WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey sdss stripe

  1. Classifying Variable Sources in SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willecke Lindberg, Christina

    2018-01-01

    SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 is a well-documented and researched region of the sky that does not have all of its ~67,500 variable objects labeled. By collecting data and consulting different catalogs such as the Catalina Survey, we are able to slowly cross-match more objects and add classifications within the Stripe 82 catalog. Such matching is performed either by pairing SDSS identification numbers, or by converting and comparing the coordinates of every object within the Stripe 82 catalog to every object within the classified catalog, such as the Catalina Survey catalog. If matching is performed with converted coordinates, a follow-up check is performed to ascertain that the magnitudes of the paired objects are within a reasonable margin of error and that objects have not been mismatched. Once matches have been confirmed, the light curves of classified objects can then be used to determine features that most effectively separate the different types of variable objects in feature spaces. By classifying variable objects, we can construct a reference for subsequent large research surveys, such as LSST (the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), that could utilize SDSS data as a training set for its own classifications.

  2. The z = 5 Quasar Luminosity Function from SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen, Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Myers, Adam D.; Brandt, W. Niel; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge, Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-01

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M 1450 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of ~2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M 1450 joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. This paper also includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  3. The Clustering of High-Redshift (2.9 < z < 5.4) Quasars in SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, John; Ross, Nicolas; Richards, Gordon; Myers, Adam; Bauer, Franz Erik; Lacy, Mark; Schneider, Donald; Wollack, Edward; Zakamska, Nadia

    2018-01-01

    We present the data from the Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES) along with our first high-redshift (2.9SpIES is a mid-infrared survey covering ~100 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 (S82) field. The SpIES field is optimally located to overlap with the optical data from SDSS and to complement the area of the pre-existing Spitzer data from the Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large-area (SHELA) survey, which adds ~20 square degrees of infrared coverage on S82. SpIES probes magnitudes significantly fainter than WISE; depth that is crucial to detect faint, high-redshift quasars. Using the infrared data from SpIES and SHELA, and the deep optical data from SDSS, we employ multi-dimensional empirical selection algorithms to identify high-redshift quasar candidates in this field. We then combine these candidates with spectroscopically confirmed high-redshift quasars and measure the angular correlation function. Using these results, we compute the linear bias to try to constrain quasar feedback models akin to those in Hopkins et al. 2007.

  4. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison...

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Early-type galaxies in the SDSS Stripe82 (Kaviraj, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, S.

    2014-11-01

    We explore the properties of "peculiar" early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the local Universe that show (faint) morphological signatures of recent interactions such as tidal tails, shells and dust lanes. Standard-depth (~51s exposure) multicolour galaxy images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are combined with the significantly (~2mag) deeper monochromatic images from the public SDSS Stripe82 (-50°extract, through careful visual inspection, a robust sample of nearby (zevidence of dust lanes and patches. An analysis of optical emission-line ratios indicates that the fraction of peculiar ETGs that are Seyferts or LINERs (19.4%) is twice the corresponding values in their relaxed counterparts (10.1%). LINER-like emission is the dominant type of nebular activity in all ETG classes, plausibly driven by stellar photoionization associated with recent star formation. An analysis of ultraviolet-optical colours indicates that, regardless of the luminosity range being considered, the fraction of peculiar ETGs that have experienced star formation in the last Gyr is a factor of ~1.5 higher than that in their relaxed counterparts. The spectrophotometric results strongly suggest that the interactions that produce the morphological peculiarities also induce low-level recent star formation which, based on the recent literature, are likely to contribute a few per cent of the stellar mass over the last ~1Gyr. Peculiar ETGs preferentially inhabit low-density environments (outskirts of clusters, groups or the field), either due to high peculiar velocities in clusters making merging unlikely or because shell systems are disrupted through frequent interactions within a cluster crossing time. (1 data file).

  6. VICS82: The VISTA-CFHT Stripe 82 Near-infrared Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J. E.; Lin, Y.-T.; Makler, M.; Kneib, J.-P.; Ross, N. P.; Wang, W.-H.; Hsieh, B.-C.; Leauthaud, A.; Bundy, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Comparat, J.; Caminha, G. B.; Hudelot, P.; Lin, L.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Mast, D.

    2017-07-01

    We present the VISTA-CFHT Stripe 82 (VICS82) survey: a near-infrared (J+K s ) survey covering 150 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) equatorial Stripe 82 to an average depth of J = 21.9 AB mag and K s = 21.4 AB mag (80% completeness limits; 5σ point-source depths are approximately 0.5 mag brighter). VICS82 contributes to the growing legacy of multiwavelength data in the Stripe 82 footprint. The addition of near-infrared photometry to the existing SDSS Stripe 82 coadd ugriz photometry reduces the scatter in stellar mass estimates to δ {log}({M}\\star )≈ 0.3 dex for galaxies with {M}\\star > {10}9 {M}⊙ at z≈ 0.5, and offers improvement compared to optical-only estimates out to z≈ 1, with stellar masses constrained within a factor of approximately 2.5. When combined with other multiwavelength imaging of the Stripe, including moderate-to-deep ultraviolet (GALEX), optical and mid-infrared (Spitzer-IRAC) coverage, as well as tens of thousands of spectroscopic redshifts, VICS82 gives access to approximately 0.5 Gpc3 of comoving volume. Some of the main science drivers of VICS82 include (a) measuring the stellar mass function of {L}\\star galaxies out to z˜ 1; (b) detecting intermediate-redshift quasars at 2≲ z≲ 3.5; (c) measuring the stellar mass function and baryon census of clusters of galaxies, and (d) performing cross-correlation experiments of cosmic microwave background lensing in the optical/near-infrared that link stellar mass to large-scale dark matter structure. Here we define and describe the survey, highlight some early science results, and present the first public data release, which includes an SDSS-matched catalog as well as the calibrated pixel data themselves.

  7. SSGSS: The Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Treyer, Marie A.; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Charlot, Stéphane; Heckman, Timothy M.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Seibert, Mark; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) provides a new sample of 101 star-forming galaxies at z <0.2 with unprecedented multi-wavelength coverage. New mid-to far-infrared spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope is added to a rich suite of previous imaging and spectroscopy,

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: ugriz colors of RR Lyrae stars in SDSS Stripe 82 (Ngeow+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, C.-C.; Kanbur, S. M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Schrecengost, Z.; Singh, H. P.

    2017-07-01

    The ugriz band photometric light-curve data for RR Lyraes in the SDSS Stripe 82 region was adopted from Sesar+ (2010, J/ApJ/708/717), who found 483 RR Lyrae based on observations that spanned from 1998 September to 2007 November. Median numbers of data points per light curve are 55 and 56 in uz bands and gri bands, respectively. This set of RR Lyraes includes 379 fundamental mode RRab stars and 104 first overtone RRc stars. In addition to the light-curve data, Sesar+ (2010, J/ApJ/708/717) also provided the ugriz band template light curves for RR Lyraes. We adopted these template light curves to derive the amplitudes and colors at maximum and minimum light for each RR Lyrae in the sample. (1 data file).

  9. Target Selection for the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasowski, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Cohen, R. E.; Carlberg, J. K.; Fleming, Scott W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chojnowski, S. D.; Holtzman, J. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88001 (United States); Santana, F. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Oelkers, R. J.; Bird, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Andrews, B. [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Beaton, R. L. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bender, C.; Cunha, K. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bovy, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Covey, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Dell’Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, and Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Harding, P. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Johnson, J. A., E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2017-11-01

    APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing ∼3 × 10{sup 5} stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding on APOGEE’s goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch and red clump stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.

  10. Target Selection for the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasowski, G.; Cohen, R. E.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Santana, F.; Oelkers, R. J.; Andrews, B.; Beaton, R. L.; Bender, C.; Bird, J. C.; Bovy, J.; Carlberg, J. K.; Covey, K.; Cunha, K.; Dell’Agli, F.; Fleming, Scott W.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Harding, P.; Holtzman, J.; Johnson, J. A.; Kollmeier, J. A.; Majewski, S. R.; Mészáros, Sz.; Munn, J.; Muñoz, R. R.; Ness, M. K.; Nidever, D. L.; Poleski, R.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Shetrone, M.; Simon, J. D.; Smith, V. V.; Sobeck, J. S.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Szigetiáros, L.; Tayar, J.; Troup, N.

    2017-11-01

    APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing ∼3 × 105 stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding on APOGEE’s goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch and red clump stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.

  11. Peculiar early-type galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, Sugata

    2010-07-01

    We explore the properties of `peculiar' early-type galaxies (ETGs) in the local Universe that show (faint) morphological signatures of recent interactions such as tidal tails, shells and dust lanes. Standard-depth (~51-s exposure) multicolour galaxy images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are combined with the significantly (~2 mag) deeper monochromatic images from the public SDSS Stripe82 to extract, through careful visual inspection, a robust sample of nearby (z evidence of dust lanes and patches. An analysis of optical emission-line ratios indicates that the fraction of peculiar ETGs that are Seyferts or LINERs (19.4 per cent) is twice the corresponding values in their relaxed counterparts (10.1 per cent). LINER-like emission is the dominant type of nebular activity in all ETG classes, plausibly driven by stellar photoionization associated with recent star formation. An analysis of ultraviolet-optical colours indicates that, regardless of the luminosity range being considered, the fraction of peculiar ETGs that have experienced star formation in the last Gyr is a factor of ~1.5 higher than that in their relaxed counterparts. The spectrophotometric results strongly suggest that the interactions that produce the morphological peculiarities also induce low-level recent star formation which, based on the recent literature, are likely to contribute a few per cent of the stellar mass over the last ~1Gyr. Peculiar ETGs preferentially inhabit low-density environments (outskirts of clusters, groups or the field), either due to high peculiar velocities in clusters making merging unlikely or because shell systems are disrupted through frequent interactions within a cluster crossing time. The catalogue of galaxies that forms the basis of this paper can be obtained at http://www.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/~ska/stripe82/skaviraj_stripe82.dat or on request from the author.

  12. THE 31 DEG{sup 2} RELEASE OF THE STRIPE 82 X-RAY SURVEY: THE POINT SOURCE CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Urry, C. Megan; Ananna, Tonima; Civano, Francesca; Marchesi, Stefano; Pecoraro, Robert [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Cappelluti, Nico; Comastri, Andrea; Brusa, Marcella [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Böhringer, Hans; Chon, Gayoung [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Richards, Gordon [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Cardamone, Carie [Department of Math and Science, Wheelock College, 200 Riverway, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Farrah, Duncan [Department of Physics MC 0435, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 850 West Campus Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Gilfanov, Marat [Max-Planck Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Green, Paul [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Komossa, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lira, Paulina [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Santiago (Chile); Makler, Martin [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr Xavier Sigaud 150, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 22290-180 (Brazil); and others

    2016-02-01

    We release the next installment of the Stripe 82 X-ray survey point-source catalog, which currently covers 31.3 deg{sup 2} of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 Legacy field. In total, 6181 unique X-ray sources are significantly detected with XMM-Newton (>5σ) and Chandra (>4.5σ). This catalog release includes data from XMM-Newton cycle AO 13, which approximately doubled the Stripe 82X survey area. The flux limits of the Stripe 82X survey are 8.7 × 10{sup −16} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, 4.7 × 10{sup −15} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, and 2.1 × 10{sup −15} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in the soft (0.5–2 keV), hard (2–10 keV), and full bands (0.5–10 keV), respectively, with approximate half-area survey flux limits of 5.4 × 10{sup −15} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, 2.9 × 10{sup −14} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}, and 1.7 × 10{sup −14} erg s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. We matched the X-ray source lists to available multi-wavelength catalogs, including updated matches to the previous release of the Stripe 82X survey; 88% of the sample is matched to a multi-wavelength counterpart. Due to the wide area of Stripe 82X and rich ancillary multi-wavelength data, including coadded SDSS photometry, mid-infrared WISE coverage, near-infrared coverage from UKIDSS and VISTA Hemisphere Survey, ultraviolet coverage from GALEX, radio coverage from FIRST, and far-infrared coverage from Herschel, as well as existing ∼30% optical spectroscopic completeness, we are beginning to uncover rare objects, such as obscured high-luminosity active galactic nuclei at high-redshift. The Stripe 82X point source catalog is a valuable data set for constraining how this population grows and evolves, as well as for studying how they interact with the galaxies in which they live.

  13. Target Selection for the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; De Lee, Nathan; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Mack, Claude E., III; Dhital, Saurav; Hebb, Leslie; Ge, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We present the target selection process for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. MARVELS is a medium-resolution (R ∼ 11,000) multi-fiber spectrograph capable of obtaining radial velocities for 60 objects at a time in order to find brown dwarfs and giant planets. The survey was configured to target dwarf stars with effective temperatures approximately between 4500 and 6250 K. For the first 2 years MARVELS relied on low-resolution spectroscopic pre-observations to estimate the effective temperature and log (g) for candidate stars and then selected suitable dwarf stars from this pool. Ultimately, the pre-observation spectra proved ineffective at filtering out giant stars; many giants were incorrectly classified as dwarfs, resulting in a giant contamination rate of ∼30% for the first phase of the MARVELS survey. Thereafter, the survey instead applied a reduced proper motion cut to eliminate giants and used the Infrared Flux Method to estimate effective temperatures, using only extant photmetric and proper-motion catalog information. The target selection method introduced here may be useful for other surveys that need to rely on extant catalog data for selection of specific stellar populations.

  14. Machine learning classification of SDSS transient survey images

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Buisson, L.; Sivanandam, N.; Bassett, Bruce A.; Smith, M.

    2015-12-01

    We show that multiple machine learning algorithms can match human performance in classifying transient imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) supernova survey into real objects and artefacts. This is a first step in any transient science pipeline and is currently still done by humans, but future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will necessitate fully machine-enabled solutions. Using features trained from eigenimage analysis (principal component analysis, PCA) of single-epoch g, r and i difference images, we can reach a completeness (recall) of 96 per cent, while only incorrectly classifying at most 18 per cent of artefacts as real objects, corresponding to a precision (purity) of 84 per cent. In general, random forests performed best, followed by the k-nearest neighbour and the SkyNet artificial neural net algorithms, compared to other methods such as naive Bayes and kernel support vector machine. Our results show that PCA-based machine learning can match human success levels and can naturally be extended by including multiple epochs of data, transient colours and host galaxy information which should allow for significant further improvements, especially at low signal-to-noise.

  15. Radio-selected Binary Active Galactic Nuclei from the Very Large Array Stripe 82 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hai; Myers, A. D.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Yan, Lin; Wrobel, J. M.; Stockton, A.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy mergers play an important role in the growth of galaxies and their supermassive black holes. Simulations suggest that tidal interactions could enhance black hole accretion, which can be tested by the fraction of binary active galactic nuclei (AGNs) among galaxy mergers. However, determining the fraction requires a statistical sample of binaries. We have identified kiloparsec-scale binary AGNs directly from high-resolution radio imaging. Inside the 92 deg2 covered by the high-resolution Very Large Array survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 field, we identified 22 grade A and 30 grade B candidates of binary radio AGNs with angular separations less than 5'' (10 kpc at z = 0.1). Eight of the candidates have optical spectra for both components from the SDSS spectroscopic surveys and our Keck program. Two grade B candidates are projected pairs, but the remaining six candidates are all compelling cases of binary AGNs based on either emission line ratios or the excess in radio power compared to the Hα-traced star formation rate. Only two of the six binaries were previously discovered by an optical spectroscopic search. Based on these results, we estimate that ~60% of our binary candidates would be confirmed once we obtain complete spectroscopic information. We conclude that wide-area high-resolution radio surveys offer an efficient method to identify large samples of binary AGNs. These radio-selected binary AGNs complement binaries identified at other wavelengths and are useful for understanding the triggering mechanisms of black hole accretion. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  16. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 Imaging Data: Depth-Optimized Co-adds Over 300 deg$^2$ in Five Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D.; Strauss, Michael A.; Annis, James; Buck, Zoë; Green, Richard; Hodge, Jacqueline A.; Myers, Adam D.; Rafiee, Alireza; Richards, Gordon

    2014-06-25

    We present and release co-added images of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82. Stripe 82 covers an area of ~300 deg(2) on the celestial equator, and has been repeatedly scanned 70-90 times in the ugriz bands by the SDSS imaging survey. By making use of all available data in the SDSS archive, our co-added images are optimized for depth. Input single-epoch frames were properly processed and weighted based on seeing, sky transparency, and background noise before co-addition. The resultant products are co-added science images and their associated weight images that record relative weights at individual pixels. The depths of the co-adds, measured as the 5σ detection limits of the aperture (3.''2 diameter) magnitudes for point sources, are roughly 23.9, 25.1, 24.6, 24.1, and 22.8 AB magnitudes in the five bands, respectively. They are 1.9-2.2 mag deeper than the best SDSS single-epoch data. The co-added images have good image quality, with an average point-spread function FWHM of ~1'' in the r, i, and z bands. We also release object catalogs that were made with SExtractor. These co-added products have many potential uses for studies of galaxies, quasars, and Galactic structure. We further present and release near-IR J-band images that cover ~90 deg(2) of Stripe 82. These images were obtained using the NEWFIRM camera on the NOAO 4 m Mayall telescope, and have a depth of about 20.0-20.5 Vega magnitudes (also 5σ detection limits for point sources).

  17. The Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Understanding the Optically Variable Sky with SEQUELS in SDSS-III

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Green, Paul J.; Morganson, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Myers, Adam D.; Badenes, Carles; Bershady, Matthew A.; Brandt, William N; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Davenport, James R.A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Flewelling, Heather; Heckman, Timothy M.; Isler, Jedidah C.

    2016-01-01

    The Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) is an SDSS-IV eBOSS subproject primarily aimed at obtaining identification spectra of ~220,000 optically-variable objects systematically selected from SDSS/Pan-STARRS1 multi-epoch imaging. We present a preview of the science enabled by TDSS, based on TDSS spectra taken over ~320 deg^2 of sky as part of the SEQUELS survey in SDSS-III, which is in part a pilot survey for eBOSS in SDSS-IV. Using the 15,746 TDSS-selected single-epoch spectra of photomet...

  18. The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey in the SDSS Footprint. I. Infrared-based Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Yang, Qian; Wu, Jin; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Studies of the most luminous quasars at high redshift directly probe the evolution of the most massive black holes in the early universe and their connection to massive galaxy formation. However, extremely luminous quasars at high redshift are very rare objects. Only wide-area surveys have a chance to constrain their population. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has so far provided the most widely adopted measurements of the quasar luminosity function at z> 3. However, a careful re-examination of the SDSS quasar sample revealed that the SDSS quasar selection is in fact missing a significant fraction of z≳ 3 quasars at the brightest end. We identified the purely optical-color selection of SDSS, where quasars at these redshifts are strongly contaminated by late-type dwarfs, and the spectroscopic incompleteness of the SDSS footprint as the main reasons. Therefore, we designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS), based on a novel near-infrared JKW2 color cut using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE) AllWISE and 2MASS all-sky photometry, to yield high completeness for very bright ({m}{{i}}learning algorithms on SDSS and WISE photometry for quasar-star classification and photometric redshift estimation. The ELQS will spectroscopically follow-up ˜230 new quasar candidates in an area of ˜12,000 deg2 in the SDSS footprint to obtain a well-defined and complete quasar sample for an accurate measurement of the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.0≤slant z≤slant 5.0. In this paper, we present the quasar selection algorithm and the quasar candidate catalog.

  19. Galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-cluster lensing with the SDSS and FIRST surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetroullas, C.; Brown, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    We perform a galaxy-galaxy lensing study by correlating the shapes of ∼2.7 × 105 galaxies selected from the VLA FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres) radio survey with the positions of ∼38.5 million Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, ∼132 000 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) and ∼78 000 SDSS galaxies that are also detected in the VLA FIRST survey. The measurements are conducted on angular scales θ ≲ 1200 arcsec. On scales θ ≲ 200 arcsec, we find that the measurements are corrupted by residual systematic effects associated with the instrumental beam of the VLA data. Using simulations, we show that we can successfully apply a correction for these effects. Using the three lens samples (the SDSS DR10 sample, the BCG sample and the SDSS-FIRST matched object sample), we measure a tangential shear signal that is inconsistent with 0 at the 10.2σ, 3.8σ and 9σ levels, respectively. Fitting an NFW model to the detected signals, we find that the ensemble mass profile of the BCG sample agrees with the values in the literature. However, the mass profiles of the SDSS DR10 and the SDSS-FIRST matched object samples are found to be shallower and steeper than results in the literature, respectively. The best-fitting Virial masses for the SDSS DR10, BCG and SDSS-FIRST matched samples, derived using an NFW model and allowing for a varying concentration factor, are M_{200}^SDSS-DR10 = (1.2 ± 0.4) × 10^{12} M_{⊙}, M_{200}^BCG = (1.4 ± 1.3) × 10^{13} M_{⊙} and M_{200}^SDSS-FIRST =8.0 ± 4.2 × 10^{13} M_{⊙}, respectively. These results are in good agreement (within ∼2σ) with values in the literature. Our findings suggest that for galaxies to be bright both in the radio and in the optical, they must be embedded in very dense environment on scales R ≲ 1 Mpc.

  20. A Study of the SDSS White Dwarf Component in the LSPM Proper Motion Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darveau-Bernier, A.; Bergeron, P.; Lépine, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present a model atmosphere analysis of the white dwarfs identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with proper motions measured in the LSPM proper motion survey of Lépine et al. We rely on reduced proper motion diagrams to build a sample of white dwarfs in the SDSS footprint, and cross correlate this sample with the SDSS spectroscopic database to understand the systematics related to completeness, contamination, WD+M dwarf binaries, reddening, etc. We then determine a white dwarf luminosity function for this sample using various methods.

  1. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; An, Deokkeun; /Ewha Women' s U., Seoul; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Michigan State U.; Berlind, Andreas A.; /Vanderbilt U.; Bickerton, Steven J.; /Princeton U.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; /Apache Point Observ.; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U., CCPP /Penn State U.

    2011-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly{alpha} forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around {approx}8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes 5-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg{sup 2} in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg{sup 2}, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.

  2. Host Galaxy Spectra and Consequences for SN Typing from the SDSS SN Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brewington, Howard; Campbell, Heather; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Gupta, Ravi R.; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kunz, Martin; Lampeitl, Hubert; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pan, Kaike; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey E.; Smith, Mathew; Snedden, Stephanie A.

    2014-03-06

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of supernova (SN) host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future nalysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2 light curve fitter, we find a 21% increase in the number of fits that converge when using the spectroscopic redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased towards lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  3. Weak-Lensing Calibration of a Stellar Mass-Based Mass Proxy for redMaPPer and Voronoi Tessellation Clusters in SDSS Stripe 82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Maria E.S. [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Soares-Santos, Marcelle [Fermilab; Makler, Martin [Rio de Janeiro, CBPF; Annis, James [Fermilab; Lin, Huan [Fermilab; Palmese, Antonella [Fermilab; Vitorelli, André Z. [Sao Paulo, Inst. Astron. Geofis.; Welch, Brian [Fermilab; Caminha, Gabriel B. [Bologna Observ.; Erben, Thomas [Argelander Inst. Astron.; Moraes, Bruno [University Coll. London; Shan, Huanyuan [Argelander Inst. Astron.

    2017-08-10

    We present the first weak lensing calibration of $\\mu_{\\star}$, a new galaxy cluster mass proxy corresponding to the total stellar mass of red and blue members, in two cluster samples selected from the SDSS Stripe 82 data: 230 redMaPPer clusters at redshift $0.1\\leq z<0.33$ and 136 Voronoi Tessellation (VT) clusters at $0.1 \\leq z < 0.6$. We use the CS82 shear catalog and stack the clusters in $\\mu_{\\star}$ bins to measure a mass-observable power law relation. For redMaPPer clusters we obtain $M_0 = (1.77 \\pm 0.36) \\times 10^{14}h^{-1} M_{\\odot}$, $\\alpha = 1.74 \\pm 0.62$. For VT clusters, we find $M_0 = (4.31 \\pm 0.89) \\times 10^{14}h^{-1} M_{\\odot}$, $\\alpha = 0.59 \\pm 0.54$ and $M_0 = (3.67 \\pm 0.56) \\times 10^{14}h^{-1} M_{\\odot}$, $\\alpha = 0.68 \\pm 0.49$ for a low and a high redshift bin, respectively. Our results are consistent, internally and with the literature, indicating that our method can be applied to any cluster finding algorithm. In particular, we recommend that $\\mu_{\\star}$ be used as the mass proxy for VT clusters. Catalogs including $\\mu_{\\star}$ measurements will enable its use in studies of galaxy evolution in clusters and cluster cosmology.

  4. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: Rhiannon.D.Griffin-1@ou.edu, E-mail: xdai@ou.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  5. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  6. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  7. The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS) in SDSS and the high-z bright-end Quasar Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Studies of the most luminous quasars at high redshift directly probe the evolution of the most massive black holes in the early Universe and their connection to massive galaxy formation. Unfortunately, extremely luminous quasars at high redshift are very rare objects. Only wide area surveys have a chance to constrain their population. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) nd the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) have so far provided the most widely adopted measurements of the type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z>3. However, a careful re-examination of the SDSS quasar sample revealed that the SDSS quasar selection is in fact missing a significant fraction of $z~3$ quasars at the brightest end.We have identified the purely optical color selection of SDSS, where quasars at these redshifts are strongly contaminated by late-type dwarfs, and the spectroscopic incompleteness of the SDSS footprint as the main reasons. Therefore we have designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS), based on a novel near-infrared JKW2 color cut using WISE AllWISE and 2MASS all-sky photometry, to yield high completeness for very bright (i learning algorithms on SDSS and WISE photometry for quasar-star classification and photometric redshift estimation.The ELQS is spectroscopically following up ~230 new quasar candidates in an area of ~12000 deg2 in the SDSS footprint, to obtain a well-defined and complete quasar sample for an accurate measurement of the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 2.8<= z<=5.0. So far the ELQS has identified 75 bright new quasars in this redshift range and observations of the fall sky will continue until the end of the year. At the AAS winter meeting we will present the full spectroscopic results of the survey, including a re-estimation and extension of the high-z QLF toward higher luminosities.

  8. The Hunt for Red Quasars: Luminous Obscured Black Hole Growth Unveiled in the Stripe 82 X-Ray Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Glikman, Eilat; Brusa, Marcella; Rigby, Jane R.; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Stern, Daniel; Lira, Paulina; Urry, C. Megan; Salvato, Mara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allevato, Viola; Cardamone, Carolin; Civano, Francesca; Coppi, Paolo; Farrah, Duncan; Komossa, S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Marchesi, Stefano; Richards, Gordon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Treister, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    We present results of a ground-based near-infrared campaign with Palomar TripleSpec, Keck NIRSPEC, and Gemini GNIRS to target two samples of reddened active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates from the 31 deg2 Stripe 82 X-ray survey. One sample, which is ∼89% complete to Kcolors (> 4, Vega). The fainter sample (K> 17, Vega) represents a pilot program to follow-up four sources from a parent sample of 34 that are not detected in the single-epoch SDSS catalog and have WISE quasar colors. All 12 sources are broad-line AGNs (at least one permitted emission line has an FWHM exceeding 1300 km s‑1) and span a redshift range 0.59 0.5), and a greater percentage have high X-ray luminosities ({L}{{X},{full}}> {10}44 erg s‑1). Such outflows and high luminosities may be consistent with the paradigm that reddened broad-line AGNs represent a transitory phase in AGN evolution as described by the major merger model for black hole growth. Results from our pilot program demonstrate proof of concept that our selection technique is successful in discovering reddened quasars at z> 1 missed by optical surveys.

  9. A Statistical Study of Brown Dwarf Companions from the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; De Lee, Nathan M.; Lee, Brian L.; Fleming, Scott W.; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Varosi, Frank; Liu, Jian; Zhao, Bo; Li, Rui; Agol, Eric; MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present 23 new Brown Dwarf (BD) candidates from the Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). The BD candidates were selected from the processed MARVELS data using the latest University of Florida 2D pipeline, which shows significant improvement and reduction of systematic errors over the 1D pipeline results included in the SDSS Data Release 12. This sample is the largest BD yield from a single radial velocity survey. Of the 23 candidates, 18 are around main sequence stars and 5 are around giant stars. Given a giant contamination rate of ~24% for the MARVELS survey, we find a BD occurrence rate around main sequence stars of ~0.7%, which agrees with previous studies and confirms the BD desert, while the BD occurrence rate around the MARVELS giant stars is ~0.6%. Preliminary results show that our new candidates around solar type stars support a two population hypothesis, where BDs are divided at a mass of ~42.5 MJup. BDs less massive than 42.5 MJup have eccentricity distributions consistent with planet-planet scattering models, where BDs more massive than 42.5 MJup have both period and eccentricity distributions similar to that of stellar binaries. Special Brown Dwarf systems such as multiple BD systems and highly eccentric BDs will also be presented.

  10. Overview of the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey: Mapping nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Wake, David A.; Cherinka, Brian; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Tremonti, Christy; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Byler, Nell; Cappellari, Michele; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Etherington, James; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Johnston, Evelyn J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kinemuchi, Karen; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Lin, Lihwai; Maiolino, Roberto; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; McDermid, Richard M.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Thanjavur, Karun; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wilkinson, David; Wright, Shelley; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic

  11. Period-color and Amplitude-color Relations at Maximum and Minimum Light for RR Lyrae Stars in the SDSS Stripe 82 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngeow, Chow-Choong; Kanbur, Shashi M.; Bhardwaj, Anupam; Schrecengost, Zachariah; Singh, Harinder P.

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of period-color (PC) and amplitude-color (AC) relations at the maximum and minimum light can be used to probe the interaction of the hydrogen ionization front (HIF) with the photosphere and the radiation hydrodynamics of the outer envelopes of Cepheids and RR Lyraes. For example, theoretical calculations indicated that such interactions would occur at minimum light for RR Lyrae and result in a flatter PC relation. In the past, the PC and AC relations have been investigated by using either the (V - R)MACHO or (V - I) colors. In this work, we extend previous work to other bands by analyzing the RR Lyraes in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 Region. Multi-epoch data are available for RR Lyraes located within the footprint of the Stripe 82 Region in five (ugriz) bands. We present the PC and AC relations at maximum and minimum light in four colors: (u - g)0, (g - r)0, (r - i)0, and (i - z)0, after they are corrected for extinction. We found that the PC and AC relations for this sample of RR Lyraes show a complex nature in the form of flat, linear or quadratic relations. Furthermore, the PC relations at minimum light for fundamental mode RR Lyrae stars are separated according to the Oosterhoff type, especially in the (g - r)0 and (r - i)0 colors. If only considering the results from linear regressions, our results are quantitatively consistent with the theory of HIF-photosphere interaction for both fundamental and first overtone RR Lyraes.

  12. The Thirteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey MApping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat

    2016-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in July 2014. It pursues three core programs: APOGEE-2,MaNGA, and eBOSS. In addition, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: TDSS and SPIDERS. This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13), which contains new data, reanalysis of existing data sets and, like all SDSS data releases, is inclusive of previously released data. DR13 makes publicly available 1390 spatially resolved in...

  13. The eleventh and twelfth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Final data from SDSS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Shadab; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F.; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Basu, Sarbani; Bautista, Julian E.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, A. Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cai, Zheng; Capozzi, Diego; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carr, Michael A.; Carrera, Ricardo; Chambers, K. C.; Chaplin, William James; Chen, Yen-Chi; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Clerc, Nicolas; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; Costa, Luiz N. da; Rio, Nicola Da; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Lee, Nathan De; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Dwelly, Tom; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ellsworth, Tristan; Elsworth, Yvonne; Epstein, Courtney R.; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Finoguenov, Alexis; Flaherty, Kevin; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foster, Jonathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García, Rafael A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Georgakakis, A.; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Grebel, Eva K.; Green, Paul J.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Grieves, Nolan; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Fred R.; Hekker, Saskia; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huber, Daniel; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koenig, Xavier P.; Lam, Charles R.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Licquia, Timothy C.; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C.; López-Corredoira, Martín; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; III, Claude E. Mack; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Mao, Qingqing; Maraston, Claudia; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Martig, Marie; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McBride, Cameron K.; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Miller, Adam A.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; More, Surhud; Morganson, Eric; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Morrison, Heather L.; Mosser, Benôit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Neyrinck, Mark; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O’Connell, Julia E.; O’Connell, Robert W.; O’Connell, Ross; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Audrey E.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Osumi, Keisuke; Owen, Russell; Padgett, Deborah L.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pellejero-Ibanez, M.; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pe´rez-Ra`fols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Mello, Gustavo F. Porto de; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Reid, Beth A.; Rich, James; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Scott, Caroline; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shane, Neville; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Aguirre, V. Silva; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobreira, Flávia; Souto, Diogo; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Tayar, Jamie; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thomas, Neil; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Ye`che, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou (周旭), Xu; Zhou (周志民), Zhimin; Zou (邹虎), Hu; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-07-20

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All of the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 deg2 of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include the measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 5200 deg2 of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 deg2; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.

  14. THE ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH DATA RELEASES OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FINAL DATA FROM SDSS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Shadab [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Albareti, Franco D. [Instituto de Física Teórica, (UAM/CSIC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Prieto, Carlos Allende [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anders, F. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Anderton, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Armengaud, Eric [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Beaton, Rachael L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All of the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 deg{sup 2} of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include the measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 5200 deg{sup 2} of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 deg{sup 2}; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.

  15. The IAC stripe82 legacy project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Javier; Fliri, Juergen; Trujillo, Ignacio

    2017-03-01

    We present new deep co-adds of data taken within Stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), especially stacked to reach the faintest surface brightness limits of this data set. Our reduction puts special emphasis on preserving the characteristics of the background (sky + diffuse light) in the input images using a non-aggressive sky subtraction strategy, resulting in an exquisite quality on extremely faint structures. The IAC Stripe 82 co-adds offer a rather unique possibility to study the low surface brightness Universe like stellar haloes and disc truncations, low surface brightness, tidal galactic interactions, extremely faint dwarf galaxies, intra-cluster light or diffuse light from galactic dust. The imaging data is publicly available at http://www.iac.es/proyecto/stripe82/.

  16. THE DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE FOR THE SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU GALAXY SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yan, Renbin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and PITT PACC, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Kavli IPMU, WPI) (Japan); Chen, Yanmei [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); D’Souza, Richard; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fu, Hai, E-mail: dlaw@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); and others

    2016-10-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an optical fiber-bundle integral-field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). With a spectral coverage of 3622–10354 Å and an average footprint of ∼500 arcsec{sup 2} per IFU the scientific data products derived from MaNGA will permit exploration of the internal structure of a statistically large sample of 10,000 low-redshift galaxies in unprecedented detail. Comprising 174 individually pluggable science and calibration IFUs with a near-constant data stream, MaNGA is expected to obtain ∼100 million raw-frame spectra and ∼10 million reduced galaxy spectra over the six-year lifetime of the survey. In this contribution, we describe the MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline algorithms and centralized metadata framework that produce sky-subtracted spectrophotometrically calibrated spectra and rectified three-dimensional data cubes that combine individual dithered observations. For the 1390 galaxy data cubes released in Summer 2016 as part of SDSS-IV Data Release 13, we demonstrate that the MaNGA data have nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction shortward of ∼8500 Å and reach a typical 10 σ limiting continuum surface brightness μ  = 23.5 AB arcsec{sup −2} in a five-arcsecond-diameter aperture in the g -band. The wavelength calibration of the MaNGA data is accurate to 5 km s{sup −1} rms, with a median spatial resolution of 2.54 arcsec FWHM (1.8 kpc at the median redshift of 0.037) and a median spectral resolution of σ  = 72 km s{sup −1}.

  17. The Data Reduction Pipeline for the SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Andrews, Brett H.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Chen, Yanmei; Drory, Niv; D'Souza, Richard; Fu, Hai; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere; MacDonald, Nicholas; Masters, Karen L.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Parejko, John K.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David J.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Zhang, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an optical fiber-bundle integral-field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). With a spectral coverage of 3622-10354 Å and an average footprint of ˜500 arcsec2 per IFU the scientific data products derived from MaNGA will permit exploration of the internal structure of a statistically large sample of 10,000 low-redshift galaxies in unprecedented detail. Comprising 174 individually pluggable science and calibration IFUs with a near-constant data stream, MaNGA is expected to obtain ˜100 million raw-frame spectra and ˜10 million reduced galaxy spectra over the six-year lifetime of the survey. In this contribution, we describe the MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline algorithms and centralized metadata framework that produce sky-subtracted spectrophotometrically calibrated spectra and rectified three-dimensional data cubes that combine individual dithered observations. For the 1390 galaxy data cubes released in Summer 2016 as part of SDSS-IV Data Release 13, we demonstrate that the MaNGA data have nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction shortward of ˜8500 Å and reach a typical 10σ limiting continuum surface brightness μ = 23.5 AB arcsec-2 in a five-arcsecond-diameter aperture in the g-band. The wavelength calibration of the MaNGA data is accurate to 5 km s-1 rms, with a median spatial resolution of 2.54 arcsec FWHM (1.8 kpc at the median redshift of 0.037) and a median spectral resolution of σ = 72 km s-1.

  18. The Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z=0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z=2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition, the stellar parameters pipeline, which determines radial velocities, surface temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities of stars, has been updated and refined with improvements in temperature estimates for stars with T_eff<5000 K and in metallicity estimates for stars with [Fe/H]>-0.5. DR9 includes new stellar parameters for all stars presented in DR8, including stars from SDSS-I and II, as well as those observed as part of the SDSS-III Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration-2 (SEGUE-2). The astrometry error introduced in the DR8 imaging catalogs has been corrected in the DR9 data products. The next data release for SDSS-III will be in Summer 2013, which will present the first data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) along with another year of data from BOSS, followed by the final SDSS-III data release in December 2014.

  19. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Basu, Sarbani; Bates, Dominic; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Baumgarten, Falk; Baur, Julien; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bershady, Matthew; Bertran de Lis, Sara; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Borissova, J.; Bovy, Jo; Nielsen Brandt, William; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Orlando Camacho Chavez, Hugo; Cano Díaz, M.; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert; Cunha, Katia; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Dawson, Kyle; Da Costa, Luiz; Da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Deconto Machado, Alice; Delubac, Timothée; De Lee, Nathan; De la Macorra, Axel; De la Torre, Sylvain; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; Downes, Juan Jose; Drory, Niv; Du, Cheng; Du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Fernandez-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Gao, Yang; Garcia, Rafael A.; Garcia-Dias, R.; Garcia-Hernández, D. A.; Garcia Pérez, Ana E.; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Junqiang; Geisler, Douglas; Gillespie, Bruce; Gil Marin, Hector; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul; Grier, Catherine J.; Grier, Thomas; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Matt; Harding, Paul; Harley, R. E.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Hu, Jian; Huber, Daniel; Hutchinson, Timothy Alan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jaehnig, Kurt; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jullo, Eric; Kallinger, T.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Law, David R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Li, Chen; Li, Cheng; Li, Niu; Li, Ran; Liang, Fu-Heng; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Lin; Lin, Yen-Ting; Liu, Chao; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; MacDonald, Nicholas; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mackereth, J. Ted; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Dullius Mallmann, Nícolas; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Martinez Valpuesta, Inma; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszáros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Miglio, Andrea; Minchev, Ivan; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Mosser, Benoit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; O’Connell, Julia; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pace, Zachary; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Paris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peacock, John A.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Percival, Jeffrey W.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Jones, Natalie; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Reyna, A. M.; Rich, James; Richstein, Hannah; Ridl, Jethro; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Roe, Natalie; Lopes, A. Roman; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.

    2017-12-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). As well as its core program, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources (SPIDERS). This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13). DR13 makes publicly available the first 1390 spatially resolved integral field unit observations of nearby galaxies from MaNGA. It includes new observations from eBOSS, completing the Sloan Extended QUasar, Emission-line galaxy, Luminous red galaxy Survey (SEQUELS), which also targeted variability-selected objects and X-ray-selected objects. DR13 includes new reductions of the SDSS-III BOSS data, improving the spectrophotometric calibration and redshift classification, and new reductions of the SDSS-III APOGEE-1 data, improving stellar parameters for dwarf stars and cooler stars. DR13 provides more robust and precise photometric calibrations. Value-added target catalogs relevant for eBOSS, TDSS, and SPIDERS and an updated red-clump catalog for APOGEE are also available. This paper describes the location and format of the data and provides references to important technical papers. The SDSS web site, http://www.sdss.org, provides links to the data, tutorials, examples of data access, and extensive documentation of the reduction and analysis procedures. DR13 is the first of a scheduled set that will contain new data and analyses from the planned ∼6 yr operations of SDSS-IV.

  20. The ninth data release of the sloan digital sky survey: First spectroscopic data from the sdss-iii baryon oscillation spectroscopic survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Prieto, Carlos Allend; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Balbinot, Eduardo; Barnes, Rory; Bautista, Julian E.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z=0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z=2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition...

  1. SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Weinberg, David H.; /Ohio State U.; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arns, James A.; /Michigan U.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bailey, Stephen; /LBL, Berkeley; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Barkhouser, Robert; /Johns Hopkins U. /Michigan State U.

    2011-01-01

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z < 0.7 and at z {approx} 2.5. SEGUE-2, a now-completed continuation of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration, measured medium-resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} 1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {ge} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {micro}m < {lambda} < 1.70 {micro}m) spectra of 10{sup 5} evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for {approx} 15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Large-area Survey (MARVELS) will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m s{sup -1}, {approx} 24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of January 2011, SDSS-III has obtained

  2. THE NINTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Anderton, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Alexandroff, Rachael; Blake, Cullen H. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), C/Via Lactea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anderson, Scott F.; Barnes, Rory; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bochanski, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, F-75205 Paris (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Balbinot, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, Porto Alegre, RS-91501-970 (Brazil); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Beifiori, Alessandra [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Blomqvist, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); and others

    2012-12-15

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z {approx} 0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z {approx} 2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition, the stellar parameters pipeline, which determines radial velocities, surface temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities of stars, has been updated and refined with improvements in temperature estimates for stars with T{sub eff} < 5000 K and in metallicity estimates for stars with [Fe/H] > -0.5. DR9 includes new stellar parameters for all stars presented in DR8, including stars from SDSS-I and II, as well as those observed as part of the SEGUE-2. The astrometry error introduced in the DR8 imaging catalogs has been corrected in the DR9 data products. The next data release for SDSS-III will be in Summer 2013, which will present the first data from the APOGEE along with another year of data from BOSS, followed by the final SDSS-III data release in 2014 December.

  3. Early Giant Planet Candidates from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, J.; Li, R.; Sithajan, S.; Chen, Y.; Shi, J.; Ma, B.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first discoveries of giant planet candidates from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey. These candidates are found using the new MARVELS data pipeline developed at UF from scratch over the past two years. Unlike the old data pipeline, this pipeline carefully corrects most of the instrument effects (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition effects (such as illumination profile). The result is long-term RV precisions that approach the photon limits in many cases and has yielded four giant planet candidates of ~1-6 Jupiter mass from only the initial fraction of data processed with the new techniques. More survey data is being processed which will likely lead to discoveries of additional giant planet candidates that will be verified and characterized with follow-up observations by the MARVELS team. The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars with well defined cadence 27 RV measurements over 2 years). The MARVELS RV data and other follow-up data (photometry, high contrast imaging, high resolution spectroscopy and RV measurements) will explore the diversity of giant planet companion formation and evolution around stars with a broad range in metallicity ([Fe/H -1.5-0.5), mass ( 0.6-2.5M(sun)), and environment (thin disk and thick disk), and will help to address the key scientific questions identified for the MARVELS survey including, but not limited to: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate-mass stars and binaries? Is the “planet desert” within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real?

  4. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Surve...

  5. The 13th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: first spectroscopic data from the SDSS-IV survey mapping nearby galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). As well as its core program, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources (SPIDERS). This paper ...

  6. A Statistical Survey of Peculiar L and T Dwarfs in SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Kendra; Metchev, Stanimir; Miles-Páez, Paulo A.; Tannock, Megan E.

    2017-09-01

    We present the final results from a targeted search for brown dwarfs with unusual near-infrared colors. From a positional cross-match of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogs, we have identified 144 candidate peculiar L and T dwarfs. Spectroscopy confirms that 20 of the objects are peculiar or are candidate binaries. Of the 420 objects in our full sample 9 are young (≲ 200 {Myr}; 2.1%) and another 8 (1.9%) are unusually red, with no signatures of youth. With a spectroscopic J-{K}s color of 2.58 ± 0.11 mag, one of the new objects, the L6 dwarf 2MASS J03530419+0418193, is among the reddest field dwarfs currently known and is one of the reddest objects with no signatures of youth known to date. We have also discovered another potentially very-low-gravity object, the L1 dwarf 2MASS J00133470+1109403, and independently identified the young L7 dwarf 2MASS J00440332+0228112, which was first reported by Schneider and collaborators. Our results confirm that signatures of low gravity are no longer discernible in low to moderate resolution spectra of objects older than ˜200 Myr. The 1.9% of unusually red L dwarfs that do not show other signatures of youth could be slightly older, up to ˜400 Myr. In this case a red J-{K}s color may be more diagnostic of moderate youth than individual spectral features. However, its is also possible that these objects are relatively metal-rich, and thus have enhanced atmospheric dust content.

  7. Detection, Occurrence, and Survey of Rice Stripe and Black-Streaked Dwarf Diseases in Zhejiang Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-mu ZHANG

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The major viral diseases that occur on rice plants in Zhejiang Province, eastern China, are stripe and rice black-streaked dwarf diseases. Rice stripe disease is only caused by rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV, while rice black-streaked dwarf disease can be caused by rice black-streaked dwarf fijivirus (RBSDV and/or southern rice black-streaked dwarf fijivirus (SRBSDV. Here we review the characterization of these viruses, methods for their detection, and extensive surveys showing their occurrence and spread in the province.

  8. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Blake, C. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Carlberg, J. K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F. [University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Crepp, J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS UMR 6213, Observatoire des Sciences de l' Univers THETA Franche-Comt é-Bourgogne, Université de Franche Comté, Observatoire de Besançon, BP 1615, F-25010 Besançon Cedex (France); Nidever, D. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, D. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Ebelke, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Ge, J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ∼2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ∼100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we

  9. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampeitl, Hubert; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U. /Portsmouth U., ICG; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Bassett, Bruce; /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Foley, Ryan J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  10. Giant Planet Candidates, Brown Dwarfs, and Binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; de Lee, Nathan M.; Heslar, Michael; Ma, Bo; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We report the discoveries of giant planet candidates, brown dwarfs, and binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey. The finalized 1D pipeline has provided 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries. An additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are also reported for future investigation. These candidates are found using the advanced MARVELS 1D data pipeline developed at UF from scratch over the past three years. This pipeline carefully corrects most of the instrument effects (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition effects (such as illumination profile, fiber degradation, and tracking variations). The result is long-term RV precisions that approach the photon limits in many cases for the ~89,000 individual stellar observations. A 2D version of the pipeline that uses interferometric information is nearing completion and is demonstrating a reduction of errors to half the current levels. The 2D processing will be used to increase the robustness of the detections presented here and to find new candidates in RV regions not confidently detectable with the 1D pipeline. The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars with a well defined cadence of 27 RV measurements over 2 years. The MARVELS RV data and other follow-up data (photometry, high contrast imaging, high resolution spectroscopy and RV measurements) will explore the diversity of giant planet companion formation and evolution around stars with a broad range in metallicity (Fe/H -1.5-0.5), mass ( 0.6-2.5M(sun)), and environment (thin disk and thick disk), and will help to address the key scientific questions identified for the MARVELS survey including, but not limited to: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate-mass stars and binaries? Is the 'planet desert

  11. Hunting for stellar streams in the solar neighbourhood with the SDSS and GSC-II kinematic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re Fiorentin, P.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Smart, R. L.; Spagna, A.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Beers, T. C.; Zwitter, T.

    The growing awareness of the importance of the fossil record in the Milky Way for constraining galaxy formation theory is reflected by the increasing number of new ground- and space-based surveys designed to unravel the formation history of the Galaxy. Recently, a new kinematic survey has been produced by means of spectro-photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7) and high-quality proper motions derived from multiepoch positions from the Guide Star Catalogue II (GSC-II). In this framework, we assembled a sample of ~ 30 000 FGK nearby metal-poor (sub)dwarfs for which selection and distance estimates take advantage of accurate stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity) derived from SDSS spectra. Here, as one of the most interesting applications of this catalogue, we consider the feasibility of probing fossil signatures of the formation of the Milky Way by selecting and analysing subsamples of stars as tracers of the seven-dimensional space distribution (full phase-space coordinates plus chemical abundance) of the Galactic halo population within a few kiloparsecs from the Sun. Preliminary results exhibit statistical evidence for discrete overdensities localised in kinematics and in the space of adiabatic invariants (angular momentum and energy). By examination of their intrinsic properties, we suggest that they may be possible fossil signatures of past mergers or other accretion events.

  12. The SDSS-IV in 2015: Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Lucatello, Sara; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cherinka, Brian; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Hagen, Alex; Jones, Amy; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lundgren, Britt; Myers, Adam D.; Roman, Alexandre; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Given that many astronomers now participate in large international scientific collaborations, it is important to examine whether these structures foster a healthy scientific climate that is inclusive and diverse. The Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (CPWS) was formed to evaluate the climate and demographics within the SDSS collaboration and to make recommendations for how best to establish the scientific and technical leadership team for SDSS-IV. Building on the work described in Lundgren et al. (2015), the CPWS conducted a demographic survey in Spring 2015 that included questions about career and leadership status, racial / ethnic identity, gender identity, identification with the LGBT community, disability, partnership status, and level of parental education. For example, 71% of survey respondents identify as male and 81% do not identify as a racial or ethnic minority at their current institution. This reflects the under-representation of women and men from minority groups (e.g., people of color in the United States) and women from majority groups (e.g., white women in the United States) in the field of astronomy. We have focused our analysis on the representation of scientists from these groups among the SDSS-IV leadership and the full collaboration. Our goal is to use these quantitative data to track the demographics of SDSS-IV membership and leadership over time as we work to assess and improve the climate of SDSS-IV.

  13. Solving the puzzle of discrepant quasar variability on monthly time-scales implied by SDSS and CRTS data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suberlak, Krzysztof; Ivezić, Željko; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Graham, Matthew; Sesar, Branimir

    2017-12-01

    We present an improved photometric error analysis for the 7 100 CRTS (Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey) optical light curves for quasars from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 catalogue. The SDSS imaging survey has provided a time-resolved photometric data set, which greatly improved our understanding of the quasar optical continuum variability: Data for monthly and longer time-scales are consistent with a damped random walk (DRW). Recently, newer data obtained by CRTS provided puzzling evidence for enhanced variability, compared to SDSS results, on monthly time-scales. Quantitatively, SDSS results predict about 0.06 mag root-mean-square (rms) variability for monthly time-scales, while CRTS data show about a factor of 2 larger rms, for spectroscopically confirmed SDSS quasars. Our analysis has successfully resolved this discrepancy as due to slightly underestimated photometric uncertainties from the CRTS image processing pipelines. As a result, the correction for observational noise is too small and the implied quasar variability is too large. The CRTS photometric error correction factors, derived from detailed analysis of non-variable SDSS standard stars that were re-observed by CRTS, are about 20-30 per cent, and result in reconciling quasar variability behaviour implied by the CRTS data with earlier SDSS results. An additional analysis based on independent light curve data for the same objects obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory provides further support for this conclusion. In summary, the quasar variability constraints on weekly and monthly time-scales from SDSS, CRTS and PTF surveys are mutually compatible, as well as consistent with DRW model.

  14. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Avila-Reese, Vladimir [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Badenes, Carles [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Falcón-Barroso, Jésus [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Belfiore, Francesco [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ∼ 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å{sup –1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup –2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS Stripe 82 VLA 1-2GHz survey (Heywood+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, I.; Jarvis, M. J.; Baker, A. J.; Bannister, K. W.; Carvalho, C. S.; Hardcastle, M.; Hilton, M.; Moodley, K.; Smirnov, O. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; White, S. V.; Wollack, E. J.

    2017-11-01

    The data (Project code: 13B-272) were taken with the array in the CnB configuration. Standard wide-band mode was employed with the correlator splitting the 1-2GHz of frequency coverage into 16 spectral windows (SPWs) with 64x1MHz channels each, and an integration time per visibility point of 3s. A total of 1368 target pointings were scheduled, 608 and 760 in the eastern and western regions, respectively, coincident with the two eastern and western areas of the existing Hodge et al. (2011, Cat. J/AJ/142/3) data. (2 data files).

  16. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Brian T.; /Notre Dame U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Jha, Saurabh W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kasen, Daniel; /UC, Santa Cruz; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble

  17. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies Using Photometric Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Abhishek; SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    2017-01-01

    SDSS-IV/eBOSS survey will allow a ˜1% measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and a 4.0%Redshift Space Distortion (RSD) measurement using a relatively uniform set of luminous, early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1. In this talk, I will present the 3D real space clustering of a sample of ~600,000 LRGs measured by the SDSS/eBOSS, using photometric redshifts. These galaxies have accurate photometric redshifts with an average error of z = 0.028. These LRGs range from redshift z = 0.6 to 1.0 over 10,000 deg2 of the sky, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clusteringpower spectrum in different redshift slices and use well-calibrated redshift distributions to combine these into a high precision 3D real space clustering. i will present an evidence for BAO in the 2-point correlation function. The detection of BAO also allows the measurement of the comoving distance to z = 1.0. Traditionally, spectroscopic redshifts are used to estimate distances to the galaxies and, in turn, to measuregalaxy clustering. However, acquiring spectroscopic redshifts is a time consuming and expensive process even with modern multi-fiber spectrographs. Although photometric redshifts are less accurate, they are signicantly easier to obtain, and for a constant amount of time, one can image both wider areas and deeper volumes than would be possible with spectroscopy, allowing one to probe both larger scales and larger volumes. The ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric data has been well demonstrated by Padmanabhan et al. (2007).

  18. SDSS-BASED ASTEROID TAXONOMY V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) asteroid photometric observations classified according to the SDSS-based Asteroid Taxonomy, as developed by...

  19. RASS-SDSS Galaxy cluster survey. IV. A ubiquitous dwarf galaxy population in clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.; Romaniello, M.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the Luminosity Functions (LFs) of a subsample of 69 clusters from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster catalog. When calculated within the cluster physical sizes, given by r200 or r500, all the cluster LFs appear to have the same shape, well fitted by a composite of two Schechter functions with a marked upturn and a steepening at the faint-end. Previously reported cluster-to-cluster variations of the LF faint-end slope are due to the use of a metric cluster aperture for computing the LF of clusters of different masses. We determine the composite LF for early- and late-type galaxies, where the typing is based on the galaxy u-r colors. The late-type LF is well fitted by a single Schechter function with a steep slope (α=-2.0 in the r band, within r200). The early-type LF instead cannot be fitted by a single Schechter function, and a composite of two Schechter functions is needed. The faint-end upturn of the global cluster LF is due to the early-type cluster galaxies. The shape of the bright-end tail of the early-type LF does not seem to depend upon the local galaxy density or the distance from the cluster center. The late-type LF shows a significant variation only very near the cluster center. On the other hand, the faint-end tail of the early-type LF shows a significant and continuous variation with the environment. We provide evidence that the process responsible for creating the excess population of dwarf early type galaxies in clusters is a threshold process that occurs when the density exceeds ˜ 500 times the critical density of the Universe. We interpret our results in the context of the "harassment" scenario, where faint early-type cluster galaxies are predicted to be the descendants of tidally-stripped late-type galaxies.

  20. The Caltech-NRAO Stripe 82 Survey (CNSS) Paper. I. The Pilot Radio Transient Survey in 50 Deg.(exp. 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooley, K. P.; Hallinan, G.; Bourke, S.; Horesh, A.; Myers, S. T.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Levitan, D. B.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cenko, S. B.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We have commenced a multiyear program, the Caltech-NRAO Stripe 82 Survey (CNSS), to search for radio transients with the Jansky VLA in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 region. The CNSS will deliver five epochs over the entire approx. 270 deg.(exp. 2) of Stripe 82, an eventual deep combined map with an rms noise of approx. 40 proper motion epoch y and catalogs at a frequency of 3 GHz, and having a spatial resolution of 3 inches. This first paper presents the results from an initial pilot survey of a 50 deg.(exp. 2) region of Stripe 82, involving four epochs spanning logarithmic timescales between 1 week and 1.5 yr, with the combined map having a median rms noise of 35 proper motion epoch y. This pilot survey enabled the development of the hardware and software for rapid data processing, as well as transient detection and follow-up, necessary for the full 270 deg.(exp. 2) survey. Data editing, calibration, imaging, source extraction, cataloging, and transient identification were completed in a semi-automated fashion within 6 hr of completion of each epoch of observations, using dedicated computational hardware at the NRAO in Socorro and custom-developed data reduction and transient detection pipelines. Classification of variable and transient sources relied heavily on the wealth of multiwavelength legacy survey data in the Stripe 82 region, supplemented by repeated mapping of the region by the Palomar Transient Factory. A total of 3.9(+0.5%/-0.9%) of the few thousand detected point sources werefound to vary by greater than 30%, consistent with similar studies at 1.4 and 5 GHz. Multiwavelength photometric data and light curves suggest that the variability is mostly due to shock-induced flaring in the jets of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Although this was only a pilot survey, we detected two bona fide transients, associated with an RS CVn binary and a dKe star. Comparison with existing legacy survey data (FIRST, VLA-Stripe 82) revealed additional highly

  1. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Calibration of redMaGiC Redshift Distributions in DES and SDSS from Cross-Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawthon, R.; et al.

    2017-12-19

    We present calibrations of the redshift distributions of redMaGiC galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 (DES Y1) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 data. These results determine the priors of the redshift distribution of redMaGiC galaxies, which were used for galaxy clustering measurements and as lenses for galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements in DES Y1 cosmological analyses. We empirically determine the bias in redMaGiC photometric redshift estimates using angular cross-correlations with Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxies. For DES, we calibrate a single parameter redshift bias in three photometric redshift bins: $z \\in[0.15,0.3]$, [0.3,0.45], and [0.45,0.6]. Our best fit results in each bin give photometric redshift biases of $|\\Delta z|<0.01$. To further test the redMaGiC algorithm, we apply our calibration procedure to SDSS redMaGiC galaxies, where the statistical precision of the cross-correlation measurement is much higher due to a greater overlap with BOSS galaxies. For SDSS, we also find best fit results of $|\\Delta z|<0.01$. We compare our results to other analyses of redMaGiC photometric redshifts.

