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Sample records for survey sdss quasar

  1. The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS) in SDSS and the high-z bright-end Quasar Luminosity Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Studies of the most luminous quasars at high redshift directly probe the evolution of the most massive black holes in the early Universe and their connection to massive galaxy formation. Unfortunately, extremely luminous quasars at high redshift are very rare objects. Only wide area surveys have a chance to constrain their population. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) nd the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) have so far provided the most widely adopted measurements of the type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z>3. However, a careful re-examination of the SDSS quasar sample revealed that the SDSS quasar selection is in fact missing a significant fraction of $z~3$ quasars at the brightest end.We have identified the purely optical color selection of SDSS, where quasars at these redshifts are strongly contaminated by late-type dwarfs, and the spectroscopic incompleteness of the SDSS footprint as the main reasons. Therefore we have designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS), based on a novel near-infrared JKW2 color cut using WISE AllWISE and 2MASS all-sky photometry, to yield high completeness for very bright (i learning algorithms on SDSS and WISE photometry for quasar-star classification and photometric redshift estimation.The ELQS is spectroscopically following up ~230 new quasar candidates in an area of ~12000 deg2 in the SDSS footprint, to obtain a well-defined and complete quasar sample for an accurate measurement of the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 2.8<= z<=5.0. So far the ELQS has identified 75 bright new quasars in this redshift range and observations of the fall sky will continue until the end of the year. At the AAS winter meeting we will present the full spectroscopic results of the survey, including a re-estimation and extension of the high-z QLF toward higher luminosities.

  2. The Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey in the SDSS Footprint. I. Infrared-based Candidate Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Jan-Torge; Fan, Xiaohui; McGreer, Ian D.; Yang, Qian; Wu, Jin; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Studies of the most luminous quasars at high redshift directly probe the evolution of the most massive black holes in the early universe and their connection to massive galaxy formation. However, extremely luminous quasars at high redshift are very rare objects. Only wide-area surveys have a chance to constrain their population. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has so far provided the most widely adopted measurements of the quasar luminosity function at z> 3. However, a careful re-examination of the SDSS quasar sample revealed that the SDSS quasar selection is in fact missing a significant fraction of z≳ 3 quasars at the brightest end. We identified the purely optical-color selection of SDSS, where quasars at these redshifts are strongly contaminated by late-type dwarfs, and the spectroscopic incompleteness of the SDSS footprint as the main reasons. Therefore, we designed the Extremely Luminous Quasar Survey (ELQS), based on a novel near-infrared JKW2 color cut using Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission (WISE) AllWISE and 2MASS all-sky photometry, to yield high completeness for very bright ({m}{{i}}learning algorithms on SDSS and WISE photometry for quasar-star classification and photometric redshift estimation. The ELQS will spectroscopically follow-up ˜230 new quasar candidates in an area of ˜12,000 deg2 in the SDSS footprint to obtain a well-defined and complete quasar sample for an accurate measurement of the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.0≤slant z≤slant 5.0. In this paper, we present the quasar selection algorithm and the quasar candidate catalog.

  3. The SDSS view of the Palomar-Green bright quasar survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; Schneider, Donald P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Green, Richard F.; Schmidt, Maarten; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Stoughton, Chris; Gunn, James E.; Brinkmann, Jon; Kent, Stephen M.; Smith, J.Allyn; Tucker, Douglas, L.; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Princeton U.

    2005-02-01

    The author investigates the extent to which the Palomar-Green (PG) Bright Quasar Survey (BQS) is complete and representative of the general quasar population by comparing with imaging and spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A comparison of SDSS and PG photometry of both stars and quasars reveals the need to apply a color and magnitude recalibration to the PG data. Using the SDSS photometric catalog, they define the PG's parent sample of objects that are not main-sequence stars and simulate the selection of objects from this parent sample using the PG photometric criteria and errors. This simulation shows that the effective U-B cut in the PG survey is U-B < -0.71, implying a color-related incompleteness. As the color distribution of bright quasars peaks near U-B = -0.7 and the 2-{sigma} error in U-B is comparable to the full width of the color distribution of quasars, the color incompleteness of the BQS is approximately 50% and essentially random with respect to U-B color for z < 0.5. There is however, a bias against bright quasars at 0.5 < z < 1, which is induced by the color-redshift relation of quasars (although quasars at z > 0.5 are inherently rare in bright surveys in any case). They find no evidence for any other systematic incompleteness when comparing the distributions in color, redshift, and FIRST radio properties of the BQS and a BQS-like subsample of the SDSS quasar sample. However, the application of a bright magnitude limit biases the BQS toward the inclusion of objects which are blue in g-i, in particular compared to the full range of g-i colors found among the i-band limited SDSS quasars, and even at i-band magnitudes comparable to those of the BQS objects.

  4. Quasar Absorption Lines and SDSS Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Emileigh Suzanne; Scott, Jennifer E.; Oldak, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the sightlines of 45 low redshift quasars (0.06 footprint of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We use both the SDSS DR12 galaxy photometric data, including photometric redshifts, and the measured properties of the absorbers along with the known absorption characteristics of the intergalactic medium and the circumgalactic medium of galaxies to assign the most probable galaxy matches for each absorber in the sample, using estimated galaxy luminosities and virial radii as a discriminator. We show that the scheme can recover known galaxy-absorber matches found from spectroscopic data and thus provides a method for identifying likely pairs in photometric data sets as well as targets for spectroscopic follow up.

  5. Measuring Quasar Variability with Pan-STARRS1 and SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morganson, E.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Green, P. J.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Marshall, P. J.; Morgan, J. S.; Price, P. A.; Rix, H.-W.; Schlafly, E. F.; Tonry, J. L.; Walter, F.

    2014-04-01

    We measure quasar variability using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System 1 Survey (Pan-STARRS1 or PS1) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and establish a method of selecting quasars via their variability in 104 deg2 surveys. We use 105 spectroscopically confirmed quasars that have been well measured in both PS1 and SDSS and take advantage of the decadal timescales that separate SDSS measurements and PS1 measurements. A power law model fits the data well over the entire time range tested, 0.01-10 yr. Variability in the current PS1-SDSS data set can efficiently distinguish between quasars and nonvarying objects. It improves the purity of a griz quasar color cut from 4.1% to 48% while maintaining 67% completeness. Variability will be very effective at finding quasars in data sets with no u band and in redshift ranges where exclusively photometric selection is not efficient. We show that quasars' rest-frame ensemble variability, measured as a root mean squared in Δ magnitudes, is consistent with V(z, L, t) = A 0(1 + z)0.37(L/L 0)-0.16(t/1 yr)0.246, where L 0 = 1046 erg s-1 and A 0 = 0.190, 0.162, 0.147, or 0.141 in the g P1, r P1, i P1, or z P1filter, respectively. We also fit across all four filters and obtain median variability as a function of z, L, and λ as V(z, L, λ, t) = 0.079(1 + z)0.15(L/L 0)-0.2(λ/1000 nm)-0.44(t/1 yr)0.246.

  6. The Final SDSS High-redshift Quasar Sample of 52 Quasars at z>5.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Bañados, Eduardo; Becker, Robert H.; Bian, Fuyan; Farnsworth, Kara; Shen, Yue; Wang, Feige; Wang, Ran; Wang, Shu; White, Richard L.; Wu, Jin; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian

    2016-12-01

    We present the discovery of nine quasars at z˜ 6 identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) imaging data. This completes our survey of z˜ 6 quasars in the SDSS footprint. Our final sample consists of 52 quasars at 5.7\\lt z≤slant 6.4, including 29 quasars with {z}{AB}≤slant 20 mag selected from 11,240 deg2 of the SDSS single-epoch imaging survey (the main survey), 10 quasars with 20≤slant {z}{AB}≤slant 20.5 selected from 4223 deg2 of the SDSS overlap regions (regions with two or more imaging scans), and 13 quasars down to {z}{AB}≈ 22 mag from the 277 deg2 in Stripe 82. They span a wide luminosity range of -29.0≤slant {M}1450≤slant -24.5. This well-defined sample is used to derive the quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z˜ 6. After combining our SDSS sample with two faint ({M}1450≥slant -23 mag) quasars from the literature, we obtain the parameters for a double power-law fit to the QLF. The bright-end slope β of the QLF is well constrained to be β =-2.8+/- 0.2. Due to the small number of low-luminosity quasars, the faint-end slope α and the characteristic magnitude {M}1450* are less well constrained, with α =-{1.90}-0.44+0.58 and {M}* =-{25.2}-3.8+1.2 mag. The spatial density of luminous quasars, parametrized as ρ ({M}1450\\lt -26,z)=ρ (z=6){10}k(z-6), drops rapidly from z˜ 5 to 6, with k=-0.72+/- 0.11. Based on our fitted QLF and assuming an intergalactic medium (IGM) clumping factor of C = 3, we find that the observed quasar population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the z˜ 6 IGM at ˜90% confidence. Quasars may still provide a significant fraction of the required photons, although much larger samples of faint quasars are needed for more stringent constraints on the quasar contribution to reionization.

  7. Mass Functions of the Active Black Holes in Distant Quasars from the Large Bright Quasar Survey, the Bright Quasar Survey, and the Color-Selected Sample of the SDSS Fall Equatorial Stripe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Osmer, Patrick S.

    2009-01-01

    functions at similar redshifts based on the SDSS Data Release 3 quasar catalog presented by Vestergaard et al. We see clear evidence of cosmic downsizing in the comoving space density distribution of active black holes in the LBQS sample alone. In forthcoming papers, further analysis, comparison...

  8. The z = 5 Quasar Luminosity Function from SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; White, Martin; Shen, Yue; Schneider, Donald P.; Myers, Adam D.; Brandt, W. Niel; DeGraf, Colin; Glikman, Eilat; Ge, Jian; Streblyanska, Alina

    2013-05-01

    We present a measurement of the Type I quasar luminosity function at z = 5 using a large sample of spectroscopically confirmed quasars selected from optical imaging data. We measure the bright end (M 1450 region (the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Cap). The faint sample includes 14 quasars with spectra obtained as ancillary science targets in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, and 59 quasars observed at the MMT and Magellan telescopes. We construct a well-defined sample of 4.7 confidence. The break luminosity appears to evolve strongly at high redshift, providing an explanation for the flattening of the bright-end slope reported previously. We find a factor of ~2 greater decrease in the number density of luminous quasars (M 1450 joint facility of the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona. This paper also includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  9. SDSS J2222+2745: A GRAVITATIONALLY LENSED SEXTUPLE QUASAR WITH A MAXIMUM IMAGE SEPARATION OF 15.''1 DISCOVERED IN THE SLOAN GIANT ARCS SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahle, H.; Groeneboom, N. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Gladders, M. D.; Abramson, L. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sharon, K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Bayliss, M. B. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wuyts, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbackstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Koester, B. P. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brinckmann, T. E.; Kristensen, M. T.; Lindholmer, M. O.; Nielsen, A.; Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U., E-mail: hdahle@astro.uio.no [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-08-20

    We report the discovery of a unique gravitational lens system, SDSS J2222+2745, producing five spectroscopically confirmed images of a z{sub s} = 2.82 quasar lensed by a foreground galaxy cluster at z{sub l} = 0.49. We also present photometric and spectroscopic evidence for a sixth lensed image of the same quasar. The maximum separation between the quasar images is 15.''1. Both the large image separations and the high image multiplicity are in themselves rare among known lensed quasars, and observing the combination of these two factors is an exceptionally unlikely occurrence in present data sets. This is only the third known case of a quasar lensed by a cluster, and the only one with six images. The lens system was discovered in the course of the Sloan Giant Arcs Survey, in which we identify candidate lenses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and target these for follow-up and verification with the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope. Multi-band photometry obtained over multiple epochs from 2011 September to 2012 September reveals significant variability at the {approx}10%-30% level in some of the quasar images, indicating that measurements of the relative time delay between quasar images will be feasible. In this lens system, we also identify a bright (g = 21.5) giant arc corresponding to a strongly lensed background galaxy at z{sub s} = 2.30. We fit parametric models of the lens system, constrained by the redshift and positions of the quasar images and the redshift and position of the giant arc. The predicted time delays between different pairs of quasar images range from {approx}100 days to {approx}6 yr.

  10. Solving the puzzle of discrepant quasar variability on monthly time-scales implied by SDSS and CRTS data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suberlak, Krzysztof; Ivezić, Željko; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Graham, Matthew; Sesar, Branimir

    2017-12-01

    We present an improved photometric error analysis for the 7 100 CRTS (Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey) optical light curves for quasars from the SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 catalogue. The SDSS imaging survey has provided a time-resolved photometric data set, which greatly improved our understanding of the quasar optical continuum variability: Data for monthly and longer time-scales are consistent with a damped random walk (DRW). Recently, newer data obtained by CRTS provided puzzling evidence for enhanced variability, compared to SDSS results, on monthly time-scales. Quantitatively, SDSS results predict about 0.06 mag root-mean-square (rms) variability for monthly time-scales, while CRTS data show about a factor of 2 larger rms, for spectroscopically confirmed SDSS quasars. Our analysis has successfully resolved this discrepancy as due to slightly underestimated photometric uncertainties from the CRTS image processing pipelines. As a result, the correction for observational noise is too small and the implied quasar variability is too large. The CRTS photometric error correction factors, derived from detailed analysis of non-variable SDSS standard stars that were re-observed by CRTS, are about 20-30 per cent, and result in reconciling quasar variability behaviour implied by the CRTS data with earlier SDSS results. An additional analysis based on independent light curve data for the same objects obtained by the Palomar Transient Factory provides further support for this conclusion. In summary, the quasar variability constraints on weekly and monthly time-scales from SDSS, CRTS and PTF surveys are mutually compatible, as well as consistent with DRW model.

  11. A survey of z > 5.7 quasars in the sloan digital sky survey. 4. discovery of seven additional quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Xiao-Hui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Becker, Robert H.; White, Richard L.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; onley, Jennifer L.D; Jiang, Lin-Hua; Kim, J.Serena; Vestergaard, Marianne; Young, Jason E.; Gunn, James E.; Lupton, Robert H.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Brandt, W.N.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Brinkmann, J.; Brewington, Howard J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Princeton U. Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /UC, Davis

    2005-12-01

    We present the discovery of seven quasars at z > 5.7, selected from {approx}2000 deg{sup 2} of multicolor imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The new quasars have redshifts z from 5.79 to 6.13. Five are selected as part of a complete flux-limited sample in the SDSS Northern Galactic Cap; two have larger photometric errors and are not part of the complete sample. One of the new quasars, SDSS J1335+3533 (z = 5.93), exhibits no emission lines; the 3-{sigma} limit on the rest-frame equivalent width of Ly{alpha} + NV line is 5 {angstrom}. It is the highest redshift lineless quasar known, and could be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z > 6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z = 6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z = 6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly{alpha}. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z > 6.2 and do not have complete Ly{beta} absorption.

  12. DISCLOSING THE RADIO LOUDNESS DISTRIBUTION DICHOTOMY IN QUASARS: AN UNBIASED MONTE CARLO APPROACH APPLIED TO THE SDSS-FIRST QUASAR SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balokovic, M. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Smolcic, V. [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Auf dem Hugel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Ivezic, Z. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zamorani, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Schinnerer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kelly, B. C. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the dichotomy in the radio loudness distribution of quasars by modeling their radio emission and various selection effects using a Monte Carlo approach. The existence of two physically distinct quasar populations, the radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, is controversial and over the last decade a bimodal distribution of radio loudness of quasars has been both affirmed and disputed. We model the quasar radio luminosity distribution with simple unimodal and bimodal distribution functions. The resulting simulated samples are compared to a fiducial sample of 8300 quasars drawn from the SDSS DR7 Quasar Catalog and combined with radio observations from the FIRST survey. Our results indicate that the SDSS-FIRST sample is best described by a radio loudness distribution which consists of two components, with (12 {+-} 1)% of sources in the radio-loud component. On the other hand, the evidence for a local minimum in the loudness distribution (bimodality) is not strong and we find that previous claims for its existence were probably affected by the incompleteness of the FIRST survey close to its faint limit. We also investigate the redshift and luminosity dependence of the radio loudness distribution and find tentative evidence that at high redshift radio-loud quasars were rarer, on average louder, and exhibited a smaller range in radio loudness. In agreement with other recent work, we conclude that the SDSS-FIRST sample strongly suggests that the radio loudness distribution of quasars is not a universal function, and that more complex models than presented here are needed to fully explain available observations.

  13. High-redshift SDSS Quasars with Weak Emission Lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Fan, Xiaohui; Brandt, W. N.

    2009-01-01

    We identify a sample of 74 high-redshift quasars (z > 3) with weak emission lines from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and present infrared, optical, and radio observations of a subsample of four objects at z > 4. These weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) constitute a prominent...... rest-frame 0.1-5 µm spectral energy distributions that are quite similar to those of normal quasars. The variability, polarization, and radio properties of WLQs are also different from those of BL Lacs, making continuum boosting by a relativistic jet an unlikely physical interpretation. The most...

  14. The Clustering of High-Redshift (2.9 < z < 5.4) Quasars in SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, John; Ross, Nicolas; Richards, Gordon; Myers, Adam; Bauer, Franz Erik; Lacy, Mark; Schneider, Donald; Wollack, Edward; Zakamska, Nadia

    2018-01-01

    We present the data from the Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES) along with our first high-redshift (2.9SpIES is a mid-infrared survey covering ~100 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82 (S82) field. The SpIES field is optimally located to overlap with the optical data from SDSS and to complement the area of the pre-existing Spitzer data from the Spitzer-HETDEX Exploratory Large-area (SHELA) survey, which adds ~20 square degrees of infrared coverage on S82. SpIES probes magnitudes significantly fainter than WISE; depth that is crucial to detect faint, high-redshift quasars. Using the infrared data from SpIES and SHELA, and the deep optical data from SDSS, we employ multi-dimensional empirical selection algorithms to identify high-redshift quasar candidates in this field. We then combine these candidates with spectroscopically confirmed high-redshift quasars and measure the angular correlation function. Using these results, we compute the linear bias to try to constrain quasar feedback models akin to those in Hopkins et al. 2007.

  15. An unobscured type II quasar candidate: SDSS J012032.19-005501.9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Yuan, W.; Komossa, S. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhou, H. Y.; Liu, W. J. [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Ai, Y. L. [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Boisvert, J. H., E-mail: liye@nao.cas.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We report the finding of an unobscured type II active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidate, SDSS J012032.19-005501.9, at a relatively high redshift of 0.601, which shows a number of unusual properties. It varies significantly on timescales of years, typical of type I AGNs, and marginally on timescales of weeks. The color–magnitude relation and the structure function are also consistent with that of type I AGNs, which implies that its variability likely originates from the black hole accretion system. However, no broad emission line (BEL) is detected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum, and the upper limit of the equivalent width of the Hβ BEL is much less than that of type I AGNs. These properties suggest that SDSS J012032.19-005501.9 may be an unobscured quasar without intrinsically broad emission lines, namely, an unobscured type II AGN or “true” type II AGN. Furthermore, its continuum luminosity is at least one order of magnitude fainter than the average value over the past century from the [O iii] emission line. This indicates that SDSS J012032.19-005501.9 may be switching off. Additional possible scenarios to explain this intriguing source are also discussed. Future deep observations at multiwavelengths are needed to reveal the nature of this peculiar and intriguing AGN.

  16. THE LARGE SKY AREA MULTI-OBJECT FIBER SPECTROSCOPIC TELESCOPE QUASAR SURVEY: QUASAR PROPERTIES FROM THE FIRST DATA RELEASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ai, Y. L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Wang, Feige; Guo, Rui; Dong, Xiaoyi [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zuo, Wenwen; Shen, S.-Y. [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China); Zhang, Y.-X.; Yuan, H.-L.; Song, Y.-H.; Yang, M.; Wu, H.; Shi, J.-R.; He, B.-L.; Lei, Y.-J.; Li, Y.-B. [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences 100012, Beijing (China); Wang, Jianguo; Dong, Xiaobo, E-mail: aiyl@pku.edu.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); and others

    2016-02-15

    We present preliminary results of the quasar survey in the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) first data release (DR1), which includes the pilot survey and the first year of the regular survey. There are 3921 quasars reliably identified, among which 1180 are new quasars discovered in the survey. These quasars are at low to median redshifts, with a highest z of 4.83. We compile emission line measurements around the Hα, Hβ, Mg ii, and C iv regions for the new quasars. The continuum luminosities are inferred from SDSS photometric data with model fitting, as the spectra in DR1 are non-flux-calibrated. We also compile the virial black hole mass estimates, with flags indicating the selection methods, and broad absorption line quasars. The catalog and spectra for these quasars are also available. Of the 3921 quasars, 28% are independently selected with optical–infrared colors, indicating that the method is quite promising for the completeness of the quasar survey. LAMOST DR1 and the ongoing quasar survey will provide valuable data for studies of quasars.

  17. Galaxies on Top of Quasars: Probing Dwarf Galaxies in the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Lorrie; York, D. G.; Noterdaeme, P.; Srianand, R.; Bowen, D. V.; Khare, P.; Bishof, M.; Whichard, Z.; Kulkarni, V. P.

    2013-07-01

    Absorption lines from galaxies at intervening redshifts in quasar spectra are sensitive probes of metals and gas that are otherwise invisible due to distance or low surface brightness. However, in order to determine the environments these absorption lines arise in, we must detect these galaxies in emission as well. Galaxies on top of quasars (GOTOQs) are low-z galaxies found intervening with background quasars in the SDSS. These galaxies have been flagged for their narrow galactic emission lines present in quasar spectra in the SDSS. Typically, the low-z nature of these galaxies allows them to be easily detected in SDSS imaging. However, a number of GOTOQs (about 10%), despite being detected in spectral emission, are NOT seen in SDSS imaging. This implies that these may be dark galaxies, dwarf galaxies, or similarly low surface brightness galaxies. Additionally, about 25% of those detected in imaging are dwarf galaxies according to their L* values. Dwarf galaxies have long been underrepresented in observations compared to theory and are known to have large extents in dark matter. Given their prevalence here in our sample we must ask what role they play in quasar absorption line systems (QSOALS). Recent detections of 21-cm galaxies with few stars imply that aborted star formation in dark matter sub halos may produce QSOALS. Thus, this sub sample of galaxies offers a unique technique for probing dark and dwarf galaxies. The sample and its properties will be discussed, including star formation rates and dust estimates, as well as prospects for the future.

  18. The clustering of the SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR14 quasar sample: first measurement of baryon acoustic oscillations between redshift 0.8 and 2.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanton, Michael R.; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burtin, Etienne; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Dawson, Kyle S.; de la Macorra, Axel; Du, Wei; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grabowski, Katie; Guy, Julien; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Ivanov, Mikhail M.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Laurent, Pierre; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; McEwen, Joseph E.; Mueller, Eva-Maria; Myers, Adam D.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pâris, Isabelle; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruggeri, Rossana; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Slosar, Anže; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas Magaña, Mariana; Vivek, M.; Wang, Yuting; Yèche, Christophe; Yu, Liang; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zhao, Cheng; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2018-02-01

    We present measurements of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale in redshift-space using the clustering of quasars. We consider a sample of 147 000 quasars from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) distributed over 2044 square degrees with redshifts 0.8 0 at 6.6σ significance when testing a ΛCDM model with free curvature.

  19. THE SUBARU HIGH-z QUASAR SURVEY: DISCOVERY OF FAINT z ∼ 6 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Furusawa, Hisanori; Niino, Yuu [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ishizaki, Yoshifumi; Onoue, Masafusa; Toshikawa, Jun; Ishikawa, Shogo [Department of Astronomy, School of Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Willott, Chris J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Im, Myungshin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-rho, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Shimasaku, Kazuhiro [Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hibon, Pascale, E-mail: n.kashikawa@nao.ac.jp [Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)

    2015-01-01

    We present the discovery of one or two extremely faint z ∼ 6 quasars in 6.5 deg{sup 2} utilizing a unique capability of the wide-field imaging of the Subaru/Suprime-Cam. The quasar selection was made in (i'-z{sub B} ) and (z{sub B} -z{sub R} ) colors, where z{sub B} and z{sub R} are bandpasses with central wavelengths of 8842 Å and 9841 Å, respectively. The color selection can effectively isolate quasars at z ∼ 6 from M/L/T dwarfs without the J-band photometry down to z{sub R} < 24.0, which is 3.5 mag deeper than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We have selected 17 promising quasar candidates. The follow-up spectroscopy for seven targets identified one apparent quasar at z = 6.156 with M {sub 1450} = –23.10. We also identified one possible quasar at z = 6.041 with a faint continuum of M {sub 1450} = –22.58 and a narrow Lyα emission with HWHM =427 km s{sup –1}, which cannot be distinguished from Lyman α emitters. We derive the quasar luminosity function at z ∼ 6 by combining our faint quasar sample with the bright quasar samples by SDSS and CFHQS. Including our data points invokes a higher number density in the faintest bin of the quasar luminosity function than the previous estimate employed. This suggests a steeper faint-end slope than lower z, though it is yet uncertain based on a small number of spectroscopically identified faint quasars, and several quasar candidates still remain to be diagnosed. The steepening of the quasar luminosity function at the faint end does increase the expected emission rate of the ionizing photon; however, it only changes by a factor of approximately two to six. This was found to still be insufficient for the required photon budget of reionization at z ∼ 6.

  20. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Quasar Reverberation Mapping Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Catherine; SDSS-RM Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project (SDSS-RM) has completed its first three years of spectroscopic observations of a sample of ~850 quasars with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. From January-July in 2014, 2015, and 2016, more than 55 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained for this quasar sample, and continued monitoring has been approved for 2017. Supporting photometric observations were also carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope. In addition, the SDSS-RM field overlaps with the Pan-STARRS 1 Medium Deep Field MD07, so we have photometric data for three years prior to the SDSS-RM observations, which considerably extends the time delay sensitivity of the campaign. Preliminary reverberation mapping results were presented by Shen et al. (2015) and the program has also yielded ancillary science results in regimes such as broad absorption line variability, quasar ensemble variability characteristics, quasar emission line studies, SDSS quasar redshift measurements, and host galaxy properties. I will discuss the current status of the SDSS-RM program, including recent reverberation mapping results from the wider 850-quasar sample using the full set of first-year photometric and spectroscopic data.

  1. Five New High-Redshift Quasar Lenses from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Naohisa; Oguri, Masamune; Shin, Min-Su; Kayo, Issha; Strauss, Michael A.; Morokuma, Tomoki; Schneider, Donald P.; Becker, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; York, Donald G.

    2008-09-08

    We report the discovery of five gravitationally lensed quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). All five systems are selected as two-image lensed quasar candidates from a sample of high-redshift (z > 2.2) SDSS quasars. We confirmed their lensing nature with additional imaging and spectroscopic observations. The new systems are SDSS J0819+5356 (source redshift z{sub s} = 2.237, lens redshift z{sub l} = 0.294, and image separation {theta} = 4.04 inch), SDSS J1254+2235 (z{sub s} = 3.626, {theta} = 1.56 inch), SDSS J1258+1657 (z{sub s} = 2.702, {theta} = 1.28 inch), SDSS J1339+1310 (z{sub s} = 2.243, {theta} = 1.69 cin), and SDSS J1400+3134 (z{sub s} = 3.317, {theta} = 1.74 inch). We estimate the lens redshifts of the latter four systems to be z{sub l} = 0.4-0.6 from the colors and magnitudes of the lensing galaxies. We find that the image configurations of all systems are well reproduced by standard mass models. Although these lenses will not be included in our statistical sample of z{sub s} < 2.2 lenses, they expand the number of lensed quasars which can be used for high-redshift galaxy and quasar studies.

  2. Quasar feedback in the early Universe : The case of SDSS J1148+5251

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valiante, Rosa; Schneider, Raffaella; Maiolino, Roberto; Salvadori, Stefania; Bianchi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy-scale gas outflows triggered by active galactic nuclei have been proposed as a key physical process to regulate the co-evolution of nuclear black holes and their host galaxies. The recent detection of a massive gas outflow in one of the most distant quasars, SDSS J1148+5251 at z = 6.4,

  3. Quasar feedback in the early Universe: the case of SDSS J1148+5251

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valiante, Rosa; Schneider, Raffaella; Maiolino, Roberto; Salvadori, Stefania; Bianchi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Galaxy-scale gas outflows triggered by active galactic nuclei have been proposed as a key physical process to regulate the co-evolution of nuclear black holes and their host galaxies. The recent detection of a massive gas outflow in one of the most distant quasars, SDSS J1148+5251 at z= 6.4,

  4. Spectral Variability of Quasar SDSS J030639.57+000343.1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spectral Variability of Quasar SDSS J030639.57+000343.1. Hengxiao Guo1,2,∗ & Minfeng Gu1. 1Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical. Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030, China. 2University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A ...

  5. Infrared Reverberation Mapping of 17 Quasars from the SDSS Reverberation Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorjian, Varoujan; Shen, Yue; Barth, Aaron J.; Brandt, W. Niel; Dawson, Kyle S.; Green, Paul J.; Ho, Luis; Horne, Keith D.; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Tao, Charling

    2017-01-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope Cycle 11/12 proposals allowed observations over a 20 month long period which opened up a new window for long term reverberation monitoring of high luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGN). Previous Spitzer reverberation monitoring projects looking for UV/optical light absorbed and re-emitted in the IR by dust had been limited to AGN that could potentially show reverberation within a single cycle (~1 year). This had narrowed the sample of sources to low luminosity AGN which would have a small dust sublimation radius thus having their dust close enough so that the light travel time from the UV/optical emitting region of the accretion disk to the IR emitting region of the dust would be on the 1-2 month timescale. With this new opportunity we monitored 17 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. This sample has photometric monitoring for 849 quasars starting in 2010 combining data from the Pan-STARRS, CFHT, and Steward Observatory telescopes. By combining these ground based observations with Spitzer data we can, for the first time, detect dust reverberation in high luminosity AGN.

  6. LSST survey: millions and millions of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivezić, Željko

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), the next-generation optical imaging survey sited at Cerro Pachon in Chile, will provide hundreds of detections for a sample of more than ten million quasars with redshifts up to about seven. The LSST design, with an 8.4m (6.7m effective) primary mirror, a 9.6 sq. deg. field of view, and a 3.2 Gigapixel camera, will allow about 10,000 sq. deg. of sky to be covered twice per night, every three to four nights on average, with typical 5-sigma depth for point sources of r=24.5 (AB). With about 1000 observations in ugrizy bands over a 10-year period, these data will enable a deep stack reaching r=27.5 (about 5 magnitudes deeper than SDSS) and faint time-domain astronomy. The measured properties of newly discovered and known astrometric and photometric transients will be publicly reported within 60 sec after closing the shutter. In addition to a brief introduction to LSST, I review optical quasar selection techniques, with emphasis on methods based on colors, variability properties, and astrometric behavior.

  7. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog I. Early Data Release

    OpenAIRE

    Donald P. Schneider(Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA); Richards, Gordon T.; Fan, Xiaohui; Hall, Patrick B.; Strauss, Michael A; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Gunn, James E.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Reichard, Timothy A.; Stoughton, C.; Voges, Wolfgang; Yanny, Brian

    2001-01-01

    We present the first edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 3814 objects (3000 discovered by the SDSS) in the initial SDSS public data release that have at least one emission line with a full width at half maximum larger than 1000 km/s, luminosities brighter than M_i^* = -23, and highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is 494 square degrees; the majority of the objects were found in SDSS commissioning data using a multicol...

  8. Lens Model and Time Delay Predictions for the Sextuply Lensed Quasar SDSS J2222+2745*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Dahle, Hakon; Florian, Michael K.; Gladders, Michael D.; Johnson, Traci L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Rigby, Jane R.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Eva

    2017-01-01

    SDSS J2222+2745 is a galaxy cluster at z = 0.49, strongly lensing a quasar at z = 2.805 into six widely separated images. In recent Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the field, we identify additional multiply lensed galaxies and confirm the sixth quasar image that was identified by Dahle et al. We used the Gemini-North telescope to measure a spectroscopic redshift of z = 4.56 of one of the lensed galaxies. These data are used to refine the lens model of SDSS J2222+2745, compute the time delay and magnifications of the lensed quasar images, and reconstruct the source image of the quasar host and a lensed galaxy at z = 2.3. This galaxy also appears in absorption in our Gemini spectra of the lensed quasar, at a projected distance of 34 kpc. Our model is in agreement with the recent time delay measurements of Dahle et al., who found T(sub AB) = 47.7 +/- 6.0 days and T(sub AC) = 722 +/- 24 days. We use the observed time delays to further constrain the model, and find that the model-predicted time delays of the three faint images of the quasar are T(sub AD) = 502+/- 68 days, T( sub AE) = 611 +/- 75 days, and T(sub AF) = 415 +/- 72 days. We have initiated a follow-up campaign to measure these time delays with Gemini North. Finally, we present initial results from an X-ray monitoring program with Swift, indicating the presence of hard X-ray emission from the lensed quasar, as well as extended X-ray emission from the cluster itself, which is consistent with the lensing mass measurement and the cluster velocity dispersion.

  9. Fundamental Plane of FSRQs from SDSS DR5 Quasar Catalogue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work, we explore a sample of 362 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) to investigate the jet formation. We find that the fundamental plane for our FSRQs can be expressed as 5\\;GHz ∝ bh − 0.19 2\\; keV 1.08 . We also find that the 5 GHz luminosities are tightly related to both black hole mass and Eddington ratio, ...

  10. Testing Accretion Disk Wind Models of Broad Absorption Line Quasars with SDSS Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Sean; Gabel, Jack

    2017-06-01

    We present an investigation of a large sample of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars (QSO) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 5 (DR5). Properties of the BALs, such as absorption equivalent width, outflow velocities, and depth of BAL, are obtained from analysis by Gibson et al. We perform correlation analysis on these data to test the predictions made by the radiation driven, accretion disk streamline model of Murray and Chiang. We find the CIV BAL maximum velocity and the continuum luminosity are correlated, consistent with radiation driven models. The mean minimum velocity of CIV is lower in low ionization BALs (LoBALs), than highly ionized BALs (HiBALS), suggesting an orientation effect consistent with the Murray and Chiang model. Finally, we find that HiBALs greatly outnumber LoBALs in the general BAL population, supporting prediction of the Murray and Chiang model that HiBALs have a greater global covering factor than LoBALs.

  11. SDSS J090152.05+624342.6: A NEW “OVERLAPPING-TROUGH” FeLoBAL QUASAR AT Z ~ 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We here report an identification of SDSS J090152.04+624342.6 as a new “overlapping-trough” iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar at redshift of z ~ 2.1. No strong variation of the broad absorption lines can be revealed through the two spectra taken by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with a time interval of ~6 yr. Further optical and infrared spectroscopic study on this object is suggested.

  12. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog V. Seventh Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; /Penn State U.; Richards, Gordon T.; /Drexel U.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Boroson, Todd A.; /Kitt Peak Observ.; Ross, Nicholas P.; /Penn State U.; Shen, Yue; /Princeton U. Observ.; Brandt, W.N.; /Penn State U.; Fan, Xiaohui; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.; Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Southampton U. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-04-01

    We present the fifth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog, which is based upon the SDSS Seventh Data Release. The catalog, which contains 105,783 spectroscopically confirmed quasars, represents the conclusion of the SDSS-I and SDSS-II quasar survey. The catalog consists of the SDSS objects that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The catalog covers an area of {approx} 9380 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.065 to 5.46, with a median value of 1.49; the catalog includes 1248 quasars at redshifts greater than 4, of which 56 are at redshifts greater than 5. The catalog contains 9210 quasars with i < 18; slightly over half of the entries have i < 19. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.1-inch rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the SDSS public database using the information provided in the catalog. Over 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS. We also include a supplemental list of an additional 207 quasars with SDSS spectra whose archive photometric information is incomplete.

  13. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Ensemble Spectroscopic Variability of Quasar Broad Emission Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mouyuan; Trump, Jonathan R.; Shen, Yue; Brandt, W. N.; Dawson, Kyle; Denney, Kelly D.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ho, Luis C.; Horne, Keith; Jiang, Linhua; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Simmons, Audrey

    2015-09-01

    We explore the variability of quasars in the Mg ii and {{H}}β broad emission lines and ultraviolet/optical continuum emission using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping project (SDSS-RM). This is the largest spectroscopic study of quasar variability to date: our study includes 29 spectroscopic epochs from SDSS-RM over 6 months, containing 357 quasars with Mg ii and 41 quasars with {{H}}β . On longer timescales, the study is also supplemented with two-epoch data from SDSS-I/II. The SDSS-I/II data include an additional 2854 quasars with Mg ii and 572 quasars with {{H}}β . The Mg ii emission line is significantly variable ({{Δ }}f/f∼ 10% on ∼100-day timescales), a necessary prerequisite for its use for reverberation mapping studies. The data also confirm that continuum variability increases with timescale and decreases with luminosity, and the continuum light curves are consistent with a damped random-walk model on rest-frame timescales of ≳ 5 days. We compare the emission-line and continuum variability to investigate the structure of the broad-line region. Broad-line variability shows a shallower increase with timescale compared to the continuum emission, demonstrating that the broad-line transfer function is not a δ-function. {{H}}β is more variable than Mg ii (roughly by a factor of ∼1.5), suggesting different excitation mechanisms, optical depths and/or geometrical configuration for each emission line. The ensemble spectroscopic variability measurements enabled by the SDSS-RM project have important consequences for future studies of reverberation mapping and black hole mass estimation of 1\\lt z\\lt 2 quasars.

  14. Lens Model and Time Delay Predictions for the Sextuply Lensed Quasar SDSS J2222+2745

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon, Keren; Bayliss, Matthew B.; Dahle, Håkon; Florian, Michael K.; Gladders, Michael D.; Johnson, Traci L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Rigby, Jane R.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Wuyts, Eva

    2017-01-01

    SDSS J2222+2745 is a galaxy cluster at z = 0.49, strongly lensing a quasar at z = 2.805 into six widely separated images. In recent Hubble Space Telescope imaging of the field, we identify additional multiply lensed galaxies and confirm the sixth quasar image that was identified by Dahle et al. We used the Gemini-North telescope to measure a spectroscopic redshift of z = 4.56 of one of the lensed galaxies. These data are used to refine the lens model of SDSS J2222+2745, compute the time delay and magnifications of the lensed quasar images, and reconstruct the source image of the quasar host and a lensed galaxy at z = 2.3. This galaxy also appears in absorption in our Gemini spectra of the lensed quasar, at a projected distance of 34 kpc. Our model is in agreement with the recent time delay measurements of Dahle et al., who found τAB = 47.7 ± 6.0 days and τAC = -722 ± 24 days. We use the observed time delays to further constrain the model, and find that the model-predicted time delays of the three faint images of the quasar are τAD = 502 ± 68 days, τAE = 611 ± 75 days, and τAF = 415 ± 72 days. We have initiated a follow-up campaign to measure these time delays with Gemini North. Finally, we present initial results from an X-ray monitoring program with Swift, indicating the presence of hard X-ray emission from the lensed quasar, as well as extended X-ray emission from the cluster itself, which is consistent with the lensing mass measurement and the cluster velocity dispersion. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-13337.

  15. Extreme variability quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumbaugh, N.; et al.

    2017-06-23

    We perform a systematic search for long-term extreme variability quasars (EVQs) in the overlapping Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and 3-Year Dark Energy Survey (DES) imaging, which provide light curves spanning more than 15 years. We identified ~1000 EVQs with a maximum g band magnitude change of more than 1 mag over this period, about 10% of all quasars searched. The EVQs have L_bol~10^45-10^47 erg/s and L/L_Edd~0.01-1. Accounting for selection effects, we estimate an intrinsic EVQ fraction of ~30-50% among all g<~22 quasars over a baseline of ~15 years. These EVQs are good candidates for so-called "changing-look quasars", where a spectral transition between the two types of quasars (broad-line and narrow-line) is observed between the dim and bright states. We performed detailed multi-wavelength, spectral and variability analyses for the EVQs and compared to their parent quasar sample. We found that EVQs are distinct from a control sample of quasars matched in redshift and optical luminosity: (1) their UV broad emission lines have larger equivalent widths; (2) their Eddington ratios are systematically lower; and (3) they are more variable on all timescales. The intrinsic difference in quasar properties for EVQs suggest that internal processes associated with accretion are the main driver for the observed extreme long-term variability. However, despite their different properties, EVQs seem to be in the tail of a continuous distribution of quasar properties, rather than standing out as a distinct population. We speculate that EVQs are normal quasars accreting at relatively low accretion rates, where the accretion flow is more likely to experience instabilities that drive the factor of few changes in flux on multi-year timescales.

