure of conscious full-body self-perception by analyzing the responses to the questionnaire by means of multidimensional scaling combined with cluster analysis. In the second study, we then extended the questionnaire and validated the stability of the structure of conscious full-body self-perception found in the first study within a larger sample of individuals by performing a principle components analysis of the questionnaire responses. The results of the two studies converge in suggesting that the structure of conscious full-body self-perception consists of the following three distinct components: bodily self-identification, space-related self-perception (spatial presence), and agency.

  18. Multisensory and sensorimotor foundation of bodily self-consciousness – An interdisciplinary approach

    OpenAIRE

    Silvio eIonta; Roger eGassert; Olaf eBlanke

    2011-01-01

    Scientific investigations on the nature of the self have so far focused on high-level mechanisms. Recent evidence, however suggests that low-level, bottom-up, mechanisms of multisensory integration play a fundamental role in encoding some specific components of bodily self-consciousness, such as self-location and first-person perspective (Blanke and Metzinger, 2009). Self-location and the first-person perspective are abnormal in neurological patients suffering from out-of body experiences (Bl...

  19. Anomalous bodily experiences and perceived social isolation in schizophrenia: An extension of the Social Deafferentation Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Jamie; Park, Sohee

    2016-10-01

    Disturbances of the bodily self are fundamental to the phenomenological experience of individuals with schizophrenia, a population at risk for social isolation. Both proprioception and exteroception contribute to a sense of consistent body boundary that contains the self across time and space, and this process is influenced by self-other (social) interactions. However, the relationship between social isolation, exteroception, and in-the-moment changes in body representation has not been elucidated. We investigated susceptibility to anomalous bodily experiences with a phantom nose induction procedure that elicits a sensation that one's nose is changing (Pinocchio Illusion: PI) in relation to exteroceptive awareness and social isolation. 25 individuals with schizophrenia (SZ) and 15 matched controls (CO) participated in a PI induction procedure to quantify susceptibility to bodily aberrations and a tactile discrimination task to assess exteroception. Clinical symptoms in SZ and schizotypy in CO were assessed, in addition to a self-report measure of perceived social isolation. Compared to CO, SZ showed increased PI and impaired tactile discriminability. SZ reported greater loneliness than CO. PI scores were correlated with increased loneliness and decreased tactile discriminability. Greater susceptibility to anomalous bodily experiences, together with reduced exteroceptive awareness and increased loneliness, is compatible with the framework of Hoffman's Social Deafferentation Hypothesis, which posits that a functional "amputation" from one's social environment could lead to a reorganization of the social brain network, resulting in hallucinations and delusions. These findings underscore the importance of the relationship between social isolation and self-disturbances in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Turning body and self inside out: visualized heartbeats alter bodily self-consciousness and tactile perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspell, Jane Elizabeth; Heydrich, Lukas; Marillier, Guillaume; Lavanchy, Tom; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-12-01

    Prominent theories highlight the importance of bodily perception for self-consciousness, but it is currently not known whether bodily perception is based on interoceptive or exteroceptive signals or on integrated signals from these anatomically distinct systems. In the research reported here, we combined both types of signals by surreptitiously providing participants with visual exteroceptive information about their heartbeat: A real-time video image of a periodically illuminated silhouette outlined participants' (projected, "virtual") bodies and flashed in synchrony with their heartbeats. We investigated whether these "cardio-visual" signals could modulate bodily self-consciousness and tactile perception. We report two main findings. First, synchronous cardio-visual signals increased self-identification with and self-location toward the virtual body, and second, they altered the perception of tactile stimuli applied to participants' backs so that touch was mislocalized toward the virtual body. We argue that the integration of signals from the inside and the outside of the human body is a fundamental neurobiological process underlying self-consciousness.

  1. The vestibular system: A spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian ePfeiffer

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the ‘I’. Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system codes head position in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortex is likely to contribute to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where ‘I’ experience the world and self-location (the feeling where ‘I’ am located in space. We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation that show that vestibular signals contribute to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction (TPJ, parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC, medial superior temporal region (MST, and ventral intraparietal region (VIP. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is important for linking multisensory signals from within personal space with those from extrapersonal space, and for spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  2. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the "I". Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where "I" experience the world) and self-location (the feeling where "I" am located in space). We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation showing vestibular contributions to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss the role for four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction, parietoinsular vestibular cortex, ventral intraparietal region, and medial superior temporal region. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is critical in linking multisensory signals from the body (personal and peripersonal space) with external (extrapersonal) space. Therefore, the vestibular system plays a critical role for neural representations of spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness.

  3. Sex and the sacred: sterilization and bodily integrity in English and Canadian law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savell, Kristin

    2004-10-01

    Through an examination of cases of non-consensual sterilization for learning disabled persons in Canada and England, this article considers the role that law plays in framing the thoughts, beliefs, and norms that fashion the ways we think about bodies, sex, gender, and sexuality. The author asks how it is that Canadian and English law, while both claiming to protect bodily integrity, have reached opposing conclusions about whether non-therapeutic sterilization can be in a person's best interests. She hypothesizes that the answer could lie in the manner in which courts have constructed the bodies of learning disabled men and women in the sphere of sexuality and reproduction. Where the overriding concern in the sterilization cases is the containment of the sexuality of a learning disabled person perceived as "out of control" or "vulnerable to seduction", sterilization is cast as a just and humane solution that will advance the welfare of the individual concerned. Conversely, where the overriding concern is the preservation of the integrity of a law committed to the principle of equality, sterilization is thought to be a violation of the bodily integrity of the person. The author shows that these two views engender very different legal and cultural discourses about best interests and bodily integrity. The debate highlighted by the sterilization cases and the commentary surrounding them reflect larger tension within legal discourse between the commitment to liberal values and the maintenance of a particular social order.

  4. Multi-sensory and sensorimotor foundation of bodily self-consciousness - an interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionta, Silvio; Gassert, Roger; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Scientific investigations on the nature of the self have so far focused on high-level mechanisms. Recent evidence, however, suggests that low-level bottom-up mechanisms of multi-sensory integration play a fundamental role in encoding specific components of bodily self-consciousness, such as self-location and first-person perspective (Blanke and Metzinger, 2009). Self-location and first-person perspective are abnormal in neurological patients suffering from out-of-body experiences (Blanke et al., 2004), and can be manipulated experimentally in healthy subjects by imposing multi-sensory conflicts (Lenggenhager et al., 2009). Activity of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ) reflects experimentally induced changes in self-location and first-person perspective (Ionta et al., 2011), and dysfunctions in TPJ are causally associated with out-of-body experiences (Blanke et al., 2002). We argue that TPJ is one of the key areas for multi-sensory integration of bodily self-consciousness, that its levels of activity reflect the experience of the conscious "I" as embodied and localized within bodily space, and that these mechanisms can be systematically investigated using state of the art technologies such as robotics, virtual reality, and non-invasive neuroimaging.

  5. Multisensory and sensorimotor foundation of bodily self-consciousness – An interdisciplinary approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio eIonta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific investigations on the nature of the self have so far focused on high-level mechanisms. Recent evidence, however suggests that low-level, bottom-up, mechanisms of multisensory integration play a fundamental role in encoding some specific components of bodily self-consciousness, such as self-location and first-person perspective (Blanke and Metzinger, 2009. Self-location and the first-person perspective are abnormal in neurological patients suffering from out-of body experiences (Blanke et al., 2004, and can be experimentally manipulated in healthy subjects by multisensory conflicts (Lenggenhager et al., 2009. Activity of the temporo-parietal junction (TPJ reflects experimentally induced changes in self-location and first person perspective (Ionta et al., 2011, and dysfunctions in TPJ are causally associated with out-of-body experiences (Blanke et al., 2002. We argue that TPJ is one of the key areas for multisensory integration of bodily self-consciousness, that its activity levels reflect the experience of the conscious I as embodied and localized within bodily space, and that these mechanisms can be systematically investigated using state of the art technologies such as robotics, virtual reality and non-invasive neuroimaging.

  6. The brain network reflecting bodily self-consciousness: a functional connectivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionta, Silvio; Martuzzi, Roberto; Salomon, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Several brain regions are important for processing self-location and first-person perspective, two important aspects of bodily self-consciousness. However, the interplay between these regions has not been clarified. In addition, while self-location and first-person perspective in healthy subjects are associated with bilateral activity in temporoparietal junction (TPJ), disturbed self-location and first-person perspective result from damage of only the right TPJ. Identifying the involved brain network and understanding the role of hemispheric specializations in encoding self-location and first-person perspective, will provide important information on system-level interactions neurally mediating bodily self-consciousness. Here, we used functional connectivity and showed that right and left TPJ are bilaterally connected to supplementary motor area, ventral premotor cortex, insula, intraparietal sulcus and occipitotemporal cortex. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between right TPJ and right insula had the highest selectivity for changes in self-location and first-person perspective. Finally, functional connectivity revealed hemispheric differences showing that self-location and first-person perspective modulated the connectivity between right TPJ, right posterior insula, and right supplementary motor area, and between left TPJ and right anterior insula. The present data extend previous evidence on healthy populations and clinical observations in neurological deficits, supporting a bilateral, but right-hemispheric dominant, network for bodily self-consciousness. PMID:24396007

  7. Parallels in preschoolers' and adults' judgments about ownership rights and bodily rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vondervoort, Julia W; Friedman, Ori

    2015-01-01

    Understanding ownership rights is necessary for socially appropriate behavior. We provide evidence that preschoolers' and adults' judgments of ownership rights are related to their judgments of bodily rights. Four-year-olds (n = 70) and adults (n = 89) evaluated the acceptability of harmless actions targeting owned property and body parts. At both ages, evaluations did not vary for owned property or body parts. Instead, evaluations were influenced by two other manipulations-whether the target belonged to the agent or another person, and whether that other person approved of the action. Moreover, these manipulations influenced judgments for owned objects and body parts in the same way: When the other person approved of the action, participants' judgments were positive regardless of who the target belonged to. In contrast, when that person disapproved, judgments depended on who the target belonged to. These findings show that young children grasp the importance of approval or consent for ownership rights and bodily rights, and likewise suggest that people's notions of ownership rights are related to their appreciation of bodily rights. Copyright © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  8. Scared by you: modulation of bodily-self by emotional body-postures in autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamagni, Elisa; Dolcini, Camilla; Gessaroli, Erica; Santelli, Erica; Frassinetti, Francesca

    2011-03-01

    Bodily self-recognition is one aspect of our ability to distinguish between self and others and is central to effective socialization. Here we explored the influence of emotional body postures on bodily self-processing in typically developing (TD) as well as in high-functioning ASD children. Subjects' bodies were photographed while expressing endogenously- (self-generated, Experiment 1) or exogenously-driven body emotions (imitated upon request, Experiment 2). Postures conveying positive (happiness), negative (fearful) and neutral valences were used. These pictures served as stimuli in a visual matching-to-sample task with self and others' body-images. A similar self-versus-others advantage was found in TD and in ASD children, since participants were faster with stimuli representing their own than others' body. This "self-advantage" was modulated by self-expressed emotional body postures being present with pictures of happy and neutral, but not fearful body images. This modulation was stronger when emotional postures were endogenously rather than exogenously driven. Moreover, faster responses were observed for others' fearful rather than happy or neutral body images in both groups. The bodily self-advantage is a low-level function present in typically developing (TD) and in high-functioning ASD children. Body postures, especially when they are endogenously generated, modulate the self and others' body processing. The advantage for processing others' fearful, comparing to others' happy and neutral, body postures may have played a crucial evolutionary role for species survival. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Faces and bodies: perception and mimicry of emotionally congruent and incongruent facial and bodily expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska eKret

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional emotion theories stress the importance of the face in the expression of emotions but bodily expressions are becoming increasingly important. Here we tested the hypothesis that similar physiological responses can be evoked by observing emotional face and body signals and that the reaction to angry signals is amplified in anxious individuals. We designed three experiments in which participants categorized emotional expressions from isolated facial and bodily expressions and from emotionally congruent and incongruent face-body compounds. Participants’ fixations were measured and their pupil size recorded with eye-tracking equipment, and their facial reactions measured with electromyography (EMG. The behavioral results support our prediction that the recognition of a facial expression is improved in the context of a matching posture and importantly, also vice versa. From their facial expression, it appeared that observers acted with signs of negative emotionality (increased corrugator activity to angry and fearful facial expressions and with positive emotionality (increased zygomaticus to happy facial expressions. What we predicted and found, was that angry and fearful cues from the face or the body, attracted more attention than happy cues. We further observed that responses evoked by angry cues were amplified in individuals with high anxiety scores. In sum, we show that people process bodily expressions of emotion in a similar fashion as facial expressions and that the congruency between the emotional signals from the face and body ameliorates the recognition of the emotion.

  10. Biased interpretations of ambiguous bodily threat information in adolescents with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, L C; Jacobs, K; Eccleston, C; Fox, E; Lau, J Y F

    2017-03-01

    Adult patients with chronic pain are consistently shown to interpret ambiguous health and bodily information in a pain-related and threatening way. This interpretation bias may play a role in the development and maintenance of pain and disability. However, no studies have yet investigated the role of interpretation bias in adolescent patients with pain, despite that pain often first becomes chronic in youth. We administered the Adolescent Interpretations of Bodily Threat (AIBT) task to adolescents with chronic pain (N = 66) and adolescents without chronic pain (N = 74). Adolescents were 10 to 18 years old and completed the study procedures either at the clinic (patient group) or at school (control group). We found that adolescents with chronic pain were less likely to endorse benign interpretations of ambiguous pain and bodily threat information than adolescents without chronic pain, particularly when reporting on the strength of belief in those interpretations being true. These differences between patients and controls were not evident for ambiguous social situations, and they could not be explained by differences in anxious or depressive symptoms. Furthermore, this interpretation pattern was associated with increased levels of disability among adolescent patients, even after controlling for severity of chronic pain and pain catastrophizing. The current findings extend our understanding of the role and nature of cognition in adolescent pain, and provide justification for using the AIBT task in longitudinal and training studies to further investigate causal associations between interpretation bias and chronic pain.

  11. Doubles everywhere: literary contributions to the study of the bodily self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The topic of the double is a hallmark of romantic, gothic, and fantastic literature. In the guise of the second self, the alter ego or the doppelgänger, fictional doubles have long fascinated critics, clinicians, and scientists. We review classical approaches to the theme and propose a broad clinical and neurocognitive framework from which to examine major instances of the motif in literature. Based on neurological disorders of the bodily self (including unilateral and whole body illusions and duplications), as well as related experimental approaches, we provide examples of literary depictions of bodily fragmentation and splitting; autoscopic hallucinations; the classical doppelgänger, second self, or heautoscopic double; the feeling of a presence; out-of-body experiences; and so-called near-death experiences. Examples include works from Guy de Maupassant, E.T.A. Hoffman, Edgar Allan Poe, Robert Louis Stevenson, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Rudyard Kipling, and others. We discuss these literary cases of doubles from a neurocognitive perspective, and suggest that common mechanisms of the bodily self are involved in the emergence of pathological illusory doubles, literary creations of the double, as well as widespread cultural and religious beliefs about the existence of doubles and the soul. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The development of bodily self-consciousness: changing responses to the Full Body Illusion in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Dorothy; McKenna, Aisling; Bremner, Andrew J; Aspell, Jane E

    2017-03-22

    The present work investigates the development of bodily self-consciousness and its relation to multisensory bodily information, by measuring for the first time the development of responses to the full body illusion in childhood. We tested three age groups of children: 6- to 7-year-olds (n = 28); 8- to 9-year-olds (n = 21); 10- to 11-year-olds (n = 19), and a group of adults (n = 31). Each participant wore a head-mounted display (HMD) which displayed a view from a video camera positioned 2 metres behind their own back. Thus, they could view a virtual body from behind. We manipulated visuo-tactile synchrony by showing the participants a view of their virtual back being stroked with a stick at the same time and same place as their real back (synchronous condition), or at different times and places (asynchronous condition). After each period of stroking, we measured three aspects of bodily self-consciousness: drift in perceived self-location, self-identification with the virtual body, and touch referral to the virtual body. Results show that self-identification with the virtual body was significantly stronger in the synchronous condition than in the asynchronous condition even in the youngest group tested; however, the size of this effect increased with age. Touch referral to the virtual body was greater in the synchronous condition than in the asynchronous condition only for 10- to 11-year-olds and adults. Drift in perceived self-location was greater in the synchronous condition than in the asynchronous condition only for adults. Thus, the youngest age tested can self-identify with a virtual body, but the links between multisensory signals and bodily self-consciousness develop significantly across childhood. This suggests a long period of development of the bodily self and exciting potential for the use of virtual reality technologies with children. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The body as a tool for anger awareness : differential effects of angry facial and bodily expressions on suppression from awareness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhan, M; Hortensius, R; de Gelder, B

    2015-01-01

    .... This pattern indicates different processing and detection mechanisms for faces and bodies outside awareness, and suggests that awareness mechanisms associated with dorsal structures might play a role in becoming conscious of angry bodily expressions.

  14. Bodily Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichberg, Henning

      Sport has gained increasing importance for welfare society. In this process, however, the term of ‘sport' has become less and less clear. Larger parts of what nowadays is called ‘sport for all' are non-competitive and derived from traditions of gymnastics, dance, festivity, games, outdoor...... practice in education and on relations between identity and recognition. The study of ‘sport for all' opens up for new ways of phenomenological knowledge, moving bottom-up from sport to the philosophy of "the individual", of event, of nature, and of human energy. Popular sports give inspiration...... to a philosophy of practice as well as to a phenomenological understanding of ‘the people', of civil society and the ‘demos' of democracy - as folk in movement....

  15. Enhancing Communication Skills with Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence in Multiple Intelligences Theory : A Case Study at AICJ Junior High School

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihiro, Nigo; Graduate School, Hiroshima Jogakuin University

    2009-01-01

    Both in theory and practice, this study aims to reveal the effectiveness of utilizing the bodily-kinesthetic intelligence (BKI) in learning English for communication skills. Because Asher's Total Physical Response (TPR) is not always effective in enhancing communication skills in junior high schools, this paper focuses on Gardner's multiple intelligences theory of BKI closely linked with the function of the brain, which represents bodily movement for problem-solving and information processing...

  16. Do SF-36 summary scores work as outcome measures in chronic functional disorders?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Ørnbøl, Eva; Fink, Per

    controlled trial on cognitive behavioural therapy in patients with severe and chronic functional disorders. Based on a pilot study and baseline data, we have assessed the performance of the summary scores. Aim To demonstrate problems in the orthogonal factor solution for PCS and MCS and to assess other...... mental health subscales showed no significant differences. Conclusion The negative weights of the orthogonal factor solution distorted the results in both study samples. As outcome measures, PCS and MCS should be interpreted with caution in patients with functional disorders and in other patient groups...

  17. Magnitude and meaningfulness of change in SF-36 scores in four types of orthopedic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busija, Lucy; Osborne, Richard H; Nilsdotter, Anna

    2008-01-01

    subscales following orthopedic surgery. METHODS: Longitudinal data on outcomes of total hip replacement (THR, n = 255), total knee replacement (TKR, n = 103), arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM, n = 74) and anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACL, n = 62) were used to estimate the effect sizes...

  18. Quality of life after pulmonary embolism as assessed with SF-36 and PEmb-QoL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Es, Josien; den Exter, Paul L.; Kaptein, Ad A.; Andela, Cornelie D.; Erkens, Petra M. G.; Klok, Frederikus A.; Douma, Renee A.; Mos, Inge C. M.; Cohn, Danny M.; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Huisman, Menno V.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although quality of life (QoL) is recognized as an important indicator of the course of a disease, it has rarely been addressed in studies evaluating the outcome of care for patients with pulmonary embolism (PE). This study primarily aimed to evaluate the QoL of patients with acute PE

  19. Impact of Uveitis on Quality of Life: A Prospective Study from a Tertiary Referral Rheumatology-Ophthalmology Collaborative Uveitis Center in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiani, Claudia; Vitale, Antonio; Orlando, Ida; Capozzoli, Marco; Fusco, Fiorella; Rana, Francesco; Franceschini, Rossella; Sota, Jurgen; Frediani, Bruno; Galeazzi, Mauro; Marco Tosi, Gian; Cantarini, Luca

    2017-08-01

    Non-infectious uveitis (NIU) leads to severe visual impairment, potentially impacting on health-related quality of life (QoL). To investigate the impact of NIU on QoL. Eighty NIU patients and 23 healthy controls completed the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF)-36. The SF-36 values were statistically analyzed to evaluate differences between patients and healthy controls and to identify correlations between SF-36 subscores and clinical/demographic data. NIU patients showed a decrease in the physical component summary score (P social functioning (P = 0.01). Physical functioning was lower in patients with acute anterior uveitis (AAU) than in those with panuveitis (P = 0.003). No differences were found between patients with bilateral or unilateral NIU, isolated NIU, or NIU associated with systemic diseases and with or without ocular activity. No correlations were identified between best-corrected visual acuity and SF-36 subscores. Physical functioning (P = 0.02), bodily pain (P = 0.004), and social functioning (P = 0.02) were reduced in males versus females. QoL is impaired in individuals with NIU, particularly in the physical domains, general health, and social functioning. AAU affects physical functioning more than panuveitis. NIU seems to affect per se QoL disregarding inflammatory activity, visual impairment, and presence of associated systemic diseases.

  20. The impact of depression and malnutrition on health-related quality of life among the elderly Iranians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarzi, Sareh; Ahmadi, Seyed Mehdi; Lankarani, Kamran B

    2014-11-26

    The present study aimed to assess the association between nutritional status and depressive symptoms among elderly Iranians and to explore their impact on their Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). In this cross-sectional study, 447 elders aging from 55 to 85 years were randomly selected and completed the Iranian version of Geriatric Depression Scale-15 (GDS), Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), and the Iranian version of Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Out of the 447 elderly, 72.1% were female with the mean age of 65.99 ± 7.89 years. The prevalence of depression was 38.1%. In addition, the SF-36 sub-scores tended to be lower among the elders with depressive symptoms according to GDS. The Physical Functioning (PF), Bodily Pain (BP), Role Physical (RP), Role Emotional (RE), and Mental Health (MH) dimensions of the SF-36 were also statistically poorer in the elders with depression. The mean MNA score was 24.6 ± 2.7; 35.4% of the participants were malnourished or at risk of malnutrition and 64.6% were adequately nourished. The sub scores of SF-36 were significantly lower in the elders with impaired nutritional status. Considering the importance of the association among psychological and nutritional problems and HRQoL in caring for and promoting the welfare of the elders, this study provided fundamental information and a basis for further evaluation of this issue in developing and undeveloped countries.