  2. Detecting active comets with SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solontoi, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /MIT, MKI; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Princeton U. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

    2010-12-01

    Using a sample of serendipitously discovered active comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we develop well-controlled selection criteria for greatly increasing the efficiency of comet identification in the SDSS catalogs. After follow-up visual inspection of images to reject remaining false positives, the total sample of SDSS comets presented here contains 19 objects, roughly one comet per 10 million other SDSS objects. The good understanding of selection effects allows a study of the population statistics, and we estimate the apparent magnitude distribution to r {approx} 18, the ecliptic latitude distribution, and the comet distribution in SDSS color space. The most surprising results are the extremely narrow range of colors for comets in our sample (e.g. root-mean-square scatter of only {approx}0.06 mag for the g-r color), and the similarity of comet colors to those of jovian Trojans. We discuss the relevance of our results for upcoming deep multi-epoch optical surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and estimate that LSST may produce a sample of about 10,000 comets over its 10-year lifetime.

  3. Periodic Variability of Low-mass Stars in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, A. C.; Bochanski, J. J.; Hawley, S. L.; Ivezić, Ž.; Kowalski, A. F.; Sesar, B.; West, A. A.

    2011-04-01

    We present a catalog of periodic stellar variability in the "Stripe 82" region of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After aggregating and re-calibrating catalog-level data from the survey, we ran a period-finding algorithm (Supersmoother) on all point-source light curves. We used color selection to identify systems that are likely to contain low-mass stars, in particular M dwarfs and white dwarfs. In total, we found 207 candidates, the vast majority of which appear to be in eclipsing binary systems. The catalog described in this paper includes 42 candidate M dwarf/white dwarf pairs, four white dwarf pairs, 59 systems whose colors indicate they are composed of two M dwarfs and whose light-curve shapes suggest they are in detached eclipsing binaries, and 28 M dwarf systems whose light-curve shapes suggest they are in contact binaries. We find no detached systems with periods longer than 3 days, thus the majority of our sources are likely to have experienced orbital spin-up and enhanced magnetic activity. Indeed, 26 of 27 M dwarf systems that we have spectra for show signs of chromospheric magnetic activity, far higher than the 24% seen in field stars of the same spectral type. We also find binaries composed of stars that bracket the expected boundary between partially and fully convective interiors, which will allow the measurement of the stellar mass-radius relationship across this transition. The majority of our contact systems have short orbital periods, with small variance (0.02 days) in the sample near the observed cutoff of 0.22 days. The accumulation of these stars at short orbital period suggests that the process of angular momentum loss, leading to period evolution, becomes less efficient at short periods. These short-period systems are in a novel regime for studying the effects of orbital spin-up and enhanced magnetic activity, which are thought to be the source of discrepancies between mass-radius predictions and measurements of these properties in eclipsing

  4. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: final emission line galaxy target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichoor, A.; Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, Ch; Dawson, K. S.; Percival, W. J.; Dey, A.; Lang, D.; Schlegel, D. J.; Gorgoni, C.; Bautista, J.; Brownstein, J. R.; Mariappan, V.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J. L.; Ross, A. J.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.-B.; Moustakas, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Jullo, E.; Newmann, J. A.; Prada, F.; Zhu, G. B.

    2017-11-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the emission line galaxy (ELG) sample at z ˜ 0.85 for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the g - r versus r - z colour-colour space and a cut on the g-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [O II] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg-2 on the North Galactic Cap and of 240 deg-2 on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50 000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict σ _{D_V}/D_V = 0.023, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at z ˜ 0.85, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.

  5. Exploring the brown dwarf desert: new substellar companions from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Ghezzi, Luan; Kimock, Ben; Willis, Kevin; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian; Fleming, Scott W.; Agol, Eric; Troup, Nicholas; Paegert, Martin; Schneider, Donald P.; Stassun, Keivan; Varosi, Frank; Zhao, Bo; Jian, Liu; Li, Rui; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Pan, Kaike; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Santiago, Basílio X.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; del Peloso, E. F.

    2017-06-01

    Planet searches using the radial velocity technique show a paucity of companions to solar-type stars within ˜5 au in the mass range of ˜10-80 MJup. This deficit, known as the brown dwarf desert, currently has no conclusive explanation. New substellar companions in this region help assess the reality of the desert and provide insight to the formation and evolution of these objects. Here, we present 10 new brown dwarf and 2 low-mass stellar companion candidates around solar-type stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. These companions were selected from processed MARVELS data using the latest University of Florida Two Dimensional pipeline, which shows significant improvement and reduction of systematic errors over previous pipelines. The 10 brown dwarf companions range in mass from ˜13 to 76 MJup and have orbital radii of less than 1 au. The two stellar companions have minimum masses of ˜98 and 100 MJup. The host stars of the MARVELS brown dwarf sample have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.03 ± 0.08 dex. Given our stellar sample we estimate the brown dwarf occurrence rate around solar-type stars with periods less than ˜300 d to be ˜0.56 per cent.

  6. AGN Populations in Large-volume X-Ray Surveys: Photometric Redshifts and Population Types Found in the Stripe 82X Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananna, Tonima Tasnin; Salvato, Mara; LaMassa, Stephanie; Urry, C. Megan; Cappelluti, Nico; Cardamone, Carolin; Civano, Francesca; Farrah, Duncan; Gilfanov, Marat; Glikman, Eilat; Hamilton, Mark; Kirkpatrick, Allison; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Marchesi, Stefano; Merloni, Andrea; Nandra, Kirpal; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Richards, Gordon T.; Timlin, John

    2017-11-01

    Multiwavelength surveys covering large sky volumes are necessary to obtain an accurate census of rare objects such as high-luminosity and/or high-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Stripe 82X is a 31.3 X-ray survey with Chandra and XMM-Newton observations overlapping the legacy Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 field, which has a rich investment of multiwavelength coverage from the ultraviolet to the radio. The wide-area nature of this survey presents new challenges for photometric redshifts for AGNs compared to previous work on narrow-deep fields because it probes different populations of objects that need to be identified and represented in the library of templates. Here we present an updated X-ray plus multiwavelength matched catalog, including Spitzer counterparts, and estimated photometric redshifts for 5961 (96% of a total of 6181) X-ray sources that have a normalized median absolute deviation, σnmad=0.06, and an outlier fraction, η = 13.7%. The populations found in this survey and the template libraries used for photometric redshifts provide important guiding principles for upcoming large-area surveys such as eROSITA and 3XMM (in X-ray) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (optical).

  7. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /Portsmouth U.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; /UC, Berkeley; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  8. THE SDSS-IV EXTENDED BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: OVERVIEW AND EARLY DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Kyle S.; Bautista, Julian E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kneib, Jean-Paul [Laboratoire dástrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Observatoire de Sauverny, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Alam, Shadab [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Albareti, Franco D. [Instituto de Física Teórica, (UAM/CSIC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Armengaud, Eric [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, PMB 401807, 2401 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37240 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Astronomy, 475 N. Charter St., Madison WI 53703 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R., E-mail: kdawson@astro.utah.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2016-02-15

    In a six-year program started in 2014 July, the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will conduct novel cosmological observations using the BOSS spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory. These observations will be conducted simultaneously with the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) designed for variability studies and the Spectroscopic Identification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS) program designed for studies of X-ray sources. In particular, eBOSS will measure with percent-level precision the distance-redshift relation with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter. eBOSS will use four different tracers of the underlying matter density field to vastly expand the volume covered by BOSS and map the large-scale-structures over the relatively unconstrained redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.2. Using more than 250,000 new, spectroscopically confirmed luminous red galaxies at a median redshift z = 0.72, we project that eBOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance d{sub A}(z) to an accuracy of 1.2% and measurements of H(z) to 2.1% when combined with the z > 0.6 sample of BOSS galaxies. With ∼195,000 new emission line galaxy redshifts, we expect BAO measurements of d{sub A}(z) to an accuracy of 3.1% and H(z) to 4.7% at an effective redshift of z = 0.87. A sample of more than 500,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars will provide the first BAO distance measurements over the redshift range 0.9 < z < 2.2, with expected precision of 2.8% and 4.2% on d{sub A}(z) and H(z), respectively. Finally, with 60,000 new quasars and re-observation of 60,000 BOSS quasars, we will obtain new Lyα forest measurements at redshifts z > 2.1; these new data will enhance the precision of d{sub A}(z) and H(z) at z > 2.1 by a factor of 1.44 relative to BOSS. Furthermore, eBOSS will provide improved tests of General Relativity on cosmological scales through redshift-space distortion measurements, improved tests for non

  9. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Anderton, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Alexandroff, Rachael [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anders, Friedrich [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris (France); Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bastien, Fabienne A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bird, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Beifiori, Alessandra [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bender, Chad F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blake, Cullen H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 219 S. 33rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the Tenth Public Data Release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R ∼ 22,500 300 fiber spectrograph covering 1.514-1.696 μm. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included. DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the Ninth Data Release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra, 182,009 quasar spectra, and 159,327 stellar spectra selected over 6373.2 deg{sup 2}.

  10. The SDSS-III DR12 MARVELS radial velocity data release: the first data release from the multiple object Doppler exoplanet survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Li, Rui; Senan Seieroe Grieves, Nolan; Ma, Bo; de Lee, Nathan M.; Lee, Brian C.; Liu, Jian; Bolton, Adam S.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Weaver, Benjamin; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We present the first data release from the SDSS-III Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) through the SDSS-III DR12. The data include 181,198 radial velocity (RV) measurements for a total of 5520 different FGK stars with V~7.6-12, of which more than 80% are dwarfs and subdwarfs while remainders are GK giants, among a total of 92 fields nearly randomly spread out over the entire northern sky taken with a 60-object MARVELS dispersed fixed-delay interferometer instrument over four years (2008-2012). There were 55 fields with a total of 3300 FGK stars which had 14 or more observations over about 2-year survey window. The median number of observations for these plates is 27 RV measurements. This represents the largest homogeneous sample of precision RV measurements of relatively bright stars. In this first released data, a total of 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries with additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are reported. The released data were produced by the MARVELS finalized 1D pipeline. We will also report preliminary statistical results from the MARVELS 2D data pipeline which has produced a median RV precision of ~30 m/s for stable stars.

  11. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  12. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Standard Star Catalog for Stripe 82: The Dawn of Industrial 1% Optical Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    lists photometric data for 215 million unique objects observed in 8000 deg2 of sky; see http://www.sdss.org/dr5/. 21 Transmission curves for the SDSS...energy distribu- tions, such as quasars and supernovae , the errors may be several times larger. See also Maı́z Apellániz (2006). IVEZIĆ ET AL.974 Vol...with such an accuracy is important for many applications (e.g., photometric redshifts of galaxies, Type Ia supernova cosmology, and testing of

  13. SpIES: The Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon; Lacy, Mark; Strauss, Michael; Spergel, David; Anderson, Scott; Bauer, Franz; Bochanski, John; Brandt, Niel; Cushing, Michael; Fan, Xiaohui; Gallagher, Sarah; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Hewett, Paul; Hodge, Jaqueline; Hopkins, Philip; Hughes, Jack; Jiang, Linhua; Knapp, Gillian; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lupton, Robert; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; McMahon, Richard; Menanteau, Felipe; Myers, Adam; Nichol, Robert; Ross, Nic; Ryan, Erin; Schneider, Donald; Szalay, Alex; Urry, C. Megan; Viero, Marco; Warren, Stephen; Zakamska, Nadia

    2012-09-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has opened up entirely new realms of astronomy, but unlike ground-based optical and NIR surveys, it has not yet conducted a wide-area survey that samples enough volume to perform investigations of quasar clustering and the quasar luminosity function at z>3. We propose to remedy this situation by performing a moderately deep Spitzer-IRAC survey of 175 sq. deg. along the Celestial Equator (SDSS 'Stripe 82'), complemented with one of the CFHT Legacy Survey wide fields with which it overlaps. With this dataset, we will 1) probe quasar clustering and the luminosity function in order to test different 'feedback' models of galaxy evolution; 2) identify obscured and unobscured AGNs with a combination of mid-IR, optical, and variability selection---taking advantage of ancillary multi-wavelength, multi-epoch data to produce accurate photometric redshifts; 3) identify ~25 6Stripe 82 is the premier large-area, multi-wavelength extragalactic region of sky, with deep imaging in the optical (SDSS, CFHT), ultraviolet (GALEX), NIR (UKIDSS), FIR (Herschel), radio (VLA), and millimeter (ACT), as well as extensive spectroscopy (SDSS I/II, SDSS-III/BOSS, 2dF, WiggleZ, VVDS, DEEP2). We therefore propose Spitzer-IRAC imaging to complete the wavelength coverage in Stripe 82, to provide a wide-area survey of lasting value. At our optimal depth, covering this area (~175 sq. deg.) will require 1270 hours of new observations. Such a survey will complement existing Spitzer Legacy programs and provide crucial input for future missions such as JWST. Reduced images and catalogs will be made available to the public using the existing SDSS, NVO, and IRSA database structures.

  14. The Final SDSS High-redshift Quasar Sample of 52 Quasars at z>5.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Bañados, Eduardo; Becker, Robert H.; Bian, Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Shen, Yue; Wang, Feige; Wang, Ran; Wang, Shu; White, Richard L.; Wu, Jin; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian

    2016-12-01

    We present the discovery of nine quasars at z˜ 6 identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of z˜ 6 quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at 5.7\\lt z≤slant 6.4, including 29 quasars with {z}{AB}≤slant 20 mag selected from 11,240 deg2 of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with 20≤slant {z}{AB}≤slant 20.5 selected from 4223 deg2 of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to {z}{AB}≈ 22 mag from the 277 deg2 in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of -29.0≤slant {M}1450≤slant -24.5. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z˜ 6. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ({M}1450≥slant -23 mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope β of the QLF is well constrained to be β =-2.8+/- 0.2. Due to the small number of low-luminosity quasars, the faint-end slope α and the characteristic magnitude {M}1450* are less well constrained, with α =-{1.90}-0.44+0.58 and {M}* =-{25.2}-3.8+1.2 mag. The spatial density of luminous quasars, parametrized as ρ ({M}1450\\lt -26,z)=ρ (z=6){10}k(z-6), drops rapidly from z˜ 5 to 6, with k=-0.72+/- 0.11. Based on our fitted QLF and assuming an intergalactic medium (IGM) clumping factor of C = 3, we find that the observed quasar population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the z˜ 6 IGM at ˜90% confidence. Quasars may still provide a significant fraction of the required photons, although much larger samples of faint quasars are needed for more stringent constraints on the quasar contribution to reionization.

  15. THE WIRED SURVEY. III. AN INFRARED EXCESS AROUND THE ECLIPSING POST-COMMON ENVELOPE BINARY SDSS J030308.35+005443.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debes, John H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Farihi, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Wachter, Stefanie [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Leisawitz, David T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We present the discovery with WISE of a significant infrared excess associated with the eclipsing post-common envelope binary SDSS J030308.35+005443.7, the first excess discovered around a non-interacting white dwarf+main-sequence M dwarf binary. The spectral energy distribution of the white dwarf+M dwarf companion shows significant excess longward of 3 {mu}m. A T {sub eff} of 8940 K for the white dwarf is consistent with a cooling age >2 Gyr, implying that the excess may be due to a recently formed circumbinary dust disk of material that extends from the tidal truncation radius of the binary at 1.96 R {sub Sun} out to <0.8 AU, with a total mass of {approx}10{sup 20} g. We also construct WISE and follow-up ground-based near-infrared light curves of the system and find variability in the K band that appears to be in phase with ellipsoidal variations observed in the visible. The presence of dust might be due to (1) material being generated by the destruction of small rocky bodies that are being perturbed by an unseen planetary system or (2) dust condensing from the companion's wind. The high inclination of this system and the presence of dust make it an attractive target for M dwarf transit surveys and long-term photometric monitoring.

  16. SDSS J2222+2745: A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED SEXTUPLE QUASAR WITH A MAXIMUM IMAGE SEPARATION OF 15.''1 DISCOVERED IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, H.; Groeneboom, N. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Gladders, M. D.; Abramson, L. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sharon, K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bayliss, M. B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wuyts, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbackstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Koester, B. P. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brinckmann, T. E.; Kristensen, M. T.; Lindholmer, M. O.; Nielsen, A.; Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U., E-mail: hdahle@astro.uio.no [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-08-20

    We report the discovery of a unique gravitational lens system, SDSS J2222+2745, producing five spectroscopically confirmed images of a z{sub s} = 2.82 quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at z{sub l} = 0.49. We also present photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a sixth lensed image of the same quasar. The maximum separation between the quasar images is 15.''1. Both the large image separations and the high image multiplicity are in themselves rare among known lensed quasars, and observing the combination of these two factors is an exceptionally unlikely occurrence in present data sets. This is only the third known case of a quasar lensed by a cluster, and the only one with six images. The lens system was discovered in the course of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, in which we identify candidate lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and target these for follow-up and verification with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope. Multi-band photometry obtained over multiple epochs from 2011 September to 2012 September reveals significant variability at the {approx}10%-30% level in some of the quasar images, indicating that measurements of the relative time delay between quasar images will be feasible. In this lens system, we also identify a bright (g = 21.5) giant arc corresponding to a strongly lensed background galaxy at z{sub s} = 2.30. We fit parametric models of the lens system, constrained by the redshift and positions of the quasar images and the redshift and position of the giant arc. The predicted time delays between different pairs of quasar images range from {approx}100 days to {approx}6 yr.

  17. SDSS-BASED ASTEROID TAXONOMY V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Moving Object Catalog (SDSS-MOC) is a large data set that provides five-filter magnitudes and astrometric information for all moving...

  18. SDSS DR6 Data for Photometric Redshift Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Subject Area: Astronomical data Description: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-organization effort to gather deep, multi-color images covering more than...

  19. The Formation of COINS: Equity and Inclusion in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose Ramon; Chanover, Nancy J.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lucatello, Sara; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Belfiore, Francesco; Cherinka, Brian; Feuillet, Diane; Jones, Amy; Masters, Karen; Simmons, Audrey; Ross, Ashley; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tayar, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    In the era of large surveys, collaborations like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are becoming a new normal for many scientists, and collaboration policies and climate have a considerable affect on scientific careers. As such, it is essential that collaborations actively strive to include all scientists regardless of gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, career stage, geographic location, economic background, social and cultural backgrounds, and all possible intersections thereof. We report on the formation and progress of the Committee On INclusiveness in the SDSS (COINS). COINS was formed to assess the SDSS-IV project and collaboration's climate and demographics, to recommend new policies or practices with regard to increasing inclusiveness, and to assist in the implementation of these new activities where necessary. We report on our current activities, which include ongoing support for the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, support for the SDSS Faculty and Student Teams initiative, administering and analyzing the SDSS demographic surveys, working towards collaboration meeting inclusiveness and accessibility, and adopting strategies for integrating and mentoring new members. We welcome input from SDSS members and non-members about how to work towards a more equitable and inclusive collaboration.

  20. Supernova studies in the SDSS-II/SNe survey spectroscopy of the peculiar SN 2007qd, and photometric properties of Type-Ia supernovae as a function of the distance to the host galaxy /

    OpenAIRE

    Galbany i Gonzàlez, Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Descripció del recurs: el 01 setembre 2012 Aquesta tesi engloba el treball fet durant els ultims quatre anys com a estudiant de doctorat a l'Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), emmarcat dins de la col·labaració Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova (SDSS-II/SNe) Survey. Al primer capítol (§1) s'introdueixen els principals conceptes del Model Estàndar de Cosmologia, presentant els seus orígens, les propietats dels seus continguts, i les mesures de distància i brillantor. També es re...

  1. SDSS-IV MaNGA IFS Galaxy Survey—Survey Design, Execution, and Initial Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Law, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Andrews, Brett; Cherinka, Brian; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Zhang, Kai; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel; Cappellari, Michele; D'Souza, Richard; Emsellem, Eric; Fu, Hai; Gaulme, Patrick; Graham, Mark T.; Goddard, Daniel; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Jones, Amy; Kinemuchi, Karen; Li, Cheng; Li, Hongyu; Maiolino, Roberto; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Masters, Karen; Merrifield, Michael R.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Thanjavur, Karun; Tinker, Jeremy; Tremonti, Christy; van den Bosch, Remco; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-12-01

    The MaNGA Survey (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV. It is obtaining integral field spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies at a spectral resolution of R ˜ 2000 from 3622 to 10354 Å. The design of the survey is driven by a set of science requirements on the precision of estimates of the following properties: star formation rate surface density, gas metallicity, stellar population age, metallicity, and abundance ratio, and their gradients; stellar and gas kinematics; and enclosed gravitational mass as a function of radius. We describe how these science requirements set the depth of the observations and dictate sample selection. The majority of targeted galaxies are selected to ensure uniform spatial coverage in units of effective radius (R e ) while maximizing spatial resolution. About two-thirds of the sample is covered out to 1.5R e (Primary sample), and one-third of the sample is covered to 2.5R e (Secondary sample). We describe the survey execution with details that would be useful in the design of similar future surveys. We also present statistics on the achieved data quality, specifically the point-spread function, sampling uniformity, spectral resolution, sky subtraction, and flux calibration. For our Primary sample, the median r-band signal-to-noise ratio is ˜70 per 1.4 Å pixel for spectra stacked between 1R e and 1.5R e . Measurements of various galaxy properties from the first-year data show that we are meeting or exceeding the defined requirements for the majority of our science goals.

  2. SDSS-IV MaNGA IFS GALAXY SURVEY—SURVEY DESIGN, EXECUTION, AND INITIAL DATA QUALITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Renbin; Zhang, Kai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0057 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Winsconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Andrews, Brett [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Thomas, Daniel; Westfall, Kyle B. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Wake, David A. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Belfiore, Francesco, E-mail: yanrenbin@uky.edu [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-12-01

    The MaNGA Survey (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV. It is obtaining integral field spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies at a spectral resolution of R  ∼ 2000 from 3622 to 10354 Å. The design of the survey is driven by a set of science requirements on the precision of estimates of the following properties: star formation rate surface density, gas metallicity, stellar population age, metallicity, and abundance ratio, and their gradients; stellar and gas kinematics; and enclosed gravitational mass as a function of radius. We describe how these science requirements set the depth of the observations and dictate sample selection. The majority of targeted galaxies are selected to ensure uniform spatial coverage in units of effective radius (R{sub e}) while maximizing spatial resolution. About two-thirds of the sample is covered out to 1.5 R{sub e} (Primary sample), and one-third of the sample is covered to 2.5 R{sub e} (Secondary sample). We describe the survey execution with details that would be useful in the design of similar future surveys. We also present statistics on the achieved data quality, specifically the point-spread function, sampling uniformity, spectral resolution, sky subtraction, and flux calibration. For our Primary sample, the median r -band signal-to-noise ratio is ∼70 per 1.4 Å pixel for spectra stacked between 1 R{sub e} and 1.5 R{sub e}. Measurements of various galaxy properties from the first-year data show that we are meeting or exceeding the defined requirements for the majority of our science goals.

  3. Type Ia Supernova Properties as a Function of the Distance to the Host Galaxy in the SDSS-II SN Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbany, Lluis [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain); et al.

    2012-08-20

    We use type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star-formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light-curves using both MLCS2k2 and SALT2, and determine color (AV, c) and light-curve shape (delta, x1) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4-sigma level) finding is that the average fitted AV from MLCS2k2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that SNe in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light-curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  4. A Type II Supernova Hubble Diagram from the CSP-I, SDSS-II, and SNLS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Folatelli, G.; Pritchet, C.; Basa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae (SNe II) combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Color Method (PCM) to 73 SNe II with a redshift range of 0.01-0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag, I.e., 13% in distance uncertainties, is derived. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat universe and using the PCM, we derive the universe’s matter density: {{{Ω }}}m={0.32}-0.21+0.30 providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program N-2005A-Q-11, GN-2005B-Q-7, GN-2006A-Q-7, GS-2005A-Q-11, GS-2005B-Q-6, and GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: constraining modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eva-Maria; Percival, Will; Linder, Eric; Alam, Shadab; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Beutler, Florian; Brinkmann, Jon

    2018-01-01

    We use baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion from the completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, corresponding to data release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, combined sample analysis in combination with cosmic microwave background, supernova and redshift space distortion measurements from additional spectroscopic surveys to test deviations from general relativity. We present constraints on several phenomenological models of modified gravity: First, we parametrise the growth of structure using the growth index γ, finding γ = 0.566 ± 0.058 (68% C.L.). Second, we modify the relation of the two Newtonian potentials by introducing two additional parameters, GM and GL. In this approach, GM refers to modifications of the growth of structure whereas GL to modification of the lensing potential. We consider a power law to model the redshift dependency of GM and GL as well as binning in redshift space, introducing four additional degrees of freedom, GM(z 0.5), GL(z 0.5). At 68% C.L. we measure GM = 0.980 ± 0.096 and GL = 1.082 ± 0.060 for a linear model, GM = 1.01 ± 0.36 and GL = 1.31 ± 0.19 for a cubic model as well as GM(z 0.5) = 0.986 ± 0.022, GL(z 0.5) = 1.037 ± 0.029. Thirdly, we investigate general scalar tensor theories of gravity, finding the model to be mostly unconstrained by current data. Assuming a one-parameter f(R) model we can constrain B0 < 7.7 × 10-5 (95% C.L). For all models we considered we find good agreement with general relativity.

  6. First-Year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Constraints on Nonstandard Cosmological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollerman, J.; Mörtsell, E.; Davis, T. M.; Blomqvist, M.; Bassett, B.; Becker, A. C.; Cinabro, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J.; Garnavich, P.; Lampeitl, H.; Marriner, J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Richmond, M. W.; Sako, M.; Schneider, D. P.; Smith, M.; Vanderplas, J. T.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    We use the new Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II supernova survey, together with additional supernova data sets as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations to constrain cosmological models. This complements the standard cosmology analysis presented by Kessler et al. in that we discuss and rank a number of the most popular nonstandard cosmology scenarios. When this combined data set is analyzed using the MLCS2k2 light-curve fitter, we find that more exotic models for cosmic acceleration provide a better fit to the data than the ΛCDM model. For example, the flat Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model is ranked higher by our information-criteria (IC) tests than the standard model with a flat universe and a cosmological constant. When the supernova data set is instead analyzed using the SALT-II light-curve fitter, the standard cosmological-constant model fares best. This investigation of how sensitive cosmological model selection is to assumptions about, and within, the light-curve fitters thereby highlights the need for an improved understanding of these unresolved systematic effects. Our investigation also includes inhomogeneous Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. While our LTB models can be made to fit the supernova data as well as any other model, the extra parameters they require are not supported by our IC analysis. Finally, we explore more model-independent ways to investigate the cosmic expansion based on this new data set.

  7. The distributed development environment for SDSS software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Eileen [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gurbani, Vijay [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mackinnon, Bryan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Newberg, Heidi [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nicinski, Tom [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Petravick, Don [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pordes, Ruth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sergey, Gary [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stoughton, C [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, Robert [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration. The SDSS is a collaborative effort between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the Univ. of Chicago, Princeton University, the Institute for Advanced Study, The John Hopkins University, Univ. of Washington, the U.S. Naval Observatory and the Japan Promotion Group. Its main results will be an imaging survey of 104deg2 and a red shift spectroscopic survey of 106 galaxies and 105 quasars producing approximately 1.2 x 1013 bytes of data over the 5 year running period (1995-2000). This will produce a three dimensional map of the Universe.

  8. SDSS-IV MaNGA: identification of active galactic nuclei in optical integral field unit surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Drory, Niv; Andrews, Brett H.; Merloni, Andrea; Thomas, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate 2727 galaxies observed by MaNGA as of 2016 June to develop spatially resolved techniques for identifying signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We identify 303 AGN candidates. The additional spatial dimension imposes challenges in identifying AGNs due to contamination from diffuse ionized gas, extraplanar gas and photoionization by hot stars. We show that the combination of spatially resolved line diagnostic diagrams and additional cuts on H α surface brightness and H α equivalent width can distinguish between AGN-like signatures and high-metallicity galaxies with low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions-like spectra. Low-mass galaxies with high specific star formation rates are particularly difficult to diagnose and routinely show diagnostic line ratios outside of the standard star formation locus. We develop a new diagnostic - the distance from the standard diagnostic line in the line-ratio space - to evaluate the significance of the deviation from the star formation locus. We find 173 galaxies that would not have been selected as AGN candidates based on single-fibre spectral measurements but exhibit photoionization signatures suggestive of AGN activity in the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO resolved observations, underscoring the power of large integral field unit surveys. A complete census of these new AGN candidates is necessary to understand their nature and probe the complex co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their hosts.

  9. Exploring the Nature of Galaxies with Abundance Gradient Anomalies in the SDSS-IV/MaNGA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Celeste; Tremonti, Christy; Pace, Zach; Schaefer, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Disk galaxies are known to have radial oxygen abundance gradients with their centers being more chemically enriched than their outskirts. The steepness of the abundance gradient has recently been shown to correlate with galaxy stellar mass, on average. However, individual galaxies sometimes show pronounced deviations from the expected trends, such as flatter or steeper slopes than expected for their mass, abrupt changes in slope, or azimuthal asymmetries. Here we report on a systematic search for galaxies with abundance gradient anomalies using 2-D spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV MaNGA. We construct nebular oxygen and nitrogen abundance maps for 300 moderately inclined non-interacting disk galaxies and use visual inspection to identify the most interesting cases. We use this training set to develop an automated pipeline to flag galaxies with abundance anomalies from the larger MaNGA dataset for visual inspection. We combine the metallicity maps with kinematic data and measurements of the galaxies' local environments to better understand the processes that shape the radial abundance gradients of disk galaxies.

  10. Evaluation of rumble stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study were to: a) monitor the initial installations of rumble stripes and b) evaluate the results of rumble stripe installations. : Ten rural, two-lane road locations were selected by the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet across t...

  11. An approach to the analysis of SDSS spectroscopic outliers based on self-organizing maps. Designing the outlier analysis software package for the next Gaia survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustes, D.; Manteiga, M.; Dafonte, C.; Arcay, B.; Ulla, A.; Smith, K.; Borrachero, R.; Sordo, R.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: A new method applied to the segmentation and further analysis of the outliers resulting from the classification of astronomical objects in large databases is discussed. The method is being used in the framework of the Gaia satellite Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) activities to prepare automated software tools that will be used to derive basic astrophysical information that is to be included in final Gaia archive. Methods: Our algorithm has been tested by means of simulated Gaia spectrophotometry, which is based on SDSS observations and theoretical spectral libraries covering a wide sample of astronomical objects. Self-organizing maps networks are used to organize the information in clusters of objects, as homogeneously as possible according to their spectral energy distributions, and to project them onto a 2D grid where the data structure can be visualized. Results: We demonstrate the usefulness of the method by analyzing the spectra that were rejected by the SDSS spectroscopic classification pipeline and thus classified as "UNKNOWN". First, our method can help distinguish between astrophysical objects and instrumental artifacts. Additionally, the application of our algorithm to SDSS objects of unknown nature has allowed us to identify classes of objects with similar astrophysical natures. In addition, the method allows for the potential discovery of hundreds of new objects, such as white dwarfs and quasars. Therefore, the proposed method is shown to be very promising for data exploration and knowledge discovery in very large astronomical databases, such as the archive from the upcoming Gaia mission.

  12. Weak-Lensing Mass Calibration of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope Equatorial Sunyaev-Zeldovich Cluster Sample with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, N.; Leauthaud, A.; Miyatake, H.; Hasseleld, M.; Gralla, M. B.; Allison, R.; Bond, J. R.; Calabrese, E.; Crichton, D.; Devlin, M. J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Mass calibration uncertainty is the largest systematic effect for using clustersof galaxies to constrain cosmological parameters. We present weak lensing mass measurements from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Stripe 82 Survey for galaxy clusters selected through their high signal-to-noise thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) signal measured with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). For a sample of 9 ACT clusters with a tSZ signal-to-noise greater than five, the average weak lensing mass is (4.8 plus or minus 0.8) times 10 (sup 14) solar mass, consistent with the tSZ mass estimate of (4.7 plus or minus 1.0) times 10 (sup 14) solar mass, which assumes a universal pressure profile for the cluster gas. Our results are consistent with previous weak-lensing measurements of tSZ-detected clusters from the Planck satellite. When comparing our results, we estimate the Eddington bias correction for the sample intersection of Planck and weak-lensing clusters which was previously excluded.

  13. Millisecond Pulsar Companions in SDSS and Pan-Starrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMann, Natasha; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; McLaughlin, Maura; Kaplan, David; NANOGrav

    2018-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are being timed precisely in hopes of detecting gravitational waves (GWs). In order to detect GWs, pulsars must be studied in great detail. The perturbations in timing caused by binaries must be determined so as not to confuse them with a GW perturbation. This study used a list of published MSPs to determine if any known MSP’s white dwarf companions are located and visible in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-Starrs) Footprints. No new possible companions were discovered but five objects were found in the SDSS and 18, including the same five from SDSS, were found in Pan-Starrs that could be the companion to an MSP. All objects are less than 1.5 arcseconds away from the MSP’s position. In order to verify the object as the companion, the color magnitudes must be compared to those previously published.

  14. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; /Fermilab /Inst. Geo. Astron., Havana /Sao Paulo U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; Johnston, David; /Fermilab; Kubo, Jeffrey; /Fermilab; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab; Seo, Hee-Jong; /UC, Berkeley; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  15. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  16. After SDSS-IV: Pioneering Panoptic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmeier, Juna; AS4 Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    I will describe the current plans for a next generation sky survey that will begin After SDSS-IV --- AS4. AS4 will be an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, the growth of black holes, and investigate the origin of planets. It will provide the most comprehensive all-sky spectroscopy to multiply the science from the Gaia, TESS and eROSITA missions. AS4 will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art, uncovering the self-regulation mechanisms of Galactic ecosystems. It will pioneer systematic, spectroscopic monitoring across the whole sky, revealing changes on timescales from 20 minutes to 20 years. The project is now developing new hardware to build on the SDSS-IV infrastructure, designing the detailed survey strategy, and actively seeking to complete its consortium of institutional and individual members.

  17. Oxygen Abundance Methods in SDSS: View from Modern Statistics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We will test the validity of several different oxygen abundance determination methods using methods of modern statistics. These methods include Bayesian analysis and information scoring. We will analyze a sample of ∼ 6000 HII galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release ...

  18. The structure of galactic disks - Studying late-type spiral galaxies using SDSS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pohlen, M; Trujillo, I

    2006-01-01

    Using imaging data from the SDSS survey, we present the g' and r' radial stellar light distribution of a complete sample of similar to 90 face-on to intermediate inclined, nearby, late-type (Sb-Sdm) spiral galaxies...

  19. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sako, Masao; et al.

    2014-01-14

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS Stripe 82, a 300 deg2 area along the celestial equator. This data release is comprised of all transient sources brighter than r~22.5 mag with no history of variability prior to 2004. Dedicated spectroscopic observations were performed on a subset of 889 transients, as well as spectra for thousands of transient host galaxies using the SDSS-III BOSS spectrographs. Photometric classifications are provided for the candidates with good multi-color light curves that were not observed spectroscopically. From these observations, 4607 transients are either spectroscopically confirmed, or likely to be, supernovae, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2 distance moduli for a total of 1443 SN Ia with spectroscopic redshifts as well as photometric redshifts for a further 677 purely-photometric SN Ia candidates. Using the spectroscopically confirmed subset of the three-year SDSS-II SN Ia sample and assuming a flat Lambda-CDM cosmology, we determine Omega_M = 0.315 +/- 0.093 (statistical error only) and detect a non-zero cosmological constant at 5.7 sigmas.

  20. Selections from 2017: Mapping the Universe with SDSS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2017, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume in January.Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant UniversePublished June2017Main takeaway:The incredibly prolific Sloan Digital Sky Survey has provided photometric observations of around 500 million objects and spectra for more than 3 million objects. The survey has now entered its fourth iteration, SDSS-IV, with the first public data release made in June 2016. A publication led by Michael Blanton (New York University) describes the facilities used for SDSS-IV, its science goals, and itsthree coreprograms.Why its interesting:Since data collection began in 2000, SDSS has been one of the premier surveysproviding imaging and spectroscopy for objects in both the near and distant universe.SDSS has measured spectra not only for the stars in our own Milky Way, but also for galaxies that lie more than 7 billion light-years distant making itan extremelyuseful and powerful tool for mapping our universe.What SDSS-IV is looking for:SDSS image of an example MaNGA target galaxy (left), with some of the many things we can learn about it shown in the right and bottom panels: stellar velocity dispersion, stellar mean velocity, stellar population age, metallicity, etc. [Blanton et al. 2017]SDSS-IV containsthree core programs:Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2)provides high-resolution near-infrared spectra of hundreds of thousands of Milky-Way stars with the goal ofimproving our understanding of the history of the Milky Way and of stellar astrophysics.Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA)obtains spatially resolved spectra for thousands of nearby galaxiesto better understand the evolutionary histories of galaxies and what regulates their star formation

  1. Comparison of Asteroids Observed in the SDSS with a Catalog of Known Asteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Juric, M.; Ivezic, Z.; Lupton, H. R.; Quinn, T.; Tabachnik, S.

    2002-01-01

    We positionally correlate asteroids from existing catalogs with a sample of $\\about$18,000 asteroids detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS, Ivezi\\'{c} {\\em et al.} 2001). We find 2641 unique matches, which represent the largest sample of asteroids with both accurate multi-color photometry and known orbital parameters. The matched objects are predominantly bright, and demonstrate that the SDSS photometric pipeline recovers \\about90% of the known asteroids in the observed region. For t...

  2. Quasar Absorption Lines and SDSS Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Emileigh Suzanne; Scott, Jennifer E.; Oldak, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the sightlines of 45 low redshift quasars (0.06 footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use both the SDSS DR12 galaxy photometric data, including photometric redshifts, and the measured properties of the absorbers along with the known absorption characteristics of the intergalactic medium and the circumgalactic medium of galaxies to assign the most probable galaxy matches for each absorber in the sample, using estimated galaxy luminosities and virial radii as a discriminator. We show that the scheme can recover known galaxy-absorber matches found from spectroscopic data and thus provides a method for identifying likely pairs in photometric data sets as well as targets for spectroscopic follow up.

  3. Measuring Quasar Variability with Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganson, E.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Green, P. J.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Marshall, P. J.; Morgan, J. S.; Price, P. A.; Rix, H.-W.; Schlafly, E. F.; Tonry, J. L.; Walter, F.

    2014-04-01

    We measure quasar variability using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 Survey (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and establish a method of selecting quasars via their variability in 104 deg2 surveys. We use 105 spectroscopically confirmed quasars that have been well measured in both PS1 and SDSS and take advantage of the decadal timescales that separate SDSS measurements and PS1 measurements. A power law model fits the data well over the entire time range tested, 0.01-10 yr. Variability in the current PS1-SDSS data set can efficiently distinguish between quasars and nonvarying objects. It improves the purity of a griz quasar color cut from 4.1% to 48% while maintaining 67% completeness. Variability will be very effective at finding quasars in data sets with no u band and in redshift ranges where exclusively photometric selection is not efficient. We show that quasars' rest-frame ensemble variability, measured as a root mean squared in Δ magnitudes, is consistent with V(z, L, t) = A 0(1 + z)0.37(L/L 0)-0.16(t/1 yr)0.246, where L 0 = 1046 erg s-1 and A 0 = 0.190, 0.162, 0.147, or 0.141 in the g P1, r P1, i P1, or z P1filter, respectively. We also fit across all four filters and obtain median variability as a function of z, L, and λ as V(z, L, λ, t) = 0.079(1 + z)0.15(L/L 0)-0.2(λ/1000 nm)-0.44(t/1 yr)0.246.

  4. THE GALEX ARECIBO SDSS SURVEY. V. THE RELATION BETWEEN THE H I CONTENT OF GALAXIES AND METAL ENRICHMENT AT THEIR OUTSKIRTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Sean M.; Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kauffmann, Guinevere; Catinella, Barbara; Wang Jing; Fabello, Silvia [Max Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Dave, Romeel [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Brinchmann, Jarle [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schiminovich, David; Hummels, Cameron; Lemonias, Jenna [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Saintonge, Amelie; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Tacconi, Linda [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessesbach-Str., 85748 Garching (Germany); Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha [Department of Astronomy, 610 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu Ronin, E-mail: moran@pha.jhu.edu [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-01-20

    We have obtained long-slit spectra of 174 star-forming galaxies with stellar masses greater than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} from the GALEX Arecibo Sloan Digital Sky Survey (GASS) survey. These galaxies have both H I and H{sub 2} mass measurements. The average metallicity profile is strikingly flat out to R{sub 90}, the radius enclosing 90% of the r-band light. Metallicity profiles which decline steadily with radius are found primarily for galaxies in our sample with low stellar mass (log(M{sub *}) < 10.2), concentration, and/or mean stellar mass density. Beyond {approx}R{sub 90}, however, around 10% of the galaxies in our sample exhibit a sharp downturn in metallicity. Remarkably, we find that the magnitude of the outer metallicity drop is well correlated with the total H I content of the galaxy (measured as f{sub HI} = M{sub HI}/M{sub *}). We examine the radial profiles of stellar population ages and star formation rate densities, and conclude that the galaxies with largest outer metallicity drops are actively growing their stellar disks, with mass-doubling times across the whole disk only one-third as long as a typical GASS galaxy. We also describe a correlation between local stellar mass density and metallicity, which is valid across all galaxies in our sample. We argue that much of the recent stellar mass growth at the edges of these galaxies can be linked to the accretion or radial transport of relatively pristine gas from beyond the galaxies' stellar disks.

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  6. Photometric Asymmetry Between Clockwise and Counterclockwise Spiral Galaxies in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior

    2017-02-01

    While galaxies with clockwise and counterclockwise handedness are visually different, they are expected to be symmetric in all of their other characteristics. Previous experiments using both manual analysis and machine vision have shown that the handedness of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies can be predicted with accuracy significantly higher than mere chance using its photometric data alone. However, some of these previous experiments were based on manually classified galaxies, and the results may therefore be subjected to bias originated from the human perception. This paper describes an experiment based on a set of 162,514 galaxies classified automatically to clockwise and counterclockwise spiral galaxies, showing that the source of the asymmetry in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is not the human perception bias. The results are compared to two smaller datasets, and confirm the observation that the handedness of SDSS galaxies can be predicted by their photometry. The experiment also shows statistically significant differences in the measured magnitude of SDSS galaxies, according which galaxies with clockwise patterns are brighter than galaxies with counterclockwise patterns. The magnitude of that difference changes across RA ranges, and exhibits a strong correlation with the cosine of the right ascension.

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the power spectrum and bispectrum of the DR12 BOSS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Verde, Licia; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-02-01

    We measure and analyse the bispectrum of the final data release 12 (DR12), galaxy sample provided by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, splitting by selection algorithm into LOWZ and CMASS galaxies. The LOWZ sample contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zLOWZ = 0.32, and the CMASS sample contains 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zCMASS = 0.57. Combining the power spectrum, measured relative to the line of sight, with the spherically averaged bispectrum, we are able to constrain the product of the growth of structure parameter, f, and the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations, σ8, along with the geometric Alcock-Paczynski parameters, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch, H(z)rs(zd), and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon, DA(z)/rs(zd). After combining pre-reconstruction RSD analyses of the power spectrum monopole, quadrupole and bispectrum monopole with post-reconstruction analysis of the BAO power spectrum monopole and quadrupole, we find f(zLOWZ)σ8(zLOWZ) = 0.427 ± 0.056, DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.60 ± 0.13, H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.55 ± 0.38)103 km s-1 for the LOWZ sample, and f(zCMASS)σ8(zCMASS) = 0.426 ± 0.029, DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.39 ± 0.10, H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.02 ± 0.22)103 km s-1 for the CMASS sample. We find general agreement with previous Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR11 and DR12 measurements. Combining our data set with Planck15 we perform a null test of General Relativity through the γ-parametrization finding γ =0.733^{+0.068}_{-0.069}, which is ˜2.7σ away from the General Relativity predictions.

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Ata, Metin; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Reid, Beth A.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A.; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-09-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method, in combination with a cosmic microwave background prior on the sound horizon scale, after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DMH from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by fσ8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine individual measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method; in particular, the AP measurement from sub-BAO scales sharpens constraints from post-reconstruction BAOs by breaking degeneracy between DM and H. Combined with Planck 2016 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature ΩK = 0.0003 ± 0.0026 and a dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.01 ± 0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter (CDM) model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Our RSD measurements of fσ8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3 ± 1.0 km s-1 Mpc-1 even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 Mpc-1. Assuming flat

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering - towards an accurate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gong-bo; Wang, Yuting; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Slosar, Anže; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-10-01

    We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z) and the physical matter density Ωm h2. We adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a 'single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalize over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationally expensive for advanced theoretical models. We develop a new methodology to speed up the analysis. Using the range 40 h-1 Mpc < s < 180 h-1 Mpc, we obtain {DA(z)rs,fid/rs (Mpc), H(z)rs/rs,fid km s-1 Mpc-1, f(z)σ8(z), Ωm h2} = {956 ± 28, 75.0 ± 4.0, 0.397 ± 0.073, 0.143 ± 0.017} at z = 0.32 and {1421 ± 23, 96.7 ± 2.7, 0.497 ± 0.058, 0.137 ± 0.015} at z = 0.59 where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc for the fiducial cosmology used in this study. Combining our measurements with Planck data, we obtain Ωm = 0.306 ± 0.009, H0 = 67.9 ± 0.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 and σ8 = 0.815 ± 0.009 assuming Λcold dark matter (CDM); Ωk = 0.000 ± 0.003 and w = -1.02 ± 0.08 assuming owCDM. Our results show no tension with the flat ΛCDM cosmological paradigm. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey.

  10. Stripe delay filters

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharov, Alexander V.; Ilchenko, Mykhailo Ye.; Trubarov, Igor V.; Pinchuk, Ludmila S.

    2016-01-01

    There are considered constructions of microsized stripe delay filters, which are realized on a basis of ceramic materials with high dielectric permittivity. Delay time of non-minimal phase filters is 7–12 ns at frequencies of 1900 MHz with relative bandwidth of 3.6–3.85%. Filters dimensions are comparable with ones used in portable communication devices. Dimensions of researched three-resonator filter at frequency of 1900 MHz are 8.4×5×2 mm with material dielectric permittivity εr = 92, and 5...

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-05-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power-spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new fast-Fourier-transform-based estimators, we measure the power-spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular-diameter distance, the Hubble parameter and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full-shape clustering measurements in combination with cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernova data. Assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1 Mpc^{-1}}, at a confidence level of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy-clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  12. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: towards a computationally efficient analysis without informative priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gongbo; Ross, Ashley J.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose A.; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-07-01

    We develop a new computationally efficient methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors (those coming from extra probes) in the estimation of cosmological parameters. Using our new methodology, we extract the dark energy model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of {R, la, Ωbh2, ns, log(As), Ωk, H(z), DA(z), f(z)σ8(z)}, which give an efficient summary of the Planck data and two-point statistics from the BOSS galaxy sample. The CMB shift parameters are R=√{Ω _m H_0^2} r(z_*) and la = πr(z*)/rs(z*), where z* is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and r(z*) and rs(z*) denote our comoving distance to the z* and sound horizon at z*, respectively; Ωb is the baryon fraction at z = 0. This approximate methodology guarantees that we will not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is unable to constrain, I.e. Ωbh2 and ns. The main advantage is that the computational time required for extracting these parameters is decreased by a factor of 60 with respect to exact full-likelihood analyses. The results obtained show no tension with the flat Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological paradigm. By comparing with the full-likelihood exact analysis with fixed dark energy models, on one hand we demonstrate that the double-probe method provides robust cosmological parameter constraints that can be conveniently used to study dark energy models, and on the other hand we provide a reliable set of measurements assuming dark energy models to be used, for example, in distance estimations. We extend our study to measure the sum of the neutrino mass using different methodologies, including double-probe analysis (introduced in this study), full-likelihood analysis and single-probe analysis

  13. Galaxy Clustering in Early SDSS Redshift Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zehavi, I.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Mo, Houjun J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Strauss, Michael A.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Briggs, John W.; Brinkmann, Jon; Burles, Scott; Carey, Larry; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, J.; Csabai, Istvan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dodelson,Scott; Doi,Mamoru; Eisenstein, Daniel; Evans, Michael L.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Friedman, Scott; Fukugita, Masataka; Gunn, James E.; Hennessy, Greg S.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent,Stephen; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kron, Richard; Kunszt, Peter; Lamb, Donald; French Leger, R.; Long, Daniel C.; Loveday, Jon.; Lupton, Robert H.; McKay, Timothy; Meiksin, Avery; Merrelli, Aronne; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Narayanan, Vijay; Newcomb, Matt; Nichol, Robert C.; Owen, Russell; Peoples, John; Pope, Adrian; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Sheth, Ravi K.; Siegmund, Walter; Smee, Stephen; Snir, Yehuda; Stebbins, Albert; Stoughton, Christopher; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istvan; Tegmark, Max; Tucker, Douglas L.; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Dan; Vogeley, Michael S.; Waddell,Patrick; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G.; Zehavi, Idit; Blanton, Michael R.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Mo, Houjun J.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first measurements of clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy redshift survey. Our sample consists of 29,300 galaxies with redshifts 5,700 km/s < cz < 39,000 km/s, distributed in several long but narrow (2.5-5 degree) segments, covering 690 square degrees. For the full, flux-limited sample, the redshift-space correlation length is approximately 8 Mpc/h. The two-dimensional correlation function \\xi(r_p,\\pi) shows clear signatures of both the small-scale, ``fingers-of-God'' distortion caused by velocity dispersions in collapsed objects and the large-scale compression caused by coherent flows, though the latter cannot be measured with high precision in the present sample. The inferred real-space correlation function is well described by a power law, \\xi(r)=(r/6.1+/-0.2 Mpc/h)^{-1.75+/-0.03}, for 0.1 Mpc/h < r < 16 Mpc/h. The galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion is \\sigma_{12} ~ 600+/-100 km/s for projected separations 0.15 Mpc/h < r_p < 5 Mpc/h. When we divide the...

  14. Exploding Stars and Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The discovery of a pattern of X-ray "stripes" in the remains of an exploded star may provide the first direct evidence that a cosmic event can accelerate particles to energies a hundred times higher than achieved by the most powerful particle accelerator on Earth. This result comes from a very long observation of the Tycho supernova remnant with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. It could explain how some of the extremely energetic particles bombarding the Earth, called cosmic rays, are produced. "We've seen lots of intriguing structures in supernova remnants, but we've never seen stripes before," said Kristoffer Eriksen, a postdoctoral researcher at Rutgers University who led the study. "This made us think very hard about what's happening in the blast wave of this powerful explosion." This latest study from Chandra provides support for a theory about how magnetic fields can be dramatically amplified in such blast waves. In this theory, the magnetic fields become highly tangled and the motions of the particles very turbulent near the expanding supernova shock wave at the front edge of the supernova remnant. High-energy charged particles can bounce back and forth across the shock wave repeatedly, gaining energy with each crossing. Theoretical models of the motion of the most energetic particles -- which are mostly protons -- are predicted to leave a messy network of holes and dense walls corresponding to weak and strong regions of magnetic fields, respectively. The X-ray stripes discovered by the Chandra researchers are thought to be regions where the turbulence is greater and the magnetic fields more tangled than surrounding areas, and may be the walls predicted by the theory. Electrons become trapped in these regions and emit X-rays as they spiral around the magnetic field lines. However, the regular and almost periodic pattern of the X-ray stripes was not predicted by the theory. "It was a big surprise to find such a neatly arranged set of stripes," said co

  15. The SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey – I. Survey overview and photometric catalogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlanetto, Cristina; Santiago, Basílio X.; Makler, Martín; Cypriano, Eduardo S.; Caminha, Gabriel B.; Pereira, Maria E. S.; Neto, Angelo Fausti; Estrada, Juan; Lin, Huan; Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.

    2013-04-11

    We present the first results of the SOAR (Southern Astrophysical Research) Gravitational Arc Survey (SOGRAS). The survey imaged 47 clusters in two redshift intervals centered at $z=0.27$ and $z=0.55$, targeting the richest clusters in each interval. Images were obtained in the $g'$, $r'$ and $i'$ bands using the SOAR Optical Imager (SOI), with a median seeing of 0.83, 0.76 and 0.71 arcsec, respectively, in these filters. Most of the survey clusters are located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 region and all of them are in the SDSS footprint. Photometric calibration was therefore performed using SDSS stars located in our SOI fields. We reached for galaxies in all fields the detection limits of $g \\sim 23.5$, $r \\sim 23$ and $i \\sim 22.5$ for a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) = 3. As a by-product of the image processing, we generated a source catalogue with 19760 entries, the vast majority of which are galaxies, where we list their positions, magnitudes and shape parameters. We compared our galaxy shape measurements to those of local galaxies and concluded that they were not strongly affected by seeing. From the catalogue data, we are able to identify a red sequence of galaxies in most clusters in the lower $z$ range. We found 16 gravitational arc candidates around 8 clusters in our sample. They tend to be bluer than the central galaxies in the lensing cluster. A preliminary analysis indicates that $\\sim 10%$ of the clusters have arcs around them, with a possible indication of a larger efficiency associated to the high-$z$ systems when compared to the low-$z$ ones. Deeper follow-up images with Gemini strengthen the case for the strong lensing nature of the candidates found in this survey.

  16. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  17. Constraining RRc candidates using SDSS colours

    OpenAIRE

    Bányai, E.; Plachy, E.; Molnár, L.; Dobos, L.; Szabó, R.

    2016-01-01

    The light variations of first-overtone RR Lyrae stars and contact eclipsing binaries can be difficult to distinguish. The Catalina Periodic Variable Star catalog contains several misclassified objects, despite the classification efforts by Drake et al. (2014). They used metallicity and surface gravity derived from spectroscopic data (from the SDSS database) to rule out binaries. Our aim is to further constrain the catalog using SDSS colours to estimate physical parameters for stars that did n...

  18. Comparison of highway striping materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate problems relating to the durability of pavement striping materials used by the Department. The research was limited to an evaluation of the durability and retroreflectance characteristics of selected paints, t...

  19. Geysers from the Tiger Stripes of Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Enceladus, the sixth-largest moon of Saturn, is a cold, icy world but its also remarkably active. Recent studies have charted over a hundred geysers venting gas and dust into space from Enceladus south polar region. New research addresses the question of how the moons extreme surface terrain influences the locations and behavior of these geysers.Active PlumesEnceladus orbiting within Saturns E ring. Enceladus plumes probably created this ring. [NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute]A decade ago, scientists discovered that Enceladus south polar region is home to a prominent set of four fractures known as the tiger stripes. This region was found to contain roughly 100 geyser jets, which form plumes of gas and dust venting into space at a combined rate of ~200 kilograms per second! These plumes are probably the source of the material in Saturns E ring, in which Enceladus orbits.Recently, Carolyn Porco (UC Berkeley and CICLOPS Space Science Institute) led a study that analyzed 6.5 years of Cassini data, surveying the locations and orientations of 101 geysers. The outcome was peculiar: the geysers are distributed along the tiger stripes, but their directions are not all pointing vertically from the surface (see the video below!).Now, Paul Helfenstein (Cornell University) has teamed up with Porco to examine whether the surface terrain surrounding the geysers affects where the jets erupt, what direction they point, and even when theyre active.Surface InfluenceHelfenstein and Porco demonstrate that the locations and behavior of the geysers are very likely influenced by Enceladus surface features in this region. In particular, they find:The spacing of the geyser jets on Enceladus is not random.The jets are roughly uniformly distributed along the three most active tiger stripes, spaced about 5 kilometers apart. This fixed spacing might be due to shear fractures produced by fault motion along the tiger stripes cutting across the stripes at regular intervals and providing

  20. Characterizing Sky Spectra Using SDSS BOSS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Lina Maria; Strauss, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    In the optical/near-infrared spectra gathered by a ground-based telescope observing very faint sources, the strengths of the emission lines due to the Earth’s atmosphere can be many times larger than the fluxes of the sources we are interested in. Thus the limiting factor in faint-object spectroscopy is the degree to which systematics in the sky subtraction can be minimized. Longwards of 6000 Angstroms, the night-sky spectrum is dominated by multiple vibrational/rotational transitions of the OH radical from our upper atmosphere. While the wavelengths of these lines are the same in each sky spectrum, their relative strengths vary considerably as a function of time and position on the sky. The better we can model their strengths, the better we can hope to subtract them off. We expect that the strength of lines from common upper energy levels will be correlated with one another. We used flux-calibrated sky spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS BOSS) to explore these correlations. Our aim is to use these correlations for creating improved sky subtraction algorithms for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. When PFS starts gathering data in 2019, it will be the most powerful multi-object spectrograph in the world. Since PFS will be gathering data on sources as faint as 24th magnitude and fainter, it's of upmost importance to be able to accurately measure and subtract sky spectra from the data that we receive.

  1. Applying the Support Vector Machine Method to Matching IRAS and SDSS Catalogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Cao

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of applying a machine learning technique, the Support Vector Machine (SVM, to the astronomical problem of matching the Infra-Red Astronomical Satellite (IRAS and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS object catalogues. In this study, the IRAS catalogue has much larger positional uncertainties than those of the SDSS. A model was constructed by applying the supervised learning algorithm (SVM to a set of training data. Validation of the model shows a good identification performance (∼ 90% correct, better than that derived from classical cross-matching algorithms, such as the likelihood-ratio method used in previous studies.

  2. A Comparison of Galaxy Bulge+Disk Decomposition Between Pan-STARRS and SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokken, Martine Elena; McPartland, Conor; Sanders, David B.

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the size and shape of bulges in galaxies provide key constraints for models of galaxy evolution. A comprehensive catalog of bulge measurements for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies is currently available to the public. However, the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3π survey now covers the same region with ~1-2 mag deeper photometry, a ~10-30% smaller PSF, and additional coverage in y-band. To test how much improvement in galaxy parameter measurements (e.g. bulge + disk) can be achieved using the new PS1 data, we make use of ultra-deep imaging data from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP). We fit bulge+disk models to images of 372 bright (mi < 18.5) galaxies detected in all three surveys. Comparison of galaxy parameters derived from SDSS and PS1 images with those measured from HSC-SSP images shows a tighter correlation between PS1 and SSP measurements for both bulge and disk parameters. Bulge parameters, such as bulge-to-total fraction and bulge radius, show the strongest improvement. However, measurements of all parameters degrade for galaxies with total r-band magnitude below the SDSS spectroscopic limit, mr = 17.7. We plan to use the PS1 3π survey data to produce an updated catalog of bulge+disk decomposition measurements for the entire SDSS DR7 spectroscopic galaxy sample.

  3. The structure of galactic disks - Studying late-type spiral galaxies using SDSS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohlen, M.; Trujillo, I.