  16. Investigations of Short-Timescale Outflow Variability in Quasars of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemler, Zachary; Grier, Catherine; Brandt, William; Hall, Patrick; Schneider, Donald; Shen, Yue; Fernandez-Trincado, Jose; SDSS-RM Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Quasar outflows are hypothesized to regulate the growth of a quasar's host galaxy and the supermassive black hole (SMBH) itself. Thus, understanding the physics of these outflows is imperative to understanding galactic evolution. The physical properties of these outflows, such as density, radial distance from the SMBH, and kinetic energy can be investigated by measuring both the strength and shape variability of broad absorption lines (BALs) in quasar spectra. However, the accuracy of physical properties calculated using BAL variability methods is limited by the time resolution of the observations. Recent spectral data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping program (SDSS-RM) provides a novel opportunity to investigate the short-term BAL variability of many quasars at many epochs. The SDSS-RM program took many epochs of spectra for a large sample of quasars over a period of several years, many of which exhibit BALs. The median rest-frame time resolution of these observations is roughly 2 days, in contrast to previous large-sample studies, which typically have time spacing on the order of hundred of days. We are using the SDSS-RM dataset to conduct a BAL variability study that will further constrain outflow properties and provide significant insights into the variability mechanisms of quasar outflows. We are searching for variability in BALs on timescales of less than 2 days among our sample of 22 quasars and determining whether this behavior is common among quasars. We are also investigating the general short-term (less than 10 days) variability characteristics of the entire sample. We will present preliminary results from this study and the possible implications to our understanding of quasar outflows.

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 4. Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Strauss, Michael A.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W.N.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester,; Gray, Jim; Gunn, James E.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Johns Hopkins U. /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona

    2007-04-01

    We present the fourth edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog contains 77,429 objects; this is an increase of over 30,000 entries since the previous edition. The catalog consists of the objects in the SDSS Fifth Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22.0 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or have interesting/complex absorption features, are fainter than i {approx} 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 5740 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.48; the catalog includes 891 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 36 are at redshifts greater than five. Approximately half of the catalog quasars have i < 19; nearly all have i < 21. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2-minutes rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains basic radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 {angstrom} at a spectral resolution of {approx_equal} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. The average SDSS colors of quasars as a function of redshift, derived from the catalog entries, are presented in tabular form. Approximately 96% of the objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS.

  18. The FIRST-2MASS Red Quasar Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glikman, E; Helfand, D J; White, R L; Becker, R H; Gregg, M D; Lacy, M

    2007-06-28

    Combining radio observations with optical and infrared color selection--demonstrated in our pilot study to be an efficient selection algorithm for finding red quasars--we have obtained optical and infrared spectroscopy for 120 objects in a complete sample of 156 candidates from a sky area of 2716 square degrees. Consistent with our initial results, we find our selection criteria--J-K > 1.7,R-K > 4.0--yield a {approx} 50% success rate for discovering quasars substantially redder than those found in optical surveys. Comparison with UVX- and optical color-selected samples shows that {approx}> 10% of the quasars are missed in a magnitude-limited survey. Simultaneous two-frequency radio observations for part of the sample indicate that a synchrotron continuum component is ruled out as a significant contributor to reddening the quasars spectra. We go on to estimate extinctions for our objects assuming their red colors are caused by dust. Continuum fits and Balmer decrements suggest E(B-V) values ranging from near zero to 2.5 magnitudes. Correcting the K-band magnitudes for these extinctions, we find that for K {le} 14.0, red quasars make up between 25% and 60% of the underlying quasar population; owing to the incompleteness of the 2MASS survey at fainter K-band magnitudes, we can only set a lower limit to the radio-detected red quasar population of > 20-30%.

  19. A Survey of z>5.7 Quasars in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Xiaohui; Strauss, Michael A.; Richards, Gordon T.

    2005-01-01

    be a gravitational lensed galaxy, a BL Lac object or a new type of quasar. Two new z>6 quasars, SDSS 1250+3130 (z=6.13) and SDSS J1137+3549 (z=6.01), show deep Gunn-Peterson absorption gaps in Ly alpha. These gaps are narrower the complete Gunn-Peterson absorption troughs observed among quasars at z>6.2 and do...

  20. Time Delay Measurements for the Cluster-lensed Sextuple Quasar SDSS J2222+2745

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahle, H.; Gladders, M. D.; Sharon, K.; Bayliss, M. B.; Rigby, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    We report first results from an ongoing monitoring campaign to measure time delays between the six images of the quasar SDSS J2222+2745, gravitationally lensed by a galaxy cluster. The time delay between A and B, the two most highly magnified images, is measured to be {τ }{{AB}}=47.7+/- 6.0 days (95% confidence interval), consistent with previous model predictions for this lens system. The strong intrinsic variability of the quasar also allows us to derive a time delay value of {τ }{{CA}}=722+/- 24 days between image C and A, in spite of modest overlap between their light curves in the current data set. Image C, which is predicted to lead all the other lensed quasar images, has undergone a sharp, monotonic flux increase of 60%-75% during 2014. A corresponding brightening is firmly predicted to occur in images A and B during 2016. The amplitude of this rise indicates that time delays involving all six known images in this system, including those of the demagnified central images D-F, will be obtainable from further ground-based monitoring of this system during the next few years. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, and including observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia e Inovação (Brazil) and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnologi´a e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  1. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens Sample from the Fifth Data Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Naohisa; /Wako, RIKEN /Tokyo U., ICEPP; Oguri, Masamune; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Shin, Min-Su; /Michigan U. /Princeton U. Observ.; Kayo, Issha; /Tokyo U., ICRR; Strauss, Michael A.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Hennawi, Joseph F.; /UC, Berkeley /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Morokuma, Tomoki; /Natl. Astron. Observ. of Japan; Becker, Robert H.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis; White, Richard L.; /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; /Ohio State U.; Gregg, Michael D.; /LLNL, Livermore /UC, Davis /Exeter U.

    2010-05-01

    We present the second report of our systematic search for strongly lensed quasars from the data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). From extensive follow-up observations of 136 candidate objects, we find 36 lenses in the full sample of 77,429 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the SDSS Data Release 5. We then define a complete sample of 19 lenses, including 11 from our previous search in the SDSS Data Release 3, from the sample of 36,287 quasars with i < 19.1 in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.2, where we require the lenses to have image separations of 1 < {theta} < 20 and i-band magnitude differences between the two images smaller than 1.25 mag. Among the 19 lensed quasars, 3 have quadruple-image configurations, while the remaining 16 show double images. This lens sample constrains the cosmological constant to be {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.84{sub -0.08}{sup +0.06}(stat.){sub -0.07}{sup + 0.09}(syst.) assuming a flat universe, which is in good agreement with other cosmological observations. We also report the discoveries of 7 binary quasars with separations ranging from 1.1 to 16.6, which are identified in the course of our lens survey. This study concludes the construction of our statistical lens sample in the full SDSS-I data set.

  2. The Eighth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Data from SDSS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; An, Deokkeun; /Ewha Women' s U., Seoul; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Michigan State U.; Berlind, Andreas A.; /Vanderbilt U.; Bickerton, Steven J.; /Princeton U.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; /Apache Point Observ.; Blanton, Michael R.; /New York U., CCPP /Penn State U.

    2011-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) started a new phase in August 2008, with new instrumentation and new surveys focused on Galactic structure and chemical evolution, measurements of the baryon oscillation feature in the clustering of galaxies and the quasar Ly{alpha} forest, and a radial velocity search for planets around {approx}8000 stars. This paper describes the first data release of SDSS-III (and the eighth counting from the beginning of the SDSS). The release includes 5-band imaging of roughly 5200 deg{sup 2} in the Southern Galactic Cap, bringing the total footprint of the SDSS imaging to 14,555 deg{sup 2}, or over a third of the Celestial Sphere. All the imaging data have been reprocessed with an improved sky-subtraction algorithm and a final, self-consistent recalibration and flat-field determination. This release also includes all data from the second phase of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Evolution (SEGUE-2), consisting of spectroscopy of approximately 118,000 stars at both high and low Galactic latitudes. All the more than half a million stellar spectra obtained with the SDSS spectrograph have been reprocessed through an improved stellar parameters pipeline, which has better determination of metallicity for high metallicity stars.

  3. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Catalog. 3. Third data release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Hall, Patrick B.; Richards, Gordon T.; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Anderson, Scott F.; Fan, Xiao-Hui; Jester, Sebastian; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss,; SubbaRao, Mark; Brandt, W.N.; Gunn, James E.; Yanny, Brian; Bahcall, Neta A.; Barentine, J.C.; Blanton, Michael R.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert; Csabai, Istvan; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /York U., Canada /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Arizona U.,

    2005-03-01

    We present the third edition of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Catalog. The catalog consists of the 46,420 objects in the SDSS Third Data Release that have luminosities larger than M{sub i} = -22 (in a cosmology with H{sub 0} = 70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1}, {Omega}{sub M} = 0.3, and {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.7), have at least one emission line with FWHM larger than 1000 km s{sup -1} or are unambiguously broad absorption line quasars, are fainter than i = 15.0, and have highly reliable redshifts. The area covered by the catalog is {approx} 4188 deg{sup 2}. The quasar redshifts range from 0.08 to 5.41, with a median value of 1.47; the high-redshift sample includes 520 quasars at redshifts greater than four, of which 17 are at redshifts greater than five. For each object the catalog presents positions accurate to better than 0.2'' rms per coordinate, five-band (ugriz) CCD-based photometry with typical accuracy of 0.03 mag, and information on the morphology and selection method. The catalog also contains radio, near-infrared, and X-ray emission properties of the quasars, when available, from other large-area surveys. The calibrated digital spectra cover the wavelength region 3800-9200 at a spectral resolution of {approx} 2000; the spectra can be retrieved from the public database using the information provided in the catalog. A total of 44,221 objects in the catalog were discovered by the SDSS; 28,400 of the SDSS discoveries are reported here for the first time.

  4. Population mixtures and searches of lensed and extended quasars across photometric surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso

    2017-04-01

    Wide-field photometric surveys enable searches of rare yet interesting objects, such as strongly lensed quasars or quasars with a bright host galaxy. Past searches for lensed quasars based on their optical and near-infrared properties have relied on photometric cuts and spectroscopic preselection (as in the Sloan Quasar Lens Search), or neural networks applied to photometric samples. These methods rely on cuts in morphology and colours, with the risk of losing many interesting objects due to scatter in their population properties, restrictive training sets, systematic uncertainties in catalogue-based magnitudes and survey-to-survey photometric variations. Here, we explore the performance of a Gaussian mixture model to separate point-like quasars, quasars with an extended host and strongly lensed quasars using griz psf and model magnitudes and WISE W1, W2. The choice of optical magnitudes is due to their presence in all current and upcoming releases of wide-field surveys, whereas UV information is not always available. We then assess the contamination from blue galaxies and the role of additional features such as W3 magnitudes or psf-model terms as morphological information. As a demonstration, we conduct a search in a random 10 per cent of the SDSS footprint, and provide the catalogue of the 43 SDSS object with the highest 'lens' score in our selection that survive visual inspection, and are spectroscopically confirmed to host active nuclei. We inspect archival data and find images of 5/43 objects in the Hubble Legacy Archive, including two known lenses. The code and materials are available to facilitate follow-up.

  5. The Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars II - The SDSS Sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Stawarz, L.; Lawrence, A.

    2012-12-28

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining SDSS optical and FIRST radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio loudness parameter R is found to be quite different than the observed one, and is smooth with no evidence of a bi-modality in radio loudness. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., 2011 which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  6. The ninth data release of the sloan digital sky survey: First spectroscopic data from the sdss-iii baryon oscillation spectroscopic survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Prieto, Carlos Allend; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, Eric; Bailey, Stephen; Balbinot, Eduardo; Barnes, Rory; Bautista, Julian E.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z=0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z=2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition...

  7. Intervening Mg II absorption systems from the SDSS DR12 quasar spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Srinivasan; Clowes, Roger G.; Campusano, Luis E.; Söchting, Ilona K.; Graham, Matthew J.; Williger, Gerard M.

    2016-12-01

    We present the catalogue of the Mg II absorption systems detected at a high significance level using an automated search algorithm in the spectra of quasars from the 12th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. A total of 266,433 background quasars were searched for the presence of absorption systems in their spectra. The continuum modelling for the quasar spectra was performed using a mean filter. A pseudo-continuum derived using a median filter was used to trace the emission lines. The absorption system catalogue contains 39,694 Mg II systems detected at a 6.0, 3.0σ level respectively for the two lines of the doublet. The catalogue was constrained to an absorption line redshift of 0.35 ≤ z2796 ≤ 2.3. The rest-frame equivalent width of the λ2796 line ranges between 0.2 ≤ Wr ≤ 6.2 Å. Using Gaussian noise-only simulations, we estimate a false positive rate of 7.7 per cent in the catalogue. We measured the number density ∂N2796/∂z of Mg II absorbers and find evidence for steeper evolution of the systems with Wr ≥ 1.2 Å at low redshifts (z2796 ≤ 1.0), consistent with other earlier studies. A suite of null tests over the redshift range 0.5 ≤ z2796 ≤ 1.5 was used to study the presence of systematics and selection effects like the dependence of the number density evolution of the absorption systems on the properties of the background quasar spectra. The null tests do not indicate the presence of any selection effects in the absorption catalogue if the quasars with spectral signal-to-noise level less than 5.0 are removed. The resultant catalogue contains 36,981 absorption systems. The Mg II absorption catalogue is publicly available and can be downloaded from the link http://srini.ph.unimelb.edu.au/mgii.php.

  8. The eleventh and twelfth data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Final data from SDSS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Shadab; Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Anders, F.; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Éric; Bailey, Stephen; Basu, Sarbani; Bautista, Julian E.; Beaton, Rachael L.; Beers, Timothy C.; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, A. Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, D. E.; Brinkmann, J.; Brown, Peter J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cai, Zheng; Capozzi, Diego; Rosell, Aurelio Carnero; Carr, Michael A.; Carrera, Ricardo; Chambers, K. C.; Chaplin, William James; Chen, Yen-Chi; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Clerc, Nicolas; Comparat, Johan; Covey, Kevin; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; Costa, Luiz N. da; Rio, Nicola Da; Davenport, James R. A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Lee, Nathan De; Delubac, Timothée; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Dwelly, Tom; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ellsworth, Tristan; Elsworth, Yvonne; Epstein, Courtney R.; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Ak, Nurten Filiz; Finley, Hayley; Finoguenov, Alexis; Flaherty, Kevin; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Foster, Jonathan; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; García, Rafael A.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Jian; Génova-Santos, R.; Georgakakis, A.; Ghezzi, Luan; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gontcho, Satya Gontcho A.; Hernández, Jonay I. González; Grebel, Eva K.; Green, Paul J.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Grieves, Nolan; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Fred R.; Hekker, Saskia; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huber, Daniel; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jiang, Linhua; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koenig, Xavier P.; Lam, Charles R.; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Licquia, Timothy C.; Liu, Jian; Long, Daniel C.; López-Corredoira, Martín; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Lupton, Robert H.; III, Claude E. Mack; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Mao, Qingqing; Maraston, Claudia; Marchwinski, Robert C.; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Martig, Marie; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McBride, Cameron K.; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Ménard, Brice; Menzel, Marie-Luise; Merloni, Andrea; Mészáros, Szabolcs; Miller, Adam A.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; More, Surhud; Morganson, Eric; Morice-Atkinson, Xan; Morrison, Heather L.; Mosser, Benôit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam D.; Nandra, Kirpal; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Neyrinck, Mark; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastián E.; O’Connell, Julia E.; O’Connell, Robert W.; O’Connell, Ross; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Audrey E.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Osumi, Keisuke; Owen, Russell; Padgett, Deborah L.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Paegert, Martin; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Pattarakijwanich, Petchara; Pellejero-Ibanez, M.; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Pérez-Fournon, Ismael; Pe´rez-Ra`fols, Ignasi; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Mello, Gustavo F. Porto de; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Reid, Beth A.; Rich, James; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Basílio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schwope, Axel D.; Scóccola, C. G.; Scott, Caroline; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Serenelli, Aldo; Shane, Neville; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Aguirre, V. Silva; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobreira, Flávia; Souto, Diogo; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Stello, Dennis; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Tayar, Jamie; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thomas, Neil; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Verde, Licia; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Ye`che, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou (周旭), Xu; Zhou (周志民), Zhimin; Zou (邹虎), Hu; Zhu, Guangtun

    2015-07-20

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All of the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 deg2 of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include the measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 5200 deg2 of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 deg2; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.

  9. THE ELEVENTH AND TWELFTH DATA RELEASES OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FINAL DATA FROM SDSS-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Shadab [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Albareti, Franco D. [Instituto de Física Teórica, (UAM/CSIC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Prieto, Carlos Allende [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anders, F. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Anderton, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Armengaud, Eric [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Basu, Sarbani [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Beaton, Rachael L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); and others

    2015-07-15

    The third generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) took data from 2008 to 2014 using the original SDSS wide-field imager, the original and an upgraded multi-object fiber-fed optical spectrograph, a new near-infrared high-resolution spectrograph, and a novel optical interferometer. All of the data from SDSS-III are now made public. In particular, this paper describes Data Release 11 (DR11) including all data acquired through 2013 July, and Data Release 12 (DR12) adding data acquired through 2014 July (including all data included in previous data releases), marking the end of SDSS-III observing. Relative to our previous public release (DR10), DR12 adds one million new spectra of galaxies and quasars from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) over an additional 3000 deg{sup 2} of sky, more than triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial velocity measurements of 5500 stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS). The APOGEE outputs now include the measured abundances of 15 different elements for each star. In total, SDSS-III added 5200 deg{sup 2} of ugriz imaging; 155,520 spectra of 138,099 stars as part of the Sloan Exploration of Galactic Understanding and Evolution 2 (SEGUE-2) survey; 2,497,484 BOSS spectra of 1,372,737 galaxies, 294,512 quasars, and 247,216 stars over 9376 deg{sup 2}; 618,080 APOGEE spectra of 156,593 stars; and 197,040 MARVELS spectra of 5513 stars. Since its first light in 1998, SDSS has imaged over 1/3 of the Celestial sphere in five bands and obtained over five million astronomical spectra.

  10. XMM-Newton observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.326

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yanli; Fabian, A. C.; Fan, Xiaohui; Walker, S. A.; Ghisellini, G.; Sbarrato, T.; Dou, Liming; Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Feng, Longlong

    2017-09-01

    A brief Chandra observation of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 at redshift 6.326 showed it to be a relatively bright, soft X-ray source with a count rate of about 1 count ks-1. In this article, we present results for the quasar from a 65-ks XMM-Newton observation, which constrains its spectral shape well. The quasar is clearly detected with a total of ˜460 net counts in the 0.2-10 keV band. The spectrum is characterized by a simple power-law model with a photon index of Γ = 2.30^{+0.10}_{-0.10} and the intrinsic 2-10 keV luminosity is 3.14 × 1045 erg s-1. The 1σ upper limit to any intrinsic absorption column density is NH = 6.07 × 1022 cm-2. No significant iron emission lines were detected. We derive an X-ray-to-optical flux ratio αox of -1.74 ± 0.01, consistent with the values found in other quasars of comparable ultraviolet luminosity. We did not detect significant flux variations either in the XMM-Newton exposure or between XMM-Newton and Chandra observations, which are separated by ˜8 months. The X-ray observation enables the bolometric luminosity to be calculated after modelling the spectral energy distribution: the accretion rate is found to be sub-Eddington.

  11. The Ninth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; et al.

    2012-07-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z=0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z=2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition, the stellar parameters pipeline, which determines radial velocities, surface temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities of stars, has been updated and refined with improvements in temperature estimates for stars with T_eff<5000 K and in metallicity estimates for stars with [Fe/H]>-0.5. DR9 includes new stellar parameters for all stars presented in DR8, including stars from SDSS-I and II, as well as those observed as part of the SDSS-III Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration-2 (SEGUE-2). The astrometry error introduced in the DR8 imaging catalogs has been corrected in the DR9 data products. The next data release for SDSS-III will be in Summer 2013, which will present the first data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) along with another year of data from BOSS, followed by the final SDSS-III data release in December 2014.

  12. The ultraviolet-to-mid-infrared spectral energy distribution of weak emission line quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lane, R.A.; Shemmer, O.; Diamond-Stanic, A.M.; Fan, X.; Anderson, S.F.; Brandt, W.N.; Plotkin, R.M.; Richards, G.T.; Schneider, D.P.; Strauss, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope photometry of 18 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars at 2.7 ≤ z ≤ 5.9 which have weak or undetectable high-ionization emission lines in their rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectra (hereafter weak-lined quasars, or WLQs). The Spitzer data are combined with SDSS

  13. SSGSS: The Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dowd, Matthew J.; Schiminovich, David; Johnson, Benjamin D.; Treyer, Marie A.; Martin, Christopher D.; Wyder, Ted K.; Charlot, Stéphane; Heckman, Timothy M.; Martins, Lucimara P.; Seibert, Mark; van der Hulst, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Spitzer-SDSS-GALEX Spectroscopic Survey (SSGSS) provides a new sample of 101 star-forming galaxies at z <0.2 with unprecedented multi-wavelength coverage. New mid-to far-infrared spectroscopy from the Spitzer Space Telescope is added to a rich suite of previous imaging and spectroscopy,

  14. THE RADIO AND OPTICAL LUMINOSITY EVOLUTION OF QUASARS. II. THE SDSS SAMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States); Stawarz, L. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5510 (Japan); Lawrence, A., E-mail: jsingal@stanford.edu [University of Edinburgh Institute for Astronomy, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-10

    We determine the radio and optical luminosity evolutions and the true distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R, defined as the ratio of the radio to optical luminosity, for a set of more than 5000 quasars combining Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical and Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) radio data. We apply the method of Efron and Petrosian to access the intrinsic distribution parameters, taking into account the truncations and correlations inherent in the data. We find that the population exhibits strong positive evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with somewhat greater radio evolution than optical. With the luminosity evolutions accounted for, we determine the density evolutions and local radio and optical luminosity functions. The intrinsic distribution of the radio-loudness parameter R is found to be quite different from the observed one and is smooth with no evidence of a bimodality in radio loudness for log R {>=} -1. The results we find are in general agreement with the previous analysis of Singal et al., which used POSS-I optical and FIRST radio data.

  15. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Basu, Sarbani; Bates, Dominic; Battaglia, Giuseppina; Baumgarten, Falk; Baur, Julien; Bautista, Julian; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bershady, Matthew; Bertran de Lis, Sara; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Borissova, J.; Bovy, Jo; Nielsen Brandt, William; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Orlando Camacho Chavez, Hugo; Cano Díaz, M.; Cappellari, Michele; Carrera, Ricardo; Chen, Yanping; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comerford, Julia M.; Comparat, Johan; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert; Cunha, Katia; Darling, Jeremy; Davidson, James W., Jr.; Dawson, Kyle; Da Costa, Luiz; Da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Deconto Machado, Alice; Delubac, Timothée; De Lee, Nathan; De la Macorra, Axel; De la Torre, Sylvain; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Donor, John; Downes, Juan Jose; Drory, Niv; Du, Cheng; Du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Dwelly, Tom; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Elsworth, Yvonne P.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Falcón-Barroso, Jesús; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Fernandez-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter; Fu, Hai; Gao, Yang; Garcia, Rafael A.; Garcia-Dias, R.; Garcia-Hernández, D. A.; Garcia Pérez, Ana E.; Gaulme, Patrick; Ge, Junqiang; Geisler, Douglas; Gillespie, Bruce; Gil Marin, Hector; Girardi, Léo; Goddard, Daniel; Gomez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul; Grier, Catherine J.; Grier, Thomas; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hall, Matt; Harding, Paul; Harley, R. E.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne; Hayes, Christian R.; Hearty, Fred; Hekker, Saskia; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Hu, Jian; Huber, Daniel; Hutchinson, Timothy Alan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jaehnig, Kurt; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jullo, Eric; Kallinger, T.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Laurent, Pierre; Law, David R.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Li, Chen; Li, Cheng; Li, Niu; Li, Ran; Liang, Fu-Heng; Liang, Yu; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Lin; Lin, Yen-Ting; Liu, Chao; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; MacDonald, Nicholas; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mackereth, J. Ted; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Olena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Dullius Mallmann, Nícolas; Manchado, Arturo; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Martinez Valpuesta, Inma; Masters, Karen L.; Mathur, Savita; McGreer, Ian D.; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszáros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Miglio, Andrea; Minchev, Ivan; Molaverdikhani, Karan; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Mosser, Benoit; Muna, Demitri; Myers, Adam; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; O’Connell, Julia; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pace, Zachary; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John; Paris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Peacock, John A.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Percival, Jeffrey W.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew; Pinsonneault, Marc H.; Pisani, Alice; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Price-Jones, Natalie; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Reyna, A. M.; Rich, James; Richstein, Hannah; Ridl, Jethro; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Rodrigues, Thaíse S.; Roe, Natalie; Lopes, A. Roman; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Ross, Ashley J.

    2017-12-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). As well as its core program, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources (SPIDERS). This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13). DR13 makes publicly available the first 1390 spatially resolved integral field unit observations of nearby galaxies from MaNGA. It includes new observations from eBOSS, completing the Sloan Extended QUasar, Emission-line galaxy, Luminous red galaxy Survey (SEQUELS), which also targeted variability-selected objects and X-ray-selected objects. DR13 includes new reductions of the SDSS-III BOSS data, improving the spectrophotometric calibration and redshift classification, and new reductions of the SDSS-III APOGEE-1 data, improving stellar parameters for dwarf stars and cooler stars. DR13 provides more robust and precise photometric calibrations. Value-added target catalogs relevant for eBOSS, TDSS, and SPIDERS and an updated red-clump catalog for APOGEE are also available. This paper describes the location and format of the data and provides references to important technical papers. The SDSS web site, http://www.sdss.org, provides links to the data, tutorials, examples of data access, and extensive documentation of the reduction and analysis procedures. DR13 is the first of a scheduled set that will contain new data and analyses from the planned ∼6 yr operations of SDSS-IV.

  16. THE NINTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Anderton, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Alexandroff, Rachael; Blake, Cullen H. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), C/Via Lactea, s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anderson, Scott F.; Barnes, Rory; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bochanski, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Aubourg, Eric; Bautista, Julian [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite, F-75205 Paris (France); Bailey, Stephen [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Balbinot, Eduardo [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Caixa Postal 15051, Porto Alegre, RS-91501-970 (Brazil); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Beifiori, Alessandra [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Blomqvist, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); and others

    2012-12-15

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III) presents the first spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This ninth data release (DR9) of the SDSS project includes 535,995 new galaxy spectra (median z {approx} 0.52), 102,100 new quasar spectra (median z {approx} 2.32), and 90,897 new stellar spectra, along with the data presented in previous data releases. These spectra were obtained with the new BOSS spectrograph and were taken between 2009 December and 2011 July. In addition, the stellar parameters pipeline, which determines radial velocities, surface temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities of stars, has been updated and refined with improvements in temperature estimates for stars with T{sub eff} < 5000 K and in metallicity estimates for stars with [Fe/H] > -0.5. DR9 includes new stellar parameters for all stars presented in DR8, including stars from SDSS-I and II, as well as those observed as part of the SEGUE-2. The astrometry error introduced in the DR8 imaging catalogs has been corrected in the DR9 data products. The next data release for SDSS-III will be in Summer 2013, which will present the first data from the APOGEE along with another year of data from BOSS, followed by the final SDSS-III data release in 2014 December.

  17. Signals from the Noise: Image Stacking for Quasars in the FIRST Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, R L; Helfand, D J; Becker, R H; Glikman, E; deVries, W

    2006-05-05

    We present a technique to explore the radio sky into the nanoJansky regime by employing image stacking using the FIRST radio sky survey. We begin with a discussion of the non-intuitive relationship between the mean and median values of a non-Gaussian distribution in which measurements of the members of the distribution are dominated by noise. Following a detailed examination of the systematic effects present in the 20 cm VLA snapshot images that comprise FIRST, we demonstrate that image stacking allows us to recover the average properties of source populations with flux densities a factor of 30 or more below the rms noise level. With the calibration described herein, mean estimates of radio flux density, luminosity, radio loudness, etc. are derivable for any undetected source class having arcsecond positional accuracy. We demonstrate the utility of this technique by exploring the radio properties of quasars found in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compute the mean luminosities and radio-loudness parameters for 41,295 quasars in the SDSS DR3 catalog. There is a tight correlation between optical and radio luminosity, with the radio luminosity increasing as the 0.72 power of optical luminosity. This implies declining radio-loudness with optical luminosity, with the most luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -30) having on average ten times lower radio-to-optical ratios than the least luminous objects (M{sub UV} = -21). There is also a striking correlation between optical color and radio loudness: quasars that are either redder or bluer than the norm are brighter radio sources. Quasars having g-r {approx} 0.8 magnitudes redder than the SDSS composite spectrum are found to have radio-loudness ratios that are higher by a factor of 8. We examine the radio properties of the subsample of quasars with broad absorption lines, finding, surprisingly, that BAL quasars have higher mean radio flux densities at all redshifts, with the greatest disparity arising in the rare low

  18. SDSS-III: Massive Spectroscopic Surveys of the Distant Universe, the Milky Way Galaxy, and Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ. /Harvard U., Phys. Dept.; Weinberg, David H.; /Ohio State U.; Agol, Eric; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Aihara, Hiroaki; /Tokyo U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Laguna U., Tenerife; Anderson, Scott F.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arns, James A.; /Michigan U.; Aubourg, Eric; /APC, Paris /DAPNIA, Saclay; Bailey, Stephen; /LBL, Berkeley; Balbinot, Eduardo; /Rio Grande do Sul U. /Rio de Janeiro Observ.; Barkhouser, Robert; /Johns Hopkins U. /Michigan State U.

    2011-01-01

    Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-I and II), SDSS-III is a program of four spectroscopic surveys on three scientific themes: dark energy and cosmological parameters, the history and structure of the Milky Way, and the population of giant planets around other stars. The Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) will measure redshifts of 1.5 million massive galaxies and Ly{alpha} forest spectra of 150,000 quasars, using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) feature of large scale structure to obtain percent-level determinations of the distance scale and Hubble expansion rate at z < 0.7 and at z {approx} 2.5. SEGUE-2, a now-completed continuation of the Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration, measured medium-resolution (R = {lambda}/{Delta}{lambda} 1800) optical spectra of 118,000 stars in a variety of target categories, probing chemical evolution, stellar kinematics and substructure, and the mass profile of the dark matter halo from the solar neighborhood to distances of 100 kpc. APOGEE, the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment, will obtain high-resolution (R {approx} 30,000), high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N {ge} 100 per resolution element), H-band (1.51 {micro}m < {lambda} < 1.70 {micro}m) spectra of 10{sup 5} evolved, late-type stars, measuring separate abundances for {approx} 15 elements per star and creating the first high-precision spectroscopic survey of all Galactic stellar populations (bulge, bar, disks, halo) with a uniform set of stellar tracers and spectral diagnostics. The Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Large-area Survey (MARVELS) will monitor radial velocities of more than 8000 FGK stars with the sensitivity and cadence (10-40 m s{sup -1}, {approx} 24 visits per star) needed to detect giant planets with periods up to two years, providing an unprecedented data set for understanding the formation and dynamical evolution of giant planet systems. As of January 2011, SDSS-III has obtained

  19. Target Selection for the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasowski, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Cohen, R. E.; Carlberg, J. K.; Fleming, Scott W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chojnowski, S. D.; Holtzman, J. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88001 (United States); Santana, F. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Oelkers, R. J.; Bird, J. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Andrews, B. [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Beaton, R. L. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Bender, C.; Cunha, K. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Bovy, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Covey, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA 98225 (United States); Dell’Agli, F.; García-Hernández, D. A. [Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, and Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Harding, P. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Johnson, J. A., E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2017-11-01

    APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing ∼3 × 10{sup 5} stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding on APOGEE’s goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch and red clump stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.

  20. Target Selection for the SDSS-IV APOGEE-2 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasowski, G.; Cohen, R. E.; Chojnowski, S. D.; Santana, F.; Oelkers, R. J.; Andrews, B.; Beaton, R. L.; Bender, C.; Bird, J. C.; Bovy, J.; Carlberg, J. K.; Covey, K.; Cunha, K.; Dell’Agli, F.; Fleming, Scott W.; Frinchaboy, P. M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Harding, P.; Holtzman, J.; Johnson, J. A.; Kollmeier, J. A.; Majewski, S. R.; Mészáros, Sz.; Munn, J.; Muñoz, R. R.; Ness, M. K.; Nidever, D. L.; Poleski, R.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Shetrone, M.; Simon, J. D.; Smith, V. V.; Sobeck, J. S.; Stringfellow, G. S.; Szigetiáros, L.; Tayar, J.; Troup, N.

    2017-11-01

    APOGEE-2 is a high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopic survey observing ∼3 × 105 stars across the entire sky. It is the successor to APOGEE and is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV). APOGEE-2 is expanding on APOGEE’s goals of addressing critical questions of stellar astrophysics, stellar populations, and Galactic chemodynamical evolution using (1) an enhanced set of target types and (2) a second spectrograph at Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. APOGEE-2 is targeting red giant branch and red clump stars, RR Lyrae, low-mass dwarf stars, young stellar objects, and numerous other Milky Way and Local Group sources across the entire sky from both hemispheres. In this paper, we describe the APOGEE-2 observational design, target selection catalogs and algorithms, and the targeting-related documentation included in the SDSS data releases.

  1. New quasar survey with WIRO: The light curves of quasars over ~15 year timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Emily; Bassett, Neil; Deam, Sophie; Dixon, Don; Harvey, William; Lee, Daniel; Lyke, Bradley; Haze Nunez, Evan; Parziale, Ryan; Witherspoon, Catherine; Myers, Adam D.; Findlay, Joseph; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2017-01-01

    Quasars, a type of active galactic nuclei (AGN), are known to vary in brightness on 10 day to 7 year timescales. While it has been proposed that this variability is caused by instability in the accretion disk, Poisson processes, or microlensing, the exact cause remains mysterious. Understanding the physical mechanisms that drive quasar variability will require imaging of quasars over a wide range of timescales. In particular, the observations required to constrain longer timescales can be difficult to conduct. This summer ~1000 quasars in Stripe 82 were observed in ugriz wavelength bands using WIRO, the University of Wyoming’s 2.3-meter telescope. Using these images, earlier data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey's observations of Stripe 82, as well as various data reduction methods, the quasars’ magnitude can be studied on our extended 3 day to 15 year timescale. Here, we present the light curves of ~1000 quasars in ugriz bands as observed over the last 15 years. Thiswork is supported by the National Science Foundation under REU grant AST 1560461.

  2. SDSS J013127.34–032100.1: A NEWLY DISCOVERED RADIO-LOUD QUASAR AT z = 5.18 WITH EXTREMELY HIGH LUMINOSITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Wei-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming; Zhang, Ju-jia; Wang, Fang; Wang, Jian-Guo; Fan, Yu-Feng; Chang, Liang; Wang, Chuan-Jun; Lun, Bao-Li [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Wang, Feige; Wu, Xue-Bing; Yang, Jinyi; Ho, Luis C.; Zuo, Wenwen; Yang, Qian; Ai, Yanli [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Brandt, William N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kim, Minjin [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Ran [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); and others

    2014-11-10

    Very few of the z > 5 quasars discovered to date have been radio-loud, with radio-to-optical flux ratios (radio-loudness parameters) higher than 10. Here we report the discovery of an optically luminous radio-loud quasar, SDSS J013127.34–032100.1 (J0131–0321 in short), at z = 5.18 ± 0.01 using the Lijiang 2.4 m and Magellan telescopes. J0131–0321 has a spectral energy distribution consistent with that of radio-loud quasars. With an i-band magnitude of 18.47 and a radio flux density of 33 mJy, its radio-loudness parameter is ∼100. The optical and near-infrared spectra taken by Magellan enable us to estimate its bolometric luminosity to be L {sub bol} ∼ 1.1 × 10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1}, approximately 4.5 times greater than that of the most distant quasar known to date. The black hole mass of J0131–0321 is estimated to be 2.7 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with an uncertainty up to 0.4 dex. Detailed physical properties of this high-redshift, radio-loud, potentially super-Eddington quasar can be probed in the future with more dedicated and intensive follow-up observations using multi-wavelength facilities.

  3. The Effects of S/N on Measuring CIV Broad Emission Line Widths in Quasars - An Early Science Result from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, Kelly; SDSS-RM Team

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) Project spectroscopically monitored ~850 quasars over a seven square degree field for approximately six months with the BOSS spectrograph. While the time series analysis of the quasar continuum and emission-line variability, and thereby the potential to measure reverberation time delays from this sample, is still underway, we have used the subset (roughly half) of this sample containing the CIV 1549A broad emission line to investigate the effects of S/N on measuring this broad emission line width. Line width measurements are necessary for inferring the broad line region gas velocities used to determine the quasar black hole mass. However, literature studies have suggested line width measurements, and therefore black hole mass estimates, may be biased by the use of relatively low S/N, typical survey-quality, data, compared to the high S/N data that calibrate single-epoch black hole mass scaling relations. The SDSS-RM data set provides a unique opportunity to search for any systematic uncertainties in CIV line width measurements through a comparison of line widths measured from the single-epoch spectra, which are roughly equivalent to other SDSS/BOSS quasar spectra (though still twice the exposure time) to those measured from the high-S/N, campaign co-added spectra, which contain more than 30 epochs of each source. Here we present results from this investigation, which have implications for estimating CIV single-epoch black hole masses from the SDSS/BOSS and other surveys.

  4. The LBT/WISSH quasar survey: revealing powerful winds in the most luminous AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vietri, Giustina

    2017-01-01

    The systematic, multi-frequency investigation of hyper-luminous quasars shining at the golden epoch of AGN activity offers the unique opportunity of studying the power and the effect of AGN feedback at its extreme.The WISE/SDSS selected hyper-luminous (WISSH) quasar survey is an extensive multi-band observing program (from millimeter wavelengths to hard X rays) designed to accurately probe the role of nuclear activity in SMBH-galaxy self-regulated growth via extended outflows.Our on-going project aims at constraining both AGN and host galaxy ISM and star-formation properties in a large sample of ~ 90 broad-line quasars at the brightest end of the AGN luminosity function (L_bol > 1e14 L_sun), and at the peak of their number density (z ~ 2.5 - 3.5).I will review the most important results of the near-IR spectroscopic follow-up of WISSH quasars (available for ~40% of the total sample) performed with the LUCI at LBT. These observations were carried out to obtain a reliable Hbeta-based estimate of the SMBH masses and a census of the ionized outflows in these hyper-luminous quasars.We found that WISSH AGN are typically powered by highly accreting (0.3-3 Ledd), ten billion solar masses SMBHs, demonstrating that WISSH provides a simple and valuable tool to complete the census of the extreme SMBH population in the universe.We also succeeded in discovering [OIII] emission lines with a broad, skewed profile and exceptional luminosities (> 6e44 erg/s), tracing very powerful ionized outflows (up to ~4% of L_bol) in ~30% of the sample.Remarkably, the remaining 70% of quasars lacks [OIII] emission but shows strong winds traced by 3,000-8,000 km/s blueshifts of the high-ionization (CIV) with respect to low-ionization (Hbeta) broad emission lines, revealing strong radiatively driven winds that dominate the BLR kinematics.I will discuss the possible origins of this intriguing dichotomy which involves fundamental parameters such as bolometric luminosity, SMBH mass, Eddington ratio

  5. Discovery of 16 New z ˜ 5.5 Quasars: Filling in the Redshift Gap of Quasar Color Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinyi; Fan, Xiaohui; Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Bian, Fuyan; Yang, Qian; McGreer, Ian D.; Yi, Weimin; Jiang, Linhua; Green, Richard; Yue, Minghao; Wang, Shu; Li, Zefeng; Ding, Jiani; Dye, Simon; Lawrence, Andy

    2017-04-01

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey of luminous z ˜ 5.5 quasars. Quasars at z ˜ 5.5, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and the early super-massive black hole growth. However, it has been very challenging to select quasars at redshifts 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distributions. We develop a new selection technique for z ˜ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near-IR, and mid-IR photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT InfraRed Deep Sky Surveys—Large Area Survey (ULAS), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS), and Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer. From our pilot observations in the SDSS-ULAS/VHS area, we have discovered 15 new quasars at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 and 6 new lower redshift quasars, with SDSS z band magnitude brighter than 20.5. Including other two z ˜ 5.5 quasars already published in our previous work, we now construct a uniform quasar sample at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7, with 17 quasars in a ˜4800 square degree survey area. For further application in a larger survey area, we apply our selection pipeline to do a test selection by using the new wide field J-band photometric data from a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS). We successfully discover the first UHS selected z ˜ 5.5 quasar.