  1. Long-term quality of life changes after primary septorhinoplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulut, Olcay Cem; Wallner, Frank; Oladokun, Dare; Kayser, Claire; Plath, Michaela; Schulz, Eric; Plinkert, Peter Karl; Baumann, Ingo

    2017-12-04

    Health-related quality of life measurements are gaining in importance in clinical medicine. Little is known about the long-term quality of life changes after septorhinoplasty. This study was designed to analyse the long-term quality of life impacts of septorhinoplasty, using disease-specific instruments-rhinoplasty outcome evaluation (ROE) and Functional Rhinoplasty Outcome Inventory-17 (FROI-17); as well as a generic instrument-Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36). Patients completed the FROI-17, the ROE and the SF-36 preoperatively and at 12 and 60 months postoperatively. General demographic and clinical information (age, gender, allergies, medication, medical and surgical history) were collected from all patients. We report a significant increase in disease-specific QOL after primary septorhinoplasty (as measured with the ROE & FROI-17) and in two scales of the SF-36 generic instrument (role-functioning physical and mental health) 1 year after surgery. Our patients showed further significant increase in disease-specific QOL (FROI-17) after their primary septorhinoplasty (1 year vs. 5 years postoperatively). SF-36 results showed significant improvements 5 years postoperatively (compared to preoperative scores) in six out of eight scales (physical functioning, role-functioning physical, bodily pain, vitality, social functioning and mental health). Septorhinoplasty can improve disease-specific and non-disease-specific QOL in the short- and long-term postoperative period. These improvements remain measurable 5 years after surgery.

  2. Exploring communication during the journey from noticing bodily changes to a diagnosis of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine; Brunton, Margaret; Pukepuke, Tepora; Tan, Ai Ling

    2017-11-17

    To understand women's perspectives about the trajectory from first bodily changes to diagnosis. With endometrial cancer, as with all gynaecological cancers, early diagnosis is key to successful outcomes. However, women do not always seek clinical advice early. Previously, this gap has been referred to as a "delay," blamed on fear or refusal to acknowledge symptoms. A qualitative research project which involved face-to-face interviews with 16 women who had presented with symptoms of endometrial cancer. The paucity of research in the trajectory of women who experience a diagnosis of endometrial cancer required an exploratory overview of the data. Accordingly, an inductive thematic analysis was conducted using the framework of Braun and Clarke (Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 2006, 77). Women and health professionals both resorted to satisficing, using heuristics to make decisions about the importance of symptoms depending on their severity and duration. Most women initially determined that the bodily changes were within the realms of normal. Time to diagnosis was also affected by the following: women's long-standing assumptions; communication with health professionals; liminality-women oscillating between their self-assessment that these changes were something significant or nothing important; and gaps in health literacy. The journey from noticing bodily changes to diagnosis was a nonlinear trajectory. Women worked to make sense of what was happening to them, informed by their sociocultural environment. In particular, confusion about the purpose of cervical screening led a number of participants who had regular smears to assume they were "safe" from cancer worries. Women and some health professionals may be unfamiliar with symptoms potentially indicative of endometrial cancer. There may be structural and communication barriers for women navigating healthcare systems. It is vital that nurses take time both to listen to women and to provide them with resources

  3. Tonic States as the Basis of Bodily States in Dialogue with a Creative Dance Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Dias Laranjeira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to reflect on the concept of bodily states in dance through artistic and academic investigations of corporeality and dance in the traditional Pernambuco cultural performance Cavalo Marinho. By analysing the artistic investigation process, encompassing field research in the context of this cultural expression, we aim to conduct a dialogue with theoretical approaches to gesture and perception. Thus, concepts of pre-movement and tonic states have significant value in understanding a creative process based on the relationship between perception, memory, imagination, states, and movements.

  4. Programming of employments physical exercises for the improvement of bodily condition of children of midchildhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sljusarchuk V.V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Approaches are considered on forming and realization of maintenance of physical education of students of initial school. The algorithm of programming of maintenance of lessons of physical culture is developed. The program foresees implementation of requirements of general and methodical principles of physical education, positions of theory of adaptation, requirements of the operating program. It is marked that employments must provide for: differentiated going near students, account of interests and to the wishes, motivation to independent employments by physical exercises, to providing of motor high-density. It is recommended to take into account the features of dynamics of indexes of bodily condition of children of different somatotype.

  5. INTERACTIVE VIDEO-GAMING AND THE NEW POSSIBILITIES FOR BODILY ACTION AND IMAGINATION

    OpenAIRE

    Nino Ferrin; Michalis Kontopodis

    2015-01-01

    Video games can open possibilities for bodily action and imagination of the youths, especially the newer forms of video games. We will discuss it through two case studies of media sporting activities with the game “Nintendo Wii”, in which the game is handled by corporal movements. The performative use of new media enables the actor-actant to recognize or misrecognize his/her abilities, since the media changes radically one’s world- and self-views. In order to deal with these basic assumptions...

  6. Multi-Sensory and Sensorimotor Foundation of Bodily Self-Consciousness – An Interdisciplinary Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ionta, Silvio; Gassert, Roger; Blanke, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Scientific investigations on the nature of the self have so far focused on high-level mechanisms. Recent evidence, however, suggests that low-level bottom-up mechanisms of multi-sensory integration play a fundamental role in encoding specific components of bodily self-consciousness, such as self-location and first-person perspective (Blanke and Metzinger, 2009). Self-location and first-person perspective are abnormal in neurological patients suffering from out-of-body experiences (Blanke et a...

  7. Criminal Rehabilitation Through Medical Intervention: Moral Liability and the Right to Bodily Integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Criminal offenders are sometimes required, by the institutions of criminal justice, to undergo medical interventions intended to promote rehabilitation. Ethical debate regarding this practice has largely proceeded on the assumption that medical interventions may only permissibly be administered to criminal offenders with their consent. In this article I challenge this assumption by suggesting that committing a crime might render one morally liable to certain forms of medical intervention. I then consider whether it is possible to respond persuasively to this challenge by invoking the right to bodily integrity. I argue that it is not.

  8. Clinical significance of lifetime mood and panic-agoraphobic spectrum symptoms on quality of life of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinni, Armando; Maser, Jack D; Bazzichi, Laura; Rucci, Paola; Vivarelli, Laura; Del Debbio, Alessandro; Catena, Mario; Bombardieri, Stefano; Dell'Osso, Lilliana

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with depressive and anxiety symptomatology. The well-being and functioning of patients with RA may be significantly influenced by subthreshold psychiatric comorbidity. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of patients with RA, compared with the Italian norms and patients with diabetes, was assessed by the influence of lifetime mood and panic-agoraphobic spectrum symptoms and demographic and clinical variables. Ninety-two patients were consecutively recruited at the Department of Rheumatology at the University Hospital of Pisa, Italy. All patients met diagnostic criteria of RA according to the American College of Rheumatology. Health-related quality of life was measured using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey questionnaire (MOS SF-36). Mood and panic-agoraphobic spectra were assessed by two different structured self-report instruments: the Mood Spectrum (MOODS-SR) and the Panic-Agoraphobic Spectrum (PAS-SR), respectively. Patients with RA were compared, as regards the MOS SF-36 scale scores, with the Italian normative population and patients with diabetes. Compared with the Italian population, patients with RA showed significantly lower MOS SF-36 scale scores, except for role emotional. Moreover, patients with RA scored significantly lower on the role physical, bodily pain, and social functioning scales compared with patients with diabetes and higher on role emotional and mental health. A significant worsening of all MOS SF-36 scale scores was related to higher scores of the depressive domains of MOODS-SR, except for social functioning and bodily pain. A statistically significant negative association was also found between PAS-SR total score and the MOS SF-36 scales physical functioning, vitality, role emotional, and mental health. There were no statistically significant correlations between MOS SF-36 scales and the manic MOODS spectrum. In the multivariate models, the

  9. The study of bodily socialization of adolescents, whose families are experiencing divorce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chechulina A.E.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a study of the sociogenesis of corporeality adolescents whose parents are in high conflict relationships and experiencing divorce. The main group consisted of families that have undergone the examination of parent-child relations in the Centre for forensic examinations and studies, the control group – families with prosperous spousal relationship (a total of 28 parents and 16 adolescents aged 13-15 years. To assess qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the bodily sphere of the adolescents used the methodology of "the Volume and structure intercepting background", "Scale of assessment of skin" and test "body Shape", especially the parent-child relationship was assessed using questionnaires "the Behavior and attitudes of parents of adolescents to them." Statistically significant intergroup differences (U-Mann–Whitney test on a number of parameters that characterize the bodily socialization of adolescents. Adolescents from families undergoing divorce, revealed violations of individual (lability of borders and social (reflection, metaphoric levels of physicality in the type of retardation.

  10. The body language: The spontaneous influence of congruent bodily arousal on the awareness of emotional words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kever, Anne; Grynberg, Delphine; Eeckhout, Coralie; Mermillod, Martial; Fantini, Carole; Vermeulen, Nicolas

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, the idea of a reciprocal influence of physiological and psychological processes seems to be widely accepted. For instance, current theories of embodied emotion suggest that knowledge about an emotion concept involves simulations of bodily experienced emotional states relevant to the concept. In line with this framework, the present study investigated whether actual levels of physiological arousal interact with the processing of emotional words. Participants performed 2 blocks of an attentional blink task, once after a cycling session (increased arousal) and once after a relaxation session (reduced arousal). Concretely, participants were instructed to detect and report 2 target words (T1 and T2) presented among a series of nonword distractors. T1 and T2 were either neutral, high arousal, or low arousal words. Results revealed that increased physiological arousal led to improved reports of high arousal T2 words, whereas reduced physiological arousal led to improved reports of low arousal T2 words. Neutral T2 remained unaffected by the arousing conditions. These findings emphasize that actual levels of physiological arousal modulate the cognitive access to arousal (in-)congruent emotional concepts and suggest a direct grounding of emotion knowledge in our bodily systems of arousal. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. The Impact of Aging and Alzheimer's Disease on Decoding Emotion Cues from Bodily Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline M. Insch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Both healthy aging and dementia cause problems with emotion perception, and the impairment is generally greater for specific emotions (anger, sadness and fear. Most studies to date have focused on static facial photographs of emotions. The current study investigated the effects of healthy aging and Alzheimer's disease (AD on the ability to decode emotions from bodily motion displayed by point light stimuli. Response biases were controlled to investigate whether these influenced the specificity of impairment in perceiving individual emotions. Study 1 compared healthy young and older adults, and Study 2 people with AD and age-matched controls, on an emotion perception task using point light stimuli. Accuracy and the pattern of errors were investigated. Specific age-related impairments were found in labeling sadness, anger and fear from point light displays. Response biases were also found, and controlling for these biases indicated that older adults were worse at labeling all emotions. People with AD were less accurate than healthy older controls at labeling fear, anger and sadness. After controlling for response biases, AD caused impairment in perceiving all emotions. These results indicate a general age-related impairment in decoding emotions from bodily motion, and a further impairment in this skill in AD. Apparent specificity of deficits in emotion labeling tasks needs to be interpreted cautiously, and correction for response bias should be considered. Problems perceiving emotion cues from biological motion might impair social interaction in older adults, particularly those with dementia.

  12. Using Virtual Reality to Distract Overweight Children from Bodily Sensations During Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baños, Rosa M; Escobar, Patricia; Cebolla, Ausias; Guixeres, Jaime; Alvarez Pitti, Julio; Lisón, Juan Francisco; Botella, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    This study analyzes the potential of virtual reality (VR) to enhance attentional distraction in overweight children as they experience bodily sensations during exercise. It has been suggested that one reason why obese children stop exercising is the perception of bodily sensations. In a counterbalanced design, a total of 109 children (33 overweight, 10-15 years old) were asked to walk twice for 6 minutes on a treadmill under one of two conditions: (a) traditional condition (TC)-focusing their attention on their physical feelings and sensations or (b) distraction condition (DC)-focusing their attention on a virtual environment. Attentional focus during exercise, bad-good feeling states (pre- and postexperimental), perceived exertion (3 minutes and post), heart rate, and enjoyment were assessed. Results indicated that overweight children focused on internal information under the TC, but they significantly shifted their attention to regard the external environment in the DC. This attentional distraction effect of VR was more intense in overweight than in normal-weight children. No differences between groups were found when examining changes in feeling states and perceived exertion. VR increased enjoyment during exercise, and children preferred exercise using virtual environments. VR is useful to promote distraction and may help overweight and obese children to enjoy exercise.

  13. Embodied economics: how bodily information shapes the social coordination dynamics of decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oullier, Olivier; Basso, Frédéric

    2010-01-01

    To date, experiments in economics are restricted to situations in which individuals are not influenced by the physical presence of other people. In such contexts, interactions remain at an abstract level, agents guessing what another person is thinking or is about to decide based on money exchange. Physical presence and bodily signals are therefore left out of the picture. However, in real life, social interactions (involving economic decisions or not) are not solely determined by a person's inference about someone else's state-of-mind. In this essay, we argue for embodied economics: an approach to neuroeconomics that takes into account how information provided by the entire body and its coordination dynamics influences the way we make economic decisions. Considering the role of embodiment in economics—movements, posture, sensitivity to mimicry and every kind of information the body conveys—makes sense. This is what we claim in this essay which, to some extent, constitutes a plea to consider bodily interactions between agents in social (neuro)economics. PMID:20026467

  14. [Too fat, too thin?--bodily self-perception and eating habits of teenagers in Bremen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horstkotte, E

    2011-02-01

    A study of about 600 eighth grade students by the Bremen Department of Health show that overweight and the risk of an eating disorder are widespread among teenagers in Bremen. In the school year 2008/2009 a quota sample of eighth graders was questioned in regard to their dietary habits, their bodily self-perception and their eating behaviour, and they were weighed and measured. 21% of the students were overweight, 10% were even obese. Our studies showed that the share of overweight students had doubled between the beginning and the end of primary school and only increased marginally after that. The students' bodily self-perception frequently did not correspond to their actual body weight, not only among those who were overweight, but also among those with an objectively normal body weight. In one in 7 of the teenagers with normal body weight, furthermore, we found signs of disrupted eating behaviour. The actuality of the topic of eating disorders for the health of teenagers becomes apparent when taking into account further results of the study. If, moreover, we bring to mind the long-term consequences of overweight and the often massive adverse effects through illnesses like anorexia or bulimia, it becomes clear that the disruptions addressed here should be a central concern for prevention. The study presented here shows where interventions are most needed. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Embodied economics: how bodily information shapes the social coordination dynamics of decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oullier, Olivier; Basso, Frédéric

    2010-01-27

    To date, experiments in economics are restricted to situations in which individuals are not influenced by the physical presence of other people. In such contexts, interactions remain at an abstract level, agents guessing what another person is thinking or is about to decide based on money exchange. Physical presence and bodily signals are therefore left out of the picture. However, in real life, social interactions (involving economic decisions or not) are not solely determined by a person's inference about someone else's state-of-mind. In this essay, we argue for embodied economics: an approach to neuroeconomics that takes into account how information provided by the entire body and its coordination dynamics influences the way we make economic decisions. Considering the role of embodiment in economics--movements, posture, sensitivity to mimicry and every kind of information the body conveys--makes sense. This is what we claim in this essay which, to some extent, constitutes a plea to consider bodily interactions between agents in social (neuro)economics.

  16. Clinically important deterioration in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery: a choice of evaluation methods using the Oswestry Disability Index, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and pain scales: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Jeffrey L; Glassman, Steven D; Carreon, Leah Y

    2013-11-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) measures have become the mainstay for outcome appraisal in spine surgery. Clinically meaningful interpretation of HRQOL improvement has centered on the minimum clinically important difference (MCID). The purpose of this study was to calculate clinically important deterioration (CIDET) thresholds and determine a CIDET value for each HRQOL measure for patients undergoing lumbar fusion. Seven hundred twenty-two patients (248 males, 127 smokers, mean age 60.8 years) were identified with complete preoperative and 1-year postoperative HRQOLs including the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), and numeric rating scales (0-10) for back and leg pain following primary, instrumented, posterior lumbar fusion. Anchor-based and distribution-based methods were used to calculate CIDET for each HRQOL. Anchor-based methods included change score, change difference, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The Health Transition Item, an independent item of the SF-36, was used as the external anchor. Patients who responded "somewhat worse" and "much worse" were combined and compared with patients responding "about the same." Distribution-based methods were minimum detectable change and effect size. Diagnoses included spondylolisthesis (n = 332), scoliosis (n = 54), instability (n = 37), disc pathology (n = 146), and stenosis (n = 153). There was a statistically significant change (p HRQOL measure from preoperatively to 1-year postoperatively. Only 107 patients (15%) reported being "somewhat worse" (n = 81) or "much worse" (n = 26). Calculation methods yielded a range of CIDET values for ODI (0.17-9.06), SF-36 physical component summary (-0.32 to 4.43), back pain (0.02-1.50), and leg pain (0.02-1.50). A threshold for clinical deterioration was difficult to identify. This may be due to the small number of patients reporting being worse after surgery and the variability across methods to determine

  17. A phenomenological analysis of bodily self-awareness in the experience of pain and pleasure: on dys-appearance and eu-appearance

    OpenAIRE

    Zeiler, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to explore nuances within the field of bodily self-awareness. My starting-point is phenomenological. I focus on how the subject experiences her or his body, i.e. how the body stands forth to the subject. I build on the phenomenologist Drew Leders distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. In bodily dis-appearance, I am only prereflectively aware of my body. My body is not a thematic object of my experience. Bodily dys-appearance takes place when t...

  18. From facial expressions to bodily gestures: Passions, photography and movement in French 19th-century sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel, Beatriz

    2016-02-01

    This article aims to determine to what extent photographic practices in psychology, psychiatry and physiology contributed to the definition of the external bodily signs of passions and emotions in the second half of the 19 th century in France. Bridging the gap between recent research in the history of emotions and photographic history, the following analyses focus on the photographic production of scientists and photographers who made significant contributions to the study of expressions and gestures, namely Duchenne de Boulogne, Charles Darwin, Paul Richer and Albert Londe. This article argues that photography became a key technology in their works due to the adequateness of the exposure time of different cameras to the duration of the bodily manifestations to be recorded, and that these uses constituted facial expressions and bodily gestures as particular objects for the scientific study.

  19. Validation of a Self-Report Questionnaire Assessing the Bodily and Physiological Sensations of Orgasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubray, Samantha; Gérard, Marina; Beaulieu-Prévost, Dominic; Courtois, Frédérique

    2017-02-01

    Despite a plethora of research on sexual functioning during the past decades, the field is still lacking standardized measurements specifically characterizing orgasm. Although several validated tools are available to assess sexual function in healthy and clinical populations, items on orgasm are limited to frequency or dichotomous responses. A neurophysiologic model of orgasm developed from previous research in able-bodied and spinally injured populations offers a promising framework for the construction of a new questionnaire. To develop and validate a brief self-report measurement of orgasm by the assessment of bodily and physiologic sensations perceived during climax by able-bodied individuals. Although the currently available tool focuses on the phenomenological sensations associated with climax, the goal of this questionnaire was to capture the more specific genital and extragenital sensations associated with orgasm. The current Bodily Sensations of Orgasm questionnaire and the Orgasm Rating Scale. Data from previous research conducted on individuals with spinal cord injury and the available empirical literature provided a pool of 45 items organized into four categories, which were reviewed by an expert panel. Upon review, a 28-item questionnaire was created and administered to a community sample of 227 participants, including men and women, 18 to 73 years old. Exploratory factor analyses supported the four-factor model, in which orgasm is comprised of extragenital sensations, genital sensations and spasms, nociceptive sensations, and sweating responses. Overall, a high degree of internal consistency was found for the final 22-item questionnaire (Cronbach α = 0.87), with individual reliability coefficients showing moderate to high internal consistency (r = 0.65-0.79) for each dimension. Overall temporal stability of the measurement was acceptable (r = 0.74). Using the Orgasm Rating Scale, satisfying convergent validity was confirmed, thereby indicating

  20. DIALOGISM, DECODING AND INTERACTIVE DIGITAL MARKETING CONCERNING THE BODILY PRACTICES IN THE ON-LINE VIDEO OLYMPIKUS.MOV FESTIVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto Godoi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to understand the meanings associated bodily practices in the videos of the festival OLYMPIKUS.MOV, and also analyze the reception/interaction Internet users on these videos. The methodology consisted the description of the videos, the selection of comments and further analysis based on the notion of dialogic language of Mikhail Bakhtin and the types of decoding Stuart Hall. We concluded that there was a large range of bodily practices and meanings related to them in the videos. Reception/interaction Internet provides a critical dialogue, congratulation, and suggestive questioning on the videos.

  1. Children's self-perceived bodily competencies and associations with motor skills, body mass index, teachers' evaluations, and parents' concerns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftegaard-Stoeckel, Jan; Groenfeldt, Vivian; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2010-01-01

    The associations between physical competence, self-perceived bodily competence, parental concern for their children's motor skill development, and teachers' evaluation of their bodily competence were assessed in 646 six- to seven-year-olds. Physical competence was assessed by the German motor...... ability test "Korperkoordinationstest fur Kinder", while the children's, their parents', and their teachers' evaluations were obtained through questionnaires. Parental concern, teacher evaluation, and a high body mass index were the strongest predictors of low physical competence (motor skill quotient ...