    Using imaging data from the SDSS survey, we present the g' and r' radial stellar light distribution of a complete sample of similar to 90 face-on to intermediate inclined, nearby, late-type (Sb-Sdm) spiral galaxies. The surface brightness profiles are reliable (1s uncertainty less than 0.2 mag) down

  4. A Multi-Survey Approach to White Dwarf Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    magnitude-limited astrometric survey is conducted, such as Gaia or LSST . Only a subset of our WD candidates were able to be observed because of telescope...Higher Education Funding Council for England. The SDSS Web site is http://www.sdss.org/. The SDSS is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium

  5. The Alignment effect of brightest cluster galaxies in the SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Rita S.J.; Annis, Jim; Strauss, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Gunn, James E.; Kepner, Jeremy V.; Postman, Marc

    2001-10-01

    One of the most vital observational clues for unraveling the origin of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) is the observed alignment of the BCGs with their host cluster and its surroundings. We have examined the BCG-cluster alignment effect, using clusters of galaxies detected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the BCGs are preferentially aligned with the principal axis of their hosts, to a much higher redshift (z >~ 0.3) than probed by previous studies (z <~ 0.1). The alignment effect strongly depends on the magnitude difference of the BCG and the second and third brightest cluster members: we find a strong alignment effect for the dominant BCGs, while less dominant BCGs do not show any departure from random alignment with respect to the cluster. We therefore claim that the alignment process originates from the same process that makes the BCG grow dominant, be it direct mergers in the early stage of cluster formation, or a later process that resembles the galactic cannibalism scenario. We do not find strong evidence for (or against) redshift evolution between 0SDSS cluster catalogs, which will provide us with better statistics for systematic investigations of the alignment with redshift, richness and morphology of both the cluster and the BCG.

  6. The milky way tomography with sdss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juric, Mario; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brooks, Alyson; Lupton, Robert H.; Schlegel, David; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Bond, Nicholas; Rockosi, Constance M.; Knapp,; Gunn, James E.; Sumi, Takahiro; Schneider, Donald; Barentine, J.C.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U., ICRR

    2005-10-01

    Using the photometric parallax method, we estimate the distances to {approx}48 million stars detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and map their three-dimensional number density distribution in the Galaxy. The currently available data sample the distance range from 100 pc to 15 kpc and cover 6,500 deg{sup 2} of sky, mostly at high galactic latitudes (|b| > 25). These stellar number density maps allow an investigation of the Galactic structure without any a priori assumptions about its components. The data show strong evidence for a Galaxy consisting of an oblate halo, disk components, and a number of localized overdensities. The number density distribution of stars in the Solar neighborhood (D < 1.5kpc) favors a model having a ''thin'' and a ''thick'' exponential disk, with scale heights and lengths of H{sub 1} {approx} 280 pc and L{sub 1} {approx} 2400pc, and H{sub 2} {approx} 1200pc and L{sub 2} {approx} 3500pc, respectively, and local thick-to-thin disk normalization {rho}{sub thick} (R{sub {circle_dot}})/{rho}{sub thin}(R{sub {circle_dot}}) = 4%. Fits applied to the entire dataset are significantly more uncertain due to the presence of clumps and overdensities. The halo power law index is very poorly constrained, but we find an oblate halo with c/a {approx} 0.5 to be strongly preferred. While roughly consistent with this simple model, the measured density distribution shows a number of statistically significant deviations from the model predictions. In addition to known features, such as the Monoceros stream, a remarkable density enhancement covering over a thousand square degrees of sky is detected towards the constellation of Virgo, at distances of {approx} 5-15 kpc. Compared to counts in a region symmetric with respect to the l = 0 line and with the same Galactic latitude, it is responsible for a factor of 2 number density excess, and may be a nearby tidal stream or a low-surface brightness dwarf galaxy

  7. The sloan digital sky survey-II supernova survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Bassett, Bruce; Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5° wide...... the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327...... spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during...

  8. MOTION VERIFIED RED STARS (MoVeRS): A CATALOG OF PROPER MOTION SELECTED LOW-MASS STARS FROM WISE, SDSS, AND 2MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theissen, Christopher A.; West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Dhital, Saurav, E-mail: ctheisse@bu.edu [Department of Physical Sciences, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Blvd., Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We present a photometric catalog of 8,735,004 proper motion selected low-mass stars (KML-spectral types) within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint, from the combined SDSS Data Release 10 (DR10), Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) point-source catalog (PSC), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) AllWISE catalog. Stars were selected using r − i, i − z, r − z, z − J, and z − W1 colors, and SDSS, WISE, and 2MASS astrometry was combined to compute proper motions. The resulting 3,518,150 stars were augmented with proper motions for 5,216,854 earlier type stars from the combined SDSS and United States Naval Observatory B1.0 catalog (USNO-B). We used SDSS+USNO-B proper motions to determine the best criteria for selecting a clean sample of stars. Only stars whose proper motions were greater than their 2σ uncertainty were included. Our Motion Verified Red Stars catalog is available through SDSS CasJobs and VizieR.

  9. The SDSS Discovery of a Strongly Lensed Post-Starburst Galaxy at z=0.766

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Min-Su; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Falco, Emilio E.; Broadhurst, Tom; Gunn, James E.

    2008-09-30

    We present the first result of a survey for strong galaxy-galaxy lenses in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. SDSS J082728.70+223256.4 was selected as a lensing candidate using selection criteria based on the color and positions of objects in the SDSS photometric catalog. Follow-up imaging and spectroscopy showed this object to be a lensing system. The lensing galaxy is an elliptical at z = 0.349 in a galaxy cluster. The lensed galaxy has the spectrum of a post-starburst galaxy at z = 0.766. The lensing galaxy has an estimated mass of {approx} 1.2 x 10{sup 12} M{sub {circle_dot}} and the corresponding mass to light ratio in the B-band is {approx} 26 M{sub {circle_dot}}/L{sub {circle_dot}} inside 1.1 effective radii of the lensing galaxy. Our study shows how catalogs drawn from multi-band surveys can be used to find strong galaxy-galaxy lenses having multiple lens images. Our strong lensing candidate selection based on photometry-only catalogs will be useful in future multi-band imaging surveys such as SNAP and LSST.

  10. Galaxy Zoo: finding offset discs and bars in SDSS galaxies★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Sandor J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Bamford, Steven P.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Fortson, Lucy; Hart, Ross E.; Häußler, Boris; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Smethurst, Rebecca J.

    2017-08-01

    We use multiwavelength Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images and Galaxy Zoo morphologies to identify a sample of ˜270 late-type galaxies with an off-centre bar. We measure offsets in the range 0.2-2.5 kpc between the photometric centres of the stellar disc and stellar bar. The measured offsets correlate with global asymmetries of the galaxies, with those with largest offsets showing higher lopsidedness. These findings are in good agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf-dwarf tidal interactions producing off-centre bars. We find that the majority of galaxies with off-centre bars are of Magellanic type, with a median mass of 109.6 M⊙, and 91 per cent of them having M⋆ < 3 × 1010 M⊙, the characteristic mass at which galaxies start having higher central concentrations attributed to the presence of bulges. We conduct a search for companions to test the hypothesis of tidal interactions, but find that a similar fraction of galaxies with offset bars have companions within 100 kpc as galaxies with centred bars. Although this may be due to the incompleteness of the SDSS spectroscopic survey at the faint end, alternative scenarios that give rise to offset bars such as interactions with dark companions or the effect of lopsided halo potentials should be considered. Future observations are needed to confirm possible low-mass companion candidates and to determine the shape of the dark matter halo, in order to find the explanation for the off-centre bars in these galaxies.

  11. On the level of cluster assembly bias in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Ying; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Simet, Melanie; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, several studies have discovered a strong discrepancy between the large-scale clustering biases of two subsamples of galaxy clusters at the same halo mass, split by their average projected membership distances 〈Rmem〉. The level of this discrepancy significantly exceeds the maximum halo assembly bias predicted by Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM). We explore whether some of the large-scale bias differences could be caused by projection effects in 〈Rmem〉 due to other systems along the line of sight. We thoroughly investigate the assembly bias of the redMaPPer clusters in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), by defining a new variant of the average membership distance estimator \\tilde{R}_{mem} that is robust against projection effects in the cluster membership identification. Using the angular mark correlation functions, we show that the large-scale bias differences when splitting by 〈Rmem〉 can be mostly attributed to projection effects. After splitting by \\tilde{R}_{mem}, the anomalously large signal is reduced, giving a ratio of 1.02 ± 0.14 between the two clustering biases as measured from weak lensing. Using a realistic mock cluster catalogue, we predict that the bias ratio between two \\tilde{R}_{mem}-split subsamples should be ≃1.10, which is >60 per cent weaker than the maximum halo assembly bias (1.24) when split by halo concentration. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the level of halo assembly bias exhibited by clusters in SDSS is consistent with the ΛCDM prediction. With a 10-fold increase in cluster numbers, deeper ongoing surveys will enable a more robust detection of halo assembly bias. Our findings also have important implications for quantifying the impact of projection effects on cosmological constraints using photometrically selected clusters.

  12. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Robert D.; Scyphers, Steven B.; Grabowski, Jonathan H.

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis) and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and...

  13. A Study of E+A Galaxies Through SDSS-MaNGA Integral Field Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wally, Muhammad; Weaver, Olivia A.; Anderson, Miguel Ricardo; Liu, Allen; Falcone, Julia; Wallack, Nicole Lisa; James, Olivia; Liu, Charles

    2017-01-01

    We outline the selection process and analysis of sixteen E+A galaxies observed by the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at the Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey as a part of the fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). We present their Integral field spectroscopy and analyze their spatial distribution of stellar ages, metallicities and other stellar population properties. We can potentially study the variation in these properties as a function of redshift. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement #SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island. This work was also supported by grants to The American Museum of Natural History, and the CUNY College of Staten Island through The National Science Foundation.

  14. Pinning of holographic sliding stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokela, Niko; Järvinen, Matti; Lippert, Matthew

    2017-11-01

    In a holographic probe-brane model exhibiting a spontaneously spatially modulated ground state, we introduce explicit sources of symmetry breaking in the form of ionic and antiferromagnetic lattices. For the first time in a holographic model, we demonstrate pinning, in which the translational Goldstone mode is lifted by the introduction of explicit sources of translational symmetry breaking. The numerically computed optical conductivity fits very well to a Drude-Lorentz model with a small residual metallicity, precisely matching analytic formulas for the DC conductivity. We also find an instability of the striped phase in the presence of a large-amplitude ionic lattice.

  15. Performance of the SDSS-III MARVELS New Data Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Ge, J.; Thomas, N. B.; Shi, J.; Petersen, E.; Ouyang, Y.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Sithajan, S.

    2013-01-01

    As one of the four surveys in the SDSS-III program, MARVELS (Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey) had monitored over 3,300 stars during 2008-2012 with each observed about 27 times over a 2-year window. MARVELS has successfully produced over 20 brown dwarf candidates and several hundreds of binaries. However, the early data pipeline has large long term systematic errors and cannot reliably produce giant planet candidates. Our new MARVELS pipeline team, with the assistance of UF Department of Mathematics, has made great progress in dealing with the long-term systematic errors over the past 9 months. We redesigned the entire pre-processing procedure to handle various types of systematic effects caused by the instrument (such as trace, slant and distortion) and observation condition changes (such as illumination profile). We explored several advanced methods to precisely extract the RV signal from the processed spectra. We also developed a new simulation program to model all of these effects and used it to test the performance of our new pipeline. Our goal is to deliver a new pipeline to meet the survey baseline performance 10-35 m/s for the survey stars) by the end of 2012. We will report the fundamental performance of the pipeline and lessons learned from the pipeline development.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SpIES: the Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (Timlin+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, J. D.; Ross, N. P.; Richards, G. T.; Lacy, M.; Ryan, E. L.; Stone, R. B.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, X.; Glikman, E.; Haggard, D.; Jiang, L.; Lamassa, S. M.; Lin, Y.-T.; Makler, M.; McGehee, P.; Myers, A. D.; Schneider, D. P.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, E. J.; Zakamska, N. L.

    2016-09-01

    The observational goal of the SpIES project was to map SDSS Stripe 82 (S82) field located on the Celestial Equator spanning a range of -60°SpIES observations cover approximately one-third of this region centered on δ=0° and spanning the range from -30°SpIES) data were obtained as part of Cycle 9 (2012-2014) of the Spitzer "warm" post-cryogenic mission utilizing the first two channels (3.6 and 4.5um) of IRAC. In total, SpIES is comprised of 154 individual Astronomical Observation Requests (AORs) observed over two epochs separated by no less than five hours in time (77 AORs per epoch), which corresponds to ~70000 IRAC FOVs spanning the full survey area. See section 3 for further explanations. (4 data files).

  17. AGN Accretion Physics in the Time Domain: Survey Cadences, Stochastic Analysis, and Physical Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jackeline; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon; O'Brien, John T.; Kasliwal, Vishal

    2018-01-01

    We present rigorous testing of survey cadences (K2, SDSS, CRTS, & Pan-STARRS) for quasar variability science using a magnetohydrodynamics synthetic lightcurve and the canonical lightcurve from Kepler, Zw 229.15. We explain where the state of the art is in regards to physical interpretations of stochastic models (CARMA) applied to AGN variability. Quasar variability offers a time domain approach of probing accretion physics at the SMBH scale. Evidence shows that the strongest amplitude changes in the brightness of AGN occur on long timescales ranging from months to hundreds of days. These global behaviors can be constrained by survey data despite low sampling resolution. CARMA processes provide a flexible family of models used to interpolate between data points, predict future observations and describe behaviors in a lightcurve. This is accomplished by decomposing a signal into rise and decay timescales, frequencies for cyclic behavior and shock amplitudes. Characteristic timescales may point to length-scales over which a physical process operates such as turbulent eddies, warping or hotspots due to local thermal instabilities. We present the distribution of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars in CARMA parameters space that pass our cadence tests and also explain how the Damped Harmonic Oscillator model, CARMA(2,1), reduces to the Damped Random Walk, CARMA(1,0), given the data in a specific region of the parameter space.

  18. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, John D.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Lacy, Mark; Ryan, Erin L.; Stone, Robert B.; Bauer, Franz E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Jiang, Linhua; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; Myers, Adam D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, Edward J.; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of ˜115 deg2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its “warm” mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z ≥slant 3 to test various models for “feedback” from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z ≥slant 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5σ depths of 6.13 μJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 μJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively—depths significantly fainter than the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically confirmed quasars (˜98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (˜55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z ≥slant 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.1 million sources, a 4.5 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing ˜5.4 million sources.

  19. Spectrophotometric Properties of E+A Galaxies in SDSS-IV MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Mariarosa; Dudley, Raymond; Edwards, Kay; Gonzalez, Andrea; Johnson, Amalya; Kerrison, Nicole; Melchert, Nancy; Ojanen, Winonah; Weaver, Olivia; Liu, Charles; SDSS-IV MaNGA

    2018-01-01

    Quenched post-starburst galaxies, or E+A galaxies, represent a unique and informative phase in the evolution of galaxies. We used a qualitative rubric-based methodology, informed by the literature, to manually select galaxies from the SDSS-IV IFU survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) using the single-fiber spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. Of the 2,812 galaxies observed so far in MaNGA, we found 39 galaxies meeting our criteria for E+A classification. Spectral energy distributions of these 39 galaxies from the far-UV to the mid-infrared demonstrate a heterogeneity in our sample emerging in the infrared, indicating many distinct paths to visually similar optical spectra. We used SDSS-IV MaNGA Pipe3D data products to analyze stellar population ages, and found that 34 galaxies exhibited stellar populations that were older at 1 effective radius than at the center of the galaxy. Given that our sample was manually chosen based on E+A markers in the single-fiber spectra aimed at the center of each galaxy, our E+A galaxies may have only experienced their significant starbursts in the central region, with a disk of quenched or quenching material further outward. This work was supported by grants AST-1460860 from the National Science Foundation and SDSS FAST/SSP-483 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  20. Satellite Galaxy Velocity Dispersions in the SDSS and Modified Gravity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Moffat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS provides data on several hundred thousand galaxies. The precise location of these galaxies in the sky, along with information about their luminosities and line-of-sight (Doppler velocities, allows one to construct a three-dimensional map of their location and estimate their line-of-sight velocity dispersion. This information, in principle, allows one to test dynamical gravity models, specifically models of satellite galaxy velocity dispersions near massive hosts. A key difficulty is the separation of true satellites from interlopers. We sidestep this problem by not attempting to derive satellite galaxy velocity dispersions from the data, but instead incorporate an interloper background into the mathematical models and compare the result to the actual data. We find that due to the presence of interlopers, it is not possible to exclude several gravitational theories on the basis of the SDSS data.

  1. The Milky Way Tomography with SDSS. 2. Stellar Metallicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle; Sesar, Branimir; /Washington U., Seattle; Juric, Mario; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Bond, Nicholas; /Princeton U.; Dalcanton, Julianne; /Washington U., Seattle; Rockosi, Constance M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab; Newberg, Heidi J.; /Rensselaer Poly.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Michigan State U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Texas U.; Wilhelm, Ron; /Texas Tech. /Michigan State U.

    2008-04-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is producing a massive spectroscopic database which already contains over 280,000 stellar spectra. Using effective temperature and metallicity derived from SDSS spectra for {approx}60,000 F and G type main sequence stars (0.2 < g-r < 0.6), we develop polynomial models, reminiscent of traditional methods based on the UBV photometry, for estimating these parameters from the SDSS u-g and g-r colors. These estimators reproduce SDSS spectroscopic parameters with a root-mean-square scatter of 100 K for effective temperature, and 0.2 dex for metallicity (limited by photometric errors), which are similar to random and systematic uncertainties in spectroscopic determinations. We apply this method to a photometric catalog of coadded SDSS observations and study the photometric metallicity distribution of {approx}200,000 F and G type stars observed in 300 deg{sup 2} of high Galactic latitude sky. These deeper (g < 20.5) and photometrically precise ({approx}0.01 mag) coadded data enable an accurate measurement of the unbiased metallicity distribution for a complete volume-limited sample of stars at distances between 500 pc and 8 kpc. The metallicity distribution can be exquisitely modeled using two components with a spatially varying number ratio, that correspond to disk and halo. The best-fit number ratio of the two components is consistent with that implied by the decomposition of stellar counts profiles into exponential disk and power-law halo components by Juric et al. (2008). The two components also possess the kinematics expected for disk and halo stars. The metallicity of the halo component can be modeled as a spatially invariant Gaussian distribution with a mean of [Fe/H] = -1.46 and a standard deviation of {approx}0.3 dex. The disk metallicity distribution is non-Gaussian, with a remarkably small scatter (rms {approx}0.16 dex) and the median smoothly decreasing with distance

  2. Comparing pymorph and SDSS photometry - II. The differences are more than semantics and are not dominated by intracluster light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, M.; Fischer, J.-L.; Sheth, R. K.; Meert, A.; Huertas-Company, M.; Shankar, F.; Vikram, V.

    2017-07-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) pipeline photometry underestimates the brightnesses of the most luminous galaxies. This is mainly because (I) the SDSS overestimates the sky background, and (II) single-component or two-component Sérsic-based models better fit the surface brightness profile of galaxies, especially at high luminosities, than the de Vaucouleurs model used by the SDSS pipeline. We use the pymorph photometric reductions to isolate effect (II) and show that it is the same in the full sample as in small group environments, and for satellites in the most massive clusters as well. None of these are expected to be significantly affected by intracluster light (ICL). We only see an additional effect for centrals in the most massive haloes, but we argue that even this is not dominated by ICL. Hence, for the vast majority of galaxies, the differences between pymorph and SDSS pipeline photometry cannot be ascribed to the semantics of whether or not one includes the ICL when describing the stellar mass of massive galaxies. Rather, they likely reflect differences in star formation or assembly histories. Failure to account for the SDSS underestimate has significantly biased most previous estimates of the SDSS luminosity and stellar mass functions, and therefore halo model estimates of the z ˜ 0.1 relation between the mass of a halo and that of the galaxy at its centre. We also show that when one studies correlations, at fixed group mass, with a quantity that was not used to define the groups, then selection effects appear. We show why such effects arise and should not be mistaken for physical effects.

  3. Mining the SDSS SkyServer SQL queries log

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Vitor M.; Santos, Rafael; Raddick, Jordan; Thakar, Ani

    2016-05-01

    SkyServer, the Internet portal for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) astronomic catalog, provides a set of tools that allows data access for astronomers and scientific education. One of SkyServer data access interfaces allows users to enter ad-hoc SQL statements to query the catalog. SkyServer also presents some template queries that can be used as basis for more complex queries. This interface has logged over 330 million queries submitted since 2001. It is expected that analysis of this data can be used to investigate usage patterns, identify potential new classes of queries, find similar queries, etc. and to shed some light on how users interact with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and how scientists have adopted the new paradigm of e-Science, which could in turn lead to enhancements on the user interfaces and experience in general. In this paper we review some approaches to SQL query mining, apply the traditional techniques used in the literature and present lessons learned, namely, that the general text mining approach for feature extraction and clustering does not seem to be adequate for this type of data, and, most importantly, we find that this type of analysis can result in very different queries being clustered together.

  4. An unobscured type II quasar candidate: SDSS J012032.19-005501.9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Yuan, W.; Komossa, S. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhou, H. Y.; Liu, W. J. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ai, Y. L. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Boisvert, J. H., E-mail: liye@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We report the finding of an unobscured type II active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidate, SDSS J012032.19-005501.9, at a relatively high redshift of 0.601, which shows a number of unusual properties. It varies significantly on timescales of years, typical of type I AGNs, and marginally on timescales of weeks. The color–magnitude relation and the structure function are also consistent with that of type I AGNs, which implies that its variability likely originates from the black hole accretion system. However, no broad emission line (BEL) is detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, and the upper limit of the equivalent width of the Hβ BEL is much less than that of type I AGNs. These properties suggest that SDSS J012032.19-005501.9 may be an unobscured quasar without intrinsically broad emission lines, namely, an unobscured type II AGN or “true” type II AGN. Furthermore, its continuum luminosity is at least one order of magnitude fainter than the average value over the past century from the [O iii] emission line. This indicates that SDSS J012032.19-005501.9 may be switching off. Additional possible scenarios to explain this intriguing source are also discussed. Future deep observations at multiwavelengths are needed to reveal the nature of this peculiar and intriguing AGN.

  5. Orbital periods of cataclysmic variables identified by the SDSS. VII. Four new eclipsing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southworth, J.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Pyrzas, S.

    2010-02-01

    We present photometry of nine cataclysmic variable stars identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, aimed at measuring the orbital periods of these systems. Four of these objects show deep eclipses, from which we measure their orbital periods. The light curves of three of the eclipsing systems are also analysed using the lcurve code, and their mass ratios and orbital inclinations determined. SDSS J075059.97+141150.1 has an orbital period of 134.1564 ± 0.0008 min, making it a useful object with which to investigate the evolutionary processes of cataclysmic variables. SDSS J092444.48+080150.9 has a period of 131.2432 ± 0.0014 min and is probably magnetic. The white dwarf ingress and egress phases are very deep and short, and there is no clear evidence that this object has an accretion disc. SDSS J115207.00+404947.8 and SDSS J152419.33+220920.1 are nearly identical twins, with periods of 97.5 ± 0.4 and 93.6 ± 0.5 min and mass ratios of 0.14 ± 0.03 and 0.17 ± 0.03, respectively. Their eclipses have well-defined white dwarf and bright spot ingress and egress features, making them excellent candidates for detailed study. All four of the orbital periods presented here are shorter than the 2-3 h period gap observed in the known population of cataclysmic variables. The reduced observational data presented in this work are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/510/A100 and at http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/ jkt/.

  6. substitution line for resistance to stripe rust

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    2D) substitution line for resistance to stripe rust. MENGPING LEI, GUANGRONG LI, SUFEN ZHANG, CHENG LIU and ZUJUN YANG. ∗. School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology ...

  7. Comparison of highway striping materials : installation report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    This study has been undertaken to investigate problems relating to the durability of highway striping materials used by the Department The research is limited to an evaluation of the durability and retroreflectance characteristics of selected paints,...

  8. The clustering of the SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR14 quasar sample: first measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations between redshift 0.8 and 2.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burtin, Etienne; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; Du, Wei; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grabowski, Katie; Guy, Julien; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; McEwen, Joseph E.; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pâris, Isabelle; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruggeri, Rossana; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas Magaña, Mariana; Vivek, M.; Wang, Yuting; Yèche, Christophe; Yu, Liang; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2018-02-01

    We present measurements of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale in redshift-space using the clustering of quasars. We consider a sample of 147 000 quasars from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) distributed over 2044 square degrees with redshifts 0.8 0 at 6.6σ significance when testing a ΛCDM model with free curvature.

  9. Update on the SDSS-III MARVELS data pipeline development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Ge, J.; Thomas, N. B.; Petersen, E.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Sithajan, S.; Shi, J.; Ouyang, Y.; Chen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    MARVELS (Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey), as one of the four surveys in the SDSS-III program, has monitored over 3,300 stars during 2008-2012, with each being visited an average of 26 times over a 2-year window. Although the early data pipeline was able to detect over 20 brown dwarf candidates and several hundreds of binaries, no giant planet candidates have been reliably identified due to its large systematic errors. Learning from past data pipeline lessons, we re-designed the entire pipeline to handle various types of systematic effects caused by the instrument (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition changes (such as illumination profile and continuum). We also introduced several advanced methods to precisely extract the RV signals. To date, we have achieved a long term RMS RV measurement error of 14 m/s for HIP-14810 (one of our reference stars) after removal of the known planet signal based on previous HIRES RV measurement. This new 1-D data pipeline has been used to robustly identify four giant planet candidates within the small fraction of the survey data that has been processed (Thomas et al. this meeting). The team is currently working hard to optimize the pipeline, especially the 2-D interference-fringe RV extraction, where early results show a 1.5 times improvement over the 1-D data pipeline. We are quickly approaching the survey baseline performance requirement of 10-35 m/s RMS for 8-12 solar type stars. With this fine-tuned pipeline and the soon to be processed plates of data, we expect to discover many more giant planet candidates and make a large statistical impact to the exoplanet study.

  10. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey: Technical Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington; Choi, Changsu; /Seoul Natl. U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; DeJongh, Don Frederic; /Fermilab; Depoy, Darren L.; /Ohio State U.; Doi, Mamoru; /Tokyo U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hogan, Craig J.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Holtzman, Jon; /New Mexico State U.; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U.; Jha, Saurabh; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Konishi, Kohki; /Tokyo U.; Lampeitl, Hubert; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Marshall, Jennifer L.; /Ohio State U.; McGinnis,; /Fermilab; Miknaitis, Gajus; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U.; Prieto, Jose Luis; /Ohio State U. /Rochester Inst. Tech. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Pennsylvania U.

    2007-09-14

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) has embarked on a multi-year project to identify and measure light curves for intermediate-redshift (0.05 < z < 0.35) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) using repeated five-band (ugriz) imaging over an area of 300 sq. deg. The survey region is a stripe 2.5 degrees wide centered on the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap that has been imaged numerous times in earlier years, enabling construction of a deep reference image for discovery of new objects. Supernova imaging observations are being acquired between 1 September and 30 November of 2005-7. During the first two seasons, each region was imaged on average every five nights. Spectroscopic follow-up observations to determine supernova type and redshift are carried out on a large number of telescopes. In its first two three-month seasons, the survey has discovered and measured light curves for 327 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia, 30 probable SNe Ia, 14 confirmed SNe Ib/c, 32 confirmed SNe II, plus a large number of photometrically identified SNe Ia, 94 of which have host-galaxy spectra taken so far. This paper provides an overview of the project and briefly describes the observations completed during the first two seasons of operation.

  11. Estimating abundance of adult striped bass in reservoirs using mobile hydroacoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Joseph E.; Taylor, J. Christopher; Degan, Donald J.

    2013-01-01

    Hydroacoustic surveys have proven valuable for estimating reservoir forage fish abundance but are more challenging for adult predators such as striped bass Morone saxatilis. Difficulties in assessing striped bass in reservoirs include their low density and the inability to distinguish species with hydroacoustic data alone. Despite these difficulties, mobile hydroacoustic surveys have potential to provide useful data for management because of the large sample volume compared to traditional methods such as gill netting and the ability to target specific areas where striped bass are aggregated. Hydroacoustic estimates of reservoir striped bass have been made using mobile surveys, with data analysis using a threshold for target strength in order to focus on striped bass-sized targets, and auxiliary sampling with nets to obtain species composition. We provide recommendations regarding survey design, based in part on simulations that provide insight on the level of effort that would be required to achieve reasonable estimates of abundance. Future surveys may be able to incorporate telemetry or other sonar techniques such as side-scan or multibeam in order to focus survey efforts on productive habitats (within lake and vertically). However, species apportionment will likely remain the main source of error, and we see no hydroacoustic system on the horizon that will identify fish by species at the spatial and temporal scale required for most reservoir surveys. In situations where species composition can be reliably assessed using traditional gears, abundance estimates from hydroacoustic methods should be useful to fishery managers interested in developing harvest regulations, assessing survival of stocked juveniles, identifying seasonal aggregations, and examining predator–prey balance.

  12. Post common envelope binaries from SDSS. XII. The orbital period distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Schreiber, M. R.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Schwope, A. D.; Southworth, J.; Aungwerojwit, A.; Bothe, M.; Davis, P. J.; Kolb, U.; Müller, M.; Papadaki, C.; Pyrzas, S.; Rabitz, A.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Schwarz, R.; Tappert, C.; Toloza, O.; Vogel, J.; Zorotovic, M.

    2011-12-01

    Context. The complexity of the common-envelope phase and of magnetic stellar wind braking currently limits our understanding of close binary evolution. Because of their intrinsically simple structure, observational population studies of white dwarf plus main sequence (WDMS) binaries can potentially test theoretical models and constrain their parameters. Aims: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has provided a large and homogeneously selected sample of WDMS binaries, which we characterise in terms of orbital and stellar parameters. Methods: We have obtained radial velocity information for 385 WDMS binaries from follow-up spectroscopy and for an additional 861 systems from the SDSS subspectra. Radial velocity variations identify 191 of these WDMS binaries as post common-envelope binaries (PCEBs). Orbital periods of 58 PCEBs were subsequently measured, predominantly from time-resolved spectroscopy, bringing the total number of SDSS PCEBs with orbital parameters to 79. Observational biases inherent to this PCEB sample were evaluated through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Results: We find that 21-24% of all SDSS WDMS binaries have undergone common-envelope evolution, which is in good agreement with published binary population models and high-resolution HST imaging of WDMS binaries unresolved from the ground. The bias-corrected orbital period distribution of PCEBs ranges from 1.9 h to 4.3 d and approximately follows a normal distribution in log (Porb), peaking at ~10.3 h. There is no observational evidence for a significant population of PCEBs with periods in the range of days to weeks. Conclusions: The large and homogeneous sample of SDSS WDMS binaries provides the means to test fundamental predictions of binary population models, hence to observationally constrain the evolution of all close compact binaries. Figures 3-6, Tables 1, 5 and Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Tables 3, 4, and 6 are only available at the CDS via

  13. Guiding thermomagnetic avalanches with soft magnetic stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Benseman, T.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W. -K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the potential for manipulating the ultrafast dynamics of thermomagnetic flux avalanches (TMA) in superconducting films with soft magnetic stripes deposited on the film. By tuning the in-plane magnetization of the stripes, we induce lines of strong magnetic potentials for Abrikosov vortices, resulting in guided slow motion of vortices along the stripe edges and preferential bursts of TMA along the stripes. Furthermore, we show that transversely polarized stripes can reduce the TMA size by diverting magnetic flux away from the major trunk of the TMA into interstripe gaps. Our data indicate that TMAs are launched from locations with enhanced vortex entry barrier, where flux accumulation followed by accelerated vortex discharge significantly reduces the threshold of the applied field ramping speed required for the creation of TMAs. Finally, vortex-antivortex annihilation at the moving front of an expanding TMA can account for the enhanced TMA activity in the receding branches of the sample's magnetization cycle and the preferred propagation of TMAs into maximum trapped flux regions.

  14. Guiding thermomagnetic avalanches with soft magnetic stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasko-Vlasov, V. K.; Colauto, F.; Benseman, T.; Rosenmann, D.; Kwok, W.-K.

    2017-12-01

    We demonstrate the potential for manipulating the ultrafast dynamics of thermomagnetic flux avalanches (TMA) in superconducting films with soft magnetic stripes deposited on the film. By tuning the in-plane magnetization of the stripes, we induce lines of strong magnetic potentials for Abrikosov vortices, resulting in guided slow motion of vortices along the stripe edges and preferential bursts of TMA along the stripes. Furthermore, we show that transversely polarized stripes can reduce the TMA size by diverting magnetic flux away from the major trunk of the TMA into interstripe gaps. Our data indicate that TMAs are launched from locations with enhanced vortex entry barrier, where flux accumulation followed by accelerated vortex discharge significantly reduces the threshold of the applied field ramping speed required for the creation of TMAs. Finally, vortex-antivortex annihilation at the moving front of an expanding TMA can account for the enhanced TMA activity in the receding branches of the sample's magnetization cycle and the preferred propagation of TMAs into maximum trapped flux regions.

  15. The Fourteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Ananna, Tonima Tasnim; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since July 2014. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the fourteenth from SDSS overall (making this, Data Release Fourteen or DR14). This release makes public data taken by SDSS-IV in its first two years of operation (July 2014-2016). Like all previous SDSS releases, DR14 is cumulative, including the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since the firs...

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia-PS1-SDSS (GPS1) proper motion catalog (Tian+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H.-J.; Gupta, P.; Sesar, B.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F.; Liu, C.; Goldman, B.; Platais, I.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Waters, C. Z.

    2018-02-01

    In order to construct proper motions, we analyze and model catalog positions from four different imaging surveys, as discussed below. Gaia DR1 is based on observations collected between 2014 July 25 and 2015 September 16. PS1 observations were collected between 2010 and 2014. The SDSS DR9 data used here were obtained in the years between 2000 and 2008. The images from 2MASS were taken between 1997 and 2001. (1 data file).

  17. Assessing Fishers' Support of Striped Bass Management Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D Murphy

    Full Text Available Incorporating the perspectives and insights of stakeholders is an essential component of ecosystem-based fisheries management, such that policy strategies should account for the diverse interests of various groups of anglers to enhance their efficacy. Here we assessed fishing stakeholders' perceptions on the management of Atlantic striped bass (Morone saxatilis and receptiveness to potential future regulations using an online survey of recreational and commercial fishers in Massachusetts and Connecticut (USA. Our results indicate that most fishers harbored adequate to positive perceptions of current striped bass management policies when asked to grade their state's management regime. Yet, subtle differences in perceptions existed between recreational and commercial fishers, as well as across individuals with differing levels of fishing experience, resource dependency, and tournament participation. Recreational fishers in both states were generally supportive or neutral towards potential management actions including slot limits (71% and mandated circle hooks to reduce mortality of released fish (74%, but less supportive of reduced recreational bag limits (51%. Although commercial anglers were typically less supportive of management changes than their recreational counterparts, the majority were still supportive of slot limits (54% and mandated use of circle hooks (56%. Our study suggests that both recreational and commercial fishers are generally supportive of additional management strategies aimed at sustaining healthy striped bass populations and agree on a variety of strategies. However, both stakeholder groups were less supportive of harvest reductions, which is the most direct measure of reducing mortality available to fisheries managers. By revealing factors that influence stakeholders' support or willingness to comply with management strategies, studies such as ours can help managers identify potential stakeholder support for or conflicts

  18. DNA methylation profiles correlated to striped bass sperm fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striped bass (Morone saxatilis) spermatozoa are used to fertilize in vitro the eggs of white bass (Morone chrysops) to produce the preferred hybrid for the striped bass aquaculture industry. Currently, only one source of domestic striped bass juveniles are available to growers that are not obtained ...

  19. Audiogram of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kastelein, R.A.; Hagedoorn, M.; Au, W.W.L.; Haan, de D.

    2003-01-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivity of a striped dolphin was measured in a pool using standard psycho-acoustic techniques. The go/no-go response paradigm and up¿down staircase psychometric method were used. Auditory sensitivity was measured by using 12 narrow-band frequency-modulated signals having

  20. Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Adam D.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Gallagher, John S.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Tremonti, Christina A.; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-III Collaboration, SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Committee on the Participation of Women in the SDSS (CPWS) was formed by the SDSS to evaluate the gender climate within the collaboration. The CPWS seeks to foster gender balance in our collaboration by fielding concerns from our members and by recommending best practices for establishing the SDSS leadership team. An important aspect of the mission of the CPWS is to regularly assess gender diversity and inclusiveness within the SDSS. Against the backdrop of the transition from SDSS-III to SDSS-IV, the CPWS has been collecting data relevant to gender issues through interviews and surveys. In April, 2014, the CPWS surveyed 251 SDSS-IV members (~50% of active membership) regarding gender and leadership. Broad findings from this survey include that the male-to-female ratio in SDSS-IV is about 3:1 and that the male-to-female ratio among those that identify themselves as being in an SDSS-IV leadership role is also close to 3:1. About 35% of those surveyed self-identify as an SDSS-IV "leader," though we recognize the possibility that active stakeholders might be more likely to respond to a demographics survey. About 80% of those that self-identify as leaders consider their leadership role within SDSS-IV to be officially acknowledged, regardless of gender. The fraction of women in SDSS leadership roles appears to be a weak function of current job position in that 6 of 32 (19%) senior faculty that are SDSS leaders are women, compared to 4 of 13 (31%) postdocs. Similarly, the fraction of SDSS leaders who are women is highest (32%) amongst those leaders who received their PhDs 6-10 years ago, while the fraction of female leaders amongst other age demographics is somewhat lower (20%). Although these are small sample sizes, this hints at a trend where women are most likely to fill SDSS leadership roles at certain stages of their lives and careers. The CPWS intends to use this initial survey data to establish a baseline for tracking SDSS-IV demographics, and thus hopes to

  1. The Halo Boundary of Galaxy Clusters in the SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Eric; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Sheth, Ravi K. [Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Chang, Chihway; Kravtsov, Andrey [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Adhikari, Susmita; Dalal, Neal [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); More, Surhud [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba, 277-8583 (Japan); Rozo, Eduardo [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rykoff, Eli, E-mail: ebax@sas.upenn.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, P.O. Box 2450, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    Analytical models and simulations predict a rapid decline in the halo density profile associated with the transition from the “infalling” regime outside the halo to the “collapsed” regime within the halo. Using data from SDSS, we explore evidence for such a feature in the density profiles of galaxy clusters using several different approaches. We first estimate the steepening of the outer galaxy density profile around clusters, finding evidence for truncation of the halo profile. Next, we measure the galaxy density profile around clusters using two sets of galaxies selected on color. We find evidence of an abrupt change in galaxy colors that coincides with the location of the steepening of the density profile. Since galaxies that have completed orbits within the cluster are more likely to be quenched of star formation and thus appear redder, this abrupt change in galaxy color can be associated with the transition from single-stream to multi-stream regimes. We also use a standard model comparison approach to measure evidence for a “splashback”-like feature, but find that this approach is very sensitive to modeling assumptions. Finally, we perform measurements using an independent cluster catalog to test for potential systematic errors associated with cluster selection. We identify several avenues for future work: improved understanding of the small-scale galaxy profile, lensing measurements, identification of proxies for the halo accretion rate, and other tests. With upcoming data from the DES, KiDS, and HSC surveys, we can expect significant improvements in the study of halo boundaries.

  2. Breakup Behavior of a Capillary Bridge on a Hydrophobic Stripe Separating Two Hydrophilic Stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Maximilian; Hardt, Steffen

    2017-11-01

    The breakup dynamics of a capillary bridge on a hydrophobic area between two liquid filaments occupying two parallel hydrophilic stripes is studied experimentally. In addition calculations with the finite-element software Surface Evolver are performed to obtain the corresponding stable minimal surfaces. Droplets of de-ionized water are placed on substrates with alternating hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes of different width. Their volume decreases by evaporation. This results in a droplet shaped as the letter ``H'' covering two hydrophilic stripes separated by one hydrophobic stripe. The width of the capillary bridge d(t) on the hydrophobic stripe during the breakup process is observed using a high-speed camera mounted on a bright-field microscope. The results of the experiments and the numerical studies show that the critical width dcrit, indicating the point where the capillary bridge becomes unstable, mainly depends on the width ratio of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic stripes. It is found that the time derivative of d(t) first decreases after dcrit has been reached. The final breakup dynamics then follows a t 2 / 3 scaling. We kindly acknowledge the financial support by the German Research Foundation (DFG) within the Collaborative Research Centre 1194 ``Interaction of Transport and Wetting Processes'', Project A02a.

  3. On the fairness of the main galaxy sample of SDSS

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Kelai; Ma, Bin; Pan, Jun; Feng, Longlong

    2010-01-01

    Flux-limited and volume-limited galaxy samples are constructed from SDSS data releases DR4, DR6 and DR7 for statistical analysis. The two-point correlation functions $\\xi(s)$, monopole of three-point correlation functions $\\zeta_0$, projected two-point correlation function $w_p$ and pairwise velocity dispersion $\\sigma_{12}$ are measured to test if galaxy samples are fair for these statistics. We find that with increment of sky coverage of SDSS, $\\xi(s)$ of flux-limited sample is extremely ro...

  4. Spectral Analysis, Synthesis, & Energy Distributions of Nearby E+A Galaxies Using SDSS-IV MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Olivia A.; Anderson, Miguel Ricardo; Wally, Muhammad; James, Olivia; Falcone, Julia; Liu, Allen; Wallack, Nicole; Liu, Charles; SDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing data from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) Survey (MaNGA Product Launch-4, or MPL-4), of the latest generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV), we identified nine post-starburst (E+A) systems that lie within the Green Valley transition zone. We identify the E+A galaxies by their SDSS single fiber spectrum and u-r color, then confirmed their classification as post-starburst by coding/plotting methods and spectral synthesis codes (FIREFLY and PIPE3D), as well as with their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) from 0.15 µm to 22 µm, using GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE data. We produced maps of gaussian-fitted fluxes, equivalent widths, stellar velocities, metallicities and age. We also produced spectral line ratio diagrams to classify regions of stellar populations of the galaxies. We found that our sample of E+As retain their post-starburst properties across the entire galaxy, not just at their center. We detected matching a trend line in the ultraviolet and optical bands, consistent with the expected SEDs for an E+A galaxy, and also through the J, H and Ks bands, except for one object. We classified one of the nine galaxies as a luminous infrared galaxy, unusual for a post-starburst object. Our group seeks to further study stellar population properties, spectral energy distributions and quenching properties in E+A galaxies, and investigate their role in galaxy evolution as a whole. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement #SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island. This work was also supported by grants to The American Museum of Natural History, and the CUNY College of Staten Island through from National Science Foundation.

  5. Distribution of Doppler Redshifts of Associated Absorbers of SDSS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doppler redshifts of a sample of Mg II associated absorbers of SDSS DR7 quasars are analysed. We find that there might be three Gaussian components in the distribution of the Doppler redshift. The first Gaussian component, with the peak being located at Dopp = -0.0074, probably arises from absorbers with outflow ...

  6. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; C. Becker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS......, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2...

  7. Constraint on neutrino masses from SDSS-III/BOSS Ly$\\alpha$ forest and other cosmological probes

    CERN Document Server

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Lesgourgues, Julien; Rossi, Graziano; Borde, Arnaud; Viel, Matteo; Aubourg, Eric; Kirkby, David; LeGoff, Jean-Marc; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinberg, David

    2015-02-27

    We present constraints on the parameters of the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model in the presence of massive neutrinos, using the one-dimensional Ly$\\alpha$ forest power spectrum obtained with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by Palanque-Delabrouille et al. (2013), complemented by additional cosmological probes. The interpretation of the measured Ly$\\alpha$ spectrum is done using a second-order Taylor expansion of the simulated power spectrum. BOSS Ly$\\alpha$ data alone provide better bounds than previous Ly$\\alpha$ results, but are still poorly constraining, especially for the sum of neutrino masses $\\sum m_\

  8. The population of white dwarf-main sequence binaries in the SDSS DR 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, R.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Torres, S.; García-Berro, E.

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo population synthesis study of white dwarf-main sequence (WD+MS) binaries in the Galactic disc aimed at reproducing the ensemble properties of the entire population observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12. Our simulations take into account all known observational biases and use the most up-to-date stellar evolutionary models. This allows us to perform a sound comparison between the simulations and the observational data. We find that the properties of the simulated and observed parameter distributions agree best when assuming low values of the common envelope efficiency (0.2-0.3), a result that is in agreement with previous findings obtained by observational and population synthesis studies of close SDSS WD+MS binaries. We also show that all synthetic populations that result from adopting an initial mass ratio distribution with a positive slope are excluded by observations. Finally, we confirm that the properties of the simulated WD+MS binary populations are nearly independent of the age adopted for the thin disc, on the contribution of WD+MS binaries from the thick disc (0-17 per cent of the total population) and on the assumed fraction of the internal energy that is used to eject the envelope during the common envelope phase (0.1-0.5).

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS bulge, disk and total stellar mass estimates (Mendel+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, J. T.; Simard, L.; Palmer, M.; Ellison, S. L.; Patton, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalog of bulge, disk, and total stellar mass estimates for ~660000 galaxies in the Legacy area of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data (SDSS) Release 7. These masses are based on a homogeneous catalog of g- and r-band photometry described by Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11), which we extend here with bulge+disk and Sersic profile photometric decompositions in the SDSS u, i, and z bands. We discuss the methodology used to derive stellar masses from these data via fitting to broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and show that the typical statistical uncertainty on total, bulge, and disk stellar mass is ~0.15 dex. Despite relatively small formal uncertainties, we argue that SED modeling assumptions, including the choice of synthesis model, extinction law, initial mass function, and details of stellar evolution likely contribute an additional 60% systematic uncertainty in any mass estimate based on broadband SED fitting. We discuss several approaches for identifying genuine bulge+disk systems based on both their statistical likelihood and an analysis of their one-dimensional surface-brightness profiles, and include these metrics in the catalogs. Estimates of the total, bulge and disk stellar masses for both normal and dust-free models and their uncertainties are made publicly available here. (4 data files).

  10. The fall of the Northern Unicorn: tangential motions in the Galactic anticentre with SDSS and Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Belokurov, V.; Koposov, S. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present the first detailed study of the behaviour of the stellar proper motion across the entire Galactic anticentre area visible in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. We use recalibrated SDSS astrometry in combination with positions from Gaia DR1 to provide tangential motion measurements with a systematic uncertainty <5 km s-1 for the Main Sequence stars at the distance of the Monoceros Ring. We demonstrate that Monoceros members rotate around the Galaxy with azimuthal speeds of ∼230 km s-1, only slightly lower than that of the Sun. Additionally, both vertical and azimuthal components of their motion are shown to vary considerably but gradually as a function of Galactic longitude and latitude. The stellar overdensity in the anti-centre region can be split into two components, the narrow, stream-like ACS and the smooth Ring. According to our analysis, these two structures show very similar but clearly distinct kinematic trends, which can be summarized as follows: the amplitude of the velocity variation in vϕ and vz in the ACS is higher compared to the Ring, whose velocity gradients appear to be flatter. Currently, no model available can explain the entirety of the data in this area of the sky. However, the new accurate kinematic map introduced here should provide strong constraints on the genesis of the Monoceros Ring and the associated substructure.

  11. Charge stripe structure in FeTe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Y., E-mail: yukik@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ichimura, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Center of Education and Research for Topological Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Ishioka, J. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Kurosawa, T. [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Oda, M. [Center of Education and Research for Topological Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Department of Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Yamaya, K. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Tanda, S. [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Center of Education and Research for Topological Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2012-06-01

    We report the STM study on a single-crystalline sample of FeTe at 7.8 K. FeTe is one of the iron-based superconductor. We measured the resistivity and the magnetization of FeTe. FeTe shows SDW transition at 58 K on these measurements. We study the electronic state of FeTe by using STM/STS for observing FeTe from a microscopic viewpoint. We observed the iron layer and the tellurium layer with atomic resolution. Moreover, we discover the charge stripe structure on STM/STS measurement. We find the charge stripe structure is caused by iron atoms from the analysis. The gap structure of 9 meV was observed in tunneling spectra. This gap size is consistent with the SDW gap which is expected from mean field theory with T{sub N}=58 K.

  12. Filarial dermatitis in a striped skunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, E K; Little, S E

    1997-10-01

    A striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) from Kansas (USA) with severe diffuse dermatitis characterized by extensive alopecic areas, thickened skin, and multiple, scattered cutaneous abscesses on the dorsal aspect of the head, neck, and trunk was submitted for diagnostic evaluation. More than 50 nematodes identified as Filaria taxideae were found in the dorsal subcutaneous tissue. Histologic examination of the skin revealed multifocal pyogranulomatous inflammation with intralesional larvated nematode eggs, moderate orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis, and mild acanthosis. The lesions resemble those reported from badgers (Taxidea taxus) and a lesser panda (Ailurus fulgens) with dermatitis caused by Filaria taxideae. Although F. taxideae has been previously collected from skunks, this is the first report of filarid dermatitis caused by this nematode in a striped skunk.

  13. 3D face recognition using isogeodesic stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretti, Stefano; Del Bimbo, Alberto; Pala, Pietro

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to 3D face matching that shows high effectiveness in distinguishing facial differences between distinct individuals from differences induced by nonneutral expressions within the same individual. The approach takes into account geometrical information of the 3D face and encodes the relevant information into a compact representation in the form of a graph. Nodes of the graph represent equal width isogeodesic facial stripes. Arcs between pairs of nodes are labeled with descriptors, referred to as 3D Weighted Walkthroughs (3DWWs), that capture the mutual relative spatial displacement between all the pairs of points of the corresponding stripes. Face partitioning into isogeodesic stripes and 3DWWs together provide an approximate representation of local morphology of faces that exhibits smooth variations for changes induced by facial expressions. The graph-based representation permits very efficient matching for face recognition and is also suited to being employed for face identification in very large data sets with the support of appropriate index structures. The method obtained the best ranking at the SHREC 2008 contest for 3D face recognition. We present an extensive comparative evaluation of the performance with the FRGC v2.0 data set and the SHREC08 data set.

  14. Capillary instability on a hydrophilic stripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speth, Raymond L.; Lauga, Eric

    2009-07-01

    A recent experiment showed that cylindrical segments of water filling a hydrophilic stripe on an otherwise hydrophobic surface display a capillary instability when their volume is increased beyond the critical volume at which their apparent contact angle on the surface reaches 90° (Gau et al 1999 Science 283 46-9). Surprisingly, the fluid segments did not break up into droplets—as would be expected for a classical Rayleigh-Plateau instability—but instead displayed a long-wavelength instability where all excess fluid gathered in a single bulge along each stripe. We consider here the dynamics of the flow instability associated with this setup. We perform a linear stability analysis of the capillary flow problem in the inviscid limit. We first confirm previous work showing that all cylindrical segments are linearly unstable if (and only if) their apparent contact angle is larger than 90°. We then demonstrate that the most unstable wavenumber for the surface perturbation decreases to zero as the apparent contact angle of the fluid on the surface approaches 90°, allowing us to re-interpret the creation of bulges in the experiment as a zero-wavenumber capillary instability. A variation of the stability calculation is also considered for the case of a hydrophilic stripe located on a wedge-like geometry.

  15. Capillary instability on a hydrophilic stripe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Speth, Raymond L [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lauga, Eric [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)], E-mail: elauga@ucsd.edu

    2009-07-15

    A recent experiment showed that cylindrical segments of water filling a hydrophilic stripe on an otherwise hydrophobic surface display a capillary instability when their volume is increased beyond the critical volume at which their apparent contact angle on the surface reaches 90 deg. (Gau et al 1999 Science 283 46-9). Surprisingly, the fluid segments did not break up into droplets-as would be expected for a classical Rayleigh-Plateau instability-but instead displayed a long-wavelength instability where all excess fluid gathered in a single bulge along each stripe. We consider here the dynamics of the flow instability associated with this setup. We perform a linear stability analysis of the capillary flow problem in the inviscid limit. We first confirm previous work showing that all cylindrical segments are linearly unstable if (and only if) their apparent contact angle is larger than 90 deg. We then demonstrate that the most unstable wavenumber for the surface perturbation decreases to zero as the apparent contact angle of the fluid on the surface approaches 90 deg, allowing us to re-interpret the creation of bulges in the experiment as a zero-wavenumber capillary instability. A variation of the stability calculation is also considered for the case of a hydrophilic stripe located on a wedge-like geometry.

  16. Exploring the Variable Sky with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Lupton, Robert; Juric, Mario; Gunn, James; Knapp, Gillian; De Lee, Nathan; Smith, J. Allyn; Miknaitis,Gajus; Lin, Huan; Tucker, Douglas; Doi, Mamoru; Tanaka, Masayuki; Fukugita, Masataka; Holtzman, Jon; Kent, Steve; Yanny, Brian; Schlegel,David; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Rockosi, Constance; Bond, Nicholas; Lee, Brian; Stoughton, Chris; Jester, Sebastian; Harris,Hugh; Harding, Paul; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald; York, Donald; Richmond, Michael; Vanden Berk, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    We quantify the variability of faint unresolved optical sources using a catalog based on multiple SDSS imaging observations. The catalog covers SDSS Stripe 82, which lies along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere (22h 24m < {alpha}{sub J2000} < 04h 08m, -1.27{sup o} < {delta}{sub J2000} < +1.27{sup o}, {approx} 290 deg{sup 2}), and contains 58 million photometric observations in the SDSS ugriz system for 1.4 million unresolved sources that were observed at least 4 times in each of the gri bands (with a median of 10 observations obtained over {approx}5 years). In each photometric bandpass we compute various low-order lightcurve statistics such as root-mean-square scatter (rms), {chi}{sup 2} per degree of freedom, skewness, minimum and maximum magnitude, and use them to select and study variable sources. We find that 2% of unresolved optical sources brighter than g = 20.5 appear variable at the 0.05 mag level (rms) simultaneously in the g and r bands. The majority (2/3) of these variable sources are low-redshift (< 2) quasars, although they represent only 2% of all sources in the adopted flux-limited sample. We find that at least 90% of quasars are variable at the 0.03 mag level (rms) and confirm that variability is as good a method for finding low-redshift quasars as is the UV excess color selection (at high Galactic latitudes). We analyze the distribution of lightcurve skewness for quasars and find that is centered on zero. We find that about 1/4 of the variable stars are RR Lyrae stars, and that only 0.5% of stars from the main stellar locus are variable at the 0.05 mag level. The distribution of lightcurve skewness in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram on the main stellar locus is found to be bimodal (with one mode consistent with Algol-like behavior). Using over six hundred RR Lyrae stars, we demonstrate rich halo substructure out to distances of 100 kpc. We extrapolate these results to expected performance by the Large Synoptic Survey

  17. Exploring the Variable Sky with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Lupton, Robert H.; Juric, Mario; Gunn, James E.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Lee, Nathan De; Smith, J.Allyn; Miknaitis, Gajus; Lin, Huan; Tucker,

    2007-04-01

    We quantify the variability of faint unresolved optical sources using a catalog based on multiple SDSS imaging observations. The catalog covers SDSS Stripe 82, which lies along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere (22h 24m < {alpha}{sub J2000} < 04h 08m, -1.27 < {delta}{sub J2000} < +1.27, {approx}290 deg{sup 2} ), and contains 58 million photometric observations in the SDSS ugriz system for 1.4 million unresolved sources that were observed at least 4 times in each of the gri bands (with a median of 10 observations obtained over {approx}5 years). In each photometric bandpass we compute various low-order lightcurve statistics such as root-mean-square scatter (rms), {chi}{sup 2} 2 per degree of freedom, skewness, minimum and maximum magnitude, and use them to select and study variable sources. We find that 2% of unresolved optical sources brighter than g = 20.5 appear variable at the 0.05 mag level (rms) simultaneously in the g and r bands. The majority (2/3) of these variable sources are low-redshift (< 2) quasars, although they represent only 2% of all sources in the adopted ux-limited sample. We find that at least 90% of quasars are variable at the 0.03 mag level (rms) and confirm that variability is as good a method for finding low-redshift quasars as is the UV excess color selection (at high Galactic latitudes). We analyze the distribution of lightcurve skewness for quasars and find that is centered on zero. We find that about 1/4 of the variable stars are RR Lyrae stars, and that only 0.5% of stars from the main stellar locus are variable at the 0.05 mag level. The distribution of lightcurve skewness in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram on the main stellar locus is found to be bimodal (with one mode consistent with Algol-like behavior). Using over six hundred RR Lyrae stars, we demonstrate rich halo substructure out to distances of 100 kpc. We extrapolate these results to expected performance by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and

  18. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog I. Early Data Release

    OpenAIRE

    Donald P. Schneider(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA); Richards, Gordon T.; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Gunn, James E.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Reichard, Timothy A.; Stoughton, C.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present the first edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 3814 objects (3000 discovered by the SDSS) in the initial SDSS public data release that have at least one emission line with a full width at half maximum larger than 1000 km/s, luminosities brighter than M_i^* = -23, and highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 494 square degrees; the majority of the objects were found in SDSS commissioning data using a multicol...

  19. Measurement Error Affects Risk Estimates for Recruitment to the Hudson River Stock of Striped Bass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J. Dunning

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined the consequences of ignoring the distinction between measurement error and natural variability in an assessment of risk to the Hudson River stock of striped bass posed by entrainment at the Bowline Point, Indian Point, and Roseton power plants. Risk was defined as the probability that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more, relative to the equilibrium value, at least once during the time periods examined (1, 5, 10, and 15 years. Measurement error, estimated using two abundance indices from independent beach seine surveys conducted on the Hudson River, accounted for 50% of the variability in one index and 56% of the variability in the other. If a measurement error of 50% was ignored and all of the variability in abundance was attributed to natural causes, the risk that recruitment of age-1+ striped bass would decline by 80% or more after 15 years was 0.308 at the current level of entrainment mortality (11%. However, the risk decreased almost tenfold (0.032 if a measurement error of 50% was considered. The change in risk attributable to decreasing the entrainment mortality rate from 11 to 0% was very small (0.009 and similar in magnitude to the change in risk associated with an action proposed in Amendment #5 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic striped bass (0.006— an increase in the instantaneous fishing mortality rate from 0.33 to 0.4. The proposed increase in fishing mortality was not considered an adverse environmental impact, which suggests that potentially costly efforts to reduce entrainment mortality on the Hudson River stock of striped bass are not warranted.

  20. Development and Application of a Spreadsheet-Based Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Dossay Oryspayev; Ramanathan Sugumaran; John DeGroote

    2011-01-01

    Spatial decision support systems (SDSS) are decision support tools which have been used widely in addressing complicated issues involving a spatial component. The use of SDSS has increased greatly over the last few decades especially in fields such as planning, natural resources management, and environmental science. Traditionally, SDSS have been developed with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology as a major component and used in application areas in which the use of GIS technology...

  1. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PUNEET INDER TOOR

    Abstract. A pair of stripe rust and leaf rust resistance genes was introgressed from Aegilops caudata, a nonprogenitor diploid species with the CC genome, to cultivated wheat. Inheritance and genetic mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in backcross- recombinant inbred line (BC-RIL) population derived from the cross of a ...