  6. Target Selection for the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paegert, Martin; Stassun, Keivan G.; De Lee, Nathan; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Mack, Claude E., III; Dhital, Saurav; Hebb, Leslie; Ge, Jian

    2015-06-01

    We present the target selection process for the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanets Large-area Survey (MARVELS), which is part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) III. MARVELS is a medium-resolution (R ∼ 11,000) multi-fiber spectrograph capable of obtaining radial velocities for 60 objects at a time in order to find brown dwarfs and giant planets. The survey was configured to target dwarf stars with effective temperatures approximately between 4500 and 6250 K. For the first 2 years MARVELS relied on low-resolution spectroscopic pre-observations to estimate the effective temperature and log (g) for candidate stars and then selected suitable dwarf stars from this pool. Ultimately, the pre-observation spectra proved ineffective at filtering out giant stars; many giants were incorrectly classified as dwarfs, resulting in a giant contamination rate of ∼30% for the first phase of the MARVELS survey. Thereafter, the survey instead applied a reduced proper motion cut to eliminate giants and used the Infrared Flux Method to estimate effective temperatures, using only extant photmetric and proper-motion catalog information. The target selection method introduced here may be useful for other surveys that need to rely on extant catalog data for selection of specific stellar populations.

  7. Machine learning classification of SDSS transient survey images

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Buisson, L.; Sivanandam, N.; Bassett, Bruce A.; Smith, M.

    2015-12-01

    We show that multiple machine learning algorithms can match human performance in classifying transient imaging data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) supernova survey into real objects and artefacts. This is a first step in any transient science pipeline and is currently still done by humans, but future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will necessitate fully machine-enabled solutions. Using features trained from eigenimage analysis (principal component analysis, PCA) of single-epoch g, r and i difference images, we can reach a completeness (recall) of 96 per cent, while only incorrectly classifying at most 18 per cent of artefacts as real objects, corresponding to a precision (purity) of 84 per cent. In general, random forests performed best, followed by the k-nearest neighbour and the SkyNet artificial neural net algorithms, compared to other methods such as naive Bayes and kernel support vector machine. Our results show that PCA-based machine learning can match human success levels and can naturally be extended by including multiple epochs of data, transient colours and host galaxy information which should allow for significant further improvements, especially at low signal-to-noise.

  8. The origin of the far-infrared continuum of z ~ 6 quasars. A radiative transfer model for SDSS J1148+5251

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, R.; Bianchi, S.; Valiante, R.; Risaliti, G.; Salvadori, S.

    2015-07-01

    Context. Understanding the history of formation of z > 6 quasars is a major challenge to theoretical models. Physical insights on the connection between the central black hole and its host galaxy can be gained by means of the quasar infrared properties. Aims: Here we investigate the origin of the far-infrared continuum of SDSS J1148+5251, using it as a prototype for the more general class of high-luminosity high-redshift quasars. Methods: We run the radiative transfer code TRADING to follow the transfer of radiation from the central source and from stellar sources through the dusty environment of the host galaxy. We adopt simple models for the central source, including all the radiation that can travel beyond the dusty torus. The radiation from stellar sources is modelled using the code PÉGASE. The model is based on the output of the semi-analytical merger tree code, GAMETE/QSOdust, which lets us predict the evolution of the host galaxy and of its nuclear black hole, following the star formation history and chemical evolution - including dust - in all the progenitor galaxies of SDSS J1148+5251. Results: We find that the radiation emitted by the central source, which dominates the observed spectral energy distribution from UV/optical to near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, can also provide an important source of heating for the dust distributed in the host galaxy, powering at least 30% and up to 70% of the observed far-infrared emission at rest-frame wavelengths [20-1000] μm. The remaining fraction is contributed by stellar sources and can only be achieved if the host galaxy is able to sustain a star formation rate of ≈900 M⊙/yr at z = 6.4. This points to a co-evolution scenario where, during their hierarchical assembly, the first super-massive black holes and their host galaxies grow at the same pace until the black hole reaches a mass of ~2 × 108 M⊙; it then starts growing faster than its host, reaching the bright quasar phase when the black hole and

  9. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs): New z > 6 Quasar Survey with Subaru/HSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; SHELLQs Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Quasars at high redshift are an important and unique probe of the distant Universe, for understanding the origin and progress of cosmic reionization, the early growth of supermassive black holes, and the evolution of quasar host galaxies and their dark matter halos, among other topics. We are currently carrying out a new spectroscopic survey, called SHELLQs (Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars), to search for low-luminosity quasars at z > 6. By exploiting the exquisite imaging data produced by the Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) survey, we aim to probe quasar luminosities down to M1450 ~ -22 mag, i.e., below the classical threshold between quasars and Seyfert galaxies. Candidate selection is performed by combining several photometric approaches including a Bayesian probabilistic algorithm. A large spectroscopic observing program is underway, using Subaru/FOCAS, GTC/OSIRIS, and Gemini/GMOS; in particular, SHELLQs has been approved as a Subaru intensive program to use 20 nights in the coming four semesters. As of August 2016, we have discovered ~40 quasars and bright galaxies at z ~ 6 and beyond, from the first 100 deg2 of the HSC survey (Matsuoka et al. 2016, ApJ, 828, 26). Surprisingly, we are starting to see the steep rise of the luminosity function of high-z galaxies, compared with that of quasars, at magnitudes fainter than M1450 ~ -22 mag or zAB ~ 24 mag. Multi-wavelength follow-up studies of the discovered objects as well as further survey observations are ongoing.

  10. Luminosity function of quasars at large redshifts from grism surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Maarten; Schneider, Donald P.; Gunn, James E.

    1991-01-01

    We have carried out a systematic search for emission-line objects through photometrically calibrated CCD grism surveys with the Palomar 200-inch telescope in transit mode, covering 62 square degrees. These surveys have yielded 141 quasars detected by their C IV or Ly-alpha emission in the redshift range 2.0 - 4.7. We use this sample and the known flux limits to derive the slope of the luminosity function and the space density above a given line luminosity, as a function of redshift. While space densities are approximately constant at redshifts 2.0 - 3.0, they are declining steeply for redshifts larger than 3.

  11. Discovery of 16 New z  ∼ 5.5 Quasars: Filling in the Redshift Gap of Quasar Color Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jinyi; Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Yang, Qian; Yue, Minghao; Wang, Shu; Li, Zefeng [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Fan, Xiaohui; Jiang, Linhua [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Bian, Fuyan [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); McGreer, Ian D.; Green, Richard; Ding, Jiani [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Yi, Weimin [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China); Dye, Simon [School of Physics and Astronomy, Nottingham University, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Lawrence, Andy [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh, EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-01

    We present initial results from the first systematic survey of luminous z  ∼ 5.5 quasars. Quasars at z ∼ 5.5, the post-reionization epoch, are crucial tools to explore the evolution of intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and the early super-massive black hole growth. However, it has been very challenging to select quasars at redshifts 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 using conventional color selections, due to their similar optical colors to late-type stars, especially M dwarfs, resulting in a glaring redshift gap in quasar redshift distributions. We develop a new selection technique for z ∼ 5.5 quasars based on optical, near-IR, and mid-IR photometric data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), UKIRT InfraRed Deep Sky Surveys—Large Area Survey (ULAS), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS), and Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer . From our pilot observations in the SDSS-ULAS/VHS area, we have discovered 15 new quasars at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7 and 6 new lower redshift quasars, with SDSS z band magnitude brighter than 20.5. Including other two z ∼ 5.5 quasars already published in our previous work, we now construct a uniform quasar sample at 5.3 ≤ z ≤ 5.7, with 17 quasars in a ∼4800 square degree survey area. For further application in a larger survey area, we apply our selection pipeline to do a test selection by using the new wide field J-band photometric data from a preliminary version of the UKIRT Hemisphere Survey (UHS). We successfully discover the first UHS selected z ∼ 5.5 quasar.

  12. Close companions to two high-redshift quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Strauss, Michael A. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Haiman, Zoltàn [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Jiang, Linhua [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Schneider, Donald P., E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and the Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We report the serendipitous discoveries of companion galaxies to two high-redshift quasars. SDSS J025617.7+001904 is a z = 4.79 quasar included in our recent survey of faint quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82 region. The initial MMT slit spectroscopy shows excess Lyα emission extending well beyond the quasar's light profile. Further imaging and spectroscopy with LBT/MODS1 confirms the presence of a bright galaxy (i {sub AB} = 23.6) located 2'' (12 kpc projected) from the quasar with strong Lyα emission (EW{sub 0} ≈ 100 Å) at the redshift of the quasar, as well as faint continuum. The second quasar, CFHQS J005006.6+344522 (z = 6.25), is included in our recent HST SNAP survey of z ∼ 6 quasars searching for evidence of gravitational lensing. Deep imaging with ACS and WFC3 confirms an optical dropout ∼4.5 mag fainter than the quasar (Y {sub AB} = 25) at a separation of 0.''9. The red i {sub 775} – Y {sub 105} color of the galaxy and its proximity to the quasar (5 kpc projected if at the quasar redshift) strongly favor an association with the quasar. Although it is much fainter than the quasar, it is remarkably bright when compared to field galaxies at this redshift, while showing no evidence for lensing. Both systems may represent late-stage mergers of two massive galaxies, with the observed light for one dominated by powerful ongoing star formation and for the other by rapid black hole growth. Observations of close companions are rare; if major mergers are primarily responsible for high-redshift quasar fueling then the phase when progenitor galaxies can be observed as bright companions is relatively short.

  13. The Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey: Understanding the Optically Variable Sky with SEQUELS in SDSS-III

    OpenAIRE

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Green, Paul J.; Morganson, Eric; Eracleous, Michael; Myers, Adam D.; Badenes, Carles; Bershady, Matthew A.; Brandt, William N; Chambers, Kenneth C.; Davenport, James R.A.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Flewelling, Heather; Heckman, Timothy M.; Isler, Jedidah C.

    2016-01-01

    The Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) is an SDSS-IV eBOSS subproject primarily aimed at obtaining identification spectra of ~220,000 optically-variable objects systematically selected from SDSS/Pan-STARRS1 multi-epoch imaging. We present a preview of the science enabled by TDSS, based on TDSS spectra taken over ~320 deg^2 of sky as part of the SEQUELS survey in SDSS-III, which is in part a pilot survey for eBOSS in SDSS-IV. Using the 15,746 TDSS-selected single-epoch spectra of photomet...

  14. Galaxy-galaxy and galaxy-cluster lensing with the SDSS and FIRST surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetroullas, C.; Brown, M. L.

    2018-01-01

    We perform a galaxy-galaxy lensing study by correlating the shapes of ∼2.7 × 105 galaxies selected from the VLA FIRST (Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty centimetres) radio survey with the positions of ∼38.5 million Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, ∼132 000 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) and ∼78 000 SDSS galaxies that are also detected in the VLA FIRST survey. The measurements are conducted on angular scales θ ≲ 1200 arcsec. On scales θ ≲ 200 arcsec, we find that the measurements are corrupted by residual systematic effects associated with the instrumental beam of the VLA data. Using simulations, we show that we can successfully apply a correction for these effects. Using the three lens samples (the SDSS DR10 sample, the BCG sample and the SDSS-FIRST matched object sample), we measure a tangential shear signal that is inconsistent with 0 at the 10.2σ, 3.8σ and 9σ levels, respectively. Fitting an NFW model to the detected signals, we find that the ensemble mass profile of the BCG sample agrees with the values in the literature. However, the mass profiles of the SDSS DR10 and the SDSS-FIRST matched object samples are found to be shallower and steeper than results in the literature, respectively. The best-fitting Virial masses for the SDSS DR10, BCG and SDSS-FIRST matched samples, derived using an NFW model and allowing for a varying concentration factor, are M_{200}^SDSS-DR10 = (1.2 ± 0.4) × 10^{12} M_{⊙}, M_{200}^BCG = (1.4 ± 1.3) × 10^{13} M_{⊙} and M_{200}^SDSS-FIRST =8.0 ± 4.2 × 10^{13} M_{⊙}, respectively. These results are in good agreement (within ∼2σ) with values in the literature. Our findings suggest that for galaxies to be bright both in the radio and in the optical, they must be embedded in very dense environment on scales R ≲ 1 Mpc.

  15. Exploration of quasars with the Gaia mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proft, Svea; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the opportunities in and limits to investigating quasars with the Gaia satellite by studying Gaia's low- and high-resolution quasar spectra, with consideration of their signal-to-noise ratios. Furthermore, we explore bright quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with broad emission lines (BELs) redshifted into the spectral range of Gaia's Radial Velocity Spectrograph (RVS). We find that Gaia low-resolution spectra of quasars enable a determination of equivalent widths, continuum variability, and the Baldwin effect. Additionally, it will be feasible to analyze BEL reverberation mapping with Gaia data for a small sample of objects. These quasars should have a high cadence of measurements or higher time lags due to large redshifts, high quasar luminosities, or selected low-ionization lines. More than 500 known quasars will also get high-resolution spectra of individual BELs in the small wavelength range of the RVS. This allows an investigation of broad emission line shapes and their variabilities to get information on the spatial structure and kinematics of the broad line region. We identify six known variable SDSS quasars with BELs in the RVS that have interesting spectra for a potential intrinsic line variability investigation. However, the signal-to-noise ratio of the RVS is too small for studying narrow and broad absorption lines in quasar spectra.

  16. A Study of the SDSS White Dwarf Component in the LSPM Proper Motion Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darveau-Bernier, A.; Bergeron, P.; Lépine, S.

    2017-03-01

    We present a model atmosphere analysis of the white dwarfs identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey with proper motions measured in the LSPM proper motion survey of Lépine et al. We rely on reduced proper motion diagrams to build a sample of white dwarfs in the SDSS footprint, and cross correlate this sample with the SDSS spectroscopic database to understand the systematics related to completeness, contamination, WD+M dwarf binaries, reddening, etc. We then determine a white dwarf luminosity function for this sample using various methods.

  17. The Hunt for Red Quasars: Luminous Obscured Black Hole Growth Unveiled in the Stripe 82 X-Ray Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Glikman, Eilat; Brusa, Marcella; Rigby, Jane R.; Tasnim Ananna, Tonima; Stern, Daniel; Lira, Paulina; Urry, C. Megan; Salvato, Mara; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allevato, Viola; Cardamone, Carolin; Civano, Francesca; Coppi, Paolo; Farrah, Duncan; Komossa, S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; Marchesi, Stefano; Richards, Gordon; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Treister, Ezequiel

    2017-10-01

    We present results of a ground-based near-infrared campaign with Palomar TripleSpec, Keck NIRSPEC, and Gemini GNIRS to target two samples of reddened active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates from the 31 deg2 Stripe 82 X-ray survey. One sample, which is ∼89% complete to Kcolors (> 4, Vega). The fainter sample (K> 17, Vega) represents a pilot program to follow-up four sources from a parent sample of 34 that are not detected in the single-epoch SDSS catalog and have WISE quasar colors. All 12 sources are broad-line AGNs (at least one permitted emission line has an FWHM exceeding 1300 km s‑1) and span a redshift range 0.59 0.5), and a greater percentage have high X-ray luminosities ({L}{{X},{full}}> {10}44 erg s‑1). Such outflows and high luminosities may be consistent with the paradigm that reddened broad-line AGNs represent a transitory phase in AGN evolution as described by the major merger model for black hole growth. Results from our pilot program demonstrate proof of concept that our selection technique is successful in discovering reddened quasars at z> 1 missed by optical surveys.

  18. UNSHIFTED METASTABLE He I* MINI-BROAD ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEM IN THE NARROW-LINE TYPE 1 QUASAR SDSS J080248.18+551328.9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Tuo; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Chenwei [Polar Research Institute of China, 451 Jinqiao Road, Pudong, Shanghai 200136 (China); Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Komossa, S.; Yuan, Weimin [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Zuther, Jens [Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Lu, Honglin [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, The University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 (China); Zuo, Wenwen, E-mail: jituo@pric.gov.cn [Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Nandan Road 80, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-02-10

    We report the identification of an unusual absorption-line system in the quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9 and present a detailed study of the system, incorporating follow-up optical and near-IR spectroscopy. A few tens of absorption lines are detected, including He I*, Fe II*, and Ni II*, which arise from metastable or excited levels, as well as resonant lines in Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, Mn II, and Ca II. All of the isolated absorption lines show the same profile of width Δv ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1} centered at a common redshift as that of the quasar emission lines, such as [O II], [S II], and hydrogen Paschen and Balmer series. With narrow Balmer lines, strong optical Fe II multiplets, and weak [O III] doublets, its emission-line spectrum is typical for that of a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1). We have derived reliable measurements of the gas-phase column densities of the absorbing ions/levels. Photoionization modeling indicates that the absorber has a density of n {sub H} ∼ (1.0-2.5) × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} and a column density of N {sub H} ∼ (1.0-3.2) × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} and is located at R ∼100-250 pc from the central supermassive black hole. The location of the absorber, the symmetric profile of the absorption lines, and the coincidence of the absorption- and emission-line centroid jointly suggest that the absorption gas originates from the host galaxy and is plausibly accelerated by stellar processes, such as stellar winds and/or supernova explosions. The implications for the detection of such a peculiar absorption-line system in an NLS1 are discussed in the context of coevolution between supermassive black hole growth and host galaxy buildup.

  19. Crowdsourcing Broad Absorption Line Properties and Other Features of Quasar Outflow Using Zooniverse Citizen Science Project Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Cassie; Lundgren, Britt; Grier, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) regularly publishes vast catalogs of quasars and other astronomical objects. Previously, the SDSS collaboration has used visual inspection to check quasar redshift validity and flag instances of broad absorption lines (BALs). This information helps researchers to easily single out the quasars with BAL properties and study their outflows and other intervening gas clouds. Due to the ever-growing number of new SDSS quasar observations, visual inspections are no longer possible using previous methods. Currently, BAL information is being determined entirely computationally, and the accuracy of that information is not precisely known. This project uses the Zooniverse citizen science platform to visually inspect quasar spectra for BAL properties, to check the accuracy of the current autonomous methods, and to flag multi-phase outflows and find candidates for in-falling gas into the quasar central engine. The layout and format of a Zooniverse project provides an easier way to inspect and record data on each spectrum and share the workload via crowdsourcing. Work done by the SDSS collaboration members is serving as a beta test for a public project upon the official release of the DR14 quasar catalog by SDSS.

  20. Host Galaxy Spectra and Consequences for SN Typing from the SDSS SN Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brown, Peter J.; Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Brewington, Howard; Campbell, Heather; D’Andrea, Chris B.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Galbany, Lluís; Garnavich, Peter; Gupta, Ravi R.; Hlozek, Renee; Jha, Saurabh W.; Kunz, Martin; Lampeitl, Hubert; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Marriner, John; Miquel, Ramon; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Pan, Kaike; Schneider, Donald P.; Simmons, Audrey E.; Smith, Mathew; Snedden, Stephanie A.

    2014-03-06

    We present the spectroscopy from 5254 galaxies that hosted supernovae (SNe) or other transient events in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II). Obtained during SDSS-I, SDSS-II, and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), this sample represents the largest systematic, unbiased, magnitude limited spectroscopic survey of supernova (SN) host galaxies. Using the host galaxy redshifts, we test the impact of photometric SN classification based on SDSS imaging data with and without using spectroscopic redshifts of the host galaxies. Following our suggested scheme, there are a total of 1166 photometrically classified SNe Ia when using a flat redshift prior and 1126 SNe Ia when the host spectroscopic redshift is assumed. For 1024 (87.8%) candidates classified as likely SNe Ia without redshift information, we find that the classification is unchanged when adding the host galaxy redshift. Using photometry from SDSS imaging data and the host galaxy spectra, we also report host galaxy properties for use in future nalysis of SN astrophysics. Finally, we investigate the differences in the interpretation of the light curve properties with and without knowledge of the redshift. When using the SALT2 light curve fitter, we find a 21% increase in the number of fits that converge when using the spectroscopic redshift. Without host galaxy redshifts, we find that SALT2 light curve fits are systematically biased towards lower photometric redshift estimates and redder colors in the limit of low signal-to-noise data. The general improvements in performance of the light curve fitter and the increased diversity of the host galaxy sample highlights the importance of host galaxy spectroscopy for current photometric SN surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey and future surveys such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  1. FR-II Broad Absorption Line Quasars and the Life Cycle of Quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; de Vries, W

    2006-01-05

    By combining the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey Third Data Release quasar list with the VLA FIRST survey, we have identified five objects having both broad absorption lines in their optical spectra and FR-II radio morphologies. We identify an additional example of this class from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey, J1408+3054. Including the original FR-II-BAL object, J1016+5209, brings the number of such objects to eight. These quasars are relatively rare; finding this small handful has required the 45,000-large quasar sample of SDSS. The FR-II-BAL quasars exhibit a significant anti-correlation between radio-loudness and the strength of the BAL features. This is easily accounted for by the evolutionary picture in which quasars emerge from cocoons of BAL-producing material which stifle the development of radio jets and lobes. There is no such simple explanation for the observed properties of FR-II-BALs in the unification-by-orientation model of quasars. The rarity of the FR-II-BAL class implies that the two phases do not coexist for very long in a single quasar, perhaps less than 10{sup 5} years, with the combined FR-II, high ionization broad absorption phase being even shorter by another factor of 10 or more.

  2. THE TENTH DATA RELEASE OF THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY: FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC DATA FROM THE SDSS-III APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY GALACTIC EVOLUTION EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Anderton, Timothy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Alexandroff, Rachael [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Allende Prieto, Carlos [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), C/Vía Láctea, s/n, E-38200, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Anders, Friedrich [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Anderson, Scott F.; Bhardwaj, Vaishali [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian E. [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-75205 Paris (France); Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bastien, Fabienne A.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bird, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, VU Station 1807, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Beifiori, Alessandra [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstraße, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Bender, Chad F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blake, Cullen H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 219 S. 33rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has been in operation since 2000 April. This paper presents the Tenth Public Data Release (DR10) from its current incarnation, SDSS-III. This data release includes the first spectroscopic data from the Apache Point Observatory Galaxy Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), along with spectroscopic data from the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) taken through 2012 July. The APOGEE instrument is a near-infrared R ∼ 22,500 300 fiber spectrograph covering 1.514-1.696 μm. The APOGEE survey is studying the chemical abundances and radial velocities of roughly 100,000 red giant star candidates in the bulge, bar, disk, and halo of the Milky Way. DR10 includes 178,397 spectra of 57,454 stars, each typically observed three or more times, from APOGEE. Derived quantities from these spectra (radial velocities, effective temperatures, surface gravities, and metallicities) are also included. DR10 also roughly doubles the number of BOSS spectra over those included in the Ninth Data Release. DR10 includes a total of 1,507,954 BOSS spectra comprising 927,844 galaxy spectra, 182,009 quasar spectra, and 159,327 stellar spectra selected over 6373.2 deg{sup 2}.

  3. THE SWIFT AGN AND CLUSTER SURVEY. II. CLUSTER CONFIRMATION WITH SDSS DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Rhiannon D.; Dai, Xinyu [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Kochanek, Christopher S. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bregman, Joel N., E-mail: Rhiannon.D.Griffin-1@ou.edu, E-mail: xdai@ou.edu, E-mail: ckochanek@astronomy.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: jbregman@umich.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    We study 203 (of 442) Swift AGN and Cluster Survey extended X-ray sources located in the SDSS DR8 footprint to search for galaxy over-densities in three-dimensional space using SDSS galaxy photometric redshifts and positions near the Swift cluster candidates. We find 104 Swift clusters with a >3σ galaxy over-density. The remaining targets are potentially located at higher redshifts and require deeper optical follow-up observations for confirmation as galaxy clusters. We present a series of cluster properties including the redshift, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) magnitude, BCG-to-X-ray center offset, optical richness, and X-ray luminosity. We also detect red sequences in ∼85% of the 104 confirmed clusters. The X-ray luminosity and optical richness for the SDSS confirmed Swift clusters are correlated and follow previously established relations. The distribution of the separations between the X-ray centroids and the most likely BCG is also consistent with expectation. We compare the observed redshift distribution of the sample with a theoretical model, and find that our sample is complete for z ≲ 0.3 and is still 80% complete up to z ≃ 0.4, consistent with the SDSS survey depth. These analysis results suggest that our Swift cluster selection algorithm has yielded a statistically well-defined cluster sample for further study of cluster evolution and cosmology. We also match our SDSS confirmed Swift clusters to existing cluster catalogs, and find 42, 23, and 1 matches in optical, X-ray, and Sunyaev–Zel’dovich catalogs, respectively, and so the majority of these clusters are new detections.

  4. PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFTS FOR QUASARS IN MULTI-BAND SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brescia, M.; Mercurio, A. [INAF-Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte, via Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Cavuoti, S.; Longo, G. [Department of Physics, University Federico II, via Cinthia 6, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); D' Abrusco, R., E-mail: brescia@oacn.inaf.it [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm (MLPQNA) is a machine learning method that can be used to cope with regression and classification problems on complex and massive data sets. In this paper, we give a formal description of the method and present the results of its application to the evaluation of photometric redshifts for quasars. The data set used for the experiment was obtained by merging four different surveys (Sloan Digital Sky Survey, GALEX, UKIDSS, and WISE), thus covering a wide range of wavelengths from the UV to the mid-infrared. The method is able (1) to achieve a very high accuracy, (2) to drastically reduce the number of outliers and catastrophic objects, and (3) to discriminate among parameters (or features) on the basis of their significance, so that the number of features used for training and analysis can be optimized in order to reduce both the computational demands and the effects of degeneracy. The best experiment, which makes use of a selected combination of parameters drawn from the four surveys, leads, in terms of {Delta}z{sub norm} (i.e., (z{sub spec} - z{sub phot})/(1 + z{sub spec})), to an average of {Delta}z{sub norm} = 0.004, a standard deviation of {sigma} = 0.069, and a median absolute deviation, MAD = 0.02, over the whole redshift range (i.e., z{sub spec} {<=} 3.6), defined by the four-survey cross-matched spectroscopic sample. The fraction of catastrophic outliers, i.e., of objects with photo-z deviating more than 2{sigma} from the spectroscopic value, is <3%, leading to {sigma} = 0.035 after their removal, over the same redshift range. The method is made available to the community through the DAMEWARE Web application.

  5. A search for changing look quasars in second epoch imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, Joseph; Myers, Adam; McGreer, Ian

    2018-01-01

    Over nearly two decades, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey has compiled a catalog of over half a million confirmed quasars. During that period approximately ten percent of these objects have been spectroscopically observed in two or more epochs over baselines of ten or more years. This led recently to the discovery of the largest change in luminosity ever before observed in a quasar. The dimming emission was a reflection of very significant changes in continuum and broad line properties, the source had effectively transitioned from a Type I quasar to a Type II AGN. Since then several more "changing look" quasars have been discovered in multi-epoch SDSS spectroscopy. Among them are objects with rising and falling luminosities, appearing and disappearing broad lines. The origin of this behavior is still very uncertain, currently favored is the scenario in which an accreting black hole is simply starved of fuel. Other plausible scenarios include flaring due to stellar tidal disruption close to the black hole or large changes in accretion flow, which can occur during transitions between radiatively efficient and inefficient accretion regimes. Monitoring of larger numbers of changing look quasars will help to elucidate these ideas.In this poster, we report on the progress of a pilot study in which we hope to learn how to select changing look quasars in multi-epoch imaging. This will allow us to take advantage of the entire SDSS quasar catalog rather than just the ten percent of objects with multi-epoch spectroscopy. Comparing archival SDSS and more recent Legacy Survey imaging over ten-year baselines we select objects whose photometry is consistent with the large changes in luminosity expected in changing look quasars. We aim to build up a catalog of both transitioned and transitioning objects for future monitoring.

  6. The distributed development environment for SDSS software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Eileen [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gurbani, Vijay [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mackinnon, Bryan [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Newberg, Heidi [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nicinski, Tom [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Petravick, Don [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Pordes, Ruth [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sergey, Gary [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Stoughton, C [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, Robert [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The authors present an integrated science software development environment, code maintenance and support system for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) now being actively used throughout the collaboration. The SDSS is a collaborative effort between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the Univ. of Chicago, Princeton University, the Institute for Advanced Study, The John Hopkins University, Univ. of Washington, the U.S. Naval Observatory and the Japan Promotion Group. Its main results will be an imaging survey of 104deg2 and a red shift spectroscopic survey of 106 galaxies and 105 quasars producing approximately 1.2 x 1013 bytes of data over the 5 year running period (1995-2000). This will produce a three dimensional map of the Universe.

  7. Catalog of 3 < z < 5.5 Quasar Candidates Selected among XMM-Newton Sources and Its Spectroscopic Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii Khorunzhev

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We have compiled a catalog of 903 quasar candidates (including known quasars at 3 < z < 5.5 selected among X-ray sources from the XMM-Newton serendipitous survey (3XMM-DR4 catalog. We used photometric SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE data to select the objects. The surface number density of objects in our sample exceeds that in the SDSS spectroscopic quasar sample at the same redshifts by a factor of 1.5. We have performed spectroscopic observations of a subsample of new quasar candidates using a new low- and medium-resolution spectrograph at the 1.6-m AZT-33IK telescope (Mondy, Russia and demonstrated that the purity of these candidates is about 65%. We have discovered one of the most distant (z = 5.08 X-ray selected quasars.

  8. Spectroscopic CCD surveys for quasars at large redshift. 3: The Palomar Transit Grism Survey catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Donald P.; Schmidt, Maarten; Gunn, James E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the initial results of the Palomar Transit Grism Survey (PTGS). The PTGS was designed to produce a sample of z greater than 2.7 quasars that were identified by well-defined selection criteria. The survey consists of six narrow (approximately equal to 8.5 min wide) strips of sky; the total effective area is 61.47 sq deg. Low-resolution slitless spectra, covering the wavelength range from 4400 to 7500 A, were obtained for approximately 600 000 objects. The wavelength- and flux-calibrated spectra were searched for emission lines with an automatic software algorithm. A total to 1655 emission features in the grism data satisfied our signal-to-noise ratio and equivalent width selection criteria; subsequent slit spectroscopy of the candidates confirmed the existence of 1052 lines (928 different objects). Six groups of emission lines were detected in the survey: Lyman alpha + N V, C IV, C III1, Mg II, H Beta + (O III), and H alpha + (S II). More than two-thirds of the candidates are low-redshift (z less than 0.45) emission-line galaxies; ninety objects are high-redshift quasars (z greater than 2.7) detected via their Lyman alpha + N V emission lines. The survey contains three previously unknown quasars brighter than 17th magnitude; all three have redshifts of approximately equal to 1.3. In this paper we present the observational properties of the survey, the algorithms used to select the emission-line candidates, and the catalog of emission-line objects.

  9. The Core Collapse Supernova Rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Matt; Cinabro, David; Dilday, Ben; Galbany, Lluis; Gupta, Ravi R.; Kessler, R.; Marriner, John; Nichol, Robert C.; Richmond, Michael; Schneider, Donald P.; Sollerman, Jesper

    2014-08-26

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova Survey (SDSS-II SNS) data to measure the volumetric core collapse supernova (CCSN) rate in the redshift range (0.03 < z < 0.09). Using a sample of 89 CCSN, we find a volume-averaged rate of 1.06 ± 0.19 × 10(–)(4)((h/0.7)(3)/(yr Mpc(3))) at a mean redshift of 0.072 ± 0.009. We measure the CCSN luminosity function from the data and consider the implications on the star formation history.

  10. Composite Spectral Energy Distributions and Infrared–Optical Colors of Type 1 and Type 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Myers, Adam D.; Greene, Jenny E.; Hainline, Kevin N.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; DiPompeo, Michael A.

    2017-11-01

    We present observed mid-infrared and optical colors and composite spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of type 1 (broad-line) and 2 (narrow-line) quasars selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopy. A significant fraction of powerful quasars are obscured by dust and are difficult to detect in optical photometric or spectroscopic surveys. However, these may be more easily identified on the basis of mid-infrared (MIR) colors and SEDs. Using samples of SDSS type 1 and 2 matched in redshift and [O III] luminosity, we produce composite rest-frame 0.2–15 μm SEDs based on SDSS, UKIDSS, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry and perform model fits using simple galaxy and quasar SED templates. The SEDs of type 1 and 2 quasars are remarkably similar, with the differences explained primarily by the extinction of the quasar component in the type 2 systems. For both types of quasar, the flux of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) relative to the host galaxy increases with AGN luminosity ({L}[{{O}{{III}}]}) and redder observed MIR color, but we find only weak dependencies of the composite SEDs on mechanical jet power as determined through radio luminosity. We conclude that luminous quasars can be effectively selected using simple MIR color criteria similar to those identified previously ({{W}}1{--}{{W}}2> 0.7; Vega), although these criteria miss many heavily obscured objects. Obscured quasars can be further identified based on optical–IR colors (for example, (u{--}{{W}}3 [{AB}])> 1.4({{W}}1{--}{{W}}2 [{Vega}])+3.2). These results illustrate the power of large statistical studies of obscured quasars selected on the basis of MIR and optical photometry.

  11. A Statistical Study of Brown Dwarf Companions from the SDSS-III MARVELS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; De Lee, Nathan M.; Lee, Brian L.; Fleming, Scott W.; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Varosi, Frank; Liu, Jian; Zhao, Bo; Li, Rui; Agol, Eric; MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    We present 23 new Brown Dwarf (BD) candidates from the Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS-III). The BD candidates were selected from the processed MARVELS data using the latest University of Florida 2D pipeline, which shows significant improvement and reduction of systematic errors over the 1D pipeline results included in the SDSS Data Release 12. This sample is the largest BD yield from a single radial velocity survey. Of the 23 candidates, 18 are around main sequence stars and 5 are around giant stars. Given a giant contamination rate of ~24% for the MARVELS survey, we find a BD occurrence rate around main sequence stars of ~0.7%, which agrees with previous studies and confirms the BD desert, while the BD occurrence rate around the MARVELS giant stars is ~0.6%. Preliminary results show that our new candidates around solar type stars support a two population hypothesis, where BDs are divided at a mass of ~42.5 MJup. BDs less massive than 42.5 MJup have eccentricity distributions consistent with planet-planet scattering models, where BDs more massive than 42.5 MJup have both period and eccentricity distributions similar to that of stellar binaries. Special Brown Dwarf systems such as multiple BD systems and highly eccentric BDs will also be presented.

  12. The Distance of Quasar outflows: VLT/X-SHOOTER Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinfeng; Arav, Nahum; Reid Miller, Timothy

    2018-01-01

    We observed 13 BAL and mini-BAL quasars using the VLT X-Shooter spectrograph. In 7 of these we find outflow troughs from S IV and S IV*. Using collisional excitation models of the measured S IV and S IV* column densities, we determine the electron number density (ne) of the outflow; and combining this value of ne with photoionization simulations, we derive the distance of each outflow from the central source. We find that 6 out of 8 outflows (one quasar shows two such outflows) are located at a distances of more than 100 pc from the central source. The spectral region covering the S IV and S IV* troughs was not observed in our targets prior to the VLT observations; and therefore this sample is unbiased towards a specific distance scale. Thus, these results are representitive (albeit in a small sample) for the general population of the high ionization BAL and mini-BAL outflows.

  13. The space distribution of quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilipenko, S. V.

    2007-01-01

    The space distribution of quasars from the 2dF and SDSS DR5 catalogs in the redshift interval 0.3 quasars in both catalogs are found to have the following common features: (1) when the distance between the nearest objects exceeds 35h (-1) Mpc (where h = H

  14. Evidence for Higher Black Hole Spin in Radio-loud Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Andreas; Done, Chris; Lu, Youjun; Zhang, Fupeng; Inoue, Yoshiyuki

    2017-11-01

    One of the major unsolved questions concerning the understanding of the active galactic nucleus population is the origin of the dichotomy between radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars. The most promising explanation is provided by the spin paradigm, which suggests that radio-loud quasars have a higher black hole spin. However, the measurement of black hole spin remains extremely challenging. We here aim at comparing the mean radiative efficiencies of carefully matched samples of radio-loud and radio-quiet Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars at 0.3paradigm.

  15. Accurate spectroscopic redshift of the multiply lensed quasar PSOJ0147 from the Pan-STARRS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2017-09-01

    Context. The gravitational lensing time delay method provides a one-step determination of the Hubble constant (H0) with an uncertainty level on par with the cosmic distance ladder method. However, to further investigate the nature of the dark energy, a H0 estimate down to 1% level is greatly needed. This requires dozens of strongly lensed quasars that are yet to be delivered by ongoing and forthcoming all-sky surveys. Aims: In this work we aim to determine the spectroscopic redshift of PSOJ0147, the first strongly lensed quasar candidate found in the Pan-STARRS survey. The main goal of our work is to derive an accurate redshift estimate of the background quasar for cosmography. Methods: To obtain timely spectroscopically follow-up, we took advantage of the fast-track service programme that is carried out by the Nordic Optical Telescope. Using a grism covering 3200-9600 Å, we identified prominent emission line features, such as Lyα, N V, O I, C II, Si IV, C IV, and [C III] in the spectra of the background quasar of the PSOJ0147 lens system. This enables us to determine accurately the redshift of the background quasar. Results: The spectrum of the background quasar exhibits prominent absorption features bluewards of the strong emission lines, such as Lyα, N V, and C IV. These blue absorption lines indicate that the background source is a broad absorption line (BAL) quasar. Unfortunately, the BAL features hamper an accurate determination of redshift using the above-mentioned strong emission lines. Nevertheless, we are able to determine a redshift of 2.341 ± 0.001 from three of the four lensed quasar images with the clean forbidden line [C III]. In addition, we also derive a maximum outflow velocity of 9800 km s-1 with the broad absorption features bluewards of the C IV emission line. This value of maximum outflow velocity is in good agreement with other BAL quasars.

  16. Overview of the SDSS-IV MaNGA Survey: Mapping nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Law, David R.; Yan, Renbin; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Wake, David A.; Cherinka, Brian; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Tremonti, Christy; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Byler, Nell; Cappellari, Michele; Conroy, Charlie; Dutton, Aaron A.; Emsellem, Eric; Etherington, James; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fu, Hai; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Johnston, Evelyn J.; Kauffmann, Guinevere; Kinemuchi, Karen; Klaene, Mark A.; Knapen, Johan H.; Leauthaud, Alexie; Li, Cheng; Lin, Lihwai; Maiolino, Roberto; Malanushenko, Viktor; Malanushenko, Elena; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; McDermid, Richard M.; Merrifield, Michael R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Steele, Oliver; Steinmetz, Matthias; Thanjavur, Karun; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; van den Bosch, Remco C. E.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Wilkinson, David; Wright, Shelley; Xiao, Ting; Zhang, Kai

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic

  17. The Thirteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey MApping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat

    2016-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in July 2014. It pursues three core programs: APOGEE-2,MaNGA, and eBOSS. In addition, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: TDSS and SPIDERS. This paper describes the first data release from SDSS-IV, Data Release 13 (DR13), which contains new data, reanalysis of existing data sets and, like all SDSS data releases, is inclusive of previously released data. DR13 makes publicly available 1390 spatially resolved in...