  2. Quality of life, anxiety and depression symptoms in early and late pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Nicoline C; Secher, Anna L; Cramon, Per; Ringholm, Lene; Watt, Torquil; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore changes in health-related quality of life, anxiety and depression symptoms during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes. An observational cohort study including 137 pregnant women with pregestational diabetes (110 with type 1 and 27 with type 2). To evaluate changes from early to late pregnancy, the internationally validated questionnaires 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were completed at 8 and 33 gestational weeks. From early to late pregnancy, the SF-36 scales Physical Function, Role Physical, Bodily Pain and Physical Component Summary worsened (p quality of life deteriorated whereas mental quality of life improved slightly during pregnancy in women with pregestational diabetes. A minor reduction in anxiety and stable depression symptoms was observed. The results on mental health are reassuring, considering the great demands that pregnancy places on women with pregestational diabetes. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  3. Test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change on balance and ambulation tests, the 36-item short-form health survey, and the unified Parkinson disease rating scale in people with parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Teresa; Seney, Megan

    2008-06-01

    Distinguishing between a clinically significant change and change due to measurement error can be difficult. The purpose of this study was to determine test-retest reliability and minimal detectable change for the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), forward and backward functional reach, the Romberg Test and the Sharpened Romberg Test (SRT) with eyes open and closed, the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale, the Six-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), comfortable and fast gait speed, the Timed "Up & Go" Test (TUG), the Medical Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in people with parkinsonism. Thirty-seven community-dwelling adults with parkinsonism (mean age=71 years) participated. The Hoehn and Yahr Scale median score of 2 was on the lower end of the scale; however, the scores ranged from 1 to 4. Subjects were tested twice by the same raters, with 1 week between tests. Test-retest reliability was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Minimal detectable change was calculated using a 95% confidence interval (MDC(95)). The ICCs for test-retest reliability were above .90 for the BBS, ABC Scale, SRT with eyes closed, 6MWT, and comfortable and fast gait speeds. The MDC(95) values for those functional tests were: BBS=5/56, ABC Scale=13%, SRT with eyes closed=19 seconds, 6MWT=82 m, comfortable gait speed=0.18 m/s, and fast gait speed=0.25 m/s. The ICCs for test-retest reliability of SF-36 scores were above .80, with the exception of the social functioning subscale. The MDC(95) values for the SF-36 ranged between 19% and 45%. The MDC(95) values for the UPDRS Activities of Daily Living section, Motor Examination section, and total scores were 4/52, 11/108, and 13/176, respectively. Minimal detectable change values are useful to therapists in rehabilitation and wellness programs in determining whether change during or after intervention is clinically significant. High test-retest reliability of

  4. What can the parkour craftsmen tell us about bodily expertise and skilled movement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre Larsen, Signe

    2016-01-01

    up, repetitions and material consciousness in developing perceptual and physical skills in parkour. The parkour craftsmen conduct a constant dialogue between concrete, material practices and thinking. It is argued in the article that Sennett’s ideas about craftsmanship are, in many ways, similar...... to Dreyfus and Dreyfus’ concept of mastery, but are less elitist and exclusive than the theory of skill acquisition. The parkour craftsmen add a critical cultural perspective to the academic field of skills and expertise in sport. They furthermore offer insight into the ontology of play, and how it plays......The aim of this paper is to contribute to the discussion of expertise and skilled movement in sport by analysing the bodily practice of learning a new movement at a high level of skill in parkour. Based on Sennett’s theory of craftsmanship and an ethnographic field study with experienced...

  5. Experiences of visually impaired students in higher education: Bodily perspectives on inclusive education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourens, Heidi; Swartz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Although previous literature sheds light on the experiences of visually impaired students on tertiary grounds, these studies failed to provide an embodied understanding of their lives. In-depth interviews with 15 visually impaired students at one university demonstrated the ways in which they experienced their disability and the built environment in their bodies. At the same time, lost, fearful, shameful and aching bodies revealed prevailing gaps in provision for disabled students. Through this research it becomes clear how the environment is acutely felt within fleshly worlds, while bodies do not fail to tell of disabling societal structures. Based on the bodily stories, we thus make recommendations to improve the lives of visually impaired students on tertiary campuses. PMID:27917028

  6. Fallen uterus: social suffering, bodily vigor, and social support among women in rural Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Oka, Vania

    2014-03-01

    This article focuses on rural indigenous Mexican women's experiences with uterine prolapse, particularly the illness's expression of social suffering. Drawing on ethnographic research conducted during 2004-2005 and 2007 in a Nahua village in the state of Veracruz, the article analyzes the multifactorial nature of women's social suffering. Results show that the roots of uterine displacement for the women lie in lack of social relations and in perceptions of bodily vigor. Additionally, inequality present in the women's interactions with mainstream Mexico brings into focus the larger structural factors that shape their reproductive health. The implications of research on the effect of social support on women's embodiment of social suffering can extend beyond one illness, linking it to broader issues shaping the health of marginalized populations. © 2014 by the American Anthropological Association.

  7. Bodily matters above and below ground: the treatment of American remains from the Korean War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keene, Judith

    2010-02-01

    Throughout most of the twentieth century, depending on the capabilities of the military mortuary services and the time limits set by government, the bodies of the American fallen in foreign wars have been repatriated home to their families. In the Korean War the conditions of combat posed large challenges to the recovery and returns of bodily remains. Almost half a century after that conflict, the American missing in Korea have become significant players within the government's expanding efforts that were prompted in answer to demands to locate American soldiers who remain unaccounted for from the Vietnam War. The essay traces the background to U.S. military mortuary services and the operation in the Korean War and in the subsequent joint expeditions in North Korea. The analysis concludes that in most of these ventures the outlay of resources has produced few remains.

  8. Experiences of visually impaired students in higher education: Bodily perspectives on inclusive education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourens, Heidi; Swartz, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Although previous literature sheds light on the experiences of visually impaired students on tertiary grounds, these studies failed to provide an embodied understanding of their lives. In-depth interviews with 15 visually impaired students at one university demonstrated the ways in which they experienced their disability and the built environment in their bodies. At the same time, lost, fearful, shameful and aching bodies revealed prevailing gaps in provision for disabled students. Through this research it becomes clear how the environment is acutely felt within fleshly worlds, while bodies do not fail to tell of disabling societal structures. Based on the bodily stories, we thus make recommendations to improve the lives of visually impaired students on tertiary campuses.

  9. Living with digestive stomas: strategies to cope with the new bodily reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonill-de-las-Nieves, Candela; Celdrán-Mañas, Miriam; Hueso-Montoro, César; Morales-Asencio, José Miguel; Rivas-Marín, Concha; Fernández-Gallego, Magdalena Cuevas

    2014-01-01

    the objective in this study was to describe the strategies developed by digestive stoma patients to cope with their situation. a qualitative and descriptive study was undertaken, involving 21 stoma patients living in the provinces of Málaga and Granada (Spain). The informants were selected in accordance with criteria of appropriateness and diversity, through intentional sampling. The data were collected by means of semistructured interviews. the content analysis revealed three categories around which the distinct strategies were developed: Self-care, Adaptation to the bodily change and Self-help. the strategies developed are focusing on achieving the effective management of the stoma and are closely linked with the achievement of autonomy. Discovering the strategies applied is fundamental for the nursing professionals to offer high-quality care, centered on people and their process.

  10. Living with digestive stomas: strategies to cope with the new bodily reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela Bonill-de-las-Nieves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the objective in this study was to describe the strategies developed by digestive stoma patients to cope with their situation.METHOD: a qualitative and descriptive study was undertaken, involving 21 stoma patients living in the provinces of Málaga and Granada (Spain. The informants were selected in accordance with criteria of appropriateness and diversity, through intentional sampling. The data were collected by means of semistructured interviews.RESULTS: the content analysis revealed three categories around which the distinct strategies were developed: Self-care, Adaptation to the bodily change and Self-help.CONCLUSION: the strategies developed are focusing on achieving the effective management of the stoma and are closely linked with the achievement of autonomy. Discovering the strategies applied is fundamental for the nursing professionals to offer high-quality care, centered on people and their process.

  11. Living with digestive stomas: strategies to cope with the new bodily reality1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonill-de-las-Nieves, Candela; Celdrán-Mañas, Miriam; Hueso-Montoro, César; Morales-Asencio, José Miguel; Rivas-Marín, Concha; Fernández-Gallego, Magdalena Cuevas

    2014-01-01

    Objective the objective in this study was to describe the strategies developed by digestive stoma patients to cope with their situation. Method a qualitative and descriptive study was undertaken, involving 21 stoma patients living in the provinces of Málaga and Granada (Spain). The informants were selected in accordance with criteria of appropriateness and diversity, through intentional sampling. The data were collected by means of semistructured interviews. Results the content analysis revealed three categories around which the distinct strategies were developed: Self-care, Adaptation to the bodily change and Self-help. Conclusion the strategies developed are focusing on achieving the effective management of the stoma and are closely linked with the achievement of autonomy. Discovering the strategies applied is fundamental for the nursing professionals to offer high-quality care, centered on people and their process. PMID:25029049

  12. Role of biographical experience and bodily sensations in patients' adaptation to hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sångren, H; Reventlow, S; Hetlevik, I

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore patients' adaptation to hypertension and to describe its impact on their sense of body, biographical experience, approach to life and daily activities. METHODS: A qualitative interview study with nine men and eight women (age: 35-50 years) with hypertension from four general...... practices in Denmark. The informants differed in type and duration of treatment. RESULTS: Adaptation to hypertension was influenced by the patients' biographical experiences and involved changes in body perception. The process affected patients' daily activities and they actively tested their physical...... abilities. Patients gradually adopted behaviour and attitudes to reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease. CONCLUSION: A diagnosis of hypertension constitutes a biographical disruption and has an impact on daily life. Patients' adaptation to hypertension combines biographical and bodily experiences...

  13. "Your body is your business card": Bodily capital and health authority in the fitness industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, David J

    2013-08-01

    Although scholars have noted the connection between appearance and assumptions of health, the degree to which these assumptions matter for establishing authority in social interaction remains less clear. Using a theoretical framework involving "bodily capital"--that is, the value generated from appearance, attractiveness, and physical ability--I investigate the role of appearance in the U.S. fitness industry. Drawing on data from interviews with 26 personal trainers and 25 clients between 2010 and 2011, I find that a trainer's fit-appearing physique imbues their interactions with a degree of moral and health authority. This corporeal credibility engenders trust among clients and allows exercise to be understood as a form of health work. The implications for academics and medical practitioners reach beyond the gym setting and extend recent research linking appearance to health, authority, and medical credibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychopathology of the bodily self and the brain: the case of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallese, Vittorio; Ferri, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we review the recent empirical evidence on the neurobiological basis of a minimal notion of the self, the bodily self. We show the relationship between the body, its motor potentialities and the notion of minimal self. We argue that this approach can shed new light onto self-disturbances and social deficits characterizing schizophrenia. We discuss our approach with other views on the neural correlates of self-disturbances in schizophrenia and propose that cognitive neuroscience can today address the classical topics of psychopathology by adding a new level of description, finally enabling the correlation between the first-person experiential aspects of psychiatric diseases and their neurobiological roots. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Motor-based bodily self is selectively impaired in eating disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansi, Gianluigi; Fumagalli, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Beatrice; Sottocornola, Simona; Molteni, Massimo; Micali, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Background Body representation disturbances in body schema (i.e. unconscious sensorimotor body representations for action) have been frequently reported in eating disorders. Recently, it has been proposed that body schema relies on adequate functioning of the motor system, which is strongly implicated in discriminating between one’s own and someone else’s body. The present study aimed to investigate the motor-based bodily self in eating disorders and controls, in order to examine the role of the motor system in body representation disturbances at the body schema level. Method Female outpatients diagnosed with eating disorders (N = 15), and healthy controls (N = 18) underwent a hand laterality task, in which their own (self-stimuli) and someone else’s hands (other-stimuli) were displayed at different orientations. Participants had to mentally rotate their own hand in order to provide a laterality judgement. Group differences in motor-based bodily self-recognition—i.e. whether a general advantage occurred when implicitly processing self- vs. other-stimuli − were evaluated, by analyzing response times and accuracy by means of mixed ANOVAs. Results Patients with eating disorders did not show a temporal advantage when mentally rotating self-stimuli compared to other-stimuli, as opposed to controls (F(1, 31) = 5.6, p = 0.02; eating disorders-other = 1092 ±256 msec, eating disorders-self = 1097±254 msec; healthy controls-other = 1239±233 msec, healthy controls -self = 1192±232 msec). Conclusion This study provides initial indication that high-level motor functions might be compromised as part of body schema disturbances in eating disorders. Further larger investigations are required to test motor system abnormalities in the context of body schema disturbance in eating disorders. PMID:29091967

  16. Pain and disgust: the facial signaling of two aversive bodily experiences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Kunz

    Full Text Available The experience of pain and disgust share many similarities, given that both are aversive experiences resulting from bodily threat and leading to defensive reactions. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether facial expressions are distinct enough to encode the specific quality of pain and disgust or whether they just encode the similar negative valence and arousal level of both states. In sixty participants pain and disgust were induced by heat stimuli and pictures, respectively. Facial responses (Facial Action Coding System as well as subjective responses were assessed. Our main findings were that nearly the same single facial actions were elicited during pain and disgust experiences. However, these single facial actions were displayed with different strength and were differently combined depending on whether pain or disgust was experienced. Whereas pain was mostly encoded by contraction of the muscles surrounding the eyes (by itself or in combination with contraction of the eyebrows; disgust was mainly accompanied by contraction of the eyebrows and--in contrast to pain--by raising of the upper lip as well as the combination of upper lip raise and eyebrow contraction. Our data clearly suggests that facial expressions seem to be distinct enough to encode not only the general valence and arousal associated with these two bodily aversive experiences, namely pain and disgust, but also the specific origin of the threat to the body. This implies that the differential decoding of these two states by an observer is possible without additional verbal or contextual information, which is of special interest for clinical practice, given that raising awareness in observers about these distinct differences could help to improve the detection of pain in patients who are not able to provide a self-report of pain (e.g., patients with dementia.

  17. Motor-based bodily self is selectively impaired in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Giovanna Cristina; Mansi, Gianluigi; Fumagalli, Alessandra; Fumagalli, Beatrice; Sottocornola, Simona; Molteni, Massimo; Micali, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Body representation disturbances in body schema (i.e. unconscious sensorimotor body representations for action) have been frequently reported in eating disorders. Recently, it has been proposed that body schema relies on adequate functioning of the motor system, which is strongly implicated in discriminating between one's own and someone else's body. The present study aimed to investigate the motor-based bodily self in eating disorders and controls, in order to examine the role of the motor system in body representation disturbances at the body schema level. Female outpatients diagnosed with eating disorders (N = 15), and healthy controls (N = 18) underwent a hand laterality task, in which their own (self-stimuli) and someone else's hands (other-stimuli) were displayed at different orientations. Participants had to mentally rotate their own hand in order to provide a laterality judgement. Group differences in motor-based bodily self-recognition-i.e. whether a general advantage occurred when implicitly processing self- vs. other-stimuli - were evaluated, by analyzing response times and accuracy by means of mixed ANOVAs. Patients with eating disorders did not show a temporal advantage when mentally rotating self-stimuli compared to other-stimuli, as opposed to controls (F(1, 31) = 5.6, p = 0.02; eating disorders-other = 1092 ±256 msec, eating disorders-self = 1097±254 msec; healthy controls-other = 1239±233 msec, healthy controls -self = 1192±232 msec). This study provides initial indication that high-level motor functions might be compromised as part of body schema disturbances in eating disorders. Further larger investigations are required to test motor system abnormalities in the context of body schema disturbance in eating disorders.

  18. Bodily lower stratum in mediatic images O rebaixamento corporal nas imagens midiáticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José de Arimathéia Cordeiro Custódio

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a reading of grotesque shown in visual medias, mainly television. The discussion is supported by the ideas of bodily lower stratum as proposed by Mikhail Bakhtin in his work about popular culture at final Middle Ages and Renaissance, based on François Rabelais’s literary creations. The study explains the anthropological dimensions of the human body; defines the bodily lower stratum from the standpoint of bakhtinian thought; presents aspects of the mentality and the cultural scenario at the end of the medieval period, with emphasis on carnivalization and desacralization of the human body; and discusses the notions of renascentist grotesque realism updated in the context of contemporary mediatic images. Este artigo faz uma leitura do grotesco apresentado nas mídias visuais, sobretudo a televisão. Fundamenta a reflexão nas idéias de rebaixamento corporal propostas por Mikhail Bakhtin em sua obra sobre a cultura popular no final da Idade Média e Renascimento, à luz das criações literárias de François Rabelais. O estudo expõe dimensões antropológicas do corpo humano; define o rebaixamento a partir do pensamento bakhtiniano; apresenta aspectos da mentalidade e do cenário cultural do fim do medievo, com ênfase na carnavalização e dessacralização do corpo humano; e discute as noções do realismo grotesco renascentista atualizadas no contexto das imagens midiáticas contemporâneas.

  19. Chronic insomnia, quality-of-life, and utility scores: comparison with good sleepers in a cross-sectional international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Damien; Morin, Charles M; Uchiyama, Makoto; Hakimi, Zalmaï; Cure, Sandrine; Walsh, James K

    2012-01-01

    Chronic insomnia has a recognized impact on health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) but data on utility scores across countries are lacking. The objective of the present study was to assess health related quality of life (HRQoL) and utility scores in individuals from three different countries (USA, France, and Japan), comparing sufferers of chronic insomnia to good sleepers. A cross-sectional survey (SLEEPI-i) of 4067 persons in the US (n=1298; 478 good sleepers and 820 patients with insomnia), France (n=1858; 998 good sleepers and 860 patients with insomnia) and Japan (n=911; 506 good sleepers and 405 patients with insomnia). Enrollment and data collection using consumer panels were web-based in the US and France, and gathered via a postal survey in Japan. People with chronic insomnia (>6 months) were selected based on Insomnia Severity Index scores (ISI). Severity of insomnia was assessed using the ISI score and HRQoL was assessed using the self-administered Short-Form SF-36 Health Survey. Utility scores were derived using the algorithm developed by Brazier et al. Multivariate analyses were used to adjust for potential confounding factors. In all countries, people with chronic insomnia (40% treated) reported lower SF-36 scores in each of eight domains compared with good sleepers (Pgood sleepers (mean scores 0.63 versus 0.72 in the US, 0.57 versus 0.67 in France, and 0.67 versus 0.77 in Japan, P<.0001). This survey suggests that chronic insomnia is associated with significant impairment of HRQoL and decreased utilities across the different geographical regions studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A phenomenological analysis of bodily self-awareness in the experience of pain and pleasure: on dys-appearance and eu-appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Kristin

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this article is to explore nuances within the field of bodily self-awareness. My starting-point is phenomenological. I focus on how the subject experiences her or his body, i.e. how the body stands forth to the subject. I build on the phenomenologist Drew Leder's distinction between bodily dis-appearance and dys-appearance. In bodily dis-appearance, I am only prereflectively aware of my body. My body is not a thematic object of my experience. Bodily dys-appearance takes place when the body appears to me as "ill" or "bad." This is often the case when I experience pain or illness. Here, I will examine three versions of bodily dys-appearance. Whereas many phenomenological studies have explored cases of bodily dys-appearance, few studies have focused on the opposite of bodily dys-appearance, i.e. on bodily modes of being where the body appears to the subject as something good, easy or well. This is done in this article. When the body stands forth as good, easy or well to the subject, I suggest that the body eu-appears to this person. The analysis of eu-appearance shows that the subject can attend to her or his body as something positive and that this attention need not result in discomfort or alienation. Eu-appearance can take place in physical exercise, in sexual pleasure and in some cases of wanted pregnancies. I also discuss, briefly, the case of masochism.

  1. Bodily Writing and Performative Inquiry: Inviting an Arts-Based Research Methodology into Collaborative Doctoral Research Vocabularies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Alexia; Gonzalez, Charles H.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors (then two doctoral students) describe their methodology of engaging in an interdisciplinary, collaborative doctoral arts-based research (ABR) project. Education and the arts were integrated utilizing dance methods of bodily writing and performative inquiry to strengthen the analysis of dissertation findings in the…

  2. How women's bodily integrity is affected by reproductive health events: A panel approach with data from Northern Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westeneng, J.; D'Exelle, B.S.H.

    2014-01-01

    While abundant evidence exists on the positive effect of women's empowerment on reproductive health, the inverse causality has been little studied. In this paper, we study the effects of reproductive health events on women's bodily integrity, using a panel data set of married women in Northern

  3. Children's Lived Experience and Their Sense of Coherence: Bodily Play in a Norwegian After-School Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londal, Knut

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on materials gathered from qualitative research interviews among eight-year-old and nine-year-old children participating in an after-school programme (ASP) in Oslo, and investigates how bodily play affects their sense of coherence (SOC). In line with Maurice Merleau-Ponty, children's lived experiences are regarded as layered…

  4. Relationships of Depression to Child and Adult Abuse and Bodily Pain among Women Who Have Experienced Intimate Partner Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Cheryl; Ismailji, Tasneem; Palesh, Oxana; Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Narayanan, Amrita; Saltzman, Kasey M.; Holmes, Danielle; McGarvey, Elizabeth L.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates whether depression in women who experienced intimate partner violence is associated with having also experienced childhood sexual and physical abuse, psychological abuse by an intimate partner, recent involvement with the abusive partner, and bodily pain. Fifty-seven women who had left a violent relationship with an…

  5. Race, Gender, and Bodily (Mis)Recognitions: Women of Color Faculty Experiences with White Students in the College Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kristie A.