  2. Mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in an Aegilops caudata ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Inheritance and genetic mapping of stripe rust resistance gene in backcrossrecombinant inbred line (BC-RIL) population derived from the cross of a wheat–Ae. caudata introgression line (IL) T291-2(pau16060) with wheat cv. PBW343 is reported here. Segregation of BC-RILs for stripe rust resistance depicted a single major ...

  3. Transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to bread ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of area, the bread wheat producing regions of China comprise the largest area in the world that is constantly threatened by stripe rust epidemics. Consequently, it is important to exploit new adultplant resistance genes in breeding. This study reports the transfer of stripe rust resistance from Aegilops variabilis to ...

  4. SDSS J090152.05+624342.6: A NEW “OVERLAPPING-TROUGH” FeLoBAL QUASAR AT Z ~ 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We here report an identification of SDSS J090152.04+624342.6 as a new “overlapping-trough” iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar at redshift of z ~ 2.1. No strong variation of the broad absorption lines can be revealed through the two spectra taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with a time interval of ~6 yr. Further optical and infrared spectroscopic study on this object is suggested.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies from SDSS-DR12 (Rakshit+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Chand, H.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new catalog of narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12). This was obtained by a systematic analysis through modeling of the continuum and emission lines of the spectra of all the 68859 SDSS-DR12 objects that are classified as "QSO" by the SDSS spectroscopic pipeline with z2/pixel. This catalog contains a total of 11101 objects, which is about 5 times larger than the previously known NLSy1 galaxies. Their monochromatic continuum luminosity at 5100Å is found to be strongly correlated with Hβ, Hα, and [OIII] emission line luminosities. The optical FeII strength in NLSy1 galaxies is about two times larger than the broad-line Seyfert 1 (BLSy1) galaxies. About 5% of the catalog sources are detected in the FIRST survey. The Eddington ratio ({xi}Edd) of NLSy1 galaxies has an average of log({xi}Edd) of -0.34, much higher than -1.03 found for BLSy1 galaxies. Their black hole masses (MBH) have an average of log(MBH) of 6.9Mȯ, which is less than BLSy1 galaxies, which have an average of log(MBH) of 8.0Mȯ. The MBH of NLSy1 galaxies is found to be correlated with their host galaxy velocity dispersion. Our analysis suggests that geometrical effects playing an important role in defining NLSy1 galaxies and their MBH deficit is perhaps due to their lower inclination compared to BLSy1 galaxies. (1 data file).

  6. Toward understanding environmental effects in SDSS clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einasto, Jaan; Tago, E.; Einasto, M.; Saar, E.; Suhhonenko, I.; /Tartu Observ.; Heinamaki, P.; /Tartu Observ. /Tuorla Observ.; Hutsi, G.; /Tartu Observ. /Garching, Max; Tucker, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    We find clusters and superclusters of galaxies using the Data Release 1 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine the luminosity function of clusters and find that clusters in a high-density environment have a luminosity a factor of {approx}5 higher than in a low-density environment. We also study clusters and superclusters in numerical simulations. Simulated clusters in a high-density environment are also more massive than those in a low-density environment. Comparison of the density distribution at various epochs in simulations shows that in large low-density regions (voids) dynamical evolution is very slow and stops at an early epoch. In contrast, in large regions of higher density (superclusters) dynamical evolution starts early and continues until the present; here particles cluster early, and by merging of smaller groups very rich systems of galaxies form.

  7. SLoWPoKES-II: 100,000 WIDE BINARIES IDENTIFIED IN SDSS WITHOUT PROPER MOTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhital, Saurav [Department of Physical Sciences, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Blvd., Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States); West, Andrew A.; Schluns, Kyle J.; Massey, Angela P. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Stassun, Keivan G., E-mail: dhitals@erau.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 6301 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN, 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We present the Sloan Low-mass Wide Pairs of Kinematically Equivalent Stars (SLoWPoKES)-II catalog of low-mass visual binaries identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by matching photometric distances. The candidate pairs are vetted by comparing the stellar information. The candidate pairs are vetted by comparing the stellar density at their respective Galactic positions to Monte Carlo realizations of a simulated Milky Way. In this way, we are able to identify large numbers of bona fide wide binaries without the need for proper motions. Here, 105,537 visual binaries with angular separations of ∼1–20″ were identified, each with a probability of chance alignment of ≤5%. This is the largest catalog of bona fide wide binaries to date, and it contains a diversity of systems—in mass, mass ratios, binary separations, metallicity, and evolutionary states—that should facilitate follow-up studies to characterize the properties of M dwarfs and white dwarfs. There is a subtle but definitive suggestion of multiple populations in the physical separation distribution, supporting earlier findings. We suggest that wide binaries are composed of multiple populations, most likely representing different formation modes. There are 141 M7 or later wide binary candidates, representing a seven-fold increase over the number currently known. These binaries are too wide to have been formed via the ejection mechanism. Finally, we found that 6% of spectroscopically confirmed M dwarfs are not included in the SDSS STAR catalog; they are misclassified as extended sources due to the presence of a nearby or partially resolved companion. The SLoWPoKES-II catalog is publicly available to the entire community on the World Wide Web via the Filtergraph data visualization portal.

  8. Brave New World: Data Intensive Science with SDSS and the VO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, A. R.; Szalay, A. S.; O'Mullane, W.; Nieto-Santisteban, M.; Budavari, T.; Li, N.; Carliles, S.; Haridas, V.; Malik, T.; Gray, J.

    2004-12-01

    With the advent of digital archives and the VO, astronomy is quickly changing from a data-hungry to a data-intensive science. Local and specialized access to data will remain the most direct and efficient way to get data out of individual archives, especially if you know what you are looking for. However, the enormous sizes of the upcoming archives will preclude this type of access for most institutions, and will not allow researchers to tap the vast potential for discovery in cross-matching and comparing data between different archives. The VO makes this type of interoperability and distributed data access possible by adopting industry standards for data access (SQL) and data interchange (SOAP/XML) with platform independence (Web services). As a sneak preview of this brave new world where astronomers may need to become SQL warriors, we present a look at VO-enabled access to catalog data in the SDSS Catalog Archive Server (CAS): CasJobs - a workbench environment that allows arbitrarily complex SQL queries and your own personal database (MyDB) that you can share with collaborators; OpenSkyQuery - an IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) compliant federation of multiple archives (OpenSkyNodes) that currently links nearly 20 catalogs and allows cross-match queries (in ADQL - Astronomical Data Query Language) between them; Spectrum and Filter Profile Web services that provide access to an open database of spectra (registered users may add their own spectra); and VO-enabled Mirage - a Java visualizatiion tool developed at Bell Labs and enhanced at JHU that allows side-by-side comparison of SDSS catalog and FITS image data. Anticipating the next generation of Petabyte archives like LSST by the end of the decade, we are developing a parallel cross-match engine for all-sky cross-matches between large surveys, along with a 100-Terabyte data intensive science laboratory with high-speed parallel data access.

  9. Negative permittivity in bubble and stripe phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, B.; Peng, Y.; Rosenow, B.; von Oppen, F.; Umansky, V.; von Klitzing, K.; Smet, J. H.

    2017-11-01

    The physics of itinerant electrons in condensed matter is by and large governed by repulsive Coulomb forces. However, attractive interactions may emerge and prevail in determining the ground state despite the pervasive Coulomb repulsion. A notable example is electron pairing and superconductivity. The interplay of attractive and repulsive interactions may also instigate spontaneous symmetry lowering and clustering of charges in geometric patterns even without net attraction. Both types of attractive interaction triggered physics--pairing and charge ordering--are at play in two-dimensional electron systems exposed to a quantizing magnetic field. The charge ordering has been concluded indirectly from transport behaviour. Here we report the observation of negative permittivity present solely when bubble and stripe phases form. In conjunction with a theoretical model, the negative permittivity provides evidence for the underlying attractive exchange-correlation energy which sufficiently countervails Coulomb repulsion at small distances to enable and mediate charge clustering.

  10. Rotational Electrophoresis of Striped Metallic Microrods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K A; Meier, J A; Dougherty, G M; Santiago, J G

    2005-11-28

    Analytical models are developed for the translation and rotation of metallic rods in a uniform electric field. The limits of thin and thick electric double layers are considered. These models include the effect of stripes of different metals along the length of the particle. Modeling results are compared to experimental measurements for metallic rods. Experiments demonstrate the increased alignment of particles with increasing field strength and the increase in degree of alignment of thin versus thick electric double layers. The metal rods polarize in the applied field and align parallel to its direction due to torques on the polarized charge. The torque due to polarization has a second order dependence on the electric field strength. The particles are also shown to have an additional alignment torque component due to non-uniform densities along their length. The orientation distributions of dilute suspensions of particles are also shown to agree well with results predicted by a rotational convective-diffusion equation.

  11. Dissipation of the striped pulsar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, B.; Philippov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Rapidly rotating neutron stars blow a relativistic, magnetized wind mainly composed of electron-positron pairs. The free expansion of the wind terminates far from the neutron star where a weakly magnetized pulsar wind nebula forms, implying efficient magnetic dissipation somewhere upstream. Aims: The wind current sheet that separates the two magnetic polarities is usually considered as the most natural place for magnetic dissipation via relativistic reconnection, but its efficiency remains an open question. Here, the goal of this work is to revisit this issue in light of the most recent progress in the understanding of reconnection and pulsar electrodynamics. Methods: We perform large two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the oblique rotator to capture the multi-scale evolution of the wind. Our simulations are limited to the equatorial plane. Results: We find that the current sheet breaks up into a dynamical chain of magnetic islands separated by secondary thin current sheets. The sheet thickness increases linearly with radius while the Poynting flux decreases monotonically as reconnection proceeds. The radius of complete annihilation of the stripes is given by the plasma multiplicity parameter at the light cylinder. Current starvation within the sheets does not occur before complete dissipation as long as there is enough charges where the sheets form. Particles are efficiently heated up to a characteristic energy set by the magnetization parameter at the light cylinder. Energetic pulsed synchrotron emission peaks close to the light cylinder, and presents sub-pulse variability associated with the formation of plasmoids in the sheet. Conclusions: This study suggests that the striped component of the wind dissipates far before reaching the termination shock in isolated pulsars, even in very-high-multiplicity systems such as the Crab pulsar. Pulsars in binary systems may provide the best environments to study magnetic dissipation in the wind.

  12. DISCOVERY OF DRAMATIC OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN SDSS J1100+4421: A PECULIAR RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Yuki [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Itoh, Ryosuke [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Akitaya, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Stawarz, Łukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Gandhi, Poshak [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1-3LE (United Kingdom); Ali, Gamal; Essam, Ahmad; Hamed, Gamal [National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Aoki, Tsutomu [Kiso Observatory, Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Kiso, Nagano 397-0101 (Japan); Contreras, Carlos; Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Iwata, Ikuru, E-mail: masaomi.tanaka@nao.ac.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    We present our discovery of dramatic variability in SDSS J1100+4421 by the high-cadence transient survey Kiso Supernova Survey. The source brightened in the optical by at least a factor of three within about half a day. Spectroscopic observations suggest that this object is likely a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) at z = 0.840, however, with unusually strong narrow emission lines. The estimated black hole mass of ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} implies bolometric nuclear luminosity close to the Eddington limit. SDSS J1100+4421 is also extremely radio-loud, with a radio loudness parameter of R ≅ 4 × 10{sup 2}-3 × 10{sup 3}, which implies the presence of relativistic jets. Rapid and large-amplitude optical variability of the target, reminiscent of that found in a few radio- and γ-ray-loud NLS1s, is therefore produced most likely in a blazar-like core. The 1.4 GHz radio image of the source shows an extended structure with a linear size of about 100 kpc. If SDSS J1100+4421 is a genuine NLS1, as suggested here, this radio structure would then be the largest ever discovered in this type of active galaxies.

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Physical parameters of ~300000 SDSS-DR12 QSOs (Kozlowski, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, S.

    2017-03-01

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Data Release 12 (DR12Q), containing nearly 300000 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), to calculate the monochromatic luminosities at 5100, 3000, and 1350Å, derived from the broadband extinction-corrected SDSS magnitudes. After matching these sources to their counterparts from the SDSS Quasar Data Release 7 (DR7Q), we find very high correlations between our luminosities and DR7Q spectra-based luminosities with minute mean offsets (~0.01dex) and dispersions of differences of 0.11, 0.10, and 0.12dex, respectively, across a luminosity range of 2.5dex. We then estimate the black hole (BH) masses of the AGNs using the broad line region radius-disk luminosity relations and the FWHM of the MgII and CIV emission lines, to provide a catalog of 283033 virial BH mass estimates (132451 for MgII, 213071 for CIV, and 62489 for both) along with the estimates of the bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio for 0.1CIV FWHMs from DR12Q as compared to DR7Q, which we correct empirically. The CIV BH mass estimates should be used with caution because the CIV line is known to cause problems in the estimation of BH mass from single-epoch spectra. Finally, after the FWHM correction, the AGN BH mass estimates from CIV closely match the DR7Q ones (with a dispersion of 0.28dex), and more importantly the MgII and CIV BH masses agree internally with a mean offset of 0.07dex and a dispersion of 0.39dex. (1 data file).

  14. A Gaia-PS1-SDSS (GPS1) Proper Motion Catalog Covering 3/4 of the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hai-Jun; Gupta, Prashansa; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martin, Nicolas F.; Liu, Chao; Goldman, Bertrand; Platais, Imants; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Waters, Christopher Z.

    2017-09-01

    We combine Gaia DR1, PS1, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and 2MASS astrometry to measure proper motions for 350 million sources across three-fourths of the sky down to a magnitude of {m}r˜ 20. Using positions of galaxies from PS1, we build a common reference frame for the multi-epoch PS1, single-epoch SDSS and 2MASS data, and calibrate the data in small angular patches to this frame. As the Gaia DR1 excludes resolved galaxy images, we choose a different approach to calibrate its positions to this reference frame: we exploit the fact that the proper motions of stars in these patches are linear. By simultaneously fitting the positions of stars at different epochs of—Gaia DR1, PS1, SDSS, and 2MASS—we construct an extensive catalog of proper motions dubbed GPS1. GPS1 has a characteristic systematic error of less than 0.3 {mas} {{yr}}-1 and a typical precision of 1.5-2.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1. The proper motions have been validated using galaxies, open clusters, distant giant stars, and QSOs. In comparison with other published faint proper motion catalogs, GPS1's systematic error ( 2.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1). Similarly, its precision (˜1.5 {mas} {{yr}}-1) is a four-fold improvement relative to PPMXL and UCAC4 (˜6.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1). For QSOs, the precision of GPS1 is found to be worse (˜2.0-3.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1), possibly due to their particular differential chromatic refraction. The GPS1 catalog will be released online and be available via the VizieR Service and VO Service.

  15. Cosmological Constraints From SDSS MaxBCG Cluster Abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U. /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David; /Caltech, JPL; Sheldon, Erin S.; /CCPP, New York; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP,

    2007-03-26

    We perform a maximum likelihood analysis of the cluster abundance measured in the SDSS using the maxBCG cluster finding algorithm. Our analysis is aimed at constraining the power spectrum normalization {sigma}{sub 8}, and assumes flat cosmologies with a scale invariant spectrum, massless neutrinos, and CMB and supernova priors {Omega}{sub m}h{sup 2} = 0.128 {+-} 0.01 and h = 0.72 {+-} 0.05 respectively. Following the method described in the companion paper Rozo et al. (2007), we derive {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.92 {+-} 0.10 (1{sigma}) after marginalizing over all major systematic uncertainties. We place strong lower limits on the normalization, {sigma}{sub 8} > 0.76 (95% CL) (> 0.68 at 99% CL). We also find that our analysis favors relatively low values for the slope of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD), {alpha} = 0.83 {+-} 0.06. The uncertainties of these determinations will substantially improve upon completion of an ongoing campaign to estimate dynamical, weak lensing, and X-ray cluster masses in the SDSS maxBCG cluster sample.

  16. Barley stripe mosaic virus: Structure and relationship to the tobamoviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, Amy [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Williams, Dewight [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Bian, Wen [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Stewart, Phoebe L. [Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Stubbs, Gerald, E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biological Sciences and Center for Structural Biology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is the type member of the genus Hordeivirus, rigid, rod-shaped viruses in the family Virgaviridae. We have used fiber diffraction and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the helical symmetry of BSMV to be 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix, and to obtain a low-resolution model of the virus by helical reconstruction methods. Features in the model support a structural relationship between the coat proteins of the hordeiviruses and the tobamoviruses. - Highlights: • We report a low-resolution structure of barley stripe mosaic virus. • Barley stripe mosaic virus has 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix. • We compare barley stripe mosaic virus with tobacco mosaic virus.

  17. Analysis of ATMS striping noise from its Earth scene observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengkun; Zou, Xiaolei; Weng, Fuzhong

    2013-12-01

    differences between brightness temperature observations and simulated observations based on numerical weather predictions, i.e., O-B, for Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) temperature sounding channels exhibit a clear striping pattern [Bormann et al., 2013]. We propose to first use the principal component analysis to isolate scan-dependent features such as the cross-track striping from the atmospheric signal and then to use an Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) to extract the striping noise in ATMS Earth scene brightness temperature observations for both temperature and water vapor sounding channels. It is shown that the Principal Component (PC) coefficient of the first PC mode, which mainly describes a scan-dependent feature of cross-track radiometer measurements, captures the striping noise. The EEMD is then applied to the PC coefficient to extract the first three high-frequency intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), which are denoted as the PC1/IMF3 noise. When the PC1/IMF3 noise is removed from the data, the striping noise is imperceptible in the global distribution of O-B for ATMS temperature sounding channels 1-16. Using the same method, it is demonstrated that the striping noise is also present in ATMS water vapor sounding channels 17-22. The magnitude of the ATMS striping noise is about ±0.3 K for the temperature sounding channels and ±1.0 K for the moisture sounding channels. The same technique is also applied to Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A), AMSU-B, and Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS). The striping noise is undetectable for AMSU-A but present in AMSU-B and MHS data.

  18. Parametrization and Classification of 20 Billion LSST Objects: Lessons from SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivezic, Z.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Axelrod, T.; /Large Binocular Telescope, Tucson; Becker, A.C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Becla, J.; /SLAC; Borne, K.; /George Mason U.; Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Claver, C.F.; /NOAO, Tucson; Cook, K.H.; /LLNL, Livermore; Connolly, A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Gilmore, D.K.; /SLAC; Jones, R.L.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, M.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Lim, K-T.; /SLAC; Lupton, R.H.; /Princeton U.; Monet, D.G.; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff; Pinto, P.A.; /Arizona U.; Sesar, B.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard U.; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC, Davis

    2011-11-10

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain, starting in 2015, multiple images of the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times during the anticipated 10 years of operations (distributed over six bands, ugrizy). Each 30-second long visit will deliver 5{sigma} depth for point sources of r {approx} 24.5 on average. The co-added map will be about 3 magnitudes deeper, and will include 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars. We discuss various measurements that will be automatically performed for these 20 billion sources, and how they can be used for classification and determination of source physical and other properties. We provide a few classification examples based on SDSS data, such as color classification of stars, color-spatial proximity search for wide-angle binary stars, orbital-color classification of asteroid families, and the recognition of main Galaxy components based on the distribution of stars in the position-metallicity-kinematics space. Guided by these examples, we anticipate that two grand classification challenges for LSST will be (1) rapid and robust classification of sources detected in difference images, and (2) simultaneous treatment of diverse astrometric and photometric time series measurements for an unprecedentedly large number of objects.

  19. Audiogram of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastelein, Ronald A.; Hagedoorn, Monique; Au, Whitlow W. L.; de Haan, Dick

    2003-02-01

    The underwater hearing sensitivity of a striped dolphin was measured in a pool using standard psycho-acoustic techniques. The go/no-go response paradigm and up-down staircase psychometric method were used. Auditory sensitivity was measured by using 12 narrow-band frequency-modulated signals having center frequencies between 0.5 and 160 kHz. The 50% detection threshold was determined for each frequency. The resulting audiogram for this animal was U-shaped, with hearing capabilities from 0.5 to 160 kHz (8 13 oct). Maximum sensitivity (42 dB re 1 μPa) occurred at 64 kHz. The range of most sensitive hearing (defined as the frequency range with sensitivities within 10 dB of maximum sensitivity) was from 29 to 123 kHz (approximately 2 oct). The animal's hearing became less sensitive below 32 kHz and above 120 kHz. Sensitivity decreased by about 8 dB per octave below 1 kHz and fell sharply at a rate of about 390 dB per octave above 140 kHz.

  20. The catalog of edge-on disk galaxies from SDSS. I. The catalog and the structural parameters of stellar disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizyaev, D. V. [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, Sunspot, NM, 88349 (United States); Kautsch, S. J. [Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314 (United States); Mosenkov, A. V. [Central Astronomical Observatory of RAS (Russian Federation); Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Hillyer, R. W. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

  1. GALAXIES IN FILAMENTS HAVE MORE SATELLITES: THE INFLUENCE OF THE COSMIC WEB ON THE SATELLITE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION IN THE SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Quan; Libeskind, N. I. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Tempel, E., E-mail: qguo@aip.de [Tartu Observatory, Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia)

    2015-02-20

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M {sub sat.} < M {sub prim.} + 2.0) by a factor of ∼2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  2. Galaxies in Filaments have More Satellites: The Influence of the Cosmic Web on the Satellite Luminosity Function in the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Quan; Tempel, E.; Libeskind, N. I.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M sat. 2.0) by a factor of ~2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  3. E+A Galaxy Properties and Post-Starburst Galaxy Evolution Data through SDSS-IV MaNGA and Illustris: A Co-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojanen, Winonah; Dudley, Raymond; Edwards, Kay; Gonzalez, Andrea; Johnson, Amalya; Kerrison, Nicole; Marinelli, Mariarosa; Melchert, Nancy; Liu, Charles; Sloan Collaboration, SDSS-IV MaNGA

    2018-01-01

    E+A galaxies (Elliptical + A-type stars) are post-starburst galaxies that have experienced a sudden quenching phase. Using previous research methods, 39 candidates out of 2,812 galaxies observed, or 1.4%, were selected from the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. We then identified morphological characteristics of the 39 galaxies including stellar kinematics, Gini coefficient, gas density and distribution and stellar ages. To study the origin of how E+A galaxies evolved to their present state, galaxy simulation data from the Illustris simulation was utilized to identify similar quenched post-starburst candidates. Seven post-starburst candidates were identified through star formation rate histories of Illustris simulated galaxies. The evolution of these galaxies is studied from 0 to 13.8 billion years ago to identify what caused the starburst and quenching of the Illustris candidates. Similar morphological characteristics of Illustris post-starburst candidates are pulled from before, during, and post-starburst and compared to the same morphological characteristics of the E+A galaxies from SDSS-IV MaNGA. The characteristics and properties of the Illustris galaxies are used to identify the possible evolutionary histories of the observed E+A galaxies. This work was supported by grants AST-1460860 from the National Science Foundation and SDSS FAST/SSP-483 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  4. The Effects of Normal Metal Stripes on TES Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeham, Nick; Adams, J. S.; Bandler, S. R.; Chervenak, J. A.; Datesman, A. M.; Eckart, M. E.; Finkbeiner, F. M.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Miniussi, A. R.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exploring the effects of size and geometry of normal metal features on the transition shapes and performance of transition-edge sensor microcalorimeters. The spectral resolution of transition-edge sensor (TES) microcalorimeters is very sensitive to the specific dependencies of the resistance R in the superconducting transition on the current I, magnetic field B, and temperature T. In particular, it has been shown that transitions that are very steep in (R,T) space lead to a significant noise term, in excess of conventional expectations. This so-called unexplained noise is known to be reduced by the addition of normal metal stripes across the TES perpendicular to the direction of current flow. These normal metal stripes have been shown to drastically alter the oscillatory patterns seen in measurements of the critical current as a function of magnetic field. However, there are many remaining questions about the exact impact of the stripes on current distributions within the TES, the Fraunhofer pattern and, therefore, the shape of the R(I, B, T) surface. Through measurements of the resistance under DC bias of TES devices of various sizes, with different stripe patterns and dimensions, we will discuss how these stripes can affect the R(I, B, T) surface. In addition, using measurements and analysis of the noise spectra of various devices we will present how these changes to the stripe pattern may affect the performance of the TES. In particular, we will discuss strategies to reduce the presence of localized discontinuities in the derivative of R, associated with increased noise, while maintaining the globally low levels of unexplained noise currently achieved with conventional metal stripe patterns. Implementing these strategies is a path towards producing large arrays with highly uniform transitions and high spectral resolution. These large uniform arrays will be required for future x-ray astronomy applications, such as the X-IFU on ATHENA.

  5. The Prevalence of Ionized Gas Outflow Signatures in SDSS-IV MaNGA Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Anthony M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia

    2018-01-01

    Actively accreting supermassive black holes (AGN) can have a variety of effects on their host galaxies, from generating large regions of hot, photoionized gas, to driving AGN feedback in the form of galaxy wide outflows that may affect the evolution of the galaxy over time by quenching their star formation and by thus setting limits to the total mass of their host galaxy. The focus of this work is to assess the prevalence of AGN-driven outflows in low-redshift AGN of moderate power using IFU observations of 2778 galaxies available through SDSS-IV MaNGA.SDSS-IV MaNGA is an optical spectroscopic IFU survey which will have obtained spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of ~10,000 galaxies at z ≤ 0.1 and with stellar masses >10^9 solar masses over the next three years, allowing us to describe the kinematic properties of a large galaxy sample across different spatial regions.We have re-mapped the kinematics of the [O III] emission line to account for asymmetries and secondary kinematic components in the emission line brought on by potential AGN-driven outflows. Using all galaxies currently in the MaNGA survey, we implement a new fitting procedure to help determine the prevalence of these secondary components. Specifically, we use the non-parametric W80 value as a proxy for velocity dispersion, which we expect to be affected especially in the case of asymmetries and broadening of the emission lines. Separating these galaxies into two samples of independently identified AGN candidates and non-AGN, I will show that broad secondary components are twice as common in MaNGA-selected AGN compared to galaxies in MaNGA not classified as AGN. Moreover, when the underlying distribution of W80 values are compared between samples, I will show that the differences in these distributions are statistically significant. This demonstrates that large IFU survey like SDSS-IV MaNGA will uncover many previously unknown AGN and AGN feedback signatures. Outflows and feedback from low

  6. Experimental mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Kator, H.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Striped bass Morone saxatilis were infected intraperitoneally with approximately 105 Mycobacterium marinum, M. shottsii sp. nov., or M. gordonae. Infected fish were maintained in a flow-through freshwater system at 18 to 21??C, and were examined histologically and bacteriologically at 2, 4, 6, 8, 17, 26, 36 and 45 wk post-infection (p.i.). M. marinum caused acute peritonitis, followed by extensive granuloma development in the mesenteries, spleen and anterior kidney. Granulomas in these tissues underwent a temporal progression of distinct morphological stages, culminating in well-circumscribed lesions surrounded by normal or healing tissue. Mycobacteria were cultured in high numbers from splenic tissue at all times p.i. Standard Ziehl-Neelsen staining, however, did not demonstrate acid-fast rods in most early inflammatory foci and granulomas. Large numbers of acid-fast rods were present in granulomas beginning at 8 wk p.i. Between 26 and 45 wk p.i., reactivation of disease was observed in some fish, with disintegration of granulomas, renewed inflammation, and elevated splenic bacterial densities approaching 109 colony-forming units g-1. Infection with M. shottsii or M. gordonae did not produce severe pathology. Mild peritonitis was followed by granuloma formation in the mesenteries, but, with 1 exception, granulomas were not observed in the spleen or anterior kidney. M. shottsii and M. gordonae both established persistent infections in the spleen, but were present at densities at least 2 orders of magnitude less than M. marinum at all time points observed. Granulomas in the mesenteries of M. shottsii- and M. gordonae-infected fish resolved over time, and no reactivation of disease was observed.

  7. Texas Urban Triangle : pilot study to implement a spatial decision support system (SDSS) for sustainable mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This project addressed sustainable transportation in the Texas Urban Triangle (TUT) by conducting a pilot : project at the county scale. The project tested and developed the multi-attribute Spatial Decision Support : System (SDSS) developed in 2009 u...

  8. Testing Accretion Disk Wind Models of Broad Absorption Line Quasars with SDSS Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Sean; Gabel, Jack

    2017-06-01

    We present an investigation of a large sample of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars (QSO) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5). Properties of the BALs, such as absorption equivalent width, outflow velocities, and depth of BAL, are obtained from analysis by Gibson et al. We perform correlation analysis on these data to test the predictions made by the radiation driven, accretion disk streamline model of Murray and Chiang. We find the CIV BAL maximum velocity and the continuum luminosity are correlated, consistent with radiation driven models. The mean minimum velocity of CIV is lower in low ionization BALs (LoBALs), than highly ionized BALs (HiBALS), suggesting an orientation effect consistent with the Murray and Chiang model. Finally, we find that HiBALs greatly outnumber LoBALs in the general BAL population, supporting prediction of the Murray and Chiang model that HiBALs have a greater global covering factor than LoBALs.

  9. Infrared Reverberation Mapping of 17 Quasars from the SDSS Reverberation Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Shen, Yue; Barth, Aaron J.; Brandt, W. Niel; Dawson, Kyle S.; Green, Paul J.; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith D.; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Tao, Charling

    2017-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Cycle 11/12 proposals allowed observations over a 20 month long period which opened up a new window for long term reverberation monitoring of high luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN). Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust had been limited to AGN that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). This had narrowed the sample of sources to low luminosity AGN which would have a small dust sublimation radius thus having their dust close enough so that the light travel time from the UV/optical emitting region of the accretion disk to the IR emitting region of the dust would be on the 1-2 month timescale. With this new opportunity we monitored 17 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. This sample has photometric monitoring for 849 quasars starting in 2010 combining data from the Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes. By combining these ground based observations with Spitzer data we can, for the first time, detect dust reverberation in high luminosity AGN.

  10. Structural compliance, misfit strain and stripe nanostructures in cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Phillip

    2002-03-01

    Structural compliance is the ability of a crystal structure to accommodate variations in local atomic bond-lengths without incurring large strain energies. Based on local pair distribution function(pdf) measurements, we show that the structural compliance of cuprates is relatively small. In addition the pdf measurements indicate the presence of short and long Cu-O-Cu bonds in doped cuprate layers. We propose that short, highly doped, Cu-O-Cu bonds in stripes are subject to a tensile misfit strain, and we develop a model to describe the effect of this misfit strain on charge ordering in the copper oxygen planes of oxide materials. The typical length of strain-induced short stripes will be presented along with some of the low energy stripe nanostructures that can result. (Preprint is at Cond-Mat: 0108338)

  11. Effects of water velocity on activity of juvenile striped bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowles, R.R.; Griffith, J.S.; Coutant, C.C.

    1976-07-01

    The swimming activity of juvenile striped bass (Morone saxatilis Walbaum) 8 to 80 mm long was investigated in a test chamber simulating, on a small scale, a fixed-screen cooling water intake structure. As water velocity increased from 0 to 30 cm/sec area and distance traveled by juvenile bass 10 to 80 mm long decreased. However, as water velocity increased from 0 to 3 cm/sec the area and distance covered by larval bass increased. The presence of food increased the activity of larval bass, but decreased the activity of juveniles. Area ranged by striped bass at test velocities ranging from 0 to 30 cm/sec increased in proportion to body length. Juvenile striped bass tested at acclimation temperatures between 20 and 5/sup 0/C experienced a 30% reduction of activity. Activity was also reduced as temperature increased from 20 to 30/sup 0/C.

  12. Roadway striping productivity data analysis for INDOT Greenfield and Crawfordsville districts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of the SPR3650 project is to provide an accurate overview of striping operation so that INDOT finds a way to : effectively save significant investment for purchasing new striping trucks in near future without compromising roadwa...

  13. Stable multidimensional soliton stripes in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brazhnyi, Valeriy A. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, Porto 4169-007 (Portugal); Perez-Garcia, Victor M., E-mail: victor.perezgarcia@uclm.es [Departamento de Matematicas, E. T. S. de Ingenieros Industriales, and Instituto de Matematica Aplicada a la Ciencia y la Ingenieria, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Soliton-stripes (multidimensional extensions of dark solitons) are constructed in multicomponent BECs. > A second component filling the core of the stripe leads to reduced instabilities while propagating in homogeneous media. > In the presence of a trap arbitrarily long-lived stripes can be constructed by increasing the core filling. - Abstract: We discuss how to construct stable multidimensional extensions of one-dimensional dark solitons, the so-called soliton stripes, in two-species Bose-Einstein condensates in the immiscible regime. We show how using a second component to fill the core of a dark soliton stripe leads to reduced instabilities while propagating in homogeneous media. We also discuss how in the presence of a trap arbitrarily long-lived dark soliton stripes can be constructed by increasing the filling of the dark stripe core. Numerical evidences of the robustness of the dark soliton stripes in collision scenarios are also provided.

  14. The Arizona striped whiptail: past and present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian K. Sullivan; Paul S. Hamilton; Matthew A. Kwiatkowski

    2005-01-01

    We surveyed historic and nearby collecting localities for Aspidoscelis (= Cnemidophorus) arizonae in Cochise and Graham Counties, Arizona, during spring and summer, 2000-2003. Aspidoscelis arizonae was present at or nearby all but one of the historic sites (seven of eight) that we surveyed located near Willcox (...

  15. Speed from light: growth rate and bulk flow at z ˜ 0.1 from improved SDSS DR13 photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feix, M.; Branchini, E.; Nusser, A.

    2017-06-01

    Observed galaxy luminosities (derived from redshifts) hold information on the large-scale peculiar velocity field in the form of spatially correlated scatter, which allows for bounds on bulk flows and the growth rate of matter density perturbations using large galaxy redshift surveys. We apply this luminosity approach to galaxies from the recent SDSS Data Release 13. Our goal is twofold. First, we take advantage of the recalibrated photometry to identify possible systematic errors relevant to our previous analysis of earlier data. Second, we seek improved constraints on the bulk flow and the normalized growth rate fσ8 at z ˜ 0.1. Our results confirm the robustness of our method. Bulk flow amplitudes, estimated in two redshift bins with 0.02 z1 z2 generation photometric catalogues.

  16. Chemo-orbital evidence from SDSS/SEGUE G dwarf stars for a mixed origin of the Galactic thick disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Ven G.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available About 13,000 G dwarf within 7SDSS/SEGUE spectroscopic survey are used to study the origin of the Milky Way thick disk. Combining [α/Fe] and [Fe/H] measurements with six-dimensional position-velocity parameters, we find that the sample is composed of two distinct stellar populations. The metal-rich population encompasses the thin disk with α-deficient stars and smoothly extends into a thick disk with α-enhanced stars, consistent with an in-situ formation through radial migration. On the other hand, the metal-poor population with enhanced α-abundance, higher scale height, and disperse kinematical properties, is difficult to explain with radial migration but might have originated from gas-rich mergers. The thick disk of the Milky Way seems to have a mixed origin.

  17. Distinguishing Patterns of Charge Order: Stripes or Checkerboards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, J.A.

    2010-04-06

    In two dimensions, quenched disorder always rounds transitions involving the breaking of spatial symmetries so, in practice, it can often be difficult to infer what form the symmetry breaking would take in the 'ideal,' zero disorder limit. We discuss methods of data analysis which can be useful for making such inferences, and apply them to the problem of determining whether the preferred order in the cuprates is 'stripes' or 'checkerboards.' In many cases we show that the experiments clearly indicate stripe order, while in others (where the observed correlation length is short), the answer is presently uncertain.

  18. The fourteenth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey : first spectroscopic data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Sky Survey and from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Funding for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV has been provided by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, and the Participating Institutions. SDSS-IV acknowledges support and resources from the Center for High-Performance Computing at the University of Utah. The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since July 2014. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the fourteenth from SDSS o...

  19. Galaxy pairs in the SDSS - XIII. The connection between enhanced star formation and molecular gas properties in galaxy mergers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violino, Giulio; Ellison, Sara L.; Sargent, Mark; Coppin, Kristen E. K.; Scudder, Jillian M.; Mendel, Trevor J.; Saintonge, Amelie

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the connection between star formation and molecular gas properties in galaxy mergers at low redshift (z≤0.06). The study we present is based on IRAM 30-m CO(1-0) observations of 11 galaxies with a close companion selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The pairs have mass ratios ≤4, projected separations rp ≤30 kpc and velocity separations ΔV≤300 km s-1, and have been selected to exhibit enhanced specific star formation rates (sSFR). We calculate molecular gas (H2) masses, assigning to each galaxy a physically motivated conversion factor αCO, and we derive molecular gas fractions and depletion times. We compare these quantities with those of isolated galaxies from the extended CO Legacy Data base for the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey sample (xCOLDGASS, Saintonge et al. 2017) with gas quantities computed in an identical way. Ours is the first study which directly compares the gas properties of galaxy pairs and those of a control sample of normal galaxies with rigorous control procedures and for which SFR and H2 masses have been estimated using the same method. We find that the galaxy pairs have shorter depletion times and an average molecular gas fraction enhancement of 0.4 dex compared to the mass matched control sample drawn from xCOLDGASS. However, the gas masses (and fractions) in galaxy pairs and their depletion times are consistent with those of non-mergers whose SFRs are similarly elevated. We conclude that both external interactions and internal processes may lead to molecular gas enhancement and decreased depletion times.

  20. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 246 - Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors E... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS STARS AND STRIPES (S&S) NEWSPAPER AND BUSINESS OPERATIONS Pt. 246, App. E Appendix E to Part 246—Stars and Stripes (S&S) Board of Directors A. Organization and Management...

  1. Spectroscopic observation of SN 2017jzp and SN 2018bf by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuncarayakti, H.; Mattila, S.; Kotak, R.; Harmanen, J.; Reynolds, T.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Stritzinger, M.; Onori, F.; Somero, A.; Kangas, T.; Lundqvist, P.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.

    2018-01-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of SNe 2017jzp and 2018bf in host galaxies KUG 1326+679 and SDSS J225746.53+253833.5, respectively.

  2. Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /CCAPP; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Evrard, August E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; Hansen, Sarah M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Hao, Jia; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Northwestern U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Sheldon, Erin S.; /Brookhaven; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

    2009-08-03

    We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

  3. The SDSS-IV MaNGA Sample: Design, Optimization, and Usage Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, David A.; Bundy, Kevin; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Yan, Renbin; Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Drory, Niv; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Law, David R.; Li, Cheng; MacDonald, Nicholas; Masters, Karen; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Brownstein, Joel R.

    2017-09-01

    We describe the sample design for the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey and present the final properties of the main samples along with important considerations for using these samples for science. Our target selection criteria were developed while simultaneously optimizing the size distribution of the MaNGA integral field units (IFUs), the IFU allocation strategy, and the target density to produce a survey defined in terms of maximizing signal-to-noise ratio, spatial resolution, and sample size. Our selection strategy makes use of redshift limits that only depend on I-band absolute magnitude (M I ), or, for a small subset of our sample, M I and color (NUV - I). Such a strategy ensures that all galaxies span the same range in angular size irrespective of luminosity and are therefore covered evenly by the adopted range of IFU sizes. We define three samples: the Primary and Secondary samples are selected to have a flat number density with respect to M I and are targeted to have spectroscopic coverage to 1.5 and 2.5 effective radii (R e ), respectively. The Color-Enhanced supplement increases the number of galaxies in the low-density regions of color-magnitude space by extending the redshift limits of the Primary sample in the appropriate color bins. The samples cover the stellar mass range 5× {10}8≤slant {M}* ≤slant 3× {10}11 {M}⊙ {h}-2 and are sampled at median physical resolutions of 1.37 and 2.5 kpc for the Primary and Secondary samples, respectively. We provide weights that will statistically correct for our luminosity and color-dependent selection function and IFU allocation strategy, thus correcting the observed sample to a volume-limited sample.

  4. Stripe domains and magnetoresistance in thermally deposited nickel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, P.D. E-mail: sparks@hmc.edu; Stern, N.P.; Snowden, D.S.; Kappus, B.A.; Checkelsky, J.G.; Harberger, S.S.; Fusello, A.M.; Eckert, J.C

    2004-05-01

    We report a study of the domain structure and magnetoresistance of thermally deposited nickel films. For films thicker than 17 nm, we observe striped domains with period varying with film thickness as a power law with exponent 0.21{+-}0.02 up to 120 nm thickness. There is a negative magnetoresistance for fields out of the plane.

  5. Monitoring quantity and quality of striped catfish pond effluent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der P.G.M.; Poelman, M.; Bosma, R.H.; Long, N.; Son, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    The production of striped catfish and other fish species in ponds has several possible impacts on the environment, one of which is caused by the discharge of pond waste water (effluent), which is enriched with nitrogen and phosphorous compounds as result of feeding and fish faeces. To restrict the

  6. Glassy spin dynamics in stripe ordered cuprate system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curro, N. J. (Nicholas J.)

    2004-01-01

    The unusual glassy dynamics exhibited by the spin fluctuations in the stripe-ordered cuprates can be quantitatively measured by La nuclear magnetic resonance. We analyze the spin lattice relaxation data in the low temperature tetragonal structural phase of La{sub 1.8-x}Eu{sub 0.2}Sr{sub x}CuO{sub 4} and find that there is a distribution of local fluctuations times, with a Vogel-Fulcher temperature dependence. Furthermore, the data are consistent with a stretched exponential form for the dynamical spin correlation function, typical of glassy systems. Several doped transition metal oxides exhibit unusual properties associated with heterogeneous charge order. Of particular interest are the cuprates, which become high temperature superconductors within a certain doping range. Charge stripe correlations may play a crucial role in the mechanism for the superconductivity, yet detailed information about the microscopic structure of the charge order as well as the dynamics of this stripes have remained elusive. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) probes the local, low energy spin and charge fluctuations at the nuclear sites, and provides important clues to charge-stripe dynamics.

  7. Distribution patterns of striped mullet Mugil cephalus in mangrove ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The density of juvenile mullet differed significantly among the creeks, but the spatial patterns within them were consistent with higher densities upstream in three of ... striped mullet vary among sites and creeks in response to refuge availability from turbid, shallow water and the accessibility of food from benthic microalgae.

  8. Intervertebral Disk Disease in 3 Striped Skunks (Mephitis mephitis)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krauss, M.W.; Benato, L.; McDonnell, J.; Schoemaker, N.J.; Westerhof, I.; Bronson, E.; Gielen, I.; van Caelenberg, A.; Hellebuyck, T.; Meij, B.P.; de Decker, S.

    Objective To describe diagnostic findings, surgical technique, and outcome in 3 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) with a history of paraparesis. Study Design Case series. Animals Skunks (n = 3) with paraparesis. Methods Neurologic examination revealed upper motor neuron disease (T2–L2) in 2 skunks

  9. leaf and stripe rust resistance among ethiopian grown wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    ABSTRACT: Ethiopian grown wheat varieties and lines were studied to identify germplasm sources possessing resistance to leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina and stripe rust (P. striiformis). Sixty-four lines were included of which 38 were bread wheat (Triticum aestivum, 2n=6x=42, AABBDD) and 26 durum wheat (T.

  10. Siim Nestor soovitab : Supreme 7aastane. White Stripes / Siim Nestor

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Nestor, Siim, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    Kolmik Supreme tähistab oma 7. tegutsemisaastat 24. juunil Von Krahlis, kus toimub ka Krecki debüütalbumi "If You Live" (väljaandjaks ettevõte Umblu) esitlus. Detroidi blues-rock duo White Stripes esitleb oma uut albumit "Get Behind Me Satan" 29. juunil Tallinnas klubis Hollywood

  11. Anatomical studies of the gastrointestinal tract of the striped sand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out on the gross anatomical, morphometric features and histology of the gastrointestinal tract of the Striped Sand Snake (Psammophis sibilans). Ten snakes (five males and five females) were euthanized and dissected for the study. The gastrointestinal tract appeared as a straight tubular organ from oral ...

  12. Expansion of the South China Sea basin: Constraints from magnetic anomaly stripes, sea floor topography, satellite gravity and submarine geothermics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The widely distributed E–W-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the central basin and the N–E-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the southwest sub-basin provide the most important evidence for Neogene expansion of the South China Sea. The expansion mechanism remains, however, controversial because of the lack of direct drilling data, non-systematic marine magnetic survey data, and irregular magnetic anomaly stripes with two obvious directions. For example, researchers have inferred different ages and episodes of expansion for the central basin and southwest sub-basin. Major controversy centers on the order of basinal expansion and the mechanism of expansion for the entire South China Sea basin. This study attempts to constrain these problems from a comprehensive analysis of the seafloor topography, magnetic anomaly stripes, regional aeromagnetic data, satellite gravity, and submarine geothermics. The mapped seafloor terrain shows that the central basin is a north-south rectangle that is relatively shallow with many seamounts, whereas the southwest sub-basin is wide in northeast, gradually narrows to the southwest, and is relatively deeper with fewer seamounts. Many magnetic anomaly stripes are present in the central basin with variable dimensions and directions that are dominantly EW-trending, followed by the NE-, NW- and NS-trending. Conversely such stripes are few in the southwest sub-basin and mainly NE-trending. Regional magnetic data suggest that the NW-trending Ailaoshan-Red River fault extends into the South China Sea, links with the central fault zone in the South China Sea, which extends further southward to Reed Tablemount. Satellite gravity data show that both the central basin and southwest sub-basin are composed of oceanic crust. The Changlong seamount is particularly visible in the southwest sub-basin and extends eastward to the Zhenbei seamount. Also a low gravity anomaly zone coincides with the central fault zone in the sub

  13. DISCLOSING THE RADIO LOUDNESS DISTRIBUTION DICHOTOMY IN QUASARS: AN UNBIASED MONTE CARLO APPROACH APPLIED TO THE SDSS-FIRST QUASAR SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balokovic, M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smolcic, V. [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Hugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ivezic, Z. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zamorani, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Schinnerer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kelly, B. C. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modeling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with (12 {+-} 1)% of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for its existence were probably affected by the incompleteness of the FIRST survey close to its faint limit. We also investigate the redshift and luminosity dependence of the radio loudness distribution and find tentative evidence that at high redshift radio-loud quasars were rarer, on average louder, and exhibited a smaller range in radio loudness. In agreement with other recent work, we conclude that the SDSS-FIRST sample strongly suggests that the radio loudness distribution of quasars is not a universal function, and that more complex models than presented here are needed to fully explain available observations.

  14. Improving the quality of stripes in structured-light three-dimensional profile measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhaoshuai; Wang, Zhao; Huang, Junhui; Xue, Qi; Gao, Jianmin

    2017-03-01

    Measuring objects with high dynamic range (HDR) reflectivity by coded structured-light, captured stripes are usually seriously distorted by reflectivity, causing inaccurate measurement results. A stripe enhancement method is proposed to deal with the problem. The method is based on the correspondence between phase and intensity of the stripe. First, the phase map of the captured stripe pattern is retrieved by phase-shift algorithm and multiexposure method, where saturation and low contrast of the stripe are eliminated; then, the modulation of stripes is normalized to eliminate the influence of reflectivity; finally, the enhanced stripe is obtained by assembling the modulation and the phase map. Experimental results demonstrate that the method is efficient for objects with HDR reflectivity and achieves high accuracy.

  15. Distinct Nature of Static and Dynamic Magnetic Stripes in Cuprate Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, H.; Holm, S. L.; Lǎcǎtuşu, M.-E.; Rømer, A. T.; Bertelsen, M.; Boehm, M.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Grivel, J.-C.; Emery, S. B.; Udby, L.; Wells, B. O.; Lefmann, K.

    2018-01-01

    We present detailed neutron scattering studies of the static and dynamic stripes in an optimally doped high-temperature superconductor, La2 CuO4 +y . We observe that the dynamic stripes do not disperse towards the static stripes in the limit of vanishing energy transfer. Therefore, the dynamic stripes observed in neutron scattering experiments are not the Goldstone modes associated with the broken symmetry of the simultaneously observed static stripes, and the signals originate from different domains in the sample. These observations support real-space electronic phase separation in the crystal, where the static stripes in one phase are pinned versions of the dynamic stripes in the other, having slightly different periods. Our results explain earlier observations of unusual dispersions in underdoped La2 -xSrx CuO4 (x =0.07 ) and La2 -xBax CuO4 (x =0.095 ).

  16. The Late-Type Extension to MoVeRS (LaTE-MoVeRS): Proper Motion Verified Low-mass Stars and Brown Dwarfs from SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, Christopher A.; West, Andrew A.; Shippee, Guillaume; Burgasser, Adam J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.

    2017-03-01

    We present the Late-Type Extension to the Motion Verified Red Stars (LaTE-MoVeRS) catalog, containing 46,463 photometric late-type (>M5) dwarfs within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint. Proper motions were computed for objects combining astrometry from the SDSS Data Release 12 (DR12), the Two-micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) Point Source Catalog, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) AllWISE data sets. LaTE-MoVeRS objects were required to have significant proper motion ({μ }{tot}≥slant 2{σ }{μ {tot}}). Using the LaTE-MoVeRS sample and Gaia Data Release 1, we estimate Gaia will be ˜64% complete for very low-mass objects (>M5) in comparison to the combined SDSS+2MASS+WISE data set (i< 21.3). We computed photometric distances and estimated stellar effective temperatures for the LaTE-MoVeRS catalog. The majority of the dwarfs in the sample have distances < 150 pc and {T}{eff}< 3000 K. Thirteen objects that have not been previously identified as nearby objects were identified within LaTE-MoVeRS with estimated photometric distances within 25 pc. We also identified one new object that has not been previously identified with a large amount of excess mid-infrared flux (2MASS J11151597+1937266). This object appears to be an L2γ at ˜50 pc showing spectroscopic signs of a flaring event (e.g., strong hydrogen Balmer emission lines). This object does not exhibit kinematics similar to any known kinematic association. The LaTE-MoVeRS catalog is available through SDSS CasJobs and VizieR.

  17. Measurement of baryon acoustic oscillation correlations at z = 2.3 with SDSS DR12 Lyα-Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Julian E.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Guy, Julien; Rich, James; Blomqvist, Michael; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Pieri, Matthew M.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Bailey, Stephen; Delubac, Timothée; Kirkby, David; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Margala, Daniel; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinberg, David H.; Yèche, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    We have used flux-transmission correlations in Lyα forests to measure the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The study uses spectra of 157 783 quasars in the redshift range 2.1 ≤ z ≤ 3.5 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 12 (DR12). Besides the statistical improvements on our previous studies using SDSS DR9 and DR11, we have implemented numerous improvements in the analysis procedure, allowing us to construct a physical model of the correlation function and to investigate potential systematic errors in the determination of the BAO peak position. The Hubble distance, DH = c/H(z), relative to the sound horizon is DH(z = 2.33) /rd = 9.07 ± 0.31. The best-determined combination of comoving angular-diameter distance, DM, and the Hubble distance is found to be DH0.7DM0.3 /rd = 13.94 ± 0.35. This value is 1.028 ± 0.026 times the prediction of the flat-ΛCDM model consistent with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy spectrum. The errors include marginalization over the effects of unidentified high-density absorption systems and fluctuations in ultraviolet ionizing radiation. Independently of the CMB measurements, the combination of our results and other BAO observations determine the open-ΛCDM density parameters to be ΩM = 0.296 ± 0.029, ΩΛ = 0.699 ± 0.100 and Ωk = -0.002 ± 0.119.

  18. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  19. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  20. SDSS 1507+52: A Halo Cataclysmic Variable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joseph; Thorstensen, John R.; Knigge, Christian

    2008-05-01

    We report a photometric and spectroscopic study of the peculiar cataclysmic variable SDSS 1507+52. The star shows very deep eclipses on the 67-minute orbital period, and those eclipses are easily separable into white-dwarf and hot-spot components. This leads to tight constraints on binary parameters, with M1 = 0.83(8) M⊙, M2 = 0.057(8) M⊙, R1 = 0.0097(9) R⊙, R2 = 0.097(4) R⊙, q = 0.069(2), and i = 83.18(13)°. Such numbers suggest possible membership among the WZ Sge stars, a common type of dwarf nova. The spectroscopic behavior (strong and broad H emission, double-peaked and showing a classic rotational disturbance during eclipse) is also typical. But the star’s orbital period is shockingly below the “period minimum” of ˜77 minutes that is characteristic of hydrogen-rich CVs; producing such a strange binary will require some tinkering with the theory of cataclysmic-variable evolution. The proper motion is also remarkably high for a star of its distance, which we estimate from photometry and trigonometric parallax as 230 ± 40 pc. This suggests a transverse velocity of 164 ± 30 km s-1 —uncomfortably high if the star belongs to a Galactic-disk population. These difficulties with understanding its evolution and space velocity can be solved if the star belongs to a Galactic-halo population. Based on observations obtained at the MDM Observatory, operated by Dartmouth College, Columbia University, Ohio State University, Ohio University, and the University of Michigan.

  1. Co-Occurrence and Habitat Use of Fin Whales, Striped Dolphins and Atlantic Bluefin Tuna in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert Klaus; Fromentin, Jean-Marc; Demarcq, Hervé; Brisset, Blandine; Bonhommeau, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Different dolphin and tuna species have frequently been reported to aggregate in areas of high frontal activity, sometimes developing close multi-species associations to increase feeding success. Aerial surveys are a common tool to monitor the density and abundance of marine mammals, and have recently become a focus in the search for methods to provide fisheries-independent abundance indicators for tuna stock assessment. In this study, we present first density estimates corrected for availability bias of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) and striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Golf of Lions (GoL), compared with uncorrected estimates of Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABFT; Thunnus thynnus) densities from 8 years of line transect aerial surveys. The raw sighting data were further used to analyze patterns of spatial co-occurrence and density of these three top marine predators in this important feeding ground in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. These patterns were investigated regarding known species-specific feeding preferences and environmental characteristics (i. e. mesoscale activity) of the survey zone. ABFT was by far the most abundant species during the surveys in terms of schools and individuals, followed by striped dolphins and fin whales. However, when accounted for availability bias, schools of dolphins and fin whales were of equal density. Direct interactions of the species appeared to be the exception, but results indicate that densities, presence and core sighting locations of striped dolphins and ABFT were correlated. Core sighting areas of these species were located close to an area of high mesoscale activity (oceanic fronts and eddies). Fin whales did not show such a correlation. The results further highlight the feasibility to coordinate research efforts to explore the behaviour and abundance of the investigated species, as demanded by the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD).

  2. Co-Occurrence and Habitat Use of Fin Whales, Striped Dolphins and Atlantic Bluefin Tuna in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Klaus Bauer

    Full Text Available Different dolphin and tuna species have frequently been reported to aggregate in areas of high frontal activity, sometimes developing close multi-species associations to increase feeding success. Aerial surveys are a common tool to monitor the density and abundance of marine mammals, and have recently become a focus in the search for methods to provide fisheries-independent abundance indicators for tuna stock assessment. In this study, we present first density estimates corrected for availability bias of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus and striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba from the Golf of Lions (GoL, compared with uncorrected estimates of Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABFT; Thunnus thynnus densities from 8 years of line transect aerial surveys. The raw sighting data were further used to analyze patterns of spatial co-occurrence and density of these three top marine predators in this important feeding ground in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. These patterns were investigated regarding known species-specific feeding preferences and environmental characteristics (i. e. mesoscale activity of the survey zone. ABFT was by far the most abundant species during the surveys in terms of schools and individuals, followed by striped dolphins and fin whales. However, when accounted for availability bias, schools of dolphins and fin whales were of equal density. Direct interactions of the species appeared to be the exception, but results indicate that densities, presence and core sighting locations of striped dolphins and ABFT were correlated. Core sighting areas of these species were located close to an area of high mesoscale activity (oceanic fronts and eddies. Fin whales did not show such a correlation. The results further highlight the feasibility to coordinate research efforts to explore the behaviour and abundance of the investigated species, as demanded by the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD.

  3. Co-Occurrence and Habitat Use of Fin Whales, Striped Dolphins and Atlantic Bluefin Tuna in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert Klaus; Demarcq, Hervé; Brisset, Blandine

    2015-01-01

    Different dolphin and tuna species have frequently been reported to aggregate in areas of high frontal activity, sometimes developing close multi-species associations to increase feeding success. Aerial surveys are a common tool to monitor the density and abundance of marine mammals, and have recently become a focus in the search for methods to provide fisheries-independent abundance indicators for tuna stock assessment. In this study, we present first density estimates corrected for availability bias of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus) and striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Golf of Lions (GoL), compared with uncorrected estimates of Atlantic bluefin tuna (ABFT; Thunnus thynnus) densities from 8 years of line transect aerial surveys. The raw sighting data were further used to analyze patterns of spatial co-occurrence and density of these three top marine predators in this important feeding ground in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea. These patterns were investigated regarding known species-specific feeding preferences and environmental characteristics (i. e. mesoscale activity) of the survey zone. ABFT was by far the most abundant species during the surveys in terms of schools and individuals, followed by striped dolphins and fin whales. However, when accounted for availability bias, schools of dolphins and fin whales were of equal density. Direct interactions of the species appeared to be the exception, but results indicate that densities, presence and core sighting locations of striped dolphins and ABFT were correlated. Core sighting areas of these species were located close to an area of high mesoscale activity (oceanic fronts and eddies). Fin whales did not show such a correlation. The results further highlight the feasibility to coordinate research efforts to explore the behaviour and abundance of the investigated species, as demanded by the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD). PMID:26458254

  4. REVEALING THE NATURE OF EXTREME CORONAL-LINE EMITTER SDSS J095209.56+214313.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palaversa, Lovro; Holl, Berry [Observatoire astronomique de l’Université de Genève, 51 chemin des Maillettes, CH-1290 Sauverny (Switzerland); Gezari, Suvi [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Sesar, Branimir [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Stuart, J. Scott [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, MA 02420-9108 (United States); Wozniak, Przemyslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory, 30 Bikini Atoll Road, Los Alamos, NM 87545-0001 (United States); Ivezić, Željko, E-mail: lovro.palaversa@unige.ch [University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States)

    2016-03-10

    Extreme coronal-line emitter (ECLE) SDSS J095209.56+214313.3, known by its strong, fading, high-ionization lines, has been a long-standing candidate for a tidal disruption event; however, a supernova (SN) origin has not yet been ruled out. Here we add several new pieces of information to the puzzle of the nature of the transient that powered its variable coronal lines: (1) an optical light curve from the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) survey that serendipitously catches the optical flare, and (2) late-time observations of the host galaxy with the Swift Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) and X-ray telescope (XRT) and the ground-based Mercator telescope. The well-sampled, ∼10 yr long, unfiltered LINEAR light curve constrains the onset of the flare to a precision of ±5 days and enables us to place a lower limit on the peak optical magnitude. Difference imaging allows us to estimate the location of the flare in proximity of the host galaxy core. Comparison of the GALEX data (early 2006) with the recently acquired Swift UVOT (2015 June) and Mercator observations (2015 April) demonstrates a decrease in the UV flux over a ∼10 yr period, confirming that the flare was UV-bright. The long-lived UV-bright emission, detected 1.8 rest-frame years after the start of the flare, strongly disfavors an SN origin. These new data allow us to conclude that the flare was indeed powered by the tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole and that tidal disruption events are in fact capable of powering the enigmatic class of ECLEs.