  18. A Quasar Turns On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has discovered a quasar the brightly-shining, active nucleus of a galaxy abruptly turning on in what appears to be the fastest such transition ever seen in such an object.A Rapid TransitionQuasars are expected to show variations in brightness on timescales of hours to millions of years, but its not often that we get to study their major variability in real time! So far, weve discovered only a dozen changing-look quasars active galactic nuclei that exhibit major changes in their spectral class and brightness between observations. Roughly half of these were quasars that turned on and half were quasars that turned off, generally on timescales of maybe 5 or 10 years.The dramatic change in spectrum of iPTF 16bco between the archival SDSS data from 2004 (bottom) and the follow-up spectroscopy from Keck 2+DEIMOS in 2016 (top). [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]In June 2016, however, a team of scientists led by Suvi Gezari (University of Maryland) discovered iPTF 16bco, a nuclear transient that wasnt there the last time Palomar checked in 2012. A search through archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey and GALEX data in addition to some follow-up X-ray imaging and spectroscopic observations told the team what they needed to know: iPTF 16bco is a quasar that only just turned on within the 500 days preceding the iPTF observations.This source, in fact, is a 100-million-solar-mass black hole located at the center of a galaxy at a redshift of z= 0.237. In just over a year, the source changed classification from a galaxy with weak narrow-line emission to a quasar with characteristic strong, broad emission lines and a ten-fold increase in continuum brightness! What caused this sudden transition?Instabilities at Fault?iPTF 16bco and the other known changing-look quasars with disappearing (red circles) and appearing (blue circles) broad-line emission. [Adapted from Gezari et al. 2017]Gezari and collaborators used the large number of recent

  19. A search for distant radio-loud quasars in the CLASS survey : three new radio-selected quasars at z > 4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, IAG; McMahon, RG; Dennett-Thorpe, J; Jackson, N; Mack, KH; Xanthopoulos, E

    2001-01-01

    We report on the search for distant radio-loud quasars in the Cosmic Lens All Sky Survey (CLASS) of flat spectrum radio sources with S-5GHz > 30 mJy. Unresolved optical counterparts were selected from APM scans of POSS-I plates, with e <19.0 and red o - e > 2.0 colours, in an effective area of

  20. THE DATA REDUCTION PIPELINE FOR THE SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU GALAXY SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Yan, Renbin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Andrews, Brett H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and PITT PACC, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Camino del Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, 277-8583 (Kavli IPMU, WPI) (Japan); Chen, Yanmei [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); D’Souza, Richard; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fu, Hai, E-mail: dlaw@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); and others

    2016-10-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an optical fiber-bundle integral-field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). With a spectral coverage of 3622–10354 Å and an average footprint of ∼500 arcsec{sup 2} per IFU the scientific data products derived from MaNGA will permit exploration of the internal structure of a statistically large sample of 10,000 low-redshift galaxies in unprecedented detail. Comprising 174 individually pluggable science and calibration IFUs with a near-constant data stream, MaNGA is expected to obtain ∼100 million raw-frame spectra and ∼10 million reduced galaxy spectra over the six-year lifetime of the survey. In this contribution, we describe the MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline algorithms and centralized metadata framework that produce sky-subtracted spectrophotometrically calibrated spectra and rectified three-dimensional data cubes that combine individual dithered observations. For the 1390 galaxy data cubes released in Summer 2016 as part of SDSS-IV Data Release 13, we demonstrate that the MaNGA data have nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction shortward of ∼8500 Å and reach a typical 10 σ limiting continuum surface brightness μ  = 23.5 AB arcsec{sup −2} in a five-arcsecond-diameter aperture in the g -band. The wavelength calibration of the MaNGA data is accurate to 5 km s{sup −1} rms, with a median spatial resolution of 2.54 arcsec FWHM (1.8 kpc at the median redshift of 0.037) and a median spectral resolution of σ  = 72 km s{sup −1}.

  1. The Data Reduction Pipeline for the SDSS-IV MaNGA IFU Galaxy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Andrews, Brett H.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Chen, Yanmei; Drory, Niv; D'Souza, Richard; Fu, Hai; Jones, Amy; Kauffmann, Guinevere; MacDonald, Nicholas; Masters, Karen L.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Parejko, John K.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Sánchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David J.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Zhang, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) is an optical fiber-bundle integral-field unit (IFU) spectroscopic survey that is one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). With a spectral coverage of 3622-10354 Å and an average footprint of ˜500 arcsec2 per IFU the scientific data products derived from MaNGA will permit exploration of the internal structure of a statistically large sample of 10,000 low-redshift galaxies in unprecedented detail. Comprising 174 individually pluggable science and calibration IFUs with a near-constant data stream, MaNGA is expected to obtain ˜100 million raw-frame spectra and ˜10 million reduced galaxy spectra over the six-year lifetime of the survey. In this contribution, we describe the MaNGA Data Reduction Pipeline algorithms and centralized metadata framework that produce sky-subtracted spectrophotometrically calibrated spectra and rectified three-dimensional data cubes that combine individual dithered observations. For the 1390 galaxy data cubes released in Summer 2016 as part of SDSS-IV Data Release 13, we demonstrate that the MaNGA data have nearly Poisson-limited sky subtraction shortward of ˜8500 Å and reach a typical 10σ limiting continuum surface brightness μ = 23.5 AB arcsec-2 in a five-arcsecond-diameter aperture in the g-band. The wavelength calibration of the MaNGA data is accurate to 5 km s-1 rms, with a median spatial resolution of 2.54 arcsec FWHM (1.8 kpc at the median redshift of 0.037) and a median spectral resolution of σ = 72 km s-1.

  2. Photometric classification of quasars from RCS-2 using Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, D.; Barrientos, L. F.; Pichara, K.; Anguita, T.; Murphy, D. N. A.; Gilbank, D. G.; Gladders, M. D.; Yee, H. K. C.; Hsieh, B. C.; López, S.

    2015-12-01

    The classification and identification of quasars is fundamental to many astronomical research areas. Given the large volume of photometric survey data available in the near future, automated methods for doing so are required. In this article, we present a new quasar candidate catalog from the Red-Sequence Cluster Survey 2 (RCS-2), identified solely from photometric information using an automated algorithm suitable for large surveys. The algorithm performance is tested using a well-defined SDSS spectroscopic sample of quasars and stars. The Random Forest algorithm constructs the catalog from RCS-2 point sources using SDSS spectroscopically-confirmed stars and quasars. The algorithm identifies putative quasars from broadband magnitudes (g, r, i, z) and colors. Exploiting NUV GALEX measurements for a subset of the objects, we refine the classifier by adding new information. An additional subset of the data with WISE W1 and W2 bands is also studied. Upon analyzing 542 897 RCS-2 point sources, the algorithm identified 21 501 quasar candidates with a training-set-derived precision (the fraction of true positives within the group assigned quasar status) of 89.5% and recall (the fraction of true positives relative to all sources that actually are quasars) of 88.4%. These performance metrics improve for the GALEX subset: 6529 quasar candidates are identified from 16 898 sources, with a precision and recall of 97.0% and 97.5%, respectively. Algorithm performance is further improved when WISE data are included, with precision and recall increasing to 99.3% and 99.1%, respectively, for 21 834 quasar candidates from 242 902 sources. We compiled our final catalog (38 257) by merging these samples and removing duplicates. An observational follow up of 17 bright (r classification of point sources with Random Forest algorithms to search for quasars within current and future large-area photometric surveys. Full Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http

  3. Clustering of High Redshift (z>2.9) Quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yue; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Fan, Xiaohui; Richards, Gordon T.; Hall, Patrick B.; Schneider, Donald P.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Thakar, Anirudda R.; Berk, Daniel E.Vanden; Anderson, Scott F.; Bahcall, Neta A.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-11-30

    We study the two-point correlation function of a uniformly selected sample of 4,428 optically selected luminous quasars with redshift 2.9 {le} z {le} 5.4 selected over 4041 deg{sup 2} from the Fifth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We fit a power-law to the projected correlation function w{sub p}(r{sub p}) to marginalize over redshift space distortions and redshift errors. For a real-space correlation function of the form {zeta}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup -{gamma}}, the fitted parameters in comoving coordinates are r{sub 0} = 15.2 {+-} 2.7 h{sup -1} Mpc and {gamma} = 2.0 {+-} 0.3, over a scale range 4 {le} r{sub p} {le} 150 h{sup -1} Mpc. Thus high-redshift quasars are appreciably more strongly clustered than their z {approx} 1.5 counterparts, which have a comoving clustering length r{sub 0} {approx} 6.5 h{sup -1} Mpc. Dividing our sample into two redshift bins: 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and z {ge} 3.5, and assuming a power-law index {gamma} = 2.0, we find a correlation length of r{sub 0} = 16.9 {+-} 1.7 h{sup -1} Mpc for the former, and r{sub 0} = 24.3 {+-} 2.4 h{sup -1} Mpc for the latter. Strong clustering at high redshift indicates that quasars are found in very massive, and therefore highly biased, halos. Following Martini & Weinberg, we relate the clustering strength and quasar number density to the quasar lifetimes and duty cycle. Using the Sheth & Tormen halo mass function, the quasar lifetime is estimated to lie in the range 4 {approx} 50 Myr for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5; and 30 {approx} 600 Myr for quasars with z {ge} 3.5. The corresponding duty cycles are 0.004 {approx} 0.05 for the lower redshift bin and 0.03 {approx} 0.6 for the higher redshift bin. The minimum mass of halos in which these quasars reside is 2-3 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with 2.9 {le} z {le} 3.5 and 4-6 x 10{sup 12} h{sup -1} M{sub {circle_dot}} for quasars with z {ge} 3.5; the effective bias factor b{sub eff} increases with redshift, e.g., b

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: C IV BAL troughs properties in quasars (Filiz+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filiz, Ak N.; Brandt, W. N.; Hall, P. B.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, A. D.; Paris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, N. P.; Shen, Y.; York, D.

    2017-03-01

    We utilize spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II (hereafter SDSS, York et al. 2000AJ....120.1579Y) and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of SDSS-III (hereafter BOSS; Eisenstein et al. 2011AJ....142...72E; Dawson et al. 2013AJ....145...10D). We select a sample of quasars for this study from these 2005 targets that were observed by SDSS between MJD 51,602 (2000 February 28) and 54,557 (2008 January 4) and by BOSS between MJD 55,176 (2009 December 11) and 56,455 (2013 June 12). Observation start dates correspond to completion of hardware commissioning for both SDSS and BOSS; post-commissioning observations have the most reliable spectral calibration. (7 data files).

  5. Merging Galaxies Create a Binary Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Astronomers have found the first clear evidence of a binary quasar within a pair of actively merging galaxies. Quasars are the extremely bright centers of galaxies surrounding super-massive black holes, and binary quasars are pairs of quasars bound together by gravity. Binary quasars, like other quasars, are thought to be the product of galaxy mergers. Until now, however, binary quasars have not been seen in galaxies that are unambiguously in the act of merging. But images of a new binary quasar from the Carnegie Institution's Magellan telescope in Chile show two distinct galaxies with "tails" produced by tidal forces from their mutual gravitational attraction. "This is really the first case in which you see two separate galaxies, both with quasars, that are clearly interacting," says Carnegie astronomer John Mulchaey who made observations crucial to understanding the galaxy merger. Most, if not all, large galaxies, such as our galaxy the Milky Way, host super-massive black holes at their centers. Because galaxies regularly interact and merge, astronomers have assumed that binary super-massive black holes have been common in the Universe, especially during its early history. Black holes can only be detected as quasars when they are actively accreting matter, a process that releases vast amounts of energy. A leading theory is that galaxy mergers trigger accretion, creating quasars in both galaxies. Because most such mergers would have happened in the distant past, binary quasars and their associated galaxies are very far away and therefore difficult for most telescopes to resolve. The binary quasar, labeled SDSS J1254+0846, was initially detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a large scale astronomical survey of galaxies and over 120,000 quasars. Further observations by Paul Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and colleagues* using NASA's Chandra's X-ray Observatory and telescopes at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona and Palomar

  6. Calan Tololo Survey: Bright Quasars at High Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Jose; Ruiz, Maria Teresa; Gonzalez, Luis E.; Wischnjewsky, Marina

    An objective prism survey has been started at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory using the thin UV prism (1,360 Å/mm at Hγ and 1,740 Å/mm at Hβ) on the Curtis Schmidt telescope. Unfiltered baked IIIaJ plates exposed 90 minutes have been obtained for 163 fields. Unwiden spectra taken in good seeing reach B ≅ 19. This survey is an extension of the original Tololo survey (Smith 1975; Smith, Aguirre and Zemelman 1986).

  7. Primordial environment of supermassive black holes. II. Deep Y- and J-band images around the z 6.3 quasar SDSS J1030+0524

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaverde, B.; Gilli, R.; Mignoli, M.; Bolzonella, M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Sani, E.; Vanzella, E.; Vignali, C.; Vito, F.; Zamorani, G.

    2017-10-01

    Many cosmological studies predict that early supermassive black holes (SMBHs) can only form in the most massive dark matter halos embedded within large-scale structures marked by galaxy overdensities that may extend up to 10 physical Mpc. This scenario, however, has not been confirmed observationally, as the search for galaxy overdensities around high-z quasars has returned conflicting results. The field around the z = 6.31 quasar SDSSJ1030+0524 (J1030) is unique for multi-band coverage and represents an excellent data legacy for studying the environment around a primordial SMBH. In this paper we present wide-area ( 25' × 25') Y- and J-band imaging of the J1030 field obtained with the near infrared camera WIRCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT). We built source catalogs in the Y- and J-band, and matched those with our photometric catalog in the r, z, and i bands presented in our previous paper and based on sources with zABdistribution of the high redshift galaxies in J1030, supporting the existence of a coherent large-scale structure around the quasar. We estimated an overdensity of z 6 galaxies in the field of δ = 2.4, which is significant at >4σ. The overdensity value and its significance are higher than those found in our previous paper and we interpret this as evidence of an improved LBG selection.

  8. The High AV Quasar Survey: A z = 2.027 metal-rich damped Lyman-α absorber towards a red quasar at z = 3.21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fynbo, J. P. U.; Krogager, J.-K.; Heintz, K. E.; Geier, S.; Møller, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Christensen, L.; Ledoux, C.; Jakobsson, P.

    2017-09-01

    It is important to understand the selection effects behind the quasar samples to fully exploit the potential of quasars as probes of cosmic chemical evolution and the internal gas dynamics of galaxies; in particular, it is vital to understand whether the selection criteria exclude foreground galaxies with certain properties, most importantly a high dust content. Here we present spectroscopic follow-up from the 10.4 m GTC telescope of a dust-reddened quasar, eHAQ0111+0641, from the extended High AV Quasar (HAQ) survey. We find that the z = 3.21 quasar has a foreground damped Lyman-α absorber (DLA) at z = 2.027 along the line of sight. The DLA has very strong metal lines due to a moderately high metallicity with an inferred lower limit of 25% of the solar metallicity, but a very large gas column density along the line of sight in its host galaxy. This discovery is further evidence that there is a dust bias affecting the census of metals, caused by the combined effect of dust obscuration and reddening, in existing samples of z > 2 DLAs. The case of eHAQ0111+0641 illustrates that dust bias is not only caused by dust obscuration, but also dust reddening. The reduced spectrum (FITS file) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A13

  9. Early Giant Planet Candidates from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, J.; Li, R.; Sithajan, S.; Chen, Y.; Shi, J.; Ma, B.; Liu, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report the first discoveries of giant planet candidates from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey. These candidates are found using the new MARVELS data pipeline developed at UF from scratch over the past two years. Unlike the old data pipeline, this pipeline carefully corrects most of the instrument effects (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition effects (such as illumination profile). The result is long-term RV precisions that approach the photon limits in many cases and has yielded four giant planet candidates of ~1-6 Jupiter mass from only the initial fraction of data processed with the new techniques. More survey data is being processed which will likely lead to discoveries of additional giant planet candidates that will be verified and characterized with follow-up observations by the MARVELS team. The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars with well defined cadence 27 RV measurements over 2 years). The MARVELS RV data and other follow-up data (photometry, high contrast imaging, high resolution spectroscopy and RV measurements) will explore the diversity of giant planet companion formation and evolution around stars with a broad range in metallicity ([Fe/H -1.5-0.5), mass ( 0.6-2.5M(sun)), and environment (thin disk and thick disk), and will help to address the key scientific questions identified for the MARVELS survey including, but not limited to: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate-mass stars and binaries? Is the “planet desert” within 0.6 AU in the planet orbital distribution of intermediate-mass stars real?

  10. The 13th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-IV Survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Surve...

  11. The 13th data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: first spectroscopic data from the SDSS-IV survey mapping nearby galaxies at Apache Point Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Albareti, Franco D.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott; Andrews, Brett H.; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barbuy, Beatriz; Barger, Kat

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) began observations in 2014 July. It pursues three core programs: the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2), Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA), and the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS). As well as its core program, eBOSS contains two major subprograms: the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) and the SPectroscopic IDentification of ERosita Sources (SPIDERS). This paper ...

  12. Spectral Variability in Radio-Loud Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spectral variability of a sample of 44 Flat-Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) and 18 Steep-Spectrum Radio Quasars (SSRQs) in SDSS stripe 82 region is investigated. Twenty-five of 44 FSRQs show a bluer-when-brighter trend (BWB), while only one FSRQ shows a redder-when-brighter trend, which is in contrast to our ...

  13. A Statistical Survey of Peculiar L and T Dwarfs in SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Kendra; Metchev, Stanimir; Miles-Páez, Paulo A.; Tannock, Megan E.

    2017-09-01

    We present the final results from a targeted search for brown dwarfs with unusual near-infrared colors. From a positional cross-match of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), 2-Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS), and Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) catalogs, we have identified 144 candidate peculiar L and T dwarfs. Spectroscopy confirms that 20 of the objects are peculiar or are candidate binaries. Of the 420 objects in our full sample 9 are young (≲ 200 {Myr}; 2.1%) and another 8 (1.9%) are unusually red, with no signatures of youth. With a spectroscopic J-{K}s color of 2.58 ± 0.11 mag, one of the new objects, the L6 dwarf 2MASS J03530419+0418193, is among the reddest field dwarfs currently known and is one of the reddest objects with no signatures of youth known to date. We have also discovered another potentially very-low-gravity object, the L1 dwarf 2MASS J00133470+1109403, and independently identified the young L7 dwarf 2MASS J00440332+0228112, which was first reported by Schneider and collaborators. Our results confirm that signatures of low gravity are no longer discernible in low to moderate resolution spectra of objects older than ˜200 Myr. The 1.9% of unusually red L dwarfs that do not show other signatures of youth could be slightly older, up to ˜400 Myr. In this case a red J-{K}s color may be more diagnostic of moderate youth than individual spectral features. However, its is also possible that these objects are relatively metal-rich, and thus have enhanced atmospheric dust content.

  14. THE SDSS-IV EXTENDED BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: OVERVIEW AND EARLY DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, Kyle S.; Bautista, Julian E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Kneib, Jean-Paul [Laboratoire dástrophysique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Observatoire de Sauverny, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland); Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Alam, Shadab [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Albareti, Franco D. [Instituto de Física Teórica, (UAM/CSIC), Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Anderson, Scott F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Armengaud, Eric [CEA, Centre de Saclay, Irfu/SPP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric [APC, University of Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Berlind, Andreas A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, PMB 401807, 2401 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37240 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Astronomy, 475 N. Charter St., Madison WI 53703 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Blanton, Michael R., E-mail: kdawson@astro.utah.edu [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2016-02-15

    In a six-year program started in 2014 July, the Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will conduct novel cosmological observations using the BOSS spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory. These observations will be conducted simultaneously with the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) designed for variability studies and the Spectroscopic Identification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS) program designed for studies of X-ray sources. In particular, eBOSS will measure with percent-level precision the distance-redshift relation with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the clustering of matter. eBOSS will use four different tracers of the underlying matter density field to vastly expand the volume covered by BOSS and map the large-scale-structures over the relatively unconstrained redshift range 0.6 < z < 2.2. Using more than 250,000 new, spectroscopically confirmed luminous red galaxies at a median redshift z = 0.72, we project that eBOSS will yield measurements of the angular diameter distance d{sub A}(z) to an accuracy of 1.2% and measurements of H(z) to 2.1% when combined with the z > 0.6 sample of BOSS galaxies. With ∼195,000 new emission line galaxy redshifts, we expect BAO measurements of d{sub A}(z) to an accuracy of 3.1% and H(z) to 4.7% at an effective redshift of z = 0.87. A sample of more than 500,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars will provide the first BAO distance measurements over the redshift range 0.9 < z < 2.2, with expected precision of 2.8% and 4.2% on d{sub A}(z) and H(z), respectively. Finally, with 60,000 new quasars and re-observation of 60,000 BOSS quasars, we will obtain new Lyα forest measurements at redshifts z > 2.1; these new data will enhance the precision of d{sub A}(z) and H(z) at z > 2.1 by a factor of 1.44 relative to BOSS. Furthermore, eBOSS will provide improved tests of General Relativity on cosmological scales through redshift-space distortion measurements, improved tests for non

  15. Quasars Probing Quasars: the Circumgalactic Medium Surrounding z ~ 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Marie; Quasars Probing Quasars survey

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the circumgalactic medium--the gaseous halo surrounding a galaxy, is an integral part to understanding galaxy evolution. The z ~ 2-3 universe is interesting as this is when the star formation rate and AGN activity peak. My thesis concludes the decade-long Quasars Probing Quasars survey designed for studying massive galaxy formation and quasar feedback. I use background quasar sightlines that pass close to foreground quasars to study the circumgalactic medium of quasar-host galaxies in absorption. My sample of 149 quasar pairs involve spectra taken with 17 different optical and near IR instruments. I present results on the statistical and physical properties of the circumgalactic medium. The circumgalactic medium is enriched even beyond the virial radius. The alpha/Fe abundance ratio is enhanced, suggesting enrichment from core-collapse supernovae. The cool gas mass within the virial radius is enough to fuel star formation for another Gyr, and may account for 1/3 of the baryonic budget of the galaxy halo. The ionization state increases with projected distance from the quasar, which implies the quasar does not dominate the ionizing radiation flux. However, detection of fluorescent Lyman-alpha emission and NV absorption imply these transverse absorbers are partially illuminated by the quasar. In one peculiar case, the absorbing clump has density >100 cm^-3 and sub-parsec size. The average absorption in the circumgalactic medium exhibits large velocity widths, and is asymmetric about the systemic redshift of the galaxies. The widths are consistent with gravitational motions and Hubble flow, and outflows are not required to explain them. The asymmetry can be explained if the ionizing radiation from the quasar is anisotropic or intermittent and the gas is not in inflow. My results pose challenges for cosmological hydrodynamic simulations to produce a substantial cool gas reservoir surrounding quasars, that is also enriched and shows extreme kinematics.

  16. The SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity survey of M dwarfs. I. Description of the survey and science goals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, R.; Bender, C. F.; Mahadevan, S.; Terrien, R. C.; Schneider, D. P.; Fleming, S. W. [Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Blake, C. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Carlberg, J. K. [Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Zasowski, G.; Hearty, F. [University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Crepp, J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Rajpurohit, A. S.; Reylé, C. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS UMR 6213, Observatoire des Sciences de l' Univers THETA Franche-Comt é-Bourgogne, Université de Franche Comté, Observatoire de Besançon, BP 1615, F-25010 Besançon Cedex (France); Nidever, D. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Prieto, C. Allende; Hernández, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Bizyaev, D. [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349-0059 (United States); Ebelke, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas Christian University, TCU Box 298840, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Frinchaboy, P. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Ge, J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); and others

    2013-12-01

    We are carrying out a large ancillary program with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS-III, using the fiber-fed multi-object near-infrared APOGEE spectrograph, to obtain high-resolution H-band spectra of more than 1200 M dwarfs. These observations will be used to measure spectroscopic rotational velocities, radial velocities, physical stellar parameters, and variability of the target stars. Here, we describe the target selection for this survey, as well as results from the first year of scientific observations based on spectra that will be publicly available in the SDSS-III DR10 data release. As part of this paper we present radial velocities and rotational velocities of over 200 M dwarfs, with a vsin i precision of ∼2 km s{sup –1} and a measurement floor at vsin i = 4 km s{sup –1}. This survey significantly increases the number of M dwarfs studied for rotational velocities and radial velocity variability (at ∼100-200 m s{sup –1}), and will inform and advance the target selection for planned radial velocity and photometric searches for low-mass exoplanets around M dwarfs, such as the Habitable Zone Planet Finder, CARMENES, and TESS. Multiple epochs of radial velocity observations enable us to identify short period binaries, and adaptive optics imaging of a subset of stars enables the detection of possible stellar companions at larger separations. The high-resolution APOGEE spectra, covering the entire H band, provide the opportunity to measure physical stellar parameters such as effective temperatures and metallicities for many of these stars. At the culmination of this survey, we will have obtained multi-epoch spectra and radial velocities for over 1400 stars spanning the spectral range M0-L0, providing the largest set of near-infrared M dwarf spectra at high resolution, and more than doubling the number of known spectroscopic vsin i values for M dwarfs. Furthermore, by modeling telluric lines to correct for small instrumental radial velocity shifts, we

  17. The Effect of Host Galaxies on Type Ia Supernovae in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampeitl, Hubert; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U. /Portsmouth U., ICG; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Bassett, Bruce; /South African Astron. Observ. /Cape Town U.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Foley, Ryan J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC; Im, Myungshin; /Seoul Natl. U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2010-05-01

    We present an analysis of the host galaxy dependencies of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) from the full three year sample of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. We re-discover, to high significance, the strong correlation between host galaxy type and the width of the observed SN light curve, i.e., fainter, quickly declining SNe Ia favor passive host galaxies, while brighter, slowly declining Ia's favor star-forming galaxies. We also find evidence (at between 2 to 3{sigma}) that SNe Ia are {approx_equal} 0.1 magnitudes brighter in passive host galaxies, than in star-forming hosts, after the SN Ia light curves have been standardized using the light curve shape and color variations: This difference in brightness is present in both the SALT2 and MCLS2k2 light curve fitting methodologies. We see evidence for differences in the SN Ia color relationship between passive and star-forming host galaxies, e.g., for the MLCS2k2 technique, we see that SNe Ia in passive hosts favor a dust law of R{sub V} {approx_equal} 1, while SNe Ia in star-forming hosts require R{sub V} {approx} 2. The significance of these trends depends on the range of SN colors considered. We demonstrate that these effects can be parameterized using the stellar mass of the host galaxy (with a confidence of > 4{sigma}) and including this extra parameter provides a better statistical fit to our data. Our results suggest that future cosmological analyses of SN Ia samples should include host galaxy information.

  18. A VLBI Survey of a Complete Sample of Lobe-dominated Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, D. H.

    1998-12-01

    We are engaged in a long-term VLBI survey of a complete sample of 25 lobe-dominated quasars selected from the revised 3CR survey. Tha main motivation for this study is to conduct statistical tests of relativistic jet models and AGN unification scenarios, using a complete sample of sources with minimal orientation bias. To date, observations have been made of the nuclei in 24 objects. Each of the 19 objects that has been imaged shows a one-sided parsec-scale jet on the same side of the core as a one-sided kpc-scale jet. No counterjets have been detected. There is some tendency for sources with strong nuclei and small projected linear sizes to exhibit more prominent jets with greater curvature and more pronounced knots. Multiple-epoch images have been made for 11 objects; for 6 of these, it seems clear that the jet speeds are in the range of approximately 1-4c. Recent results include the first evidence for acceleration and nonradial motion of jet components, flat-spectrum cores and steep-spectrum jets, and a transition of the jet magnetic field from perpendicular to parallel to the jet axis. These results are all consistent with beaming and unification of core- and lobe-dominated quasars. (This work is currently supported by NSF grant AST-9422075).

  19. Giant Planet Candidates, Brown Dwarfs, and Binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS Planet Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Neil; Ge, Jian; Li, Rui; de Lee, Nathan M.; Heslar, Michael; Ma, Bo; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We report the discoveries of giant planet candidates, brown dwarfs, and binaries from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey. The finalized 1D pipeline has provided 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries. An additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are also reported for future investigation. These candidates are found using the advanced MARVELS 1D data pipeline developed at UF from scratch over the past three years. This pipeline carefully corrects most of the instrument effects (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition effects (such as illumination profile, fiber degradation, and tracking variations). The result is long-term RV precisions that approach the photon limits in many cases for the ~89,000 individual stellar observations. A 2D version of the pipeline that uses interferometric information is nearing completion and is demonstrating a reduction of errors to half the current levels. The 2D processing will be used to increase the robustness of the detections presented here and to find new candidates in RV regions not confidently detectable with the 1D pipeline. The MARVELS survey has produced the largest homogeneous RV measurements of 3300 V=7.6-12 FGK stars with a well defined cadence of 27 RV measurements over 2 years. The MARVELS RV data and other follow-up data (photometry, high contrast imaging, high resolution spectroscopy and RV measurements) will explore the diversity of giant planet companion formation and evolution around stars with a broad range in metallicity (Fe/H -1.5-0.5), mass ( 0.6-2.5M(sun)), and environment (thin disk and thick disk), and will help to address the key scientific questions identified for the MARVELS survey including, but not limited to: Do metal poor stars obey the same trends for planet occurrence as metal rich stars? What is the distribution of giant planets around intermediate-mass stars and binaries? Is the 'planet desert

  20. Quasar Accretion Disk Sizes With Continuum Reverberation Mapping From the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudd, D.; et al.

    2017-11-30

    We present accretion disk size measurements for 15 luminous quasars at $0.7 \\leq z \\leq 1.9$ derived from $griz$ light curves from the Dark Energy Survey. We measure the disk sizes with continuum reverberation mapping using two methods, both of which are derived from the expectation that accretion disks have a radial temperature gradient and the continuum emission at a given radius is well-described by a single blackbody. In the first method we measure the relative lags between the multiband light curves, which provides the relative time lag between shorter and longer wavelength variations. The second method fits the model parameters for the canonical Shakura-Sunyaev thin disk directly rather than solving for the individual time lags between the light curves. Our measurements demonstrate good agreement with the sizes predicted by this model for accretion rates between 0.3-1 times the Eddington rate. These results are also in reasonable agreement with disk size measurements from gravitational microlensing studies of strongly lensed quasars, as well as other photometric reverberation mapping results.

  1. An approach to the analysis of SDSS spectroscopic outliers based on self-organizing maps. Designing the outlier analysis software package for the next Gaia survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustes, D.; Manteiga, M.; Dafonte, C.; Arcay, B.; Ulla, A.; Smith, K.; Borrachero, R.; Sordo, R.

    2013-11-01

    Aims: A new method applied to the segmentation and further analysis of the outliers resulting from the classification of astronomical objects in large databases is discussed. The method is being used in the framework of the Gaia satellite Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC) activities to prepare automated software tools that will be used to derive basic astrophysical information that is to be included in final Gaia archive. Methods: Our algorithm has been tested by means of simulated Gaia spectrophotometry, which is based on SDSS observations and theoretical spectral libraries covering a wide sample of astronomical objects. Self-organizing maps networks are used to organize the information in clusters of objects, as homogeneously as possible according to their spectral energy distributions, and to project them onto a 2D grid where the data structure can be visualized. Results: We demonstrate the usefulness of the method by analyzing the spectra that were rejected by the SDSS spectroscopic classification pipeline and thus classified as "UNKNOWN". First, our method can help distinguish between astrophysical objects and instrumental artifacts. Additionally, the application of our algorithm to SDSS objects of unknown nature has allowed us to identify classes of objects with similar astrophysical natures. In addition, the method allows for the potential discovery of hundreds of new objects, such as white dwarfs and quasars. Therefore, the proposed method is shown to be very promising for data exploration and knowledge discovery in very large astronomical databases, such as the archive from the upcoming Gaia mission.

  2. Hunting for stellar streams in the solar neighbourhood with the SDSS and GSC-II kinematic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Re Fiorentin, P.; Lattanzi, M. G.; Smart, R. L.; Spagna, A.; Bailer-Jones, C. A. L.; Beers, T. C.; Zwitter, T.

    The growing awareness of the importance of the fossil record in the Milky Way for constraining galaxy formation theory is reflected by the increasing number of new ground- and space-based surveys designed to unravel the formation history of the Galaxy. Recently, a new kinematic survey has been produced by means of spectro-photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7) and high-quality proper motions derived from multiepoch positions from the Guide Star Catalogue II (GSC-II). In this framework, we assembled a sample of ~ 30 000 FGK nearby metal-poor (sub)dwarfs for which selection and distance estimates take advantage of accurate stellar atmospheric parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity) derived from SDSS spectra. Here, as one of the most interesting applications of this catalogue, we consider the feasibility of probing fossil signatures of the formation of the Milky Way by selecting and analysing subsamples of stars as tracers of the seven-dimensional space distribution (full phase-space coordinates plus chemical abundance) of the Galactic halo population within a few kiloparsecs from the Sun. Preliminary results exhibit statistical evidence for discrete overdensities localised in kinematics and in the space of adiabatic invariants (angular momentum and energy). By examination of their intrinsic properties, we suggest that they may be possible fossil signatures of past mergers or other accretion events.

  3. The SDSS-IV in 2015: Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Lucatello, Sara; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cherinka, Brian; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Hagen, Alex; Jones, Amy; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lundgren, Britt; Myers, Adam D.; Roman, Alexandre; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Given that many astronomers now participate in large international scientific collaborations, it is important to examine whether these structures foster a healthy scientific climate that is inclusive and diverse. The Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (CPWS) was formed to evaluate the climate and demographics within the SDSS collaboration and to make recommendations for how best to establish the scientific and technical leadership team for SDSS-IV. Building on the work described in Lundgren et al. (2015), the CPWS conducted a demographic survey in Spring 2015 that included questions about career and leadership status, racial / ethnic identity, gender identity, identification with the LGBT community, disability, partnership status, and level of parental education. For example, 71% of survey respondents identify as male and 81% do not identify as a racial or ethnic minority at their current institution. This reflects the under-representation of women and men from minority groups (e.g., people of color in the United States) and women from majority groups (e.g., white women in the United States) in the field of astronomy. We have focused our analysis on the representation of scientists from these groups among the SDSS-IV leadership and the full collaboration. Our goal is to use these quantitative data to track the demographics of SDSS-IV membership and leadership over time as we work to assess and improve the climate of SDSS-IV.

  4. Selections from 2017: Mapping the Universe with SDSS-IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    Editors note:In these last two weeks of 2017, well be looking at a few selections that we havent yet discussed on AAS Nova from among the most-downloaded paperspublished in AAS journals this year. The usual posting schedule will resume in January.Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant UniversePublished June2017Main takeaway:The incredibly prolific Sloan Digital Sky Survey has provided photometric observations of around 500 million objects and spectra for more than 3 million objects. The survey has now entered its fourth iteration, SDSS-IV, with the first public data release made in June 2016. A publication led by Michael Blanton (New York University) describes the facilities used for SDSS-IV, its science goals, and itsthree coreprograms.Why its interesting:Since data collection began in 2000, SDSS has been one of the premier surveysproviding imaging and spectroscopy for objects in both the near and distant universe.SDSS has measured spectra not only for the stars in our own Milky Way, but also for galaxies that lie more than 7 billion light-years distant making itan extremelyuseful and powerful tool for mapping our universe.What SDSS-IV is looking for:SDSS image of an example MaNGA target galaxy (left), with some of the many things we can learn about it shown in the right and bottom panels: stellar velocity dispersion, stellar mean velocity, stellar population age, metallicity, etc. [Blanton et al. 2017]SDSS-IV containsthree core programs:Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2)provides high-resolution near-infrared spectra of hundreds of thousands of Milky-Way stars with the goal ofimproving our understanding of the history of the Milky Way and of stellar astrophysics.Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA)obtains spatially resolved spectra for thousands of nearby galaxiesto better understand the evolutionary histories of galaxies and what regulates their star formation

  5. A Sample of Quasars with Strong Nitrogen Emission Lines from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7......We report on 293 quasars with strong NIV] lambda 1486 or NIII] lambda 1750 emission lines (rest-frame equivalent width > 3 \\AA) at 1.7...

  6. Quasars as Cosmological Standard Candles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alenka Negrete

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose the use of quasars with accretion rate near the Eddington ratio (extreme quasars as standard candles. The selection criteria are based on the Eigenvector 1 (E1 formalism. Our first sample is a selection of 334 optical quasar spectra from the SDSS DR7 database with a S/N > 20. Using the E1, we define primary and secondary selection criteria in the optical spectral range. We show that it is possible to derive a redshift-independent estimate of luminosity for extreme Eddington ratio sources. Our results are consistent with concordance cosmology but we need to work with other spectral ranges to take into account the quasar orientation, among other constrains.

  7. An Optically Faint Quasar Survey at z ˜ 5 in the CFHTLS Wide Field: Estimates of the Black Hole Masses and Eddington Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H.; Nagao, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Kawakatu, N.; Kajisawa, M.; Akiyama, M.; Miyaji, T.; Morokuma, T.

    2017-09-01

    We present the result of our spectroscopic follow-up observation for faint quasar candidates at z ˜ 5 in part of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey wide field. We select nine photometric candidates and identify three z ˜ 5 faint quasars, one z ˜ 4 faint quasar, and a late-type star. Since two faint quasar spectra show the C IV emission line without suffering from a heavy atmospheric absorption, we estimate their black hole masses ({M}{BH}) and Eddington ratios (L/{L}{Edd}). The inferred {log}{M}{BH} are 9.04 ± 0.14 and 8.53 ± 0.20, respectively. In addition, the inferred {log}(L/{L}{Edd}) are -1.00 ± 0.15 and -0.42 ± 0.22, respectively. If we adopt that L/{L}{Edd}={constant} {or}\\propto {(1+z)}2, the seed black hole masses ({M}{seed}) of our z ˜ 5 faint quasars are expected to be > {10}5 {M}⊙ in most cases. We also compare the observational results with a mass accretion model, where angular momentum is lost due to supernova explosions. Accordingly, {M}{BH} of the z ˜ 5 faint quasars in our sample can be explained even if {M}{seed} is ˜ {10}3 {M}⊙ . Since z ˜ 6 luminous qusars and our z ˜ 5 faint quasars are not on the same evolutionary track, z ˜ 6 luminous quasars and our z ˜ 5 quasars are not the same populations but different populations, due to the difference of a period of the mass supply from host galaxies. Furthermore, we confirm that one can explain {M}{BH} of z ˜ 6 luminous quasars and our z ˜ 5 faint quasars even if their seed black holes are formed at z ˜ 7.

  8. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bundy, Kevin [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0055 (United States); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Avila-Reese, Vladimir [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-264, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Badenes, Carles [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Falcón-Barroso, Jésus [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Belfiore, Francesco [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ∼ 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å{sup –1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup –2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ≳ 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  9. The Rise and Fall of Type Ia Supernova Light Curves in the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayden, Brian T.; /Notre Dame U.; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U.; Kessler, Richard; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Jha, Saurabh W.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Kasen, Daniel; /UC, Santa Cruz; Marriner, John; /Fermilab; Nichol, Robert C.; /Portsmouth U., ICG /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the rise and fall times of Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) light curves discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. From a set of 391 light curves k-corrected to the rest-frame B and V bands, we find a smaller dispersion in the rising portion of the light curve compared to the decline. This is in qualitative agreement with computer models which predict that variations in radioactive nickel yield have less impact on the rise than on the spread of the decline rates. The differences we find in the rise and fall properties suggest that a single 'stretch' correction to the light curve phase does not properly model the range of SN Ia light curve shapes. We select a subset of 105 light curves well observed in both rise and fall portions of the light curves and develop a '2-stretch' fit algorithm which estimates the rise and fall times independently. We find the average time from explosion to B-band peak brightness is 17.38 {+-} 0.17 days, but with a spread of rise times which range from 13 days to 23 days. Our average rise time is shorter than the 19.5 days found in previous studies; this reflects both the different light curve template used and the application of the 2-stretch algorithm. The SDSS-II supernova set and the local SNe Ia with well-observed early light curves show no significant differences in their average rise-time properties. We find that slow-declining events tend to have fast rise times, but that the distribution of rise minus fall time is broad and single peaked. This distribution is in contrast to the bimodality in this parameter that was first suggested by Strovink (2007) from an analysis of a small set of local SNe Ia. We divide the SDSS-II sample in half based on the rise minus fall value, t{sub r} - t{sub f} {approx}< 2 days and t{sub r} - t{sub f} > 2 days, to search for differences in their host galaxy properties and Hubble residuals; we find no difference in host galaxy properties or Hubble

  10. [Galaxy/quasar classification based on nearest neighbor method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-Ru; Lu, Yu; Zhou, Jian-Ming; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2011-09-01

    With the wide application of high-quality CCD in celestial spectrum imagery and the implementation of many large sky survey programs (e. g., Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Two-degree-Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dF), Spectroscopic Survey Telescope (SST), Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) program and Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) program, etc.), celestial observational data are coming into the world like torrential rain. Therefore, to utilize them effectively and fully, research on automated processing methods for celestial data is imperative. In the present work, we investigated how to recognizing galaxies and quasars from spectra based on nearest neighbor method. Galaxies and quasars are extragalactic objects, they are far away from earth, and their spectra are usually contaminated by various noise. Therefore, it is a typical problem to recognize these two types of spectra in automatic spectra classification. Furthermore, the utilized method, nearest neighbor, is one of the most typical, classic, mature algorithms in pattern recognition and data mining, and often is used as a benchmark in developing novel algorithm. For applicability in practice, it is shown that the recognition ratio of nearest neighbor method (NN) is comparable to the best results reported in the literature based on more complicated methods, and the superiority of NN is that this method does not need to be trained, which is useful in incremental learning and parallel computation in mass spectral data processing. In conclusion, the results in this work are helpful for studying galaxies and quasars spectra classification.