    2011-01-01

    Identities are not only shaped by self-perception, but are influenced by others' perceptions of self as well. More pointedly, one's physicality or bodily self can be perceived differently depending upon the viewer. To that end, Turner (2002) notes, "faculty women of color experience multiple marginality, characterized by lived contradiction…

  6. Thinking big: The effect of sexually objectifying music videos on bodily self-perception in young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mischner, I.H.S.; Schie, H.T. van; Wigboldus, D.H.J.; Baaren, R.B. van; Engels, R.C.M.E.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of sexually objectifying music video exposure on young women's implicit bodily self-perception and the moderating role of self-esteem. Fifty-six college women of normal weight were either exposed to three sexually objectifying music videos or three neutral

  7. Comparison of Treatment Outcomes of Arthrodesis and Two Generations of Ankle Replacement Implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benich, Marisa R; Ledoux, William R; Orendurff, Michael S; Shofer, Jane B; Hansen, Sigvard T; Davitt, James; Anderson, John G; Bohay, Donald; Coetzee, J Chris; Maskill, John; Brage, Michael; Houghton, Michael; Sangeorzan, Bruce J

    2017-11-01

    We analyzed self-reported outcomes in a prospective cohort of patients treated with ankle arthrodesis or total ankle replacement (TAR) during a time of transition from older to newer-generation TAR implants. We performed a prospective cohort study comparing outcomes in 273 consecutive patients treated for ankle arthritis with arthrodesis or TAR between 2005 and 2011. Adult patients with end-stage ankle arthritis who were able to walk and willing and able to respond to surveys were included in the study. Patients were excluded when they had another lower-limb problem that might affect walking. At baseline and at 6, 12, 24, and 36-month follow-up visits, participants completed a pain score, a Musculoskeletal Function Assessment (MFA), and a Short Form-36 (SF-36) survey. There was significant mean improvement in most outcomes after surgery regardless of procedure. In general, the greatest improvement occurred during the first 6 months of follow-up. Linear mixed-effects regression adjusted for differences at baseline in age, body mass index (BMI), and surgery type showed that at 6 months the scores were improved by a mean (and standard error) of 12.6 ± 0.7 (33%) on the MFA, 22.0 ± 1.4 (56%) on the SF-36 Physical Functioning (PF) scale, 32.4 ± 1.6 (93%) on the SF-36 Bodily Pain (BP) scale, and 4.0 ± 0.2 (63%) on the pain rating scale. The mean improvements in the MFA and SF-36 PF scores over the 3-year follow-up period were significantly better after the TARs than after the arthrodeses, with differences between the 2 groups of 3.6 ± 1.6 (p = 0.023) and 7.5 ± 2.9 (p = 0.0098), respectively. The differences between the 2 groups were slightly greater when only the newer TAR devices were compared with the arthrodeses (MFA = 3.8 ± 1.8 [p = 0.031], SF-36 PF = 8.8 ± 3.3 [p = 0.0074], SF-36 BP = 7.3 ± 3.6 [p = 0.045], and pain score = 0.8 ± 0.4 [p = 0.038]). Patients reported improved comfort and function after both surgical treatments. The average improvement in the

  8. Seeing and feeling architecture: how bodily self-consciousness alters architectonic experience and affects the perception of interiors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella ePasqualini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the centuries architectural theory evolved several notions of embodiment, proposing in the 19th and 20th century that architectonic experience is related to physiological responses of the observer. Recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of embodiment (or bodily self-consciousness enable empirical studies of architectonic embodiment. Here, we investigated how architecture modulates bodily self-consciousness by adapting a video-based virtual reality setup previously used to investigate visuo-tactile mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness. While standing in two different interiors, participants were filmed from behind and watched their own virtual body online on a head-mounted display. Visuo-tactile strokes were applied in synchronous or asynchronous mode to the participants and their virtual body. Two interiors were simulated in the laboratory by placing the sidewalls either far or near from the participants, generating a large and narrow room. We tested if bodily self-consciousness was differently modulated when participants were exposed to both rooms and whether these changes depend on visuo-tactile stimulation. We measured illusory touch, self-identification and performed length estimations. Our data show that synchronous stroking of the physical and the virtual body induces illusory touch and self-identification with the virtual body, independent of room-size. Moreover, in the narrow room we observed weak feelings of illusory touch with the sidewalls and of approaching walls. These subjective changes were complemented by a stroking-dependent modulation of length estimation only in the narrow room with participants judging the room-size more accurately during conditions of illusory self-identification. We discuss our findings and previous notions of architectonic embodiment in the context of the cognitive neuroscience of bodily self-consciousness and propose an empirical framework grounded in architecture, cognitive neuroscience

  9. "Seeing" and "feeling" architecture: how bodily self-consciousness alters architectonic experience and affects the perception of interiors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Isabella; Llobera, Joan; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Over the centuries architectural theory evolved several notions of embodiment, proposing in the nineteenth and twentieth century that architectonic experience is related to physiological responses of the observer. Recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of embodiment (or bodily self-consciousness) enable empirical studies of architectonic embodiment. Here, we investigated how architecture modulates bodily self-consciousness by adapting a video-based virtual reality (VR) setup previously used to investigate visuo-tactile mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness. While standing in two different interiors, participants were filmed from behind and watched their own virtual body online on a head-mounted display (HMD). Visuo-tactile strokes were applied in synchronous or asynchronous mode to the participants and their virtual body. Two interiors were simulated in the laboratory by placing the sidewalls either far or near from the participants, generating a large and narrow room. We tested if bodily self-consciousness was differently modulated when participants were exposed to both rooms and whether these changes depend on visuo-tactile stimulation. We measured illusory touch, self-identification, and performed length estimations. Our data show that synchronous stroking of the physical and the virtual body induces illusory touch and self-identification with the virtual body, independent of room-size. Moreover, in the narrow room we observed weak feelings of illusory touch with the sidewalls and of approaching walls. These subjective changes were complemented by a stroking-dependent modulation of length estimation only in the narrow room with participants judging the room-size more accurately during conditions of illusory self-identification. We discuss our findings and previous notions of architectonic embodiment in the context of the cognitive neuroscience of bodily self-consciousness and propose an empirical framework grounded in architecture, cognitive

  10. Right insular damage decreases heartbeat awareness and alters cardio-visual effects on bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Roberta; Bello-Ruiz, Javier; Lukowska, Marta; Herbelin, Bruno; Cabrilo, Ivan; Schaller, Karl; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that multisensory integration of bodily signals involving exteroceptive and interoceptive information modulates bodily aspects of self-consciousness such as self-identification and self-location. In the so-called Full Body Illusion subjects watch a virtual body being stroked while they perceive tactile stimulation on their own body inducing illusory self-identification with the virtual body and a change in self-location towards the virtual body. In a related illusion, it has recently been shown that similar changes in self-identification and self-location can be observed when an interoceptive signal is used in association with visual stimulation of the virtual body (i.e., participants observe a virtual body illuminated in synchrony with their heartbeat). Although brain imaging and neuropsychological evidence suggest that the insular cortex is a core region for interoceptive processing (such as cardiac perception and awareness) as well as for self-consciousness, it is currently not known whether the insula mediates cardio-visual modulation of self-consciousness. Here we tested the involvement of insular cortex in heartbeat awareness and cardio-visual manipulation of bodily self-consciousness in a patient before and after resection of a selective right neoplastic insular lesion. Cardio-visual stimulation induced an abnormally enhanced state of bodily self-consciousness; in addition, cardio-visual manipulation was associated with an experienced loss of the spatial unity of the self (illusory bi-location and duplication of his body), not observed in healthy subjects. Heartbeat awareness was found to decrease after insular resection. Based on these data we propose that the insula mediates interoceptive awareness as well as cardio-visual effects on bodily self-consciousness and that insular processing of interoceptive signals is an important mechanism for the experienced unity of the self. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bodily Reactions to Emotional Words Referring to Own versus Other People’s Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Weis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available According to embodiment theories, language and emotion affect each other. In line with this, several previous studies investigated changes in bodily responses including facial expressions, heart rate or skin conductance during affective evaluation of emotional words and sentences. This study investigates the embodiment of emotional word processing from a social perspective by experimentally manipulating the emotional valence of a word and its personal reference. Stimuli consisted of pronoun-noun pairs, i.e., positive, negative, and neutral nouns paired with possessive pronouns of the first or the third person (“my,” “his” or the non-referential negation term (“no” as controls. Participants had to quickly evaluate the word pairs by key presses as either positive, negative, or neutral, depending on the subjective feelings they elicit. Hereafter, they elaborated the intensity of the feeling on a non-verbal scale from 1 (very unpleasant to 9 (very pleasant. Facial expressions (M. Zygomaticus, M. Corrugator, heart rate, and, for exploratory purposes, skin conductance were recorded continuously during the spontaneous and elaborate evaluation tasks. Positive pronoun-noun phrases were responded to the quickest and judged more often as positive when they were self-related, i.e., related to the reader’s self (e.g., “my happiness,” “my joy” than when related to the self of a virtual other (e.g., “his happiness,” “his joy”, suggesting a self-positivity bias in the emotional evaluation of word stimuli. Physiologically, evaluation of emotional, unlike neutral pronoun-noun pairs initially elicited an increase in mean heart rate irrespective of stimulus reference. Changes in facial muscle activity, M. Zygomaticus in particular, were most pronounced during spontaneous evaluation of positive other-related pronoun-noun phrases in line with theoretical assumptions that facial expressions are socially embedded even in situation where no

  12. Biased perception and interpretation of bodily anxiety symptoms in childhood social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Julian; Blechert, Jens; Krämer, Martina; Asbrand, Julia; Tuschen-Caffier, Brunna

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive models of social phobia (SP) and empirical evidence in adults suggest that affected individuals overestimate arousal symptoms such as heart rate (HR) during social stress and worry about their visibility in public. To date, little is known about these aspects in childhood social anxiety, an important precursor of the disorder. We assessed perception of--and worry about--HR visibility, actual HR, and subjective anxiety during public speaking in high socially anxious (HSA; n = 20) and low socially anxious (LSA; n = 20) Caucasian children, aged 10 to 12 years. Symptom visibility was manipulated by making a nonveridical HR feedback tone audible only to the participant (private condition, HR sounds via headphone) or to participant and observers (public condition, HR sounds via speakers). Further, we assessed interoceptive accuracy in a heartbeat counting task. As expected, HSA children perceived their HR as higher than LSA children in both private and public conditions despite similar actual HR and comparable interoceptive accuracy. Public feedback led to more worry about HR visibility only in HSA but not in LSA children. Biased perception and interpretation of bodily anxiety symptoms during social stress manifests early in social anxiety and might therefore play a crucial role in the aggravation of social anxiety and the development of SP. We discuss implications for current theory, clinical practice, and prevention.

  13. Phantom limb pain and bodily awareness: current concepts and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giummarra, Melita J; Moseley, G Lorimer

    2011-10-01

    Phantom pain is a frequent consequence of amputation or deafferentation. There are many possible contributing mechanisms, including stump-related pathology, spinal and cortical changes. Phantom limb pain is notoriously difficult to treat. Continued consideration of the factors associated with phantom pain and its treatment is of utmost importance, not only to advance the scientific knowledge about the experience of the body and neuropathic pain, but also fundamentally to promote efficacious pain management. This review first discusses the mechanisms associated with phantom pain and summarizes the current treatments. The mechanisms underlying phantom pain primarily relate to peripheral/spinal dysfunction, and supraspinal and central plasticity in sensorimotor body representations. The most promising methods for managing phantom pain address the maladaptive changes at multiple levels of the neuraxis, for example, complementing pharmacological administration with physical, psychological or behavioural intervention. These supplementary techniques are even efficacious in isolation, perhaps by replacing the absent afferent signals from the amputated limb, thereby restoring disrupted bodily representations. Ultimately, for optimal patient outcomes, treatments should be both symptom and mechanism targeted.

  14. Infant attachment predicts bodily freezing in adolescence: evidence from a prospective longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah C. M. Niermann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Early life-stress, particularly maternal deprivation, is associated with long-lasting deviations in animals’ freezing responses. Given the relevance of freezing for stress-coping, translational research is needed to examine the relation between insecure infant-parent attachment and bodily freezing-like behavior in humans. Therefore, we investigated threat-related reductions in body sway (indicative of freezing-like behavior in 14-year-old adolescents (N=79, for whom attachment security was earlier assessed in infancy. As expected, insecure (versus secure attachment was associated with less body sway for angry versus neutral faces. This effect remained when controlling for intermediate life-events. These results suggest that the long-lasting effects of early negative caregiving experiences on the human stress and threat systems extend to the primary defensive reaction of freezing. Additionally, we replicated earlier work in adults, by observing a significant correlation (in adolescents assessed as securely attached between subjective state anxiety and reduced body sway in response to angry versus neutral faces. Together, this research opens venues to start exploring the role of freezing in the development of human psychopathology.

  15. Neural Network Underlying Recovery from Disowned Bodily States Induced by the Rubber Hand Illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Seon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how causal influences between brain regions during the rubber hand illusion (RHI are modulated by tactile and visual stimuli. We applied needle rotations during the RHI in two different ways: one was with the real hand (reinstantiation by tactile stimuli, R-TS and the other was with the rubber hand (reinstantiation by visual stimuli, R-VS. We used dynamic causal modeling to investigate interactions among four relevant brain regions: the ventral premotor cortex (PMv, the intraparietal sulcus (IPS, the secondary somatosensory cortex (SII, and the lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOC. The tactile aspects of needle rotations changed the effective connectivity by directly influencing activity in the SII, whereas visual aspects of needle rotation changed the effective connectivity by influencing both the SII and the LOC. The endogenous connectivity parameters between the IPS and the PMv were reduced significantly in the R-TS condition. The modulatory parameters between the IPS and the PMv were enhanced significantly in the R-TS condition. The connectivity patterns driven by disowned bodily states could be differentially modulated by tactile and visual afferent inputs. Effective connectivity between the parietal and frontal multimodal areas may play important roles in the reinstantiation of body ownership.

  16. Appraisal of space words and allocation of emotion words in bodily space.

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    Fernando Marmolejo-Ramos

    Full Text Available The body-specificity hypothesis (BSH predicts that right-handers and left-handers allocate positive and negative concepts differently on the horizontal plane, i.e., while left-handers allocate negative concepts on the right-hand side of their bodily space, right-handers allocate such concepts to the left-hand side. Similar research shows that people, in general, tend to allocate positive and negative concepts in upper and lower areas, respectively, in relation to the vertical plane. Further research shows a higher salience of the vertical plane over the horizontal plane in the performance of sensorimotor tasks. The aim of the paper is to examine whether there should be a dominance of the vertical plane over the horizontal plane, not only at a sensorimotor level but also at a conceptual level. In Experiment 1, various participants from diverse linguistic backgrounds were asked to rate the words "up", "down", "left", and "right". In Experiment 2, right-handed participants from two linguistic backgrounds were asked to allocate emotion words into a square grid divided into four boxes of equal areas. Results suggest that the vertical plane is more salient than the horizontal plane regarding the allocation of emotion words and positively-valenced words were placed in upper locations whereas negatively-valenced words were placed in lower locations. Together, the results lend support to the BSH while also suggesting a higher saliency of the vertical plane over the horizontal plane in the allocation of valenced words.

  17. A novel route for the removal of bodily heavy metal lead (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weirong; Zhang, Penghua; Xu, Hui; Chang, Shengli; He, Yongju; Wang, Fei; Liang, Gaowei

    2015-09-01

    The lead ion concentration in bile is considerably higher than in blood, and bile is released into the alimentary tract. Thiol-modified SBA-15 administered orally can combine with lead ions in the alimentary tract. In this paper, the in vitro lead absorption of bile was investigated. This thiol-modified SBA-15 material was used in pharmacodynamics studies on rabbits. The result that the lead content in faeces was notably higher indicates that thiol-modified SBA-15 can efficiently remove lead. The mechanism could include the following: thiol-modified SBA-15 material cuts off the heavy metal lead recirculation in the process of bile enterohepatic circulation by chelating the lead in the alimentary tract, causing a certain proportion of lead to be removed by the thiol mesoporous material, and the lead is subsequently egested out of the body in faeces. The results indicate that this material might be a potential non-injection material for the removal bodily heavy metal lead in the alimentary tract. This material may also be a useful means of lead removal, especially for non-acute sub-poisoning symptoms.

  18. Xenomelia: a social neuroscience view of altered bodily self-consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugger, Peter; Lenggenhager, Bigna; Giummarra, Melita J

    2013-01-01

    Xenomelia, the "foreign limb syndrome," is characterized by the non-acceptance of one or more of one's own extremities and the resulting desire for elective limb amputation or paralysis. Formerly labeled "body integrity identity disorder" (BIID), the condition was originally considered a psychological or psychiatric disorder, but a brain-centered Zeitgeist and a rapidly growing interest in the neural underpinnings of bodily self-consciousness has shifted the focus toward dysfunctional central nervous system circuits. The present article outlays both mind-based and brain-based views highlighting their shortcomings. We propose that full insight into what should be conceived a "xenomelia spectrum disorder" will require interpretation of individual symptomatology in a social context. A proper social neuroscience of xenomelia respects the functional neuroanatomy of corporeal awareness, but also acknowledges the brain's plasticity in response to an individual's history, which is lived against a cultural background. This integrated view of xenomelia will promote the subfield of consciousness research concerned with the unity of body and self.

  19. Xenomelia: a social neuroscience view of altered bodily self-consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eBrugger

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Xenomelia, the "foreign limb syndrome", is characterized by the non-acceptance of one or more of one’s own extremities and the resulting desire for elective limb amputation or paralysis. Formerly labeled 'body integrity identity disorder' (BIID, the condition was originally considered a psychological or psychiatric disorder, but a brain-centered Zeitgeist and a rapidly growing interest in the neural underpinnings of bodily self-consciousness has shifted the focus towards dysfunctional central nervous system circuits. The present article outlays both mind-based and brain-based views highlighting their shortcomings. We propose that full insight into what should be conceived a xenomelia spectrum disorder will require interpretation of individual symptomatology in a social context. A proper social neuroscience of xenomelia respects the functional neuroanatomy of corporeal awareness, but also acknowledges the brain’s plasticity in response to an individual’s history, which is lived against a cultural background. This integrated view of xenomelia will promote the subfield of consciousness research concerned with the unity of body and self.

  20. Embodied mental rotation: A special link between egocentric transformation and the bodily self

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    Sandra eKaltner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This experiment investigated the influence of motor expertise on object-based versus egocentric transformations in a chronometric mental rotation task using images of either the own or another person’s body as stimulus material. According to the embodied cognition viewpoint, we hypothesized motor-experts to outperform non-motor experts specifically in the egocentric condition because of higher kinesthetic representation and motor simulations compared to object-based transformations. In line with this, we expected that images of the own body are solved faster than another person’s body stimuli. Results showed a benefit of motor expertise and representations of another person’s body, but only for the object-based transformation task. That is, this other-advantage diminishes in egocentric transformations. Since motor experts didn’t show any specific expertise in rotational movements, we concluded that using human bodies as stimulus material elicits embodied spatial transformations, which facilitates performance exclusively for egocentric transformations. Regarding stimulus material, the other-advantage ascribed to increased self-awareness-consciousness distracting attention-demanding resources, disappeared in the egocentric condition. This result may be due to the stronger link between the bodily self and motor representations compared to that emerging in object-based transformations.

  1. Effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on the recognition of bodily emotions from point light displays.

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    Sharona eVonck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Perceiving human motion, recognizing actions and interpreting emotional body language are tasks we perform daily and which are supported by a network of brain areas including the human posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS. Here, we applied transcranial direct current stimulation with anodal (excitatory or cathodal (inhibitory electrodes mounted over right pSTS (target and orbito-frontal cortex (reference while healthy participants performed a bodily emotion recognition task using biological motion point light displays (PLDs. Performance (accuracy and reaction times was also assessed on a control task which was matched to the emotion recognition task in terms of cognitive and motor demands. Each subject participated in two experimental sessions, receiving either anodal or cathodal stimulation, which were separated by one week to avoid residual effects of previous stimulations.Overall, tDCS brain stimulation did not affect the recognition of emotional states from PLDs. However, when emotions with a negative or positive-neutral emotional valence were analyzed separately, effects of stimulation were shown for recognizing emotions with a negative emotional valence (sadness & anger, indicating increased recognition performance when receiving anodal (excitatory stimulation compared to cathodal (inhibitory stimulation over pSTS. No stimulation effects were shown for the recognition of emotions with positive-neutral emotional valences. These findings extend previous studies showing structure-function relationships between STS and biological motion processing from PLDs and provide indications that stimulation effects may be modulated by the emotional valence of the stimuli.

  2. The afterlife of the slide: exploring emotional attachment to artefactualised bodily traces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Bronwyn

    2013-01-01

    In this paper I explore the role of the slide, not as familiar scientific object, but rather as a fixed remnant that testifies to the lived experience of an individual. Returning to the scene of the public scandal that surrounded the unauthorised retention of children's organs and tissues at two British hospitals in the late 1990s, I investigate the emotional significance that here came to be attached to archived slides. In so doing I draw attention to the ways in which the facticity of the slide--its ability to testify to the fact, or the existence, not only of the person from whom it is drawn, but also, when created for histopathological reasons, the disease that ultimately killed them--acts to efface their presumed ephemerality. In the final section of the paper I turn to consider how the events that I describe have come to shape the ways in which this kind of highly artefactualised bodily material is now accommodated in the institutional setting of the tissue bank and with what implications for research and the wider dissemination of scientific knowledge. Specifically, I explore how and why slides have come to acquire a "personality" and, with it, something akin to legally constituted "personality rights" including rights relating to publicity and privacy.

  3. Squid have nociceptors that display widespread long-term sensitization and spontaneous activity after bodily injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Robyn J; Hanlon, Roger T; Walters, Edgar T

    2013-06-12

    Bodily injury in mammals often produces persistent pain that is driven at least in part by long-lasting sensitization and spontaneous activity (SA) in peripheral branches of primary nociceptors near sites of injury. While nociceptors have been described in lower vertebrates and invertebrates, outside of mammals there is limited evidence for peripheral sensitization of primary afferent neurons, and there are no reports of persistent SA being induced in primary afferents by noxious stimulation. Cephalopod molluscs are the most neurally and behaviorally complex invertebrates, with brains rivaling those of some vertebrates in size and complexity. This has fostered the opinion that cephalopods may experience pain, leading some governments to include cephalopods under animal welfare laws. It is not known, however, if cephalopods possess nociceptors, or whether their somatic sensory neurons exhibit nociceptive sensitization. We demonstrate that squid possess nociceptors that selectively encode noxious mechanical but not heat stimuli, and that show long-lasting peripheral sensitization to mechanical stimuli after minor injury to the body. As in mammals, injury in squid can cause persistent SA in peripheral afferents. Unlike mammals, the afferent sensitization and SA are almost as prominent on the contralateral side of the body as they are near an injury. Thus, while squid exhibit peripheral alterations in afferent neurons similar to those that drive persistent pain in mammals, robust changes far from sites of injury in squid suggest that persistently enhanced afferent activity provides much less information about the location of an injury in cephalopods than it does in mammals.