  5. SDSS-IV MaNGA: stellar population gradients as a function of galaxy environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, D.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Westfall, K.; Etherington, J.; Riffel, R.; Mallmann, N. D.; Zheng, Z.; Argudo-Fernández, M.; Bershady, M.; Bundy, K.; Drory, N.; Law, D.; Yan, R.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Brownstein, J.; Lane, R. R.; Maiolino, R.; Masters, K.; Merrifield, M.; Nitschelm, C.; Pan, K.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.

    2017-02-01

    We study the internal radial gradients of stellar population properties within 1.5 Re and analyse the impact of galaxy environment. We use a representative sample of 721 galaxies with masses ranging between 109 M⊙ and 1011.5 M⊙ from the SDSS-IV survey MaNGA. We split this sample by morphology into early-type and late-type galaxies. Using the full spectral fitting code FIREFLY, we derive the light and mass-weighted stellar population properties, age and metallicity, and calculate the gradients of these properties. We use three independent methods to quantify galaxy environment, namely the Nth nearest neighbour, the tidal strength parameter Q and distinguish between central and satellite galaxies. In our analysis, we find that early-type galaxies generally exhibit shallow light-weighted age gradients in agreement with the literature and mass-weighted median age gradients tend to be slightly positive. Late-type galaxies, instead, have negative light-weighted age gradients. We detect negative metallicity gradients in both early- and late-type galaxies that correlate with galaxy mass, with the gradients being steeper and the correlation with mass being stronger in late-types. We find, however, that stellar population gradients, for both morphological classifications, have no significant correlation with galaxy environment for all three characterizations of environment. Our results suggest that galaxy mass is the main driver of stellar population gradients in both early and late-type galaxies, and any environmental dependence, if present at all, must be very subtle.

  6. Satellites of radio AGN in SDSS: Insights into agn triggering and feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pace, Cameron; Salim, Samir, E-mail: cjpace@indiana.edu, E-mail: salims@indiana.edu [Indiana University, Department of Astronomy, Swain Hall West 319, Bloomington, IN 47405-7105 (United States)

    2014-04-10

    We study the effects of radio jets on galaxies in their vicinity (satellites) and the role of satellites in triggering radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The study compares the aggregate properties of satellites of a sample of 7220 radio AGNs at z < 0.3 (identified by Best and Heckman from the SDSS and NVSS+FIRST surveys) to the satellites of a control sample of radio-quiet galaxies, which are matched in redshift, color, luminosity, and axis ratio, as well as by environment type: field galaxies, cluster members, and brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). Remarkably, we find that radio AGNs exhibit on average a 50% excess (17σ significance) in the number of satellites within 100 kpc even though the cluster membership was controlled (e.g., radio BCGs have more satellites than radio-quiet BCGs, etc.). Satellite excess is not confirmed for high-excitation sources, which are only 2% of radio AGN. Extra satellites may be responsible for raising the probability for hot gas AGN accretion via tidal effects or may otherwise enhance the intensity or duration of the radio-emitting phase. Furthermore, we find that the incidence of radio AGNs among potential hosts (massive ellipticals) is similar for field galaxies and for non-BCG cluster members, suggesting that AGN fueling depends primarily on conditions in the host halo rather than the parent, cluster halo. Regarding feedback, we find that radio AGNs, either high or low excitation, have no detectable effect on star formation in their satellites, as neither induced star formation nor star formation quenching is present in more than ∼1% of radio AGN.

  7. The dark side of galaxy colour: evidence from new SDSS measurements of galaxy clustering and lensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hearin, Andrew P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics; Watson, Douglas F. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics (KICP); Becker, Matthew R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics (KICP); KICP, Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Reyes, Reinabelle [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Kavli Inst. for Cosmological Physics (KICP); Berlind, Andreas A. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Zentner, Andrew R. [Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics, and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), PA (United States)

    2014-08-12

    The age matching model has recently been shown to predict correctly the luminosity L and g-r color of galaxies residing within dark matter halos. The central tenet of the model is intuitive: older halos tend to host galaxies with older stellar populations. In this paper, we demonstrate that age matching also correctly predicts the g-r color trends exhibited in a wide variety of statistics of the galaxy distribution for stellar mass M* threshold samples. In particular, we present new measurements of the galaxy two-point correlation function and the galaxy-galaxy lensing signal as a function of M* and g-r color from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and show that age matching exhibits remarkable agreement with these and other statistics of low-redshift galaxies. In so doing, we also demonstrate good agreement between the galaxy-galaxy lensing observed by SDSS and the signal predicted by abundance matching, a new success of this model. We describe how age matching is a specific example of a larger class of Conditional Abundance Matching models (CAM), a theoretical framework we introduce here for the first time. CAM provides a general formalism to study correlations at fixed mass between any galaxy property and any halo property. The striking success of our simple implementation of CAM provides compelling evidence that this technique has the potential to describe the same set of data as alternative models, but with a dramatic reduction in the required number of parameters. CAM achieves this reduction by exploiting the capability of contemporary N-body simulations to determine dark matter halo properties other than mass alone, which distinguishes our model from conventional approaches to the galaxy-halo connection.

  8. Counter-Checking Tycho Double Stars with the SDSS DR9 Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    As already reported (Knapp and Gould 2016), most Tycho Double Star objects in the WDS catalog are unconfirmed. Small separation and faint components make these objects hard to resolve either by visual observation or by imaging in the V-band and only few public domain star catalogs offer resolution for stars with less than 2-3 arcseconds. One exception is the SDSS DR9 catalog based on images with a resolution of 0.396 arcseconds per pixel. This report shows that SDSS DR9 is of good use for counter-checking double stars down to a separation of 1.5 arcseconds or even less.

  9. Striped patterns induced by delamination of drying colloidal films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgiutti-Dauphiné, F; Pauchard, L

    2015-02-04

    The drying of a dispersion of nanoparticles on a solid substrate can result in the formation of spontaneous well-ordered stripe patterns left on the substrate. The evaporation of solvent yields large stresses in the material which usually cause crack formation and delamination from the substrate. The formation of these stripes results from a balance between the drying stress which drives the delamination crack front propagation and the cohesive properties of the material. These solid residues arise behind the crack front and can be perpendicular or parallel to the front. It is then possible to inhibit these structures by modifying the cohesive properties of the material. This self-assembly into an ordered pattern can offer an efficient method to produce a patterned surface in a simple way.

  10. Controlled particle transport in a plasma chamber with striped electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ke; Li, Yang-fang; Shimizu, T.; Konopka, U.; Thomas, H. M.; Morfill, G. E.

    2009-12-01

    The controlled transport of micrometer size dust particles in a parallel-plate radio frequency discharge has been investigated. The lower stainless steel electrode consisted of 100 independently controllable electrical metal stripes. The voltage signals on these stripes were modulated, causing traveling plasma sheath distortions. Because the particles trapped in local potential wells moved according to the direction of the distortion, the transport velocity could be actively controlled by adjusting frequencies and phase shifts of the applied periodic voltage signals. To investigate the detailed principle of this transport, molecular dynamic simulations was performed to reproduce the observations with the plasma background conditions calculated by separated particle-in-cell simulations for the experimental parameters. The findings will help develop novel technologies for investigating large-scale complex plasma systems and techniques for achieving clean environments in plasma processing reactors.

  11. Tissue distribution of metals in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from the Apulian coasts, southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardellicchio, N; Giandomenico, S; Ragone, P; Di Leo, A

    2000-02-01

    Tissue distributions of metals (mercury, lead, cadmium, zinc, copper, iron, manganese) were determined in six specimens of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba, Meyen) stranded on the Apulian coasts (Southern Italy) between February and June 1987. Methyl mercury and selenium were also determined in the liver samples. The liver accumulated the highest concentrations of metals, except for cadmium and chromium. Metal levels were higher than those found in dolphins living in the Atlantic, but lower than those recorded in the same species from the French Mediterranean coasts. Necroscopic surveys found that all specimens were affected by haemorrhagic gastritis, but the cause was not clear. While it was not possible to related the death of dolphins to a specific cause, or to contaminants, the accumulation of metals is likely to contribute to the health of the organism and represents a risk factor for dolphins.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Solar-type stars from SDSS-III MARVELS. VI. HD 87646 (Ma+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, B.; Ge, J.; Wolszczan, A.; Muterspaugh, M. W.; Lee, B.; Henry, G. W.; Schneider, D. P.; Martin, E. L.; Niedzielski, A.; Xie, J.; Fleming, S. W.; Thomas, N.; Williamson, M.; Zhu, Z.; Agol, E.; Bizyaev, D.; da Costa, L. N.; Jiang, P.; Fiorenzano, A. F. M.; Hernandez, J. I. G.; Guo, P.; Grieves, N.; Li, R.; Liu, J.; Mahadevan, S.; Mazeh, T.; Nguyen, D. C.; Paegert, M.; Sithajan, S.; Stassun, K.; Thirupathi, S.; van Eyken, J. C.; Wan, X.; Wang, J.; Wisniewski, J. P.; Zhao, B.; Zucker, S.

    2016-11-01

    We have obtained a total of 16 observations of HD87646 using the W.M. Keck Exoplanet Tracker (KeckET) from 2006 December to 2007 June. The radial velocities obtained are listed in Table1. The KeckET instrument was constructed in 2005 August-2006 February with support from the Keck Foundation. It was coupled with a wide field Sloan Digital Sky Survey telescope (SDSS) and used for the pilot Multi-Object APO RV Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). This is the sixth paper in this series, examining the low-mass companions around solar-type stars from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey (Wisniewski et al. 2012, Cat. J/AJ/143/107; Fleming et al. 2012AJ....144...72F; Ma et al. 2013AJ....145...20M; Jiang et al. 2013AJ....146...65J; De Lee et al. 2013AJ....145..155D). The KeckET instrument consists of eight subsystems-a multi-object fiber feed, an iodine cell, a fixed-delay interferometer system, a slit, a collimator, a grating, a camera, and a 4k*4k CCD detector. In addition, it contains four auxiliary subsystems: the interferometer control, an instrument calibration system, a photon flux monitoring system, and a thermal probe and control system. The instrument is fed with 60 fibers with 200μm core diameters, which are coupled to 180μm core diameter short fibers from the SDSS telescope, corresponding to 3arcsec on the sky at f/5. The resolving power for the spectrograph is R=5100, and the wavelength coverage is ~900Å, centered at 5400Å. KeckET has one spectrograph and one 4k*4k CCD camera that captures one of the two interferometer outputs, and has a 5.5% detection efficiency from the telescope to the detector without the iodine cell under the typical APO seeing conditions (~1.5arcsec seeing). The CCD camera records fringing spectra from 59 objects in a single exposure. Subsequent observations were performed using the Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instrument at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO). Initial follow-up was performed in 2007 November. Additional data points were

  13. The Stellar Kinematics of E+A Galaxies in SDSS IV-MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Amalya; Dudley, Raymond; Edwards, Kay; Gonzalez, Andrea; Kerrison, Nicole; Marinelli, Mariarosa; Melchert, Nancy; Ojanen, Winonah; Liu, Charles; SDSS-IV MaNGA

    2018-01-01

    E+A galaxies, hypothesized to be “transition” galaxies between the blue cloud and the red sequence, are valuable sources for studying the evolution of galaxies. Using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, a large scale integral field spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies from 3600 to 10300 Å, we identifed galaxies that exhibitted E+A characteristics within their optical spectra. We analyzed the 2,812 galaxies thus far observed by MaNGA to identify those that showed evidence of a starburst about 1 billion years ago, followed by cessation of star formation and quenching of the galaxy. Through this process we identifed 39 E+A galaxies by directly looking at the optical spectra and ensuring they exhibited the necessary properties of an E+A spectra, including a strong break at the 4000 Å mark, little to no Hα emission and absorption through the Balmer series, and a blue slope of the continuum past ~5000 Å as the flux decreases. We analyzed the stellar kinematics of these galaxies to determine whether or not they were fast or slow rotators, a proposed indicator of a major merger in their recent past. Using Voronoi binned graphs from the MaNGA Marvin database, we measured their stellar rotation curves in order to more clearly show the range of velocities within the galaxies. Among our 39 E+A candidates, all but two exhibited significant, orderly rotation across the galaxy, and 29 out of 39 of our galaxies show rotation faster than 30 km/s. With the caveat that our selection process was biased toward galaxies with orderly rotation, this prevalence of rotation challenges the belief that all E+A galaxies are created from major mergers. This work was supported by grants AST-1460860 from the National Science Foundation and SDSS FAST/SSP-483 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  14. Numerical Investigation of Tunable Plasmonic Tweezers based on Graphene Stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Mohsen; Darbari, Sara; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2017-11-06

    We are proposing tunable plasmonic tweezers, consisting two parallel graphene stripes, which can be utilized to effectively trap and sort nanoparticles. We show that by electrostatically tuning the chemical potential of a graphene stripe by about 100 meV (equivalent to ΔV G ≈ 4.4 V), the plasmonic force can be switched efficiently, without a need to switch the laser intensity. This enables high speed and low power switching with a large number of switching cycles. By applying two independent and appropriate gate bias voltages to the stripes, the direction of the plasmonic force can be reversed, which leads to separation of nanoparticles that satisfy the trapping conditions. Numerical simulations show that the potential depths obtained for polystyrene nanoparticles of refractive index n = 1.5717 and radii r ≥ 50 nm is deeper than -10 k B T , confirming the ability of the proposed system to effectively separate such nanoparticles. This capability holds for smaller nanoparticles with larger refractive indices. Finally, performing thermal simulations, we have demonstrated that the heat induced by the illumination increases the fluid temperature by at most 9 °C, having negligible effect on the trapping mechanism. The proposed system opens up new possibilities in developing tunable on-chip manipulation devices, suitable for biological applications.

  15. Observing the fluctuating stripes in high-Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovic, V.; Nussinov, Z.; Mukhin, S.; Zaanen, J.

    2008-01-01

    Superfluids and superconductors have been around for a long time and their explanation in terms of the Bogoliubov theory for bosons and the BCS theory for fermions belong to the highlights of twentieth century physics. However, it appears that these theories are too primitive to address the high-Tc superconductivity found in copper oxides. These electron systems seem to behave more like a dense, strongly correlated liquid contrasting markedly with the conventional quantum gasses: these show strong dynamical correlations on mesoscopic length and time scales associated with stripes, a particular form of electron crystallization. Resting on the gauge theory of topological quantum melting in 2+1 dimensions relevant for the cuprates, we describe the limit which is exactly opposite to the gas limit: the superconductor with the maximum possible amount of transient translational order. We predict that in this "orderly limit" an extra collective mode appears, and this "massive shear photon" can be regarded as a universal fingerprint of the fluctuating stripes. This mode is visible in the electrodynamic response and the ramification of our theory is that electron energy loss spectroscopy can be employed to prove or disprove the existence of dynamical stripes in cuprate superconductors.

  16. Ultrafast charge localization in a stripe-phase nickelate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coslovich, Giacomo; Huber, Bernhard; Lee, Wei-Sheng; Sasagawa, Takao; Hussain, Zahid; Bechtel, Hans A.; Martin, Michael C.; Shen, Zhi-Xun; W. Schoenlein, Robert; A. Kaindl, Robert

    2013-08-30

    Self-organized electronically-ordered phases are a recurring feature in correlated materials, resulting in e.g. fluctuating charge stripes whose role in high-Tc superconductivity is under debate. However, the relevant cause-effect relations between real-space charge correlations and low-energy excitations remain hidden in time-averaged studies. Here, we reveal ultrafast charge localization and lattice vibrational coupling as dynamical precursors of stripe formation in the model compound La1.75Sr0.25NiO4, using ultrafast and equilibrium mid-infrared spectroscopy. The opening of a pseudogap at a crossover temperature T* far above long-range stripe formation establishes the onset of electronic localization which is accompanied by an enhanced Fano asymmetry of Ni-O stretch vibrations. Ultrafast excitation triggers a sub-picosecond dynamics exposing the synchronous modulation of electron-phonon coupling and charge localization. These results illuminate the role of localization in forming the pseudogap in nickelates, opening a path to understanding this mysterious phase in a broad class of complex oxides.

  17. NATURAL TRANSVERSE VIBRATIONS OF A PRESTRESSED ORTHOTROPIC PLATE-STRIPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorychev Oleg Aleksandrovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article represents a new outlook at the boundary-value problem of natural vibrations of a homogeneous pre-stressed orthotropic plate-stripe. In the paper, the motion equation represents a new approximate hyperbolic equation (rather than a parabolic equation used in the majority of papers covering the same problem describing the vibration of a homogeneous orthotropic plate-stripe. The proposed research is based on newly derived boundary conditions describing the pin-edge, rigid, and elastic (vertical types of fixing, as well as the boundary conditions applicable to the unfixed edge of the plate. The paper contemplates the application of the Laplace transformation and a non-standard representation of a homogeneous differential equation with fixed factors. The article proposes a detailed representation of the problem of natural vibrations of a homogeneous orthotropic plate-stripe if rigidly fixed at opposite sides; besides, the article also provides frequency equations (no conclusions describing the plate characterized by the following boundary conditions: rigid fixing at one side and pin-edge fixing at the opposite side; pin-edge fixing at one side and free (unfixed other side; rigid fixing at one side and elastic fixing at the other side. The results described in the article may be helpful if applied in the construction sector whenever flat structural elements are considered. Moreover, specialists in solid mechanics and theory of elasticity may benefit from the ideas proposed in the article.

  18. Sensitivity of juvenile striped bass to chemicals used in aquaculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bills, Terry D.; Marking, Leif L.; Howe, George E.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts to restore anadromous striped bass (Morone saxatilis) populations by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and other agencies over the past 20 years have concentrated on hatchery culture to supplement dwindling natural reproduction. Adult fish captured for artificial spawning are stressed by handling and crowding in rearing ponds and are often exposed to therapeutants, anesthetics, disinfectants, and herbicides used in fish culture. We determined the toxicity of 17 fishery chemicals (chloramine-T, erythromycin, formalin, Hyamine 3500, Roccal, malachite green, sulfamerazine, benzocaine, etomidate, Finquel (MS-222) , metomidate, quinaldine sulfate, chlorine, potassium permanganate, Aquazine, copper sulfate, and Rodeo) to striped bass fry (average weight = 1 g) in reconstituted water (total hardness 40 mg/L) at 12 degree C. The 96-h LC50's (concentration calculated to produce 50% mortality in a population) ranged from 0.129 mg/L for malachite green to 340 mg/L for erythromycin. We also determined the effects of selected levels of water temperature, hardness, and pH on the toxicity of chloramine-T, formalin, malachite green, and Roccal. There were no differences in toxicity for any of the chemicals at any water quality variable tested except for chloramine-T, which was about 25 times more toxic in soft, acid water than in soft, alkaline water. Our data show that the striped bass is as sensitive to fishery chemicals as rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), but is generally less resistant than bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus).

  19. Lessons learned from Sloan Digital Sky Survey operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, S. J.; Gunn, J. E.; Boroski, B.; Long, D.; Snedden, S.; Nitta, A.; Krzesiński, J.; Harvanek, M.; Neilsen, E.; Gillespie, B.; Barentine, J. C.; Uomoto, A.; Tucker, D.; York, D.; Jester, S.

    2008-07-01

    Astronomy is changing. Large projects, large collaborations, and large budgets are becoming the norm. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one example of this new astronomy, and in operating the original survey, we put in place and learned many valuable operating principles. Scientists sometimes have the tendency to invent everything themselves but when budgets are large, deadlines are many, and both are tight, learning from others and applying it appropriately can make the difference between success and failure. We offer here our experiences well as our thoughts, opinions, and beliefs on what we learned in operating the SDSS.

  20. The STRIPES Trial - Support to Rural India's Public Education System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbourne Diana

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Performance of primary school students in India lags far below government expectations, and major disparity exists between rural and urban areas. The Naandi Foundation has designed and implemented a programme using community members to deliver after-school academic support for children in over 1,100 schools in five Indian states. Assessments to date suggest that it might have a substantial effect. This trial aims to evaluate the impact of this programme in villages of rural Andhra Pradesh and will compare test scores for children in three arms: a control and two intervention arms. In both intervention arms additional after-school instruction and learning materials will be offered to all eligible children and in one arm girls will also receive an additional 'kit' with a uniform and clothes. Methods/Design The trial is a cluster-randomised controlled trial conducted in conjunction with the CHAMPION trial. In the CHAMPION trial 464 villages were randomised so that half receive health interventions aiming to reduce neonatal mortality. STRIPES will be introduced in those CHAMPION villages which have a public primary school attended by at least 15 students at the time of a baseline test in 2008. 214 villages of the 464 were found to fulfil above criteria, 107 belonging to the control and 107 to the intervention arm of the CHAMPION trial. These latter 107 villages will serve as control villages in the STRIPES trial. A further randomisation will be carried out within the 107 STRIPES intervention villages allocating half to receive an additional kit for girls on the top of the instruction and learning materials. The primary outcome of the trial is a composite maths and language test score. Discussion The study is designed to measure (i whether the educational intervention affects the exam score of children compared to the control arm, (ii if the exam scores of girls who receive the additional kit are different from those of girls

  1. Variability-based active galactic nucleus selection using image subtraction in the SDSS and LSST era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yumi; Gibson, Robert R.; Becker, Andrew C.; Ivezić, Željko; Connolly, Andrew J.; Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); MacLeod, Chelsea L., E-mail: ymchoi@astro.washington.edu [Physics Department, U.S. Naval Academy, 572 Holloway Road, Annapolis, MD 21402 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    With upcoming all-sky surveys such as LSST poised to generate a deep digital movie of the optical sky, variability-based active galactic nucleus (AGN) selection will enable the construction of highly complete catalogs with minimum contamination. In this study, we generate g-band difference images and construct light curves (LCs) for QSO/AGN candidates listed in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 public catalogs compiled from different methods, including spectroscopy, optical colors, variability, and X-ray detection. Image differencing excels at identifying variable sources embedded in complex or blended emission regions such as Type II AGNs and other low-luminosity AGNs that may be omitted from traditional photometric or spectroscopic catalogs. To separate QSOs/AGNs from other sources using our difference image LCs, we explore several LC statistics and parameterize optical variability by the characteristic damping timescale (τ) and variability amplitude. By virtue of distinguishable variability parameters of AGNs, we are able to select them with high completeness of 93.4% and efficiency (i.e., purity) of 71.3%. Based on optical variability, we also select highly variable blazar candidates, whose infrared colors are consistent with known blazars. One-third of them are also radio detected. With the X-ray selected AGN candidates, we probe the optical variability of X-ray detected optically extended sources using their difference image LCs for the first time. A combination of optical variability and X-ray detection enables us to select various types of host-dominated AGNs. Contrary to the AGN unification model prediction, two Type II AGN candidates (out of six) show detectable variability on long-term timescales like typical Type I AGNs. This study will provide a baseline for future optical variability studies of extended sources.

  2. A Precision Photometric Comparison between SDSS-II and CSP Type Ia Supernova Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosher, J.; Sako, M.; Corlies, L.

    2012-01-01

    were transformed into the SDSS photometric system. Sources of systematic uncertainty have been identified, quantified, and shown to be at or below the 0.023 mag level in all bands. When all photometry for a given band is combined, we find average magnitude differences of equal to or less than 0.011 mag...

  3. Quasar feedback in the early Universe : The case of SDSS J1148+5251

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valiante, Rosa; Schneider, Raffaella; Maiolino, Roberto; Salvadori, Stefania; Bianchi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy-scale gas outflows triggered by active galactic nuclei have been proposed as a key physical process to regulate the co-evolution of nuclear black holes and their host galaxies. The recent detection of a massive gas outflow in one of the most distant quasars, SDSS J1148+5251 at z = 6.4,

  4. Quasar feedback in the early Universe: the case of SDSS J1148+5251

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valiante, Rosa; Schneider, Raffaella; Maiolino, Roberto; Salvadori, Stefania; Bianchi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy-scale gas outflows triggered by active galactic nuclei have been proposed as a key physical process to regulate the co-evolution of nuclear black holes and their host galaxies. The recent detection of a massive gas outflow in one of the most distant quasars, SDSS J1148+5251 at z= 6.4,

  5. Exploring the SDSS Data Set with Linked Scatter Plots. I. EMP, CEMP, and CV Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbon, Duane F.; Henze, Christopher; Nelson, Bron C., E-mail: Duane.F.Carbon@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Facility, Moffett Field, CA, 94035-1000 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a search for extremely metal-poor (EMP), carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP), and cataclysmic variable (CV) stars using a new exploration tool based on linked scatter plots (LSPs). Our approach is especially designed to work with very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, LAMOST, RAVE, and Gaia data sets, and it can be applied to stellar, galaxy, and quasar spectra. As a demonstration, we conduct our search using the SDSS DR10 data set. We first created a 3326-dimensional phase space containing nearly 2 billion measures of the strengths of over 1600 spectral features in 569,738 SDSS stars. These measures capture essentially all the stellar atomic and molecular species visible at the resolution of SDSS spectra. We show how LSPs can be used to quickly isolate and examine interesting portions of this phase space. To illustrate, we use LSPs coupled with cuts in selected portions of phase space to extract EMP stars, CEMP stars, and CV stars. We present identifications for 59 previously unrecognized candidate EMP stars and 11 previously unrecognized candidate CEMP stars. We also call attention to 2 candidate He ii emission CV stars found by the LSP approach that have not yet been discussed in the literature.

  6. Exploring the SDSS Dataset with Linked Scatter Plots: I. EMP, CEMP, and CV Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Duane F; Henze, Christopher; Nelson, Bron C

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a search for EMP, CEMP, and cataclysmic variable stars using a new exploration tool based on linked scatter plots (LSPs). Our approach is especially designed to work with very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, LAMOST, RAVE, and Gaia data sets and can be applied to stellar, galaxy, and quasar spectra. As a demonstration, we conduct a search for EMP, CEMP, and cataclysmic variable stars in the SDSS DR10 data set. We first created a 3326-dimensional phase space containing nearly 2 billion measures of the strengths of over 1600 spectral features in 569,738 SDSS stars. These measures capture essentially all the stellar atomic and molecular species visible at the resolution of SDSS spectra. We show how LSPs can be used to quickly isolate and examine interesting portions of this phase space. To illustrate, we use LSPs coupled with cuts in selected portions of phase space to extract EMP stars, C-rich EMP stars, and CV stars. We present identifications for 59 previously unrecognized candidate EMP stars and 11 previously unrecognized candidate CEMP stars. We also call attention to 2 candidate He II emission CV stars found by the LSP approach that have not yet been discussed in the literature.

  7. Spectral Variability of Quasar SDSS J030639.57+000343.1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectral Variability of Quasar SDSS J030639.57+000343.1. Hengxiao Guo1,2,∗ & Minfeng Gu1. 1Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical. Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030, China. 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A ...

  8. Galaxies on Top of Quasars: Probing Dwarf Galaxies in the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Lorrie; York, D. G.; Noterdaeme, P.; Srianand, R.; Bowen, D. V.; Khare, P.; Bishof, M.; Whichard, Z.; Kulkarni, V. P.

    2013-07-01

    Absorption lines from galaxies at intervening redshifts in quasar spectra are sensitive probes of metals and gas that are otherwise invisible due to distance or low surface brightness. However, in order to determine the environments these absorption lines arise in, we must detect these galaxies in emission as well. Galaxies on top of quasars (GOTOQs) are low-z galaxies found intervening with background quasars in the SDSS. These galaxies have been flagged for their narrow galactic emission lines present in quasar spectra in the SDSS. Typically, the low-z nature of these galaxies allows them to be easily detected in SDSS imaging. However, a number of GOTOQs (about 10%), despite being detected in spectral emission, are NOT seen in SDSS imaging. This implies that these may be dark galaxies, dwarf galaxies, or similarly low surface brightness galaxies. Additionally, about 25% of those detected in imaging are dwarf galaxies according to their L* values. Dwarf galaxies have long been underrepresented in observations compared to theory and are known to have large extents in dark matter. Given their prevalence here in our sample we must ask what role they play in quasar absorption line systems (QSOALS). Recent detections of 21-cm galaxies with few stars imply that aborted star formation in dark matter sub halos may produce QSOALS. Thus, this sub sample of galaxies offers a unique technique for probing dark and dwarf galaxies. The sample and its properties will be discussed, including star formation rates and dust estimates, as well as prospects for the future.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS magnetic white dwarf stars (Kepler+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepler, S. O.; Pelisoli, I.; Jordan, S.; Kleinman, S. J.; Koester, D.; Kulebi, B.; Pecanha, V.; Castanheira, B. G.; Nitta, A.; Costa, J. E. S.; Winget, D. E.; Kanaan, A.; Fraga, L.

    2017-07-01

    We classified more than 48000 spectra, selected as possible white dwarf stars from the SDSS DR7 by their colours, through visual inspection and detected Zeeman splittings in 521 DA stars. Table 1 shows the estimated values for the magnetic fields for the 521 spectra we measured. (1 data file).

  10. Quantifying dwarf satellites through gravitational imaging : The case of SDSS J120602.09+514229.5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegetti, Simona; Czoske, Oliver; Koopmans, Léon V. E.

    2010-01-01

    SDSS J120602.09+514229.5 is a gravitational lens system formed by a group of galaxies at redshift z(FG) = 0.422 lensing a bright background galaxy at redshift z(BG) = 2.001. The main peculiarity of this system is the presence of a luminous satellite near the Einstein radius, which slightly deforms

  11. Does a Differentiated, Carbonate-rich, Rocky Object Pollute the White Dwarf SDSS J104341.53+085558.2?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Carl; Dufour, P.

    2017-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of the dust- and gas-enshrouded, polluted, single white dwarf star SDSS J104341.53+085558.2 (hereafter SDSS J1043+0855). Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph far-ultraviolet spectra combined with deep Keck HIRES optical spectroscopy reveal the elements C, O, Mg, Al, Si, P, S, Ca, Fe, and Ni and enable useful limits for Sc, Ti, V, Cr, and Mn in the photosphere of SDSS J1043+0855. From this suite of elements we determine that the parent body being accreted by SDSS J1043+0855 is similar to the silicate Moon or the outer layers of Earth in that it is rocky and iron-poor. Combining this with comparison to other heavily polluted white dwarf stars, we are able to identify the material being accreted by SDSS J1043+0855 as likely to have come from the outermost layers of a differentiated object. Furthermore, we present evidence that some polluted white dwarfs (including SDSS J1043+0855) allow us to examine the structure of differentiated extrasolar rocky bodies. Enhanced levels of carbon in the body polluting SDSS J1043+0855 relative to the Earth-Moon system can be explained with a model where a significant amount of the accreted rocky minerals took the form of carbonates; specifically, through this model the accreted material could be up to 9% calcium-carbonate by mass.

  12. Strong chromatic microlensing in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, K.; Motta, V. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Avda. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso 2360102 (Chile); Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Avda. Vía Lactea s/n, La Laguna, E-38200 Tenerife (Spain); Falco, E. [Whipple Observatory, Smithsonian Institution, 670 Mt. Hopkins Road, PO Box 6369, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Jiménez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Muñoz, J. A., E-mail: karina.rojas@uv.cl, E-mail: veronica.motta@uv.cl, E-mail: emg@iac.es, E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jjimenez@ugr.es, E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, E-46100 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-12-10

    We use spectra of the double-lensed quasars HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 to study their unresolved structure through the impact of microlensing. There is no significant evidence of microlensing in the emission line profiles except for the Lyα line of SDSS1155+6346, which shows strong differences in the shapes for images A and B. However, the continuum of the B image spectrum in SDSS1155+6346 is strongly contaminated by the lens galaxy, and these differences should be considered with caution. Using the flux ratios of the emission lines for image pairs as a baseline to remove macro-magnification and extinction, we have detected strong chromatic microlensing in the continuum measured by CASTLES (www.cfa.harvard.edu/castles/) in both lens systems, with amplitudes 0.09(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for HE0047–1756, and 0.2(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for SDSS1155+6346. Using magnification maps to simulate microlensing and modeling the accretion disk as a Gaussian source (I ∝ exp(–R {sup 2}/2r {sub s}{sup 2})) of size r {sub s} ∝ λ {sup p}, we find r {sub s} = 2.5{sub −1.4}{sup +3.0} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 2.3 ± 0.8 at the rest frame for λ = 2045 for HE0047–1756 (log prior) and r {sub s} = 5.5{sub −3.3}{sup +8.2} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 1.5 ± 0.6 at the rest frame of λ = 1398 for SDSS1155+6346 (log prior). Contrary to other studied lens systems, the chromaticity detected in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 is large enough to fulfill the thin disk prediction. The inferred sizes, however, are very large compared to the predictions of this model, especially in the case of SDSS1155+6346.

  13. The quest for companions to post-common envelope binaries. I. Searching a sample of stars from the CSS and SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, U.; Bauer, S.; Beuermann, K.; Diese, J.; Dreizler, S.; Hessman, F. V.; Husser, T.-O.; Klapdohr, K.-H.; Möllmanns, J.; Schünecke, R.; Dette, J.; Dubbert, J.; Miosga, T.; Rochus Vogel, A. L.; Simons, S.; Biriuk, S.; Debrah, M.; Griemens, M.; Hahn, A.; Möller, T.; Pawlowski, M.; Schweizer, M.; Speck, A.-L.; Zapros, C.; Bollmann, T.; Habermann, F. N.; Haustovich, N.; Lauser, M.; Liebing, F.; Niederstadt, F.; Hoppen, K.; Kindermann, D.; Küppers, F.; Rauch, B.; Althoff, F.; Horstmann, M.; Kellerman, J. N.; Kietz, R.; Nienaber, T.; Sauer, M.; Secci, A.; Wüllner, L.

    2012-02-01

    As part of an ongoing collaboration between student groups at high schools and professional astronomers, we have searched for the presence of circum-binary planets in a bona-fide unbiased sample of twelve post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs) from the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Although the present ephemerides are significantly more accurate than previous ones, we find no clear evidence for orbital period variations between 2005 and 2011 or during the 2011 observing season. The sparse long-term coverage still permits O-C variations with a period of years and an amplitude of tens of seconds, as found in other systems. Our observations provide the basis for future inferences about the frequency with which planet-sized or brown-dwarf companions have either formed in these evolved systems or survived the common envelope (CE) phase.

  14. Evidence of Primordial Clustering around the QSO SDSS J1030+0524 at z=6.28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiavelli, M.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Pavlovsky, C.; Scarlata, C.; Stern, D.; Mahabal, A.; Thompson, D.; Dickinson, M.; Panagia, N.; Meylan, G.

    2005-03-01

    We present tentative evidence of primordial clustering, manifested as an excess of color-selected objects in the field of the QSO SDSS J1030+0524 at redshift z=6.28. We have selected objects red in i775-z850 on the basis of Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys imaging of a field centered on the QSO. Compared to data at comparable depth obtained by the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey, we find an excess of objects with i775-z850>=1.5 in the QSO field. The significance of the detection is estimated to be ~97% on the basis of the counts alone and increases to 99.4% if one takes into account the color distribution. If confirmed, this would represent the highest redshift example of galaxy clustering and would have implications on models for the growth of structure. Bias-driven clustering of first luminous objects forming in the highest peaks of the primordial density field is expected in most models of early structure formation. The redshift of one of the candidates has been found to be z=5.970 by our spectroscopy with the Keck I Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, confirming the validity of our color selection. Based, in part, on data obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership between the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and NASA, and was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  15. SDSS-IV MaNGA: faint quenched galaxies - I. Sample selection and evidence for environmental quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Masters, Karen L.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Law, David; Nichol, Robert C.; Thomas, Daniel; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brownstein, Joel R.; Freischlad, Gordon; Gaulme, Patrick; Grabowski, Katie; Kinemuchi, Karen; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Oravetz, Daniel; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey; Wake, David A.

    2016-11-01

    Using kinematic maps from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey, we reveal that the majority of low-mass quenched galaxies exhibit coherent rotation in their stellar kinematics. Our sample includes all 39 quenched low-mass galaxies observed in the first year of MaNGA. The galaxies are selected with Mr > -19.1, stellar masses 109 M⊙ 1.9. They lie on the size-magnitude and σ-luminosity relations for previously studied dwarf galaxies. Just six (15 ± 5.7 per cent) are found to have rotation speeds ve, rot 5 × 1010 M⊙), supporting the hypothesis that galaxy-galaxy or galaxy-group interactions quench star formation in low-mass galaxies. The local bright galaxy density for our sample is ρproj = 8.2 ± 2.0 Mpc-2, compared to ρproj = 2.1 ± 0.4 Mpc-2 for a star-forming comparison sample, confirming that the quenched low-mass galaxies are preferentially found in higher density environments.

  16. Identification of 13 DB + dM and 2 DC + dM binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besselaar, E.J.M. van den; Roelofs, G.H.A.; Nelemans, G.A.; Augusteijn, T.; Groot, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present the identification of 13 DB + dM binaries and 2 DC + dM binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Before the SDSS only 2 DB + dM binaries and 1 DC + dM binary were known. At least three, possibly 8, of the new DB + dM binaries seem to have white dwarf temperatures well above 30

  17. The assembly of the halo system of the Milky Way as revealed by SDSS/SEGUE – The CEMP star connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carollo D.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, massive new spectroscopic data sets, such as the over half million stellar spectra obtained during the course of SDSS (in particular its sub-survey SEGUE, have provided the quantitative detail required to formulate a coherent story of the assembly and evolution of the Milky Way. The disk and halo systems of our Galaxy have been shown to be both more complex, and more interesting, than previously thought. Here we concentrate on the halo system of the Milky Way. New data from SDSS/SEGUE has revealed that the halo system comprises at least two components, the inner halo and the outer halo, with demonstrably different characteristics (metallicity distributions, density distributions, kinematics, etc.. In addition to suggesting new ways to examine these data, the inner/outer halo dichotomy has enabled an understanding of at least one long-standing observational result, the increase of the fraction of carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP stars with decreasing metallicity.

  18. A morphology-stitching method to improve Landsat SLC-off images with stripes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Aghamohamadnia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Stripes are artifacts in satellite images caused by various factors such as hardware defects. In some cases, these artifacts are introduced by some mitigating algorithms like Landsat SLC-off (Scan Line Corrector gap-filling methods of LLHM (Local Linear Histogram Matching and AWLHM (Adaptive Window Linear Histogram Matching, which leave stripes as a byproduct. To improve Landsat SLC-off images with stripes, we propose an algorithm involving some hypothetical stripe-crossing stitch lines using the mean pixel value of the stitch lines.

  19. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  20. Distant clusters of galaxies in the 2XMM/SDSS footprint: follow-up observations with the LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, A.; Lamer, G.; Schwope, A.; Takey, A.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Galaxy clusters at high redshift are important to test cosmological models and models for the growth of structure. They are difficult to find in wide-angle optical surveys, however, leaving dedicated follow-up of X-ray selected candidates as one promising identification route. Aims: We aim to increase the number of galaxy clusters beyond the SDSS-limit, z 0.75. Methods: We compiled a list of extended X-ray sources from the 2XMMp catalogue within the footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Fields without optical counterpart were selected for further investigation. Deep optical imaging and follow-up spectroscopy were obtained with the Large Binocular Telescope, Arizona (LBT), of those candidates not known to the literature. Results: From initially 19 candidates, selected by visually screening X-ray images of 478 XMM-Newton observations and the corresponding SDSS images, 6 clusters were found in the literature. Imaging data through r,z filters were obtained for the remaining candidates, and 7 were chosen for multi-object (MOS) spectroscopy. Spectroscopic redshifts, optical magnitudes, and X-ray parameters (flux, temperature, and luminosity) are presented for the clusters with spectroscopic redshifts. The distant clusters studied here constitute one additional redshift bin for studies of the LX-T relation, which does not seem to evolve from high to low redshifts. Conclusions: The selection method of distant galaxy clusters presented here was highly successful. It is based solely on archival optical (SDSS) and X-ray (XMM-Newton) data. Out of 19 selected candidates, 6 of the 7 candidates selected for spectroscopic follow-up were verified as distant clusters, a further candidate is most likely a group of galaxies at z 1.21. Out of the remaining 12 candidates, 6 were known previously as galaxy clusters, one object is a likely X-ray emission from an AGN radio jet, and for 5 we see no clear evidence for them to be high-redshift galaxy clusters. Based on

  1. Ash clouds stripes: mechanisms and implications for dispersion and detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanu, Antonio; de'Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Barsotti, Sara; Clarke, Amanda B.

    2017-04-01

    Occasionally, volcanic clouds show horizontal structures (or stripes) oriented perpendicular to the prevailing wind direction. This phenomenon has been observed by satellite images and reported at several volcanoes worldwide (e.g., Klyuchevskaya in Kamchatka and Eyjafjallajokull in Iceland) and it was particularly evident at Mt. Etna during different eruptions in 2001 and 2006 where stripes 2 km to 5 km wide were documented and interpreted to be waves. A variety of possible forcing mechanisms exist, including mountain waves and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, and create atmospheric waves either by heating or dynamic effects. The aim of this study is two-fold: first to analyze different driving mechanisms, and second to study how the waves affect dispersion and the detection of ash clouds. To this end, we use an Eulerian fully-compressible non-hydrostatic atmospheric model (WRF) at high resolution (200m x 200m) and initialized with an atmospheric sounding profile. The simulated wind field is then coupled (one way) with a Lagrangian particle model (LPAC) to simulate the transport of both passive tracers as well as particles with mass. Results are compared with MODIS satellite images. The Etna test cases show how high resolution weather data are critical to reproducing stripes structures in the plume. In ash cloud models, vertical diffusion is typically ignored and plumes are assumed to disperse only due to horizontal diffusion. Our results provide evidence that wave-like phenomena exert a significant control on aerosol and ash dispersal, by influencing vertical diffusion and particle settling velocity and consequently ash residence time in the atmosphere.

  2. WE-EF-207-10: Striped Ratio Grids: A New Concept for Scatter Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, S [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To propose a new method for estimating scatter in x-ray imaging. We propose the “striped ratio grid,” an anti-scatter grid with alternating stripes of high scatter rejection (attained, for example, by high grid ratio) and low scatter rejection. To minimize artifacts, stripes are oriented parallel to the direction of the ramp filter. Signal discontinuities at the boundaries between stripes provide information on local scatter content, although these discontinuities are contaminated by variation in primary radiation. Methods: We emulated a striped ratio grid by imaging phantoms with two sequential CT scans, one with and one without a conventional grid, and processed them together to mimic a striped ratio grid. Two phantoms were scanned with the emulated striped ratio grid and compared with a conventional anti-scatter grid and a fan-beam acquisition, which served as ground truth. A nonlinear image processing algorithm was developed to mitigate the problem of primary variation. Results: The emulated striped ratio grid reduced scatter more effectively than the conventional grid alone. Contrast is thereby improved in projection imaging. In CT imaging, cupping is markedly reduced. Artifacts introduced by the striped ratio grid appear to be minimal. Conclusion: Striped ratio grids could be a simple and effective evolution of conventional anti-scatter grids. Unlike several other approaches currently under investigation for scatter management, striped ratio grids require minimal computation, little new hardware (at least for systems which already use removable grids) and impose few assumptions on the nature of the object being scanned.

  3. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Roy L; Ross, Richard; Rodaniche, Arcadio; Huffard, Christine L

    2015-01-01

    Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  4. Behavior and Body Patterns of the Larger Pacific Striped Octopus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy L Caldwell

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago anecdotal accounts of the undescribed Larger Pacific Striped Octopus suggested behaviors previously unknown for octopuses. Beak-to-beak mating, dens shared by mating pairs, inking during mating and extended spawning were mentioned in publications, and enticed generations of cephalopod biologists. In 2012-2014 we were able to obtain several live specimens of this species, which remains without a formal description. All of the unique behaviors listed above were observed for animals in aquaria and are discussed here. We describe the behavior, body color patterns, and postures of 24 adults maintained in captivity. Chromatophore patterns of hatchlings are also shown.

  5. Response to "Critical Assessment of the Evidence for Striped Nanoparticles".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quy Khac Ong

    Full Text Available Stirling et al., (10.1371/journal.pone.0108482 presented an analysis on some of our publications on the formation of stripe-like domains on mixed-ligand coated gold nanoparticles. The authors shed doubts on some of our results however no valid argument is provided against what we have shown since our first publication: scanning tunneling microscopy (STM images of striped nanoparticles show stripe-like domains that are independent of imaging parameters and in particular of imaging speed. We have consistently ruled out the presence of artifacts by comparing sets of images acquired at different tip speeds, finding invariance of the stipe-like domains. Stirling and co-workers incorrectly analyzed this key control, using a different microscope and imaging conditions that do not compare to ours. We show here data proving that our approach is rigorous. Furthermore, we never solely relied on image analysis to draw our conclusions; we have always used the chemical nature of the particles to assess the veracity of our images. Stirling et al. do not provide any justification for the spacing of the features that we find on nanoparticles: ~1 nm for mixed ligand particles and ~ 0.5 nm for homoligand particles. Hence our two central arguments remain unmodified: independence from imaging parameters and dependence on ligand shell chemical composition. The paper report observations on our STM images; none is a sufficient condition to prove that our images are artifacts. We thoroughly addressed issues related to STM artifacts throughout our microscopy work. Stirling et al. provide guidelines for what they consider good STM images of nanoparticles, such images are indeed present in our literature. They conclude that the evidences we provided to date are insufficient, this is a departure from one of the authors' previous article which concluded that our images were composed of artifacts. Given that four independent laboratories have reproduced our measurements and

  6. Unfolding of vortices into topological stripes in a multiferroic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Mostovoy, M; Han, M G; Horibe, Y; Aoki, T; Zhu, Y; Cheong, S-W

    2014-06-20

    Multiferroic hexagonal RMnO(3) (R=rare earths) crystals exhibit dense networks of vortex lines at which six domain walls merge. While the domain walls can be readily moved with an applied electric field, the vortex cores so far have been impossible to control. Our experiments demonstrate that shear strain induces a Magnus-type force pulling vortices and antivortices in opposite directions and unfolding them into a topological stripe domain state. We discuss the analogy between this effect and the current-driven dynamics of vortices in superconductors and superfluids.

  7. The Milky Way Tomography With SDSS. 3. Stellar Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    further improvements in kinematic mapping of the Galaxy expected from Gaia and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Key words: Galaxy: disk – Galaxy: halo...kinematic and metallicity space. We use this model to predict further improvements in kinematic mapping of the Galaxy expected from Gaia and the Large...the Gaia survey (Perryman et al. 2001) will be sufficiently accurate to exploit the full potential of this method. 5.4. The Kinematic–Parallax

  8. The size distributions of asteroid families in the SDSS Moving Object Catalog 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, A.; Ivezić, Ž.; Jurić, M.; Lupton, R.; Sekora, M. D.; Kowalski, A.

    2008-11-01

    Asteroid families, traditionally defined as clusters of objects in orbital parameter space, often have distinctive optical colors. We show that the separation of family members from background interlopers can be improved with the aid of SDSS colors as a qualifier for family membership. Based on an ˜88,000 object subset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Moving Object Catalog 4 with available proper orbital elements, we define 37 statistically robust asteroid families with at least 100 members (12 families have over 1000 members) using a simple Gaussian distribution model in both orbital and color space. The interloper rejection rate based on colors is typically ˜10% for a given orbital family definition, with four families that can be reliably isolated only with the aid of colors. About 50% of all objects in this data set belong to families, and this fraction varies from about 35% for objects brighter than an H magnitude of 13 and rises to 60% for objects fainter than this. The fraction of C-type objects in families decreases with increasing H magnitude for H>13, while the fraction of S-type objects above this limit remains effectively constant. This suggests that S-type objects require a shorter timescale for equilibrating the background and family size distributions via collisional processing. The size distribution varies significantly among families, and is typically different from size distributions for background populations. The size distributions for 15 families display a well-defined change of slope and can be modeled as a "broken" double power-law. Such "broken" size distributions are twice as likely for S-type familes than for C-type families (73% vs. 36%), and are dominated by dynamically old families. The remaining families with size distributions that can be modeled as a single power law are dominated by young families (families. No such slope-color correlation is discernible for families whose size distribution follows a single power law. For several

  9. Comparisons of egg quality traits, egg weight loss and hatchability between striped and normal duck eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, J; Wang, B; Huang, Z; Fan, Y; Huang, C; Hou, Z

    2013-01-01

    1. The egg quality of striped and normal duck eggs was compared to determine why striped eggs show decreased hatchability. A total of 430 eggs, obtained from a Pekin duck breeder flock aged 50-65 wks, were used in three experiments. The eggs were weighed and assigned randomly to measure egg quality traits, egg weight (EW) loss and hatchability during incubation. 2. There were no significant differences between egg types in terms of egg shape index, eggshell strength and thickness, albumen height, Haugh unit, yolk colour, weight of the eggshell with or without membranes, calcium, phosphorus, copper and manganese contents in the eggshell (with the inner and outer membranes or without the inner membrane), albumen weight, dry matter of albumen, crude protein (CP) of thick albumen and pH of the thick albumen. 3. The weight of eggshells with membranes, weight of thick albumen and CP of thin albumen in striped eggs were lower than those in normal eggs. 4. The thin albumen in striped eggs was heavier than that in normal eggs. The pH of the thin albumin in striped egg was significantly higher than that in normal eggs. 5. There were no significant differences in EW loss during incubation or duckling weight between striped and normal eggs. However, the hatchability of striped eggs was lower. 6. The lower weight of the eggshell inner membrane and thick albumen, lower CP content and higher pH in the thin albumen of striped eggs might contribute to lower hatchability.

  10. QTL mapping of adult-plant resistance to stripe rust in wheat line P9897

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripe rust (or yellow rust), caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst), is a devastating fungal disease of common wheat. Wheat line P9897 showed adult-plant resistance (APR) to stripe rust for several years. To map resistance quantitative trait loci (QTL), F2:3 lines from a cross of P9897...

  11. Effective genes for resistance to stripe rust and virulence of Puccinia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective genes for resistance to stripe rust and virulence of Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici in Pakistan. H Bux, M Ashraf, X Chen, S Mumtaz. Abstract. Virulence patterns of wheat stripe rust were studied under the field conditions across four environmentally different locations: Quaid-i-Azam University (Islamabad), Pirsabak ...

  12. Osmoregulatory effects of hypophysectomy and homologous prolactin replacement in hybrid striped bass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, Leslie F; McCormick, Stephen D; Madsen, Steffen S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of ovine prolactin (oPRL) and striped bass prolactin (sbPRL; Morone saxatilis) on plasma osmolality, electrolyte balance, and gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity were investigated in hypophysectomized (Hx), freshwater (FW)-acclimated, hybrid striped bass (M. saxatilis x Morone chrysops...

  13. Effect of stripe rust on the yield response of wheat to nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakhesh Devadas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (N is the most important fertiliser element determining the productivity of wheat. N nutrition is known to affect the level of stripe rust infection, with higher N associated with increased disease severity. Stripe rust, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is a major yield-limiting disease of wheat in Australia. This paper describes experiments designed to investigate the agronomic response to the interaction of various levels of N application and stripe rust severity in wheat varieties differing in response. Experimental plots were established in crop seasons 2006 and 2007 on the Liverpool Plains of northern NSW, Australia. Yield, biomass, grain protein content (GPC and harvest index (HI data were recorded. Increased rates of N increased the severity of stripe rust during grain filling. N application also increased yield and GPC in all varieties in both years. Stripe rust reduced the yield of the rust-susceptible wheat varieties, and GPC and proportion of added N recovered in the grain were also reduced in one year but not the other. It was evident from our experiment that stripe rust caused yield loss accompanied by either no change or reduction in GPC, indicating that the total amount of N entering the grain was reduced by stripe rust. The effects of stripe rust on N yield are most likely associated with reduced uptake of N during grain filling.

  14. Color Fringes Bordering Black Stripes at the Bottom of a Swimming Pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Gonzalo; Rojas, Roberto; Slüsarenko, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    We have observed a nice example of chromatic dispersion due to refraction in water, in the form of color fringes bordering the black stripes that exist at the bottom of a swimming pool. Here we give a qualitative description of the phenomenon, explaining the role of the black stripes and the dispersive index of refraction of water.

  15. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wheat line CSP44, a selection from an Australian bread wheat cultivar Condor, has shown resistance to stripe rust in India since the last twenty years. Seedlings and adult plants of CSP44 showed susceptible infection types against stripe rust race 46S119 but displayed average terminal disease severity of 2.67 on adult ...

  16. Genetic analysis and location of gene for resistance to stripe rust in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Strubes Dickkopf is the sixth differential in the world set for wheat stripe (yellow) rust. It is very important to clarify its genetic character of resistance to stripe rust and to develop the molecular markers linked to resistance genes. The NIL Taichung 29*6/Strubes Dickkopf, which was obtained by Strubes Dickkopf as the gene ...

  17. Allelic variation at loci controlling stripe rust resistance in spring wheat

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-20

    Aug 20, 2014 ... Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) rusts have been one of the main yield limiting factors in wheat cultivation throughout the world. Three kinds of rust diseases that attack wheat crop are leaf (brown) rust, stripe (yellow) rust and stem (black) rust. Leaf rust is caused by Puccinia triticina f.sp. tritici; stripe rust is ...

  18. An optical catalog of galaxy clusters obtained from an adaptive matched filter finder applied to SDSS DR9 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, P.; Szabo, T.; Pierpaoli, E.; Franco, G.; Ortiz, M.; Oramas, A.; Tornello, B.

    2018-01-01

    We present a new galaxy cluster catalog constructed from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 9 (SDSS DR9) using an Adaptive Matched Filter (AMF) technique. Our catalog has 46,479 galaxy clusters with richness Λ200 > 20 in the redshift range 0.045 ≤ z clusters, as well as their error analysis, are provided as part of this catalog. In addition to the main version of the catalog, we also provide an extended version with a lower richness cut, containing 79,368 clusters. This version, in addition to the clusters in the main catalog, also contains those clusters (with richness 10 cluster membership for each galaxy and implement several procedures for the identification and removal of false cluster detections. We cross-correlate the main AMF DR9 catalog with a number of cluster catalogs in different wavebands (Optical, X-ray). We compare our catalog with other SDSS-based ones such as the redMaPPer (26,350 clusters) and the Wen et al. (WHL) (132,684 clusters) in the same area of the sky and in the overlapping redshift range. We match 97% of the richest Abell clusters (Richness group 3), the same as WHL, while redMaPPer matches ∼ 90% of these clusters. Considering AMF DR9 richness bins, redMaPPer does not have one-to-one matches for 70% of our lowest richness clusters (20 clusters (not present in redMaPPer). redMaPPer consistently does not possess one-to-one matches for ∼ 20% AMF DR9 clusters with Λ200 > 40, while WHL matches ≥ 70% of these missed clusters on average. For comparisons with X-ray clusters, we match the AMF catalog with BAX, MCXC and a combined catalog from NORAS and REFLEX. We consistently obtain a greater number of one-to-one matches for X-ray clusters across higher luminosity bins (Lx > 6 × 1044 ergs/sec) than redMaPPer while WHL matches the most clusters overall. For the most luminous clusters (Lx > 8), our catalog performs equivalently to WHL. This new catalog provides a wider sample than redMaPPer while retaining many fewer objects than

  19. Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lisa; Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Durey, Guillaume; Darmon, Alexandre; Haase, Martin F.; Li, Ningwei; Lee, Daeyeon; Stebe, Kathleen J.; Kamien, Randall D.; Lopez-Leon, Teresa

    2017-10-01

    Chirality, ubiquitous in complex biological systems, can be controlled and quantified in synthetic materials such as cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) systems. In this work, we study spherical shells of CLC under weak anchoring conditions. We induce anchoring transitions at the inner and outer boundaries using two independent methods: by changing the surfactant concentration or by raising the temperature close to the clearing point. The shell confinement leads to new states and associated surface structures: a state where large stripes on the shell can be filled with smaller, perpendicular substripes, and a focal conic domain (FCD) state, where thin stripes wrap into at least two, topologically required, double spirals. Focusing on the latter state, we use a Landau-de Gennes model of the CLC to simulate its detailed configurations as a function of anchoring strength. By abruptly changing the topological constraints on the shell, we are able to study the interconversion between director defects and pitch defects, a phenomenon usually restricted by the complexity of the cholesteric phase. This work extends the knowledge of cholesteric patterns, structures that not only have potential for use as intricate, self-assembly blueprints but are also pervasive in biological systems.

  20. Change in Stripes for Cholesteric Shells via Anchoring in Moderation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Chirality, ubiquitous in complex biological systems, can be controlled and quantified in synthetic materials such as cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC systems. In this work, we study spherical shells of CLC under weak anchoring conditions. We induce anchoring transitions at the inner and outer boundaries using two independent methods: by changing the surfactant concentration or by raising the temperature close to the clearing point. The shell confinement leads to new states and associated surface structures: a state where large stripes on the shell can be filled with smaller, perpendicular substripes, and a focal conic domain (FCD state, where thin stripes wrap into at least two, topologically required, double spirals. Focusing on the latter state, we use a Landau–de Gennes model of the CLC to simulate its detailed configurations as a function of anchoring strength. By abruptly changing the topological constraints on the shell, we are able to study the interconversion between director defects and pitch defects, a phenomenon usually restricted by the complexity of the cholesteric phase. This work extends the knowledge of cholesteric patterns, structures that not only have potential for use as intricate, self-assembly blueprints but are also pervasive in biological systems.

  1. Rotationally driven 'zebra stripes' in Earth's inner radiation belt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhorskiy, A Y; Sitnov, M I; Mitchell, D G; Takahashi, K; Lanzerotti, L J; Mauk, B H

    2014-03-20

    Structured features on top of nominally smooth distributions of radiation-belt particles at Earth have been previously associated with particle acceleration and transport mechanisms powered exclusively by enhanced solar-wind activity. Although planetary rotation is considered to be important for particle acceleration at Jupiter and Saturn, the electric field produced in the inner magnetosphere by Earth's rotation can change the velocity of trapped particles by only about 1-2 kilometres per second, so rotation has been thought inconsequential for radiation-belt electrons with velocities of about 100,000 kilometres per second. Here we report that the distributions of energetic electrons across the entire spatial extent of Earth's inner radiation belt are organized in regular, highly structured and unexpected 'zebra stripes', even when the solar-wind activity is low. Modelling reveals that the patterns are produced by Earth's rotation. Radiation-belt electrons are trapped in Earth's dipole-like magnetic field, where they undergo slow longitudinal drift motion around the planet because of the gradient and curvature of the magnetic field. Earth's rotation induces global diurnal variations of magnetic and electric fields that resonantly interact with electrons whose drift period is close to 24 hours, modifying electron fluxes over a broad energy range into regular patterns composed of multiple stripes extending over the entire span of the inner radiation belt.