  11. Deep Learning of Quasar Spectra to Discover and Characterize Damped Lyα Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, David; Xavier Prochaska, J.; Dong, Shawfeng; Cai, Zheng

    2018-01-01

    We have designed, developed, and applied a convolutional neural network (CNN) architecture using multi-task learning to search for and characterize strong HI Lyα absorption in quasar spectra. Without any explicit modeling of the quasar continuum nor application of the predicted line-profile for Lyα from quantum mechanics, our algorithm predicts the presence of strong HI absorption and estimates the corresponding redshift zabs and HI column density NHI, with emphasis on damped Lyα systems (DLAs, absorbers with NHI ≥ 2 × 1020 cm-2). We tuned the CNN model using a custom training set of DLAs injected into DLA-free quasar spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), data release 5 (DR5). Testing on a held-back validation set demonstrates a high incidence of DLAs recovered by the algorithm (97.4% as DLAs and 99% as an HI absorber with NHI > 1019.5 cm-2) and excellent estimates for zabs and NHI. Similar results are obtained against a human-generated survey of the SDSS DR5 dataset. The algorithm yields a low incidence of false positives and negatives but is challenged by overlapping DLAs and/or very high NHI systems. We have applied this CNN model to the quasar spectra of SDSS-DR7 and the Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS, data release 12) and provide catalogs of 4,913 and 50,969 DLAs respectively (including 1,659 and 9,230 high-confidence DLAs that were previously unpublished). This work validates the application of deep learning techniques to astronomical spectra for both classification and quantitative measurements.

  12. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies Using Photometric Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Abhishek; SDSS-IV/eBOSS

    2017-01-01

    SDSS-IV/eBOSS survey will allow a ˜1% measurement of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale and a 4.0%Redshift Space Distortion (RSD) measurement using a relatively uniform set of luminous, early-type galaxies in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1. In this talk, I will present the 3D real space clustering of a sample of ~600,000 LRGs measured by the SDSS/eBOSS, using photometric redshifts. These galaxies have accurate photometric redshifts with an average error of z = 0.028. These LRGs range from redshift z = 0.6 to 1.0 over 10,000 deg2 of the sky, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clusteringpower spectrum in different redshift slices and use well-calibrated redshift distributions to combine these into a high precision 3D real space clustering. i will present an evidence for BAO in the 2-point correlation function. The detection of BAO also allows the measurement of the comoving distance to z = 1.0. Traditionally, spectroscopic redshifts are used to estimate distances to the galaxies and, in turn, to measuregalaxy clustering. However, acquiring spectroscopic redshifts is a time consuming and expensive process even with modern multi-fiber spectrographs. Although photometric redshifts are less accurate, they are signicantly easier to obtain, and for a constant amount of time, one can image both wider areas and deeper volumes than would be possible with spectroscopy, allowing one to probe both larger scales and larger volumes. The ability to make precise clustering measurements with photometric data has been well demonstrated by Padmanabhan et al. (2007).

  13. Understanding the Nature of X-ray Weak Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William

    We propose a program of archival X-ray and related studies designed to advance understanding of the remarkable active galactic nucleus (AGN) population of X-ray weak quasars. These exceptional objects reveal phenomena that are more generally applicable but are difficult to investigate when more subtly expressed in the overall quasar population. X-ray weak quasars furthermore challenge a central tenet of X-ray astronomy that luminous X-ray emission is a universal property of efficiently accreting supermassive black holes; this idea underlies the utility of X-ray surveys for identifying AGNs throughout the Universe. Our previous findings indicate that understanding of Xray weak quasars is now primed for rapid further advances. Our studies of X-ray weak quasars will employ data from the vast archives of forefront X-ray missions, particularly XMM-Newton and Chandra, and they will also benefit greatly from the use of NuSTAR, ROSAT, Suzaku, Swift, GALEX, and WISE data. They are largely enabled by the enormous quasar samples delivered by modern widefield sky surveys. In particular, we will identify X-ray weak quasars using the serendipitous X-ray coverage of the 380,000 relatively bright quasars spectroscopically identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) from z 0.1-5.5; these are wellmatched to the depths of typical archival X-ray observations. The number of SDSS spectroscopic quasars has more than tripled in recent years, and the sample-size improvements at redshifts of z = 2-4, important for our investigations, are even more dramatic. We will construct an unprecedented new sample of X-ray weak quasars, about 20 times larger than those used currently, to enable systematic studies of the X-ray weakness phenomenon. This work should reveal the cause of X-ray weakness for quasars with weak emission lines, allowing testing of a model that relies upon small-scale shielding of ionizing photons by a thick inner accretion disk around a black hole accreting at a high

  14. The Time-domain Spectroscopic Survey: Target Selection for Repeat Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Green, Paul J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Eracleous, Michael; Ruan, John J.; Runnoe, Jessie; Nielsen Brandt, William; Badenes, Carles; Greene, Jenny; Morganson, Eric; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schwope, Axel; Shen, Yue; Amaro, Rachael; Lebleu, Amy; Filiz Ak, Nurten; Grier, Catherine J.; Hoover, Daniel; McGraw, Sean M.; Dawson, Kyle; Hall, Patrick B.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Mariappan, Vivek; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, Isabelle; Schneider, Donald P.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Fernández-Trincado, J. G.; Chambers, Kenneth; Kaiser, Nick; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, Eugene; Metcalfe, Nigel; Waters, Chris Z.

    2018-01-01

    As astronomers increasingly exploit the information available in the time domain, spectroscopic variability in particular opens broad new channels of investigation. Here we describe the selection algorithms for all targets intended for repeat spectroscopy in the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), part of the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV. Also discussed are the scientific rationale and technical constraints leading to these target selections. The TDSS includes a large “repeat quasar spectroscopy” (RQS) program delivering ∼13,000 repeat spectra of confirmed SDSS quasars, and several smaller “few-epoch spectroscopy” (FES) programs targeting specific classes of quasars as well as stars. The RQS program aims to provide a large and diverse quasar data set for studying variations in quasar spectra on timescales of years, a comparison sample for the FES quasar programs, and an opportunity for discovering rare, serendipitous events. The FES programs cover a wide variety of phenomena in both quasars and stars. Quasar FES programs target broad absorption line quasars, high signal-to-noise ratio normal broad line quasars, quasars with double-peaked or very asymmetric broad emission line profiles, binary supermassive black hole candidates, and the most photometrically variable quasars. Strongly variable stars are also targeted for repeat spectroscopy, encompassing many types of eclipsing binary systems, and classical pulsators like RR Lyrae. Other stellar FES programs allow spectroscopic variability studies of active ultracool dwarf stars, dwarf carbon stars, and white dwarf/M dwarf spectroscopic binaries. We present example TDSS spectra and describe anticipated sample sizes and results.

  15. A glimpse at quasar host galaxy far-UV emission using damped Lyα's as natural coronagraphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zheng; Fan, Xiaohui; Wang, Ran; McGreer, Ian, E-mail: caize@arizona.edu [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Finley, Hayley; Petitjean, Patrick [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Carithers, Bill [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bian, Fuyan [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, Weston Creek, ACT, 2611 (Australia); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Barcelona (Spain); Pâris, Isabelle [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zakamska, Nadia L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ge, Jian [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    In merger-driven models of massive galaxy evolution, the luminous quasar phase is expected to be accompanied by vigorous star formation in quasar host galaxies. In this paper, we use high column density damped Lyα (DLA) systems along quasar sight lines as natural coronagraphs to directly study the far-UV (FUV) radiation from the host galaxies of luminous background quasars. We have stacked the spectra of ∼2000 DLA systems (N {sub H} {sub I} > 10{sup 20.6} cm{sup –2}) with a median absorption redshift (z) = 2.6 selected from quasars observed in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We detect residual flux in the dark troughs of the composite DLA spectra. The level of this residual flux significantly exceeds systematic errors in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fiber sky subtraction; furthermore, the residual flux is strongly correlated with the continuum luminosity of the background quasar, while uncorrelated with DLA column density or metallicity. We conclude that the flux could be associated with the average FUV radiation from the background quasar host galaxies (with medium redshift (z) = 3.1) that is not blocked by the intervening DLA. Assuming that all of the detected flux originates from quasar hosts, for the highest quasar luminosity bin ((L) = 2.5 × 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}), the host galaxy has an FUV intensity of 1.5 ± 0.2 × 10{sup 40} erg s{sup –1} Å{sup –1}; this corresponds to an unobscured UV star formation rate of 9 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}.

  16. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. VI. Constraints on Dark Energy and the Evolution of Massive Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguri, Masamune [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); et al.

    2012-05-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the final lens sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search (SQLS). The number distribution of a complete subsample of 19 lensed quasars selected from 50,836 source quasars is compared with theoretical expectations, with particular attention to the selection function. Assuming that the velocity function of galaxies does not evolve with redshift, the SQLS sample constrains the cosmological constant to \\Omega_\\Lambda=0.79^{+0.06}_{-0.07}(stat.)^{+0.06}_{-0.06}(syst.) for a flat universe. The dark energy equation of state is found to be consistent with w=-1 when the SQLS is combined with constraints from baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements or results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). We also obtain simultaneous constraints on cosmological parameters and redshift evolution of the galaxy velocity function, finding no evidence for redshift evolution at z<1 in any combinations of constraints. For instance, number density evolution quantified as \

  17. SDSS-BASED ASTEROID TAXONOMY V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) asteroid photometric observations classified according to the SDSS-based Asteroid Taxonomy, as developed by...

  18. RASS-SDSS Galaxy cluster survey. IV. A ubiquitous dwarf galaxy population in clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popesso, P.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.; Romaniello, M.

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the Luminosity Functions (LFs) of a subsample of 69 clusters from the RASS-SDSS galaxy cluster catalog. When calculated within the cluster physical sizes, given by r200 or r500, all the cluster LFs appear to have the same shape, well fitted by a composite of two Schechter functions with a marked upturn and a steepening at the faint-end. Previously reported cluster-to-cluster variations of the LF faint-end slope are due to the use of a metric cluster aperture for computing the LF of clusters of different masses. We determine the composite LF for early- and late-type galaxies, where the typing is based on the galaxy u-r colors. The late-type LF is well fitted by a single Schechter function with a steep slope (α=-2.0 in the r band, within r200). The early-type LF instead cannot be fitted by a single Schechter function, and a composite of two Schechter functions is needed. The faint-end upturn of the global cluster LF is due to the early-type cluster galaxies. The shape of the bright-end tail of the early-type LF does not seem to depend upon the local galaxy density or the distance from the cluster center. The late-type LF shows a significant variation only very near the cluster center. On the other hand, the faint-end tail of the early-type LF shows a significant and continuous variation with the environment. We provide evidence that the process responsible for creating the excess population of dwarf early type galaxies in clusters is a threshold process that occurs when the density exceeds ˜ 500 times the critical density of the Universe. We interpret our results in the context of the "harassment" scenario, where faint early-type cluster galaxies are predicted to be the descendants of tidally-stripped late-type galaxies.

  19. Chandra Finds Well-Established Black Holes In Distant Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    University of Arizona and her colleagues disagree. In addition to the three distant Sloan quasars, they observed 14 other quasars with distances between 12 and 12.5 billion light years. Bechtold's group looked at their larger sample to determine that the younger, more distant quasars were radiating a lower percentage of their energy in X-rays. "The X-ray data are consistent with predictions of some theories that a hot gas atmosphere is associated with the accretion disk swirling around a central supermassive black hole," said Bechtold, provided the distant quasars have more massive black holes than nearby ones. "These theories predict that large supermassive black holes should be relatively weaker X-ray emittters than smaller ones, which is what we observed with Chandra." All groups agreed that the masses of the black holes producing the X-rays are huge, given their relative youth. By various estimates, the three quasars each weighed in at between one and 10 billion times the mass of the Sun. By comparison, the black hole at the center of the Milky Way is believed to contain the mass equivalent to only about 3 million Suns. Daniel Schwartz of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics took a different approach to the same data. In addition to looking at the quasars themselves, he examined the space around them. His search paid off with the discovery of a new X-ray source, which may be only about half a million light years away from the quasar SDSS 1306+0356 "It's not clear what the source is," said Schwartz. "One plausible explanation is that it is due to a high-energy jet of material ejected by the quasar over at least several hundred thousand years." Chandra has detected a number of such jets, which could be generated by the extraction of energy from the rotation of a supermassive black hole. In addition to SDSS 1306+0356, which has a cosmological redshift z = 5.99, the other distant Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars observed in this study are SDSS 0836+0054 (redshift

  20. Eight New Luminous z > 6 Quasars Selected via SED Model Fitting of VISTA, WISE and Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.L.; et al.

    2017-01-17

    We present the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation with the ESO NTT and Gemini South telescopes of eight new 6.0 < z < 6.5 quasars with z$_{AB}$ < 21.0. These quasars were photometrically selected without any star-galaxy morphological criteria from 1533 deg$^{2}$ using SED model fitting to photometric data from the Dark Energy Survey (g, r, i, z, Y), the VISTA Hemisphere Survey (J, H, K) and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (W1, W2). The photometric data was fitted with a grid of quasar model SEDs with redshift dependent Lyman-{\\alpha} forest absorption and a range of intrinsic reddening as well as a series of low mass cool star models. Candidates were ranked using on a SED-model based $\\chi^{2}$-statistic, which is extendable to other future imaging surveys (e.g. LSST, Euclid). Our spectral confirmation success rate is 100% without the need for follow-up photometric observations as used in other studies of this type. Combined with automatic removal of the main types of non-astrophysical contaminants the method allows large data sets to be processed without human intervention and without being over run by spurious false candidates. We also present a robust parametric redshift estimating technique that gives comparable accuracy to MgII and CO based redshift estimators. We find two z $\\sim$ 6.2 quasars with HII near zone sizes < 3 proper Mpc which could indicate that these quasars may be young with ages < 10$^6$ - 10$^7$ years or lie in over dense regions of the IGM. The z = 6.5 quasar VDESJ0224-4711 has J$_{AB}$ = 19.75 is the second most luminous quasar known with z > 6.5.

  1. Dark Energy Survey Year 1 Results: Calibration of redMaGiC Redshift Distributions in DES and SDSS from Cross-Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cawthon, R.; et al.

    2017-12-19

    We present calibrations of the redshift distributions of redMaGiC galaxies in the Dark Energy Survey Year 1 (DES Y1) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR8 data. These results determine the priors of the redshift distribution of redMaGiC galaxies, which were used for galaxy clustering measurements and as lenses for galaxy-galaxy lensing measurements in DES Y1 cosmological analyses. We empirically determine the bias in redMaGiC photometric redshift estimates using angular cross-correlations with Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxies. For DES, we calibrate a single parameter redshift bias in three photometric redshift bins: $z \\in[0.15,0.3]$, [0.3,0.45], and [0.45,0.6]. Our best fit results in each bin give photometric redshift biases of $|\\Delta z|<0.01$. To further test the redMaGiC algorithm, we apply our calibration procedure to SDSS redMaGiC galaxies, where the statistical precision of the cross-correlation measurement is much higher due to a greater overlap with BOSS galaxies. For SDSS, we also find best fit results of $|\\Delta z|<0.01$. We compare our results to other analyses of redMaGiC photometric redshifts.

  2. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cross-Correlation of Cosmic Microwave Background Lensing and Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwin, Blake D; Das, Sudeep; Haijian, Amir; Addison, Graeme; Bond, Richard; Crichton, Devin; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Gralla, Megan B.; Halpern, Mark; hide

    2012-01-01

    We measure the cross-correlation of Atacama cosmology telescope cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing convergence maps with quasar maps made from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8 SDSS-XDQSO photometric catalog. The CMB lensing quasar cross-power spectrum is detected for the first time at a significance of 3.8 sigma, which directly confirms that the quasar distribution traces the mass distribution at high redshifts z > 1. Our detection passes a number of null tests and systematic checks. Using this cross-power spectrum, we measure the amplitude of the linear quasar bias assuming a template for its redshift dependence, and find the amplitude to be consistent with an earlier measurement from clustering; at redshift z ap 1.4, the peak of the distribution of quasars in our maps, our measurement corresponds to a bias of b = 2.5 +/- 0.6. With the signal-to-noise ratio on CMB lensing measurements likely to improve by an order of magnitude over the next few years, our results demonstrate the potential of CMB lensing crosscorrelations to probe astrophysics at high redshifts.

  3. Nature and statistical properties of quasar associated absorption systems in the XQ-100 Legacy Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrotta, Serena; D'Odorico, Valentina; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We statistically study the physical properties of a sample of narrow absorption line (NAL) systems looking for empirical evidences to distinguish between intrinsic and intervening NALs without taking into account any a priori definition or velocity cut-off. We analyze the spectra of 100 quasars...

  4. Detecting active comets with SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solontoi, Michael; Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; West, Andrew A.; /MIT, MKI; Claire, Mark; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, Mario; /Princeton U. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; Jones, Lynne; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Kent, Steve; /Fermilab; Lupton, Robert H.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Quinn, Tom; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. Observ.

    2010-12-01

    Using a sample of serendipitously discovered active comets in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we develop well-controlled selection criteria for greatly increasing the efficiency of comet identification in the SDSS catalogs. After follow-up visual inspection of images to reject remaining false positives, the total sample of SDSS comets presented here contains 19 objects, roughly one comet per 10 million other SDSS objects. The good understanding of selection effects allows a study of the population statistics, and we estimate the apparent magnitude distribution to r {approx} 18, the ecliptic latitude distribution, and the comet distribution in SDSS color space. The most surprising results are the extremely narrow range of colors for comets in our sample (e.g. root-mean-square scatter of only {approx}0.06 mag for the g-r color), and the similarity of comet colors to those of jovian Trojans. We discuss the relevance of our results for upcoming deep multi-epoch optical surveys such as the Dark Energy Survey, Pan-STARRS, and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and estimate that LSST may produce a sample of about 10,000 comets over its 10-year lifetime.

  5. Unveiling hidden black holes in the cosmic web: Dark matter halos of WISE quasars from Planck CMB lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickox, Ryan

    The WISE and Planck surveys have now produced groundbreaking data sets which, in concert, can be exploited to obtain revolutionary constraints on the evolution of structure in the Universe. One particularly powerful application of WISE has been to uncover millions of the previously "hidden" obscured quasars, rapidly growing supermassive black holes that are shrouded in gas and dust and so are not detectable using traditional ground-based optical and near-IR techniques. Recently, Planck has produced the most precise all-sky map to date of dark matter structures via the lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We propose to combine these data sets to obtain a uniquely powerful measurement of the link between rapidly growing black holes and their host dark matter structures, by cross-correlating the density field of WISE-selected quasars with the CMB lensing convergence maps obtained from Planck. This proposal will build on our current ADAP program (NNX12AE38G), which studies the host dark matter halos of WISE-selected quasars via spatial clustering. NNX12AE38G involves a detailed characterization of the redshifts, luminosities, and spectral energy distributions of WISE-selected quasars and uses new techniques to measure how quasars cluster around themselves. NNX12AE38G has contributed to more than 10 journal articles and 5 conference proceedings. Building on our current work, an even more complete understanding of the link between black holes and their host dark matter structures is possible if we employ an independent method for measuring the clustering bias (and thus characteristic halo mass) of the quasar population. This has recently become possible using CMB lensing maps. In the past two years, our team has conducted an initial analysis covering 2500 square degrees using WISE-selected quasars and lensing maps from the South Pole Telescope (Geach, Hickox, Myers et al., 2013), and have implemented this technique with Planck over part of the SDSS region

  6. DES J0454-4448: discovery of the first luminous z ≥ 6 quasar from the Dark Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S. L.; McMahon, R. G.; Banerji, M.; Becker, G. D.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Martini, P.; Ostrovski, F.; Rauch, M.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bertin, E.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; da Costa, L. N.; D' Andrea, C.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Cunha, C. E.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Finley, D. A.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gruen, D.; Honscheid, K.; James, D.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Marshall, J.; Merritt, K.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A.; Romer, K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla, I.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Walker, A.; Wechsler, R. H.

    2015-10-28

    We present the first results of a survey for high-redshift, z ≥ 6, quasars using izY multicolour photometric observations from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). Here we report the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation of the zAB, YAB = 20.2, 20.2 (M1450 = -26.5) quasar DES J0454-4448 with a redshift of z = 6.09±0.02 based on the onset of the Ly α forest and an H I near zone size of 4.1+1.1-1.2 proper Mpc. The quasar was selected as an i-band drop out with i-z = 2.46 and zAB < 21.5 from an area of ~300 deg2. It is the brightest of our 43 candidates and was identified for spectroscopic follow-up solely based on the DES i-z and z-Y colours. The quasar is detected by WISE and has W1AB = 19.68. The discovery of one spectroscopically confirmed quasar with 5.7 < z < 6.5 and zAB ≤ 20.2 is consistent with recent determinations of the luminosity function at z ~ 6. DES when completed will have imaged ~5000 deg2 to YAB = 23.0 (5σ point source) and we expect to discover 50–100 new quasars with z > 6 including 3–10 with z > 7 dramatically increasing the numbers of quasars currently known that are suitable for detailed studies.

  7. SpIES: The Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon; Lacy, Mark; Strauss, Michael; Spergel, David; Anderson, Scott; Bauer, Franz; Bochanski, John; Brandt, Niel; Cushing, Michael; Fan, Xiaohui; Gallagher, Sarah; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Hewett, Paul; Hodge, Jaqueline; Hopkins, Philip; Hughes, Jack; Jiang, Linhua; Knapp, Gillian; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Lin, Yen-Ting; Lupton, Robert; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; McMahon, Richard; Menanteau, Felipe; Myers, Adam; Nichol, Robert; Ross, Nic; Ryan, Erin; Schneider, Donald; Szalay, Alex; Urry, C. Megan; Viero, Marco; Warren, Stephen; Zakamska, Nadia

    2012-09-01

    The Spitzer Space Telescope has opened up entirely new realms of astronomy, but unlike ground-based optical and NIR surveys, it has not yet conducted a wide-area survey that samples enough volume to perform investigations of quasar clustering and the quasar luminosity function at z>3. We propose to remedy this situation by performing a moderately deep Spitzer-IRAC survey of 175 sq. deg. along the Celestial Equator (SDSS 'Stripe 82'), complemented with one of the CFHT Legacy Survey wide fields with which it overlaps. With this dataset, we will 1) probe quasar clustering and the luminosity function in order to test different 'feedback' models of galaxy evolution; 2) identify obscured and unobscured AGNs with a combination of mid-IR, optical, and variability selection---taking advantage of ancillary multi-wavelength, multi-epoch data to produce accurate photometric redshifts; 3) identify ~25 6quasars, which are important probes of reionization; and 4) support other wide-field ancillary science. We show that SWIRE-depth exposures (120s) are an optimal choice for our investigations. Stripe 82 is the premier large-area, multi-wavelength extragalactic region of sky, with deep imaging in the optical (SDSS, CFHT), ultraviolet (GALEX), NIR (UKIDSS), FIR (Herschel), radio (VLA), and millimeter (ACT), as well as extensive spectroscopy (SDSS I/II, SDSS-III/BOSS, 2dF, WiggleZ, VVDS, DEEP2). We therefore propose Spitzer-IRAC imaging to complete the wavelength coverage in Stripe 82, to provide a wide-area survey of lasting value. At our optimal depth, covering this area (~175 sq. deg.) will require 1270 hours of new observations. Such a survey will complement existing Spitzer Legacy programs and provide crucial input for future missions such as JWST. Reduced images and catalogs will be made available to the public using the existing SDSS, NVO, and IRSA database structures.

  8. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: final emission line galaxy target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raichoor, A.; Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, Ch; Dawson, K. S.; Percival, W. J.; Dey, A.; Lang, D.; Schlegel, D. J.; Gorgoni, C.; Bautista, J.; Brownstein, J. R.; Mariappan, V.; Seo, H.-J.; Tinker, J. L.; Ross, A. J.; Wang, Y.; Zhao, G.-B.; Moustakas, J.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Jullo, E.; Newmann, J. A.; Prada, F.; Zhu, G. B.

    2017-11-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the emission line galaxy (ELG) sample at z ˜ 0.85 for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV, using photometric data from the DECam Legacy Survey. Our selection is based on a selection box in the g - r versus r - z colour-colour space and a cut on the g-band magnitude, to favour galaxies in the desired redshift range with strong [O II] emission. It provides a target density of 200 deg-2 on the North Galactic Cap and of 240 deg-2 on the South Galactic Cap (SGC), where we use a larger selection box because of deeper imaging. We demonstrate that this selection passes the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey requirements in terms of homogeneity. About 50 000 ELGs have been observed since the observations have started in 2016, September. These roughly match the expected redshift distribution, though the measured efficiency is slightly lower than expected. The efficiency can be increased by enlarging the redshift range and with incoming pipeline improvement. The cosmological forecast based on these first data predict σ _{D_V}/D_V = 0.023, in agreement with previous forecasts. Lastly, we present the stellar population properties of the ELG SGC sample. Once observations are completed, this sample will be suited to provide a cosmological analysis at z ˜ 0.85, and will pave the way for the next decade of massive spectroscopic cosmological surveys, which heavily rely on ELGs. The target catalogue over the SGC will be released along with DR14.

  9. Distribution of Doppler Redshifts of Associated Absorbers of SDSS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doppler redshifts of a sample of Mg II associated absorbers of SDSS DR7 quasars are analysed. We find that there might be three Gaussian components in the distribution of the Doppler redshift. The first Gaussian component, with the peak being located at Dopp = -0.0074, probably arises from absorbers with outflow ...

  10. Exploring the brown dwarf desert: new substellar companions from the SDSS-III MARVELS survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil; Ma, Bo; Sithajan, Sirinrat; Ghezzi, Luan; Kimock, Ben; Willis, Kevin; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian; Fleming, Scott W.; Agol, Eric; Troup, Nicholas; Paegert, Martin; Schneider, Donald P.; Stassun, Keivan; Varosi, Frank; Zhao, Bo; Jian, Liu; Li, Rui; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Pan, Kaike; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Santiago, Basílio X.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; del Peloso, E. F.

    2017-06-01

    Planet searches using the radial velocity technique show a paucity of companions to solar-type stars within ˜5 au in the mass range of ˜10-80 MJup. This deficit, known as the brown dwarf desert, currently has no conclusive explanation. New substellar companions in this region help assess the reality of the desert and provide insight to the formation and evolution of these objects. Here, we present 10 new brown dwarf and 2 low-mass stellar companion candidates around solar-type stars from the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. These companions were selected from processed MARVELS data using the latest University of Florida Two Dimensional pipeline, which shows significant improvement and reduction of systematic errors over previous pipelines. The 10 brown dwarf companions range in mass from ˜13 to 76 MJup and have orbital radii of less than 1 au. The two stellar companions have minimum masses of ˜98 and 100 MJup. The host stars of the MARVELS brown dwarf sample have a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.03 ± 0.08 dex. Given our stellar sample we estimate the brown dwarf occurrence rate around solar-type stars with periods less than ˜300 d to be ˜0.56 per cent.

  11. Measurements of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae at Redshift z < ~0.3 from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Smith, Mathew; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /Portsmouth U.; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; /UC, Berkeley; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter M.; /Notre Dame U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the volumetric Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The adopted sample of supernovae (SNe) includes 516 SNe Ia at redshift z {approx}< 0.3, of which 270 (52%) are spectroscopically identified as SNe Ia. The remaining 246 SNe Ia were identified through their light curves; 113 of these objects have spectroscopic redshifts from spectra of their host galaxy, and 133 have photometric redshifts estimated from the SN light curves. Based on consideration of 87 spectroscopically confirmed non-Ia SNe discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey, we estimate that 2.04{sub -0.95}{sup +1.61}% of the photometric SNe Ia may be misidentified. The sample of SNe Ia used in this measurement represents an order of magnitude increase in the statistics for SN Ia rate measurements in the redshift range covered by the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. If we assume a SN Ia rate that is constant at low redshift (z < 0.15), then the SN observations can be used to infer a value of the SN rate of r{sub V} = (2.69{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.34+0.21}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} at a mean redshift of {approx} 0.12, based on 79 SNe Ia of which 72 are spectroscopically confirmed. However, the large sample of SNe Ia included in this study allows us to place constraints on the redshift dependence of the SN Ia rate based on the SDSS-II Supernova Survey data alone. Fitting a power-law model of the SN rate evolution, r{sub V} (z) = A{sub p} x ((1+z)/(1+z{sub 0})){sup {nu}}, over the redshift range 0.0 < z < 0.3 with z{sub 0} = 0.21, results in A{sub p} = (3.43{sub -0.15}{sup +0.15}) x 10{sup -5} SNe yr{sup -1} Mpc{sup -3} (H{sub 0}/(70 km s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1})){sup 3} and {nu} = 2.04{sub -0.89}{sup +0.90}.

  12. ELM-KNN for photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Tu, Yang; Zhao, Yongheng; Tian, Haijun

    2017-06-01

    We explore photometric redshift estimation of quasars with the SDSS DR12 quasar sample. Firstly the quasar sample is separated into three parts according to different redshift ranges. Then three classifiers based on Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) are created in the three redshift ranges. Finally k-Nearest Neighbor (kNN) approach is applied on the three samples to predict photometric redshifts of quasars with multiwavelength photometric data. We compare the performance with different input patterns by ELM-KNN with that only by kNN. The experimental results show that ELM-KNN is feasible and superior to kNN (e.g. rms is 0.0751 vs. 0.2626 for SDSS sample), in other words, the ensemble method has the potential to increase regressor performance beyond the level reached by an individual regressor alone and will be a good choice when facing much more complex data.

  13. An Archival Chandra and XMM-Newton Survey of Type 2 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Jianjun; Ptak, Andrew Francis; Heckman, Timothy; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate obscuration in high-luminosity type 2 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), we analyzed Chandra and XMM-Newton archival observations for 71 type 2 quasars detected at 0.05 100 eV in the rest frame) and we detect this line in the other sources through a joint fit (spectral stacking). The correlation between the Fe K alpha and [O III] fluxes and the inverse correlation of the equivalent width of the Fe Ka line with the ratio of hard X-ray and [O III] fluxes is consistent with previous results for lower luminosity Seyfert 2 galaxies. We conclude that obscuration is the cause of the weak hard X-ray emission rather than intrinsically low X-ray luminosities. We find that about half of the population of optically selected type 2 quasars are likely to be Compton thick. We also find no evidence that the amount of X-ray obscuration depends on the AGN luminosity (over a range of more than three orders of magnitude in luminosity).

  14. Eight new luminous z ≥ 6 quasars discovered via SED model fitting of VISTA, WISE and Dark Energy Survey Year 1 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S. L.; McMahon, R. G.; Martini, P.; Banerji, M.; Auger, M.; Hewett, P. C.; Koposov, S. E.; Gibbons, S. L. J.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Ostrovski, F.; Tie, S. S.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; da Costa, L. N.; DePoy, D. L.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Doel, P.; Evrard, A. E.; Finley, D. A.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; García-Bellido, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.; Wester, W.

    2017-07-01

    We present the discovery and spectroscopic confirmation with the European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope (NTT) and Gemini South telescopes of eight new, and the rediscovery of two previously known, 6.0 energy distribution (SED) model fitting to photometric data from Dark Energy Survey (g, r, I, z, Y), VISTA Hemisphere Survey (J, H, K) and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (W1, W2). The photometric data were fitted with a grid of quasar model SEDs with redshift-dependent Ly α forest absorption and a range of intrinsic reddening as well as a series of low-mass cool star models. Candidates were ranked using an SED-model-based χ2-statistic, which is extendable to other future imaging surveys (e.g. LSST and Euclid). Our spectral confirmation success rate is 100 per cent without the need for follow-up photometric observations as used in other studies of this type. Combined with automatic removal of the main types of non-astrophysical contaminants, the method allows large data sets to be processed without human intervention and without being overrun by spurious false candidates. We also present a robust parametric redshift estimator that gives comparable accuracy to Mg II and CO-based redshift estimators. We find two z ˜ 6.2 quasars with H II near zone sizes ≤3 proper Mpc that could indicate that these quasars may be young with ages ≲ 106-107 years or lie in over dense regions of the IGM. The z = 6.5 quasar VDES J0224-4711 has JAB = 19.75 and is the second most luminous quasar known with z ≥ 6.5.

  15. Insights into quasar UV spectra using unsupervised clustering analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammour, A.; Gallagher, S. C.; Daley, M.; Richards, G. T.

    2016-06-01

    Machine learning techniques can provide powerful tools to detect patterns in multidimensional parameter space. We use K-means - a simple yet powerful unsupervised clustering algorithm which picks out structure in unlabelled data - to study a sample of quasar UV spectra from the Quasar Catalog of the 10th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR10) of Paris et al. Detecting patterns in large data sets helps us gain insights into the physical conditions and processes giving rise to the observed properties of quasars. We use K-means to find clusters in the parameter space of the equivalent width (EW), the blue- and red-half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) of the Mg II 2800 Å line, the C IV 1549 Å line, and the C III] 1908 Å blend in samples of broad absorption line (BAL) and non-BAL quasars at redshift 1.6-2.1. Using this method, we successfully recover correlations well-known in the UV regime such as the anti-correlation between the EW and blueshift of the C IV emission line and the shape of the ionizing spectra energy distribution (SED) probed by the strength of He II and the Si III]/C III] ratio. We find this to be particularly evident when the properties of C III] are used to find the clusters, while those of Mg II proved to be less strongly correlated with the properties of the other lines in the spectra such as the width of C IV or the Si III]/C III] ratio. We conclude that unsupervised clustering methods (such as K-means) are powerful methods for finding `natural' binning boundaries in multidimensional data sets and discuss caveats and future work.

  16. Mining the Infrared Sky for High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon

    The Spitzer and WISE satellites have opened up new avenues for the study of active galactic nuclei (AGN) by peering through the dust shrouding half (or more) of AGNs. However, despite being more sensitive to shrouded AGNs, current selection methods being used in the mid-IR are still largely blind to the highest redshift quasars-both those that are shrouded and those that are not (and should therefore be easy to find). We describe projects to identify both unobscured (at z>3) and obscured quasars (at z>2) that have heretofore been missed in significant numbers. Finding the high-z obscured quasars in large numbers is crucial for fulfilling the legacy of NASA missions in the IR and X-ray. With these quasars we will be able to perform clustering analyses that break the degeneracy of models describing how black holes can ``feed back" energy to the large-scale host galaxy, significantly influencing its evolution. We will further trace the luminosity function of galaxies undergoing active accretion from low-luminosity AGNs to luminous quasars—probing the growth of the supermassive black holes that we see today in the local universe. Our new insights come about from leveraging new Spitzer data, primarily from the PI's SpitzerIRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES). The Spitzer data are 2.5 magnitudes deeper than the "AllWISE" survey in a 125 square degree, multiwavelength-rich, equatorial region known as SDSS "Stripe 82". These data are crucial for extending mid-IR investigations to higher redshifts, both for unobscured and obscured sources. The PI's team are among the world's experts in using the proposed machine learning techniques to find both unobscured (type-1) and obscured (type- 2) quasars and in using quasar clustering and luminosity functions to do cutting-edge science. The luminosity function and clustering algorithms are already in place, allowing for timely completion of this project once the multi-wavelength NASA data have been incorporated. This project is directly

  17. The SDSS-III DR12 MARVELS radial velocity data release: the first data release from the multiple object Doppler exoplanet survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Li, Rui; Senan Seieroe Grieves, Nolan; Ma, Bo; de Lee, Nathan M.; Lee, Brian C.; Liu, Jian; Bolton, Adam S.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Weaver, Benjamin; SDSS-Iii Marvels Team

    2015-01-01

    We present the first data release from the SDSS-III Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) through the SDSS-III DR12. The data include 181,198 radial velocity (RV) measurements for a total of 5520 different FGK stars with V~7.6-12, of which more than 80% are dwarfs and subdwarfs while remainders are GK giants, among a total of 92 fields nearly randomly spread out over the entire northern sky taken with a 60-object MARVELS dispersed fixed-delay interferometer instrument over four years (2008-2012). There were 55 fields with a total of 3300 FGK stars which had 14 or more observations over about 2-year survey window. The median number of observations for these plates is 27 RV measurements. This represents the largest homogeneous sample of precision RV measurements of relatively bright stars. In this first released data, a total of 18 giant planet candidates, 16 brown dwarfs, and over 500 binaries with additional 96 targets having RV variability indicative of a giant planet companion are reported. The released data were produced by the MARVELS finalized 1D pipeline. We will also report preliminary statistical results from the MARVELS 2D data pipeline which has produced a median RV precision of ~30 m/s for stable stars.

  18. A Measurement of the Rate of Type Ia Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin; /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Bassett, Bruce; /Cape Town U., Dept. Math. /South African Astron. Observ.; Becker, Andrew; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Bender, Ralf; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ.; Castander, Francisco; /Barcelona, IEEC; Cinabro, David; /Wayne State U.; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Chicago U. /Fermilab; Galbany, Lluis; /Barcelona, IFAE; Garnavich, Peter; /Notre Dame U.; Goobar, Ariel; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Hopp, Ulrich; /Munich, Tech. U. /Munich U. Observ. /Tokyo U.

    2010-03-01

    We present measurements of the Type Ia supernova (SN) rate in galaxy clusters based on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. The cluster SN Ia rate is determined from 9 SN events in a set of 71 C4 clusters at z {le} 0.17 and 27 SN events in 492 maxBCG clusters at 0.1 {le} z {le} 0.3. We find values for the cluster SN Ia rate of (0.37{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.17+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.55{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.13+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} (SNux = 10{sup -12}L{sub x{circle_dot}}{sup -1} yr{sup -1}) in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively, where the quoted errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. The SN rate for early-type galaxies is found to be (0.31{sub -0.12-0.01}{sup +0.18+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.49{sub -0.11-0.01}{sup +0.15+0.02}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate for the brightest cluster galaxies (BCG) is found to be (2.04{sub -1.11-0.04}{sup +1.99+0.07}) SNur h{sup 2} and (0.36{sub -0.30-0.01}{sup +0.84+0.01}) SNur h{sup 2} in C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The ratio of the SN Ia rate in cluster early-type galaxies to that of the SN Ia rate in field early-type galaxies is 1.94{sub -0.91-0.015}{sup +1.31+0.043} and 3.02{sub -1.03-0.048}{sup +1.31+0.062}, for C4 and maxBCG clusters, respectively. The SN rate in galaxy clusters as a function of redshift, which probes the late time SN Ia delay distribution, shows only weak dependence on redshift. Combining our current measurements with previous measurements, we fit the cluster SN Ia rate data to a linear function of redshift, and find r{sub L} = [(0.49{sub -0.14}{sup +0.15}) + (0.91{sub -0.81}{sup +0.85}) x z] SNuB h{sup 2}. A comparison of the radial distribution of SNe in cluster to field early-type galaxies shows possible evidence for an enhancement of the SN rate in the cores of cluster early-type galaxies. With an observation of at most 3 hostless, intra-cluster SNe Ia, we estimate the fraction of cluster SNe that are

  19. Gravitationally lensed quasars in Gaia: I. Resolving small-separation lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Cameron A.; Auger, Matthew W.; McMahon, Richard G.; Koposov, Sergey E.

    2017-12-01

    Gaia's exceptional resolution (FWHM $\\sim$ 0.1$^{\\prime\\prime}$) allows identification and cataloguing of the multiple images of gravitationally lensed quasars. We investigate a sample of 49 known lensed quasars in the SDSS footprint, with image separations less than 2$^{\\prime\\prime}$, and find that 8 are detected with multiple components in the first Gaia data release. In the case of the 41 single Gaia detections, we generally are able to distinguish these lensed quasars from single quasars when comparing Gaia flux and position measurements to those of Pan-STARRS and SDSS. This is because the multiple images of these lensed quasars are typically blended in ground-based imaging and therefore the total flux and a flux-weighted centroid are measured, which can differ significantly from the fluxes and centroids of the individual components detected by Gaia. We compare the fluxes through an empirical fit of Pan-STARRS griz photometry to the wide optical Gaia bandpass values using a sample of isolated quasars. The positional offsets are calculated from a recalibrated astrometric SDSS catalogue. Applying flux and centroid difference criteria to spectroscopically confirmed quasars, we discover 4 new sub-arcsecond-separation lensed quasar candidates which have two distinct components of similar colour in archival CFHT or HSC data. Our method based on single Gaia detections can be used to identify the $\\sim$ 1400 lensed quasars with image separation above 0.5$^{\\prime\\prime}$, expected to have only one image bright enough to be detected by Gaia.