  4. Sexual and bodily rights as human rights in the Middle East and North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercevik Amado, Liz

    2004-05-01

    A regional workshop on sexual and bodily rights as human rights in the Middle East and North Africa was held in Malta in 2003, attended by 22 NGO representatives from Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Palestine, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria, Turkey, Pakistan and USA. The meeting aimed to develop strategies for overcoming human rights violations in the region with reference to law and social and political practices. Session topics included sexuality and gender identity; sexuality and sexual health; sexuality and comparative penal law; sexual rights in international documents; advocacy and lobbying. Sexual rights, sexual health and education, sexual violence and adolescent sexuality were explored in depth, including taboos and emerging trends. Specific areas of concern included marital rape, early marriages, temporary marriages, sexual orientation, premarital and extramarital sexuality, honour crimes, female genital mutilation, unmarried mothers, adolescent sexuality, unwanted pregnancies and safe abortion, sexuality in education and health services. An analysis of civil codes, penal codes and personal status codes indicated a clear imperative for legal reform. Participants heard about efforts to promote the right to sexual orientation which have already been initiated in Lebanon, Turkey and Tunisia. Networking within the region and with counterparts in other regions in comparable situations and conditions was deemed essential.

  5. Pain in adult patients with Pompe disease: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güngör, D; Schober, A K; Kruijshaar, M E; Plug, I; Karabul, N; Deschauer, M; van Doorn, P A; van der Ploeg, A T; Schoser, B; Hanisch, F

    2013-08-01

    Pompe disease is a rare hereditary metabolic myopathy caused by a deficiency of acid-α-glucosidase. We investigated the presence and severity of pain and its interference with daily activities in a large group of adults with Pompe disease, who we compared with an age-matched control group. Data were collected in a cross-sectional survey in Germany and The Netherlands. Pain was assessed using the short-form brief pain inventory (BPI). Patients also completed the Short Form-36 item (SF-36v2), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Rotterdam Handicap Scale (RHS). Forty-five percent of the 124 adult Pompe patients reported having had pain in the previous 24h, against 27% of the 111 controls (p=0.004). The median pain severity score in Pompe patients reporting pain was 3.1 (on a scale from 0 to 10), indicating mild pain; against 2.6 amongst controls (p=0.06). The median score of pain interference with daily activities in patients who reported pain was 3.3, against 1.3 in controls (p=0.001). Relative to patients without pain, those with pain had lower RHS scores (p=0.02), lower SF-36 Physical and Mental component summary scores (pPompe patients had experienced pain in the previous 24h. Although pain severity and its interference with daily life were mild, pain was related to a reduced quality of life, less participation in daily life, and greater depression and anxiety. Its management should therefore be seen as part of clinical practice involving Pompe patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tumor-resected kidney transplant – a quality of life survey

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    Sundararajan S

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Siva Sundararajan,1 Bulang He,1,2 Luc Delriviere,1,2 1WA Liver and Kidney Surgical Transplant Service, Department of General Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, WA, Australia; 2School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia Background: To overcome the organ shortage, a program to use kidney grafts after excision of a small renal tumor (tumor resected kidney [TRK] was implemented in February 2007. All recipients were over 55 years old according to the selection criteria. The aim of this study is to assess the quality of life after kidney transplant in this cohort. Methods: From February 2007 to July 2013, 27 patients received a kidney graft after excision of the small kidney tumor. All patients were given the modified 36-Item Short Form Survey (SF-36 questionnaire with additional information regarding concerns about tumor recurrence and whether they would choose TRK transplantation or prefer to stay on dialysis if they have an option again. Results: Of them, 20 returned the completed questionnaire. There is no tumor recurrence on a mean follow-up of 38 months. The mean scores in all eight domains of the SF-36 were higher posttransplantation. The differences were statistically significant. Ninety-five percent of recipients would prefer to have TRK transplantation rather than remain on dialysis. Eighty percent of patients had no or minimal concerns regarding tumor recurrence. Conclusion: The patients who had kidney transplantation by using the graft after excision of a small tumor have achieved excellent quality of life. It is an important alternative for the solution of organ shortage in kidney transplantation. The concern of tumor recurrence is minimal. Performing a further study is worthwhile, with prospective data collection and a control group. Keywords: quality of life, kidney transplant, tumor, small renal cell carcinoma

  7. Bodily-Moral Disgust: What It Is, How It Is Different from Anger and Why It Is an Unreasoned Emotion.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Pascale S.; Giner-Sorolla, Roger

    2013-01-01

    With the recent upswing in research interest on the moral implications of disgust, there has been uncertainty about what kind of situations elicit moral disgust and whether disgust is a rational or irrational player in moral decision making. We first outline the benefits of distinguishing between bodily violations (e.g., sexual taboos, such as pedophilia and incest) and nonbodily violations (e.g., deception or betrayal) when examining moral disgust. We review findings from our lab and others'...

  8. Bodily moral disgust: what it is, how it is different from anger, and why it is an unreasoned emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Pascale Sophie; Giner-Sorolla, Roger

    2013-03-01

    With the recent upswing in research interest on the moral implications of disgust, there has been uncertainty about what kind of situations elicit moral disgust and whether disgust is a rational or irrational player in moral decision making. We first outline the benefits of distinguishing between bodily violations (e.g., sexual taboos, such as pedophilia and incest) and nonbodily violations (e.g., deception or betrayal) when examining moral disgust. We review findings from our lab and others' showing that, although many existing studies do not control for anger when studying disgust, disgust at nonbodily violations is often associated with anger and hard to separate from it, while bodily violations more consistently predict disgust independently of anger. Building on this distinction, we present further empirical evidence that moral disgust, in the context of bodily violations, is a relatively primitively appraised moral emotion compared to others such as anger, and also that it is less flexible and less prone to external justifications. Our review and results underscore the need to distinguish between the different consequences of moral emotions. © 2013 American Psychological Association

  9. Neural correlates of blink suppression and the buildup of a natural bodily urge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Brian D.; Horovitz, Silvina G.; Morel, Brent; Hallett, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have elucidated some of the underlying physiology of spontaneous and voluntary eye blinking; however, the neural networks involved in eye blink suppression remain poorly understood. Here we investigated blink suppression by analyzing fMRI data in a block design and event-related manner, and employed a novel hypothetical time-varying neural response model to detect brain activations associated with the buildup of urge. Blinks were found to activate visual cortices while our block design analysis revealed activations limited to the middle occipital gyri and deactivations in medial occipital, posterior cingulate and precuneus areas. Our model for urge, however, revealed a widespread network of activations including right greater than left insular cortex, right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, middle cingulate cortex, and bilateral temporo-parietal cortices, primary and secondary face motor regions, and visual cortices. Subsequent inspection of BOLD time-series in an extensive ROI analysis showed that activity in the bilateral insular cortex, right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and bilateral STG and MTG showed strong correlations with our hypothetical model for urge suggesting these areas play a prominent role in the buildup of urge. The involvement of the insular cortex in particular, along with its function in interoceptive processing, help support a key role for this structure in the buildup of urge during blink suppression. The right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex findings in conjunction with its known involvement in inhibitory control suggest a role for this structure in maintaining volitional suppression of an increasing sense of urge. The consistency of our urge model findings with prior studies investigating the suppression of blinking and other bodily urges, thoughts, and behaviors suggests that a similar investigative approach may have utility in fMRI studies of disorders associated with abnormal urge suppression such as Tourette

  10. A new questionnaire to identify bodily distress in primary care: The 'BDS checklist'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Lilly, Anna; Fink, Per; Ørnbøl, Eva; Vestergaard, Mogens; Moth, Grete; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Rosendal, Marianne

    2015-06-01

    Functional symptoms and disorders are common in primary care. Bodily distress syndrome (BDS) is a newly proposed clinical diagnosis for functional disorders. The BDS diagnosis is based on empirical research, and the symptoms stated in the BDS criteria have been translated into a self-report questionnaire called the BDS checklist. The aim of the present study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the checklist and to test the construct of BDS. The 30-item BDS checklist was completed by 2480 adult primary care patients in a cross-sectional study on contact and disease patterns in Danish general practice. We performed (internal) validation analyses of the collected checklist data. We also performed factor and latent class analyses to identify both BDS symptom groups and BDS patient groups. Internal validation analyses revealed acceptable and usable psychometric properties of the BDS checklist. The factor analyses identified the four distinct determining factors for BDS: cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal and general symptoms. Results from factor and multi-trait analyses suggested a shortening of the BDS checklist (from 30 to 25 items). The latent class analyses resulted in three severity levels (no, moderate and severe BDS); the best fit index was found for a threshold of ≥4 symptoms in a symptom group. The results provide empirical support for the previously described construct of BDS with four symptom groups and three patient groups. The BDS checklist is a self-report instrument that may be used for case finding in both clinical practice and in research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Review of cytomegalovirus shedding in bodily fluids and relevance to congenital cytomegalovirus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Michael J.; Hyde, Terri B.; Schmid, D. Scott

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections are a leading cause of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) and neurological impairment. Congenital transmission of CMV can occur with maternal primary infection, reactivation, or reinfection during pregnancy. We reviewed studies of CMV shedding in bodily fluids (defined as CMV detected by culture or CMV DNA detected by polymerase chain reaction). Following diagnosis at birth, children with congenital CMV infection exhibited the highest prevalences of CMV shedding (median = 80%, number of sample population prevalences [N] = 6) and duration of shedding, with a steep decline by age five. Healthy children attending day care shed more frequently (median = 23%, N = 24) than healthy children not attending day care (median = 12%, N = 11). Peak shedding prevalences in children occurred at 1–2 years of age, confirming that young children are the key transmission risk for pregnant women. CMV shedding among children was more prevalent in urine specimens than in oral secretions (median prevalence difference = 11.5%, N = 12). Adults with risk factors such as STD clinic attendance had higher shedding prevalences (median = 22%, N = 20) than adults without risk factors (median = 7%, N = 44). In adults with risk factors, CMV was shed more frequently in urine; in adults without risk factors genital shedding was most common. The prevalence of CMV shedding in nine sample populations of pregnant women increased with advancing gestation. In seven sample populations of children with congenital CMV infection, higher viral load at birth was consistently associated with an elevated risk of SNHL. Higher CMV viral load at birth also consistently correlated with the presence of symptoms of congenital CMV at birth. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:21674676

  12. Bodily pleasure matters: Velocity of touch modulates body ownership during the rubber hand illusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eCrucianelli

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The sense of body ownership represents a fundamental aspect of our self-consciousness. Influential experimental paradigms, such as the rubber hand illusion (RHI, in which a seen rubber hand is experienced as part of one’s body when one’s own unseen hand receives congruent tactile stimulation, have extensively examined the role of exteroceptive, multisensory integration on body ownership. However, remarkably, despite the more general current interest in the nature and role of interoception in emotion and consciousness, no study has investigated how the illusion may be affected by interoceptive bodily signals, such as affective touch. Here, we recruited 52 healthy, adult participants and we investigated for the first time, whether applying slow velocity, light tactile stimuli, known to elicit interoceptive feelings of pleasantness, would influence the illusion more than faster, emotionally-neutral, tactile stimuli. We also examined whether seeing another person’s hand versus a rubber hand would reduce the illusion in slow versus fast stroking conditions, as interoceptive signals are used to represent one’s own body from within and it is unclear how they would be integrated with visual signals from another person’s hand. We found that slow velocity touch was perceived as more pleasant and it produced higher levels of subjective embodiment during the RHI compared with fast touch. Moreover, this effect applied irrespective of whether the seen hand was a rubber or a confederate’s hand. These findings provide support for the idea that affective touch, and more generally interoception, may have a unique contribution to the sense of body ownership, and by implication to our embodied psychological self.

  13. Balancing benefits and harm: chemical use and bodily transformation among Indonesia's transgender waria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Nurul Ilmi; Hymans, Takeo David

    2014-07-01

    Members of Indonesia's diverse male-to-female transgender community often describe themselves as waria. Waria do not equate being feminine with being female. They do not want to be women; they aspire to be like women. It entails cultivating mannerisms and wearing make-up and women's clothes, shaving one's legs and styling one's hair. But some go further in their practices of self-administered, chemically assisted bodily transformation. Field research took place in Makassar, the capital city of South Sulawesi; in a smaller town in the regency of Bulukumba on the south coast of Sulawesi; and in the special region of Yogyakarta in Java. Data were collected through repeated in-depth interviews with ten waria youths aged between 18 and 26 in each site; interviews with pharmacists, drug and cosmetics store clerks; three focus group discussions at each site; and participant observation. Our respondents saw their bodies as 'projects' they can manipulate with pharmaceutical products and cosmetics. To lighten their skin, they experimented with different brands of exfoliating liquid, whitening cream, powder, foundation, face soap and skin scrub. To grow breasts and reduce muscle mass, they experimented with different brands and dosages of contraceptive pills and injections in order to get faster, better and longer-lasting results. Harm reduction programs often neglect chemicals that are not narcotics, not related to sexually transmitted infections, and which are legally and freely available. Safety issues arise when otherwise safe products are used off-label in large quantities. Drug policy-makers are paying insufficient attention to the safety of cosmetics. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Altered White Matter and Sensory Response to Bodily Sensation in Female-to-Male Transgender Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Laura K; Brang, David; Landazuri, Rosalynn; Viswanathan, Pavitra; Ramachandran, Vilayanur S

    2017-07-01

    While most people take identification with their body for granted, conditions such as phantom limb pain, alien hand syndrome, and xenomelia suggest that the feeling of bodily congruence is constructed and susceptible to alteration. Individuals with xenomelia typically experience one of their limbs as over-present and aversive, leading to a desire to amputate the limb. Similarly, many transgender individuals describe their untreated sexed body parts as incongruent and aversive, and many experience phantom body parts of the sex they identify with (Ramachandran, 2008). This experience may relate to differences in brain representation of the sexed body part, as suggested in xenomelia (McGeoch et al., 2011). We utilized magnetoencephalography imaging to record brain activity during somatosensory stimulation of the breast-a body part that feels incongruent to most presurgical female-to-male (FtM)-identified transgender individuals-and the hand, a body part that feels congruent. We measured the sensory evoked response in right hemisphere somatosensory and body-related brain areas and found significantly reduced activation in the supramarginal gyrus and secondary somatosensory cortex, but increased activation at the temporal pole for chest sensation in the FtM group (N = 8) relative to non-transgender females (N = 8). In addition, we found increased white matter coherence in the supramarginal gyrus and temporal pole and decreased white matter diffusivity in the anterior insula and temporal pole in the FtM group. These findings suggest that dysphoria related to gender-incongruent body parts in FtM individuals may be tied to differences in neural representation of the body and altered white matter connectivity.

  15. Contribution of Bodily and Gravitational Orientation Cues to Face and Letter Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Snow, Jacqueline C; Culham, Jody C

    2015-01-01

    Sensory information provided by the vestibular system is crucial in cognitive processes such as the ability to recognize objects. The orientation at which objects are most easily recognized--the perceptual upright (PU)--is influenced by body orientation with respect to gravity as detected from the somatosensory and vestibular systems. To date, the influence of these sensory cues on the PU has been measured using a letter recognition task. Here we assessed whether gravitational influences on letter recognition also extend to human face recognition. 13 right-handed observers were positioned in four body orientations (upright, left-side-down, right-side-down, supine) and visually discriminated ambiguous characters ('p'-from-'d'; 'i'-from-'!') and ambiguous faces used in popular visual illusions ('young woman'-from-'old woman'; 'grinning man'-from-'frowning man') in a forced-choice paradigm. The two transition points (e.g., 'p-to-d' and 'd-to-p'; 'young woman-to-old woman' and 'old woman-to-young woman') were fit with a sigmoidal psychometric function and the average of these transitions was taken as the PU for each stimulus category. The results show that both faces and letters are more influenced by body orientation than gravity. However, faces are more optimally recognized when closer in alignment with body orientation than letters--which are more influenced by gravity. Our results indicate that the brain does not utilize a common representation of upright that governs recognition of all object categories. Distinct areas of ventro-temporal cortex that represent faces and letters may weight bodily and gravitational cues differently--possibly to facilitate the specific demands of face and letter recognition.

  16. Balancing benefits and harm: Chemical use and bodily transformation among Indonesia's transgender waria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrus, Nurul Ilmi; Hymans, Takeo David

    2014-01-01

    Background Members of Indonesia's diverse male-to-female transgender community often describe themselves as waria. Waria do not equate being feminine with being female. They do not want to be women; they aspire to be like women. It entails cultivating mannerisms and wearing make-up and women's clothes, shaving one's legs and styling one's hair. But some go further in their practices of self-administered, chemically assisted bodily transformation. Methods Field research took place in Makassar, the capital city of South Sulawesi; in a smaller town in the regency of Bulukumba on the south coast of Sulawesi; and in the special region of Yogyakarta in Java. Data were collected through repeated in-depth interviews with ten waria youths aged between 18 and 26 in each site; interviews with pharmacists, drug and cosmetics store clerks; three focus group discussions at each site; and participant observation. Results Our respondents saw their bodies as ‘projects’ they can manipulate with pharmaceutical products and cosmetics. To lighten their skin, they experimented with different brands of exfoliating liquid, whitening cream, powder, foundation, face soap and skin scrub. To grow breasts and reduce muscle mass, they experimented with different brands and dosages of contraceptive pills and injections in order to get faster, better and longer-lasting results. Conclusion Harm reduction programs often neglect chemicals that are not narcotics, not related to sexually transmitted infections, and which are legally and freely available. Safety issues arise when otherwise safe products are used off-label in large quantities. Drug policy-makers are paying insufficient attention to the safety of cosmetics. PMID:25091633

  17. Combination treatment of physical modalities in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain syndromes: a prospective-controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Pieber

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of combinations of several physical therapies in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain syndromes by a prospective, controlled study. Forty patients (5 men and 35 women, 18-80 years with musculoskeletal pain syndrome were included. Thirty patients were assigned to the intervention group and 10 patients to the control group. The intervention group received a combination of physical therapies according to the clinical needs (electrotherapy, fango packs, mud packs, ultrasound, massage, exercise therapy. Treatment consisted of 10 sessions. The control group did not receive any physical therapy in the waiting period. The intervention group was examined at the beginning and the end of the treatment period. The control group was evaluated at the beginning and the end of the waiting period (before their physical therapy treatment started. Main outcome measurements were: Visual analogue scale for pain (VAS; Timed Get up and Go Test (TUG; Functional Reach Test (FRT. In addition bodily, emotional and social functioning was accessed by selected ICF-Items and items of the SF-36 health survey (SF-36. The main outcome measures showed significant improvement in the intervention group compared to the control group. Furthermore, ICF- and SF-36-Items also improved. In conclusion significant pain relief and improvement of function was achieved by a combination treatment of physical therapies in patients with musculoskeletal pain syndromes.

  18. Changes in the health status and functional outcomes in acute traumatic hand injury patients, during physical therapy treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca John

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic hand injury causes chronic disability. A large number of studies have reported impairments in clinical parameters, but few studies have described their disability experience. Aims To examine the functional disability and quality of life in traumatic hand injured patients receiving physical therapy. Settings and Design: The physiotherapy department in a multi-specialty public sector hospital. Convenient sampling method was used. Materials and Methods: The 36-item short-form health survey-MOS (SF-36, v2 and disabilities of arm, shoulder and hand (DASH questionnaire were obtained and subjects were given physiotherapy, accordingly to their condition. Questionnaires were re-administered every month till discharge. Statistical Analysis Used: A One-way ANOVA test. Results: At end of 6 months, among eight subscales of SF-36, there is improvement in mean scores of physical functioning (39.1%. The bodily pain, general health, vitality, social function, and mental health had more than 100% improvement. DASH showed regression in disability (50.8%. Conclusions: Measuring quality of life (QOL can provide detailed assessment of physical disability and treatment effects as well as the global impact of those effects on the person′s daily life. Hence, the use of self-report questionnaires such as DASH and SF-36, combined with physical performance score, helps to achieve more comprehensive evaluation of outcome.

  19. Early and late activity in somatosensory cortex reflects changes in bodily self-consciousness: an evoked potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspell, J E; Palluel, E; Blanke, O

    2012-08-02

    How can we investigate the brain mechanisms underlying self-consciousness? Recent behavioural studies on multisensory bodily perception have shown that multisensory conflicts can alter bodily self-consciousness such as in the "full body illusion" (FBI) in which changes in self-identification with a virtual body and tactile perception are induced. Here we investigated whether experimental changes in self-identification during the FBI are accompanied by activity changes in somatosensory cortex by recording somatosensory-evoked potentials (SEPs). To modulate self-identification, participants were filmed by a video camera from behind while their backs were stroked, either synchronously (illusion condition) or asynchronously (control condition) with respect to the stroking seen on their virtual body. Tibial nerve SEPs were recorded during the FBI and analysed using evoked potential (EP) mapping. Tactile mislocalisation was measured using the crossmodal congruency task. SEP mapping revealed five sequential periods of brain activation during the FBI, of which two differed between the illusion condition and the control condition. Activation at 30-50 ms (corresponding to the P40 component) in primary somatosensory cortex was stronger in the illusion condition. A later activation at ∼110-200 ms, likely originating in higher-tier somatosensory regions in parietal cortex, was stronger and lasted longer in the control condition. These data show that changes in bodily self-consciousness modulate activity in primary and higher-tier somatosensory cortex at two distinct processing steps. We argue that early modulations of primary somatosensory cortex may be a consequence of (1) multisensory integration of synchronous vs. asynchronous visuo-tactile stimuli and/or (2) differences in spatial attention (to near or far space) between the conditions. The later activation in higher-tier parietal cortex (and potentially other regions in temporo-parietal and frontal cortex) likely

  20. Comparison of a generic and a rhinitis-specific quality-of-life (QOL) instrument in patients with house dust mite allergy: relationship between the SF-36 and Rhinitis QOL Questionnaire : relationship between the SF-36 and Rhinitis QOL Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terreehorst, I.; Duivenvoorden, H.J.; Tempels-Pavlica, Z.; Oosting, A.J.; de Monchy, J.G.R.; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, C.A.F.M.; van Wijk, R. G.