  2. Flipper development in the Mediterranean striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calzada, N; Aguilar, A

    1996-08-01

    Studies of population biology are scarce in Mediterranean striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) mostly because of the lack of samples. Until now, studies of physical maturity, growth, and development of the flipper bones were not available for this species in the Mediterranean. The osteological features and metric characters of the pectoral limbs of Mediterranean striped dolphins were analyzed with radiological techniques. Measurements were made directly on the radiographic films. We found five carpal bones arranged in a proximal row of three and a distal row of two, although one or two additional osseous elements were occasionally observed. The phalangeal formula (excluding metacarpals) was established as 1-2:8-9-10:6-5-7:3-2:1-2. In metacarpals, epiphyseal ossification centers matured at the same time at both ends. As a general rule, the ossification of the epiphyses in the flipper bones showed a decreasing gradient in the proximodistal direction, confirming the pattern previously described in other species. Phalangeal epiphyses were not useful as indicators of skeletal maturity, and grading epiphyseal maturation of the distal radius and ulna is proposed as the more straight-forward and precise method for assessing bone maturation. In females, maturity of the flipper was achieved between 5 and 6 years of age and 160-175 cm of body length, whereas this maturation occurred between 8 and 9 years of age and 170-181 cm in length in males. Prediction of gender through examination of flipper structure was not feasible.

  3. Endothelial plasmalemmal vesicles have a characteristic striped bipolar surface structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K R; Carley, W W; Palade, G E

    1985-12-01

    Capillary endothelial cells have a large population of small (65-80 nm diameter in transmission electron microscopy) vesicles of which a large fraction is associated with the plasmalemma of the luminal and abluminal side. We studied the fine structure and distribution of these plasmalemmal vesicles by high resolution scanning electron microscopy in cultured endothelial cells obtained from bovine adrenal cortical capillaries. Cell monolayers were covered with polylysine-coated silicon chips, split in high potassium buffer, fixed in aldehyde mixtures, and then treated with OsO4 and thiocarbohydrazide. After critical point drying, the specimens were coated with a thin (less than 2 nm) continuous film of chromium. On the cytoplasmic aspect of the dorsal plasmalemmal fragments seen in such specimens, plasmalemmal vesicles appear as uniform vesicular protrusions approximately 70-90 nm in diameter, preferentially concentrated in distinct large fields in which they occur primarily as single units. Individual plasmalemmal vesicles exhibit a striped surface fine structure which consists of ridges approximately 10 nm in diameter, separated by furrows and oriented as meridians, often ending at two poles on opposite sides of the vesicles in a plane parallel to the plasmalemma. This striped surface structure is clearly distinct from the cage structure of coated pits found, at low surface density, on the same specimens. The cytoplasmic aspect of the plasmalemma proper is covered by a fibrillar infrastructure which does not extend over plasmalemmal vesicles but on which the latter appear to be anchored by fine filaments.

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Quasar Reverberation Mapping Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Catherine; SDSS-RM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project (SDSS-RM) has completed its first three years of spectroscopic observations of a sample of ~850 quasars with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. From January-July in 2014, 2015, and 2016, more than 55 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained for this quasar sample, and continued monitoring has been approved for 2017. Supporting photometric observations were also carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope. In addition, the SDSS-RM field overlaps with the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Field MD07, so we have photometric data for three years prior to the SDSS-RM observations, which considerably extends the time delay sensitivity of the campaign. Preliminary reverberation mapping results were presented by Shen et al. (2015) and the program has also yielded ancillary science results in regimes such as broad absorption line variability, quasar ensemble variability characteristics, quasar emission line studies, SDSS quasar redshift measurements, and host galaxy properties. I will discuss the current status of the SDSS-RM program, including recent reverberation mapping results from the wider 850-quasar sample using the full set of first-year photometric and spectroscopic data.

  5. Do galaxy global relationships emerge from local ones? The SDSS IV MaNGA surface mass density-metallicity relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Law, David; Wake, David; Green, Jenny E.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Malanushenko, Elena; Pan, Kaike; Roman Lopes, Alexandre; Lane, Richard R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the stellar surface mass density versus gas metallicity (Σ*-Z) relation for more than 500 000 spatially resolved star-forming resolution elements (spaxels) from a sample of 653 disc galaxies included in the SDSS IV MaNGA survey. We find a tight relation between these local properties, with higher metallicities as the surface density increases. This relation extends over three orders of magnitude in the surface mass density and a factor of 4 in metallicity. We show that this local relationship can simultaneously reproduce two well-known properties of disc galaxies: their global mass-metallicity relationship and their radial metallicity gradients. We also find that the Σ*-Z relation is largely independent of the galaxy's total stellar mass and specific star formation rate (sSFR), except at low stellar mass and high sSFR. These results suggest that in the present-day universe local properties play a key role in determining the gas-phase metallicity in typical disc galaxies.

  6. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Evidence of the importance of AGN feedback in low-mass galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Samantha J.; Masters, Karen L.; Smethurst, Rebecca; Nichol, Robert C.; Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Greene, Olivia; Liu, Charles; Marinelli, Mariarosa; Rembold, Sandro B.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Wylezalek, Dominika; Andrews, Brett H.; Bundy, Kevin; Drory, Niv; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike

    2018-01-01

    We present new evidence for AGN feedback in a subset of 69 quenched low-mass galaxies (M⋆ ≲ 5 × 109 M⊙, Mr > -19) selected from the first two years of the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The majority (85 per cent) of these quenched galaxies appear to reside in a group environment. We find 6 galaxies in our sample that appear to have an active AGN that is preventing on-going star-formation; this is the first time such a feedback mechanism has been observed in this mass range. Interestingly, five of these six galaxies have an ionised gas component that is kinematically offset from their stellar component, suggesting the gas is either recently accreted or outflowing. We hypothesise these six galaxies are low-mass equivalents to the "red geysers" observed in more massive galaxies. Of the other 62 galaxies in the sample, we find 8 do appear for have some low-level, residual star formation, or emission from hot, evolved stars. The remaining galaxies in our sample have no detectable ionised gas emission throughout their structures, consistent with them being quenched. This work shows the potential for understanding the detailed physical properties of dwarf galaxies through spatially resolved spectroscopy.

  7. The SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline. III. Comparison with High-Resolution Spectroscopy of SDSS/SEGUE Field Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allende Prieto, C.; Sivarani, T.; Beers, T.C.; Lee, Y.S.; Koesterke, L.; Shetrone, M.; Sneden, C.; Lambert, D.L.; Wilhelm, R.; Rockosi, C.M.; Lai, D.

    2007-10-01

    The authors report high-resolution spectroscopy of 125 field stars previously observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its program for Galactic studies, the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SEGUE). These spectra are used to measure radial velocities and to derive atmospheric parameters, which they compare with those reported by the SEGUE Stellar Parameter Pipeline (SSPP). The SSPP obtains estimates of these quantities based on SDSS ugriz photometry and low-resolution (R {approx} 2000) spectroscopy. For F- and G-type stars observed with high signal-to-noise ratios (S/N), they empirically determine the typical random uncertainties in the radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities delivered by the SSPP to be 2.4 km s{sup -1}, 130 K (2.2%), 0.21 dex, and 0.11 dex, respectively, with systematic uncertainties of a similar magnitude in the effective temperatures and metallicities. They estimate random errors for lower S/N spectra based on numerical simulations.

  8. 30+ New & Known SB2s in the SDSS-III/APOGEE M Dwarf Ancillary Science Project Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Jacob; Covey, Kevin; Bender, Chad; De Lee, Nathan Michael; Chojnowski, Drew; Troup, Nicholas; Badenes, Carles; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Terrien, Ryan

    2018-01-01

    Close stellar binaries can drive dynamical interactions that affect the structure and evolution of planetary systems. Binary surveys indicate that the multiplicity fraction and typical orbital separation decrease with primary mass, but correlations with higher order architectural parameters such as the system's mass ratio are less well constrained. We seek to identify and characterize double-lined spectroscopic binaries (SB2s) among the 1350 M dwarf ancillary science targets with APOGEE spectra in the SDSS-III Data Release 13. We quantitatively measure the degree of asymmetry in the APOGEE pipeline cross-correlation functions (CCFs), and use those metrics to identify a sample of 44 high-likelihood candidate SB2s. Extracting radial velocities (RVs) for both binary components from the CCF, we then measure mass ratios for 31 SB2s; we also use Bayesian techniques to fit orbits for 4 systems with 8 or more distinct APOGEE observations. The (incomplete) mass ratio distribution of this sample rises quickly towards unity. Two-sided Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) tests find probabilities of 13.8% and 14.2% that the M dwarf mass ratio distribution is consistent with those measured by Pourbaix et al. (2004) and Fernandez et al. (2017), respectively. The samples analyzed by Pourbaix et al. and Fernandez et al. are dominated by higher-mass solar type stars; this suggests that the mass ratio distribution of close binaries is not strongly dependent on primary mass.

  9. A GMBCG Galaxy Cluster Catalog of 55,424 Rich Clusters from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U.; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara /LBL, Berkeley; Rozo, Eduardo; /Chicago U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Wechsler, Risa H.; /SLAC; Evrard, August; /Michigan U.; Siegel, Seth R.; /Michigan U.; Becker, Matthew; /Chicago U.; Busha, Michael; /SLAC; Gerdes, David; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Fermilab; Sheldon, Erin; /Brookhaven

    2011-08-22

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  10. A GMBCG galaxy cluster catalog of 55,880 rich clusters from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Jiangang; McKay, Timothy A.; Koester, Benjamin P.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Rozo, Eduardo; Annis, James; Wechsler, Risa H.; Evrard, August; Siegel, Seth R.; Becker, Matthew; Busha, Michael; /Fermilab /Michigan U. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /UC, Santa Barbara /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Caltech /Brookhaven

    2010-08-01

    We present a large catalog of optically selected galaxy clusters from the application of a new Gaussian Mixture Brightest Cluster Galaxy (GMBCG) algorithm to SDSS Data Release 7 data. The algorithm detects clusters by identifying the red sequence plus Brightest Cluster Galaxy (BCG) feature, which is unique for galaxy clusters and does not exist among field galaxies. Red sequence clustering in color space is detected using an Error Corrected Gaussian Mixture Model. We run GMBCG on 8240 square degrees of photometric data from SDSS DR7 to assemble the largest ever optical galaxy cluster catalog, consisting of over 55,000 rich clusters across the redshift range from 0.1 < z < 0.55. We present Monte Carlo tests of completeness and purity and perform cross-matching with X-ray clusters and with the maxBCG sample at low redshift. These tests indicate high completeness and purity across the full redshift range for clusters with 15 or more members.

  11. A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis

    2005-12-01

    We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

  12. SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Candidate RV Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SIthajan, Sirinrat

    2014-02-01

    Planetary systems, discovered by the radial velocity (RV) surveys, reveal strong correlations between the planet frequency and stellar properties, such as metallicity and mass, and a greater diversity in planets than found in the solar system. However, due to the sample sizes of extant surveys (~100 to a few hundreds of stars) and their heterogeneity, many key questions remained to be addressed: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate- mass stars and binaries? Is the ``planet desert'' within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real? The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars. The latest data pipeline effort at UF has been able to remove long term systematic errors suffered in the earlier data pipeline. 18 high confident giant planet candidates have been identified among newly processed data. We propose to follow up these giant planet candidates with the KPNO EXPERT instrument to confirm the detection and also characterize their orbits. The confirmed planets will be used to measure occurrence rates, distributions and multiplicity of giants planets around F,G,K stars with a broad range of mass (~0.6-2.5 M_⊙) and metallicity ([Fe/H]~-1.5-0.5). The well defined MARVELS survey cadence allows robust determinations of completeness limits for rigorously testing giant planet formation theories and constraining models.

  13. SDSS J1056+5516: A Triple AGN or an SMBH Recoil Candidate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfountzou, E.; Santos Lleo, M.; Trichas, M.

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery of a kiloparsec-scale triple supermassive black hole system at z = 0.256: SDSS J1056+5516, discovered by our systematic search for binary quasars. The system contains three strong emission-line nuclei, which are offset by black hole (SMBH) interacting system, a triple AGN, or a recoiling SMBH. Each of these scenarios is unique for our understanding of the hierarchical growth of galaxies, AGN triggering, and gravitational waves.

  14. An application of MC-SDSS for water supply management during a drought crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeihouni, Mehrdad; Toomanian, Ara; Alavipanah, Seyed Kazem; Shahabi, Mahmoud; Bazdar, Saba

    2015-07-01

    Climate change influences many countries' rainfall patterns and temperatures. In Iran, population growth has increased water demands. Tabriz is the capital of East Azerbaijan province, in northwestern Iran. A large proportion of the water required for this city is supplied from dams; thus, it is important to find alternatives to supply water for this city, which is the largest industrial city in northwestern Iran. In this paper, the groundwater quality was assessed using 70 wells in Tabriz Township. This work seeks to define the spatial distribution of groundwater quality parameters such as chloride, electrical conductivity (EC), pH, hardness, and sulfate using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and geostatistics; map groundwater quality for drinking purposes employing multiple-criteria decision-making (MCDM), such as the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) and fuzzy logic, in the study area; and develop an Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS) for managing a water crisis in the region. The map produced by the AHP is more accurate than the map produced using fuzzy logic because in the AHP, priorities were assigned to each parameter based on the weights given by water quality experts. The final map indicates that the groundwater quality increases from the north to the south and from the west to the east within the study area. During critical conditions, the groundwater quality maps and the presented SDSS core can be utilized by East Azerbaijan Regional Water Company to develop an SDSS to drill new wells or to select existing wells to supply drinking water to Tabriz City.

  15. Robust automatic photometry of local galaxies from SDSS. Dissecting the color magnitude relation with color profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolandi, Guido; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Fumagalli, Michele; Dotti, Massimo; Fossati, Matteo

    2016-06-01

    We present an automatic procedure to perform reliable photometry of galaxies on SDSS images. We selected a sample of 5853 galaxies in the Coma and Virgo superclusters. For each galaxy, we derive Petrosian g and I magnitudes, surface brightness and color profiles. Unlike the SDSS pipeline, our procedure is not affected by the well known shredding problem and efficiently extracts Petrosian magnitudes for all galaxies. Hence we derived magnitudes even from the population of galaxies missed by the SDSS which represents ~25% of all local supercluster galaxies and ~95% of galaxies with g inner (r ≤ 1 kpc), intermediate (0.2RPet ≤ r ≤ 0.3RPet) and outer, disk-dominated (r ≥ 0.35RPet)) zone; and (II), we compute template color profiles, discussing the dependences of the templates on the galaxy masses and on their morphological type. The two analyses consistently lead to a picture where elliptical galaxies show no color gradients, irrespective of their masses. Spirals, instead, display a steeper gradient in their color profiles with increasing mass, which is consistent with the growing relevance of a bulge and/or a bar component above 1010 M⊙. Full Table A.1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A38

  16. Structure and Kinematics of the Stellar Halos and Thick Disks of the Milky Way Based on Calibration Stars from SDSS DR7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carollo, D.; Beers, T. C.; Chiba, M.; Norris, J. E.; Freeman, K. C.; Lee, Y. S.

    2010-03-01

    The structure and kinematics of the recognized stellar components of the Milky Way are explored, based on well-determined atmospheric parameters and kinematic quantities for 32360 “calibration stars” from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and its first extension, (SDSS-II), which included the sub-survey SEGUE: Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration. Full space motions for a sub-sample of 16920 stars, exploring a local volume within 4 kpc of the Sun, are used to derive velocity ellipsoids for the inner- and outer-halo components of the Galaxy, as well as for the canonical thick-disk and proposed metal-weak thick-disk populations. This new sample of calibration stars represents an increase of 60% relative to the numbers used in a previous analysis. A Maximum Likelihood analysis of a local sub-sample of 16920 calibration stars has been developed in order to extract kinematic information for the major Galactic components (thick disk, inner halo, and outer halo), as well as for the elusive metal-weak thick disk (MWTD). We measure velocity ellipsoids for the thick disk, the MWTD, the inner halo, and the outer halo, demonstrate that the MWTD may be a component that is kinematically and chemically independent of the canonical thick disk (and put limits on the metallicity range of the MWTD), and derive the inferred spatial density profiles of the inner/outer halo components. We also present evidence for tilts in the velocity ellipsoids for stars in our sample as a function of height above the plane, for several ranges in metallicity, and confirm the shift of the observed metallicity distribution function (MDF) from the inner-halo to the outer-halo dominated sample.

  17. A direct measurement of the high-mass end of the velocity dispersion function at z ˜ 0.55 from SDSS-III/BOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Bolton, Adam S.; Shu, Yiping

    2017-06-01

    We report the first direct spectroscopic measurement of the velocity dispersion function (VDF) for the high-mass red sequence (RS) galaxy population at redshift z ˜ 0.55. We achieve high precision by using a sample of 600 000 massive galaxies with spectra from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the third Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III), covering stellar masses M* ≳ 1011 M⊙. We determine the VDF by projecting the joint probability density function (PDF) of luminosity L and velocity dispersion σ, i.e. p(L, σ), defined by our previous measurements of the RS luminosity function and L-σ relation for this sample. These measurements were corrected from red-blue galaxy population confusion, photometric blurring, incompleteness and selection effects within a forward-modelling framework that furthermore correctly accommodates the low spectroscopic signal-to-noise ratio of individual BOSS spectra. Our z ˜ 0.55 RS VDF is in overall agreement with the z ˜ 0 early-type galaxy (ETG) VDF at log10 σ ≳ 2.47; however, the number density of z = 0.55 RS galaxies that we report is larger than that of z = 0 ETG galaxies at 2.35 ≳ log10 σ ≳ 2.47. The extrapolation of an intermediate-mass L-σ relation towards the high-mass end in previous low-z works may be responsible for this disagreement. Evolutionary interpretation of this comparison is also subject to differences in the way the respective samples are selected; these differences can be mitigated in future work by analysing z = 0 SDSS data using the same framework presented in this paper. We also provide the sample PDF for the RS population (i.e. uncorrected for incompleteness), which is a key ingredient for gravitational lensing analyses using BOSS.

  18. The Eighth Data Release Of The Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data From SDSS-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Mönchhofstr. 12–14, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany 38 Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University...Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA 54 Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis ...Bottom right: same as other panels but for DR8 only, where separate line colors and styles indicate different foreground magnitude bins. In this case

  19. Visual lateralization in wild striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba in response to stimuli with different degrees of familiarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Siniscalchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apart from findings on both functional and motor asymmetries in captive aquatic mammals, only few studies have focused on lateralized behaviour of these species in the wild. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we focused on lateralized visual behaviour by presenting wild striped dolphins with objects of different degrees of familiarity (fish, ball, toy. Surveys were conducted in the Gulf of Taranto, the northern Ionian Sea portion delimited by the Italian regions of Calabria, Basilicata and Apulia. After sighting striped dolphins from a research vessel, different stimuli were presented in a random order by a telescopic bar connected to the prow of the boat. The preferential use of the right/left monocular viewing during inspection of the stimuli was analysed. CONCLUSION: Results clearly showed a monocular viewing preference with respect to the type of the stimulus employed. Due to the complete decussation of the optical nerves in dolphin brain our results reflected a different specialization of brain hemispheres for visual scanning processes confirming that in this species different stimuli evoked different patterns of eye use. A preferential use of the right eye (left hemisphere during visual inspection of unfamiliar targets was observed supporting the hypothesis that, in dolphins, the organization of the functional neural structures which reflected cerebral asymmetries for visual object recognition could have been subjected to a deviation from the evolutionary line of most terrestrial vertebrates.

  20. Visual lateralization in wild striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) in response to stimuli with different degrees of familiarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Dimatteo, Salvatore; Pepe, Anna Maria; Sasso, Raffaella; Quaranta, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Apart from findings on both functional and motor asymmetries in captive aquatic mammals, only few studies have focused on lateralized behaviour of these species in the wild. In this study we focused on lateralized visual behaviour by presenting wild striped dolphins with objects of different degrees of familiarity (fish, ball, toy). Surveys were conducted in the Gulf of Taranto, the northern Ionian Sea portion delimited by the Italian regions of Calabria, Basilicata and Apulia. After sighting striped dolphins from a research vessel, different stimuli were presented in a random order by a telescopic bar connected to the prow of the boat. The preferential use of the right/left monocular viewing during inspection of the stimuli was analysed. Results clearly showed a monocular viewing preference with respect to the type of the stimulus employed. Due to the complete decussation of the optical nerves in dolphin brain our results reflected a different specialization of brain hemispheres for visual scanning processes confirming that in this species different stimuli evoked different patterns of eye use. A preferential use of the right eye (left hemisphere) during visual inspection of unfamiliar targets was observed supporting the hypothesis that, in dolphins, the organization of the functional neural structures which reflected cerebral asymmetries for visual object recognition could have been subjected to a deviation from the evolutionary line of most terrestrial vertebrates.

  1. Stripe noise removal of remote sensing images by total variation regularization and group sparsity constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing images have been used in many fields, such as urban planning, military, and environment monitoring, but corruption by stripe noise limits its subsequent applications. Most existing stripe noise removal (destriping methods aim to directly estimate the clear images from the stripe images without considering the intrinsic properties of stripe noise, which causes the image structure destroyed. In this paper, we propose a new destriping method from the perspective of image decomposition, which takes the intrinsic properties of stripe noise and image characteristics into full consideration. The proposed method integrates the unidirectional total variation (TV regularization, group sparsity regularization, and TV regularization together in an image decomposition framework. The first two terms are utilized to exploit the stripe noise properties by implementing statistical analysis, and the TV regularization is adopted to explore the spatial piecewise smooth structure of stripe-free image. Moreover, an efficient alternating minimization scheme is designed to solve the proposed model. Extensive experiments on simulated and real data demonstrate that our method outperforms several existing state-of-the-art destriping methods in terms of both quantitative and qualitative assessments.

  2. Testing the thermal-niche oxygen-squeeze hypothesis for estuarine striped bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Richard T.; Secor, D.H.; Wingate, Rebecca L.

    2015-01-01

    In many stratified coastal ecosystems, conceptual and bioenergetics models predict seasonal reduction in quality and quantity of fish habitat due to high temperatures and hypoxia. We tested these predictions using acoustic telemetry of 2 to 4 kg striped bass (Morone saxatilis Walbaum) and high-resolution spatial water quality sampling in the Patuxent River, a sub-estuary of the Chesapeake Bay, during 2008 and 2009. Striped bass avoided hypoxic (dissolved oxygen ≤2 mg·l−1) subpycnocline waters, but frequently occupied habitats with high temperatures (>25 °C) in the summer months, as cooler habitats were typically not available. Using traditional concepts of the seasonal thermal-niche oxygen-squeeze, most of the Patuxent estuary would beconsidered unsuitable habitat for adult striped bass during summer. Application of a bioenergetics model revealed that habitats selected by striped bass during summer would support positive growth rates assuming fish could feed at one-half ofmaximum consumption. Occupancy of the estuary during summer by striped bass in this study was likely facilitated by sufficient prey and innate tolerance of high temperatures by sub-adult fish of the size range that we tagged. Our results help extend the thermalniche oxygen-squeeze hypothesis to native populations of striped bass in semi-enclosed coastal systems. Tolerance of for supraoptimal temperatures in our study supports recent suggestions by others that the thermal-niche concept for striped bass should be revised to include warmer temperatures.

  3. Stripe to slab confinement for the linearization of macromolecules in nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benková, Zuzana; Námer, Pavol; Cifra, Peter

    2015-03-21

    We investigated the recently suggested advantageous analysis of chain linearization experiments with macromolecules confined in a stripe-like channel (Huang and Battacharya, EPL, 2014, 106, 18004) using Monte Carlo simulations. The enhanced chain extension in a stripe, which is due to the significant excluded volume interactions between the monomers in two dimensions, weakens considerably on transition to an experimentally feasible slit-like channel. Based on the chain extension-confinement strength dependence and the structure factor behavior for a chain in a stripe, we infer the excluded volume regime (de Gennes regime) typical for two-dimensional systems. On widening of the stripe in a direction perpendicular to the stripe plane, i.e. on the transition to the slab geometry, the advantageous chain extension decreases and a Gaussian regime is observed for not very long semiflexible chains. The evidence for pseudo-ideality in confined chains is based on four indicators: the extension curves, variation of the extension with the persistence length P, estimated limits for the regimes in the investigated systems, and the structure factor behavior. The slab behavior can be observed when the two-dimensional stripe (originally of a one-monomer thickness) reaches a reduced thickness D larger than approximately D/P ≈ 0.2 in the third dimension. This maximum height of a slab at which the advantage of a stripe is retained is very low and has implications for DNA linearization experiments.

  4. Pathology of striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) infected with Brucella ceti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Barrientos, R; Morales, J-A; Hernández-Mora, G; Barquero-Calvo, E; Guzmán-Verri, C; Chaves-Olarte, E; Moreno, E

    2010-05-01

    Seventeen striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) displaying swimming disorders compatible with neurological syndromes were investigated for Brucella infection. Sixteen dolphins had meningoencephalomyelitis. Serum antibody against Brucella antigen was detected in all 14 animals tested and Brucella ceti was isolated from eight out of nine animals. Brucella antigen was detected in the brain by immunofluorescence, but not by immunohistochemical labelling. By contrast, Brucella antigen was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in the trophoblast of animals with severe placentitis and in the mitral valve of animals with myocarditis. The microscopical lesions observed in the tissues of the infected dolphins were similar to those of chronic brucellosis in man. The severity of brucellosis in S. coeruleoalba indicates that this dolphin species is highly susceptible to infection by B. ceti. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Explanation of the nature of stripe magnetic anomalies without inversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melikhov, Vjacheslav; Lygin, Ivan; Sokolova, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Several scientists of different branches express doubts on the validity of the Earth's geomagnetic field inversions hypothesis [Vine F.J., Matthews D.H, 1963]. Presently a lot of information allows to link the appearance of stripe magnetic anomalies of both signs with the spreading fracture structure (horizontal segmentation of intrusions and sills, breaks in the strong crust, vertical movements of blocks), remagnetization near the borders of the blocks, hydrothermal activity. Non-inversion mechanism of origin of linear stripe magnetic anomalies in the oceans could be explained as follows. Ascending asthenospheric flows have been enrich with volatile components, become thinner, pressure on the walls of the lithospheric plates grows and part them. When it approaches the surface: - horizontal tensile pressure grows, - lithostatic pressure in the vertical column of rocks decreases, - crust strong upper layer flakes away and begins to move horizontally. It is important that thin magmatic and magnetic layers (further layers) of the newly formed strong upper crust move away from the ridge axis. The structure of such layers forms by horizontal stresses and so consist of the hills and depressions sequences or updiped and downdiped blocks heaped each other. This layer is the main source of the magnetic field and cannot be approximated by a horizontal homogeneous plate as it proved before. In the mid-ocean ridges (MOR) the folding periods of layer depend on its thickness and rigidity and horizontal velocity of spreading. The higher velocity - the longer periods of roughness are and contrary. Same pattern is observed for the stripe magnetic anomalies distribution. The magnetic field of the MOR forms there due to young lava flows which get thermoremanent magnetization according the current direction of geomagnetic field. Partial destruction of the relief, overlaying and creation of the new shapes occur when new magma penetrates the moved magnetic layer. The process entails

  6. Diamagnetic vortex barrier stripes in underdoped BaFe2(As1-xPx) 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagil, A.; Lamhot, Y.; Almoalem, A.; Kasahara, S.; Watashige, T.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Auslaender, O. M.

    2016-08-01

    We report magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements on underdoped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 (x =0.26 ) that show enhanced superconductivity along stripes parallel to twin boundaries. These stripes of enhanced diamagnetic response repel superconducting vortices and act as barriers for them to cross. The width of the stripes is hundreds of nanometers, on the scale of the penetration depth, well within the inherent spatial resolution of MFM and implying that the width is set by the interaction of the superconductor with the MFM's magnetic tip. Unlike similar stripes observed previously by scanning SQUID in the electron doped Ba (Fe1 -xCox)2As2 , the stripes in the isovalently doped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 disappear gradually when we warm the sample towards the superconducting transition temperature. Moreover, we find that the stripes move well below the reported structural transition temperature in BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 and that they can be much denser than in the Ba (Fe1 -xCox)2As2 study. When we cool in finite magnetic field we find that some vortices appear in the middle of stripes, suggesting that the stripes may have an inner structure, which we cannot resolve. Finally, we use both vortex decoration at higher magnetic field and deliberate vortex dragging by the MFM magnetic tip to obtain bounds on the strength of the interaction between the stripes and vortices. We find that this interaction is strong enough to play a significant role in determining the critical current in underdoped BaFe2(As1 -xPx)2 .

  7. Study of combined filter based on wavelet transform to denoise stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongling; Jing, Chao; Zhang, Yimo

    2011-11-01

    Stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry, in which stripe distribution are correlated with vertical micro distortion or micro vibration of objects, are severely disturbed by noises, and so denoising stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry is necessary to extract useful stripe distribution information. Denoising methods and flow for stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry are analyzed in this paper to get the stripe distribution correlated with vertical micro distortion or micro vibration of objects. The noises in the stripe images of electronic speckle shearography pattern interferometry are comprised of speckle noise and other random noises induced by environmental disturb and instrumental performance, so it's difficult to use familiar filters, such as mean-value filter, medium-value filter and adaptive filter, etc, to remove all noises in the stripe images. The combined filter composed of mean-value filter and wavelet filter is designed to denoise stripe images. The aim of mean-value filter is to remove random noises induced by environmental disturb and instrumental performance, and then the wavelet filter, in which the Meyer wavelet is adopted, is designed to remove speckle noise in the stripe images. The final stripe distribution images after denoising and binarization are listed to prove the denoising validity of combined filter based on wavelet transform.

  8. High-redshift SDSS Quasars with Weak Emission Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W. N.

    2009-01-01

    We identify a sample of 74 high-redshift quasars (z > 3) with weak emission lines from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present infrared, optical, and radio observations of a subsample of four objects at z > 4. These weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) constitute a prominent...... rest-frame 0.1-5 µm spectral energy distributions that are quite similar to those of normal quasars. The variability, polarization, and radio properties of WLQs are also different from those of BL Lacs, making continuum boosting by a relativistic jet an unlikely physical interpretation. The most...

  9. Rogue wave and a pair of resonance stripe solitons to a reduced (3+1)-dimensional Jimbo-Miwa equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoen; Chen, Yong

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a combination of stripe soliton and lump soliton is discussed to a reduced (3+1)-dimensional Jimbo-Miwa equation, in which such solution gives rise to two different excitation phenomena: fusion and fission. Particularly, a new combination of positive quadratic functions and hyperbolic functions is considered, and then a novel nonlinear phenomenon is explored. Via this method, a pair of resonance kink stripe solitons and rogue wave is studied. Rogue wave is triggered by the interaction between lump soliton and a pair of resonance kink stripe solitons. It is exciting that rogue wave must be attached to the stripe solitons from its appearing to disappearing. The whole progress is completely symmetry, the rogue wave starts itself from one stripe soliton and lose itself in another stripe soliton. The dynamic properties of the interaction between one stripe soliton and lump soliton, rogue wave are discussed by choosing appropriate parameters.

  10. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Valdés-Bango

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  11. Magnetic stripes and holes: Complex domain patterns in perforated films with weak perpendicular anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Bango, F.; Vélez, M.; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Alameda, J. M.; Martín, J. I.

    2017-05-01

    Hexagonal antidot arrays have been patterned on weak perpendicular magnetic anisotropy NdCo films by e-beam lithography and lift off. Domain structure has been characterized by Magnetic Force Microscopy at remanence. On a local length scale, of the order of stripe pattern period, domain configuration is controlled by edge effects within the stripe pattern: stripe domains meet the hole boundary at either perpendicular or parallel orientation. On a longer length scale, in-plane magnetostatic effects dominate the system: clear superdomains are observed in the patterned film with average in-plane magnetization along the easy directions of the antidot array, correlated over several antidot array cells.

  12. Brightest galaxies as halo centre tracers in SDSS DR7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Johannes U.; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Hearin, Andrew; Campbell, Duncan; Zentner, Andrew R.; Villarreal, Antonio; Mao, Yao-Yuan

    2018-01-01

    Determining the positions of halo centres in large-scale structure surveys is crucial for many cosmological studies. A common assumption is that halo centres correspond to the location of their brightest member galaxies. In this paper, we study the dynamics of brightest galaxies with respect to other halo members in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7. Specifically, we look at the line-of-sight velocity and spatial offsets between brightest galaxies and their neighbours. We compare those to detailed mock catalogues, constructed from high-resolution, dark-matter-only N-body simulations, in which it is assumed that satellite galaxies trace dark matter subhaloes. This allows us to place constraints on the fraction fBNC of haloes in which the brightest galaxy is not the central. Compared to previous studies, we explicitly take into account the unrelaxed state of the host haloes, velocity offsets of halo cores and correlations between fBNC and the satellite occupation. We find that fBNC strongly decreases with the luminosity of the brightest galaxy and increases with the mass of the host halo. Overall, in the halo mass range 1013-1014.5 h- 1M⊙ we find fBNC ∼ 30 per cent, in good agreement with a previous study by Skibba et al. We discuss the implications of these findings for studies inferring the galaxy-halo connection from satellite kinematics, models of the conditional luminosity function and galaxy formation in general.

  13. SDSS-IV/MaNGA: SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC CALIBRATION TECHNIQUE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose St., Lexington, KY 40506-0057 (United States); Tremonti, Christy; Bershady, Matthew A.; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Wake, David A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Winsconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Schlegel, David J. [Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720-8160 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino el Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Blanton, Michael R.; Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Gunn, James E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Harding, Paul [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Sánchez, Sebastian F., E-mail: yanrenbin@uky.edu [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2016-01-15

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA), one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV, is an integral-field spectroscopic survey of roughly 10,000 nearby galaxies. It employs dithered observations using 17 hexagonal bundles of 2″ fibers to obtain resolved spectroscopy over a wide wavelength range of 3600–10300 Å. To map the internal variations within each galaxy, we need to perform accurate spectral surface photometry, which is to calibrate the specific intensity at every spatial location sampled by each individual aperture element of the integral field unit. The calibration must correct only for the flux loss due to atmospheric throughput and the instrument response, but not for losses due to the finite geometry of the fiber aperture. This requires the use of standard star measurements to strictly separate these two flux loss factors (throughput versus geometry), a difficult challenge with standard single-fiber spectroscopy techniques due to various practical limitations. Therefore, we developed a technique for spectral surface photometry using multiple small fiber-bundles targeting standard stars simultaneously with galaxy observations. We discuss the principles of our approach and how they compare to previous efforts, and we demonstrate the precision and accuracy achieved. MaNGA's relative calibration between the wavelengths of Hα and Hβ has an rms of 1.7%, while that between [N ii] λ6583 and [O ii] λ3727 has an rms of 4.7%. Using extinction-corrected star formation rates and gas-phase metallicities as an illustration, this level of precision guarantees that flux calibration errors will be sub-dominant when estimating these quantities. The absolute calibration is better than 5% for more than 89% of MaNGA's wavelength range.

  14. Striped Marlin Hardparts and Gonads Collected by the PIRO Hawaii Longline Observer Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Compilation of all samples collected from striped marlin (Tetrapturus audax) collected and brought to the Aiea Heights Research Facility by the PIRO Hawaii Longline...

  15. Genetic analysis and location of gene for resistance to stripe rust in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-08-06

    yellow) rust. It is very important to clarify its genetic character of resistance to stripe rust and to develop the molecular markers linked to resistance genes. The NIL Taichung. 29*6/Strubes Dickkopf, which was obtained by ...

  16. Nonlocal Electron-Phonon Interaction as a Source of Dynamic Charge Stripes in the Cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Falter

    2012-01-01

    small pockets with reduced doping. We argue that the incompressibility of the orbital and simultaneously the compressibility of the orbital in the pseudogap state seem to be required to nucleate dynamic stripes.

  17. Improving sustainability of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) farming in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam through recirculation technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Nhut

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to document improvements in sustainability indicators of striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus, Sauvage, 1878) production through the application of recirculation and waste treatment techniques. To be able to document improvements in sustainability, in each system

  18. Contaminants in striped bass from the flint and Apalachicola Rivers 1986-1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Five striped bass (Morone saxitilis), collected between April 1986 and May 1989 from the Flint River at Albany, Georgia, and the Apalachicola River at Chattahoochee,...

  19. Quantity and functionality of protein fractions in chicken breast fillets affected by white striping

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2014-01-01

    ... features of chicken breast meat. During this study, a total of 12 pectoralis major muscles from both normal and white striped fillets were used to evaluate chemical composition, protein solubility...

  20. Yr32 for resistance to stripe (yellow) rust present in the wheat cultivar Carstens V

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, L.; Afshari, F.; Christiansen, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Stripe or yellow rust of wheat, caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an important disease in many wheat-growing regions of the world. A number of major genes providing resistance to stripe rust have been used in breeding, including one gene that is present in the differential tester...... Carstens V. The objective of this study was to locate and map a stripe rust resistance gene transferred from Carstens V to Avocet S and to use molecular tools to locate a number of genes segregating in the cross Savannah/Senat. One of the genes present in Senat was predicted to be a gene that is present...... in Carstens V. For this latter purpose, stripe rust response data from both seedling and field tests on a doubled haploid population consisting of 77 lines were compared to an available molecular map for the same lines using a non-parametric quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis. Results obtained in Denmark...

  1. THE MULTI-OBJECT, FIBER-FED SPECTROGRAPHS FOR THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AND THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smee, Stephen A.; Gunn, James E.; Uomoto, Alan; Roe, Natalie; Schlegel, David; Rockosi, Constance M.; Carr, Michael A.; Leger, French; Dawson, Kyle S.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brinkmann, Jon; Owen, Russell; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Honscheid, Klaus; Harding, Paul; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Loomis, Craig; Anderson, Lauren; Annis, James; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W.; Burles, Scott; Burns, James G.; Castander, Francisco Javier; Connolly, Andrew; Davenport, James R. A.; Ebelke, Garrett; Epps, Harland; Feldman, Paul D.; Friedman, Scott D.; Frieman, Joshua; Heckman, Timothy; Hull, Charles L.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Lawrence, David M.; Loveday, Jon; Mannery, Edward J.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Merrelli, Aronne James; Muna, Demitri; Newman, Peter R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pope, Adrian C.; Ricketts, Paul G.; Shelden, Alaina; Sandford, Dale; Siegmund, Walter; Simmons, Audrey; Smith, D. Shane; Snedden, Stephanie; Schneider, Donald P.; SubbaRao, Mark; Tremonti, Christy; Waddell, Patrick; York, Donald G.

    2013-07-12

    We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5-m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Lyman-alpha absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 square degrees of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the Universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near ultraviolet to the near infrared, with a resolving power R = \\lambda/FWHM ~ 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 < \\lambda < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.

  2. Alignments of galaxies within cosmic filaments from SDSS DR7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China); Wang, Huiyuan [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wang, Lei [Purple Mountain Observatory, the Partner Group of MPI für Astronomie, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Mo, H. J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003-9305 (United States); Van den Bosch, Frank C., E-mail: yczhang@shao.ac.cn, E-mail: xyang@sjtu.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    Using a sample of galaxy groups selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we examine the alignment between the orientation of galaxies and their surrounding large-scale structure in the context of the cosmic web. The latter is quantified using the large-scale tidal field, reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the major axes of galaxies in filaments tend to be preferentially aligned with the directions of the filaments, while galaxies in sheets have their major axes preferentially aligned parallel to the plane of the sheets. The strength of this alignment signal is strongest for red, central galaxies, and in good agreement with that of dark matter halos in N-body simulations. This suggests that red, central galaxies are well aligned with their host halos, in quantitative agreement with previous studies based on the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies. There is a luminosity and mass dependence that brighter and more massive galaxies in filaments and sheets have stronger alignment signals. We also find that the orientation of galaxies is aligned with the eigenvector associated with the smallest eigenvalue of the tidal tensor. These observational results indicate that galaxy formation is affected by large-scale environments and strongly suggest that galaxies are aligned with each other over scales comparable to those of sheets and filaments in the cosmic web.

  3. Alignments of Galaxies within Cosmic Filaments from SDSS DR7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Youcai; Yang, Xiaohu; Wang, Huiyuan; Wang, Lei; Mo, H. J.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2013-12-01

    Using a sample of galaxy groups selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7, we examine the alignment between the orientation of galaxies and their surrounding large-scale structure in the context of the cosmic web. The latter is quantified using the large-scale tidal field, reconstructed from the data using galaxy groups above a certain mass threshold. We find that the major axes of galaxies in filaments tend to be preferentially aligned with the directions of the filaments, while galaxies in sheets have their major axes preferentially aligned parallel to the plane of the sheets. The strength of this alignment signal is strongest for red, central galaxies, and in good agreement with that of dark matter halos in N-body simulations. This suggests that red, central galaxies are well aligned with their host halos, in quantitative agreement with previous studies based on the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies. There is a luminosity and mass dependence that brighter and more massive galaxies in filaments and sheets have stronger alignment signals. We also find that the orientation of galaxies is aligned with the eigenvector associated with the smallest eigenvalue of the tidal tensor. These observational results indicate that galaxy formation is affected by large-scale environments and strongly suggest that galaxies are aligned with each other over scales comparable to those of sheets and filaments in the cosmic web.

  4. Improving galaxy morphologies for SDSS with Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez Sánchez, H.; Huertas-Company, M.; Bernardi, M.; Tuccillo, D.; Fischer, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    We present a morphological catalogue for ˜ 670,000 galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey in two flavours: T-Type, related to the Hubble sequence, and Galaxy Zoo 2 (GZ2 hereafter) classification scheme. By combining accurate existing visual classification catalogues with machine learning, we provide the largest and most accurate morphological catalogue up to date. The classifications are obtained with Deep Learning algorithms using Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs). We use two visual classification catalogues, GZ2 and Nair & Abraham (2010), for training CNNs with colour images in order to obtain T-Types and a series of GZ2 type questions (disk/features, edge-on galaxies, bar signature, bulge prominence, roundness and mergers). We also provide an additional probability enabling a separation between pure elliptical (E) from S0, where the T-Type model is not so efficient. For the T-Type, our results show smaller offset and scatter than previous models trained with support vector machines. For the GZ2 type questions, our models have large accuracy (> 97%), precision and recall values (> 90%) when applied to a test sample with the same characteristics as the one used for training. The catalogue is publicly released with the paper.

  5. Unusual sighting of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Kvarnerić, Northern Adriatic sea

    OpenAIRE

    Bearzi, Giovanni; Fortuna, Caterina Maria; Notabartolo di Sciara, Giuseppe

    1998-01-01

    An adult striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba, was encountered east of the island of Lošinj on 6 May 1996, and observed from a small inflatable boat for 5 hours. The only cetacean species that has been consistently observed in the Northern Adriatic Sea in the last decades is the bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus. Occasional reports of striped dolphins in the Central and Northern Adriatic Sea may simply reflect the occurrence of stray individuals, but the fact that such observations ...

  6. Propagation of dark stripe beams in nonlinear media: Snake instability and creation of optical vortices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mamaev, A.V.; Saffman, M.; Zozulya, A.A.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of (1+1) dimensional dark stripe beams in bulk media with a photorefractive nonlinear response. These beams, including solitary wave solutions, are shown to be unstable with respect to symmetry breaking and formation of structure along the initially homogeneous coordinate....... Experimental results show the complete sequence of events starting from self-focusing of the stripe, its bending due to the snake instability, and subsequent decay into a set of optical vortices....

  7. Alignment of galaxies relative to their local environment in SDSS-DR8

    OpenAIRE

    Hirv, A.; Pelt, J.; Saar, E.; Tago, E.; Tamm, A.; Tempel, E.; Einasto, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the alignment of galaxies relative to their local environment in SDSS-DR8 and, using these data, we discuss evolution scenarios for different types of galaxies. We defined a vector field of the direction of anisotropy of the local environment of galaxies. We summed the unit direction vectors of all close neighbours of a given galaxy in a particular way to estimate this field. We found the alignment angles between the spin axes of disc galaxies, or the minor axes of elliptical galaxie...

  8. Are stripes beneficial? Dazzle camouflage influences perceived speed and hit rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina von Helversen

    Full Text Available In the animal kingdom, camouflage refers to patterns that help potential prey avoid detection. Mostly camouflage is thought of as helping prey blend in with their background. In contrast, disruptive or dazzle patterns protect moving targets and have been suggested as an evolutionary force in shaping the dorsal patterns of animals. Dazzle patterns, such as stripes and zigzags, are thought to reduce the probability with which moving prey will be captured by impairing predators' perception of speed. We investigated how different patterns of stripes (longitudinal-i.e., parallel to movement direction-and vertical-i.e., perpendicular to movement direction affect the probability with which humans can hit moving objects and if differences in hitting probability are caused by a misperception of speed. A first experiment showed that longitudinally striped objects were hit more often than unicolored objects. However, vertically striped objects did not differ from unicolored objects. A second study examining the link between perceived speed and hitting probability showed that longitudinally and vertically striped objects were both perceived as moving faster and were hit more often than unicolored objects. In sum, our results provide evidence that striped patterns disrupt the perception of speed, which in turn influences how often objects are hit. However, the magnitude and the direction of the effects depend on additional factors such as speed and the task setup.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Emission lines for SDSS Coronal-Line Forest AGNs (Rose+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M.; Elvis, M.; Tadhunter, C. N.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we make use of SDSS spectra. The basic properties of the CLiF AGN sample studied in this paper are given in Table 1. Note that the outputs of the SDSS pipeline are used only for the sample selection. Detailed measurements of emission line parameters such as the flux and velocity widths are measured using our own methods (Section 4). The redshifts were determined using single Gaussian fits to the [O III] λ5007 emission line. This line was chosen because it is the most prominent emission line in the optical spectra of these and most other AGN. (5 data files).

  10. Structural lability of Barley stripe mosaic virus virions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin V Makarov

    Full Text Available Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed.

  11. Current Insights into Research on Rice stripe virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Kyong Cho

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Rice stripe virus (RSV is one of the most destructive viruses of rice, and greatly reduces rice production in China, Japan, and Korea, where mostly japonica cultivars of rice are grown. RSV is transmitted by the small brown plant-hopper (SBPH in a persistent and circulative-propagative manner. Several methods have been developed for detection of RSV, which is composed of four single-stranded RNAs that encode seven proteins. Genome sequence data and comparative phylogenetic analysis have been used to identify the origin and diversity of RSV isolates. Several rice varieties resistant to RSV have been selected and QTL analysis and fine mapping have been intensively performed to map RSV resistance loci or genes. RSV genes have been used to generate several genetically modified transgenic rice plants with RSV resistance. Recently, genome-wide transcriptome analyses and deep sequencing have been used to identify mRNAs and small RNAs involved in RSV infection; several rice host factors that interact with RSV proteins have also been identified. In this article, we review the current statues of RSV research and propose integrated approaches for the study of interactions among RSV, rice, and the SBPH.

  12. Strategies for Wheat Stripe Rust Pathogenicity Identified by Transcriptome Sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana P Garnica

    Full Text Available Stripe rust caused by the fungus Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici (Pst is a major constraint to wheat production worldwide. The molecular events that underlie Pst pathogenicity are largely unknown. Like all rusts, Pst creates a specialized cellular structure within host cells called the haustorium to obtain nutrients from wheat, and to secrete pathogenicity factors called effector proteins. We purified Pst haustoria and used next-generation sequencing platforms to assemble the haustorial transcriptome as well as the transcriptome of germinated spores. 12,282 transcripts were assembled from 454-pyrosequencing data and used as reference for digital gene expression analysis to compare the germinated uredinospores and haustoria transcriptomes based on Illumina RNAseq data. More than 400 genes encoding secreted proteins which constitute candidate effectors were identified from the haustorial transcriptome, with two thirds of these up-regulated in this tissue compared to germinated spores. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the expression patterns of 94 effector candidates. The analysis also revealed that spores rely mainly on stored energy reserves for growth and development, while haustoria take up host nutrients for massive energy production for biosynthetic pathways and the ultimate production of spores. Together, these studies substantially increase our knowledge of potential Pst effectors and provide new insights into the pathogenic strategies of this important organism.

  13. Ultrastructure of Mycobacterium marinum granuloma in striped bass Morone saxatilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, David T.; Vogelbein, W.K.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    An emerging epizootic of mycobacteriosis currently threatens striped bass Morone saxatilis populations in Chesapeake Bay, USA. Several species of mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium marinum, species resembling M. avium, M. gordonae, M. peregrinum, M. scrofulaceum and M. terrae, and the new species M. shottsii have been isolated from diseased and healthy bass. In this study, we describe the ultrastructure of developing M. marinum granulomas in experimentally infected bass over a period of 45 wk. The primary host response to injected mycobacteria was formation of large macrophage aggregations containing phagocytosed bacilli, M. marinum were always contained within phagosomes. Close association of lysosomes with mycobacterial phagosomes, as well as the presence of electron-opaque material within phagosomes, suggested phagolysosomal fusion. Development of granulomas involved epithelioid transformation of macrophages, followed by appearance of central necrosis. Desmosomes were present between mature epithelioid cells. The necrotic core region of M. marinum granulomas was separated from overlying epithelioid cells by several layers of flattened, electron-opaque spindle-shaped cells. These cells appeared to be formed by compression of epithelioid cells and, aside from a flattened nucleus, did not possess recognizable organelles. Following the development of well-defined, paucibacillary granulomas, secondary disease was observed. Recrudescence was marked by bacterial replication followed by disruption of granuloma architecture, including loss of epithelioid and spindle cell layers. In advanced recrudescent lesions, normal tissue was replaced by macrophages, fibroblasts, and other inflammatory leukocytes. Large numbers of mycobacteria were observed, both intracellular and suspended in cellular debris.

  14. Striped lanthanum cobaltite films: how strain orders oxygen defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birenbaum, Axiel Yael; Biegalski, Michael D.; Qiao, Liang; Cooper, Valentino R.; Borisevich, Albina

    Oxygen-deficient metal cobalt oxides have been widely studied for solid oxide fuel cell cathode applications. In order to predict atomic-scale transport pathways, a thorough understanding of its defect properties is crucial. Previous studies, including Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM), demonstrate lanthanum cobaltite, grown as thin films on [100]pc oriented perovskites, spontaneously order its oxygen vacancies. In this work, we investigate the behavior of LaCoO3 - δ thin films grown on SrTiO3 [111] surface to determine if orientation can be used to shape the anisotropy of oxygen transport. For these films, STEM studies reveal ordered vacancy arrangements. We do so by establishing the structural and electronic properties of LaCoO3 - δ on SrTiO3, using ab initio electronic structure calculations. We then treat how epitaxial strain leads to oxygen vacancies forming these distinctive stripe patterns. The impact of different substrates is addressed. In addition, this leads to an opportunity to discuss the effect of reduced symmetry in oxygen deficient compounds on cobalt oxide behavior compared to the ideal perovskite environment. Research was sponsored by the US DoE, Office of Science, BES, MSED, and used resources at NERSC and OLCF.

  15. Direct Detection of SDSS J0926+3624 Orbital Expansion with ARCONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szypryt, P. [UC, Santa Barbara; Duggan, G. E. [Caltech; Mazin, B. A. [UC, Santa Barbara; Meeker, S. R. [UC, Santa Barbara; Strader, M. J. [UC, Santa Barbara; van Eyken, J. C. [UC, Santa Barbara; Marsden, D. [UC, Santa Barbara; O' Brien, K. [Oxford U.; Walter, A. B. [UC, Santa Barbara; Ulbricht, G. [UC, Santa Barbara; Prince, T. A. [Caltech; Stoughton, C. [Fermilab; Bumble, B. [Caltech, JPL

    2014-04-11

    AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn) stars belong to a class of ultra-compact, short period binaries with spectra dominated largely by helium. SDSS J0926+3624 is of particular interest as it is the first observed eclipsing AM CVn system. We observed SDSS J0926+3624 with the \\textbf{Ar}ray \\textbf{C}amera for \\textbf{O}ptical to \\textbf{N}ear-IR \\textbf{S}pectrophotometry (ARCONS) at the Palomar 200" telescope. ARCONS uses a relatively new type of energy-resolved photon counters called Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). ARCONS, sensitive to radiation from 350 to 1100 nm, has a time resolution of several microseconds and can measure the energy of a photon to $\\sim10%$. We present the light curves for these observations and examine changes in orbital period from prior observations. Using a quadratic ephemeris model, we measure a period rate of change $\\dot{P} = (3.07 \\pm 0.56)\\times 10^{-13}$. In addition, we use the high timing resolution of ARCONS to examine the system's high frequency variations and search for possible quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). Finally, we use the instrument's spectral resolution to examine the light curves in various wavelength bands. We do not find any high frequency QPOs or significant spectral variability throughout an eclipse.

  16. Néel coupling in Co/Cu/Co stripes with unidirectional interface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydenko, A.V., E-mail: avdavydenko@gmail.com [Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation); Pustovalov, E.V.; Ognev, A.V.; Kozlov, A.G.; Chebotkevich, L.A. [Far Eastern Federal University, 8 Sukhanova Street, Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation); Han, X.F. [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the influence of interlayer Néel coupling on the magnetization reversal processes in epitaxial Co(5 nm)/Cu(5 nm)/Co(5 nm) stripes by experimental methods and computer modeling. The stripes with a width of 900 and 1800 nm were formed on a step-bunched Si(111) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy and focused ion beam etching. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy with the easy axis of the magnetization along the steps is induced in the stripes by the steps of the Si(111) substrate. The stepped structure of the layers in the multilayered stripes reproduces the morphology of the Si(111) substrate. Néel coupling between the Co layers is realized due to the unidirectional roughness at the Co/Cu interfaces caused by the steps of the substrate. Interlayer Néel coupling at the interfaces overcomes antiparallel magnetostatic interaction realized through the sides of the Co layers in the trilayered stripes. We used a modified Néel model in the simulation of the magnetization reversal in the multilayered system with unidirectional interface roughness. The surface energy of Néel coupling was spatially varied against the direction of the magnetization relative to the step edge. The results of micromagnetic simulations of the Co/Cu/Co stripes with spatially non-uniform and averaged surface energies of interlayer Néel coupling are compared and discussed. - Highlights: • We investigated Co/Cu/Co stripes with unidirectional roughness at the interfaces. • Results obtained by MOKE and MFM are compared to micromagnetic simulations. • A modified Néel model was used in the micromagnetic simulation of the Co/Cu/Co system. • The surface energy of Néel coupling depends on the direction of the magnetization.

  17. Mesospheric Temperatures over Apache Point Observatory (32°N, 105°W) Derived from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gawon; Kim, Yong Ha; Lee, Young Sun

    2017-06-01

    We retrieved rotational temperatures from emission lines of the OH airglow (8-3) band in the sky spectra of the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS) for the period 2000-2014, as part of the astronomical observation project conducted at the Apache Point observatory (32°N, 105°W). The SDSS temperatures show a typical seasonal variation of mesospheric temperature: low in summer and high in winter. We find that the temperatures respond to solar activity by as much as 1.2 K ±0.8 K per 100 solar flux units, which is consistent with other studies in mid-latitude regions. After the seasonal variation and solar response were subtracted, the SDSS temperature is fairly constant over the 15 year period, unlike cooling trends suggested by some studies. This temperature analysis using SDSS spectra is a unique contribution to the global monitoring of climate change because the SDSS project was established for astronomical purposes and is independent from climate studies. The SDSS temperatures are also compared with mesospheric temperatures measured by the microwave limb sounder (MLS) instrument on board the Aura satellite and the differences are discussed.

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Exploring the SDSS data set. I. EMP & CV stars (Carbon+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, D. F.; Henze, C.; Nelson, B. C.

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of a search for extremely metal-poor (EMP), carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP), and cataclysmic variable (CV) stars using a new exploration tool based on linked scatter plots (LSPs). Our approach is especially designed to work with very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, LAMOST, RAVE, and Gaia data sets, and it can be applied to stellar, galaxy, and quasar spectra. As a demonstration, we conduct our search using the SDSS DR10 data set. We first created a 3326-dimensional phase space containing nearly 2 billion measures of the strengths of over 1600 spectral features in 569738 SDSS stars. These measures capture essentially all the stellar atomic and molecular species visible at the resolution of SDSS spectra. We show how LSPs can be used to quickly isolate and examine interesting portions of this phase space. To illustrate, we use LSPs coupled with cuts in selected portions of phase space to extract EMP stars, CEMP stars, and CV stars. We present identifications for 59 previously unrecognized candidate EMP stars and 11 previously unrecognized candidate CEMP stars. We also call attention to 2 candidate He II emission CV stars found by the LSP approach that have not yet been discussed in the literature. (3 data files).

  19. Three-body encounters in the Galactic Centre: the origin of the hypervelocity star SDSS J090745.0+024507

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gualandris, A.; Portegies Zwart, S.F.; Sipior, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    In the late 1980s Hills predicted that runaway stars could be accelerated to velocities greater than 1000kms-1 by dynamical encounters with the supermassive black hole (SMBH) in the Galactic Centre. The recently discovered hypervelocity star SDSS J090745.0+024507 (hereafter the HVS) is escaping the

  20. High-Speed Ultracam Colorimetry of the Subdwarf B Star SDSS J171722.08+58055.8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, C.C.; Jeffery, C.S.; Dhillon, V.S.; Marsh, T.R.; Groot, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    We present high-speed multicolour photometry of the faint sub-dwarf B star SDSS J171722.08+58055.8 (mB=16.7mag), which was recently discovered to be pulsating. The data were obtained during two consecutive nights in 2004 August using the three-channel photometer Ultracam attached to the

  1. Anechoic stripe size influences accuracy of FAST examination interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, O John; Gaddis, Gary

    2006-03-01

    Accurate and precise interpretations of Focused Assessment with Sonography for Trauma (FAST) findings are important factors in managing trauma patients. The objectives were to analyze the influence of anechoic stripe (AS) size on interpretation accuracy by emergency physicians (EPs) and to assess the precision of FAST examination interpretation as a function of EP FAST experience. A prospective comparison study of FAST examination interpretation by 11 emergency medicine faculty (FAC), nine community attending EPs (ATT), and nine senior emergency medicine residents (RES) was conducted; these physicians were then divided into more experienced and less experienced cohorts to assess precision. Participants interpreted video recordings of the four standard views from five FAST examinations (20 total video clips); each examination contained views with various AS sizes. Accuracy of FAST examination interpretation was calculated for each group stratified by size of AS. Precision (reproducibility) of FAST examination interpretation was assessed by calculating kappa values. With large, moderate, or no AS, no significant differences in accuracy were found between groups. For small AS, significant differences in accuracy were found between the ATT and RES groups and between the combined FAC + ATT group and the RES group. Kappa was good to excellent when the nth and the (n + 1)th experienced physicians in the more experienced cohort were compared. kappa values reflected that the more experienced cohort was more precise than the less experienced cohort. AS size visible on FAST examinations and EP experience level with FAST examination interpretation exerted a significant influence on the interpretation accuracy of videotaped FAST examinations. In addition, precision was enhanced by increased EP experience with FAST.