  20. New cosmological constraints with extended-Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR14 quasar sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Huang, Qing-Guo; Wang, Ke

    2017-11-01

    We update the constraints on the cosmological parameters by adopting the Planck data released in 2015 and baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements including the new DR14 quasar sample measurement at redshift z=1.52, and we conclude that the six-parameter Λ CDM model is preferred. Exploring some extensions to the Λ CDM model, we find that the equation of state of dark energy reads w=-1.036± 0.056 in the wCDM model, the effective number of relativistic degrees of freedom in the Universe is N_ {eff}=3.09_{-0.20}^{+0.18} in the N_ {eff}+Λ CDM model and the spatial curvature parameter is Ω _k=(1.8± 1.9)× 10^{-3} in the Ω _k+Λ CDM model at 68% confidence level (C.L.), and the 95% C.L. upper bounds on the sum of three active neutrinos masses are \\sum m_ν <0.16 eV for the normal hierarchy (NH) and \\sum m_ν <0.19 eV for the inverted hierarchy (IH) with Δ χ ^2≡ χ ^2_ {NH}-χ ^2_ {IH}=-1.25.

  1. The Scale Invariant Synchrotron Jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this paper, the scale invariance of the synchrotron jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars has been studied using a sample of combined sources from FKM04 and from SDSS DR3 catalogue. Since the research of scale invariance has been focused on sub-Eddington cases that can be fitted onto the ...

  2. The Scale Invariant Synchrotron Jet of Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper, the scale invariance of the synchrotron jet of Flat. Spectrum Radio Quasars has been studied using a sample of combined sources from FKM04 and from SDSS DR3 catalogue. Since the research of scale invariance has been focused on sub-Eddington cases that can be fitted onto the fundamental ...

  3. OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY OF SDSS J004054.65-0915268: THREE POSSIBLE SCENARIOS FOR THE CLASSIFICATION. A z ∼ 5 BL LACERTAE, A BLUE FSRQ, OR A WEAK EMISSION LINE QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landoni, M.; Zanutta, A.; Bianco, A.; Tavecchio, F.; Bonnoli, G.; Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    The haunt of high-redshift BL Lacerate objects is day by day more compelling to firmly understand their intrinsic nature and evolution. SDSS J004054.65-0915268 is, at the moment, one of the most distant BL Lac candidates, at z ∼ 5. We present a new optical-near-IR spectrum obtained with ALFOSC-NOT with a new, custom designed dispersive grating aimed to detect broad emission lines that could disprove this classification. In the obtained spectra, we do not detect any emission features and we provide an upper limit to the luminosity of the C iv broad emission line. Therefore, the nature of the object is then discussed, building the overall spectral energy distribution (SED) and fitting it with three different models. Our fits, based on SED modeling with different possible scenarios, cannot rule out the possibility that this source is indeed a BL Lac object, though the absence of optical variability and the lack of strong radio flux seem to suggest that the observed optical emission originates from a thermalized accretion disk.

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Maping Project: H-alpha and H-beta Reverberation Measurements from First-Year Spectroscopy and Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, Catherine; SDSS-RM Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project (SDSS-RM) has completed its first four years of spectroscopic observations of a sample of ~850 quasars with the SDSS-III BOSS spectrograph. From January-July in 2014-2017, more than 55 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained for this quasar sample, and continued monitoring has been approved for 2018-2020. Supporting photometric observations were also carried out at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and the Steward Observatory Bok telescope. We will present a status update on the SDSS-RM program, including recent reverberation mapping results from the wider 850-quasar sample using the full set of combined first-year photometric and spectroscopic data. We successfully recovered reverberation time delays between the g+i-band emission and the H-beta emission line in 44 quasars, and for the broad H-alpha line in 18 quasars. Our work has increased the previous sample size of reverberation-mapped active galaxies by about two thirds, and represents the first large sample of reverberation mapping observations beyond the local universe.

  5. Observational Constraints on Quasar Black Hole Mass Distributions, Eddington Ratio Distributions, and Lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Fan, X.

    2010-01-01

    I will present the black hole mass function (BHMF) of broad line quasars in the SDSS DR3. We employ a powerful Bayesian statistical technique that corrects for incompleteness and the statistical uncertainty in the mass estimates. We find evidence that the most massive black hole appeared as quasars...... earlier in the universe, and that most quasars are not radiating at or near the Eddington limit. I will also present constraints on the quasar lifetime and maximum black hole mass, derived from the mass functions....

  6. Two to Tango? Binary Quasars, their Environments, and the Merger Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul

    2008-09-01

    Merger/feedback scenarios linking AGN and galaxy evolution to cosmological structure formation seem wildly successful. Close quasar pairs, which are rare but show a significant excess over the extrapolated large-scale quasar correlation function, are the strongest candidates for merger triggering we have. But a competing theory posits that their excess is only due to their inhabiting locally overdense environments. To address this controversy, we propose to observe 9 close quasar pairs. Their X-ray luminosity, spectra, and broadband SEDs will be compared to hundreds of isolated SDSS quasars already imaged and analyzed. Proposed NOAO 4-meter imaging provides complementary tests for environmental overdensities.

  7. THE HIGH A{sub V} Quasar Survey: Reddened Quasi-Stellar Objects selected from optical/near-infrared photometry. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krogager, J.-K.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Vestergaard, M. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø (Denmark); Geier, S. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Venemans, B. P. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ledoux, C. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Møller, P. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschildstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Noterdaeme, P. [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS-UPMC, UMR7095, 98bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Kangas, T.; Pursimo, T.; Smirnova, O. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Apartado 474, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain); Saturni, F. G. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Väisäläntie 20, 21500 Piikkiö (Finland)

    2015-03-15

    Quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) whose spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are reddened by dust either in their host galaxies or in intervening absorber galaxies are to a large degree missed by optical color selection criteria like the ones used by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To overcome this bias against red QSOs, we employ a combined optical and near-infrared (near-IR) color selection. In this paper, we present a spectroscopic follow-up campaign of a sample of red candidate QSOs which were selected from the SDSS and the UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS). The spectroscopic data and SDSS/UKIDSS photometry are supplemented by mid-infrared photometry from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. In our sample of 159 candidates, 154 (97%) are confirmed to be QSOs. We use a statistical algorithm to identify sightlines with plausible intervening absorption systems and identify nine such cases assuming dust in the absorber similar to Large Magellanic Cloud sightlines. We find absorption systems toward 30 QSOs, 2 of which are consistent with the best-fit absorber redshift from the statistical modeling. Furthermore, we observe a broad range in SED properties of the QSOs as probed by the rest-frame 2 μm flux. We find QSOs with a strong excess as well as QSOs with a large deficit at rest-frame 2 μm relative to a QSO template. Potential solutions to these discrepancies are discussed. Overall, our study demonstrates the high efficiency of the optical/near-IR selection of red QSOs.

  8. Quasar-Lyman α forest cross-correlation from BOSS DR11: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Kirkby, David; Blomqvist, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA, 92697 (United States); Busca, Nicolas; Aubourg, Éric; Bautista, Julian [APC, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rue A. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi [Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (IEEC/UB), Martí i Franquès 1, Barcelona, 08028 Catalonia (Spain); Ross, Nicholas P.; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Carithers, Bill [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA (United States); Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton, NY, 11375 (United States); Rich, James; Delubac, Timothée [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, Gif-sur-Yvette, 91191 France (France); Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA, 98195 (United States); Brewington, Howard; Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM, 88349-0059 (United States); Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S., E-mail: font@physik.uzh.ch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT, 84112 (United States); and others

    2014-05-01

    We measure the large-scale cross-correlation of quasars with the Lyα forest absorption, using over 164,000 quasars from Data Release 11 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We extend the previous study of roughly 60,000 quasars from Data Release 9 to larger separations, allowing a measurement of the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale along the line of sight c/(H(z = 2.36)r{sub s}) = 9.0±0.3 and across the line of sight D{sub A}(z = 2.36)/r{sub s} = 10.8±0.4, consistent with CMB and other BAO data. Using the best fit value of the sound horizon from Planck data (r{sub s} = 147.49 Mpc), we can translate these results to a measurement of the Hubble parameter of H(z = 2.36) = 226±8 km s{sup −1} Mpc{sup −1} and of the angular diameter distance of D{sub A}(z = 2.36) = 1590±60 Mpc. The measured cross-correlation function and an update of the code to fit the BAO scale (baofit) are made publicly available.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Physical parameters of ~300000 SDSS-DR12 QSOs (Kozlowski, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, S.

    2017-03-01

    We use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Quasar Data Release 12 (DR12Q), containing nearly 300000 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), to calculate the monochromatic luminosities at 5100, 3000, and 1350Å, derived from the broadband extinction-corrected SDSS magnitudes. After matching these sources to their counterparts from the SDSS Quasar Data Release 7 (DR7Q), we find very high correlations between our luminosities and DR7Q spectra-based luminosities with minute mean offsets (~0.01dex) and dispersions of differences of 0.11, 0.10, and 0.12dex, respectively, across a luminosity range of 2.5dex. We then estimate the black hole (BH) masses of the AGNs using the broad line region radius-disk luminosity relations and the FWHM of the MgII and CIV emission lines, to provide a catalog of 283033 virial BH mass estimates (132451 for MgII, 213071 for CIV, and 62489 for both) along with the estimates of the bolometric luminosity and Eddington ratio for 0.1CIV FWHMs from DR12Q as compared to DR7Q, which we correct empirically. The CIV BH mass estimates should be used with caution because the CIV line is known to cause problems in the estimation of BH mass from single-epoch spectra. Finally, after the FWHM correction, the AGN BH mass estimates from CIV closely match the DR7Q ones (with a dispersion of 0.28dex), and more importantly the MgII and CIV BH masses agree internally with a mean offset of 0.07dex and a dispersion of 0.39dex. (1 data file).

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: WFC3/UVIS quasar-stacked spectrum at z=~2.4 (Lusso+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusso, E.; Worseck, G.; Hennawi, J. F.; Prochaska, J. X.; Vignali, C.; Stern, J.; O'Meara, J. M.

    2017-11-01

    The data sample employed in the present analysis comes from a survey performed with HST using the WFC3 instrument. Quasar sample, HST observations, and reduction procedures are described in detail in O'meara et al. 2011, J/ApJS/195/16 (O11). The O11 survey consists of 53 quasars selected from SDSS Data Release 5 (Schneider et al. 2007, Cat. VII/252) with ggrism in Cycle 17. These data were taken specifically for the scientific goal of surveying the abundance of strong H I Lyman limit absorption features at 1.2quasar in this sample are extracted using customized software (see section 3.1 in O11). WFC3/UVIS-G280 spectra span roughly λ=2000-6000Å and they have relatively high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N~20) per pixel down to λ~2000Å (FWHM~60Å at λ=2500Å). (1 data file).

  11. Ultraviolet Echoes of Quasar Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, Jonathan

    2017-08-01

    We propose a novel ultraviolet monitoring campaign with WFC3/UVIS to measure quasar accretion disk structure. The bulk of supermassive black hole growth occurs in luminous quasar phases of rapid accretion, yet the governing physics remains poorly understood. Continuum reverberation mapping (RM) measures the accretion disk size via the time lag between short- and long-wavelength emission: the proposed UV monitoring forms the foundation for simultaneous optical observations (expected to continue for our quasars through 2019). Currently only 4 Seyfert AGNs have UV/optical RM accretion-disk sizes, all low-luminosity and at z<0.02. We propose to monitor 5 new quasars, spanning an order of magnitude higher accretion rate and out to z 1. The 5 quasar targets are drawn from SDSS-RM, a pioneering multi-object spectroscopic RM campaign, and have been monitored with optical photometry and spectroscopy since 2014. The higher luminosity and accurate RM masses of our sample enable the first measurements of accretion-rate effects on accretion-disk size, with UV monitoring directly probing changes in the inner disk suggested by theory and previous indirect observations. Our proposed HST monitoring campaign is unusually efficient, targeting 5 quasars per orbit using the DASH method with UVIS subarray readouts. We use simulations to demonstrate that our 2-day cadence over 32 epochs will accurately measure continuum lags and accretion-disk structure. Ultraviolet monitoring of these 5 quasars will enable critical new measurements of accretion-disk structure during the rapid accretion mode that dominates black hole growth.

  12. The WISSH quasars project. II. Giant star nurseries in hyper-luminous quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duras, F.; Bongiorno, A.; Piconcelli, E.; Bianchi, S.; Pappalardo, C.; Valiante, R.; Bischetti, M.; Feruglio, C.; Martocchia, S.; Schneider, R.; Vietri, G.; Vignali, C.; Zappacosta, L.; La Franca, F.; Fiore, F.

    2017-08-01

    Context. Studying the coupling between the energy output produced by the central quasar and the host galaxy is fundamental to fully understand galaxy evolution. Quasar feedback is indeed supposed to dramatically affect the galaxy properties by depositing large amounts of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM). Aims: In order to gain further insights on this process, we study the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of sources at the brightest end of the quasar luminosity function, for which the feedback mechanism is assumed to be at its maximum, given their high efficiency in driving powerful outflows. Methods: We modelled the rest-frame UV-to-far-IR SEDs of 16 WISE-SDSS Selected Hyper-luminous (WISSH) quasars at 1.8 standard combination of accretion disc plus torus and cold dust emission. However, about 30% of SEDs require an additional emission component in the near-IR, with temperatures peaking at 750 K, which indicates that a hotter dust component is present in these powerful quasars. We measure extreme values of both AGN bolometric luminosity (LBOL > 1047 erg/s) and star formation rate (up to 2000 M⊙/yr) based on the quasar-corrected, IR luminosity of the host galaxy. A new relation between quasar and star formation luminosity is derived (LSF ∝ L0.73QSO) by combining several Herschel-detected quasar samples from z 0 to 4. WISSH quasars have masses ( 108M⊙) and temperatures ( 50 K) of cold dust in agreement with those found for other high-z IR luminous quasars. Conclusions: Thanks to their extreme nuclear and star formation luminosities, the WISSH quasars are ideal targets to shed light on the feedback mechanism and its effect on the evolution of their host galaxies, as well as on the merger-induced scenario that is commonly assumed to explain these exceptional luminosities. Future observations will be crucial to measure the molecular gas content in these systems, probe the effect between quasar-driven outflows and on-going star formation

  13. THE WIRED SURVEY. III. AN INFRARED EXCESS AROUND THE ECLIPSING POST-COMMON ENVELOPE BINARY SDSS J030308.35+005443.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debes, John H. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hoard, D. W. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Farihi, Jay [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Wachter, Stefanie [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Leisawitz, David T. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Monterey Institute for Research in Astronomy, Marina, CA 93933 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We present the discovery with WISE of a significant infrared excess associated with the eclipsing post-common envelope binary SDSS J030308.35+005443.7, the first excess discovered around a non-interacting white dwarf+main-sequence M dwarf binary. The spectral energy distribution of the white dwarf+M dwarf companion shows significant excess longward of 3 {mu}m. A T {sub eff} of 8940 K for the white dwarf is consistent with a cooling age >2 Gyr, implying that the excess may be due to a recently formed circumbinary dust disk of material that extends from the tidal truncation radius of the binary at 1.96 R {sub Sun} out to <0.8 AU, with a total mass of {approx}10{sup 20} g. We also construct WISE and follow-up ground-based near-infrared light curves of the system and find variability in the K band that appears to be in phase with ellipsoidal variations observed in the visible. The presence of dust might be due to (1) material being generated by the destruction of small rocky bodies that are being perturbed by an unseen planetary system or (2) dust condensing from the companion's wind. The high inclination of this system and the presence of dust make it an attractive target for M dwarf transit surveys and long-term photometric monitoring.

  14. Inspiraling halo accretion mapped in Ly α emission around a z ˜ 3 quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni Battaia, Fabrizio; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Obreja, Aura; Buck, Tobias; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Dutton, Aaron A.; Macciò, Andrea V.

    2018-01-01

    In an effort to search for Ly α emission from circum- and intergalactic gas on scales of hundreds of kpc around z ∼ 3 quasars, and thus characterize the physical properties of the gas in emission, we have initiated an extensive fast survey with the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE): Quasar Snapshot Observations with MUse: Search for Extended Ultraviolet eMission (QSO MUSEUM). In this work, we report the discovery of an enormous Ly α nebula (ELAN) around the quasar SDSS J102009.99+104002.7 at z = 3.164, which we followed-up with deeper MUSE observations. This ELAN spans ∼297 projected kpc, has an average Ly α surface brightness SBLy α ∼ 6.04 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2(within the 2σ isophote) and is associated with an additional four previously unknown embedded sources: two Ly α emitters and two faint active galactic nuclei (one type-1 and one type-2 quasar). By mapping at high significance, the line-of-sight velocity in the entirety of the observed structure, we unveiled a large-scale coherent rotation-like pattern spanning ∼300 km s-1 with a velocity dispersion of complement our MUSE observations and are definitely needed to fully characterize such a complex system. None the less, our observations reveal the potential of new sensitive integral-field spectrographs to characterize the dynamical state of diffuse gas on large scales in the young Universe, and thereby witness the assembly of galaxies.

  15. SDSS-BASED ASTEROID TAXONOMY V1.1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Moving Object Catalog (SDSS-MOC) is a large data set that provides five-filter magnitudes and astrometric information for all moving...

  16. SDSS DR6 Data for Photometric Redshift Calculations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Subject Area: Astronomical data Description: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a multi-organization effort to gather deep, multi-color images covering more than...

  17. Quasar Saleem Padiath

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. Quasar Saleem Padiath. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 83 Issue 2 August 2004 pp 117-119 Perspectives. Chance in our strands? Quasar Saleem Padiath B. Jagadeeshwara Rao · More Details Fulltext PDF ...

  18. The Formation of COINS: Equity and Inclusion in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose Ramon; Chanover, Nancy J.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lucatello, Sara; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Belfiore, Francesco; Cherinka, Brian; Feuillet, Diane; Jones, Amy; Masters, Karen; Simmons, Audrey; Ross, Ashley; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tayar, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    In the era of large surveys, collaborations like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are becoming a new normal for many scientists, and collaboration policies and climate have a considerable affect on scientific careers. As such, it is essential that collaborations actively strive to include all scientists regardless of gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, career stage, geographic location, economic background, social and cultural backgrounds, and all possible intersections thereof. We report on the formation and progress of the Committee On INclusiveness in the SDSS (COINS). COINS was formed to assess the SDSS-IV project and collaboration's climate and demographics, to recommend new policies or practices with regard to increasing inclusiveness, and to assist in the implementation of these new activities where necessary. We report on our current activities, which include ongoing support for the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, support for the SDSS Faculty and Student Teams initiative, administering and analyzing the SDSS demographic surveys, working towards collaboration meeting inclusiveness and accessibility, and adopting strategies for integrating and mentoring new members. We welcome input from SDSS members and non-members about how to work towards a more equitable and inclusive collaboration.

  19. Supernova studies in the SDSS-II/SNe survey spectroscopy of the peculiar SN 2007qd, and photometric properties of Type-Ia supernovae as a function of the distance to the host galaxy /

    OpenAIRE

    Galbany i Gonzàlez, Lluís

    2012-01-01

    Descripció del recurs: el 01 setembre 2012 Aquesta tesi engloba el treball fet durant els ultims quatre anys com a estudiant de doctorat a l'Institut de Física d'Altes Energies (IFAE), emmarcat dins de la col·labaració Sloan Digital Sky Survey II Supernova (SDSS-II/SNe) Survey. Al primer capítol (§1) s'introdueixen els principals conceptes del Model Estàndar de Cosmologia, presentant els seus orígens, les propietats dels seus continguts, i les mesures de distància i brillantor. També es re...

  20. SDSS-IV MaNGA IFS Galaxy Survey—Survey Design, Execution, and Initial Data Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Renbin; Bundy, Kevin; Law, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Andrews, Brett; Cherinka, Brian; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Thomas, Daniel; Wake, David A.; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Westfall, Kyle B.; Zhang, Kai; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Belfiore, Francesco; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blanton, Michael R.; Brownstein, Joel; Cappellari, Michele; D'Souza, Richard; Emsellem, Eric; Fu, Hai; Gaulme, Patrick; Graham, Mark T.; Goddard, Daniel; Gunn, James E.; Harding, Paul; Jones, Amy; Kinemuchi, Karen; Li, Cheng; Li, Hongyu; Maiolino, Roberto; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Masters, Karen; Merrifield, Michael R.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Sanchez, Sebastian F.; Schlegel, David; Simmons, Audrey; Thanjavur, Karun; Tinker, Jeremy; Tremonti, Christy; van den Bosch, Remco; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-12-01

    The MaNGA Survey (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV. It is obtaining integral field spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies at a spectral resolution of R ˜ 2000 from 3622 to 10354 Å. The design of the survey is driven by a set of science requirements on the precision of estimates of the following properties: star formation rate surface density, gas metallicity, stellar population age, metallicity, and abundance ratio, and their gradients; stellar and gas kinematics; and enclosed gravitational mass as a function of radius. We describe how these science requirements set the depth of the observations and dictate sample selection. The majority of targeted galaxies are selected to ensure uniform spatial coverage in units of effective radius (R e ) while maximizing spatial resolution. About two-thirds of the sample is covered out to 1.5R e (Primary sample), and one-third of the sample is covered to 2.5R e (Secondary sample). We describe the survey execution with details that would be useful in the design of similar future surveys. We also present statistics on the achieved data quality, specifically the point-spread function, sampling uniformity, spectral resolution, sky subtraction, and flux calibration. For our Primary sample, the median r-band signal-to-noise ratio is ˜70 per 1.4 Å pixel for spectra stacked between 1R e and 1.5R e . Measurements of various galaxy properties from the first-year data show that we are meeting or exceeding the defined requirements for the majority of our science goals.

  1. SDSS-IV MaNGA IFS GALAXY SURVEY—SURVEY DESIGN, EXECUTION, AND INITIAL DATA QUALITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Renbin; Zhang, Kai [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40506-0057 (United States); Bundy, Kevin [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Law, David R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Winsconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Andrews, Brett [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 OHara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Cherinka, Brian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Bloomberg Center, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Drory, Niv [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); MacDonald, Nicholas; Sánchez-Gallego, José R. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Thomas, Daniel; Westfall, Kyle B. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Wake, David A. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Weijmans, Anne-Marie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Belfiore, Francesco, E-mail: yanrenbin@uky.edu [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-12-01

    The MaNGA Survey (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory) is one of three core programs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV. It is obtaining integral field spectroscopy for 10,000 nearby galaxies at a spectral resolution of R  ∼ 2000 from 3622 to 10354 Å. The design of the survey is driven by a set of science requirements on the precision of estimates of the following properties: star formation rate surface density, gas metallicity, stellar population age, metallicity, and abundance ratio, and their gradients; stellar and gas kinematics; and enclosed gravitational mass as a function of radius. We describe how these science requirements set the depth of the observations and dictate sample selection. The majority of targeted galaxies are selected to ensure uniform spatial coverage in units of effective radius (R{sub e}) while maximizing spatial resolution. About two-thirds of the sample is covered out to 1.5 R{sub e} (Primary sample), and one-third of the sample is covered to 2.5 R{sub e} (Secondary sample). We describe the survey execution with details that would be useful in the design of similar future surveys. We also present statistics on the achieved data quality, specifically the point-spread function, sampling uniformity, spectral resolution, sky subtraction, and flux calibration. For our Primary sample, the median r -band signal-to-noise ratio is ∼70 per 1.4 Å pixel for spectra stacked between 1 R{sub e} and 1.5 R{sub e}. Measurements of various galaxy properties from the first-year data show that we are meeting or exceeding the defined requirements for the majority of our science goals.

  2. Type Ia Supernova Properties as a Function of the Distance to the Host Galaxy in the SDSS-II SN Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galbany, Lluis [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona (Spain); et al.

    2012-08-20

    We use type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) discovered by the SDSS-II SN Survey to search for dependencies between SN Ia properties and the projected distance to the host galaxy center, using the distance as a proxy for local galaxy properties (local star-formation rate, local metallicity, etc.). The sample consists of almost 200 spectroscopically or photometrically confirmed SNe Ia at redshifts below 0.25. The sample is split into two groups depending on the morphology of the host galaxy. We fit light-curves using both MLCS2k2 and SALT2, and determine color (AV, c) and light-curve shape (delta, x1) parameters for each SN Ia, as well as its residual in the Hubble diagram. We then correlate these parameters with both the physical and the normalized distances to the center of the host galaxy and look for trends in the mean values and scatters of these parameters with increasing distance. The most significant (at the 4-sigma level) finding is that the average fitted AV from MLCS2k2 and c from SALT2 decrease with the projected distance for SNe Ia in spiral galaxies. We also find indications that SNe in elliptical galaxies tend to have narrower light-curves if they explode at larger distances, although this may be due to selection effects in our sample. We do not find strong correlations between the residuals of the distance moduli with respect to the Hubble flow and the galactocentric distances, which indicates a limited correlation between SN magnitudes after standardization and local host metallicity.

  3. A Type II Supernova Hubble Diagram from the CSP-I, SDSS-II, and SNLS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jaeger, T.; González-Gaitán, S.; Hamuy, M.; Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Carlberg, R. G.; Sullivan, M.; Gutiérrez, C. P.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. Andrew; Hsiao, E. Y.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Folatelli, G.; Pritchet, C.; Basa, S.

    2017-02-01

    The coming era of large photometric wide-field surveys will increase the detection rate of supernovae by orders of magnitude. Such numbers will restrict spectroscopic follow-up in the vast majority of cases, and hence new methods based solely on photometric data must be developed. Here, we construct a complete Hubble diagram of Type II supernovae (SNe II) combining data from three different samples: the Carnegie Supernova Project-I, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II SN, and the Supernova Legacy Survey. Applying the Photometric Color Method (PCM) to 73 SNe II with a redshift range of 0.01-0.5 and with no spectral information, we derive an intrinsic dispersion of 0.35 mag. A comparison with the Standard Candle Method (SCM) using 61 SNe II is also performed and an intrinsic dispersion in the Hubble diagram of 0.27 mag, I.e., 13% in distance uncertainties, is derived. Due to the lack of good statistics at higher redshifts for both methods, only weak constraints on the cosmological parameters are obtained. However, assuming a flat universe and using the PCM, we derive the universe’s matter density: {{{Ω }}}m={0.32}-0.21+0.30 providing a new independent evidence for dark energy at the level of two sigma. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescopes, with the du Pont and Swope telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile; and the Gemini Observatory, Cerro Pachon, Chile (Gemini Program N-2005A-Q-11, GN-2005B-Q-7, GN-2006A-Q-7, GS-2005A-Q-11, GS-2005B-Q-6, and GS-2008B-Q-56). Based on observations collected at the European Organization for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile (ESO Programmes 076.A-0156,078.D-0048, 080.A-0516, and 082.A-0526).

  4. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: constraining modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Eva-Maria; Percival, Will; Linder, Eric; Alam, Shadab; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Beutler, Florian; Brinkmann, Jon

    2018-01-01

    We use baryon acoustic oscillation and redshift space distortion from the completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, corresponding to data release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, combined sample analysis in combination with cosmic microwave background, supernova and redshift space distortion measurements from additional spectroscopic surveys to test deviations from general relativity. We present constraints on several phenomenological models of modified gravity: First, we parametrise the growth of structure using the growth index γ, finding γ = 0.566 ± 0.058 (68% C.L.). Second, we modify the relation of the two Newtonian potentials by introducing two additional parameters, GM and GL. In this approach, GM refers to modifications of the growth of structure whereas GL to modification of the lensing potential. We consider a power law to model the redshift dependency of GM and GL as well as binning in redshift space, introducing four additional degrees of freedom, GM(z 0.5), GL(z 0.5). At 68% C.L. we measure GM = 0.980 ± 0.096 and GL = 1.082 ± 0.060 for a linear model, GM = 1.01 ± 0.36 and GL = 1.31 ± 0.19 for a cubic model as well as GM(z 0.5) = 0.986 ± 0.022, GL(z 0.5) = 1.037 ± 0.029. Thirdly, we investigate general scalar tensor theories of gravity, finding the model to be mostly unconstrained by current data. Assuming a one-parameter f(R) model we can constrain B0 < 7.7 × 10-5 (95% C.L). For all models we considered we find good agreement with general relativity.

  5. THE TIME DOMAIN SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY: VARIABLE SELECTION AND ANTICIPATED RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morganson, Eric; Green, Paul J. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Anderson, Scott F.; Ruan, John J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Eracleous, Michael; Brandt, William Nielsen [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kelly, Brandon [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Badenes, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Pittsburgh Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology Center (PITT PACC), University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara St, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bañados, Eduardo [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Blanton, Michael R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Bershady, Matthew A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Borissova, Jura [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030, and Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Burgett, William S. [GMTO Corp, Suite 300, 251 S. Lake Ave, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Chambers, Kenneth, E-mail: emorganson@cfa.harvard.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2015-06-20

    We present the selection algorithm and anticipated results for the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS). TDSS is an Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) subproject that will provide initial identification spectra of approximately 220,000 luminosity-variable objects (variable stars and active galactic nuclei across 7500 deg{sup 2} selected from a combination of SDSS and multi-epoch Pan-STARRS1 photometry. TDSS will be the largest spectroscopic survey to explicitly target variable objects, avoiding pre-selection on the basis of colors or detailed modeling of specific variability characteristics. Kernel Density Estimate analysis of our target population performed on SDSS Stripe 82 data suggests our target sample will be 95% pure (meaning 95% of objects we select have genuine luminosity variability of a few magnitudes or more). Our final spectroscopic sample will contain roughly 135,000 quasars and 85,000 stellar variables, approximately 4000 of which will be RR Lyrae stars which may be used as outer Milky Way probes. The variability-selected quasar population has a smoother redshift distribution than a color-selected sample, and variability measurements similar to those we develop here may be used to make more uniform quasar samples in large surveys. The stellar variable targets are distributed fairly uniformly across color space, indicating that TDSS will obtain spectra for a wide variety of stellar variables including pulsating variables, stars with significant chromospheric activity, cataclysmic variables, and eclipsing binaries. TDSS will serve as a pathfinder mission to identify and characterize the multitude of variable objects that will be detected photometrically in even larger variability surveys such as Large Synoptic Survey Telescope.

  6. First-Year Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Results: Constraints on Nonstandard Cosmological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollerman, J.; Mörtsell, E.; Davis, T. M.; Blomqvist, M.; Bassett, B.; Becker, A. C.; Cinabro, D.; Filippenko, A. V.; Foley, R. J.; Frieman, J.; Garnavich, P.; Lampeitl, H.; Marriner, J.; Miquel, R.; Nichol, R. C.; Richmond, M. W.; Sako, M.; Schneider, D. P.; Smith, M.; Vanderplas, J. T.; Wheeler, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    We use the new Type Ia supernovae discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II supernova survey, together with additional supernova data sets as well as observations of the cosmic microwave background and baryon acoustic oscillations to constrain cosmological models. This complements the standard cosmology analysis presented by Kessler et al. in that we discuss and rank a number of the most popular nonstandard cosmology scenarios. When this combined data set is analyzed using the MLCS2k2 light-curve fitter, we find that more exotic models for cosmic acceleration provide a better fit to the data than the ΛCDM model. For example, the flat Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model is ranked higher by our information-criteria (IC) tests than the standard model with a flat universe and a cosmological constant. When the supernova data set is instead analyzed using the SALT-II light-curve fitter, the standard cosmological-constant model fares best. This investigation of how sensitive cosmological model selection is to assumptions about, and within, the light-curve fitters thereby highlights the need for an improved understanding of these unresolved systematic effects. Our investigation also includes inhomogeneous Lemaître-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models. While our LTB models can be made to fit the supernova data as well as any other model, the extra parameters they require are not supported by our IC analysis. Finally, we explore more model-independent ways to investigate the cosmic expansion based on this new data set.

  7. Application of Independent Component Analysis to Legacy UV Quasar Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gordon

    2017-08-01

    We propose to apply a novel analysis technique to UV spectroscopy ofquasars in the HST archive. We endeavor to analyze all of thearchival quasar spectra, but will first focus on those quasars thatalso have optical spectroscopy from SDSS. An archival investigationby Sulentic et al. (2007) revealed 130 known quasars with UV coverageof CIV complementing optical emission line coverage. Today, thesample has grown considerably and now includes COS spectroscopy. Ourproposal includes a proof-of-concept demonstration of the power of atechnique called Independent Component Analysis (ICA). ICA allows usto reduce complexity of of quasar spectra to just a handful ofnumbers. In addition to providing a uniform set of traditional linemeasurements (and carefully calibrated redshifts), we will provide ICAweights to the community with examples of how they can be used to doscience that previously would have been quite difficult. The time isripe for such an investigation because 1) it has been a decade sincethe last significant archival investigation of UV emission lines fromHST quasars, 2) the future is uncertain for obtaining new UV quasarspectroscopy, and 3) the rise of machine learning has provided us withpowerful new tools. Thus our proposed work will provide a true UVlegacy database for quasar-based investigations.

  8. NuSTAR unveils a compton-thick 2 quasar in MrK 34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandhi, P.; Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) 3-40 keV observations of the optically selected Type 2 quasar (QSO2) SDSS J1034+6001 or Mrk 34. The high-quality hard X-ray spectrum and archival XMM-Newton data can be fitted self-consistently with a reflection-dominated continuum...

  9. Identification of Metal Absorption Lines on Quasar Spectra of SDSS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Cai-Juan Pan1 Cheng-Yu Su2 Mu-Sheng Li3 Wei-Rong Huang3. Department of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering of Baise University, Baise 533000, China. Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China. Centre for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006, ...

  10. Identification of Metal Absorption Lines on Quasar Spectra of SDSS ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . Baise 533000, China. 2Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China. 3Centre for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006, China. ∗ e-mail: cysu@gdut.edu.cn. Abstract. Absorption lines are an important ...

  11. Fundamental Plane of FSRQs from SDSS DR5 Quasar Catalogue ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. The formation of relativistic jets in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is still unclear due to fundamental problems in astrophysics (Meier et al. 2001). Although the jet formation remains unclear, the relationships explored between the jet emission and accretion processes have been explored by many authors ...

  12. New Discoveries Fill the Quasar Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    Quasars active and luminous galactic centers can be difficult to find at some high redshifts due to their camouflaging color. A team of scientists has now come up with a way to detect these distant monsters in spite of their disguise.Quasar CamouflageThe color track of quasars between 5 z 6 in the commonly used i z and r i bands. Each dot on the red line marks a 0.1 difference in redshift. The contours show the colors of M dwarfs, from early type to late type. Quasars at a redshift of 5.3 z 5.7 are clearly contaminated by M dwarfs, making them difficult to identify. [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]One of the key ways we can study the early universe is by building a large sample of high-redshift quasars. In particular, we believe that reionization of the universe is just completing around z 6. Quasars near this redshift are crucial tools for probing the post-reionization epoch and exploring the evolution of the intergalactic medium, quasar evolution, and early supermassive black hole growth.But quasars at this redshift are difficult to detect! The problem is contamination: quasars at this distance are the same color in commonly used optical bands as cool M-dwarf stars. As a result, surveys searching for quasars have often just cut out that entire section of the color space in order to avoid this contamination.This means that theres a huge gap in our sample of quasars around z 5.5: of the more than 300,000 quasars known, only 30 have been found in the redshift range of 5.3 z 5.7.The addition of new colorcolor selection criteria using infrared bands (bottom two plots) allows the authors to differentiate quasars (blue) from M dwarfs (grey), which isnt possible when only the traditional optical colorcolor selection criteria are used (top plot). [Adapted from Yang et al. 2017]A New ApproachIn a recent publication led by Jinyi Yang (Peking University, China and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona), a team of scientists has demonstrated a new technique for finding

  13. SDSS-IV MaNGA: identification of active galactic nuclei in optical integral field unit surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Greene, Jenny E.; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Drory, Niv; Andrews, Brett H.; Merloni, Andrea; Thomas, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate 2727 galaxies observed by MaNGA as of 2016 June to develop spatially resolved techniques for identifying signatures of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We identify 303 AGN candidates. The additional spatial dimension imposes challenges in identifying AGNs due to contamination from diffuse ionized gas, extraplanar gas and photoionization by hot stars. We show that the combination of spatially resolved line diagnostic diagrams and additional cuts on H α surface brightness and H α equivalent width can distinguish between AGN-like signatures and high-metallicity galaxies with low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions-like spectra. Low-mass galaxies with high specific star formation rates are particularly difficult to diagnose and routinely show diagnostic line ratios outside of the standard star formation locus. We develop a new diagnostic - the distance from the standard diagnostic line in the line-ratio space - to evaluate the significance of the deviation from the star formation locus. We find 173 galaxies that would not have been selected as AGN candidates based on single-fibre spectral measurements but exhibit photoionization signatures suggestive of AGN activity in the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO resolved observations, underscoring the power of large integral field unit surveys. A complete census of these new AGN candidates is necessary to understand their nature and probe the complex co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their hosts.

  14. Exploring the Nature of Galaxies with Abundance Gradient Anomalies in the SDSS-IV/MaNGA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Celeste; Tremonti, Christy; Pace, Zach; Schaefer, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Disk galaxies are known to have radial oxygen abundance gradients with their centers being more chemically enriched than their outskirts. The steepness of the abundance gradient has recently been shown to correlate with galaxy stellar mass, on average. However, individual galaxies sometimes show pronounced deviations from the expected trends, such as flatter or steeper slopes than expected for their mass, abrupt changes in slope, or azimuthal asymmetries. Here we report on a systematic search for galaxies with abundance gradient anomalies using 2-D spectroscopy from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV MaNGA. We construct nebular oxygen and nitrogen abundance maps for 300 moderately inclined non-interacting disk galaxies and use visual inspection to identify the most interesting cases. We use this training set to develop an automated pipeline to flag galaxies with abundance anomalies from the larger MaNGA dataset for visual inspection. We combine the metallicity maps with kinematic data and measurements of the galaxies' local environments to better understand the processes that shape the radial abundance gradients of disk galaxies.

  15. Classifying Variable Sources in SDSS Stripe 82

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willecke Lindberg, Christina

    2018-01-01

    SDSS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) Stripe 82 is a well-documented and researched region of the sky that does not have all of its ~67,500 variable objects labeled. By collecting data and consulting different catalogs such as the Catalina Survey, we are able to slowly cross-match more objects and add classifications within the Stripe 82 catalog. Such matching is performed either by pairing SDSS identification numbers, or by converting and comparing the coordinates of every object within the Stripe 82 catalog to every object within the classified catalog, such as the Catalina Survey catalog. If matching is performed with converted coordinates, a follow-up check is performed to ascertain that the magnitudes of the paired objects are within a reasonable margin of error and that objects have not been mismatched. Once matches have been confirmed, the light curves of classified objects can then be used to determine features that most effectively separate the different types of variable objects in feature spaces. By classifying variable objects, we can construct a reference for subsequent large research surveys, such as LSST (the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope), that could utilize SDSS data as a training set for its own classifications.

  16. Tracing a high redshift cosmic web with quasar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einasto, Maret; Tago, Erik; Lietzen, Heidi; Park, Changbom; Heinämäki, Pekka; Saar, Enn; Song, Hyunmi; Liivamägi, Lauri Juhan; Einasto, Jaan

    2014-08-01

    Context. To understand the formation, evolution, and present-day properties of the cosmic web we need to study it at low and high redshifts. Aims: We trace the cosmic web at redshifts that range from 1.0 ≤ z ≤ 1.8 by using the quasar (QSO) data from the SDSS DR7 QSO catalogue. Methods: We apply a friend-of-friend algorithm to the quasar and random catalogues to determine systems at a series of linking length and analyse richness and sizes of these systems. Results: At the linking lengths l ≤ 30 h-1 Mpc, the number of quasar systems is larger than the number of systems detected in random catalogues, and the systems themselves have smaller diameters than random systems. The diameters of quasar systems are comparable to the sizes of poor galaxy superclusters in the local Universe. The richest quasar systems have four members. The mean space density of quasar systems, ≈ 10-7 (h-1 Mpc)-3, is close to the mean space density of local rich superclusters. At intermediate linking lengths (40 ≤ l ≤ 70 h-1 Mpc), the richness and length of quasar systems are similar to those derived from random catalogues. Quasar system diameters are similar to the sizes of rich superclusters and supercluster chains in the local Universe. The percolating system, which penetrate the whole sample volume appears in a quasar sample at a smaller linking length than in random samples (85 h-1 Mpc). At the linking length 70 h-1 Mpc, the richest systems of quasars have diameters exceeding 500 h-1 Mpc. Quasar luminosities in systems are not correlated with the system richness. Conclusions: Quasar system catalogues in our web pages and at the Strasbourg Astronomical Data Center (CDS) serve as a database for searching superclusters of galaxies and for tracing the cosmic web at high redshifts. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgThe catalogues are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  17. Overdensity of galaxies in the environment of quasar pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrinelli, A.; Falomo, R.; Treves, A.; Scarpa, R.; Uslenghi, M.