    2004-01-01

    Background Generic and disease-specific quality-of-life (QOL) questionnaires are commonly used in subjects with allergic rhinitis (AR). AR, however, is closely associated with other disorders such as bronchial asthma and atopic dermatitis (AD). These co-morbid associations may have an effect on the

  1. Postconcussion Symptom Reporting After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Female Service Members: Impact of Gender, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Severity of Injury, and Associated Bodily Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Sara M; Brickell, Tracey A; Bailie, Jason M; French, Louis M; Kennedy, Jan E; Lange, Rael T

    2017-10-27

    Examine effects of diagnostically relevant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) severity, and associated bodily injury severity on postconcussion symptom reporting in female service members (SM) compared with a matched sample of male SM. Six US military medical treatment facilities. A total of 158 SM (79 females, 79 males) evaluated within 30 months after mild TBI. Men and women were matched by age, days postinjury, PTSD symptom status, mild TBI severity, and bodily injury severity. All passed a measure of symptom validity. Compare reported postconcussion symptoms for men and women stratified by PTSD diagnostic symptoms (present/absent), mild TBI severity (alteration of consciousness/loss of consciousness), and bodily injury severity (mild/moderate-severe). Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, PTSD Checklist, Abbreviated Injury Scale. Overall postconcussion symptom reporting increased with PTSD but did not significantly differ based on severity of mild TBI or associated bodily injury. Females reported more somatosensory and/or vestibular symptoms than males under some circumstances. Females in the PTSD-Present group, Alteration of Consciousness Only group, and Moderate-Severe Bodily Injury group reported more somatosensory symptoms than males in those groups. Females in the Alteration of Consciousness Only group and Minor Bodily Injury group reported more vestibular symptoms than males in those groups. Diagnostically relevant PTSD symptoms, mild TBI severity, and bodily injury severity differentially impact somatosensory and vestibular postconcussion symptom reporting for male and female SM after mild TBI. Controlling for PTSD and symptom validity resulted in fewer gender-based differences in postconcussive symptoms than previously demonstrated in the literature.

  2. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies-one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  3. An expressive bodily movement repertoire for marimba performance, revealed through observers’ Laban effort-shape analyses, and allied musical features: two case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C Broughton

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Musicians’ expressive bodily movements can influence observers’ perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers’ music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies – one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers’ perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players’ bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the

  4. An Expressive Bodily Movement Repertoire for Marimba Performance, Revealed through Observers' Laban Effort-Shape Analyses, and Allied Musical Features: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2016-01-01

    Musicians' expressive bodily movements can influence observers' perception of performance. Furthermore, individual differences in observers' music and motor expertise can shape how they perceive and respond to music performance. However, few studies have investigated the bodily movements that different observers of music performance perceive as expressive, in order to understand how they might relate to the music being produced, and the particular instrument type. In this paper, we focus on marimba performance through two case studies—one solo and one collaborative context. This study aims to investigate the existence of a core repertoire of marimba performance expressive bodily movements, identify key music-related features associated with the core repertoire, and explore how observers' perception of expressive bodily movements might vary according to individual differences in their music and motor expertise. Of the six professional musicians who observed and analyzed the marimba performances, three were percussionists and experienced marimba players. Following training, observers implemented the Laban effort-shape movement analysis system to analyze marimba players' bodily movements that they perceived as expressive in audio-visual recordings of performance. Observations that were agreed by all participants as being the same type of action at the same location in the performance recording were examined in each case study, then across the two studies. A small repertoire of bodily movements emerged that the observers perceived as being expressive. Movements were primarily allied to elements of the music structure, technique, and expressive interpretation, however, these elements appeared to be interactive. A type of body sway movement and more localized sound generating actions were perceived as expressive. These movements co-occurred and also appeared separately. Individual participant data revealed slightly more variety in the types and locations of actions

  5. Thinking big: the effect of sexually objectifying music videos on bodily self-perception in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mischner, Isabelle H S; van Schie, Hein T; Wigboldus, Daniël H J; van Baaren, Rick B; Engels, Rutger C M E

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of sexually objectifying music video exposure on young women's implicit bodily self-perception and the moderating role of self-esteem. Fifty-six college women of normal weight were either exposed to three sexually objectifying music videos or three neutral music videos. Perceived and ideal body size were measured both before and after video exposure, using horizontally stretched and compressed photographs of the participant's own body in swimming garment. As expected, only women low (but not high) in self-esteem were negatively affected by the sexually objectifying content of the music videos: they perceived themselves as bigger and showed an increased discrepancy between their perceived and ideal body size after video exposure. The neutral music videos did not influence women's bodily self-perceptions. These findings suggest that body image is a flexible construct, and that high self-esteem can protect women against the adverse effects of sexually objectifying media. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of bodily retraction of mandibular incisors versus mandibular setback surgery on pharyngeal airway space: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, Byeong-Tak; Choi, Sung-Hwan; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Baik, Hyoung-Seon; Lee, Kee-Joon

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the changes induced in the pharyngeal airway space by orthodontic treatment with bodily retraction of the mandibular incisors and mandibular setback surgery without extraction. This retrospective study included 63 adult patients (32 men and 31 women). Thirty-three patients who had been treated via four-bicuspid extraction and bodily retraction of the mandibular incisors (incisor retraction, IR group) were compared with 30 patients who had been treated via mandibular setback surgery (MS group) without extraction. Lateral cephalograms were acquired and analyzed before (T1) and after treatment (T2). The superior pharyngeal airway space did not change significantly in either group during treatment. The middle pharyngeal airway space decreased by 1.15 ± 1.17 mm and 1.25 ± 1.35 mm after treatment in the IR and MS groups, respectively, and the decrease was comparable between the two groups. In the MS group, the inferior pharyngeal airway space (E-IPW) decreased by 0.88 ± 1.67 mm after treatment (p space and the skeletal and dental variables in each group. The middle pharyngeal airway space decreased because of the posterior displacement of the mandibular incisors and/or the mandibular body. The E-IPW decreased only in the MS group because of the posterior displacement of only the mandibular body.

  7. Types of tooth movement, bodily or tipping, do not affect the displacement of the tooth's center of resistance but do affect the alveolar bone resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takanobu; Hotokezaka, Hitoshi; Hamanaka, Ryo; Hashimoto, Megumi; Nakano-Tajima, Takako; Arita, Kotaro; Kurohama, Takeshi; Ino, Airi; Tominaga, Jun-Ya; Yoshida, Noriaki

    2017-07-01

    To investigate how types of tooth movement, bodily or tipping, influence the displacement of the center of resistance in teeth and alveolar bone resorption. Ten-week-old female Wistar rats were divided into eight groups of different factors, as follows: type of movement (bodily and tipping) and force magnitude (10, 25, 50, and 100 cN). The maxillary left first molars were moved mesially with nickel-titanium coil springs for 28 days. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) images were taken before and after tooth movement. The position of the center of resistance was determined by using finite element models constructed from the micro-CT image. The displacement of the center of resistance and the volume of alveolar bone resorption were measured. The displacement of the center of resistance showed no significant difference between the bodily and tipping groups. The displacements of the center of resistance were increased with force magnitude at 10 and 25 cN, whereas they were not further increased at 50 and 100 cN. On the other hand, cervical alveolar bone resorption was significantly greater in the tipping group than in the bodily group. Displacement of the center of resistance was not influenced by the types of tooth movement. However, volume of cervical alveolar bone resorption was greater in the tipping movement group than in the bodily movement group.

  8. Alveolar bone response to light-force tipping and bodily movement in maxillary incisor advancement:A prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimongkol, Priyakorn; Thongudomporn, Udom; Lindauer, Steven J

    2017-10-30

    To compare alveolar bone thickness and height changes between untreated incisors (control), incisors advanced with light-force tipping, and incisors advanced with bodily movement mechanics. Forty-three subjects (aged 9.49 ± 1.56 years) with anterior crossbite were allocated into an untreated group (control), tipping group, or bodily movement group. Lateral cephalograms were taken before advancement (T0) and after obtaining normal overjet (T1). Changes in labial and palatal alveolar bone thickness and height surrounding maxillary incisors were evaluated with limited field-of-view cone-beam computed tomography before advancement (CT0) and 4 months after normal overjet was obtained (CT1). Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-rank and Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA tests were used to compare changes within and between groups, as appropriate. The significance level was set at .05. Labial alveolar bone thickness at the midroot and apical levels were significantly decreased in the bodily movement group (P tipping group compared with the control and bodily movement groups (P tipping and bodily movement in growing patients resulted in labial alveolar bone thickness and labial and palatal alveolar bone height changes that were similar to the untreated group.

  9. The role of anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention in anxiety and worry about bodily sensations among adults living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Adam; Zvolensky, Michael J; Grover, Kristin W; Parent, Justin

    2012-12-01

    The current study examined cognitive factors that may be relevant to understanding anxiety and worry about bodily sensations among an HIV/AIDS population. Specifically, this investigation tested the main and interactive effects of anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention on anxious arousal, bodily vigilance, interoceptive fear, and HIV symptom distress among 164 adults with HIV/AIDS. Results indicated that anxiety sensitivity was positively related to anxious arousal, bodily vigilance, and interoceptive fear, but not HIV symptom distress. Mindful attention was negatively related to anxious arousal, interoceptive fear, and HIV symptom distress, but not bodily vigilance. These main effects for anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention were evident after controlling for disease stage, years with HIV, and demographic variables. There were no interactive effects between anxiety sensitivity and mindful attention. Results are discussed in terms of the clinical implications for identifying and treating anxiety and worry about bodily sensations among adults with HIV/AIDS. Limitations of this study include the use of cross-sectional data and self-report assessments. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Cross-sectional survey on self-reported health of ambulance personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Pek, Emese; Fuge, Kata; Marton, Jozsef; Banfai, Balint; Gombos, Gabriella Csaszarne; Betlehem, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Background The high job stress among ambulance personnel is a widely known phenomenon. Purpose: to asses the self reported health status of ambulance workers. Methods An anonym self-fill-in questionnaire applying SF-36 was used among workers from the northern and western regions of Hungarian National Ambulance Service. Results Based on the dimensions of the SF-36 questionnaire the respondents considered their ?Physical Functioning? the best, while ?Vitality? was regarded the worst. The more t...

  11. Wooden combs from the Roman fort at Vechten: the bodily appearance of soldiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, A.M.J.; Vos, W.K.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Excavations in the late 19th century and surveys carried out in the 1970s have produced 12 boxwood combs from the Roman fort at Vechten (NL). They are to be considered waste material that was dumped in the river Rhine which in the Roman period ran just north of the camp. In this article,

  12. Hearing handicap, rather than measured hearing impairment, predicts poorer quality of life over 10 years in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Bamini; Schneider, Julie; Hickson, Louise; McMahon, Catherine M; Burlutsky, George; Leeder, Stephen R; Mitchell, Paul

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to determine the prospective association between measured hearing impairment, self-reported hearing handicap and hearing aid use with quality of life. 829 Blue Mountains Hearing Study participants (≥ 55 years) were examined between 1997-1999 and 2007-2009. The shortened version of the hearing handicap inventory was administered. Hearing levels were measured using pure-tone audiometry. Quality of life was assessed using the 36-Item Short-Form Survey (SF-36); higher scores reflect better quality of life. Hearing impairment at baseline compared with no impairment was associated with lower mean SF-36 mental composite score 10 years later (multivariable-adjusted p=0.03). Physical composite score and mean scores for seven of the eight SF-36 domains after 10-year follow-up were significantly lower among participants who self-reported hearing handicap at baseline. Differences in the adjusted means between participants with and without hearing handicap ranged from 2.7 (physical composite score) to 10.4 units ('role limitations due to physical problems' domain). Individuals who developed incident hearing impairment compared to those who did not, had adjusted mean scores 9.5- and 7.7-units lower in the 'role limitation due to physical problems', and 'bodily pain' domains, respectively, at the 10-year follow-up. Hearing aid users versus non-users at baseline showed a 1.82-point (p=0.03) and 3.32-point (p=0.01) increase in SF-36 mental composite score and mental health domain over the 10-year follow-up, respectively. Older adults with self-perceived hearing handicap constitute a potential risk group for overall deterioration in quality of life, while hearing aid use could help improve the well-being of hearing impaired adults. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Health-Related Quality of Life in Elderly Patients With Pressure Ulcers in Different Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebba Tosta de Souza, Diba Maria; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; Santos, Ivan Dunshee de Abranches Oliveira; Abla, Luiz Eduardo Felipe; Juliano, Yara; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare health-related quality of life in elderly patients with pressure ulcers in different health care settings (home care acute care facility, and long-term care facility [LTCF]). Cross-sectional comparative study. One hundred ten elderly patients with (n = 36) and without (n = 74) pressure ulcers living in LTCFs, hospitals, or at home. The research setting included 1 tertiary and 2 community-based hospitals, 10 LTCFs, and 18 community health centers in Brazil. The Mini-Mental State Examination, Braden Scale for Predicting Pressure Sore Risk, and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) were used to assess cognitive status, pressure ulcer risk, and health-related quality of life, respectively. Compared with those without pressure ulcers, elderly patients with pressure ulcers reported significantly lower (worse) SF-36 scores on physical functioning (P ulcers scored significantly higher (better) SF-36 scores on mental health (P = .046) and vitality (P = .009). Hospitalized patients without pressure ulcers had lower SF-36 scores on bodily pain (P = .007) and general health (P = .026) than those living in LTCFs or at home. Patients without pressure ulcers in LTCFs had significantly lower Mini-Mental State Examination scores (lower cognitive status) than those living in other settings (P = .001). Elderly patients with pressure ulcers who were hospitalized and living at home or in LTCFs reported low scores on physical functioning and role physical, and LTCF residents also reported low scores on social functioning and role emotional. This shows the need for an environment that includes health care professionals prepared to implement strategies for pressure ulcer prevention.

  14. Smoking and Early COPD as Independent Predictors of Body Composition, Exercise Capacity, and Health Status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miranda de Oliveira Caram

    Full Text Available The effects of tobacco smoke, mild/moderate COPD disease and their combined effect on health status (HS, body composition (BC, and exercise capacity (EC impairment are still unclear. We hypothesized that smoking and early COPD have a joint negative influence on these outcomes. We evaluated 32 smokers (smoking history >10 pack/years, 32 mild/moderate COPD (current smokers or former smokers, and 32 never smokers. All individuals underwent medical and smoking status evaluations, pre and post-bronchodilator spirometry, BC [fat-free mass (FFM and FFM index (FFMI], EC [six-minute walk distance (6MWD] and HS [Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36]. FFM (p = 0.02 and FFMI (p = 0.008 were lower in COPD than never smokers. 6MWT, as a percentage of reference values for the Brazilian population, was lower in COPD and smokers than never smokers (p = 0.01. Smokers showed worse SF-36 score for functional capacity than never smokers (p<0.001. SF-36 score for physical functioning (p<0.001 and role-emotional (p<0.001 were impaired in COPD patients than smokers. SF-36 scores for physical functioning (p<0.001, role-physical (p = 0.01, bodily pain (p = 0.01, vitality (p = 0.04 and role-emotional (p<0.001 were lower in COPD than never smokers. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that both COPD diagnosis and smoking were inversely associated with FFMI, 6MWD and HS. Smoking and early COPD have a joint negative influence on body composition, exercise capacity and health status.

  15. Quality of life in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benrud-Larson, Lisa M; Dewar, Melanie S; Sandroni, Paola; Rummans, Teresa A; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Low, Phillip A

    2002-06-01

    To quantify quality of life and identify demographic and clinical correlates of functioning in a well-characterized sample of patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Prospective patients were those seen at the Mayo Clinic Autonomic Disorders Laboratory from September 2000 to June 2001. Neurologists made diagnoses of POTS according to established criteria. Patients completed a questionnaire packet that included measures of quality of life (36-Item Short-Form Health Survey [SF-36]) and symptom severity (Autonomic Symptom Profile). Additional clinical information was abstracted from medical records. Ninety-four patients (89% female; mean age, 34.2 years) were enrolled in the study. Patients with POTS reported impairment across multiple domains on the SF-36. Physical functioning, role functioning, bodily pain, general health, vitality, and social functioning were all significantly impaired compared with a healthy population (P<.01 for all) and similar to that reported by patients with other chronic, disabling conditions. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that symptom severity (beta = -.36, P<.001) and disability status (beta = -36, P<.001) were independent predictors of SF-36 physical component scores, with the full model accounting for 54% of the variance (P<.001). None of the variables examined accounted for a significant amount of the variance in SF-36 mental component scores. Patients with POTS experience clear limitations across multiple domains of quality of life, including physical, social, and role functioning. Treatment should address the multiple and varied impairments experienced by these patients and may require a multidisciplinary approach. Future research must further delineate factors, both disease related and psychosocial, that predict functioning and adjustment in this population.

  16. Health-related quality of life is inversely correlated with C-reactive protein and age in Mycobacterium avium complex lung disease: a cross-sectional analysis of 235 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Takanori; Funatsu, Yohei; Ishii, Makoto; Namkoong, Ho; Yagi, Kazuma; Suzuki, Shoji; Asami, Takahiro; Kamo, Tetsuro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Uwamino, Yoshifumi; Nishimura, Tomoyasu; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2015-12-03

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung diseases generally cause chronic disease in immunocompetent hosts. Although a few studies have examined health-related quality of life (HRQL) in patients with MAC lung disease, there have been no large studies. This study aimed to evaluate HRQL and its correlation with clinical outcomes in MAC lung disease. A cross-sectional study was conducted at Keio University Hospital to investigate the factors associated with HRQL in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial diseases. MAC lung diseases were diagnosed according to the 2007 ATS/IDSA guidelines for nontuberculous mycobacterial diseases. The 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) was administered to assess clinical outcomes. Clinical variables included treatment status, latest haematological data, and bacterial smear and culture results. The SF-36 scores for the 235 patients (median age, 69 years; 45 men and 190 women) with MAC lung disease, except for the bodily pain and mental health subscale scores, were significantly lower than the Japanese population norms. In the multivariable analyses, current treatment for MAC and a positive sputum smear or culture within the past year were significantly associated with lower SF-36 scores. C-reactive protein (CRP) and age showed stronger inverse correlations with SF-36 scores. HRQL, especially the physical component, was impaired in patients with MAC lung diseases; this appears to be related with current treatment status, positive sputum smear or culture within the previous year, and particularly CRP and age. Further studies including qualitative assessments are needed to investigate the efficacy of CRP as a marker for progression or treatment response in MAC lung disease. Clinical trial registered with UMIN ( UMIN000007964 ).

  17. Understanding the determinants of health-related quality of life in rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natalini, Jake G; Swigris, Jeff J; Morisset, Julie; Elicker, Brett M; Jones, Kirk D; Fischer, Aryeh; Collard, Harold R; Lee, Joyce S

    2017-06-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is impaired among patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Little is understood about HRQL in specific subtypes of ILD. The aim of this study was to characterize and identify clinical determinants of HRQL among patients with rheumatoid arthritis-associated interstitial lung disease (RA-ILD) and compare them to patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We identified patients with a diagnosis of RA-ILD and IPF from an ongoing longitudinal cohort of ILD patients. HRQL was measured at their baseline visit using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), versions 1 and 2. Regression models were used to characterize and understand the relationship between selected baseline clinical covariates, the physical component score (PCS) and mental component score (MCS) of the SF-36. RA-ILD patients (n = 50) were more likely to be younger and female compared to IPF patients (n = 50). After controlling for age and pulmonary function, RA-ILD patients had a lower HRQL compared to IPF patients, as measured by the PCS (P = 0.03), with significant differences in two of four PCS domains - bodily pain (P Mental and emotional health, as measured by the MCS, was similar between RA-ILD and IPF patients. The physical components of HRQL appear worse in RA-ILD patients compared to IPF patients as measured by the PCS of the SF-36. Differences in the PCS of the SF-36 can be explained in part by dyspnea severity and joint symptoms among patients with RA-ILD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Action and familiarity effects on self and other expert musicians’ Laban effort-shape analyses of expressive bodily behaviors in instrumental music performance: A case study approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary C Broughton

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Self-reflective performance review and expert evaluation are features of Western music performance practice. While music is usually the focus, visual information provided by performing musicians’ expressive bodily behaviors communicates expressiveness to musically trained and untrained observers. Yet, within a seemingly homogenous group such as one of musically trained individuals, diversity of experience exists. Individual differences potentially affect perception of the subtleties of expressive performance, and performers’ effective communication of their expressive intentions. This study aimed to compare self- and other expert musicians’ perception of expressive bodily behaviors observed in marimba performance. We hypothesised that analyses of expressive expressive bodily behaviors differ between expert musicians according to their specialist motor expertise and familiarity with the music. Two professional percussionists and experienced marimba players, and one professional classical singer took part in the study. Participants independently conducted Laban effort-shape analysis – proposing that intentions manifest in bodily activity are understood through shared embodied processes – of a marimbists’ expressive bodily behaviors in an audio-visual performance recording. For one percussionist, this was a self-reflective analysis. The work was unfamiliar to the other percussionist and singer. Perception of the performer’s expressive bodily behaviors differed according to participants’ individual instrumental or vocal motor expertise, and familiarity with the music. Furthermore, individual type of motor experience appeared to direct participants’ attention in approaching the analyses. Findings support forward and inverse perception-action models, and embodied cognitive theory. Implications offer scientific rigour and artistic interest for how performance practitioners can reflectively analyze performance to improve expressive

  19. Action and familiarity effects on self and other expert musicians’ Laban effort-shape analyses of expressive bodily behaviors in instrumental music performance: a case study approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Mary C.; Davidson, Jane W.