  2. Dynamical Black Hole Masses of BL Lac Objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Markoff, Sera; Trager, Scott C.; Anderson, Scott F.

    2012-01-01

    We measure black hole masses for 71 BL Lac objects from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with redshifts out to z ∼ 0.4. We perform spectral decompositions of their nuclei from their host galaxies and measure their stellar velocity dispersions. Black hole masses are then derived from the black

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Stellar kinematics in CALIFA survey (Falcon-Barroso+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon-Barroso, J.; Lyubenova, M.; van de Ven, G.; Mendez-Abreu, J.; Aguerri, J. A. L.; Garcia-Lorenzo, B.; Bekeraite, S.; Sanchez, S. F.; Husemann, B.; Garcia-Benito, R.; Mast, D.; Walcher, C. J.; Zibetti, S.; Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Galbany, L.; Sanchez-Blazquez, P.; Singh, R.; van den Bosch, R. C. E.; Wild, V.; Zhu, L.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Cid Fernandes, R.; de Lorenzo-Caceres, A.; Gallazzi, A.; Gonzalez Delgado, R. M.; Marino, R. A.; Marquez, I.; Perez, E.; Perez, I.; Roth, M. M.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Ruiz-Lara, T.; Wisotzki, L.; Ziegler, B.

    2017-06-01

    This study is based on observations of 300 galaxies drawn from the CALIFA mother and extended samples1, which are part of the photometric catalog of the seventh data release (Abazajian et al., 2009ApJS..182..543A) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). (1 data file).

  4. Development of a Spectrophotometric System to Detect White Striping Physiopathy in Whole Chicken Carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traffano-Schiffo, Maria Victoria; Castro-Giraldez, Marta; Colom, Ricardo J.; Fito, Pedro J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the high intensification of poultry production in recent years, white chicken breast striping is one of the most frequently seen myopathies. The aim of this research was to develop a spectrophotometry-based sensor to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken breast meat in whole chicken carcasses with skin. Experiments were carried out using normal and white striping breasts. In order to understand the mechanism involved in this physiopathy, the different tissues that conform each breast were analyzed. Permittivity in radiofrequency (40 Hz to 1 MHz) was measured using two different sensors; a sensor with two flat plates to analyze the whole breast with skin (NB or WSB), and a two needles with blunt-ended sensor to analyze the different surface tissues of the skinless breast. In the microwave range (500 MHz to 20 GHz), permittivity was measured as just was described for the two needles with blunt-ended sensor. Moreover, fatty acids composition was determined by calorimetry techniques from −40 °C to 50 °C at 5 °C/min after previously freeze-drying the samples, and pH, microstructure by Cryo-SEM and binocular loupe structure were also analyzed. The results showed that the white striping physiopathy consists of the partial breakdown of the pectoral muscle causing an increase in fatty acids, reducing the quality of the meat. It was possible to detect white striping physiopathy in chicken carcasses with skin using spectrophotometry of radiofrequency spectra. PMID:28471378

  5. Stripe artifact elimination based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform for light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiao; Zang, Yali; Dong, Di; Zhang, Liwen; Fang, Mengjie; Yang, Xin; Arranz, Alicia; Ripoll, Jorge; Hui, Hui; Tian, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Stripe artifacts, caused by high-absorption or high-scattering structures in the illumination light path, are a common drawback in both unidirectional and multidirectional light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), significantly deteriorating image quality. To circumvent this problem, we present an effective multidirectional stripe remover (MDSR) method based on nonsubsampled contourlet transform (NSCT), which can be used for both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. In MDSR, a fast Fourier transform (FFT) filter is designed in the NSCT domain to shrink the stripe components and eliminate the noise. Benefiting from the properties of being multiscale and multidirectional, MDSR succeeds in eliminating stripe artifacts in both unidirectional and multidirectional LSFM. To validate the method, MDSR has been tested on images from a custom-made unidirectional LSFM system and a commercial multidirectional LSFM system, clearly demonstrating that MDSR effectively removes most of the stripe artifacts. Moreover, we performed a comparative experiment with the variational stationary noise remover and the wavelet-FFT methods and quantitatively analyzed the results with a peak signal-to-noise ratio, showing an improved noise removal when using the MDSR method.

  6. Seasonal use of a New England estuary by foraging contingents of migratory striped bass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Martha E.; Pautzke, Sarah M.; Finn, John T.; Deegan, Linda A.; Muth, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Using acoustic telemetry on migratory striped bass Morone saxatilis in Plum Island Estuary (PIE), Massachusetts, we found that striped bass (335–634 mm total length) tagged in the spring and summer of 2005 (n = 14) and 2006 (n = 46) stayed in the estuary for an average of 66.0 d in 2005 and 72.2 d in 2006. Striped bass spent the most time in two specific reaches: middle Plum Island Sound and lower Rowley River. In both years, three different use-groups of striped bass were observed in PIE. Short-term visitors (n = 24) stayed in the estuary only briefly (range = 5–20 d). Two groups of seasonal residents stayed for more than 30 d, either in the Rowley River (n = 14) or in Plum Island Sound (n = 22). Within PIE, the two seasonal-resident use-groups may be foraging contingents that learn how to feed efficiently in specific parts of the estuary. These distinct within-estuary use patterns could have different implications for striped bass condition and prey impact.

  7. The Stripe 82 Massive Galaxy Project. III. A Lack of Growth among Massive Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundy, Kevin; Leauthaud, Alexie; Saito, Shun; Maraston, Claudia; Wake, David A.; Thomas, Daniel

    2017-12-01

    The average stellar mass (M *) of high-mass galaxies ({log}{M}* /{M}⊙ > 11.5) is expected to grow by ˜30% since z˜ 1, largely through ongoing mergers that are also invoked to explain the observed increase in galaxy sizes. Direct evidence for the corresponding growth in stellar mass has been elusive, however, in part because the volumes sampled by previous redshift surveys have been too small to yield reliable statistics. In this work, we make use of the Stripe 82 Massive Galaxy Catalog (S82-MGC) to build a mass-limited sample of 41,770 galaxies ({log}{M}* /{M}⊙ > 11.2) with optical-to-near-IR photometry and a large fraction (>55%) of spectroscopic redshifts. Our sample spans 139 deg2, significantly larger than most previous efforts. After accounting for a number of potential systematic errors, including the effects of M * scatter, we measure galaxy stellar mass functions over 0.3history assumed for M * estimates, although our inability to characterize low-surface-brightness outskirts may be the most important limitation of our study. Even among these high-mass galaxies, we find evidence for differential evolution when splitting the sample by recent SF activity. While low-SF systems appear to become completely passive, we find a mostly subdominant population of galaxies with residual, but low rates of SF (˜1 M ⊙ yr-1) whose number density does not evolve. Interestingly, these galaxies become more prominent at higher M *, representing ˜10% of all galaxies at {10}12 {M}⊙ and perhaps dominating at even larger masses.

  8. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U.; Richards, Gordon T.; /Drexel U.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Boroson, Todd A.; /Kitt Peak Observ.; Ross, Nicholas P.; /Penn State U.; Shen, Yue; /Princeton U. Observ.; Brandt, W.N.; /Penn State U.; Fan, Xiaohui; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Southampton U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-04-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of {approx} 9380 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than 4, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than 5. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i < 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1-inch rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.

  9. An edge sensitive 3D measurement using two directional laser stripes scanning with a laser projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dong; Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Changda; Wang, Chao; Guo, Jiayu

    2017-09-01

    Laser scanning is widely used in on-line industrial 3D inspection, cultural heritage conservation and reverse engineering. However, in the traditional laser scanning, the most widely-used approach is based on the projection of a single directional laser stripe over an object. Because the width of the laser stripe is physically difficult to compress enough to be fine at the edge of the object, the traditional measurement method is not accurate for edge measurements. This paper proposes an edge sensitive 3D measurement system which is fast and accurate, using two directional laser stripes scanning with a laser projector. Scanning metal edge steps and complex surface edge with this system only require a single scanning to perform 3D reconstruction. So this scanning method has the advantages of high efficiency, high speed and edges with high precision.

  10. Striped states in a many-body system of tilted dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Matthias; Böttcher, Fabian; Langen, Tim; Ferrier-Barbut, Igor; Pfau, Tilman

    2017-11-01

    We study theoretically and experimentally the behavior of a strongly confined dipolar Bose-Einstein condensate in the regime of quantum-mechanical stabilization by beyond-mean-field effects. Theoretically, we demonstrate that self-organized "striped" ground states are predicted in the framework of the extended Gross-Pitaevskii theory. Experimentally, by tilting the magnetic dipoles we show that self-organized striped states can be generated, likely in their metastable state. Matter-wave interference experiments with multiple stripes show that there is no long-range off-diagonal order (global phase coherence). We outline a parameter range where global phase coherence could be established, thus paving the way towards the observation of supersolid states in this system.

  11. A new species of striped Ichthyophis Fitzinger, 1826 (Amphibia: Gymnophiona: Ichthyophiidae) from Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Presswell, Bronwen; Sherratt, Emma; Papadopoulou, Anna; Gower, David J

    2014-04-02

    A new species of striped ichthyophiid caecilian, Ichthyophis multicolor sp. nov., is described on the basis of morphological and molecular data from a sample of 14 specimens from Ayeyarwady Region, Myanmar. The new species resembles superficially the Indian I. tricolor Annandale, 1909 in having both a pale lateral stripe and an adjacent dark ventrolateral stripe contrasting with a paler venter. It differs from I. tricolor in having many more annuli, and in many details of cranial osteology, and molecular data indicate that it is more closely related to other Southeast Asian Ichthyophis than to those of South Asia. The caecilian fauna of Myanmar is exceptionally poorly known but is likely to include chikilids as well as multiple species of Ichthyophis.

  12. Star formation history of the galaxy merger Mrk848 with SDSS-IV MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang-Ting; Shen, Shiyin; Hao, Lei; Fernandez, Maria Argudo

    2017-03-01

    With the 3D data of SDSS-IV MaNGA (Bundy et al. 2015) spectra and multi-wavelength SED modeling, we expect to have a better understanding of the distribution of dust, gas and star formation of galaxy mergers. For a case study of the merging galaxy Mrk848, we use both UV-to-IR broadband SED and the MaNGA integral field spectroscopy to obtain its star formation histories at the tail and core regions. From the SED fitting and full spectral fitting, we find that the star formation in the tail regions are affected by the interaction earlier than the core regions. The core regions show apparently two times of star formation and a strong burst within 500Myr, indicating the recent star formation is triggered by the interaction. The star formation histories derived from these two methods are basically consistent.

  13. The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lauren E; Bisesi, Joseph H; Lei, E N Y; Lam, Michael H W; Klaine, Stephen J

    2016-08-01

    Increased use of antidepressants has led to an increase in their detection in final treated wastewater effluents and receiving streams. Antidepressants are intended to modify human behavior by altering brain chemistry, and because of the high functional conservation of antidepressant target receptors in vertebrates, aquatic organisms may be at risk. The antidepressant bupropion is designed to alter brain norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in humans. The objective of the present study was to understand if alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis × Morone chrysops) brain by bupropion would alter this predator's ability to capture prey. The authors exposed hybrid striped bass to bupropion in a static system for 6 d, followed by a 6-d recovery period. During the present study's 12-d experiment, each hybrid striped bass was fed 4 unexposed fathead minnows every 3 d, and the time it took the hybrid striped bass to consume each of those 4 fathead minnows was quantified. After each feeding event, hybrid striped bass brains were harvested and analyzed for changes in several brain neurotransmitter concentrations, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and many of their metabolites. Although bupropion altered the concentration of dopamine and many of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter metabolite concentrations in the brains on day 3 of the exposure, it did not alter the time to capture prey. This suggests that alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass brain does not alter a predator's ability to capture prey. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2058-2065. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  14. Determination of the quality of stripe-marked and cracked eggs during storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Chi Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Stripe marks, which occasionally occur on the shell, do not cause breakage to the shell and shell membranes of eggs. This study investigated the quality of intact eggs (IEs, minor stripe-marked eggs (MEs, severe stripe-marked eggs (SEs, and cracked eggs (CEs during 3-week storage at 25°C. Methods Shell eggs were collected the day after being laid and were washed. Among them, eggs without any visual cracks or stripe marks on the shells were evaluated as IEs by the plant employees using candling in a darkened egg storage room; the remaining eggs exhibited some eggshell defects. At day 3, the eggs were further categorized into IEs, MEs, SEs, CEs, and broken eggs (BEs on the basis of the description given. Except BEs, which were discarded, the remaining eggs were stored at 25°C (approximate relative humidity 50% and then analyzed. Results Stripe marks were observed primarily within the first 3 days after washing. At day 3, CEs had significantly (p<0.05 lower Haugh unit values, but all eggs had grades AA or A, according to the United States Department of Agriculture standard. As storage time increased, differences in egg quality between groups were more obvious. IEs had the highest eggshell breaking strength. During storage, the total plate counts and pathogens, namely Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella spp., were not detectable in the internal content of IEs and SEs. Conclusion In conclusion, cracks degraded egg quality severely and minor stripe marks only slightly influenced the egg quality.

  15. Effect of white striping on chemical composition and nutritional value of chicken breast meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Petracci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available White striping defect (appearance of white striations parallel to muscle fiber on surface of breast is considered an emerging issue in chicken breast meat which is related to increasing growth rate of modern hybrid birds. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of white striping on chemical composition and nutritional value of chicken breast meat. During three replications, a total of 108 Pectoralis major muscles representing three degrees of white striping (absence=normal; presence classified in 2 levels as moderate or severe were selected to determine proximate composition (moisture, protein, lipid and collagen as well as sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar protein profile by sodium dodecyl sulphatepolyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis. The results showed that both severe and moderate white-striped fillets had higher fat content (2.53 vs 1.46 vs 0.78%; P<0.001, lower protein level (20.9 vs 22.2 vs 22.9%; P<0.001, decreased quality of protein as proven by higher collagen content (1.30 vs 1.37 vs 1.43%; P<0.001, and different pattern on myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic fractions when compared to normal fillets. Moreover, severe white-striped fillets exhibited higher energy content (450.7 vs 421.1 kJ/100g; P<0.01 with respect to normal meat. In conclusion, there was a large worsening of nutritional value of chicken breast meat following occurrence of white striping and this might impair consumer attitude towards poultry meat.

  16. Quantity and functionality of protein fractions in chicken breast fillets affected by white striping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalal, S; Babini, E; Cavani, C; Petracci, M

    2014-08-01

    Recently, white striations parallel to muscle fibers direction have been observed on the surface of chicken breast, which could be ascribed to intensive growth selection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of white striping on chemical composition with special emphasis on myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic protein fractions that are relevant to the processing features of chicken breast meat. During this study, a total of 12 pectoralis major muscles from both normal and white striped fillets were used to evaluate chemical composition, protein solubility (sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and total protein solubility), protein quantity (sarcoplasmic, myofibrillar, and stromal proteins), water holding capacity, and protein profile by SDS-PAGE analysis. White-striped fillets exhibited a higher percentage of moisture (75.4 vs. 73.8%; P content of protein (18.7 vs. 22.8%; P content and solubility as well as an increase in cooking loss (33.7 vs. 27.4%; P proteins corresponding to actin (42 kDa); LC1, slow-twitch light chain myosin (27.5 kDa); and LC3, fast-twitch light chain myosin (16 kDa), and almost all sarcoplasmic proteins were lower than normal. In conclusion, the findings of this study revealed that chicken breast meat with white striping defect had different chemical composition (more fat and less protein) and protein quality and quantity (low content of myofibrillar proteins and high content of stromal proteins) with respect to normal meat. Furthermore, white striped fillets had lower protein functionality (higher cooking loss). All the former changes indicate that white striping has great impact on quality characteristics of chicken breast meat. © Poultry Science Association Inc.

  17. Lens Model and Time Delay Predictions for the Sextuply Lensed Quasar SDSS J2222+2745*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Dahle, Hakon; Florian, Michael K.; Gladders, Michael D.; Johnson, Traci L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Rigby, Jane R.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Eva

    2017-01-01

    SDSS J2222+2745 is a galaxy cluster at z = 0.49, strongly lensing a quasar at z = 2.805 into six widely separated images. In recent Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the field, we identify additional multiply lensed galaxies and confirm the sixth quasar image that was identified by Dahle et al. We used the Gemini-North telescope to measure a spectroscopic redshift of z = 4.56 of one of the lensed galaxies. These data are used to refine the lens model of SDSS J2222+2745, compute the time delay and magnifications of the lensed quasar images, and reconstruct the source image of the quasar host and a lensed galaxy at z = 2.3. This galaxy also appears in absorption in our Gemini spectra of the lensed quasar, at a projected distance of 34 kpc. Our model is in agreement with the recent time delay measurements of Dahle et al., who found T(sub AB) = 47.7 +/- 6.0 days and T(sub AC) = 722 +/- 24 days. We use the observed time delays to further constrain the model, and find that the model-predicted time delays of the three faint images of the quasar are T(sub AD) = 502+/- 68 days, T( sub AE) = 611 +/- 75 days, and T(sub AF) = 415 +/- 72 days. We have initiated a follow-up campaign to measure these time delays with Gemini North. Finally, we present initial results from an X-ray monitoring program with Swift, indicating the presence of hard X-ray emission from the lensed quasar, as well as extended X-ray emission from the cluster itself, which is consistent with the lensing mass measurement and the cluster velocity dispersion.

  18. Embryonic developmental process governing the conspicuousness of body stripes and blue tail coloration in the lizard Plestiodon latiscutatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriyama, Takeo; Hasegawa, Masami

    2017-01-01

    The combination of body stripes and vivid blue tail color has independently evolved in different lizard families. To understand how and when lizards developed this coloration, we microscopically compared the embryonic development of pigment cells in two island populations of Plestiodon latiscutatus that exhibit either striped and blue tailed or inconspicuously striped and blue tailed juveniles, based on the newly determined 12 normal developmental stages of embryos from shortly after egg laying to just before hatching. We focus on the role of the melanophores in the body stripe and the role of iridophore morphotypes in the extent of blue tail coloration. The melanophore density in the black background region was higher in lizards with vivid stripes than in lizards with drab stripes. Iridophores started to fill the dermal space that was not yet occupied by melanophores, which resulted in a higher iridophore density in stripes than in the inter-stripe regions. We also discovered that iridophores with thin platelets reflecting blue structural coloration appeared at a specific region in the tail at stage 11. The position of the tail where iridophores emerged coincided with the boundary area separating anterior brown and green colored tail from posterior blue colored tail after hatching. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Histology and Ultrastructure of Transitional Changes in Skin Morphology in the Juvenile and Adult Four-Striped Mouse (Rhabdomys pumilio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eranée; Ajao, Moyosore Salihu

    2013-01-01

    The four-striped mouse has a grey to brown coloured coat with four characteristic dark stripes interspersed with three lighter stripes running along its back. The histological differences in the skin of the juvenile and adult mouse were investigated by Haematoxylin and Eosin and Masson Trichrome staining, while melanocytes in the skin were studied through melanin-specific Ferro-ferricyanide staining. The ultrastructure of the juvenile skin, hair follicles, and melanocytes was also explored. In both the juvenile and adult four-striped mouse, pigment-containing cells were observed in the dermis and were homogeneously dispersed throughout this layer. Apart from these cells, the histology of the skin of the adult four-striped mouse was similar to normal mammalian skin. In the juvenile four-striped mouse, abundant hair follicles of varying sizes were observed in the dermis and hypodermis, while hair follicles of similar size were only present in the dermis of adult four-striped mouse. Ultrastructural analysis of juvenile hair follicles revealed that the arrangement and differentiation of cellular layers were typical of a mammal. This study therefore provides unique transition pattern in the four-striped mouse skin morphology different from the textbook description of the normal mammalian skin. PMID:24288469

  20. Feshbach shape resonance for high Tc pairing in superlattices of quantum stripes and quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Bianconi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   The Feshbach shape resonances in the interband pairing in superconducting superlattices of quantum wells or quantum stripes is shown to provide the mechanism for high Tc superconductivity. This mechanism provides the Tc amplification driven by the architecture of material: superlattices of quantum wells (intercalated graphite or diborides and superlattices of quantum stripes (doped high Tc cuprate perovskites where the chemical potential is tuned to a Van Hove-Lifshitz singularity (vHs in the electronic energy spectrum of the superlattice associated with the change of the Fermi surface dimensionality in one of the subbands.

  1. Results from a Pilot REU Program: Exploring the Cosmos Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.

    2017-01-01

    In the Summer of 2016 we conducted a 10-week pilot Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program aimed at increasing the participation of underrepresented minority undergraduate students in research using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This program utilized a distributed REU model, whereby students worked with SDSS scientists on exciting research projects while serving as members of a geographically distributed research community. The format of this REU is similar to that of the SDSS collaboration itself, and since this collaboration structure has become a model for the next generation of large scale astronomical surveys, the students participating in the SDSS REU received early exposure and familiarity with this approach to collaborative scientific research. The SDSS REU also provided the participants with a low-risk opportunity to audition for graduate schools and to explore opportunities afforded by a career as a research scientist. The six student participants were placed at SDSS REU host sites at the Center for Astrophysics at Harvard University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Portsmouth. Their research projects covered a broad range of topics related to stars, galaxies, and quasars, all making use of SDSS data. At the start of the summer the REU students participated in a week-long Boot Camp at NMSU, which served as a program orientation, an introduction to skills relevant to their research projects, and an opportunity for team-building and cohort-forming. To foster a sense of community among our distributed students throughout the summer, we conducted a weekly online meeting for all students in the program via virtual meeting tools. These virtual group meetings served two purposes: as a weekly check-in to find out how their projects were progressing, and to conduct professional development seminars on topics of interest and relevance to the REU participants. We discuss the outcomes of this

  2. Identification of 13 DB + dM and 2 DC + dM binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Besselaar, E. J. M. van den; Roelofs, G. H. A.; Nelemans, G.A.; Augusteijn, T.; Groot, P.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present the identification of 13 DB + dM binaries and 2 DC + dM binaries from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Before the SDSS only 2 DB + dM binaries and 1 DC + dM binary were known. At least three, possibly 8, of the new DB + dM binaries seem to have white dwarf temperatures well above 30000 K which would place them in the so called DB-gap. Finding these DB white dwarfs in binaries may suggest that they have formed through a different evolutionary channel than the ones in which DA wh...

  3. Separate Ways: The Mass-Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Heckman, T.; Blanc, G. A.; The MaNGA Team

    2017-07-01

    We present the integrated stellar mass-metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R eff) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  4. Separate Ways: The Mass–Metallicity Relation Does Not Strongly Correlate with Star Formation Rate in SDSS-IV MaNGA Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera-Ballesteros, J. K.; Heckman, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sánchez, S. F. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-264, 04510 México, D.F., México (Mexico); Blanc, G. A., E-mail: jbarrer3@jhu.edu [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Collaboration: MaNGA Team

    2017-07-20

    We present the integrated stellar mass–metallicity relation (MZR) for more than 1700 galaxies included in the integral field area SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. The spatially resolved data allow us to determine the metallicity at the same physical scale (effective radius, R {sub eff}) using a heterogeneous set of 10 abundance calibrators. In addition to scale factors, the shape of the MZR is similar for all calibrators, consistent with those reported previously using single-fiber and integral field spectroscopy. We compare the residuals of this relation against the star formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR). We do not find a strong secondary relation of the MZR with either SFR or sSFR for any of the calibrators, in contrast with previous single-fiber spectroscopic studies. Our results agree with a scenario in which metal enrichment happens at local scales, with global outflows playing a secondary role in shaping the chemistry of galaxies and cold-gas inflows regulating the stellar formation.

  5. The sloan lens acs survey. II. Stellar populations and internal structure of early-type lens galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treu, Tommaso; Koopmans, Léon V.; Bolton, Adam S.; Burles, Scott; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    2006-01-01

    We use HST images to derive effective radii and effective surface brightnesses of 15 early-type (E+S0) lens galaxies identified by the SLACS Survey. Our measurements are combined with stellar velocity dispersions from the SDSS database to investigate for the first time the distribution of lens

  6. Spectroscopic observation of Gaia17dht and Gaia17diu by NUTS (NOT Un-biased Transient Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, M.; Dyrbye, S.; Cappella, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) Unbiased Transient Survey (NUTS; ATel #8992) reports the spectroscopic classification of Gaia17dht/SN2017izz and Gaia17diu/SN2017jdb (in host galaxies SDSS J145121.24+283521.6 and LEDA 2753585 respectively).

  7. 2015 nationwide survey revealed Barley stripe mosaic virus in Korean barley fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    A seed-transmitted virus has consistently caused significant economic damage to barley crops in Korea in recent years, and may be increasing because many farmers save seed for replanting. Because some barley seed is imported, there is the potential for introduction of new seed-transmitted viruses, c...

  8. Genetics of adult plant stripe rust resistance in CSP44, a selection ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    areas of temperate zones (Johnson 1988). Yield losses can be considerable, ranging from about 40 per cent to com- plete destruction of the crop depending upon the growth stage at which the disease attacks. Using diverse genes for resistance against stripe rust disease is the most eco- nomical and environmentally safe ...

  9. Genetics of leaf and stripe rust resistance in a bread wheat cultivar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 87; Issue 2. Genetics of leaf and stripe rust resistance in a bread wheat cultivar Tonichi. Satinder Kaur U. K. Bansal Renu Khanna R. G. Saini. Research Note Volume 87 Issue 2 August 2008 pp 191-194 ...

  10. Spin-stripe phase in a frustrated zigzag spin-1/2 chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregelj, M.; Zorko, A.; Zaharko, O.; Nojiri, H.; Berger, H.; Chapon, L. C.; Arčon, D.

    2015-06-01

    Motifs of periodic modulations are encountered in a variety of natural systems, where at least two rival states are present. In strongly correlated electron systems, such behaviour has typically been associated with competition between short- and long-range interactions, for example, between exchange and dipole-dipole interactions in the case of ferromagnetic thin films. Here we show that spin-stripe textures may develop also in antiferromagnets, where long-range dipole-dipole magnetic interactions are absent. A comprehensive analysis of magnetic susceptibility, high-field magnetization, specific heat and neutron diffraction measurements unveils β-TeVO4 as a nearly perfect realization of a frustrated (zigzag) ferromagnetic spin-1/2 chain. Notably, a narrow spin-stripe phase develops at elevated magnetic fields due to weak frustrated short-range interchain exchange interactions, possibly assisted by the symmetry-allowed electric polarization. This concept provides an alternative route for the stripe formation in strongly correlated electron systems and may help understanding of other widespread, yet still elusive, stripe-related phenomena.

  11. Post-epizootic chronic dolphin morbillivirus infection in Mediterranean striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Sara; Alba, Ana; Ganges, Llilianne; Vidal, Enric; Raga, Juan Antonio; Alegre, Ferrán; González, Beatriz; Medina, Pascual; Zorrilla, Irene; Martínez, Jorge; Marco, Alberto; Pérez, Mónica; Pérez, Blanca; Pérez de Vargas Mesas, Ana; Martínez Valverde, Rosa; Domingo, Mariano

    2011-10-06

    Dolphin morbillivirus (DMV) has caused 2 epizootics with high mortality rates on the Spanish Mediterranean coast, in 1990 and 2006-07, mainly affecting striped dolphins Stenella coeruleoalba. Following the first epizootic unusual DMV infections affecting only the central nervous system of striped dolphins were found, with histological features similar to subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and old dog encephalitis, the chronic latent localised infections caused by defective forms of measles virus and canine distemper virus, respectively. Between 2008 and 2010, monitoring by microscopic and immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of 118 striped dolphins stranded along Catalonia, the Valencia Region and Andalusia showed similar localised DMV nervous system infections in 25.0, 28.6 and 27.4% of cases, respectively, with no significant differences among regions or sex. The body length of DMV-infected dolphins was statistically greater than that of non-infected dolphins (196.5 vs. 160.5 cm; p dolphins with positive IHC-DMV had positive PCR results. All 6 cases were positive with the 78 bp RT-PCR. These findings contraindicate the use of the 429 bp RT-PCR protocol based on the P gene to detect this specific form of DMV. DMV localised nervous infection constitutes the most relevant single cause of stranding and death in Mediterranean striped dolphins in the years following a DMV epizootic, and it might even overwhelm the effects of the epizootic itself, at least in 2007.

  12. Aerial Ultrasonic Source Using Stripe-Mode Transverse Vibrating Plate with Jutting Driving Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hikaru; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2009-07-01

    Ultrasonic sources using a stripe-mode rectangular transverse vibrating plate have been used as acoustic sources emitting intense acoustic waves in air. Because these sources are based on the resonance of transverse vibration, their electric-acoustic conversion rate is as high as 90%, which is a merit. In this study, a vibrating plate with a unique shape was developed to enhance the effectiveness of acoustic sources. It is called a stripe-mode transverse vibrating plate with a jutting driving point. The advantage of this plate shape is that the acoustic source does not interfere with the emission of acoustic waves since the driving point is outside the plate, and there is no need to distinguish between the front and back sides of the vibrating plate. The conditions effective for driving the stripe-mode transverse vibrating plate were clarified. That is, the length of the side parallel to the node lines of the plate is an odd number times the length between the nodes in the stripe mode, and the length of the side perpendicular is at least 6 times but not a multiple of 3 greater than or equal to 15 times, subtracted by 0.5 times, the length between the nodes. Moreover, the length between the driving point and the edge of the plate is a positive integer with a noninteger value of 0.9.

  13. Genetics of leaf and stripe rust resistance in a bread wheat cultivar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina (=P. recondita Rober- age ex Desmaz f. sp. tritici Eriks and E. Henn.) and stripe rust caused by P. striiformis Westend f. sp. tritici are the major foliar diseases of wheat, resulting in yield loss all over the world (Eversmeyer and Browder 1974; Kolmer 1996). The wheat cultivars become ...

  14. Variation in the timing of reproduction of the four-striped field mouse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We used the four-striped field mouse, Rhabdomys pumilio (Sparrmann, 1784), to test the hypothesis that reproduction in a small, short-lived mammal will be opportunistic, characterized by temporal and spatial variation in the timing of events, and only be inhibited under harsh and predictable winter conditions. Field mice ...

  15. Molecular mapping of a stripe rust resistance gene in wheat line C51

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stripe rust, a major disease in areas where cool temperatures prevail, can strongly influence grain yield. To control this disease, breeders have incorporated seedling resistance genes from a variety of sources outside the primary wheat gene pool. The wheat line C51, introduced from the International Center for Agricultural ...

  16. Mutual information of local field potentials distinguishes area-V2 stripe compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parajuli A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Arun Parajuli, Anastasia Eriksson, Daniel J Felleman Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Texas Medical School at Houston, Houston, TX, USA Purpose: Determining how information is represented by populations of neurons in different cortical areas is critical to our understanding of the brain mechanisms of visual perception. Recently, information-theoretical approaches have been applied to the analysis of spike trains of multiple neurons. However, other neurophysiological signals, such as local field potentials (LFPs, offer a different source of information worthy of investigating in this way. In this study, we investigate how the modular organization of area V2 of macaque monkeys impacts the information represented in LFPs. Materials and methods: LFPs were recorded from a 32-channel microelectrode array implanted in area V2 of an anesthetized macaque monkey. The electrode positions were recovered in histological tissue stained for cytochrome oxidase (CO to reveal the modular organization of V2. Visual stimuli consisted of a variety of moving gratings that differed in orientation, direction, spatial frequency, and chromatic content. Results: LFPs were separated into different frequency bands for analysis of mutual information as a function of stimulus type and CO-stripe location. High-γ-band LFPs revealed the highest information content across the electrode array. The distributions of total mutual information as well as mutual information due to correlations varied greatly by CO stripe. This analysis indicates that local correlations within each CO stripe generally reduce mutual information, whereas correlations between stripes greatly increase mutual information. Conclusion: The decomposition mutual information based on the power of different frequency bands of LFPs provides new insight into the impact of modular architecture on population coding in area V2. Unlike other cortical areas, such as V1, where mutual information based

  17. Diel behavior of adult striped bass using tailwater habitat as summer refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S.P.; Isely, J.J.

    2007-01-01

    General patterns of summer diel distribution and movement were identified for adult striped bass Morone saxatilis using tailwater habitat influenced by the diel operation cycle of a hydroelectric dam during the summers of 2003 and 2004. Striped bass distribution within the tailwater was similar during each diel-tracking event and across both summers. The majority of fish remained within the tailwater the entire summer; however, some made periodic excursions to and from the tailwater throughout the summer. Further, most striped bass were located within 0.5 km of Richard B. Russell Dam during all stages of operation on all occasions - probably because of the constant availability of optimal habitat during all three stages of operation on all diel-tracking events. The diel cycle of dam operation, which included pumped storage during each summer, did not degrade tailwater habitat below optimal conditions, according to summer habitat suitability index values for inland adult striped bass. Movement was significantly higher during hydroelectric generation operations than during no-generation and pumped storage periods in summer 2003; this difference was not apparent during summer 2004. Mean absolute movement peaked during hydroelectric generation on six of eight diel-tracking events. During both summers, movement was directed up-reservoir during no-generation and generation periods and down-reservoir during pumped storage. Mean total daily movement rates ranged from 0.59 to 4.04 km/d and were greater than those previously estimated from bimonthly sampling for this population. Total daily movement rate peaked during the first tracking event each summer and then declined as summer progressed. These findings suggest that hydroelectric discharges affect adult striped bass behavior, but the effects are not adverse as long as habitat is not degraded by hydroelectric facility operations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2007.

  18. Sustained eruptions on Enceladus explained by turbulent dissipation in tiger stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Edwin S; Rubin, Allan M

    2016-04-12

    Spacecraft observations suggest that the plumes of Saturn's moon Enceladus draw water from a subsurface ocean, but the sustainability of conduits linking ocean and surface is not understood. Observations show eruptions from "tiger stripe" fissures that are sustained (although tidally modulated) throughout each orbit, and since the 2005 discovery of the plumes. Peak plume flux lags peak tidal extension by ∼1 rad, suggestive of resonance. Here, we show that a model of the tiger stripes as tidally flexed slots that puncture the ice shell can simultaneously explain the persistence of the eruptions through the tidal cycle, the phase lag, and the total power output of the tiger stripe terrain, while suggesting that eruptions are maintained over geological timescales. The delay associated with flushing and refilling of O(1)-m-wide slots with ocean water causes erupted flux to lag tidal forcing and helps to buttress slots against closure, while tidally pumped in-slot flow leads to heating and mechanical disruption that staves off slot freezeout. Much narrower and much wider slots cannot be sustained. In the presence of long-lived slots, the 10(6)-y average power output of the tiger stripes is buffered by a feedback between ice melt-back and subsidence to O(10(10)) W, which is similar to observed power output, suggesting long-term stability. Turbulent dissipation makes testable predictions for the final flybys of Enceladus by Cassini Our model shows how open connections to an ocean can be reconciled with, and sustain, long-lived eruptions. Turbulent dissipation in long-lived slots helps maintain the ocean against freezing, maintains access by future Enceladus missions to ocean materials, and is plausibly the major energy source for tiger stripe activity.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: LCs & spectra of SDSS J1515+1511 lens system (Shalyapin+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalyapin, V. N.; Goicoechea, L. J.

    2017-09-01

    We conducted a photometric monitoring campaign of SDSS J1515+1511 from early February of 2014 to mid September of 2016, i.e., for 2.6yr with an average sampling rate of about two nights every week. All optical observations were performed with the 2.0m fully robotic Liverpool Telescope (LT) at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, Canary Islands (Spain). Deep long-slit spectra of SDSS J1515+1511 were obtained using the R500B and R500R grisms in the OSIRIS spectrograph on the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC). We took a single 1800s exposure with the blue grism (R500B) on 2015 April 15. We also observed the lens system with the red grism (R500R) on 2015 April 16. Hence, the new data cover a wavelength range of 3570-9250Å with a resolving power of ~300-400. We observed SDSS J1515+1511 with the SPRAT long-slit spectrograph on 2015 August 16 (red grating) and 2015 August 18 (blue). We have re-observed the system on 2016 March 17 (blue). (5 data files).

  20. Prevention of landfill pollution by multicriteria spatial decision support systems (MC-SDSS): development, implementation, and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshand, Afshin; Bafrani, Ali Hasani; Zahedipour, Mohammad; Mirbagheri, Seyed Ahmad; Ehtehsami, Majid

    2018-01-06

    Landfilling of municipal solid waste (MSW) is one of the serious environmental concerns as improper location of MSW landfill site can release the pollutants into the surrounding environment. The process of selecting MSW landfill site is a complicated decision making problem since it is subjected to simultaneous assessment of several environmental criteria, rules, and restrictions besides sociocultural and economic ones. The current study suggests a framework based on Multicriteria spatial decision support systems (MC-SDSS) to select landfill site. The MC-SDSS is an advanced method to integrate multiple criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and geographical information systems (GIS) techniques. This approach enables the incorporation of several conflicting objectives and preferences into spatial decision models. In this study, 14 criteria were chosen and then divided into environmental, sociocultural, and economic categories. Finally, suitability maps were generated based on the MC-SDSS analysis. The developed method was implemented in a real case study in Arak city in northwestern region of Iran, which is environmentally sensitive area. The suitability maps of the case study in Arak showed that 10% (391 km2) is least suitable area, 23% (942 km2) is low suitable, 37% (1507 km2) is moderate suitable, 19% (783 km2) is suitable, and 11% (489 km2) is most suitable locations for landfill site, and finally, three best alternative sites were introduced for the final landfill site.

  1. Lens Model and Time Delay Predictions for the Sextuply Lensed Quasar SDSS J2222+2745

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Dahle, Håkon; Florian, Michael K.; Gladders, Michael D.; Johnson, Traci L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Rigby, Jane R.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Eva

    2017-01-01

    SDSS J2222+2745 is a galaxy cluster at z = 0.49, strongly lensing a quasar at z = 2.805 into six widely separated images. In recent Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the field, we identify additional multiply lensed galaxies and confirm the sixth quasar image that was identified by Dahle et al. We used the Gemini-North telescope to measure a spectroscopic redshift of z = 4.56 of one of the lensed galaxies. These data are used to refine the lens model of SDSS J2222+2745, compute the time delay and magnifications of the lensed quasar images, and reconstruct the source image of the quasar host and a lensed galaxy at z = 2.3. This galaxy also appears in absorption in our Gemini spectra of the lensed quasar, at a projected distance of 34 kpc. Our model is in agreement with the recent time delay measurements of Dahle et al., who found τAB = 47.7 ± 6.0 days and τAC = -722 ± 24 days. We use the observed time delays to further constrain the model, and find that the model-predicted time delays of the three faint images of the quasar are τAD = 502 ± 68 days, τAE = 611 ± 75 days, and τAF = 415 ± 72 days. We have initiated a follow-up campaign to measure these time delays with Gemini North. Finally, we present initial results from an X-ray monitoring program with Swift, indicating the presence of hard X-ray emission from the lensed quasar, as well as extended X-ray emission from the cluster itself, which is consistent with the lensing mass measurement and the cluster velocity dispersion. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-13337.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: New SDSS and Washington photometry in Segue 3 (Hughes+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J.; Lacy, B.; Sakari, C.; Wallerstein, G.; Davis, C. E.; Schiefelbein, S.; Corrin, O.; Joudi, H.; Le, D.; Haynes, R. M.

    2017-10-01

    We used the Apache Point Observatory (APO) new Astrophysical Research Consortium Telescope Imaging Camera (ARCTIC) imager and the camera it replaced, Seaver Prototype Imaging camera (SPIcam) for our observations with the 3.5m telescope. The ARCTIC camera has a 4096*4096 STA chip giving 7.5'*7.5' as the FOV when the new 5-inch diameter circular filters are used. The older Washington filters are 3''*3'' and vigniette the FOV. SPIcam had a FOV of 4.8'*4.8'. We have several filter wheels that can handle up to ten 3*3 inch square filters (fewer in full-field mode), where binning 1*1 yields 0.11arcseconds/pixel. The fastest readout time in 2*2 binned mode is about 5s. The blue-UV sensitivity of ARCTIC is greater than that of SPIcam, which was a backside-illuminated SITe TK2048E 2048*2048 pixel CCD with 24 micron pixels, which we also binned (2*2), giving a plate scale of 0.28 arcsec per pixel. Where we combined the data sets, we binned ARCTIC 2*2 and slightly degraded its resolution. We found no irreducible color terms between frames taken with both imagers, internally. From 2013 to 2015, we had 11 half-nights total, and 102 frames had seeing better than 2'', many of which were under photometric conditions, and several nights had subarcsecond seeing. Some of the observations were repeated between SPIcam and ARCTIC, which served to test the new imager. We observed Seg 3 in the Washington filters (Canterna 1976AJ.....81..228C) C and T1 and SDSS ugri filters with both SPIcam and ARCTIC. The frames used are listed in Table1, the overlap between this paper and the Vr-data from Fadely et al. 2011 (Cat. J/AJ/142/88) (not the g and r mag values) and Ortolani et al. 2013 (Cat. J/MNRAS/433/1966) is detailed in Table2. Our photometry is presented in Table3 for all 218 objects detected in our field-of-view in CT1ugri-filters, where we required detections in all filters in order to produce spectral energy distributions (SEDs). We include the z-filter from SDSS DR13 and any 2MASS

  3. Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe

    OpenAIRE

    Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    © 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved. We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially resolved spectroscopy for ...

  4. X-ray resonant magnetic scattering study of magnetic stripe domains in a-GdFe thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, J.; Peters, J. F.; Toulemonde, O. M.; Dhesi, S. S.; Brookes, N. B.; Goedkoop, J. B.

    2006-09-01

    X-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) has been used to investigate the structure of magnetic stripe domain patterns in thin amorphous GdFe films. Under the influence of a perpendicular magnetic field, the scattered intensity displays a smooth transition from a structure factor of correlated stripes to the form factor of isolated domains. We derive a quite general expression that relates the total scattered intensity of XRMS to the absolute value of the magnetization. Furthermore, we compare our results for the domain period with domain theory. We obtain good agreement for prealigned stripes, but disorder tends to lead to an overestimation of the period measured with XRMS.

  5. The Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2012-12-28

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  6. Accretion disc mapping of the shortest period eclipsing binary SDSS J0926+36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlindwein, W.; Baptista, R.

    2014-10-01

    AM CVn stars are ultracompact binaries (P_{orb}probably as a reminiscence of a (in some cases undetected) previous outburst. Its eclipsing nature allows a unique opportunity to disentangle the emission from several different light sources, and to map the surface brightness distribution of its hydrogen-deficient accretion disc with the aid of maximum entropy eclipse mapping techniques. Here we report the eclipse mapping analysis of optical light curves of SDSS J0926+36, collected with the 2.4 m Liverpool Robotic Telescope, covering 20 orbits of the binary over 5 nights of observations between 2012 February and March. The object was in quiescence at all runs. Our data show no evidence of superhumps nor of orbital modulation due to anisotropic emission from a bright spot at disc rim. Accordingly, the average out-of-eclipse flux level is consistent with that of the superhump-subtracted previous light curves. We combined all runs to obtain an orbital light curve of improved S/N. The corresponding eclipse map shows a compact source at disc centre (T_{b}simeq 17000 K), a faint, cool accretion disc (˜ 4000 K) plus enhanced emission along the gas stream (˜ 6000 K) beyond the impact point at the outer disc rim, suggesting the occurrence of gas stream overflow at that epoch.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Red giant star sample from SDSS (Chen+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y. Q.; Zhao, G.; Carrell, K.; Zhao, J. K.; Tan, K. F.; Nissen, P. E.; Wei, P.

    2017-05-01

    Based on the SDSS DR9 database, we selected stars with (g-r)0 color in the range of 0.1 to 1.0 mag, and log g less than 3.5 dex for each metallicity bin ranging from [Fe/H]AJ....136.2022L, 2008, J/AJ/136/2050, 2011, J/AJ/141/90; Allende Prieto et al. 2008AJ....136.2070A; Smolinski et al. 2011, J/AJ/141/89). As described in Ahn et al. (2012ApJS..203...21A), the updated SSPP adopts a much-improved color-temperature relation from the InfraRed Flux Method Casagrande et al. (2010, J/A+A/512/A54), and the estimates of surface gravity and metallicity have been thoroughly recalibrated based on results from high-resolution observations. An estimate of the internal uncertainties of the SSPP is ~50 K for Teff, ~0.12 dex for log g, and ~0.10 dex for [Fe/H]. In order to avoid early-type stars, we limit the stars to have SSPP temperatures from 3000 K to 10000 K and a signal-to-noise ratio larger than 10. (1 data file).

  8. The properties of galaxy groups from the luminous red galaxies (LRGs) of SDSS DR6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin-Fa; He, Ji-Zhou; Wu, Ping; Liao, Qing-Hua

    2008-06-01

    Using an approximately volume-limited LRG sample of SDSS DR6, we investigate the basic properties of groups identified by Berlind et al. [A.A. Berlind, J. Frieman, D.H. Weinberg, et al., ApJS 167 (2006) 1] 's algorithm and Davis et al. [M. Davis, G. Efstathiou, C.S. Frenk, S.D.M. White, ApJ 292 (1985) 371]'s algorithm, respectively. It is found that the basic properties of groups strongly depend on the values of the linking parameters. Different group samples have mean physical parameters which are rather different. We may confess that there is no values for the linking lengths that will work perfectly for every sample. In addition, we note that the luminosity distribution of member galaxies of groups identified by different algorithms is nearly the same, but member galaxies of groups identified using the linking lengths b⊥=0.14, b=0.75 have a higher proportion of red galaxies and a lower proportion of blue galaxies than member galaxies of groups identified using the linking length b = 0.2.

  9. Zooming into local active galactic nuclei: the power of combining SDSS-IV MaNGA with higher resolution integral field unit observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Schnorr Müller, Allan; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Greene, Jenny E.; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Kelly, Michael; Liu, Guilin; Law, David R.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge K.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Thomas, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Ionized gas outflows driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are ubiquitous in high-luminosity AGN with outflow speeds apparently correlated with the total bolometric luminosity of the AGN. This empirical relation and theoretical work suggest that in the range Lbol ˜ 1043-45 erg s-1 there must exist a threshold luminosity above which the AGN becomes powerful enough to launch winds that will be able to escape the galaxy potential. In this paper, we present pilot observations of two AGN in this transitional range that were taken with the Gemini North Multi-Object Spectrograph integral field unit (IFU). Both sources have also previously been observed within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-IV (SDSS) Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey. While the MaNGA IFU maps probe the gas fields on galaxy-wide scales and show that some regions are dominated by AGN ionization, the new Gemini IFU data zoom into the centre with four times better spatial resolution. In the object with the lower Lbol we find evidence of a young or stalled biconical AGN-driven outflow where none was obvious at the MaNGA resolution. In the object with the higher Lbol we trace the large-scale biconical outflow into the nuclear region and connect the outflow from small to large scales. These observations suggest that AGN luminosity and galaxy potential are crucial in shaping wind launching and propagation in low-luminosity AGN. The transition from small and young outflows to galaxy-wide feedback can only be understood by combining large-scale IFU data that trace the galaxy velocity field with higher resolution, small-scale IFU maps.

  10. [Identification and classification of disease severity of wheat stripe rust using near infrared spectroscopy technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-long; Qin, Feng; Zhao, Long-lian; Li, Jun-hui; Ma, Zhan-hong; Wang, Hai-guang

    2015-02-01

    Wheat stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici, is an economically important disease in the world. It is of great significance to assess disease severity of wheat stripe rust quickly and accurately for monitoring and controlling the disease. In this study, wheat leaves infected with stripe rust pathogen under different severity levels were acquired through artificial inoculation in artificial climate chamber. Thirty wheat leaves with disease severity equal to 1%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% or 100% were picked out, respectively, and 30 healthy leaves were chosen as controls. A total of 270 wheat leaves were obtained and then their near infrared spectra were measured using MPA spectrometer. According to disease severity levels, 270 near infrared spectra were divided into 9 categories and each category included 30 spectra. From each category, 7 or 8 spectra were randomly chosen to make up the testing set that included 67 spectra. The remaining spectra were treated as the training set. A qualitative model for identification and classification of disease severity of wheat stripe rust was built using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) technology combined with discriminant partial least squares (DPLS). The effects of different preprocessing methods of obtained spectra, ratios between training sets and testing sets, and spectral ranges on qualitative recognition results of the model were investigated. The optimal model based on DPLS was built using cross verification method in the spectral region of 4000-9000 cm(-1) when "centralization" was used as the preprocessing method of spectra and the spectra were divided into the training set and the testing set with the ratio equal to 3:1. Accuracy rate of the training set was 95.57% and accuracy rate of the testing set was 97.01%. The results showed that good recognition performance could be acquired using the model based on DPLS. The results indicated that the method using near infrared reflectance

  11. Population Genetics of red striped mullet (Mullus surmuletus in Turkish Seas Based on Mitochondrial and Nuclear DNA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fevzi Bardakci

    2014-07-01

    This study was determined a preview of genetic structure of red striped mullet because of few sampling localities so a further study is would be useful to determine its population structure along its distribution area in detail.

  12. Optical discovery of probable stellar tidal discruption flares

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velzen, S.; Farrar, G.R.; Gezari, S.; Morrell, N.; Zaritsky, D.; Ostman, L.; Smith, M.; Gelfand, J.; Drake, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82), we have searched for the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black holes in non-active galaxies. Two candidate tidal disruption events (TDEs) are identified. The TDE flares have optical blackbody temperatures

  13. Galaxy-galaxy lensing constraints on the relation between baryons and dark matter in galaxies in the Red Sequence Cluster Survey 2

    OpenAIRE

    van Uitert, Edo; Hoekstra, Henk; Velander, Malin; Gilbank, David G.; Gladders, Michael D.; Yee, H. K. C.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a study of weak gravitational lensing by galaxies using imaging data that were obtained as part of the second Red Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS2). In order to compare to the baryonic properties of the lenses we focus here on the ~300 square degrees that overlap with the DR7 of the SDSS. The depth and image quality of the RCS2 enables us to significantly improve upon earlier work for luminous galaxies at z>=0.3. Comparison with dynamical masses from the SDSS shows a go...

  14. The physics of stripe patterns in turbulent channel flow determined by DNS results

    CERN Document Server

    Kiš, P; Herwig, H

    2015-01-01

    The turbulent flow in an infinitely extended plane channel is analysed by solving the Navier-Stokes equations with a DNS approach. Solutions are obtained in a numerical solution domain of finite size in the streamwise as well as in the lateral direction setting periodic boundary conditions in both directions. Their impact on large scale structures in the turbulent flow field is analysed carefully in order to avoid their suppression. When this is done appropriately well known stripe patterns in these flows can be observed and analysed especially with respect to their relative motion compared to the mean flow velocity. Various details of this stripe pattern dominated velocity field are shown. Also global parameters like the friction factor in the flow field and the Nusselt number in the temperature field are determined based on the statistics of the flow and temperature data in a very large time period that guarantees fully developed turbulent flow and heat transfer.

  15. Pigment cell interactions and differential xanthophore recruitment underlying zebrafish stripe reiteration and Danio pattern evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Larissa B; Bain, Emily J; Parichy, David M

    2014-11-06

    Fishes have diverse pigment patterns, yet mechanisms of pattern evolution remain poorly understood. In zebrafish, Danio rerio, pigment-cell autonomous interactions generate dark stripes of melanophores that alternate with light interstripes of xanthophores and iridophores. Here, we identify mechanisms underlying the evolution of a uniform pattern in D. albolineatus in which all three pigment cell classes are intermingled. We show that in this species xanthophores differentiate precociously over a wider area, and that cis regulatory evolution has increased expression of xanthogenic Colony Stimulating Factor-1 (Csf1). Expressing Csf1 similarly in D. rerio has cascading effects, driving the intermingling of all three pigment cell classes and resulting in the loss of stripes, as in D. albolineatus. Our results identify novel mechanisms of pattern development and illustrate how pattern diversity can be generated when a core network of pigment-cell autonomous interactions is coupled with changes in pigment cell differentiation.

  16. Angular dependent ferromagnetic resonance analysis in a single micron sized cobalt stripe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeppner, C.; Wagner, K.; Stienen, S.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.; Narkowicz, R.; Suter, D.; Lindner, J.

    2014-07-01

    We demonstrate how planar microresonators (PMRs) can be utilized to investigate the angular dependent magnetic resonance response of single magnetic nanostructures. In contrast to alternative detection schemes like electrical or optical detection, the PMR approach provides a classical means of investigating the high frequency dynamics of single magnetic entities, enabling the use of well-established analysis methods of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy. To demonstrate the performance of the PMR-based FMR setup for angular dependent measurements, we investigate the microwave excited magnons in a single Co stripe of 5 × 1 × 0.02 μm3 and compare the results to micromagnetic simulations. The evolution of excited magnons under rotation of one individual stripe with respect to a static magnetic field is investigated. Besides quasi uniform excitations, we observe magneto-static as well as localized excitations. We find a strong influence of inhomogeneous dynamic and static demagnetizing fields for all modes.

  17. Effect of an electric field on the properties of BN Möbius stripes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos de Melo, J. [Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Azevedo, S., E-mail: sazevedo@fisica.ufpb.br [Departamento de Física, CCEN, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-900 João Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Kaschny, J.R. [Instituto Federal da Bahia, Campus Vitória da Conquista, Av. Amazonas 3150, 45075-265 Vitória da conquista, BA (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    In the present work, we present a first-principles study on the effects of an external electric field on the structural stability and electronic properties of boron nitride Möbius stripes with armchair and zigzag chirality. The calculation results indicate that the gap energy can be remarkably reduced by the application of an external field. Such reduction is in principle attributed to the occurrence of Stark effect, which significance depends on the orientation of the applied field relative to the stripe axis. Moreover, the electric field produces significant changes on dipole momentum of the structure and induces a negative shift on the calculated total energy, reducing the obtained formation energy. - Highlights: • The gap energy is remarkably reduced by the application of an external field. • The electric field produces significant changes on dipole momentum. • The field induces a negative shift on the total energy due to Stark effect.

  18. Stripe order in the underdoped region of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao; Chung, Chia-Min; Corboz, Philippe; Ehlers, Georg; Qin, Ming-Pu; Noack, Reinhard M.; Shi, Hao; White, Steven R.; Zhang, Shiwei; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2017-12-01

    Competing inhomogeneous orders are a central feature of correlated electron materials, including the high-temperature superconductors. The two-dimensional Hubbard model serves as the canonical microscopic physical model for such systems. Multiple orders have been proposed in the underdoped part of the phase diagram, which corresponds to a regime of maximum numerical difficulty. By combining the latest numerical methods in exhaustive simulations, we uncover the ordering in the underdoped ground state. We find a stripe order that has a highly compressible wavelength on an energy scale of a few kelvin, with wavelength fluctuations coupled to pairing order. The favored filled stripe order is different from that seen in real materials. Our results demonstrate the power of modern numerical methods to solve microscopic models, even in challenging settings.

  19. Effect of the tiger stripes on the deformation of Saturn's moon Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souček, Ondřej; Hron, Jaroslav; Běhounková, Marie; Čadek, Ondřej

    2016-07-01

    Enceladus is a small icy moon of Saturn with active jets of water emanating from fractures around the south pole, informally called tiger stripes, which might be connected to a subsurface water ocean. The effect of these features on periodic tidal deformation of the moon has so far been neglected because of the difficulties associated with implementation of faults in continuum mechanics models. Here we estimate the maximum possible impact of the tiger stripes on tidal deformation and heat production within Enceladus's ice shell by representing them as narrow zones with negligible frictional and bulk resistance passing vertically through the whole ice shell. Assuming a uniform ice shell thickness of 25 km, consistent with the recent estimate of libration, we demonstrate that the faults can dramatically change the distribution of stress and strain in Enceladus's south polar region, leading to a significant increase of the heat production in this area.

  20. The external and middle ear of the striped dolphin Stenella coeruleoalba (Meyen 1833).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassu, R; Cozzi, B

    2007-06-01

    The ear of cetaceans, and especially the middle ear, is very different from that of terrestrial mammals and shows specific adaptations to diving. Our research, performed on six Striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded along the Italian coasts of the Mediterranean Sea, concentrated on the morphology of the external and middle ear of this species. We report the findings using a proper Veterinary Anatomical Nomenclature and describe the characteristics of the auditory meatus of the external ear and the presence and morphology of the erectile tissue in the middle ear. Our anatomical and histological data highlight the structure and possible functions of the corpus cavernosum located in the middle ear of the Striped dolphin, and suggest a possible role for this structure in relation to pressure regulation during diving. Many of our observations indicate the existence of an internal regulatory system able to prevent barotraumas by regulating pressure and volume inside the middle ear cavity.

  1. Systemic herpesvirus and morbillivirus co-infection in a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, S; González, B; Willoughby, K; Maley, M; Olvera, A; Kennedy, S; Marco, A; Domingo, M

    2012-01-01

    During 2007 a dolphin morbillivirus epizootic affected the western Mediterranean and several striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded on the Catalonian coasts. One of those animals had severe lymphoid depletion, necrosis and syncytial formation in lymph nodes and spleen, with large basophilic nuclear inclusions compatible with herpesvirus detected by immunohistochemical and ultrastructural examination. Non-suppurative encephalitis with associated morbillivirus antigen and morbillivirus antigen within alveolar macrophages were also observed. A pan-herpesvirus nested polymerase chain reaction amplified a sequence virtually identical to two cetacean herpesvirus sequences previously identified in systemic infections in an Atlantic Cuvier's beaked whale (Ziphius cavirostris) and in a Mediterranean striped dolphin. The herpesviral infection was probably secondary to the immunosuppression caused by the morbillivirus. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a cetacean co-infected by dolphin morbillivirus and herpesvirus with evidence of lesions attributable to both viruses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Linearly enhanced response of thermopower in cascaded array of dual-stripe single-metal thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Han, Danhong; Yang, Fan; Wang, Zhenhai; Pi, Yudan; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shengyong

    2017-05-01

    Based on the width dependence of thermopower, cascaded single-metal thermocouples were demonstrated in this report. The cascaded thermocouples were made from 100 nm thick Ni films with a 100 μm wide stripe and a 5 μm narrow stripe. The experiment results showed a linearly enhanced response of thermopower. The 64-cascaded thermocouple achieved an equivalent Seebeck coefficient of up to 55.69 μV/K, which is higher than that of a commercial type-K thermocouple (39.6 μV/K). The single-metal thermocouples were also fabricated on flexible substrates. With the simple fabrication process and remarkable temperature sensing ability, the cascaded single-metal thermocouples may find promising applications in temperature measurement of modern flexible electronic products and wearable devices.