    2018-03-01

    We report on a study of the galaxy environments of low redshift physical quasars pairs. We selected 20 pairs having projected separation Digital Sky Survey images, we evaluated the galaxy overdensity around these quasars in pairs and then compare it with that of a sample of isolated quasars with same redshift and luminosity. It is found that on average there is a systematic larger overdensity of galaxies around quasars in pairs with respect to that of isolated quasars. This may represent a significant link between nuclear activity and galaxy environment. However, at odds with that, the closest quasar pairs seem to inhabit poorer environments. Implications of present results and perspectives for future work are briefly discussed.

  18. Optical microvariability of bright type 2 quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polednikova, Jana; Ederoclite, Alessandro; Cepa, Jordi; de Diego Onsurbe, José Antonio; González-Serrano, José Ignacio

    2014-07-01

    We present results from a project focused on searching optical microvariabilty (also known as ``intra-night'' variability) in type 2 - obscured - quasars. Optical microvariability can be described as very small changes in the flux, typically in the order of hundredths of magnitude, which can be observed on timescales of hours. Such studies have been so far conducted for samples of blazars and type 1, unobscured, AGNs, where the optical microvariability was detected with success. We have focused on obscured targets which would pose a challenge to the AGN standard model. In the present work, however, we have observed a sample of three bright (g mag < 17) type 2 quasar, based on the catalog of type 2 quasars from SDSS of Reyes et al. (2008). The observations were carried out with the 1.5 meter telescope at San Pedro Martir observatory in Mexico. The sample was observed during an observation period of four days in Johnsons V filter, resulting in at least two continuous intervals of observations per target during the observational run. We have obtained differential light curves for our sources as well as for the comparison stars. They were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance statistical test (ANOVA), which has been repeatedly used in the past for studies of unobscured targets. Based on the results from the statistical analysis, we show that at least two out of three observed targets appear to be variable on time scales of hours. So far, this is the first study which confirmed existence of optical microvariability in type 2 quasars.

  19. SDSS J1056+5516: A Triple AGN or an SMBH Recoil Candidate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalfountzou, E.; Santos Lleo, M.; Trichas, M.

    2017-12-01

    We report the discovery of a kiloparsec-scale triple supermassive black hole system at z = 0.256: SDSS J1056+5516, discovered by our systematic search for binary quasars. The system contains three strong emission-line nuclei, which are offset by black hole (SMBH) interacting system, a triple AGN, or a recoiling SMBH. Each of these scenarios is unique for our understanding of the hierarchical growth of galaxies, AGN triggering, and gravitational waves.

  20. A CONSTRAINT ON QUASAR CLUSTERING AT z = 5 FROM A BINARY QUASAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Myers, Adam D., E-mail: imcgreer@as.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    We report the discovery of a quasar pair at z = 5 separated by 21″. Both objects were identified as quasar candidates using simple color selection techniques applied to photometric catalogs from the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) Legacy Survey (CFHTLS). Spectra obtained with the MMT present no discernible offset in redshift between the two objects; on the other hand, there are clear differences in the emission line profiles and in the multiwavelength spectral energy distributions that strongly disfavor the hypothesis that they are gravitationally lensed images of a single quasar. Both quasars are surprisingly bright given their proximity (a projected separation of ∼135 kpc), with i = 19.4 and i = 21.4. Previous measurements of the luminosity function demonstrate that luminous quasars are extremely rare at z = 5; the existence of this pair suggests that quasars have strong small-scale clustering at high redshift. Assuming a real-space correlation function of the form ξ(r) ∝ (r/r{sub 0}){sup −2}, this discovery implies a correlation length of r{sub 0} ≳ 20h{sup −1} Mpc, consistent with a rapid strengthening of quasar clustering at high redshift as seen in previous observations and predicted by theoretical models where feedback effects are inefficient at shutting down black hole growth at high redshift.

  1. Gravitational lensing of quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Eigenbrod, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The universe, in all its richness, diversity and complexity, is populated by a myriad of intriguing celestial objects. Among the most exotic of them are gravitationally lensed quasars. A quasar is an extremely bright nucleus of a galaxy, and when such an object is gravitationally lensed, multiple images of the quasar are produced – this phenomenon of cosmic mirage can provide invaluable insights on burning questions, such as the nature of dark matter and dark energy. After presenting the basics of modern cosmology, the book describes active galactic nuclei, the theory of gravitational lensing, and presents a particular numerical technique to improve the resolution of astronomical data. The book then enters the heart of the subject with the description of important applications of gravitational lensing of quasars, such as the measurement of the famous Hubble constant, the determination of the dark matter distribution in galaxies, and the observation of the mysterious inner parts of quasars with much higher r...

  2. Time Delay and Accretion Disk Size Measurements in the Lensed Quasar SBS 0909+532 from Multiwavelength Microlensing Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hainline, Laura J.; Morgan, Christopher W.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Landaal, Zachary D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Harris, Hugh C.; Tilleman, Trudy; Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.; Falco, Emilio E.

    2013-09-01

    We present three complete seasons and two half-seasons of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) r-band photometry of the gravitationally lensed quasar SBS 0909+532 from the U.S. Naval Observatory, as well as two seasons each of SDSS g-band and r-band monitoring from the Liverpool Robotic Telescope. Using Monte Carlo simulations to simultaneously measure the system's time delay and model the r-band microlensing variability, we confirm and significantly refine the precision of the system's time delay to \\Delta t_{AB} = 50^{+2}_{-4}\\,{days}, where the stated uncertainties represent the bounds of the formal 1σ confidence interval. There may be a conflict between the time delay measurement and a lens consisting of a single galaxy. While models based on the Hubble Space Telescope astrometry and a relatively compact stellar distribution can reproduce the observed delay, the models have somewhat less dark matter than we would typically expect. We also carry out a joint analysis of the microlensing variability in the r and g bands to constrain the size of the quasar's continuum source at these wavelengths, obtaining log {(r s, r /cm)[cos i/0.5]1/2} = 15.3 ± 0.3 and log {(r s, g /cm)[cos i/0.5]1/2} = 14.8 ± 0.9, respectively. Our current results do not formally constrain the temperature profile of the accretion disk but are consistent with the expectations of standard thin disk theory.

  3. SpIES: The Spitzer IRAC Equatorial Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timlin, John D.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Richards, Gordon T.; Lacy, Mark; Ryan, Erin L.; Stone, Robert B.; Bauer, Franz E.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Glikman, Eilat; Haggard, Daryl; Jiang, Linhua; LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Makler, Martin; McGehee, Peregrine; Myers, Adam D.; Schneider, Donald P.; Urry, C. Megan; Wollack, Edward J.; Zakamska, Nadia L.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the first data release from the Spitzer-IRAC Equatorial Survey (SpIES); a large-area survey of ˜115 deg2 in the Equatorial SDSS Stripe 82 field using Spitzer during its “warm” mission phase. SpIES was designed to probe sufficient volume to perform measurements of quasar clustering and the luminosity function at z ≥slant 3 to test various models for “feedback” from active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Additionally, the wide range of available multi-wavelength, multi-epoch ancillary data enables SpIES to identify both high-redshift (z ≥slant 5) quasars as well as obscured quasars missed by optical surveys. SpIES achieves 5σ depths of 6.13 μJy (21.93 AB magnitude) and 5.75 μJy (22.0 AB magnitude) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively—depths significantly fainter than the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). We show that the SpIES survey recovers a much larger fraction of spectroscopically confirmed quasars (˜98%) in Stripe 82 than are recovered by WISE (˜55%). This depth is especially powerful at high-redshift (z ≥slant 3.5), where SpIES recovers 94% of confirmed quasars, whereas WISE only recovers 25%. Here we define the SpIES survey parameters and describe the image processing, source extraction, and catalog production methods used to analyze the SpIES data. In addition to this survey paper, we release 234 images created by the SpIES team and three detection catalogs: a 3.6 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.1 million sources, a 4.5 μm only detection catalog containing ˜6.5 million sources, and a dual-band detection catalog containing ˜5.4 million sources.

  4. AGN Accretion Physics in the Time Domain: Survey Cadences, Stochastic Analysis, and Physical Interpretations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jackeline; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon; O'Brien, John T.; Kasliwal, Vishal

    2018-01-01

    We present rigorous testing of survey cadences (K2, SDSS, CRTS, & Pan-STARRS) for quasar variability science using a magnetohydrodynamics synthetic lightcurve and the canonical lightcurve from Kepler, Zw 229.15. We explain where the state of the art is in regards to physical interpretations of stochastic models (CARMA) applied to AGN variability. Quasar variability offers a time domain approach of probing accretion physics at the SMBH scale. Evidence shows that the strongest amplitude changes in the brightness of AGN occur on long timescales ranging from months to hundreds of days. These global behaviors can be constrained by survey data despite low sampling resolution. CARMA processes provide a flexible family of models used to interpolate between data points, predict future observations and describe behaviors in a lightcurve. This is accomplished by decomposing a signal into rise and decay timescales, frequencies for cyclic behavior and shock amplitudes. Characteristic timescales may point to length-scales over which a physical process operates such as turbulent eddies, warping or hotspots due to local thermal instabilities. We present the distribution of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars in CARMA parameters space that pass our cadence tests and also explain how the Damped Harmonic Oscillator model, CARMA(2,1), reduces to the Damped Random Walk, CARMA(1,0), given the data in a specific region of the parameter space.

  5. Millisecond Pulsar Companions in SDSS and Pan-Starrs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMann, Natasha; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; McLaughlin, Maura; Kaplan, David; NANOGrav

    2018-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are being timed precisely in hopes of detecting gravitational waves (GWs). In order to detect GWs, pulsars must be studied in great detail. The perturbations in timing caused by binaries must be determined so as not to confuse them with a GW perturbation. This study used a list of published MSPs to determine if any known MSP’s white dwarf companions are located and visible in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-Starrs) Footprints. No new possible companions were discovered but five objects were found in the SDSS and 18, including the same five from SDSS, were found in Pan-Starrs that could be the companion to an MSP. All objects are less than 1.5 arcseconds away from the MSP’s position. In order to verify the object as the companion, the color magnitudes must be compared to those previously published.

  6. Quasar Mass Functions Across Cosmic Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    I present mass functions of actively accreting black holes detected in different quasar surveys which in concert cover a wide range of cosmic history. I briefly address what we learn from these mass functions. I summarize the motivation for such a study and the methods by which we determine black...

  7. THE DISCOVERY OF THE FIRST “CHANGING LOOK” QUASAR: NEW INSIGHTS INTO THE PHYSICS AND PHENOMENOLOGY OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaMassa, Stephanie M.; Cales, Sabrina; Urry, C. Megan [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Moran, Edward C. [Astronomy Department, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University, Laramaie, WY 82071 (United States); Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Eracleous, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gallo, Luigi [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada)

    2015-02-20

    SDSS J015957.64+003310.5 is an X-ray selected, z = 0.31 active galactic nucleus (AGN) from the Stripe 82X survey that transitioned from a Type 1 quasar to a Type 1.9 AGN between 2000 and 2010. This is the most distant AGN, and first quasar, yet observed to have undergone such a dramatic change. We re-observed the source with the double spectrograph on the Palomar 5 m telescope in 2014 July and found that the spectrum is unchanged since 2010. From fitting the optical spectra, we find that the AGN flux dropped by a factor of 6 between 2000 and 2010 while the broad Hα emission faded and broadened. Serendipitous X-ray observations caught the source in both the bright and dim state, showing a similar 2–10 keV flux diminution as the optical while lacking signatures of obscuration. The optical and X-ray changes coincide with g-band magnitude variations over multiple epochs of Stripe 82 observations. We demonstrate that variable absorption, as might be expected from the simplest AGN unification paradigm, does not explain the observed photometric or spectral properties. We interpret the changing state of J0159+0033 to be caused by dimming of the AGN continuum, reducing the supply of ionizing photons available to excite gas in the immediate vicinity around the black hole. J0159+0033 provides insight into the intermittency of black hole growth in quasars, as well as an unprecedented opportunity to study quasar physics (in the bright state) and the host galaxy (in the dim state), which has been impossible to do in a single sources until now.

  8. Black-hole masses of distant quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    A brief overview of the methods commonly used to determine or estimate the black hole mass in quiescent or active galaxies is presented and it is argued that the use of mass-scaling relations is both a reliable and the preferred method to apply to large samples of distant quasars. The method uses...... that the black hole masses are very large, of order 1 to 10 billion solar masses, even at the highest redshifts of 4 to 6. The black holes must build up their mass very fast in the early universe. Yet they do not grow much larger than that: a maximum mass of about 10 billion solar masses is also observed....... Preliminary mass functions of active black holes are presented for several quasar samples, including the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Finally, common concerns related to the application of the mass scaling relations, especially for high redshift quasars, are briefly discussed....

  9. THE MULTI-OBJECT, FIBER-FED SPECTROGRAPHS FOR THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY AND THE BARYON OSCILLATION SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smee, Stephen A.; Gunn, James E.; Uomoto, Alan; Roe, Natalie; Schlegel, David; Rockosi, Constance M.; Carr, Michael A.; Leger, French; Dawson, Kyle S.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Brinkmann, Jon; Owen, Russell; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Honscheid, Klaus; Harding, Paul; Long, Dan; Lupton, Robert H.; Loomis, Craig; Anderson, Lauren; Annis, James; Bernardi, Mariangela; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Bolton, Adam S.; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W.; Burles, Scott; Burns, James G.; Castander, Francisco Javier; Connolly, Andrew; Davenport, James R. A.; Ebelke, Garrett; Epps, Harland; Feldman, Paul D.; Friedman, Scott D.; Frieman, Joshua; Heckman, Timothy; Hull, Charles L.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Lawrence, David M.; Loveday, Jon; Mannery, Edward J.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Merrelli, Aronne James; Muna, Demitri; Newman, Peter R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Pope, Adrian C.; Ricketts, Paul G.; Shelden, Alaina; Sandford, Dale; Siegmund, Walter; Simmons, Audrey; Smith, D. Shane; Snedden, Stephanie; Schneider, Donald P.; SubbaRao, Mark; Tremonti, Christy; Waddell, Patrick; York, Donald G.

    2013-07-12

    We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5-m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Lyman-alpha absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 square degrees of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the Universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near ultraviolet to the near infrared, with a resolving power R = \\lambda/FWHM ~ 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 < \\lambda < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.

  10. The SDSS Coadd: A Galaxy Photometric Redshift Catalog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Ribamar R.R.; /Fermilab /Rio de Janeiro Federal U.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; /Fermilab /Inst. Geo. Astron., Havana /Sao Paulo U.; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Dodelson, Scott; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Chicago U., KICP; Hao, Jiangang; /Fermilab; Johnston, David; /Fermilab; Kubo, Jeffrey; /Fermilab; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab; Seo, Hee-Jong; /UC, Berkeley; Simet, Melanie; /Chicago U.

    2011-11-01

    We present and describe a catalog of galaxy photometric redshifts (photo-z's) for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Coadd Data. We use the Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique to calculate photo-z's and the Nearest Neighbor Error (NNE) method to estimate photo-z errors for {approx} 13 million objects classified as galaxies in the coadd with r < 24.5. The photo-z and photo-z error estimators are trained and validated on a sample of {approx} 89, 000 galaxies that have SDSS photometry and spectroscopic redshifts measured by the SDSS Data Release 7 (DR7), the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology Field Galaxy Survey (CNOC2), the Deep Extragalactic Evolutionary Probe Data Release 3(DEEP2 DR3), the SDSS-III's Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), the Visible imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph - Very Large Telescope Deep Survey (VVDS) and the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. For the best ANN methods we have tried, we find that 68% of the galaxies in the validation set have a photo-z error smaller than {sigma}{sub 68} = 0.036. After presenting our results and quality tests, we provide a short guide for users accessing the public data.

  11. Type Ia supernova rate studies from the SDSS-II Supernova Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilday, Benjamin [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The author presents new measurements of the type Ia SN rate from the SDSS-II Supernova Survey. The SDSS-II Supernova Survey was carried out during the Fall months (Sept.-Nov.) of 2005-2007 and discovered ~ 500 spectroscopically confirmed SNe Ia with densely sampled (once every ~ 4 days), multi-color light curves. Additionally, the SDSS-II Supernova Survey has discovered several hundred SNe Ia candidates with well-measured light curves, but without spectroscopic confirmation of type. This total, achieved in 9 months of observing, represents ~ 15-20% of the total SNe Ia discovered worldwide since 1885. The author describes some technical details of the SN Survey observations and SN search algorithms that contributed to the extremely high-yield of discovered SNe and that are important as context for the SDSS-II Supernova Survey SN Ia rate measurements.

  12. After SDSS-IV: Pioneering Panoptic Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmeier, Juna; AS4 Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    I will describe the current plans for a next generation sky survey that will begin After SDSS-IV --- AS4. AS4 will be an unprecedented all-sky spectroscopic survey of over six million objects. It is designed to decode the history of the Milky Way galaxy, trace the emergence of the chemical elements, reveal the inner workings of stars, the growth of black holes, and investigate the origin of planets. It will provide the most comprehensive all-sky spectroscopy to multiply the science from the Gaia, TESS and eROSITA missions. AS4 will also create a contiguous spectroscopic map of the interstellar gas in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies that is 1,000 times larger than the state of the art, uncovering the self-regulation mechanisms of Galactic ecosystems. It will pioneer systematic, spectroscopic monitoring across the whole sky, revealing changes on timescales from 20 minutes to 20 years. The project is now developing new hardware to build on the SDSS-IV infrastructure, designing the detailed survey strategy, and actively seeking to complete its consortium of institutional and individual members.

  13. Oxygen Abundance Methods in SDSS: View from Modern Statistics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We will test the validity of several different oxygen abundance determination methods using methods of modern statistics. These methods include Bayesian analysis and information scoring. We will analyze a sample of ∼ 6000 HII galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic observations data release ...

  14. The structure of galactic disks - Studying late-type spiral galaxies using SDSS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pohlen, M; Trujillo, I

    2006-01-01

    Using imaging data from the SDSS survey, we present the g' and r' radial stellar light distribution of a complete sample of similar to 90 face-on to intermediate inclined, nearby, late-type (Sb-Sdm) spiral galaxies...

  15. Measurement of baryon acoustic oscillation correlations at z = 2.3 with SDSS DR12 Lyα-Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Julian E.; Busca, Nicolás G.; Guy, Julien; Rich, James; Blomqvist, Michael; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Pieri, Matthew M.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Bailey, Stephen; Delubac, Timothée; Kirkby, David; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Margala, Daniel; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pâris, Isabelle; Petitjean, Patrick; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinberg, David H.; Yèche, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    We have used flux-transmission correlations in Lyα forests to measure the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). The study uses spectra of 157 783 quasars in the redshift range 2.1 ≤ z ≤ 3.5 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data release 12 (DR12). Besides the statistical improvements on our previous studies using SDSS DR9 and DR11, we have implemented numerous improvements in the analysis procedure, allowing us to construct a physical model of the correlation function and to investigate potential systematic errors in the determination of the BAO peak position. The Hubble distance, DH = c/H(z), relative to the sound horizon is DH(z = 2.33) /rd = 9.07 ± 0.31. The best-determined combination of comoving angular-diameter distance, DM, and the Hubble distance is found to be DH0.7DM0.3 /rd = 13.94 ± 0.35. This value is 1.028 ± 0.026 times the prediction of the flat-ΛCDM model consistent with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy spectrum. The errors include marginalization over the effects of unidentified high-density absorption systems and fluctuations in ultraviolet ionizing radiation. Independently of the CMB measurements, the combination of our results and other BAO observations determine the open-ΛCDM density parameters to be ΩM = 0.296 ± 0.029, ΩΛ = 0.699 ± 0.100 and Ωk = -0.002 ± 0.119.

  16. NuSTAR Reveals Extreme Absorption in z <0.5 Type 2 Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Gandhi, P.; Alexander, D. M.

    2015-01-01

    -ray observatory NuSTAR, along with archival Chandra and XMM-Newton data, we study the broad-band X-ray spectra of nine optically selected (from the SDSS), candidate Compton-thick (N-H > 1.5 x 10(24) cm(-2)) type 2 quasars (CTQSO2s); five new NuSTAR observations are reported herein, and four have been previously......STAR-detected type 2 quasars are representative of other Compton-thick candidates, we make a correction to the N-H distribution for optically selected type 2 quasars as measured by Chandra and XMM-Newton for 39 objects. With this approach, we predict a Compton-thick fraction of f(CT) = 36(-12)(+14)%, although higher...

  17. Exploring the Variable Sky with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Lupton, Robert; Juric, Mario; Gunn, James; Knapp, Gillian; De Lee, Nathan; Smith, J. Allyn; Miknaitis,Gajus; Lin, Huan; Tucker, Douglas; Doi, Mamoru; Tanaka, Masayuki; Fukugita, Masataka; Holtzman, Jon; Kent, Steve; Yanny, Brian; Schlegel,David; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Rockosi, Constance; Bond, Nicholas; Lee, Brian; Stoughton, Chris; Jester, Sebastian; Harris,Hugh; Harding, Paul; Brinkmann, Jon; Schneider, Donald; York, Donald; Richmond, Michael; Vanden Berk, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    We quantify the variability of faint unresolved optical sources using a catalog based on multiple SDSS imaging observations. The catalog covers SDSS Stripe 82, which lies along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere (22h 24m < {alpha}{sub J2000} < 04h 08m, -1.27{sup o} < {delta}{sub J2000} < +1.27{sup o}, {approx} 290 deg{sup 2}), and contains 58 million photometric observations in the SDSS ugriz system for 1.4 million unresolved sources that were observed at least 4 times in each of the gri bands (with a median of 10 observations obtained over {approx}5 years). In each photometric bandpass we compute various low-order lightcurve statistics such as root-mean-square scatter (rms), {chi}{sup 2} per degree of freedom, skewness, minimum and maximum magnitude, and use them to select and study variable sources. We find that 2% of unresolved optical sources brighter than g = 20.5 appear variable at the 0.05 mag level (rms) simultaneously in the g and r bands. The majority (2/3) of these variable sources are low-redshift (< 2) quasars, although they represent only 2% of all sources in the adopted flux-limited sample. We find that at least 90% of quasars are variable at the 0.03 mag level (rms) and confirm that variability is as good a method for finding low-redshift quasars as is the UV excess color selection (at high Galactic latitudes). We analyze the distribution of lightcurve skewness for quasars and find that is centered on zero. We find that about 1/4 of the variable stars are RR Lyrae stars, and that only 0.5% of stars from the main stellar locus are variable at the 0.05 mag level. The distribution of lightcurve skewness in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram on the main stellar locus is found to be bimodal (with one mode consistent with Algol-like behavior). Using over six hundred RR Lyrae stars, we demonstrate rich halo substructure out to distances of 100 kpc. We extrapolate these results to expected performance by the Large Synoptic Survey

  18. Exploring the Variable Sky with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesar, Branimir; Ivezic, Zeljko; Lupton, Robert H.; Juric, Mario; Gunn, James E.; Knapp, Gillian R.; Lee, Nathan De; Smith, J.Allyn; Miknaitis, Gajus; Lin, Huan; Tucker,

    2007-04-01

    We quantify the variability of faint unresolved optical sources using a catalog based on multiple SDSS imaging observations. The catalog covers SDSS Stripe 82, which lies along the celestial equator in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere (22h 24m < {alpha}{sub J2000} < 04h 08m, -1.27 < {delta}{sub J2000} < +1.27, {approx}290 deg{sup 2} ), and contains 58 million photometric observations in the SDSS ugriz system for 1.4 million unresolved sources that were observed at least 4 times in each of the gri bands (with a median of 10 observations obtained over {approx}5 years). In each photometric bandpass we compute various low-order lightcurve statistics such as root-mean-square scatter (rms), {chi}{sup 2} 2 per degree of freedom, skewness, minimum and maximum magnitude, and use them to select and study variable sources. We find that 2% of unresolved optical sources brighter than g = 20.5 appear variable at the 0.05 mag level (rms) simultaneously in the g and r bands. The majority (2/3) of these variable sources are low-redshift (< 2) quasars, although they represent only 2% of all sources in the adopted ux-limited sample. We find that at least 90% of quasars are variable at the 0.03 mag level (rms) and confirm that variability is as good a method for finding low-redshift quasars as is the UV excess color selection (at high Galactic latitudes). We analyze the distribution of lightcurve skewness for quasars and find that is centered on zero. We find that about 1/4 of the variable stars are RR Lyrae stars, and that only 0.5% of stars from the main stellar locus are variable at the 0.05 mag level. The distribution of lightcurve skewness in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram on the main stellar locus is found to be bimodal (with one mode consistent with Algol-like behavior). Using over six hundred RR Lyrae stars, we demonstrate rich halo substructure out to distances of 100 kpc. We extrapolate these results to expected performance by the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and

  19. Clustering of quasars from the ROE/ESO large-scale Automated Quasar Detection (AQD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clowes, R.G.; Iovino, A.; Shaver, P.

    1987-08-15

    The new ROE/ESO large-scale AQD survey for quasars forms a connected area of approx. 200 deg/sup 2/ near the South Galactic Pole, and has resulted in the discovery of a total number of quasar candidates that is comparable to the number previously published from all other sources. This paper describes a three-dimensional clustering analysis of approx. 1100 'high-probability' candidates occupying the assigned-redshift band of 1.8-2.4. The analysis is sensitive to very weak clustering - to a level of 7 per cent of the quasars occurring in pairs on scales approx. 5h/sup -1/ Mpc - but none is found.

  20. Exploring the SDSS Data Set with Linked Scatter Plots. I. EMP, CEMP, and CV Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbon, Duane F.; Henze, Christopher; Nelson, Bron C., E-mail: Duane.F.Carbon@nasa.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Advanced Supercomputing Facility, Moffett Field, CA, 94035-1000 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a search for extremely metal-poor (EMP), carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP), and cataclysmic variable (CV) stars using a new exploration tool based on linked scatter plots (LSPs). Our approach is especially designed to work with very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, LAMOST, RAVE, and Gaia data sets, and it can be applied to stellar, galaxy, and quasar spectra. As a demonstration, we conduct our search using the SDSS DR10 data set. We first created a 3326-dimensional phase space containing nearly 2 billion measures of the strengths of over 1600 spectral features in 569,738 SDSS stars. These measures capture essentially all the stellar atomic and molecular species visible at the resolution of SDSS spectra. We show how LSPs can be used to quickly isolate and examine interesting portions of this phase space. To illustrate, we use LSPs coupled with cuts in selected portions of phase space to extract EMP stars, CEMP stars, and CV stars. We present identifications for 59 previously unrecognized candidate EMP stars and 11 previously unrecognized candidate CEMP stars. We also call attention to 2 candidate He ii emission CV stars found by the LSP approach that have not yet been discussed in the literature.

  1. Exploring the SDSS Dataset with Linked Scatter Plots: I. EMP, CEMP, and CV Stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, Duane F; Henze, Christopher; Nelson, Bron C

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of a search for EMP, CEMP, and cataclysmic variable stars using a new exploration tool based on linked scatter plots (LSPs). Our approach is especially designed to work with very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, LAMOST, RAVE, and Gaia data sets and can be applied to stellar, galaxy, and quasar spectra. As a demonstration, we conduct a search for EMP, CEMP, and cataclysmic variable stars in the SDSS DR10 data set. We first created a 3326-dimensional phase space containing nearly 2 billion measures of the strengths of over 1600 spectral features in 569,738 SDSS stars. These measures capture essentially all the stellar atomic and molecular species visible at the resolution of SDSS spectra. We show how LSPs can be used to quickly isolate and examine interesting portions of this phase space. To illustrate, we use LSPs coupled with cuts in selected portions of phase space to extract EMP stars, C-rich EMP stars, and CV stars. We present identifications for 59 previously unrecognized candidate EMP stars and 11 previously unrecognized candidate CEMP stars. We also call attention to 2 candidate He II emission CV stars found by the LSP approach that have not yet been discussed in the literature.

  2. AN X-RAY AND MULTIWAVELENGTH SURVEY OF HIGHLY RADIO-LOUD QUASARS AT z > 4: JET-LINKED EMISSION IN THE BRIGHTEST RADIO BEACONS OF THE EARLY UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jianfeng; Brandt, W. N.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Miller, Brendan P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Vignali, Cristian, E-mail: jfwu@astro.psu.edu [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita degli Studi di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    We present a systematic study of the X-ray and multiwavelength properties of a sample of 17 highly radio-loud quasars (HRLQs) at z > 4 with sensitive X-ray coverage from new Chandra and archival Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations. Eight of the new and archival observations are reported in this work for the first time. New Chandra observations of two moderately radio-loud and highly optically luminous quasars at z {approx}> 4 are also reported. Our HRLQ sample represents the top {approx}5% of radio-loud quasars (RLQs) in terms of radio loudness. We found that our HRLQs have an X-ray emission enhancement over HRLQs at lower redshifts (by a typical factor of Almost-Equal-To 3), and this effect, after controlling for several factors which may introduce biases, has been solidly estimated to be significant at the 3{sigma}-4{sigma} level. HRLQs at z = 3-4 are also found to have a similar X-ray emission enhancement over z < 3 HRLQs, which further supports the robustness of our results. We discuss models for the X-ray enhancement's origin including a fractional contribution from inverse Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons. No strong correlations are found between the relative X-ray brightness and optical/UV emission-line rest-frame equivalent widths (REWs) for RLQs. However, the line REWs are positively correlated with radio loudness, which suggests that relativistic jets make a negligible contribution to the optical/UV continua of these HRLQs (contrary to the case where the emission lines are diluted by the relativistically boosted continuum). Our HRLQs are generally consistent with the known anti-correlation between radio loudness and X-ray power-law photon index. We also found that the two moderately radio-loud quasars appear to have the hardest X-ray spectra among our objects, suggesting that intrinsic X-ray absorption (N {sub H} {approx} 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}) may be present. Our z > 4 HRLQs generally have higher X-ray luminosities

  3. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: Composite Lags at z ≤ 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jennifer; Shen, Yue [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Horne, Keith [SUPA Physics/Astronomy, Univ. of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802 (United States); Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Ho, Luis C. [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Kochanek, Chris [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Trump, Jonathan R. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, 2152 Hillside Road, Unit 3046, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey; Malanushenko, Elena [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM, 88349-0059 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    We present composite broad-line region (BLR) reverberation mapping lag measurements for H α , H β , He ii λ 4686, and Mg ii for a sample of 144, z ≲ 1 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project. Using only the 32-epoch spectroscopic light curves in the first six-month season of SDSS-RM observations, we compile correlation function measurements for individual objects and then coadd them to allow the measurement of the average lags for our sample at mean redshifts of 0.4 (for H α ) and ∼0.65 (for the other lines). At similar quasar luminosities and redshifts, the sample-averaged lag decreases in the order of Mg ii, H α , H β , and He ii. This decrease in lags is accompanied by an increase in the mean line width of the four lines, and is roughly consistent with the virialized motion for BLR gas in photoionization equilibrium. These are among the first RM measurements of stratified BLR structure at z > 0.3. Dividing our sample by luminosity, H α shows clear evidence of increasing lags with luminosity, consistent with the expectation from the measured BLR size–luminosity relation based on H β . The other three lines do not show a clear luminosity trend in their average lags due to the limited dynamic range of luminosity probed and the poor average correlation signals in the divided samples, a situation that will be improved with the incorporation of additional photometric and spectroscopic data from SDSS-RM. We discuss the utility and caveats of composite lag measurements for large statistical quasar samples with reverberation mapping data.

  4. Investigating Quasar Diversity using UV, X-ray, and Emission-line Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briana Rivera, Angelica; Richards, Gordon; Shemmer, Ohad; Gallagher, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the diversity of quasars through the analysis of their UV (Sheldon et al, these proceedings), X-ray, and emission-line properties. We concentrate on a sample of 25 radio-quiet SDSS quasars with HST observations that all have similar optical luminosities and redshifts (z~0.5). These objects fill gaps in the sample of “reverberation mapped (RM)” quasars in terms of their CIV parameter space (CIV EQW vs. CIV blueshift). In addition to exploring their UV properties, we use Chandra observations to analyze their X-ray properties (Γ, αox, Δαox), in order to determine how accretion disk winds (which are regulated by αox) contribute to the diversity of UV emission-line properties in quasars. We compare optical and X-ray derived values of L/LEdd , as Γ has been shown to be an indicator of the accretion rate. We are able to determine Γ for 7 quasars from the Chandra sample with over 100 counts. Preliminary data reduction demonstrates that all of the quasars observed with over 100 counts have similar values of αox and Δαox (averaging ~ -1.56 and ~0.42, respectively), while those below 100 counts lie within a wider, weaker range (average αox ~ -1.78, and average Δαox ~0.2). With the combined UV and X-ray data, we explore the differences between quasars and attempt to understand how/when quasars can have high L/LEdd, but show little evidence for strong winds.

  5. Comparison of Asteroids Observed in the SDSS with a Catalog of Known Asteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Juric, M.; Ivezic, Z.; Lupton, H. R.; Quinn, T.; Tabachnik, S.

    2002-01-01

    We positionally correlate asteroids from existing catalogs with a sample of $\\about$18,000 asteroids detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS, Ivezi\\'{c} {\\em et al.} 2001). We find 2641 unique matches, which represent the largest sample of asteroids with both accurate multi-color photometry and known orbital parameters. The matched objects are predominantly bright, and demonstrate that the SDSS photometric pipeline recovers \\about90% of the known asteroids in the observed region. For t...

  6. Physical Properties of 15 Quasars at z ≳ 6.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzucchelli, C.; Bañados, E.; Venemans, B. P.; Decarli, R.; Farina, E. P.; Walter, F.; Eilers, A.-C.; Rix, H.-W.; Simcoe, R.; Stern, D.; Fan, X.; Schlafly, E.; De Rosa, G.; Hennawi, J.; Chambers, K. C.; Greiner, J.; Burgett, W.; Draper, P. W.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E.; Metcalfe, N.; Waters, C.; Wainscoat, R. J.

    2017-11-01

    Quasars are galaxies hosting accreting supermassive black holes; due to their brightness, they are unique probes of the early universe. To date, only a few quasars have been reported at z> 6.5 (big bang). In this work, we present six additional z≳ 6.5 quasars discovered using the Pan-STARRS1 survey. We use a sample of 15 z≳ 6.5 quasars to perform a homogeneous and comprehensive analysis of this highest-redshift quasar population. We report four main results: (1) the majority of z≳ 6.5 quasars show large blueshifts of the broad C IV λ1549 emission line compared to the systemic redshift of the quasars, with a median value ˜3× higher than a quasar sample at z˜ 1; (2) we estimate the quasars’ black hole masses ({M}{BH} ˜ (0.3-5) × 109 M ⊙) via modeling of the Mg II λ2798 emission line and rest-frame UV continuum and find that quasars at high redshift accrete their material (with =0.39) at a rate comparable to a luminosity-matched sample at lower redshift, albeit with significant scatter (0.4 dex); (3) we recover no evolution of the Fe II/Mg II abundance ratio with cosmic time; and (4) we derive near-zone sizes and, together with measurements for z˜ 6 quasars from recent work, confirm a shallow evolution of the decreasing quasar near-zone sizes with redshift. Finally, we present new millimeter observations of the [C II] 158 μm emission line and underlying dust continuum from NOEMA for four quasars and provide new accurate redshifts and [C II]/infrared luminosity estimates. The analysis presented here shows the large range of properties of the most distant quasars.

  7. DISCOVERY OF A FAINT QUASAR AT z ∼ 6 AND IMPLICATIONS FOR COSMIC REIONIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yongjung; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Choi, Changsu; Hong, Jueun; Hyun, Minhee; Jun, Hyunsung David; Kim, Dohyeong; Kim, Duho; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lee, Seong-Kook; Taak, Yoon Chan; Yoon, Yongmin [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Building 45, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Minjin; Park, Won-Kee [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Karouzos, Marios [Astronomy Program, FPRD, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji Hoon [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Pak, Soojong, E-mail: yjkim@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr [School of Space Research and Institute of Natural Sciences, Kyung Hee University, 1732 Deogyeong-daero, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-10

    Recent studies suggest that faint active galactic nuclei may be responsible for the reionization of the universe. Confirmation of this scenario requires spectroscopic identification of faint quasars (M{sub 1450} > −24 mag) at z ≳ 6, but only a very small number of such quasars have been spectroscopically identified so far. Here, we report the discovery of a faint quasar IMS J220417.92+011144.8 at z ∼ 6 in a 12.5 deg{sup 2} region of the SA22 field of the Infrared Medium-deep Survey (IMS). The spectrum of the quasar shows a sharp break at ∼8443 Å, with emission lines redshifted to z = 5.944 ± 0.002 and rest-frame ultraviolet continuum magnitude M{sub 1450} = −23.59 ± 0.10 AB mag. The discovery of IMS J220417.92+011144.8 is consistent with the expected number of quasars at z ∼ 6 estimated from quasar luminosity functions based on previous observations of spectroscopically identified low-luminosity quasars. This suggests that the number of M{sub 1450} ∼ −23 mag quasars at z ∼ 6 may not be high enough to fully account for the reionization of the universe. In addition, our study demonstrates that faint quasars in the early universe can be identified effectively with a moderately wide and deep near-infrared survey such as the IMS.

  8. Results from a Pilot REU Program: Exploring the Cosmos Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.

    2017-01-01

    In the Summer of 2016 we conducted a 10-week pilot Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program aimed at increasing the participation of underrepresented minority undergraduate students in research using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This program utilized a distributed REU model, whereby students worked with SDSS scientists on exciting research projects while serving as members of a geographically distributed research community. The format of this REU is similar to that of the SDSS collaboration itself, and since this collaboration structure has become a model for the next generation of large scale astronomical surveys, the students participating in the SDSS REU received early exposure and familiarity with this approach to collaborative scientific research. The SDSS REU also provided the participants with a low-risk opportunity to audition for graduate schools and to explore opportunities afforded by a career as a research scientist. The six student participants were placed at SDSS REU host sites at the Center for Astrophysics at Harvard University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Portsmouth. Their research projects covered a broad range of topics related to stars, galaxies, and quasars, all making use of SDSS data. At the start of the summer the REU students participated in a week-long Boot Camp at NMSU, which served as a program orientation, an introduction to skills relevant to their research projects, and an opportunity for team-building and cohort-forming. To foster a sense of community among our distributed students throughout the summer, we conducted a weekly online meeting for all students in the program via virtual meeting tools. These virtual group meetings served two purposes: as a weekly check-in to find out how their projects were progressing, and to conduct professional development seminars on topics of interest and relevance to the REU participants. We discuss the outcomes of this

  9. DISSECTING THE QUASAR MAIN SEQUENCE: INSIGHT FROM HOST GALAXY PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jiayi [Tsinghua Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shen, Yue [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The diverse properties of broad-line quasars appear to follow a well-defined main sequence along which the optical Fe ii strength increases. It has been suggested that this sequence is mainly driven by the Eddington ratio (L/L{sub Edd}) of the black hole (BH) accretion. Shen and Ho demonstrated with quasar clustering analysis that the average BH mass decreases with increasing Fe ii strength when quasar luminosity is fixed, consistent with this suggestion. Here we perform an independent test by measuring the stellar velocity dispersion σ{sub *} (hence, the BH mass via the M–σ{sub *} relation) from decomposed host spectra in low-redshift Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars. We found that at fixed quasar luminosity, σ{sub *} systematically decreases with increasing Fe ii strength, confirming that the Eddington ratio increases with Fe ii strength. We also found that at fixed luminosity and Fe ii strength, there is little dependence of σ{sub *} on the broad Hβ FWHM. These new results reinforce the framework that the Eddington ratio and orientation govern most of the diversity seen in broad-line quasar properties.

  10. The XMM-Newton Very Large Program on Cosmology with High-Redshift Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risaliti, G.