    2014-01-01

    Self-reflective performance review and expert evaluation are features of Western music performance practice. While music is usually the focus, visual information provided by performing musicians’ expressive bodily behaviors communicates expressiveness to musically trained and untrained observers. Yet, within a seemingly homogenous group, such as one of musically trained individuals, diversity of experience exists. Individual differences potentially affect perception of the subtleties of expressive performance, and performers’ effective communication of their expressive intentions. This study aimed to compare self- and other expert musicians’ perception of expressive bodily behaviors observed in marimba performance. We hypothesized that analyses of expressive bodily behaviors differ between expert musicians according to their specialist motor expertise and familiarity with the music. Two professional percussionists and experienced marimba players, and one professional classical singer took part in the study. Participants independently conducted Laban effort-shape analysis – proposing that intentions manifest in bodily activity are understood through shared embodied processes – of a marimbists’ expressive bodily behaviors in an audio-visual performance recording. For one percussionist, this was a self-reflective analysis. The work was unfamiliar to the other percussionist and singer. Perception of the performer’s expressive bodily behaviors appeared to differ according to participants’ individual instrumental or vocal motor expertise, and familiarity with the music. Furthermore, individual type of motor experience appeared to direct participants’ attention in approaching the analyses. Findings support forward and inverse perception–action models, and embodied cognitive theory. Implications offer scientific rigor and artistic interest for how performance practitioners can reflectively analyze performance to improve expressive communication. PMID

  20. Action and familiarity effects on self and other expert musicians' Laban effort-shape analyses of expressive bodily behaviors in instrumental music performance: a case study approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Mary C; Davidson, Jane W

    2014-01-01

    Self-reflective performance review and expert evaluation are features of Western music performance practice. While music is usually the focus, visual information provided by performing musicians' expressive bodily behaviors communicates expressiveness to musically trained and untrained observers. Yet, within a seemingly homogenous group, such as one of musically trained individuals, diversity of experience exists. Individual differences potentially affect perception of the subtleties of expressive performance, and performers' effective communication of their expressive intentions. This study aimed to compare self- and other expert musicians' perception of expressive bodily behaviors observed in marimba performance. We hypothesized that analyses of expressive bodily behaviors differ between expert musicians according to their specialist motor expertise and familiarity with the music. Two professional percussionists and experienced marimba players, and one professional classical singer took part in the study. Participants independently conducted Laban effort-shape analysis - proposing that intentions manifest in bodily activity are understood through shared embodied processes - of a marimbists' expressive bodily behaviors in an audio-visual performance recording. For one percussionist, this was a self-reflective analysis. The work was unfamiliar to the other percussionist and singer. Perception of the performer's expressive bodily behaviors appeared to differ according to participants' individual instrumental or vocal motor expertise, and familiarity with the music. Furthermore, individual type of motor experience appeared to direct participants' attention in approaching the analyses. Findings support forward and inverse perception-action models, and embodied cognitive theory. Implications offer scientific rigor and artistic interest for how performance practitioners can reflectively analyze performance to improve expressive communication.

  1. The role of recalibration response shift in explaining bodily pain in cancer patients undergoing invasive surgery: an empirical investigation of the Sprangers and Schwartz model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Mechteld R M; Oort, Frans J; van Lanschot, J Jan B; van der Velden, Jacobus; Kloek, Jaap J; Gouma, Dirk J; Schwartz, Carolyn E; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2013-03-01

    This study aims to explain bodily pain using the Sprangers and Schwartz theoretical model (1999) on quality of life (QL) and response shift in its entirety. Response shift refers to the phenomenon that the meaning of a person's self-evaluation changes over time. In this model, response shift mediates effects of changes in health status (catalysts), stable characteristics of the person (antecedents), and coping mechanisms (mechanisms) on QL. Cancer patients (202) were assessed prior to and 3 months following surgery. Measures were for catalysts: type of operation and possibility of tumor resection; for antecedents: age, duration of pain, optimism, and rigidity; for mechanisms: post-traumatic growth, social comparisons, social support, denial, and acceptance; and for QL: bodily pain; for response shift: the pretest-minus-thentest bodily pain score, further referred to as recalibration response shift. Structural equation modeling and sequential regression analyses were used. The final model reached close fit (RMSEA = 0.03; 90% CI = 0.000-0.071; χ2 (18) = 21.13; p = 0.27). Significant effects were found for catalysts on mechanisms, antecedents on mechanisms, mechanisms on response shift, and response shift on bodily pain. Four extra model effects had to be permitted. Using sequential regression analysis, recalibration response shift added 4.4% to the total amount of 29.8% explained variance of bodily pain. Many effects as hypothesized by the model were found. Recalibration response shift had a unique albeit small contribution to the explanation of bodily pain. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The Survey of SMS Effect on General Health and Quality of Life in People with Diabetes Type 2 Referring to Clinic of 22-Bahman Hospital of

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    Alireza Atarodi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is one of the most common chronic diseases of the present era. This disease with its many complications has so many effects on quality of life that affects people. Since awareness increase is effective on self-control, some strategies can improve quality of life and technology has changed the way of education and life1. So, this study was performed to survey SMS effect on general health and quality of life in people with diabetes type 2 referring to clinic of 22-Bahman hospital of Gonabad city in 2011. Materials and Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study. The samples were chosen with a simple random sampling from those referring to clinic of 22-Bahman hospital of Gonabad city in 2011. The data were collected by SF-36 quality of life questionnaire. In both of the intervention (X = 40 and the control groups (X = 40 SF-36, quality of life questionnaire was completed before intervention and again one month after sending educational short messages through mobile phone, and then the data were analyzed by independent Mann-whitney, Wilcoxon, Chi square and T-test and using SPSS-14 software.Results: This study reviewed the mean quality of life before and after sending educational short messages in two intervention and control groups. The findings showed that the average quality of life score before intervention was 56.9 in the control group and 58.3 in the intervention group (p=0. But the comparison of the quality of life scores showed a significant difference in the intervention group according to t-test before and after sending educational mobile messages to them (p=0.Conclusion: SMS based on educational text is effective on quality of life increasing and then modern technology can be effective positively if it used approprately.

  3. Health promoting outdoor environments--associations between green space, and health, health-related quality of life and stress based on a Danish national representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigsdotter, Ulrika K; Ekholm, Ola; Schipperijn, Jasper; Toftager, Mette; Kamper-Jørgensen, Finn; Randrup, Thomas B

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the associations between green space and health, health-related quality of life and stress, respectively. Data were derived from the 2005 Danish Health Interview Survey and are based on a region-stratified random sample of 21,832 adults. Data were collected via face-to-face interviews followed by a self-administered questionnaire, including the SF-36, which measures eight dimensions of health and the Perceived Stress Scale, which measures self-reported stress. A total of 11,238 respondents completed the interview and returned the questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the association between distance to green space and self-perceived stress. Danes living more than 1 km away from the nearest green space report poorer health and health-related quality of life, i.e. lower mean scores on all eight SF-36 dimensions of health than respondents living closer. Respondents living more than 1 km away from a green space have 1.42 higher odds of experiencing stress than do respondents living less than 300 m from a green space. Respondents not reporting stress are more likely to visit a green space than are respondents reporting stress. Reasons for visiting green spaces differ significantly depending on whether or not respondents experience stress. Respondents reporting stress are likely to use green spaces to reduce stress. An association between distance to a green space and health and health-related quality of life was found. Further, the results indicate awareness among Danes that green spaces may be of importance in managing stress and that green spaces may play an important role as health-promoting environments.

  4. Bodily symptoms in patients with post traumatic stress disorder: A comparative study of traumatized refugees, Danish war veterans, and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentholm, Anette Lisbeth; Nyboe, Lene; Gyllensten, Amanda Lundvik

    2017-01-01

    Background: Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with increased general health symptoms and patients suffer from numerous bodily complaints such as increased pain, increased muscular tension, and restricted breathing. Methods and material: This study applied the Body Awareness......, flexibility and coordination in movement, had more muscular tension, more complaints of pain, more restricted breathing, and more limitation in function of daily life than healthy controls. Conclusion: The BAS MQ-E was found to be an applicable and useful measure of bodily symptoms in patients with PTSD...

  5. The roles of sex, anxious reactivity to bodily arousal, and anxiety sensitivity in coping motives for cigarette smoking among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsky, Sarah A; Feldner, Matthew T; Knapp, Ashley A; Rojas, Sasha M; Leen-Feldner, Ellen W

    2016-06-01

    Evidence suggests that smoking to cope among adolescents is associated with a number of problematic outcomes (e.g., greater smoking frequency, higher rates of dependence). It is thus imperative to better understand factors that may increase the likelihood of smoking to cope among adolescents. Research suggests anxiety sensitivity (AS) is associated with smoking to cope among adults, although the link between AS and coping motives for cigarette use among youth is less clear. Gender differences have also been noted in AS. The current study investigates this association using a biological challenge paradigm. Specifically, the indirect effects of anxious reactivity to bodily arousal on the relation between the physical and mental AS factors and coping motives for cigarette smoking were examined within a sample of 108 adolescent cigarette smokers. Gender was examined as a moderator. Results suggested significant indirect effects of self-reported anxiety in response to bodily arousal on the relation between physical AS and coping motives for cigarette smoking. This indirect effect was moderated by gender, such that it was significant for females but not males. Models examining AS mental concerns and psychophysiological responding to the challenge were not significant. These results suggest that, relative to their low AS counterparts, female adolescents high in physical concerns respond with elevated anxiety in response to interoceptive arousal and, in turn, endorse elevated coping-related smoking motives. Findings are discussed in terms of implications for understanding the nature and origins of coping-related smoking motives and how such information can be used to inform intervention efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Self-Reported Pleasantness Ratings and Examiner-Coded Defensiveness in Response to Touch in Children with ASD: Effects of Stimulus Material and Bodily Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Carissa J.; Lorenzi, Jill; Baranek, Grace T.

    2016-01-01

    Tactile defensiveness, characterized by behavioral hyperresponsiveness and negative emotional responses to touch, is a common manifestation of aberrant sensory processing in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other developmental disabilities (DD). Variations in tactile defensiveness with the properties of the stimulus and the bodily site of…

  7. Evaluation of Optimal Implant Positions and Height of Retraction Hook for Intrusive and Bodily Movement of Anterior Teeth in Sliding Mechanics: A FEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas S Ashekar

    2013-01-01

    Results and conclusions: In low OMI (6 mm anteriors showed tipping movement. Mid implant condition (8 mm showed more of bodily movement during retraction as the force passes near or through the CRs of all the six anterior teeth. In high OMI (10 mm and 0 mm ARH condition, all the six anterior teeth showed intrusion with retraction.

  8. Exploratory study of the relationship between the musical, visuospatial, bodily-kinesthetic intelligence and drive creativity in the process of learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula MARCHENA CRUZ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the Spanish educational system focuses its attention on the development of priority subjects such as language and mathematics versus other secondary such as music (Palacios, 2006, without considering numerous neuropsychological research that provides new theories of mind and learning that can positively influence the transformation of current educational models (Martin-Lobo, 2015. This research aims to determine the relation between musical intelligence, bodily-kinesthetic intelligence, intelligence visuospatial and motor creativity in a sample among 5 years old students from the last year of Early Childhood Education. The instrument used to assess the three intelligences, based on Gardner’s theory, was the Multiple Intelligences questionnaire for children of pre-school age (Prieto and Ballester, 2003; for the evaluation of motor creativity was used Test of Creative Thinking in Action and Movement (Torrance, Reisman and Floyd, 1981. A descriptive and correlational statistical analysis (using the Pearson correlation index applying the Microsoft Excel program along with the supplement known as Ezanalyze. The results indicated no significant relationship between musical intelligence and motor creativity (p = 0.988; the visuospatial intelligence and motor creativity (p = 0.992; and the bodily-kinesthetic intelligence and motor creativity (p = 0.636. Although there was significant relation between the musical and visuospatial intelligence (p = 0.000; the musical and bodily-kinesthetic intelligence (p = 0.000; and the bodily-kinesthetic and visuospatial intelligence (p = 0.025.

  9. CHANGES IN QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER SHORT AND LONG TERM FOLLOW-UP OF ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS FOR MORBID OBESITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael M. LAURINO NETO

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Context It is unclear whether health-related quality of life (HRQL is sustained in a long-term follow-up of morbidly obese patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB. Objective This study aims to analyze the HRQL changes following RYGB in short and long-term follow-up. Methods We compared the health-related quality of life among three separate patient groups, using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. Group A - 50 preoperative morbidly obese patients; Group B - 50 RYGB patients 1-2 years post-surgery; Group C - 50 RYGB patients more than 7 years post-surgery. Results The groups were similar for gender, age and body mass index before surgery. We observed that physical functioning, social function, emotional role functioning and mental health scales did not vary between the three groups. The physical role functioning scale was unchanged in the short-term and decreased compared to the preoperative scale in the long-term follow-up. Bodily pain improved after the operation but returned to the initial level after 7 years. The vitality and general health perceptions improved after the operation and maintained these results after 7 years compared with the preoperative perceptions. Conclusions RYGB improved health-related quality of life in three SF-36 domains (bodily pain, general health perceptions and vitality in the short-term and two SF-36 domains (general health perceptions and vitality in the long-term.

  10. Can dialysis modality influence quality of life in chronic hemodialysis patients? Low-flux hemodialysis versus high-flux hemodiafiltration: a cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantartzi, Konstantia; Panagoutsos, Stelios; Mourvati, Efthemia; Roumeliotis, Athanasios; Leivaditis, Konstantinos; Devetzis, Vassilios; Passadakis, Ploumis; Vargemezis, Vassilios

    2013-01-01

    Hemodiafiltration with online preparation of the substitution [online high-flux hemodiafiltration (OHDF)] and hemodiafiltration with prepared bags of substitution (HDF) are important, recently widely used renal replacement therapies in patients with end-stage renal disease. However, there is little information on the comparative impacts of these modalities versus conventional low-flux hemodialysis (HD) on the quality of life (QoL) of HD patients. This study investigates the effect of dialysis modality on QoL in chronic HD patients. In this prospective, randomized, cross-over, open label study, 24 patients were enrolled. Their age were 62 ± 13.34 years (mean ± SD), with the duration of dialysis of 31 ± 23.28 months (mean ± SD). Five of the patients were women. QoL was measured by the Short-Form Health Survey with 36 questions (SF-36) and subscale scores were calculated. Each patient received HD, OHDF, and HDF for 3 months, with the dialysis modality subsequently being altered. They completed the questionnaire of QoL at the end of each period. There were statistical significant differences in QoL for the total SF-36 [36.1 (26.7-45.7) and 40.7 (30.2-62.8)], for classic low-flux HD and high-flux hemodiafiltration, for bodily pain [45 (26.9-66.9) and 55 (35.6-87.5)], and for role limitations due to emotional functioning [0 (0-33.3) and 33.3 (0-100)], respectively. The scores did not differ significantly between the two types of hemodiafiltration. Our study indicates that QoL differs significantly among patients receiving low-flux HD and high-flux hemodiafiltration, on total SF-36, bodily pain, and role limitations due to emotional functioning. Convective modalities may offer better QoL than diffusive HD.

  11. Tai Chi Exercise for the Quality of Life in a Perimenopausal Women Organization: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Shan, Weichao; Li, Qing; Yang, Na; Shan, Weiying

    2017-08-01

    Improvement of the quality of life in perimenopausal women has recently become an important global health issue. Extensive research reports provide evidence of Tai Chi for the quality of life, but no systematic review has individually investigated Tai Chi as a main intervention on the quality of life in perimenopausal women. To assess clinical evidence of Tai Chi for the quality of life in perimenopausal women. Studies related to the effect of Tai Chi on the quality of life in perimenopausal women in the databases of China and abroad were searched. RevMan version 5.2 software was used, and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form health survey (SF-36) and bone mineral density (BMD) were selected as evaluation indices. Five trials were included. The results of this study showed that Tai Chi had a significant effect on bodily pain, general health, vitality, mental health of SF-36, and the spine dimension of BMD, as supported by the following data: bodily pain (Standard Mean Difference [SMD] = -3.63; 95% confidence interval [CI] [-6.62, -0.64]; p = .02); general health (SMD = -5.08; 95% CI [-7.60, -2.56]; p quality randomized controlled trials are urgently needed to confirm these results. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Disease-Specific as Well as Generic Quality of Life Is Widely Impacted in Autoimmune Hypothyroidism and Improves during the First Six Months of Levothyroxine Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristian Hillert; Cramon, Per; Watt, Torquil

    2016-01-01

    -specific (ThyPRO) and generic (SF-36) HRQL, following levothyroxine therapy in patients with hypothyroidism due to autoimmune thyroiditis. METHODS: This prospective cohort study was set at endocrine outpatient clinics at two Danish university hospitals. Seventy-eight consecutive patients were enrolled...... were significantly impacted (pgeneral population sample. The same was observed for seven of eight SF-36 scales, the exception being Bodily Pain. Tiredness (ThyPRO) and Vitality (SF-36) were the most markedly impacted scales. After six weeks of treatment, nine of thirteen Thy...

  13. “Seeing” and “feeling” architecture: how bodily self-consciousness alters architectonic experience and affects the perception of interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualini, Isabella; Llobera, Joan; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    Over the centuries architectural theory evolved several notions of embodiment, proposing in the nineteenth and twentieth century that architectonic experience is related to physiological responses of the observer. Recent advances in the cognitive neuroscience of embodiment (or bodily self-consciousness) enable empirical studies of architectonic embodiment. Here, we investigated how architecture modulates bodily self-consciousness by adapting a video-based virtual reality (VR) setup previously used to investigate visuo-tactile mechanisms of bodily self-consciousness. While standing in two different interiors, participants were filmed from behind and watched their own virtual body online on a head-mounted display (HMD). Visuo-tactile strokes were applied in synchronous or asynchronous mode to the participants and their virtual body. Two interiors were simulated in the laboratory by placing the sidewalls either far or near from the participants, generating a large and narrow room. We tested if bodily self-consciousness was differently modulated when participants were exposed to both rooms and whether these changes depend on visuo-tactile stimulation. We measured illusory touch, self-identification, and performed length estimations. Our data show that synchronous stroking of the physical and the virtual body induces illusory touch and self-identification with the virtual body, independent of room-size. Moreover, in the narrow room we observed weak feelings of illusory touch with the sidewalls and of approaching walls. These subjective changes were complemented by a stroking-dependent modulation of length estimation only in the narrow room with participants judging the room-size more accurately during conditions of illusory self-identification. We discuss our findings and previous notions of architectonic embodiment in the context of the cognitive neuroscience of bodily self-consciousness and propose an empirical framework grounded in architecture, cognitive

  14. A survey of role stress, coping and health in Australian and New Zealand hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Esther M L; Bidewell, John W; Huntington, Annette D; Daly, John; Johnson, Amanda; Wilson, Helen; Lambert, Vicki A; Lambert, Clinton E

    2007-11-01

    Previous research has identified international and cultural differences in nurses' workplace stress and coping responses. We hypothesised an association between problem-focused coping and improved health, emotion-focused coping with reduced health, and more frequent workplace stress with reduced health. Test the above hypotheses with Australian and New Zealand nurses, and compare Australian and New Zealand nurses' experience of workplace stress, coping and health status. Three hundred and twenty-eight New South Wales (NSW) and 190 New Zealand (NZ) volunteer acute care hospital nurses (response rate 41%) from randomly sampled nurses. Postal survey consisting of a demographic questionnaire, the Nursing Stress Scale, the WAYS of Coping Questionnaire and the SF-36 Health Survey Version 2. Consistent with hypotheses, more frequent workplace stress predicted lower physical and mental health. Problem-focused coping was associated with better mental health. Emotion-focused coping was associated with reduced mental health. Contrary to hypotheses, coping styles did not predict physical health. NSW and NZ scored effectively the same on sources of workplace stress, stress coping methods, and physical and mental health when controlling for relevant variables. Results suggest mental health benefits for nurses who use problem-solving to cope with stress by addressing the external source of the stress, rather than emotion-focused coping in which nurses try to control or manage their internal response to stress. Cultural similarities and similar hospital environments could account for equivalent findings for NSW and NZ.

  15. Bodily Expression Support for Creative Dance Education by Grasping-Type Musical Interface with Embedded Motion and Grasp Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Yamaguchi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dance has been made mandatory as one of the physical education courses in Japan because it can cultivate capacities for expression and communication. Among several types of dance education, creative dance especially contributes to the cultivation of these capacities. However, creative dance requires some level of particular skills, as well as creativity, and it is difficult to presuppose these pre-requisites in beginner-level dancers without experience. We propose a novel supporting device for dance beginners to encourage creative dance performance by continuously generating musical sounds in real-time in accordance with their bodily movements. It has embedded sensors developed for this purpose. Experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the device were conducted with ten beginner-level dancers. Using the proposed device, the subjects demonstrated enhanced creative dance movements with greater variety, evaluated in terms of Laban dance movement description. Also, using the device, they performed with better accuracy and repeatability in a task where they produced an imagined circular trajectory by hand. The proposed interface is effective in terms of creative dance activity and accuracy of motion generation for beginner-level dancers.