  3. The X-Shooter Lens Survey - I. Dark matter domination and a Salpeter-type initial mass function in a massive early-type galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spiniello, C.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Trager, S. C.; Czoske, O.; Treu, T.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first results from the X-Shooter Lens Survey: an analysis of the massive early-type galaxy SDSS J1148+1930 at redshift z= 0.444. We combine its extended kinematic profile derived from spectra obtained with X-Shooter on the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope with strong

  4. Serially homologous engrailed stripes are generated via different cell lineages in the germ band of amphipod crustaceans (Malacostraca, Peracarida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, G; Patel, N H; Dohle, W

    1994-09-01

    A monoclonal antibody (mAb 4D9) was used to analyze engrailed expression in amphipod embryos. As in other arthropods, engrailed is expressed in iterated transverse stripes in the germ band. In the anterior region these stripes are generated without a recognizable division pattern, and their appearance and formation show some irregularities. In the posterior region of the germ band, engrailed expression is correlated with a stereotyped cell division pattern resulting in a highly ordered formation and array of stripes. The engrailed positive cells mark the anterior border of genealogical units, which therefore can be compared with parasegments in Drosophila. Expression starts in the mandibular segment and proceeds first anteriorly and subsequently in a posterior direction. Initial stripes are one cell wide. The widening of stripes is caused by both division of engrailed positive cells and recruitment of new cells that did not previously express engrailed. The widening process is related to segment formation as the intersegmental furrows are established behind the engrailed expressing cells, which are restricted to the posterior portion of the forming segments. A comparison of the modes of engrailed expression in different segments suggests that initial engrailed expression is independent of a certain cell lineage or division pattern. The comparison of the development of the early engrailed stripes in different insects and crustaceans reveals some similarities which show that early engrailed expression is not necessarily clonally inherited.

  5. A study of chiral magnetic stripe domains within an in-plane virtual magnetic field using SPLEEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Yang, Mengmeng; Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas; Dong, Qiaoyan; Wu, Yizheng; Hwang, Chanyong; Li, Jia; Qiu, Ziqiang

    Stripe domains form in magnetic thin films at the spin reorientation transition. Different from the typical Bloch type domain walls (DW), it was found recently that Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (DMI) could lead to chiral Néel type DMs in the stripe domain phase. While the application of an out-of-plane magnetic field is known to break the stripes into skyrmions, it is unclear how the chiral stripe phase would respond to an in-plane magnetic field? Here we report an experimental study on Fe/Ni/Cu/Co/Cu(001) system using spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM). In this system, the Fe/Ni layer exhibits stripe domains with chiral Néel type DMs and its interlayer coupling to Co across the Cu spacer layer serves as an in-plane virtual magnetic field whose strength can be tuned by changing the Cu spacer layer thickness. We find the in-plane field aligns the stripes parallel to the field direction. Increasing the in-plane field strength gradually changes the Néel type DWs into Bloch type DWs. However, it is surprising the adjacent Néel DWs behave asymmetrically in-response to the in-plane magnetic field, suggesting a topological effect in switching the chiral Néel DWs to the non-chiral Bloch DWs.

  6. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenewald, John H.; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W.; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-young; Seo, Sung S. Ambrose

    2017-01-04

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr2IrO4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials.

  7. Mapping genes for resistance to stripe rust in spring wheat landrace PI 480035.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinita Sthapit Kandel

    Full Text Available Stripe rust caused by Puccinia striiformis Westend. f. sp. tritici Erikks. is an economically important disease of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.. Hexaploid spring wheat landrace PI 480035 was highly resistant to stripe rust in the field in Washington during 2011 and 2012. The objective of this research was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL for stripe rust resistance in PI 480035. A spring wheat, "Avocet Susceptible" (AvS, was crossed with PI 480035 to develop a biparental population of 110 recombinant inbred lines (RIL. The population was evaluated in the field in 2013 and 2014 and seedling reactions were examined against three races (PSTv-14, PSTv-37, and PSTv-40 of the pathogen under controlled conditions. The population was genotyped with genotyping-by-sequencing and microsatellite markers across the whole wheat genome. A major QTL, QYr.wrsggl1-1BS was identified on chromosome 1B. The closest flanking markers were Xgwm273, Xgwm11, and Xbarc187 1.01 cM distal to QYr.wrsggl1-1BS, Xcfd59 0.59 cM proximal and XA365 3.19 cM proximal to QYr.wrsggl1-1BS. Another QTL, QYr.wrsggl1-3B, was identified on 3B, which was significant only for PSTv-40 and was not significant in the field, indicating it confers a race-specific resistance. Comparison with markers associated with previously reported Yr genes on 1B (Yr64, Yr65, and YrH52 indicated that QYr.wrsggl1-1BS is potentially a novel stripe rust resistance gene that can be incorporated into modern breeding materials, along with other all-stage and adult-plant resistance genes to develop cultivars that can provide durable resistance.

  8. Sustained eruptions on Enceladus explained by turbulent dissipation in tiger stripes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kite, Edwin S.; Rubin, Allan M.

    2016-04-01

    Spacecraft observations suggest that the plumes of Saturn’s moon Enceladus draw water from a subsurface ocean, but the sustainability of conduits linking ocean and surface is not understood. Observations show eruptions from “tiger stripe” fissures that are sustained (although tidally modulated) throughout each orbit, and since the 2005 discovery of the plumes. Peak plume flux lags peak tidal extension by ˜1 rad, suggestive of resonance. Here, we show that a model of the tiger stripes as tidally flexed slots that puncture the ice shell can simultaneously explain the persistence of the eruptions through the tidal cycle, the phase lag, and the total power output of the tiger stripe terrain, while suggesting that eruptions are maintained over geological timescales. The delay associated with flushing and refilling of O(1)-m-wide slots with ocean water causes erupted flux to lag tidal forcing and helps to buttress slots against closure, while tidally pumped in-slot flow leads to heating and mechanical disruption that staves off slot freezeout. Much narrower and much wider slots cannot be sustained. In the presence of long-lived slots, the 106-y average power output of the tiger stripes is buffered by a feedback between ice melt-back and subsidence to O(1010) W, which is similar to observed power output, suggesting long-term stability. Turbulent dissipation makes testable predictions for the final flybys of Enceladus by Cassini. Our model shows how open connections to an ocean can be reconciled with, and sustain, long-lived eruptions. Turbulent dissipation in long-lived slots helps maintain the ocean against freezing, maintains access by future Enceladus missions to ocean materials, and is plausibly the major energy source for tiger stripe activity.

  9. Neuronal and astrocytic involvement in striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) with morbilliviral encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucá, R; Giacominelli-Stuffler, R; Mazzariol, S; Roperto, S; Cocumelli, C; DI Guardo, G

    2017-01-01

    Dolphin morbillivirus (DMV), a highly pathogenic agent, may cause peculiar, "brain-only" forms of infection (BOFDI), in which viral antigen and/or genome is found exclusively in the brain from striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba). These BOFDIs show morphopathological similarities with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and old dog encephalitis (ODE) in measles virus-infected patients and in canine distemper virus-infected dogs, respectively. The brain tissue from 3 BOFDI-affected striped dolphins was investigated by means of double labelling-indirect immunofluorescence (DL-IIF) and ultrastructurally, in order to characterize the DMV-targeted neuronal and non-neuronal cell populations, along with the associated submicroscopic findings. Viral colonization of calbindin-immunoreactive (IR) and nitric oxide synthase-IR neurons was detected in the cerebral parenchyma from the 3 DMV-infected dolphins under study, associated with nuclear (chromatin) and cytoplasmic (mitochondrial) ultrastructural changes. Furthermore, a limited viral targeting of brain astrocytes was found in these animals, all of which exhibited a prominent astrogliosis/astrocytosis. To the best of our knowledge, those herein reported should be the first submicroscopic pathology and neuropathogenetic data about BOFDI in striped dolphins. In this respect, the marked astrogliosis/astrocytosis and the low viral colonization of brain astrocytes in the 3 DMV-infected dolphins under investigation are of interest from the comparative pathology and viral neuropathogenesis standpoints, when compared with ODE-affected dogs, in whose brain a non-cytolytic, astrocyte-to-astrocyte infectious spread has been recently documented. Further studies aimed at characterizing the complex DMV-host interactions in BOFDI-affected striped dolphins are needed.

  10. A histological and NMR study of the melon of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scano, P; Maxia, C; Maggiani, F; Crnjar, R; Lai, A; Sirigu, P

    2005-03-01

    The melon, the echolocation organ of the striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba), was investigated by morphological and high-resolution (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, in order to characterize structure and composition gradient at the histological and molecular level. Morphological analysis showed that the lipidic components are organized in an adipose tissue; moreover, a clear muscular component was observed. Age-related structural differences also were noted. Furthermore, NMR yielded detailed information at a qualitative-quantitative level on the lipid components.

  11. Experimental and numerical analysis of thermal striping in automotive brake discs

    OpenAIRE

    Augustins, L; Hild, Francois; Billardon, R; Boudevin, S

    2017-01-01

    International audience; In the present study, thermal striping development on friction bands of brake discs is investigated through an experimental and numerical analysis. A test consisting of a series of several hundred severe brakings was carried out on a specific bench at PSA Peugeot Citroën. The experimental observations of the crack network evolution and a numerical analysis of a brake disc with a single crack helped to propose a macroscopic criterion capable of predicting the criticalit...

  12. Summer habitat selection by striped bass, Morone Saxatilis, in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waddle, H.R.; Coutant, C.C.; Wilson, J.L.

    1980-02-01

    Summer habitat selection patterns of 18 adult striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Cherokee Reservoir were monitored with externally attached temperature-sensing acoustic or radio transmitters from June through September 1977. Mortalities of adult striped bass in this reservoir were hypothesized to be related to high summer temperatures and low dissolved oxygen (DO). The inhabited areas or refuges differed from noninhabited areas by maintaining temperatures less than or equal to 22 C and DO concentrations greater than 5 mg/liter. Total water hardness, pH, and water transparency were not significantly different among refuges and noninhabited areas. Movement of fish outside refuges occurred more frequently and for longer periods during June when the summer pattern of high temperatures and low DO was less severe. Fish experienced temperatures between 15 and 27 C with mean temperatures of individuals ranging from 18.5 to 22.0 C. Several tagged fish migrated outside the refuges and selected the lowest available temperature, generally near 21 C, even though DO concentrations at these temperatures were 3 mg/liter or less. Long-term survival of tagged and nontagged fish outside refuges was undetermined because no fish were tracked outside a refuge for more than 12 days without being lost. This study indicates that temperature strongly influences the behavior of striped bass and that adults of this species may have a thermal preferendum of approximately 21 C.

  13. Polarization of high-energy emission in a pulsar striped wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétri, Jérôme; Kirk, John

    2008-02-01

    Recent observations of the polarization of the optical pulses from the Crab pulsar motivated detailed comparative studies of the emission predicted by the polar cap, the outer gap and the two-pole caustics models. In this work, we study the polarization properties of the synchrotron emission emanating from the striped wind model. We use an explicit asymptotic solution for the large-scale field structure related to the oblique split monopole and valid for the case of an ultra-relativistic plasma. This is combined with a crude model for the emissivity of the striped wind and of the magnetic field within the dissipating stripes themselves. We calculate the polarization properties of the high-energy pulsed emission and compare our results with optical observations of the Crab pulsar. The resulting radiation is linearly polarized. In the off-pulse region, the electric vector lies in the direction of the projection on the sky of the rotation axis of the pulsar, in good agreement with the data. Other properties such as a reduced degree of polarization and a characteristic sweep of the polarization angle within the pulses are also reproduced.

  14. Polarisation Of High-Energy Emission In A Pulsar Striped Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petri, J. A.; Kirk, J. G.

    2006-08-01

    Recent observations of the polarisation of the optical pulses from the Crab pulsar (Kanbach et al. 2005, AIP Proceedings, astro-ph/0511636) motivated detailed comparative studies of the emission predicted by the polar cap, the outer gap and the two-pole caustics models. In this work, we study the polarisation properties of the synchrotron emission emanating from the striped wind model. We use an explicit asymptotic solution for the large-scale field structure related to the oblique split monopole and valid for the case of an ultrarelativistic plasma (Bogovalov, A&A, 1999, 349, 1017). This is combined with a crude model for the emissivity of the striped wind and of the magnetic field within the dissipating stripes themselves. We calculate the polarisation properties of the high-energy pulsed emission and compare our results with optical observations of the Crab pulsar. The resulting radiation is linearly polarized. In the off-pulse region, the electric vector lies in the direction of the projection on the sky of the rotation axis of the pulsar, in good agreement with the data. Other properties such as a reduced degree of polarisation and a characteristic sweep of the polarisation angle within the pulses are also reproduced (Petri & Kirk, ApJ Letters, 2005, 627, L37).

  15. Reduction of Uncorrelated Striping Noise—Applications for Hyperspectral Pushbroom Acquisitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rogass

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral images are of increasing importance in remote sensing applications. Imaging spectrometers provide semi-continuous spectra that can be used for physics based surface cover material identification and quantification. Preceding radiometric calibrations serve as a basis for the transformation of measured signals into physics based units such as radiance. Pushbroom sensors collect incident radiation by at least one detector array utilizing the photoelectric effect. Temporal variations of the detector characteristics that differ with foregoing radiometric calibration cause visually perceptible along-track stripes in the at-sensor radiance data that aggravate succeeding image-based analyses. Especially, variations of the thermally induced dark current dominate and have to be reduced. In this work, a new approach is presented that efficiently reduces dark current related stripe noise. It integrates an across-effect gradient minimization principle. The performance has been evaluated using artificially degraded whiskbroom (reference and real pushbroom acquisitions from EO-1 Hyperion and AISA DUAL that are significantly covered by stripe noise. A set of quality indicators has been used for the accuracy assessment. They clearly show that the new approach outperforms a limited set of tested state-of-the-art approaches and achieves a very high accuracy related to ground-truth for selected tests. It may substitute recent algorithms in the Reduction of Miscalibration Effects (ROME framework that is broadly used to reduce radiometric miscalibrations of pushbroom data takes.

  16. Characterization of cysteine protease-like genes in the striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhao-Yu; Wan, Pin-Jun; Li, Guo-Qing; Xia, Yong-Gui; Han, Zhao-Jun

    2014-02-01

    The striped rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis (Walker), is a major pest for rice production in China and the rest of Southeast Asia. Chemical control is the main means to alleviate losses due to this pest, which causes serious environmental pollution. An effective and environmentally friendly approach is needed for the management of the striped rice stem borer. Cysteine proteases in insects could be useful targets for pest management either through engineering plant protease inhibitors, targeting insect digestive cysteine proteases, or through RNA interference-based silencing of cysteine proteases, disrupting developmental regulation of insects. In this study, eight cysteine protease-like genes were identified and partially characterized. The genes CCO2 and CCL4 were exclusively expressed in the larval gut, and their expression was affected by the state of nutrition in the insect. The expression of CCL2, CCL3, and CCO1 was significantly affected by the type of host plant, suggesting a role in host plant - insect interactions. Our initial characterization of the striped rice stem borer cysteine protease-like genes provides a foundation for further research on this important group of genes in this major insect pest of rice.

  17. The microbiome of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Vitorino, Filipa; Rodriguez-Hilario, Arnold; Alves, Ana Luísa; Gonçalves, Filipa; Cabrera-Colon, Beatriz; Mesquita, Cristina Sousa; Soares-Castro, Pedro; Ferreira, Marisa; Marçalo, Ana; Vingada, José; Eira, Catarina; Santos, Pedro Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Infectious diseases with epizootic consequences have not been fully studied in marine mammals. Presently, the unprecedented depth of sequencing, made available by high-throughput approaches, allows detailed comparisons of the microbiome in health and disease. This is the first report of the striped dolphin microbiome in different body sites. Samples from one striped female edematous dolphin were acquired from a variety of body niches, including the blowhole, oral cavity, oral mucosa, tongue, stomach, intestines and genital mucosa. Detailed 16S rRNA analysis of over half a million sequences identified 235 OTUs. Beta diversity analyses indicated that microbial communities vary in structure and cluster by sample origin. Pathogenic, Gram-negative, facultative and obligate anaerobic taxa were significantly detected, including Cetobacterium, Fusobacterium and Ureaplasma. Phocoenobacter and Arcobacter dominated the oral-type samples, while Cardiobacteriaceae and Vibrio were associated with the blowhole and Photobacterium were abundant in the gut. We report for the first time the association of Epulopiscium with a marine mammal gut. The striped dolphin microbiota shows variation in structure and diversity according to the organ type. The high dominance of Gram-negative anaerobic pathogens evidences a cetacean microbiome affected by human-related bacteria. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. SDSS-IV MaNGA - the spatially resolved transition from star formation to quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfiore, Francesco; Maiolino, Roberto; Maraston, Claudia; Emsellem, Eric; Bershady, Matthew A.; Masters, Karen L.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Boquien, Médéric; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Drory, Niv; Heckman, Timothy M.; Law, David R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Oravetz, Audrey; Pan, Kaike; Roman-Lopes, Alexandre; Thomas, Daniel; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Yan, Renbin

    2017-04-01

    Using spatially resolved spectroscopy from SDSS-IV MaNGA we have demonstrated that low ionization emission-line regions (LIERs) in local galaxies result from photoionization by hot evolved stars, not active galactic nuclei, hence tracing galactic region hosting old stellar population where, despite the presence of ionized gas, star formation is no longer occurring. LIERs are ubiquitous in both quiescent galaxies and in the central regions of galaxies where star formation takes place at larger radii. We refer to these two classes of galaxies as extended LIER (eLIER) and central LIER (cLIER) galaxies, respectively. cLIERs are late-type galaxies primarily spread across the green valley, in the transition region between the star formation main sequence and quiescent galaxies. These galaxies display regular disc rotation in both stars and gas, although featuring a higher central stellar velocity dispersion than star-forming galaxies of the same mass. cLIERs are consistent with being slowly quenched inside-out; the transformation is associated with massive bulges, pointing towards the importance of bulge growth via secular evolution. eLIERs are morphologically early types and are indistinguishable from passive galaxies devoid of line emission in terms of their stellar populations, morphology and central stellar velocity dispersion. Ionized gas in eLIERs shows both disturbed and disc-like kinematics. When a large-scale flow/rotation is observed in the gas, it is often misaligned relative to the stellar component. These features indicate that eLIERs are passive galaxies harbouring a residual cold gas component, acquired mostly via external accretion. Importantly, quiescent galaxies devoid of line emission reside in denser environments and have significantly higher satellite fraction than eLIERs. Environmental effects thus represent the likely cause for the existence of line-less galaxies on the red sequence.

  19. Gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310: microlensing factory and time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    We spectroscopically re-observed the gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310 using OSIRIS on the GTC. We also monitored the r-band variability of the two quasar images (A and B) with the LT over 143 epochs in the period 2009-2016. These new data in both the wavelength and time domains have confirmed that the system is an unusual microlensing factory. The C iv emission line is remarkably microlensed, since the microlensing magnification of B relative to that for A, μBA, reaches a value of 1.4 ( 0.4 mag) for its core. Moreover, the B image shows a red wing enhancement of C iv flux (relative to A), and μBA = 2 (0.75 mag) for the C iv broad-line emission. Regarding the nuclear continuum, we find a chromatic behaviour of μBA, which roughly varies from 5 (1.75 mag) at 7000 Å to 6 (1.95 mag) at 4000 Å. We also detect significant microlensing variability in the r band, and this includes a number of microlensing events on timescales of 50-100 d. Fortunately, the presence of an intrinsic 0.7 mag dip in the light curves of A and B, permitted us to measure the time delay between both quasar images. This delay is ΔtAB = 47 d (1σ confidence interval; A is leading), in good agreement with predictions of lens models. Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A77

  20. Time Delay Measurements for the Cluster-lensed Sextuple Quasar SDSS J2222+2745

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, H.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Bayliss, M. B.; Rigby, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    We report first results from an ongoing monitoring campaign to measure time delays between the six images of the quasar SDSS J2222+2745, gravitationally lensed by a galaxy cluster. The time delay between A and B, the two most highly magnified images, is measured to be {τ }{{AB}}=47.7+/- 6.0 days (95% confidence interval), consistent with previous model predictions for this lens system. The strong intrinsic variability of the quasar also allows us to derive a time delay value of {τ }{{CA}}=722+/- 24 days between image C and A, in spite of modest overlap between their light curves in the current data set. Image C, which is predicted to lead all the other lensed quasar images, has undergone a sharp, monotonic flux increase of 60%-75% during 2014. A corresponding brightening is firmly predicted to occur in images A and B during 2016. The amplitude of this rise indicates that time delays involving all six known images in this system, including those of the demagnified central images D-F, will be obtainable from further ground-based monitoring of this system during the next few years. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, and including observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologi´a e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens Sample from the Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Oguri, Masamune; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Shin, Min-Su; /Michigan U. /Princeton U. Observ.; Kayo, Issha; /Tokyo U., ICRR; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; /UC, Berkeley /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Morokuma, Tomoki; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan; Becker, Robert H.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; White, Richard L.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; /Ohio State U.; Gregg, Michael D.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Exeter U.

    2010-05-01

    We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i < 19.1 in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1 < {theta} < 20 and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, 3 have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.84{sub -0.08}{sup +0.06}(stat.){sub -0.07}{sup + 0.09}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of 7 binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.1 to 16.6, which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.

  2. The STRIPES trial--support to rural India's public education system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eble, Alex; Mann, Vera; Bhakta, Preetha; Lakshminarayana, Rashmi; Frost, Chris; Elbourne, Diana; Boone, Peter

    2010-02-01

    Performance of primary school students in India lags far below government expectations, and major disparity exists between rural and urban areas. The Naandi Foundation has designed and implemented a programme using community members to deliver after-school academic support for children in over 1,100 schools in five Indian states. Assessments to date suggest that it might have a substantial effect. This trial aims to evaluate the impact of this programme in villages of rural Andhra Pradesh and will compare test scores for children in three arms: a control and two intervention arms. In both intervention arms additional after-school instruction and learning materials will be offered to all eligible children and in one arm girls will also receive an additional 'kit' with a uniform and clothes. The trial is a cluster-randomised controlled trial conducted in conjunction with the CHAMPION trial. In the CHAMPION trial 464 villages were randomised so that half receive health interventions aiming to reduce neonatal mortality. STRIPES will be introduced in those CHAMPION villages which have a public primary school attended by at least 15 students at the time of a baseline test in 2008. 214 villages of the 464 were found to fulfil above criteria, 107 belonging to the control and 107 to the intervention arm of the CHAMPION trial. These latter 107 villages will serve as control villages in the STRIPES trial. A further randomisation will be carried out within the 107 STRIPES intervention villages allocating half to receive an additional kit for girls on the top of the instruction and learning materials. The primary outcome of the trial is a composite maths and language test score. The study is designed to measure (i) whether the educational intervention affects the exam score of children compared to the control arm, (ii) if the exam scores of girls who receive the additional kit are different from those of girls living in the other STRIPES intervention arm. One of the goals of

  3. Carbon-enhanced Metal-poor Stars in SDSS/SEGUE. I. Carbon Abundance Estimation and Frequency of CEMP Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Sun [NMSU, Las Cruces; Beers, Timothy C. [Michigan State U., JINA; Masseron, Thomas [Brussels U.; Plez, Bertrand [U. Montpellier 2, LUPM; Rockosi, Constance M. [Lick Observ.; Sobeck, Jennifer [Chicago U.; Yanny, Brian [Fermilab; Lucatello, Sara [Padua Observ.; Sivarani, Thirupathi [Bangalore, Indian Inst. Astrophys.; Placco, Vinicius M. [Sao Paulo U., IAG; Carollo, Daniela [Macquarie U.

    2013-10-17

    We describe a method for the determination of stellar [C/Fe] abundance ratios using low-resolution (R = 2000) stellar spectra from the SDSS and SEGUE. By means of a star-by-star comparison with a set of SDSS/SEGUE spectra with available estimates of [C/Fe] based on published high-resolution analyses, we demonstrate that we can measure [C/Fe] from SDSS/SEGUE spectra with S/N > 15 to a precision better than 0.35 dex. Using the measured carbon-to-iron abundance ratios obtained by this technique, we derive the frequency of carbon-enhanced stars ([C/Fe] > +0.7) as a function of [Fe/H], for both the SDSS/SEGUE stars and other samples from the literature. We find that the differential frequency slowly rises from almost zero to about 14% at [Fe/H] ~ -2.4, followed by a sudden increase, by about a factor of three, to 39% from [Fe/H] ~ -2.4 to [Fe/H] ~ -3.7. We also examine how the cumulative frequency of CEMP stars varies across different luminosity classes. The giant sample exhibits a cumulative CEMP frequency of 32% for [Fe/H] < -2.5, 31% for [Fe/H] < -3.0, and 33% for [Fe/H] < -3.5. For the main-sequence turnoff stars, we obtain a lower cumulative CEMP frequency, around 10% for [Fe/H] < -2.5. The dwarf population displays a large change in the cumulative frequency for CEMP stars below [Fe/H] = -2.5, jumping from 15% for [Fe/H] < -2.5 to about 75% for [Fe/H] < -3.0. When we impose a restriction with respect to distance from the Galactic mid-plane (|Z| < 5 kpc), the frequency of the CEMP giants does not increase at low metallicity ([Fe/H] < -2.5), but rather, decreases, due to the dilution of C-rich material in stars that have undergone mixing with CNO-processed material from their interiors. The frequency of CEMP stars near the main-sequence turnoff, which are not expected to have experienced mixing, increases for [Fe/H] < -3.0. [abridged

  4. Chemical Cartography in the Milky Way with SDSS/APOGEE: Multi-element abundances and abundance ratio variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Jon A.; Hasselquist, Sten; Johnson, Jennifer; Bird, Jonathan C.; Majewski, Steven R.; SDSS/APOGEE Team

    2017-01-01

    The SDSS/APOGEE project is measuring abundances of multiple elements for several hundred thousand stars across the Milky Way. These allow the mapping of abundances and abundance ratio variations. Results will be presented for multiple abundance ratios across of the Galactic disk. The interpretation of mean abundance maps is complicated by variations in star formation history across the disk and by changing abundance ratios that result from an overall metallicity gradient. Variations in chemical abundance sequences, however, show the potential for using abundance ratios to track the movement of stars through the disk, and provide key information for constraining Galaxy formation and chemical evolution models.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Distant clusters of galaxies in the 2XMM/SDSS (Rabitz+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, A.; Lamer, G.; Schwope, A.; Takey, A.

    2017-07-01

    Positions and redshifts of the fields with spectroscopic follow-up with the LBT. The astrometry is based on the SDSS. We give redshifts based on LBT/MODS observations. Optical magnitudes were measured using SExtractor's ISO-mag on LBT/LBC imaging in the SLOAN-r and SLOAN-z filters. The errors for the magnitudes are given in extra columns, the redshift is printed out to the last two significant digits (except for stars). A flag indicates the affiliation and/or the astronomical classification of the object. (1 data file).

  6. Novel Low Cost Organic Vapor Jet Printing of Striped High Efficiency Phosphorescent OLEDs for White Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Hack

    2008-12-31

    In this program, Universal Display Corporation and University of Michigan proposed to integrate three innovative concepts to meet the DOE's Solid State Lighting (SSL) goals: (1) high-efficiency phosphorescent organic light emitting device (PHOLED{trademark}) technology, (2) a white lighting design that is based on a series of red, green and blue OLED stripes, and (3) the use of a novel cost-effective, high rate, mask-less deposition process called organic vapor jet printing (OVJP). Our PHOLED technology offers up to four-times higher power efficiency than other OLED approaches for general lighting. We believe that one of the most promising approaches to maximizing the efficiency of OLED lighting sources is to produce stripes of the three primary colors at such a pitch (200-500 {mu}m) that they appear as a uniform white light to an observer greater than 1 meter (m) away from the illumination source. Earlier work from a SBIR Phase 1 entitled 'White Illumination Sources Using Striped Phosphorescent OLEDs' suggests that stripe widths of less than 500 {mu}m appear uniform from a distance of 1m without the need for an external diffuser. In this program, we intend to combine continued advances in this PHOLED technology with the striped RGB lighting design to demonstrate a high-efficiency, white lighting source. Using this background technology, the team has focused on developing and demonstrating the novel cost-effective OVJP process to fabricate these high-efficiency white PHOLED light sources. Because this groundbreaking OVJP process is a direct printing approach that enables the OLED stripes to be printed without a shadow mask, OVJP offers very high material utilization and high throughput without the costs and wastage associated with a shadow mask (i.e. the waste of material that deposits on the shadow mask itself). As a direct printing technique, OVJP also has the potential to offer ultra-high deposition rates (> 1,000 Angstroms/second) for any size or

  7. SDSS IV MaNGA: Deep observations of extra-planar, diffuse ionized gas around late-type galaxies from stacked IFU spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A.; Kauffmann, G.; D'Souza, R.; Bizyaev, D.; Law, D.; Haffner, L.; Bahé, Y.; Andrews, B.; Bershady, M.; Brownstein, J.; Bundy, K.; Cherinka, B.; Diamond-Stanic, A.; Drory, N.; Riffel, R. A.; Sánchez, S. F.; Thomas, D.; Wake, D.; Yan, R.; Zhang, K.

    2017-03-01

    We have conducted a study of extra-planar diffuse ionized gas using the first year data from the MaNGA IFU survey. We have stacked spectra from 49 edge-on, late-type galaxies as a function of distance from the midplane of the galaxy. With this technique we can detect the bright emission lines Hα, Hβ, [O II]λλ3726, 3729, [O III]λ5007, [N II]λλ6549, 6584, and [S II]λλ6717, 6731 out to about 4 kpc above the midplane. With 16 galaxies we can extend this analysis out to about 9 kpc, I.e. a distance of 2Re, vertically from the midplane. In the halo, the surface brightnesses of the [O II] and Hα emission lines are comparable, unlike in the disk where Hα dominates. When we split the sample by specific star-formation rate, concentration index, and stellar mass, each subsample's emission line surface brightness profiles and ratios differ, indicating that extra-planar gas properties can vary. The emission line surface brightnesses of the gas around high specific star-formation rate galaxies are higher at all distances, and the line ratios are closer to ratios characteristic of H II regions compared with low specific star-formation rate galaxies. The less concentrated and lower stellar mass samples exhibit line ratios that are more like H II regions at larger distances than their more concentrated and higher stellar mass counterparts. The largest difference between different subsamples occurs when the galaxies are split by stellar mass. We additionally infer that gas far from the midplane in more massive galaxies has the highest temperatures and steepest radial temperature gradients based on their [N II]/Hα and [O II]/Hα ratios between the disk and the halo. SDSS IV.

  8. SDSS-IV MaNGA: Spatially resolved star formation histories in galaxies as a function of galaxy mass and type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, D.; Thomas, D.; Maraston, C.; Westfall, K.; Etherington, J.; Riffel, R.; Mallmann, N. D.; Zheng, Z.; Argudo-Fernández, M.; Lian, J.; Bershady, M.; Bundy, K.; Drory, N.; Law, D.; Yan, R.; Wake, D.; Weijmans, A.; Bizyaev, D.; Brownstein, J.; Lane, R. R.; Maiolino, R.; Masters, K.; Merrifield, M.; Nitschelm, C.; Pan, K.; Roman-Lopes, A.; Storchi-Bergmann, T.; Schneider, D. P.

    2017-04-01

    We study the internal gradients of stellar population properties within 1.5 Re for a representative sample of 721 galaxies, with stellar masses ranging between 109 M⊙ and 1011.5 M⊙ from the SDSS-IV MaNGA Integral-Field-Unit survey. Through the use of our full spectral fitting code firefly, we derive light- and mass-weighted stellar population properties and their radial gradients, as well as full star formation and metal enrichment histories. We also quantify the impact that different stellar population models and full spectral fitting routines have on the derived stellar population properties and the radial gradient measurements. In our analysis, we find that age gradients tend to be shallow for both early-type and late-type galaxies. Mass-weighted age gradients of early-types arepositive (˜0.09 dex/Re) pointing to 'outside-in' progression of star formation, while late-type galaxies have negative light-weighted age gradients (˜-0.11 dex/Re), suggesting an 'inside-out' formation of discs. We detect negative metallicity gradients in both early- and late-type galaxies, but these are significantly steeper in late-types, suggesting that the radial dependence of chemical enrichment processes and the effect of gas inflow and metal transport are far more pronounced in discs. Metallicity gradients of both morphological classes correlate with galaxy mass, with negative metallicity gradients becoming steeper with increasing galaxy mass. The correlation with mass is stronger for late-type galaxies, with a slope of d(∇[Z/H])/d(log M) ˜ -0.2 ± 0.05 , compared to d(∇[Z/H])/d(log M) ˜ -0.05 ± 0.05 for early-types. This result suggests that the merger history plays a relatively small role in shaping metallicity gradients of galaxies.

  9. Seasonal differential expression of KiSS-1/GPR54 in the striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) among different tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Laixiang; Xue, Huiliang; Li, Shenning; Xu, Jinhui; Chen, Lei

    2017-05-01

    Kisspeptins and G protein coupled receptor (GPR54) play significant roles in regulating reproductive activity among seasonally reproductive animals; however, the mechanisms of KiSS-1 and GPR54 gene affecting the seasonal reproduction in striped hamster are still unknown. In this study, real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed to examine the expression profiles of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in the hypothalamus, ovaries, testes, uterus and epididymis of striped hamsters across 4 different seasons. Our results showed that, across different seasons, the KiSS-1 expression mode of male striped hamsters and the GPR54 expression mode of female striped hamsters were consistent with the seasonal photoperiod in the hypothalamus. Meanwhile, across different seasons, the expression profile of KiSS-1 in the testes and the GPR54 expression profile of male striped hamsters in the hypothalamus were consistent with the intensity of their seasonal reproductive activity. Among different tissues, the expression trend for GPR54 is consistent across 4 seasons, while that for KiSS-1 is tissue-dependent. The expression trend for GPR54 across 4 seasons is the same regardless of gender, while that for KiSS-1 is dramatically different and sex-dependent across different seasons. These results suggest that the expressions of KiSS-1 and GPR54 in the striped hamsters were regulated by complicated mechanisms, and the regulatory mechanisms in the striped hamsters are seasonal-dependent and sex-dependent. This research will provide a theoretical basis for studying how KiSS-1 and GPR54 affect seasonal reproduction and the mechanisms behind their influence. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Assessing the Effects of Suomi NPP VIIRS M15/M16 Detector Radiometric Stability and Relative Spectral Response Variation on Striping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern satellite radiometers have many detectors with different relative spectral response (RSR. Effect of RSR differences on striping and the root cause of striping in sensor data record (SDR radiance and brightness temperature products have not been well studied. A previous study used MODTRAN radiative transfer model (RTM to analyze striping. In this study, we make efforts to find the possible root causes of striping. Line-by-Line RTM (LBLRTM is used to evaluate the effect of RSR difference on striping and the atmospheric dependency for VIIRS bands M15 and M16. The results show that previous study using MODTRAN is repeatable: the striping is related to the difference between band-averaged and detector-level RSR, and the BT difference has some atmospheric dependency. We also analyzed VIIRS earth view (EV data with several striping index methods. Since the EV data is complex, we further analyze the onboard calibration data. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test shows that the noise along track direction is the major reason for striping. We also found evidence of correlation between solar diffuser (SD and blackbody (BB for detector 1 in M15. Digital Count Restoration (DCR and detector instability are possibly related to the striping in SD and EV data, but further analysis is needed. These findings can potentially lead to further SDR processing improvements.

  11. Keck DEIMOS Spectroscopy of a GALEX UV-Selected Sample from the Medium Imaging Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, Ryan P.; Rich, R. Michael; Salim, Samir; Small, Todd; Charlot, Stephane; Seibert, Mark; Wyder, Ted; Barlow, Tom A.; Forster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G.; Martin, D. Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G.; Schiminovich, David; Bianchi, Luciana; Donas, José; Heckman, Timothy M.; Lee, Young-Wook; Madore, Barry F.; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, Alex S.; Welsh, Barry Y.; Yi, Sukyoung

    2007-12-01

    We report results from a pilot program to obtain spectroscopy for objects detected in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Medium Imaging Survey (MIS). Our study examines the properties of galaxies detected by GALEX fainter than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic survey. This is the first study to extend the techniques of Salim and coworkers to estimate stellar masses, star formation rates (SFRs), and the b (star formation history) parameter for star-forming galaxies out to z~0.7. We obtain redshifts for 50 GALEX MIS sources reaching NUV=23.9 (AB mag) having counterparts in the SDSS Data Release 4 (DR4). Of our sample, 43 are star-forming galaxies with z1 are QSOs, 3 of which are not previously cataloged. We compare our sample to a much larger sample of ~50,000 matched GALEX/SDSS galaxies with SDSS spectroscopy; while our survey is shallow, the optical counterparts to our sources reach ~3 mag fainter in SDSS r than the SDSS spectroscopic sample. We use emission-line diagnostics for the galaxies to determine that the sample contains mostly star-forming galaxies. The galaxies in the sample populate the blue sequence in the NUV-r versus Mr color-magnitude diagram. The derived stellar masses of the galaxies range from 108 to 1011 Msolar, and derived SFRs are between 10-1 and 102 Msolar yr-1. Our sample has SFRs, luminosities, and velocity dispersions that are similar to the samples of faint compact blue galaxies studied previously in the same redshift range by Koo and collaborators, Guzmán and collaborators, and Phillips and collaborators. However, our sample is ~2 mag fainter in surface brightness than the compact blue galaxies. We find that the star formation histories for a majority of the galaxies are consistent with a recent starburst within the last 100 Myr. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of

  12. An Improved Photometric Calibration of the Sloan Digital SkySurvey Imaging Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brewington, Howard J.; Gunn, JamesE.; Harvanek, Michael; Hogg, David W.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Johnston, David; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S.J.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; Neilsen Jr., Eric H.; Nitta, Atsuko; Loomis, Craig; Lupton,Robert H.; Roweis, Sam; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tucker, Douglas L.

    2007-09-30

    We present an algorithm to photometrically calibrate widefield optical imaging surveys, that simultaneously solves for thecalibration parameters and relative stellar fluxes using overlappingobservations. The algorithm decouples the problem of "relative"calibrations from that of "absolute" calibrations; the absolutecalibration is reduced to determining a few numbers for the entiresurvey. We pay special attention to the spatial structure of thecalibration errors, allowing one to isolate particular error modes indownstream analyses. Applying this to the SloanDigital Sky Survey imagingdata, we achieve ~;1 percent relative calibration errors across 8500sq.deg/ in griz; the errors are ~;2 percent for the u band. These errorsare dominated by unmodelled atmospheric variations at Apache PointObservatory. These calibrations, dubbed ubercalibration, are now publicwith SDSS Data Release 6, and will be a part of subsequent SDSS datareleases.

  13. Post-common envelope binaries from SDSS - XVI. Long orbital period systems and the energy budget of common envelope evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Zorotovic, M.; Schreiber, M. R.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Southworth, J.; Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Tappert, C.; Koester, D.; Pyrzas, S.; Papadaki, C.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Schwope, A.; Toloza, O.

    2012-06-01

    Virtually all close compact binary stars are formed through common envelope (CE) evolution. It is generally accepted that during this crucial evolutionary phase a fraction of the orbital energy is used to expel the envelope. However, it is unclear whether additional sources of energy, such as the recombination energy of the envelope, play an important role. Here we report the discovery of the second and third longest orbital period post-common envelope binaries (PCEBs) containing white dwarf (WD) primaries, i.e. SDSS J121130.94-024954.4 (? d) and SDSS J222108.45+002927.7 (? d), reconstruct their evolutionary history and discuss the implications for the energy budget of CE evolution. We find that, despite their long orbital periods, the evolution of both systems can still be understood without incorporating recombination energy, although at least small contributions of this additional energy seem to be likely. If recombination energy significantly contributes to the ejection of the envelope, more PCEBs with relatively long orbital periods (? d) harbouring massive WDs (?) should exist.

  14. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Ensemble Spectroscopic Variability of Quasar Broad Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mouyuan; Trump, Jonathan R.; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle; Denney, Kelly D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-09-01

    We explore the variability of quasars in the Mg ii and {{H}}β broad emission lines and ultraviolet/optical continuum emission using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM). This is the largest spectroscopic study of quasar variability to date: our study includes 29 spectroscopic epochs from SDSS-RM over 6 months, containing 357 quasars with Mg ii and 41 quasars with {{H}}β . On longer timescales, the study is also supplemented with two-epoch data from SDSS-I/II. The SDSS-I/II data include an additional 2854 quasars with Mg ii and 572 quasars with {{H}}β . The Mg ii emission line is significantly variable ({{Δ }}f/f∼ 10% on ∼100-day timescales), a necessary prerequisite for its use for reverberation mapping studies. The data also confirm that continuum variability increases with timescale and decreases with luminosity, and the continuum light curves are consistent with a damped random-walk model on rest-frame timescales of ≳ 5 days. We compare the emission-line and continuum variability to investigate the structure of the broad-line region. Broad-line variability shows a shallower increase with timescale compared to the continuum emission, demonstrating that the broad-line transfer function is not a δ-function. {{H}}β is more variable than Mg ii (roughly by a factor of ∼1.5), suggesting different excitation mechanisms, optical depths and/or geometrical configuration for each emission line. The ensemble spectroscopic variability measurements enabled by the SDSS-RM project have important consequences for future studies of reverberation mapping and black hole mass estimation of 1\\lt z\\lt 2 quasars.

  15. Mass and Environment as Drivers of Galaxy Evolution in SDSS and zCOSMOS and the Origin of the Schechter Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ying-jie; Lilly, Simon J.; Kovač, Katarina; Bolzonella, Micol; Pozzetti, Lucia; Renzini, Alvio; Zamorani, Gianni; Ilbert, Olivier; Knobel, Christian; Iovino, Angela; Maier, Christian; Cucciati, Olga; Tasca, Lidia; Carollo, C. Marcella; Silverman, John; Kampczyk, Pawel; de Ravel, Loic; Sanders, David; Scoville, Nicholas; Contini, Thierry; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Scodeggio, Marco; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Le Fèvre, Olivier; Bardelli, Sandro; Bongiorno, Angela; Caputi, Karina; Coppa, Graziano; de la Torre, Sylvain; Franzetti, Paolo; Garilli, Bianca; Lamareille, Fabrice; Le Borgne, Jean-Francois; Le Brun, Vincent; Mignoli, Marco; Perez Montero, Enrique; Pello, Roser; Ricciardelli, Elena; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tresse, Laurence; Vergani, Daniela; Welikala, Niraj; Zucca, Elena; Oesch, Pascal; Abbas, Ummi; Barnes, Luke; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Bottini, Dario; Cappi, Alberto; Cassata, Paolo; Cimatti, Andrea; Fumana, Marco; Hasinger, Gunther; Koekemoer, Anton; Leauthaud, Alexei; Maccagni, Dario; Marinoni, Christian; McCracken, Henry; Memeo, Pierdomenico; Meneux, Baptiste; Nair, Preethi; Porciani, Cristiano; Presotto, Valentina; Scaramella, Roberto

    2010-09-01

    We explore the simple inter-relationships between mass, star formation rate, and environment in the SDSS, zCOSMOS, and other deep surveys. We take a purely empirical approach in identifying those features of galaxy evolution that are demanded by the data and then explore the analytic consequences of these. We show that the differential effects of mass and environment are completely separable to z ~ 1, leading to the idea of two distinct processes of "mass quenching" and "environment quenching." The effect of environment quenching, at fixed over-density, evidently does not change with epoch to z ~ 1 in zCOSMOS, suggesting that the environment quenching occurs as large-scale structure develops in the universe, probably through the cessation of star formation in 30%-70% of satellite galaxies. In contrast, mass quenching appears to be a more dynamic process, governed by a quenching rate. We show that the observed constancy of the Schechter M* and αs for star-forming galaxies demands that the quenching of galaxies around and above M* must follow a rate that is statistically proportional to their star formation rates (or closely mimic such a dependence). We then postulate that this simple mass-quenching law in fact holds over a much broader range of stellar mass (2 dex) and cosmic time. We show that the combination of these two quenching processes, plus some additional quenching due to merging naturally produces (1) a quasi-static single Schechter mass function for star-forming galaxies with an exponential cutoff at a value M* that is set uniquely by the constant of proportionality between the star formation and mass quenching rates and (2) a double Schechter function for passive galaxies with two components. The dominant component (at high masses) is produced by mass quenching and has exactly the same M* as the star-forming galaxies but a faint end slope that differs by Δαs ~ 1. The other component is produced by environment effects and has the same M* and αs as the

  16. transparent, a gene affecting stripe formation in Zebrafish, encodes the mitochondrial protein Mpv17 that is required for iridophore survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Krauss

    2013-06-01

    In the skin of adult zebrafish, three pigment cell types arrange into alternating horizontal stripes, melanophores in dark stripes, xanthophores in light interstripes and iridophores in both stripes and interstripes. The analysis of mutants and regeneration studies revealed that this pattern depends on interactions between melanophores and xanthophores; however, the role of iridophores in this process is less understood. We describe the adult viable and fertile mutant transparent (tra, which shows a loss or strong reduction of iridophores throughout larval and adult stages. In addition, in adults only the number of melanophores is strongly reduced, and stripes break up into spots. Stripes in the fins are normal. By cell transplantations we show that tra acts cell-autonomously in iridophores, whereas the reduction in melanophores in the body occurs secondarily as a consequence of iridophore loss. We conclude that differentiated iridophores are required for the accumulation and maintenance of melanophores during pigment pattern formation. The tra mutant phenotype is caused by a small deletion in mpv17, an ubiquituously expressed gene whose protein product, like its mammalian and yeast homologs, localizes to mitochondria. Iridophore death might be the result of mitochondrial dysfunction, consistent with the mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome observed in mammalian mpv17 mutants. The specificity of the tra phenotype is most likely due to redundancy after gene multiplication, making this mutant a valuable model to understand the molecular function of Mpv17 in mitochondria.

  17. Magnetization dynamics of weak stripe domains in Fe–N thin films: a multi-technique complementary approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, I. S.; Tacchi, S.; Garnier, L.-C.; Eddrief, M.; Fortuna, F.; Carlotti, G.; Marangolo, M.

    2017-11-01

    The resonant eigenmodes of an α‧-FeN thin film characterized by weak stripe domains are investigated by Brillouin light scattering and broadband ferromagnetic resonance experiments, assisted by micromagnetic simulations. The spectrum of the dynamic eigenmodes in the presence of the weak stripes is very rich and two different families of modes can be selectively detected using different techniques or different experimental configurations. Attention is paid to the evolution of the mode frequencies and spatial profiles under the application of an external magnetic field, of variable intensity, in the direction parallel or transverse to the stripes. The different evolution of the modes with the external magnetic field is accompanied by a distinctive spatial localization in specific regions, such as the closure domains at the surface of the stripes and the bulk domains localized in the inner part of the stripes. The complementarity of BLS and FMR techniques, based on different selection rules, is found to be a fruitful tool for the study of the wealth of localized magnetic excitations generally found in nanostructures.

  18. Strong lens search in the ESO public Survey KiDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Napolitano, N. R.; Covone, G.; Roy, N.; Tortora, C.; Barbera, F. La; Radovich, M.; Getman, F.; Capaccioli, M.; Colonna, A.; Paolillo, M.; Kleijn, G. A. Verdoes; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Valentijn, E; Napolitano, Nicola R.; Longo, Giuseppe; Marconi, Marcella; Paolillo, Maurizio; Lodice, Enrichetta

    2015-01-01

    We have started a systematic search for strong lens candidates in the ESO public survey KiDS based on the visual inspection of massive galaxies in the redshift range 0. 1 < z < 0. 5. As a pilot program we have inspected 100 deg2, which overlap with SDSS and where there are known lenses to use as a

  19. A large volume striped bass egg incubation chamber: design and comparison with a traditional method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    I conducted a comparative study of a new jar design (experimental chamber) with a standard egg incubation vessel (McDonald jar). Experimental chambers measured 0.4 m in diameter by 1.3 m in height and had a volume of 200 L. McDonald hatching jars measured 16 cm in diameter by 45 cm in height and had a volume of 6 L. Post-hatch survival was estimated at 48, 96 and 144 h. Stocking rates resulted in an average egg density of 21.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 21.6 – 22.1) for McDonald jars and 10.9 eggs ml-1 (range = 7.0 – 16.8) for experimental chambers. I was unable to detect an effect of container type on survival to 48, 96 or 144 h. At 144 h striped bass fry survival averaged 37.3% for McDonald jars and 34.2% for experimental chambers. Survival among replicates was significantly different. Survival of striped bass significantly decreased between 96 and 144 h. Mean survival among replicates ranged from 12.4 to 57.3%. I was unable to detect an effect of initial stocking density on survival. Experimental jars allow for incubation of a larger number of eggs in a much smaller space. As hatchery production is often limited by space or water supply, experimental chambers offer an alternative to extending spawning activities, thereby reducing manpower and cost. However, the increase in the number of eggs per rearing container does increase the risk associated with catastrophic loss of a production unit. I conclude the experimental chamber is suitable for striped bass egg incubation.

  20. Isolation and characterization of mycobacteria from striped bass Morone saxatilis from the Chesapeake Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, M.W.; Kator, H.; Kaattari, I.; Gauthier, D.; Vogelbein, W.; Ottinger, C.A.

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in striped bass Morone saxatilis of Chesapeake Bay, USA, was first diagnosed in 1997 based on the presence of granulomatous inflammation and acid-fast bacteria in skin and spleen. To confirm histopathology, bacteriological detection and identification of mycobacteria were begun using splenic tissue from fish with and without skin ulcerations. On the basis of initial studies using a variety of selective and nonselective media, decontamination, homogenization and incubation conditions, a simple and quantitative recovery method using aseptic necropsy of splenic tissue was developed. Optimal recovery was obtained by spread-plating homogenates on Middlebrook 7H10 agar with incubation for 3 mo at 23??C. Mycobacteria were recovered from 76% (n = 149/196) of fish examined. Mycobacterial densities exceeded 104 colony forming units??g tissue-1 in 38% of samples (n = 63/168) that were examined using a quantitative approach. The most frequently recovered mycobacterium, present in 57% (n = 109/192) of characterized samples, was the recently named new species Mycobacterium shottsii. Polyinfections of M. shottsii and other mycobacteria were observed in 25% of samples (n = 47/192) with densities of M. shottsii usually 1 or more orders of magnitude higher than co-isolate(s). Other mycobacteria recovered included isolates that, based on phenotypic traits, resembled M. interjectum, M. marinum, M. scrofulaceum, M. szulgai and M. triplex. M. marinum, commonly associated with fish mycobacteriosis and human disease, was recovered infrequently (3%, n = 6/192). The presence of multiple mycobacterial types occurring at high densities suggests that a variety of mycobacteria could be causative agents of mycobacteriosis in striped bass from the Chesapeake Bay. Striped bass is the major recreational fish species in the Chesapeake Bay, and the significance of the current epizootic to human health and the potential adverse effects on fish stocks are not known.

  1. Gill remodelling and growth rate of striped catfish Pangasianodon hypophthalmus under impact of hypoxia and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phuong, Le My; Huong, Do Thi Thanh; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2016-01-01

    Gill morphometric and gill plasticity of the air-breathing striped catfish (Pangasianodon hypophthalmus) exposed to different temperatures (present day 27 °C and future 33 °C) and different air saturation levels (92% and 35%) during 6 weeks were investigated using vertical sections to estimate th...... was almost eliminated in the 27 °C normoxic group, with other groups intermediate. In addition, elevated temperature had an astounding effect on growth with the 33 °C group growing nearly 8-fold faster than the 27 °C fish....

  2. Isolation and characterization of 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers from striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, C M; Harrison, J S; Edmands, S

    2009-11-01

    We present the isolation and characterization of 10 microsatellite loci for striped marlin, Tetrapturus audax. Thirty individuals from each of four locations revealed that all loci were polymorphic with two to 31 alleles per locus. Observed levels of heterozygosity ranged from 0.3000 to 0.9667. Significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were detected in two loci, TA105 in Hawaii and New Zealand and TA155 in Hawaii, and null alleles may be present in loci TA105 and TA155 in those locations, and in locus TA193 in Mexico. No significant linkage disequilibrium was detected in any pairwise-locus comparison. © 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Stripes and antiphase boundaries in CaFe2O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Chris; Rodriguez, Efrain; Green, Mark; Lee, Nara; Cheong, S.-W.

    2015-03-01

    We report on the magnetic structure and spin dynamics in CaFe2O4 based upon an orthorhombic structure. The magnetic structure consists of two competing magnetic phases based upon stripes of S =5/2 Fe3+ ions. The magnetic dynamics illustrate that the coupling is primarily two dimensional. On application of a magnetic field, antiphase magnetic boundaries can be introduced into the lattice and frozen in at low temperatures. We investigate the structure and dynamics of these domains using polarized and unpolarized neutron scattering and discuss how the triangular geometry allow these localized defects to be energetically favorable. Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland, Royal Society, and EPSRC.

  4. Engineering 1D Quantum Stripes from Superlattices of 2D Layered Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenewald, John H; Kim, Jungho; Kim, Heung Sik; Johnson, Jared M; Hwang, Jinwoo; Souri, Maryam; Terzic, Jasminka; Chang, Seo Hyoung; Said, Ayman; Brill, Joseph W; Cao, Gang; Kee, Hae-Young; Seo, Sung S Ambrose

    2017-01-01

    Dimensional tunability from two dimensions to one dimension is demonstrated for the first time using an artificial superlattice method in synthesizing 1D stripes from 2D layered materials. The 1D confinement of layered Sr 2 IrO 4 induces distinct 1D quantum-confined electronic states, as observed from optical spectroscopy and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering. This 1D superlattice approach is generalizable to a wide range of layered materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Effective Hamiltonian for striped and paired states at the half-filled Landau level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Nobuki

    2001-03-01

    We study a pairing mechanism for the quantum Hall system using a mean field theory with a basis on the von Neumann lattice, on which the magnetic translations commute. In the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov approximation, we solve the gap equation for spin-polarized electrons at the half-filled Landau levels. We obtain an effective Hamiltonian which shows a continuous transition from the compressible striped state to the paired state. Furthermore, a crossover occurs in the pairing phase. The energy spectrum and energy gap of the quasiparticle in the paired state is calculated numerically at the half-filled second Landau level.

  6. IGF-I and branchial IGF receptor expression and localization during salinity acclimation in striped bass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian Kølbaek; Luckenbach, John Adam; Madsen, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    The initial response of the IGF-I system and the expression and cellular localization of IGF type-I receptor (IGF-IR) were studied in the gill of a euryhaline teleost during salinity acclimation. Exposure of striped bass (Morone saxatilis) to hyperosmotic and hypoosmotic challenges induced small...... in either plasma IGF-I, liver, or gill IGF-I mRNA, or gill IGF-IR mRNA levels. In a separate experiment, FW-acclimated fish were injected with saline or IGF-I prior to a 24-h SW challenge. Rapid regain of osmotic balance following SW transfer was hindered by IGF-I. Immunohistochemistry revealed...

  7. New components in defensive secretion of the striped skunk,Mephitis mephitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W F

    1990-06-01

    GC-MS analysis of the anal sac secretion of the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis), shows seven major components: (E)-2-butene-1-thiol, 3-methyl-1-butanethiol, S-(E)-2-butenyl thioacetate,S-3-methylbutanyl thioacetate, 2-methylquinoline, 2-quinolinemethanethiol, andS-2-quinolinemethyl thioacetate. The following compounds previously reported from this secretion could not be confirmed: bis(2-butenyl) sulfide, (E)-2-Butenyl methyl disuffide, (E)-2-butenyl propyl sulfide, butyl 3-methylbutyl disulfide, and 2-butenyl butyl disulfide.

  8. Electronic structure of a striped nickelate studied by the exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE) approach

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlögl, Udo

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by a RIXS study of Wakimoto, et al.(Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 157001) we use density functional theory to analyze the magnetic order in the nickelate La5/3Sr1/3NiO4 and the details of its crystal and electronic structure. We compare the generalized gradient approximation to the hybrid functional approach of exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE). In contrast to the former, the latter reproduces the insulating state of the compound and the midgap states. The EECE approach, in general, appears to be appropriate for describing stripe phases in systems with orbital degrees of freedom. Copyright © EPLA, 2009.

  9. Isolation of Clostridium tertium from a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) in the Adriatic Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Branka; Gomercić, Martina Duras; Naglić, Tomo; Gomercić, Tomislav; Galov, Ana; Gomercić, Hrvoje

    2006-07-01

    Bacteriologic examination of an abscess found between blubber and musculature of a striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba) found dead on 30 March 2002 in the Adriatic Sea, Croatia, was performed and an aerotolerant, nontoxogenic Clostridium tertium was isolated in pure culture. National Collections of Industrial Food and Marine Bacteria (NCIMB Ltd., Aberdeen, Scotland, UK) confirmed the results. Sequencing results showed it to be C. tertium with 100% similarity. The strain was named Clostridium tertium strain Zagreb, acceded to the culture collection and assigned the accession number NCIMB 13970. This is the first record of C. tertium in marine mammals.

  10. Multifocal granulomatous panniculitis with ceroid pigment in two Mediterranean striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Sara; Fondevila, Dolors; González, Beatriz; Gómez-Campos, Encarna; Domingo, Mariano

    2010-01-01

    Two striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) were found stranded on the Catalonian Spanish coast. The main pathologic finding in both animals was the existence of multiple granulomatous lesions in the blubber, microscopically composed of macrophages and multinucleated cells containing vacuolar material. This material was identified as ceroid pigment due to its ultrastructural morphology, autofluorescence, and positive staining with periodic acid-Schiff and Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. The special stains and electron microscopy did not reveal any microorganisms associated with the lesions. These findings are very suggestive of "nutritional panniculitis," a well-defined entity associated with vitamin E deficiency that has been rarely described in free-living species.

  11. Faint Carbon Stars Discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margon, B.; Anderson, S. F.; Deutsch, E. W.; Harris, H. C.; SDSS Collaboration

    1999-12-01

    Although faint high latitude carbon (FHLC) stars range in luminosity by up to factors of 105, both the high and low luminosity versions are interesting. The apparently faintest of the luminous giants are located at >100 kpc, and aside from raising issues of stellar evolution, are also excellent probes of the dynamics of the distant halo, at a distance which encompasses all of the dark matter. The intrinsically faint dwarf carbon stars constitute a class of objects just recognized a decade ago, yet now understood to be the numerical majority of all stars with C2 in their spectra. The faintest of the FHLC (R>16) have thus far been discovered either serendipitously, or in very small numbers by heterogeneous techniques. We have long hoped that the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) might provide a large, homogeneously-selected sample of FHLCs via color-selection from the 5-color imaging data base, and followup fiber spectroscopy as an adjunct to other SDSS primary programs. However this is a challenging task, as these rare objects are expected to be only slightly separated from the 108 normal stars in SDSS photometry, even in 5-color space. In particular, most FHLCs are not terribly red. Here we report initial successful results on the search for FHLC stars in SDSS commissioning data. Two such objects have thus far been discovered in a very informal search of a small fraction of the data. The fainter object, at R 19, is one of the fain