  16. Bodily Expression Support for Creative Dance Education by Grasping-Type Musical Interface with Embedded Motion and Grasp Sensors †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kadone, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    Dance has been made mandatory as one of the physical education courses in Japan because it can cultivate capacities for expression and communication. Among several types of dance education, creative dance especially contributes to the cultivation of these capacities. However, creative dance requires some level of particular skills, as well as creativity, and it is difficult to presuppose these pre-requisites in beginner-level dancers without experience. We propose a novel supporting device for dance beginners to encourage creative dance performance by continuously generating musical sounds in real-time in accordance with their bodily movements. It has embedded sensors developed for this purpose. Experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the device were conducted with ten beginner-level dancers. Using the proposed device, the subjects demonstrated enhanced creative dance movements with greater variety, evaluated in terms of Laban dance movement description. Also, using the device, they performed with better accuracy and repeatability in a task where they produced an imagined circular trajectory by hand. The proposed interface is effective in terms of creative dance activity and accuracy of motion generation for beginner-level dancers. PMID:28531114

  17. Bodily Expression Support for Creative Dance Education by Grasping-Type Musical Interface with Embedded Motion and Grasp Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kadone, Hideki

    2017-05-20

    Dance has been made mandatory as one of the physical education courses in Japan because it can cultivate capacities for expression and communication. Among several types of dance education, creative dance especially contributes to the cultivation of these capacities. However, creative dance requires some level of particular skills, as well as creativity, and it is difficult to presuppose these pre-requisites in beginner-level dancers without experience. We propose a novel supporting device for dance beginners to encourage creative dance performance by continuously generating musical sounds in real-time in accordance with their bodily movements. It has embedded sensors developed for this purpose. Experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the device were conducted with ten beginner-level dancers. Using the proposed device, the subjects demonstrated enhanced creative dance movements with greater variety, evaluated in terms of Laban dance movement description. Also, using the device, they performed with better accuracy and repeatability in a task where they produced an imagined circular trajectory by hand. The proposed interface is effective in terms of creative dance activity and accuracy of motion generation for beginner-level dancers.

  18. On the pregnance of bodily movement and geometrical objects: A post-constructivist account of the origin of mathematical knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Wolff-Michael

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Traditional (e.g., constructivist accounts of knowledge ground its origin in the intentional construction on the part of the learner. Such accounts are blind to the fact that learners, by the fact that they do not know the knowledge to be learned, cannot orient toward it as an object to be constructed. In this study, I provide a phenomenological account of the naissance (birth of knowledge, two words that both have their etymological origin in the same, homonymic Proto-Indo-European syllable ĝen-, ĝenә-, ĝnē-, ĝnō-. Accordingly, the things of the world and the bodily movements they shape, following Merleau-Ponty (1964, are pregnant with new knowledge that cannot foresee itself, and that no existing knowledge can anticipate. I draw on a study of learning in a second-grade mathematics classroom, where children (6-7 years learned geometry by classifying and modeling 3-dimensional objects. The data clearly show that the children did not foresee, and therefore did not intentionally construct, the knowledge that emerged from the movements of their hands, arms, and bodies that comply with the forms of things. Implications are drawn for classroom instruction

  19. Flow reproducibility of whole blood and other bodily fluids in simplified no reaction lateral flow assay devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Han, D; Hegener, M A; Pauletti, G M; Steckl, A J

    2017-03-01

    The "no reaction" lateral flow assay (nrLFA) uses a simplified LFA structure with no conjugate pad and no stored reagents. In the nrLFA, the capillary-based transport time or distance is the key indicator, rather than the outcome of a biochemical reaction. Hence, the calibration and reproducibility of the nrLFA device are critical. The capillary flow properties of several membrane types (nitrocellulose, nylon, cellulose acetate, polyethersulfone, and polyvinylidene difluoride) are evaluated. Flow rate evaluations of MilliporeSigma Hi-Flow™ Plus (HF075, HF135 and HF180) nitrocellulose membranes on nrLFA are performed using bodily fluids (whole blood, blood plasma, and artificial sweat). The results demonstrate that fluids with lower viscosity travel faster, and membranes with slower flow rate exhibit higher capability to distinguish fluids with different viscosities. Reproducibility tests of nrLFA are performed on HF075, demonstrating excellent reproducibility. The coefficient of variation for blood coagulation tests performed with the nrLFA using induced coagulation was 5% for the plasma front and 2% for the RBC front. The effects of variation in blood hematocrit and sample volume are also reported. The overall results indicate that the nrLFA approach has a high potential to be commercially developed as a blood monitoring point-of-care device with simple calibration capability and excellent reproducibility.

  20. Statistical methods for detecting and comparing periodic data and their application to the nycthemeral rhythm of bodily harm: A population based study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stroebel, Armin M

    2010-11-08

    Abstract Background Animals, including humans, exhibit a variety of biological rhythms. This article describes a method for the detection and simultaneous comparison of multiple nycthemeral rhythms. Methods A statistical method for detecting periodic patterns in time-related data via harmonic regression is described. The method is particularly capable of detecting nycthemeral rhythms in medical data. Additionally a method for simultaneously comparing two or more periodic patterns is described, which derives from the analysis of variance (ANOVA). This method statistically confirms or rejects equality of periodic patterns. Mathematical descriptions of the detecting method and the comparing method are displayed. Results Nycthemeral rhythms of incidents of bodily harm in Middle Franconia are analyzed in order to demonstrate both methods. Every day of the week showed a significant nycthemeral rhythm of bodily harm. These seven patterns of the week were compared to each other revealing only two different nycthemeral rhythms, one for Friday and Saturday and one for the other weekdays.

  1. [Contributions and challenges associated with bodily practices and meditation for health promotion in the public primary care system in the city of São Paulo, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanese, Ana Tereza Costa; Barros, Nelson Filice de; d'Oliveira, Ana Flávia Pires Lucas

    2017-12-18

    The article presents an analysis of contributions and challenges associated with bodily practices and meditation for health promotion in the public primary care system. The qualitative study was developed in 16 healthcare units in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, using interviews with 29 health professionals and 36 practitioners of bodily practices and meditation, including participant observation of 31 practices such as Tai Chi, Lian Gong, Qigong, Yoga, Capoeira, Dance, Meditation, Relaxation, Mindfulness, and Body Awareness. There was an improvement in joint pain, mobility, balance, memory, depression, and anxiety, besides greater ease in coping with chronic conditions. Such contributions are related to favoring practitioners' autonomy, building health references through self-awareness; the combination of health promotion and therapeutic care in the approaches; and support for access to cultural goods and community spaces. The challenges identified here were precarious integration with the supply of other health services, lack of supervision and evaluation, and the predominance of a health-sector culture.

  2. Exploratory study of the relationship between the musical, visuospatial, bodily-kinesthetic intelligence and drive creativity in the process of learning

    OpenAIRE

    Paula MARCHENA CRUZ; Verónica LÓPEZ FERNÁNDEZ; Armando EZQUERRO CORDÓN

    2017-01-01

    Currently, the Spanish educational system focuses its attention on the development of priority subjects such as language and mathematics versus other secondary such as music (Palacios, 2006), without considering numerous neuropsychological research that provides new theories of mind and learning that can positively influence the transformation of current educational models (Martin-Lobo, 2015). This research aims to determine the relation between musical intelligence, bodily-kinesthetic intell...

  3. Fibromyalgia syndrome improved using a mostly raw vegetarian diet: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Speight Neal

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibromyalgia engulfs patients in a downward, reinforcing cycle of unrestorative sleep, chronic pain, fatigue, inactivity, and depression. In this study we tested whether a mostly raw vegetarian diet would significantly improve fibromyalgia symptoms. Methods Thirty people participated in a dietary intervention using a mostly raw, pure vegetarian diet. The diet consisted of raw fruits, salads, carrot juice, tubers, grain products, nuts, seeds, and a dehydrated barley grass juice product. Outcomes measured were dietary intake, the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ, SF-36 health survey, a quality of life survey (QOLS, and physical performance measurements. Results Twenty-six subjects returned dietary surveys at 2 months; 20 subjects returned surveys at the beginning, end, and at either 2 or 4 months of intervention; 3 subjects were lost to follow-up. The mean FIQ score (n = 20 was reduced 46% from 51 to 28. Seven of the 8 SF-36 subscales, bodily pain being the exception, showed significant improvement (n = 20, all P for trend Conclusion This dietary intervention shows that many fibromyalgia subjects can be helped by a mostly raw vegetarian diet.

  4. Core Outcome Domains for Clinical Trials on Somatic Symptom Disorder, Bodily Distress Disorder, and Functional Somatic Syndromes: European Network on Somatic Symptom Disorders Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rief, Winfried; Burton, Chris; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Henningsen, Peter; Kleinstäuber, Maria; Kop, Willem J; Löwe, Bernd; Martin, Alexandra; Malt, Ulrik; Rosmalen, Judith; Schröder, Andreas; Shedden-Mora, Meike; Toussaint, Anne; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina

    The harmonization of core outcome domains in clinical trials facilitates comparison and pooling of data, and simplifies the preparation and review of research projects and comparison of risks and benefits of treatments. Therefore, we provide recommendations for the core outcome domains that should be considered in clinical trials on the efficacy and effectiveness of interventions for somatic symptom disorder, bodily distress disorder, and functional somatic syndromes. The European Network on Somatic Symptom Disorders group of more than 20 experts in the field met twice in Hamburg to discuss issues of assessment and intervention research in somatic symptom disorder, bodily distress disorder, and functional somatic syndromes. The consensus meetings identified core outcome domains that should be considered in clinical trials evaluating treatments for somatic symptom disorder and associated functional somatic syndromes. The following core domains should be considered when defining ascertainment methods in clinical trials: a) classification of somatic symptom disorder/bodily distress disorder, associated functional somatic syndromes, and comorbid mental disorders (using structured clinical interviews), duration of symptoms, medical morbidity, and prior treatments; b) location, intensity, and interference of somatic symptoms; c) associated psychobehavioral features and biological markers; d) illness consequences (quality of life, disability, health care utilization, health care costs; e) global improvement and treatment satisfaction; and f) unwanted negative effects. The proposed criteria are intended to improve synergies of clinical trials and to facilitate decision making when comparing different treatment approaches. These recommendations should not result in inflexible guidelines, but increase consistency across investigations in this field.

  5. The Comparison of Ibn Sina and Molla Sadra’s Views Concerning the Immateriality of the Imagination and its Relation to Bodily Resurrection

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    Abbas Yazdani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available   One of the important issues which has differentiated Ibn Sina’s views from Sadra’s on psychology is the immateriality of imagination. Although Ibn Sina dealt with immateriality of imagination by scepticism in some of his writings such as al- Mobahesat, but on the basis of his philosophy, which considers intellect as simply perceiving general notions and ascribes any partial perception to material faculty, he dosenot belive in the immateriality of imagination. Hence, he states implicitly in his al-Najat that imaginative perception is material and not immaterial. In his booKs. al-Nafs men-al-Shefa he presents three different arguments for the materiality of imagination. In contrast, Sadra believes in the immateriality of imagination and argues for the immateriality of imagination in his varied writings. In his book. al-Shavahed al-Robobiyeh Sadra argues metaphysically for the bodily resurrection through the immateriality of imagination. He contends that nobody could argue metaphysically for bodily resurrection. The purpose of this paper is firstly, the comparision of Ibn Sina and Molla Sadra’s views concerning the immateriality of imagination and then to assess their arguments, and secondly, to assess Sadra’s arguments for the bodily resurrection through the immateriality of imagination. It is show that the truth of some of the arguments he presented are doubtfull.  

  6. Health-state utilities in a prisoner population: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levy Michael H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-state utilities for prisoners have not been described. Methods We used data from a 1996 cross-sectional survey of Australian prisoners (n = 734. Respondent-level SF-36 data was transformed into utility scores by both the SF-6D and Nichol's method. Socio-demographic and clinical predictors of SF-6D utility were assessed in univariate analyses and a multivariate general linear model. Results The overall mean SF-6D utility was 0.725 (SD 0.119. When subdivided by various medical conditions, prisoner SF-6D utilities ranged from 0.620 for angina to 0.764 for those with none/mild depressive symptoms. Utilities derived by the Nichol's method were higher than SF-6D scores, often by more than 0.1. In multivariate analysis, significant independent predictors of worse utility included female gender, increasing age, increasing number of comorbidities and more severe depressive symptoms. Conclusion The utilities presented may prove useful for future economic and decision models evaluating prison-based health programs.

  7. Long-term follow-up of mental health, health-related quality of life and associations with motor skills in young adults born preterm with very low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husby, Ingrid Marie; Stray, Kaia Mølbach-Thellefsen; Olsen, Alexander; Lydersen, Stian; Indredavik, Marit Sæbø; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Skranes, Jon; Evensen, Kari Anne I

    2016-04-07

    Being born with very low birth weight (VLBW: ≤ 1,500 g) is related to long-term disability and neurodevelopmental problems, possibly affecting mental health and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). However, studies in young adulthood yield mixed findings. The aim of this study was to examine mental health and HRQoL at 23 years, including changes from 20 to 23 years and associations with motor skills in VLBW young adults compared with controls. In a geographically based follow-up study, 35 VLBW and 37 term-born young adults were assessed at 23 years by using Achenbach Adult Self-Report (ASR), Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and various motor tests. The ASR and SF-36 were also used at 20 years. Longitudinal changes in ASR and SF-36 from 20 to 23 years were analysed by linear mixed models and associations with motor skills at 23 years by linear regression. At 23 years, total ASR score was 38.6 (SD: 21.7) in the VLBW group compared with 29.0 (SD: 18.6) in the control group (p = 0.048). VLBW participants had higher scores for attention problems, internalizing problems and critical items, and they reported to drink less alcohol than controls. BDI total score did not differ between groups. On SF-36, VLBW participants reported significantly poorer physical and social functioning, more role-limitations due to physical and emotional problems, more bodily pain and lower physical and mental component summaries than controls. In the VLBW group, total ASR score increased by 9.0 (95 % CI: 3.3 to 14.7) points from 20 to 23 years (p = 0.009 vs controls), physical and mental component summaries of SF-36 decreased by 2.9 (95 % CI: -4.8 to -1.1) and 4.4 (95 % CI: -7.1 to -1.7) points, respectively (p = 0.012 and p = 0.022 vs controls). Among VLBW participants, more mental health problems and lower physical and mental HRQoL were associated with poorer motor skills at 23 years. VLBW young adults reported poorer and declining

  8. Cognitive problems in patients in a cardiac rehabilitation program after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce-van der Wal, L W; Volker, W G; Vliet Vlieland, T P M; van den Heuvel, D M J; van Exel, H J; Goossens, P H

    2015-08-01

    Estimate prevalence of cognitive problems due to hypoxic brain injury in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors referred for cardiac rehabilitation and association with quality of life as well as autonomy and participation. Prospective cohort study. Consecutive OHCA patients. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ) and Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE) were administered 4 weeks after the OHCA. Cognitive problems were defined if MMSE 32 or IQCODE >3.6. The Impact on Participation and Autonomy Questionnaire (IPAQ) (participation/autonomy), the SF-36 Health Survey (SF-36) (quality of life) and the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) (anxiety/depression) were administered. Correlations between cognitive problems and participation/autonomy and quality of life were calculated. 63 of 77 patients were male (82%), median age 59 years (range 15-84). MMSE median 29 (interquartile range 28-30), CFQ mean 20.9 (SD 9.4) and IQCODE mean 3.1 (SD 0.2). Eighteen patients (23%) scored positive for cognitive problems. Significant correlations were found between MMSE and IPAQ: autonomy inside (r = -0.38), family role (r = -0.26), autonomy outside (r = -0.32), social relations (r = -0.38) and social functioning (r = 0.32). MMSE was related to SF-36: social functioning (r = 0.32). The CFQ was related to IPAQ: autonomy outdoors (r = 0.29) and SF-36: bodily pain (r = -0.37), vitality (r = -0.25), mental health (r = -0.35) and role emotional (r = -0.40). The IQCODE was related to IPAQ: autonomy indoors (r = 0.26) and to SF-36: vitality (r = -0.33) and social functioning (r = -0.41). Twenty-three percent of the patients referred for cardiac rehabilitation showed cognitive problems. Associations were found between cognitive problems and several aspects of participation/autonomy and perceived quality of life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Muscle stretching exercises and resistance training in fibromyalgia: which is better? A three-arm randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assumpção, Ana; Matsutani, Luciana A; Yuan, Susan L; Santo, Adriana S; Sauer, Juliana; Mango, Pamela; Marques, Amelia P

    2017-11-29

    Exercise therapy is an effective component of fibromyalgia (FM) treatment. However, it is important to know the effects and specificities of the different types of exercise: muscle stretching and resistance training. To verify and compare the effectiveness of muscle stretching exercise and resistance training for symptoms and quality of life in FM patients. Randomized controlled trial. Physical therapy service, FM outpatient clinic. Forty-four women with FM (79 screened). Patients were randomly allocated into a stretching group (n=14), resistance group (n=16), and control group (n=14). Pain was assessed using the visual analog scale, pain threshold using a Fischer dolorimeter, FM symptoms using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), and quality of life using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short- Form Health Survey (SF-36). The three intervention groups continued with usual medical treatment. In addition, the stretching and resistance groups performed two different exercise programs twice a week for 12 weeks. After treatment, the stretching group showed the highest SF-36 physical functioning score (p=0.01) and the lowest bodily pain score (p=0.01). The resistance group had the lowest FIQ depression score (p=0.02). The control group had the highest score for FIQ morning tiredness and stiffness, and the lowest score for SF-36 vitality. In clinical analyses, the stretching group had significant improvement in quality of life for all SF-36 domains, and the resistance group had significant improvement in FM symptoms and in quality of life for SF-36 domains of physical functioning, vitality, social function, emotional role, and mental health. Muscle stretching exercise was the most effective modality in improving quality of life, especially with regard to physical functioning and pain, and resistance training was the most effective modality in reducing depression. The trial included a control group and two intervention groups, both of which received exercise

  10. The Curvilinear Effect of BMI on Functional Health - Evidence of the Long-Running German Ageing Survey

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    André Hajek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We aimed at determining the effect of BMI on functional health among older Germans longitudinally. Methods: Data from four waves (2002-2014 of the German Ageing Survey (‘Deutscher Alterssurvey'; DEAS, a representative sample of community-dwelling individuals aged 40 years and above, were used. Functional health was quantified by the subscale ‘physical functioning' of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36. Fixed effects regressions were used to estimate the predictors of functional health. Linear, quadratic, and cubic terms were included for BMI (self-reported. Results: Fixed effects regressions showed significant linear, quadratic, and cubic effects of BMI on functional health in the total sample and in both sexes. Furthermore, regressions revealed that functional health decreased with increasing age in the total sample and in both sexes. In addition, changes in marital and employment status were significantly associated with changes in functional health in men, but not in women. Conclusion: Our data indicate that the greater the extreme of BMI (either higher or lower, the greater the risk for functional decline. Nutrition programs aimed at preventing changes to extreme BMI might be productive.

  11. The Curvilinear Effect of BMI on Functional Health - Evidence of the Long-Running German Ageing Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, André; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-01-01

    We aimed at determining the effect of BMI on functional health among older Germans longitudinally. Data from four waves (2002-2014) of the German Ageing Survey ('Deutscher Alterssurvey'; DEAS), a representative sample of community-dwelling individuals aged 40 years and above, were used. Functional health was quantified by the subscale 'physical functioning' of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Fixed effects regressions were used to estimate the predictors of functional health. Linear, quadratic, and cubic terms were included for BMI (self-reported). Fixed effects regressions showed significant linear, quadratic, and cubic effects of BMI on functional health in the total sample and in both sexes. Furthermore, regressions revealed that functional health decreased with increasing age in the total sample and in both sexes. In addition, changes in marital and employment status were significantly associated with changes in functional health in men, but not in women. Our data indicate that the greater the extreme of BMI (either higher or lower), the greater the risk for functional decline. Nutrition programs aimed at preventing changes to extreme BMI might be productive. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  12. Functional disability and depression in the general population. Results from the Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study (NEMESIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spijker, J; Graaf, R; Bijl, R V; Beekman, A T F; Ormel, J; Nolen, W A

    2004-09-01

    Data on the temporal relationships between duration of depression and recovery and functional disability are sparse. These relationships were examined in subjects from the general population (n = 250) with newly originated episodes of DSM-III-R major depression. The Netherlands Mental Health Survey and Incidence Study is a prospective epidemiological survey in the adult population (n = 7076), using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). Duration of depression and duration of recovery over 2 years were assessed with a life chart interview. Functional disabilities were assessed with the MOS-SF-36 and with absence days from work. Functional disabilities and absence days in depressed individuals were not found to be associated with duration of depression. Functioning in daily activities improved with longer duration of recovery but social functioning not. Functioning deteriorates by actual depressive symptomatology and comorbid anxiety but not by longer duration of depression. After symptomatic recovery, functioning improves to premorbid level, irrespective of the length of the depression. Improvements in daily activities and work can be expected with longer duration of recovery.

  13. Living with bodily strangeness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvigne, Kari; Kirkevold, Marit

    2003-01-01

    The authors' aim in this phenomenologial and feminist study was to gain a deeper understanding of how female stroke survivors experienced their body after a stroke. They recruited 25 women in a rural area in eastern Norway who had suffered a first-time stroke and interviewed them in depth three...... times each during the first 1 1/2 to 2 years following the stroke. The data analysis was inspired by phenomenological method. The stroke survivors' experiences of their bodies were characterized by profound, disturbing, and, in part, unintelligible changes during the onset and the process of recovery...... from the stroke. Their experiences can be summarized under three major themes: The Unpredictable Body, The Demanding Body, and The Extended Body....

  14. Bodily Relational Autonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Folkmarson Käll, Lisa; Zeiler, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Conceptions of autonomy in western philosophy and ethics have often centred on self-governance and self-determination. However, a growing bulk of literature also questions such conceptions, including the understanding of the autonomous self as a self-governing independent individual that chooses, acts, and lives in accordance with her or his own values, norms, or sense of sell This article contributes to the critical interrogation of selfhood, autonomy, and autonomous decision making by combi...

  15. Influence of self-reported chronic rhinosinusitis on health-related quality of life: a population-based survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Ling Fu

    Full Text Available Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS is a frequently occurring chronic respiratory disease. There is evidence that effective treatment of CRS can improve patients' quality of life, but the data regarding the extent to which CRS impairs patients' quality of life (QoL is sparse. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of self-reported CRS on health-related QoL and to determine whether the influence was associated with gender, age and socio-economic status. A four-stage random sampling method was used to select the participants from the general population in Guangzhou, China. All participants were interviewed face-to-face at their homes using a standardized questionnaire. The health-related QoL of each participant was assessed using the SF-36 Health Survey. The scores of the SF<