    2017-10-01

    The non-linear relation between the X-ray and UV emission in quasars can be used to estimate the distance of quasars with a precision of 0.2 dex. Based on this property, we built a Hubble Diagram of quasars up to z˜6. This provides a new way to test the cosmological model at high redshift, and to measure the cosmological parameters. So far, we filled the Hubble Diagram with SDSS quasars with serendipitous XMM observation. This is an efficient method up to z˜2-2.5, but at higher redshifts pointed observations are needed in order to constrain the cosmological models. XMM-Newton will observe 30 optically bright quasars at z 3, allowing to measure the expansion rate of the Universe at z=3 with a 8% precision. This will provide a tight test of the standard LCDM model, and an improvement of the constraints on the possible evolution of the equation of state of the dark energy.

  11. Quasar lenses and galactic streams: outlier selection and Gaia multiplet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Adriano

    2017-10-01

    I describe two novel techniques originally devised to select strongly lensed quasar candidates in wide-field surveys. The first relies on outlier selection in optical and mid-infrared magnitude space; the second combines mid-infrared colour selection with Gaia spatial resolution, to identify multiplets of objects with quasar-like colours. Both methods have already been applied successfully to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, ATLAS and Dark Energy Survey footprints: besides recovering known lenses from previous searches, they have led to new discoveries, including quadruply lensed quasars, which are rare within the rare-object class of quasar lenses. As a serendipitous by-product, at least four candidate Galactic streams in the South have been identified among foreground contaminants. There is considerable scope for tailoring the WISE-Gaia multiplet search to stellar-like objects, instead of quasar-like, and to automatically detect Galactic streams.

  12. NuSTAR observations of heavily obscured quasars at z ~ 0.5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lansbury, G. B.; Alexander, D. M.; Del Moro, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of three Type 2 quasars at z ≈ 0.4-0.5, optically selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Although the quasars show evidence for being heavily obscured, Compton-thick systems on the basis of the 2-10 keV to [O III] luminosity ratio and multiwavelength...

  13. Intrinsic, Narrow N V Absorption Reveals a Clumpy Outflow in z < 0.4 Radio-Loud Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMarcy, Bryan; Serra, Viktoriah; Culliton, Chris; Ganguly, Rajib; Runnoe, Jessie; Charlton, Jane; Eracleous, Michael; Misawa, Toru; Narayanan, Anand

    2018-01-01

    Quasar outflows are often invoked in models for galaxy evolution to inject energy and momentum into the gas in the host galaxy and influence its star formation history. Thus, the study of quasar outflows is essential for understanding galaxy evolution. N V absorption systems within the associated region (|Δv| ≤ 5000 km s-1) of the quasar are thought to be intrinsic since many show evidence for partial covering of the quasar. A recent archival study of quasar spectra taken with COS/G130M or G160M found 39/181 radio-quiet quasars show intrinsic N V absorption, while none of the 31 radio-loud quasars have N V absorption detected (Culliton et al. 2017). Further investigation of these radio-loud quasars showed a clear bias towards compact morphologies as revealed by FIRST 1.4 GHz imaging and comparatively flat radio spectra. This suggests we are viewing more face-on orientations which prevent us from seeing absorption outflows. The cause for such bias within the HST archive is still unknown; however, it could explain the lack of radio-loud intrinsic N V absorption seen by Culliton et al. (2017). Alternatively, the quasar wind structure may be fundamentally different between radio-loud and radio-quiet objects. We used COS/G130M or G160M to obtain rest-frame UV spectra (1195 Å - 1250 Å) of 14 low-redshift SDSS radio-loud quasars which show lobe-dominated FIRST morphologies to distinguish between these possibilities. Intrinsic N V absorption was detected in 6 of our 14 quasars. This suggests the lack of detections in the archival study was a result of an orientation effect/sampling bias rather than to differences in wind structure between radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars. Interestingly, we find significant overlap in radio core fractions between quasars with and without N V detection. Quasars in our sample with N V detection span a range of core fractions from < 0.01 up to 0.89 while those without detected N V range from 0.04 up to 0.93. A laminar outflow with a

  14. Outshining the quasars at reionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watson, D.; Reeves, J.N.; Hjorth, J.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January......Gamma Rays: Bursts, Galaxies: Intergalactic Medium, Galaxies: Quasars: Absorption Lines, X-Rays: Galaxies, X-Rays: General Udgivelsesdato: 19 January...

  15. Quasars in the Cosmic Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Onofrio, Mauro; Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack W.; Dultzin, Deborah; Richards, Gordon; Knapen, Johan; Shlosman, Isaac; Morganti, Raffaella; Falomo, Renato; Hawkins, Mike; Cavaliere, Alfonso; McLure, Ross; Shields, Greg; Netzer, Hagai; Proga, Daniel; Franceschini, Alberto; Fan, Xiaoui; Elvis, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We now consider the environment of quasars in the widest possible sense, from the circumnuclear regions to very large scales of hundreds of kiloparsecs. The circumgalactic environment of nearby quasars has been widely studied since the late 1960s in an attempt to test its influence on the triggering

  16. Subaru High-z Exploration of Low-Luminosity Quasars (SHELLQs). II. Discovery of 32 quasars and luminous galaxies at 5.7 < z ≤ 6.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshiki; Onoue, Masafusa; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Strauss, Michael A.; Nagao, Tohru; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Lee, Chien-Hsiu; Akiyama, Masayuki; Asami, Naoko; Bosch, James; Foucaud, Sébastien; Furusawa, Hisanori; Goto, Tomotsugu; Gunn, James E.; Harikane, Yuichi; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Takuma; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Kikuta, Satoshi; Kohno, Kotaro; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lupton, Robert H.; Minezaki, Takeo; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Morokuma, Tomoki; Murayama, Hitoshi; Niida, Mana; Nishizawa, Atsushi J.; Oguri, Masamune; Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami; Price, Paul A.; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Schulze, Andreas; Shirakata, Hikari; Silverman, John D.; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tait, Philip J.; Takada, Masahiro; Takata, Tadafumi; Tanaka, Masayuki; Tang, Ji-Jia; Toba, Yoshiki; Utsumi, Yousuke; Wang, Shiang-Yu

    2018-01-01

    We present spectroscopic identification of 32 new quasars and luminous galaxies discovered at 5.7 galaxies, two [O III] emitters at z ˜ 0.8, and 15 Galactic brown dwarfs. The new quasars have considerably lower luminosity (M1450 ˜ -25 to -22 mag) than most of the previously known high-z quasars. Several of these quasars have luminous (>1043 erg s-1) and narrow (galaxies have extremely high luminosities (M1450 ˜ -24 to -22 mag) compared to other galaxies found at similar redshifts. With the discovery of these new classes of objects, we are opening up new parameter spaces in the high-z Universe. Further survey observations and follow-up studies of the identified objects, including the construction of the quasar luminosity function at z ˜ 6, are ongoing.

  17. Revealing the Star-Forming Hosts of Luminous Quasars at z~2: A Multi-Wavelength Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wethers, Clare; Banerji, Manda; Hewett, Paul; Dark Energy Survey (DES)

    2018-01-01

    Quasars are thought to govern many fundamental processes within galaxies, from quenching star formation to shaping the galaxy itself. In an evolutionary picture of quasars, the most luminous systems (Lbol~1047erg) are thought to evolve from merger-driven starbursts, appearing heavily obscured during their transition to UV-luminous quasars as dust from the decaying starburst is being cleared out of the galaxy. Understanding the connection between dust obscuration, black hole accretion and star formation in luminous quasars undergoing this transition is therefore an important test of such evolutionary models. Host galaxy studies of the most massive and luminous quasars at z>1.5 remain challenging, particularly in the rest-frame UV where a quasar will typically outshine its host galaxy by several orders of magnitude. I will present the first rest-frame UV study for a population of obscured type-1 quasars at z~2 - a peak epoch in both star formation and black hole accretion. By combining deep ground-based imaging from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) with near infra-red observations, I exploit dust obscuration towards the quasar to isolate host galaxy emission, finding obscured quasars to reside in prodigiously star-forming hosts at z~2, with the most actively star-forming galaxies appearing to host the most luminous quasars. Combining these results with new sub-mm observations from SCUBA2, I will present a direct comparison of the unobscured and obscured star formation in this population of dusty quasar hosts.

  18. THE GALEX ARECIBO SDSS SURVEY. V. THE RELATION BETWEEN THE H I CONTENT OF GALAXIES AND METAL ENRICHMENT AT THEIR OUTSKIRTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Sean M.; Heckman, Timothy M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kauffmann, Guinevere; Catinella, Barbara; Wang Jing; Fabello, Silvia [Max Planck Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Dave, Romeel [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Brinchmann, Jarle [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Schiminovich, David; Hummels, Cameron; Lemonias, Jenna [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Saintonge, Amelie; Gracia-Carpio, Javier; Tacconi, Linda [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessesbach-Str., 85748 Garching (Germany); Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha [Department of Astronomy, 610 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wu Ronin, E-mail: moran@pha.jhu.edu [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA), 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-01-20

    We have obtained long-slit spectra of 174 star-forming galaxies with stellar masses greater than 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} from the GALEX Arecibo Sloan Digital Sky Survey (GASS) survey. These galaxies have both H I and H{sub 2} mass measurements. The average metallicity profile is strikingly flat out to R{sub 90}, the radius enclosing 90% of the r-band light. Metallicity profiles which decline steadily with radius are found primarily for galaxies in our sample with low stellar mass (log(M{sub *}) < 10.2), concentration, and/or mean stellar mass density. Beyond {approx}R{sub 90}, however, around 10% of the galaxies in our sample exhibit a sharp downturn in metallicity. Remarkably, we find that the magnitude of the outer metallicity drop is well correlated with the total H I content of the galaxy (measured as f{sub HI} = M{sub HI}/M{sub *}). We examine the radial profiles of stellar population ages and star formation rate densities, and conclude that the galaxies with largest outer metallicity drops are actively growing their stellar disks, with mass-doubling times across the whole disk only one-third as long as a typical GASS galaxy. We also describe a correlation between local stellar mass density and metallicity, which is valid across all galaxies in our sample. We argue that much of the recent stellar mass growth at the edges of these galaxies can be linked to the accretion or radial transport of relatively pristine gas from beyond the galaxies' stellar disks.

  19. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  20. An ultraluminous quasar with a twelve-billion-solar-mass black hole at redshift 6.30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Bing; Wang, Feige; Fan, Xiaohui; Yi, Weimin; Zuo, Wenwen; Bian, Fuyan; Jiang, Linhua; McGreer, Ian D; Wang, Ran; Yang, Jinyi; Yang, Qian; Thompson, David; Beletsky, Yuri

    2015-02-26

    So far, roughly 40 quasars with redshifts greater than z = 6 have been discovered. Each quasar contains a black hole with a mass of about one billion solar masses (10(9) M Sun symbol). The existence of such black holes when the Universe was less than one billion years old presents substantial challenges to theories of the formation and growth of black holes and the coevolution of black holes and galaxies. Here we report the discovery of an ultraluminous quasar, SDSS J010013.02+280225.8, at redshift z = 6.30. It has an optical and near-infrared luminosity a few times greater than those of previously known z > 6 quasars. On the basis of the deep absorption trough on the blue side of the Lyman-α emission line in the spectrum, we estimate the proper size of the ionized proximity zone associated with the quasar to be about 26 million light years, larger than found with other z > 6.1 quasars with lower luminosities. We estimate (on the basis of a near-infrared spectrum) that the black hole has a mass of ∼1.2 × 10(10) M Sun symbol, which is consistent with the 1.3 × 10(10) M Sun symbol derived by assuming an Eddington-limited accretion rate.

  1. Photometric Asymmetry Between Clockwise and Counterclockwise Spiral Galaxies in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamir, Lior

    2017-02-01

    While galaxies with clockwise and counterclockwise handedness are visually different, they are expected to be symmetric in all of their other characteristics. Previous experiments using both manual analysis and machine vision have shown that the handedness of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies can be predicted with accuracy significantly higher than mere chance using its photometric data alone. However, some of these previous experiments were based on manually classified galaxies, and the results may therefore be subjected to bias originated from the human perception. This paper describes an experiment based on a set of 162,514 galaxies classified automatically to clockwise and counterclockwise spiral galaxies, showing that the source of the asymmetry in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database is not the human perception bias. The results are compared to two smaller datasets, and confirm the observation that the handedness of SDSS galaxies can be predicted by their photometry. The experiment also shows statistically significant differences in the measured magnitude of SDSS galaxies, according which galaxies with clockwise patterns are brighter than galaxies with counterclockwise patterns. The magnitude of that difference changes across RA ranges, and exhibits a strong correlation with the cosine of the right ascension.

  2. Serendipitous discovery of quadruply-imaged quasars:Two diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucey, John R.; Schechter, Paul L.; Smith, Russell J.; Anguita, T.

    2018-02-01

    Gravitationally lensed quasars are powerful and versatile astrophysical tools, but they are challengingly rare. In particular, only ˜25 well-characterized quadruple systems are known to date. To refine the target catalogue for the forthcoming Taipan Galaxy Survey, the images of a large number of sources are being visually inspected in order to identify objects that are confused by a foreground star or galaxies that have a distinct multi-component structure. An unexpected by-product of this work has been the serendipitous discovery of about a dozen galaxies that appear to be lensing quasars, i.e. pairs or quartets of foreground stellar objects in close proximity to the target source. Here we report two diamond-shaped systems. Follow-up spectroscopy with the IMACS instrument on the 6.5m Magellan Baade telescope confirms one of these as a z = 1.975 quasar quadruply lensed by a double galaxy at z = 0.293. Photometry from publicly available survey images supports the conclusion that the other system is a highly sheared quadruply-imaged quasar. In starting with objects thought to be galaxies, our lens finding technique complements the conventional approach of first identifying sources with quasar-like colours and subsequently finding evidence of lensing.

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: RSD measurement from the power spectrum and bispectrum of the DR12 BOSS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Marín, Héctor; Percival, Will J.; Verde, Licia; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-02-01

    We measure and analyse the bispectrum of the final data release 12 (DR12), galaxy sample provided by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, splitting by selection algorithm into LOWZ and CMASS galaxies. The LOWZ sample contains 361 762 galaxies with an effective redshift of zLOWZ = 0.32, and the CMASS sample contains 777 202 galaxies with an effective redshift of zCMASS = 0.57. Combining the power spectrum, measured relative to the line of sight, with the spherically averaged bispectrum, we are able to constrain the product of the growth of structure parameter, f, and the amplitude of dark matter density fluctuations, σ8, along with the geometric Alcock-Paczynski parameters, the product of the Hubble constant and the comoving sound horizon at the baryon drag epoch, H(z)rs(zd), and the angular distance parameter divided by the sound horizon, DA(z)/rs(zd). After combining pre-reconstruction RSD analyses of the power spectrum monopole, quadrupole and bispectrum monopole with post-reconstruction analysis of the BAO power spectrum monopole and quadrupole, we find f(zLOWZ)σ8(zLOWZ) = 0.427 ± 0.056, DA(zLOWZ)/rs(zd) = 6.60 ± 0.13, H(zLOWZ)rs(zd) = (11.55 ± 0.38)103 km s-1 for the LOWZ sample, and f(zCMASS)σ8(zCMASS) = 0.426 ± 0.029, DA(zCMASS)/rs(zd) = 9.39 ± 0.10, H(zCMASS)rs(zd) = (14.02 ± 0.22)103 km s-1 for the CMASS sample. We find general agreement with previous Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey DR11 and DR12 measurements. Combining our data set with Planck15 we perform a null test of General Relativity through the γ-parametrization finding γ =0.733^{+0.068}_{-0.069}, which is ˜2.7σ away from the General Relativity predictions.

  4. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Ata, Metin; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Reid, Beth A.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A.; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-09-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method, in combination with a cosmic microwave background prior on the sound horizon scale, after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DMH from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by fσ8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine individual measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method; in particular, the AP measurement from sub-BAO scales sharpens constraints from post-reconstruction BAOs by breaking degeneracy between DM and H. Combined with Planck 2016 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature ΩK = 0.0003 ± 0.0026 and a dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.01 ± 0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter (CDM) model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Our RSD measurements of fσ8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3 ± 1.0 km s-1 Mpc-1 even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 Mpc-1. Assuming flat

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: single-probe measurements from DR12 galaxy clustering - towards an accurate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Zhao, Gong-bo; Wang, Yuting; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Prada, Francisco; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Slosar, Anže; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-10-01

    We analyse the broad-range shape of the monopole and quadrupole correlation functions of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (DR12) CMASS and LOWZ galaxy sample to obtain constraints on the Hubble expansion rate H(z), the angular-diameter distance DA(z), the normalized growth rate f(z)σ8(z) and the physical matter density Ωm h2. We adopt wide and flat priors on all model parameters in order to ensure the results are those of a 'single-probe' galaxy clustering analysis. We also marginalize over three nuisance terms that account for potential observational systematics affecting the measured monopole. However, such Monte Carlo Markov Chain analysis is computationally expensive for advanced theoretical models. We develop a new methodology to speed up the analysis. Using the range 40 h-1 Mpc < s < 180 h-1 Mpc, we obtain {DA(z)rs,fid/rs (Mpc), H(z)rs/rs,fid km s-1 Mpc-1, f(z)σ8(z), Ωm h2} = {956 ± 28, 75.0 ± 4.0, 0.397 ± 0.073, 0.143 ± 0.017} at z = 0.32 and {1421 ± 23, 96.7 ± 2.7, 0.497 ± 0.058, 0.137 ± 0.015} at z = 0.59 where rs is the comoving sound horizon at the drag epoch and rs,fid = 147.66 Mpc for the fiducial cosmology used in this study. Combining our measurements with Planck data, we obtain Ωm = 0.306 ± 0.009, H0 = 67.9 ± 0.7 km s-1 Mpc-1 and σ8 = 0.815 ± 0.009 assuming Λcold dark matter (CDM); Ωk = 0.000 ± 0.003 and w = -1.02 ± 0.08 assuming owCDM. Our results show no tension with the flat ΛCDM cosmological paradigm. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey.

  6. Strong chromatic microlensing in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojas, K.; Motta, V. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Avda. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Valparaíso 2360102 (Chile); Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Avda. Vía Lactea s/n, La Laguna, E-38200 Tenerife (Spain); Falco, E. [Whipple Observatory, Smithsonian Institution, 670 Mt. Hopkins Road, PO Box 6369, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Jiménez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Muñoz, J. A., E-mail: karina.rojas@uv.cl, E-mail: veronica.motta@uv.cl, E-mail: emg@iac.es, E-mail: falco@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: jjimenez@ugr.es, E-mail: jmunoz@uv.es [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, Burjassot, E-46100 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-12-10

    We use spectra of the double-lensed quasars HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 to study their unresolved structure through the impact of microlensing. There is no significant evidence of microlensing in the emission line profiles except for the Lyα line of SDSS1155+6346, which shows strong differences in the shapes for images A and B. However, the continuum of the B image spectrum in SDSS1155+6346 is strongly contaminated by the lens galaxy, and these differences should be considered with caution. Using the flux ratios of the emission lines for image pairs as a baseline to remove macro-magnification and extinction, we have detected strong chromatic microlensing in the continuum measured by CASTLES (www.cfa.harvard.edu/castles/) in both lens systems, with amplitudes 0.09(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for HE0047–1756, and 0.2(λ16000) ≲ |Δm| ≲ 0.8(λ5439) for SDSS1155+6346. Using magnification maps to simulate microlensing and modeling the accretion disk as a Gaussian source (I ∝ exp(–R {sup 2}/2r {sub s}{sup 2})) of size r {sub s} ∝ λ {sup p}, we find r {sub s} = 2.5{sub −1.4}{sup +3.0} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 2.3 ± 0.8 at the rest frame for λ = 2045 for HE0047–1756 (log prior) and r {sub s} = 5.5{sub −3.3}{sup +8.2} √(M/0.3M{sub ⊙}) lt-day and p = 1.5 ± 0.6 at the rest frame of λ = 1398 for SDSS1155+6346 (log prior). Contrary to other studied lens systems, the chromaticity detected in HE0047–1756 and SDSS1155+6346 is large enough to fulfill the thin disk prediction. The inferred sizes, however, are very large compared to the predictions of this model, especially in the case of SDSS1155+6346.

  7. Dust reddened quasars in first and UKIDSS: Beyond the tip of the iceberg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States); Urrutia, Tanya [Leibniz Institut fr Astrophysik, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Lacy, Mark [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, Ashish; Graham, Matthew [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Urry, Meg [Department of Physics and Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208121, New Haven, CT 06520-8121 (United States); Croom, Scott [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ge, Jian, E-mail: eglikman@middlebury.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present the results of a pilot survey to find dust-reddened quasars by matching the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-Centimeters (FIRST) radio catalog to the UKIDSS near-infrared survey and using optical data from Sloan Digital Sky Survey to select objects with very red colors. The deep K-band limit provided by UKIDSS allows for finding more heavily reddened quasars at higher redshifts as compared with previous work using FIRST and Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS). We selected 87 candidates with K ≤ 17.0 from the UKIDSS Large Area Survey (LAS) First Data Release (DR1), which covers 190 deg{sup 2}. These candidates reach up to ∼1.5 mag below the 2MASS limit and obey the color criteria developed to identify dust-reddened quasars. We have obtained 61 spectroscopic observations in the optical and/or near-infrared, as well as classifications in the literature, and have identified 14 reddened quasars with E(B – V) > 0.1, including 3 at z > 2. We study the infrared properties of the sample using photometry from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer and find that infrared colors improve the efficiency of red quasar selection, removing many contaminants in an infrared-to-optical color-selected sample alone. The highest-redshift quasars (z ≳ 2) are only moderately reddened, with E(B – V) ∼ 0.2-0.3. We find that the surface density of red quasars rises sharply with faintness, comprising up to 17% of blue quasars at the same apparent K-band flux limit. We estimate that to reach more heavily reddened quasars (i.e., E(B – V) ≳ 0.5) at z > 2 and a depth of K = 17, we would need to survey at least ∼2.5 times more area.

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-05-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power-spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new fast-Fourier-transform-based estimators, we measure the power-spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular-diameter distance, the Hubble parameter and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full-shape clustering measurements in combination with cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernova data. Assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1 Mpc^{-1}}, at a confidence level of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy-clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: towards a computationally efficient analysis without informative priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gongbo; Ross, Ashley J.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose A.; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-07-01

    We develop a new computationally efficient methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors (those coming from extra probes) in the estimation of cosmological parameters. Using our new methodology, we extract the dark energy model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of {R, la, Ωbh2, ns, log(As), Ωk, H(z), DA(z), f(z)σ8(z)}, which give an efficient summary of the Planck data and two-point statistics from the BOSS galaxy sample. The CMB shift parameters are R=√{Ω _m H_0^2} r(z_*) and la = πr(z*)/rs(z*), where z* is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and r(z*) and rs(z*) denote our comoving distance to the z* and sound horizon at z*, respectively; Ωb is the baryon fraction at z = 0. This approximate methodology guarantees that we will not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is unable to constrain, I.e. Ωbh2 and ns. The main advantage is that the computational time required for extracting these parameters is decreased by a factor of 60 with respect to exact full-likelihood analyses. The results obtained show no tension with the flat Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological paradigm. By comparing with the full-likelihood exact analysis with fixed dark energy models, on one hand we demonstrate that the double-probe method provides robust cosmological parameter constraints that can be conveniently used to study dark energy models, and on the other hand we provide a reliable set of measurements assuming dark energy models to be used, for example, in distance estimations. We extend our study to measure the sum of the neutrino mass using different methodologies, including double-probe analysis (introduced in this study), full-likelihood analysis and single-probe analysis

  10. Quasar Jet Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Nicholas; Hough, David

    2009-10-01

    We observed radio jets in six lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs) from 1995 to 2008 using the NRAO VLBA at 8.4 and 15 GHz. These observations have tracked jet component positions and velocities over that time period. There is a correlation between apparent jet speed and projected core distance in these LDQs at greater than 99 per cent confidence levels (Hough 2008, Extragalactic Jets, eds: Rector and DeYoung, ASP, p. 274). Four of our sources show this effect particularly strongly. We only tracked single jet components over relatively short distances, but the assumption of a unique velocity profile allows us to study component motion on an effective timescale of approximately 20-50 years. Results for 3C207 and 3C263 show a good fit using a constant acceleration model. The cause of such acceleration is still unknown, though ``magnetic acceleration'' by a gradient in magnetic field pressure is one possibility.

  11. Astronomy: Quasars signpost massive galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwens, Rychard

    2017-05-01

    The neighbourhoods of extremely bright astronomical objects called quasars in the early Universe have been incompletely probed. Observations suggest that these regions harbour some of the most massive known galaxies. See Letter p.457

  12. A Hubble Diagram for Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Bisogni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The cosmological model is at present not tested between the redshift of the farthest observed supernovae (z ~ 1.4 and that of the Cosmic Microwave Background (z ~ 1,100. Here we introduce a new method to measure the cosmological parameters: we show that quasars can be used as “standard candles” by employing the non-linear relation between their intrinsic UV and X-ray emission as an absolute distance indicator. We built a sample of ~1,900 quasars with available UV and X-ray observations, and produced a Hubble Diagram up to z ~ 5. The analysis of the quasar Hubble Diagram, when used in combination with supernovae, provides robust constraints on the matter and energy content in the cosmos. The application of this method to forthcoming, larger quasar samples, will also provide tight constraints on the dark energy equation of state and its possible evolution with time.

  13. Galaxy Clustering in Early SDSS Redshift Data

    CERN Document Server

    Zehavi, I.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Mo, Houjun J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Strauss, Michael A.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Briggs, John W.; Brinkmann, Jon; Burles, Scott; Carey, Larry; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, J.; Csabai, Istvan; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Dodelson,Scott; Doi,Mamoru; Eisenstein, Daniel; Evans, Michael L.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Friedman, Scott; Fukugita, Masataka; Gunn, James E.; Hennessy, Greg S.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Kent,Stephen; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kron, Richard; Kunszt, Peter; Lamb, Donald; French Leger, R.; Long, Daniel C.; Loveday, Jon.; Lupton, Robert H.; McKay, Timothy; Meiksin, Avery; Merrelli, Aronne; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Narayanan, Vijay; Newcomb, Matt; Nichol, Robert C.; Owen, Russell; Peoples, John; Pope, Adrian; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Scoccimarro, Roman; Sheth, Ravi K.; Siegmund, Walter; Smee, Stephen; Snir, Yehuda; Stebbins, Albert; Stoughton, Christopher; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istvan; Tegmark, Max; Tucker, Douglas L.; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Dan; Vogeley, Michael S.; Waddell,Patrick; Yanny, Brian; York, Donald G.; Zehavi, Idit; Blanton, Michael R.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Weinberg, David H.; Mo, Houjun J.; Strauss, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first measurements of clustering in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy redshift survey. Our sample consists of 29,300 galaxies with redshifts 5,700 km/s < cz < 39,000 km/s, distributed in several long but narrow (2.5-5 degree) segments, covering 690 square degrees. For the full, flux-limited sample, the redshift-space correlation length is approximately 8 Mpc/h. The two-dimensional correlation function \\xi(r_p,\\pi) shows clear signatures of both the small-scale, ``fingers-of-God'' distortion caused by velocity dispersions in collapsed objects and the large-scale compression caused by coherent flows, though the latter cannot be measured with high precision in the present sample. The inferred real-space correlation function is well described by a power law, \\xi(r)=(r/6.1+/-0.2 Mpc/h)^{-1.75+/-0.03}, for 0.1 Mpc/h < r < 16 Mpc/h. The galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion is \\sigma_{12} ~ 600+/-100 km/s for projected separations 0.15 Mpc/h < r_p < 5 Mpc/h. When we divide the...

  14. Hunting for Intrinsically X-ray Weak Quasars: The Case of PHL 1811 Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William

    2009-09-01

    A central dogma of X-ray astronomy is that luminous X-ray emission is a universal property of efficiently accreting supermassive black holes. One interesting challenge to this idea has come from the quasar PHL 1811 which appears to be intrinsically X-ray weak and also has distinctive emission-line properties. We propose to observe a sample of eight SDSS quasars, selected to have similar UV emission-line properties to that of PHL 1811, to test if they are also X-ray weak. Our analyses of the currently available X-ray data appear to support this hypothesis but do not provide a proper test. Our results will have implications for the nature of accretion-disk coronae, emission-line formation, and AGN selection.

  15. Parsec-scale radio structures in Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldwell, G.; Paragi, Z.; Gurvits, L.

    Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) con su nueva extensión para el radio telescopio orbital, VSOP/HALCA, ofrece una incomparable resolución angular alcanzando escalas de milisegundos y submilisegundos de arco a longitudes de onda de centímetros. En este trabajo presentamos observaciones y análisis de estructuras en radio, en escalas de parsec, para 3 radio fuentes extragalácticas de la muestra de VSOP Survey y 1 quasar, 1442+101, del proyecto `VSOP High Redshift'.

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Exploring the SDSS data set. I. EMP & CV stars (Carbon+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, D. F.; Henze, C.; Nelson, B. C.

    2017-08-01

    We present the results of a search for extremely metal-poor (EMP), carbon-enhanced metal-poor (CEMP), and cataclysmic variable (CV) stars using a new exploration tool based on linked scatter plots (LSPs). Our approach is especially designed to work with very large spectrum data sets such as the SDSS, LAMOST, RAVE, and Gaia data sets, and it can be applied to stellar, galaxy, and quasar spectra. As a demonstration, we conduct our search using the SDSS DR10 data set. We first created a 3326-dimensional phase space containing nearly 2 billion measures of the strengths of over 1600 spectral features in 569738 SDSS stars. These measures capture essentially all the stellar atomic and molecular species visible at the resolution of SDSS spectra. We show how LSPs can be used to quickly isolate and examine interesting portions of this phase space. To illustrate, we use LSPs coupled with cuts in selected portions of phase space to extract EMP stars, CEMP stars, and CV stars. We present identifications for 59 previously unrecognized candidate EMP stars and 11 previously unrecognized candidate CEMP stars. We also call attention to 2 candidate He II emission CV stars found by the LSP approach that have not yet been discussed in the literature. (3 data files).

  17. Camera for Quasars in the Early Universe (CQUEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunbin; Park, W.; Lim, J.; Jeong, H.; Kim, J.; Oh, H.; Pak, S.; Im, M.; Kuehne, J.

    2010-05-01

    The early universe of z ɳ is where the first stars, galaxies, and quasars formed, starting the re-ionization of the universe. The discovery and the study of quasars in the early universe allow us to witness the beginning of history of astronomical objects. In order to perform a medium-deep, medium-wide, imaging survey of quasars, we are developing an optical CCD camera, CQUEAN (Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse) which uses a 1024*1024 pixel deep-depletion CCD. It has an enhanced QE than conventional CCD at wavelength band around 1μm, thus it will be an efficient tool for observation of quasars at z > 7. It will be attached to the 2.1m telescope at McDonald Observatory, USA. A focal reducer is designed to secure a larger field of view at the cassegrain focus of 2.1m telescope. For long stable exposures, auto-guiding system will be implemented by using another CCD camera viewing an off-axis field. All these instruments will be controlled by the software written in python on linux platform. CQUEAN is expected to see the first light during summer in 2010.

  18. Occurrence and Global Properties of Narrow CIV lambda 1549 Absorption Lines in Moderate-Redshift Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne

    2003-01-01

    A statistical study is presented of (a) the frequency of narrow CIV lambda 1549 absorption lines in 1.5 ~50%) of narrow CIV absorbers is detected for the radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars, and a constant ~25% of all the quasars, irrespective of radio type display associated CIV absorbers stronger...... than a rest equivalent width of 0.5A. Both radio-quiet and radio-loud quasars with narrow absorption lines have systematically redder continua, especially strongly absorbed objects. There is evidence of inclination dependent dust reddening and absorption for the radio quasars. An additional key result...... is that the most strongly absorbed radio quasars have the largest radio source extent. This result is in stark contrast to a recent study of the low-frequency selected Molonglo survey in which a connection between the strength of the narrow absorbers and the (young) age of the radio source has been proposed...

  19. How Far Is Quasar UV/Optical Variability from a Damped Random Walk at Low Frequency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hengxiao; Wang, Junxian; Cai, Zhenyi; Sun, Mouyuan

    2017-10-01

    Studies have shown that UV/optical light curves of quasars can be described using the prevalent damped random walk (DRW) model, also known as the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. A white noise power spectral density (PSD) is expected at low frequency in this model; however, a direct observational constraint to the low-frequency PSD slope is difficult due to the limited lengths of the light curves available. Meanwhile, quasars show scatter in their DRW parameters that is too large to be attributed to uncertainties in the measurements and dependence on the variation of known physical factors. In this work we present simulations showing that, if the low-frequency PSD deviates from the DRW, the red noise leakage can naturally produce large scatter in the variation parameters measured from simulated light curves. The steeper the low-frequency PSD slope, the larger scatter we expect. Based on observations of SDSS Stripe 82 quasars, we find that the low-frequency PSD slope should be no steeper than -1.3. The actual slope could be flatter, which consequently requires that the quasar variabilities should be influenced by other unknown factors. We speculate that the magnetic field and/or metallicity could be such additional factors.

  20. Microlensing Measurements of the X-ray Continuum Emitting Region of the Gravitational Lens SDSS0924+0219

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Chelsea; Morgan, C. W.; Mosquera, A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Tewes, M.; Courbin, F.; Meylan, G.

    2014-01-01

    Microlensing offers a unique way to constrain the physical extent of different emission regions in a lensed quasar, putting to test various accretion and continuum emission models. We perform a joint microlensing analysis using six Chandra observations (spanning six years) of the lensed quasar SDSS 0924+0219 in two energy bands (spanning 0.4-8.0 keV), in which X-ray microlensing variability is detected with high confidence, and high-cadence r-band monitoring (spanning eight years). Our joint microlensing analysis provides robust constraints on the extent of the X-ray continuum emission region and the accretion disk radius, disfavoring models involving an extended X-ray corona.

  1. Constraining RRc candidates using SDSS colours

    OpenAIRE

    Bányai, E.; Plachy, E.; Molnár, L.; Dobos, L.; Szabó, R.

    2016-01-01

    The light variations of first-overtone RR Lyrae stars and contact eclipsing binaries can be difficult to distinguish. The Catalina Periodic Variable Star catalog contains several misclassified objects, despite the classification efforts by Drake et al. (2014). They used metallicity and surface gravity derived from spectroscopic data (from the SDSS database) to rule out binaries. Our aim is to further constrain the catalog using SDSS colours to estimate physical parameters for stars that did n...

  2. Characterizing Sky Spectra Using SDSS BOSS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Lina Maria; Strauss, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    In the optical/near-infrared spectra gathered by a ground-based telescope observing very faint sources, the strengths of the emission lines due to the Earth’s atmosphere can be many times larger than the fluxes of the sources we are interested in. Thus the limiting factor in faint-object spectroscopy is the degree to which systematics in the sky subtraction can be minimized. Longwards of 6000 Angstroms, the night-sky spectrum is dominated by multiple vibrational/rotational transitions of the OH radical from our upper atmosphere. While the wavelengths of these lines are the same in each sky spectrum, their relative strengths vary considerably as a function of time and position on the sky. The better we can model their strengths, the better we can hope to subtract them off. We expect that the strength of lines from common upper energy levels will be correlated with one another. We used flux-calibrated sky spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS BOSS) to explore these correlations. Our aim is to use these correlations for creating improved sky subtraction algorithms for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. When PFS starts gathering data in 2019, it will be the most powerful multi-object spectrograph in the world. Since PFS will be gathering data on sources as faint as 24th magnitude and fainter, it's of upmost importance to be able to accurately measure and subtract sky spectra from the data that we receive.

  3. Probing the Interstellar Medium and Star Formation of the Most Luminous Quasar at z = 6.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Wu, Xue-Bing; Neri, Roberto; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Carilli, Chris L.; Momjian, Emmanuel; Bertoldi, Frank; Strauss, Michael A.; Li, Qiong; Wang, Feige; Riechers, Dominik A.; Jiang, Linhua; Omont, Alain; Wagg, Jeff; Cox, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    We report new IRAM/PdBI, JCMT/SCUBA-2, and VLA observations of the ultraluminous quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter, J0100+2802) at z = 6.3, which hosts the most massive supermassive black hole (SMBH), 1.24× {10}10 {M}⊙ , that is known at z > 6. We detect the [C II] 158 μm fine structure line and molecular CO(6-5) line and continuum emission at 353, 260, and 3 GHz from this quasar. The CO(2-1) line and the underlying continuum at 32 GHz are also marginally detected. The [C II] and CO detections suggest active star formation and highly excited molecular gas in the quasar host galaxy. The redshift determined with the [C II] and CO lines shows a velocity offset of ˜ 1000 {km} {{{s}}}-1 from that measured with the quasar Mg II line. The CO (2-1) line luminosity provides a direct constraint on the molecular gas mass, which is about (1.0+/- 0.3)× {10}10 {M}⊙ . We estimate the FIR luminosity to be (3.5+/- 0.7)× {10}12 {L}⊙ , and the UV-to-FIR spectral energy distribution of J0100+2802 is consistent with the templates of the local optically luminous quasars. The derived [C II]-to-FIR luminosity ratio of J0100+2802 is 0.0010 ± 0.0002, which is slightly higher than the values of the most FIR luminous quasars at z ˜ 6. We investigate the constraint on the host galaxy dynamical mass of J0100+2802 based on the [C II] line spectrum. It is likely that this ultraluminous quasar lies above the local SMBH-galaxy mass relationship, unless we are viewing the system at a small inclination angle.

  4. Applying the Support Vector Machine Method to Matching IRAS and SDSS Catalogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Cao

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of applying a machine learning technique, the Support Vector Machine (SVM, to the astronomical problem of matching the Infra-Red Astronomical Satellite (IRAS and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS object catalogues. In this study, the IRAS catalogue has much larger positional uncertainties than those of the SDSS. A model was constructed by applying the supervised learning algorithm (SVM to a set of training data. Validation of the model shows a good identification performance (∼ 90% correct, better than that derived from classical cross-matching algorithms, such as the likelihood-ratio method used in previous studies.

  5. GALEX observations of quasar variability in the ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, B. Y.; Wheatley, J. M.; Neil, J. D.

    2011-03-01

    Aims: Using archival observations recorded over a 5+ year timeframe with the NASA GALaxy Evolution eXplorer (GALEX) satellite, we present a study of the ultraviolet (UV) variability of 4360 quasars of redshifts up to z = 2.5 that have optical counterparts in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR5 spectroscopic catalog of Schneider et al. (2007, AJ, 134, 102). The observed changes in both the far UV (FUV: 1350-1785 Å) and near UV (NUV: 1770-2830 Å) AB magnitudes as a function of time may help differentiate between models of the emission mechanisms thought to operate in these active galaxies. Methods: A list of NUV and FUV variable quasars was derived from the UV light-curves of sources with 5 or more observational visits by GALEX that spanned a time-frame > 3 months. By measuring the error in the derived mean UV magnitude from the series of GALEX observations for each source, quasars whose UV variability was greater than the 3-σ variance from the mean observed value were deemed to be (intrinsically) UV variable. This conservative selection criterion (which was applied to both FUV and NUV observations) resulted in identifying 550 NUV and 371 FUV quasars as being statistically significant UV variable objects. Results: Following the work of Vanden Berk et al. (2004, ApJ, 601, 692), we have performed a structure function (SF) analysis of these data to search for possible correlations between UV variability and parameters such as rest frame time-lag, redshift, luminosity and radio loudness. Firstly, we observe that the amplitudes of variability as a function of time-lag for both the NUV and FUV data are far larger than those observed at visible wavelengths. Secondly, the levels of FUV variability are greater than those observed in the NUV for a given value of time-lag. Also, the amplitudes of both the NUV and FUV variability of quasars increase as a function of rest frame time-lag, irrespective of the value of quasar redshift, for time-lags 300 days there is a pronounced

  6. A Comparison of Galaxy Bulge+Disk Decomposition Between Pan-STARRS and SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokken, Martine Elena; McPartland, Conor; Sanders, David B.

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the size and shape of bulges in galaxies provide key constraints for models of galaxy evolution. A comprehensive catalog of bulge measurements for Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR7 galaxies is currently available to the public. However, the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3π survey now covers the same region with ~1-2 mag deeper photometry, a ~10-30% smaller PSF, and additional coverage in y-band. To test how much improvement in galaxy parameter measurements (e.g. bulge + disk) can be achieved using the new PS1 data, we make use of ultra-deep imaging data from the Hyper Suprime-Cam (HSC) Subaru Strategic Program (SSP). We fit bulge+disk models to images of 372 bright (mi < 18.5) galaxies detected in all three surveys. Comparison of galaxy parameters derived from SDSS and PS1 images with those measured from HSC-SSP images shows a tighter correlation between PS1 and SSP measurements for both bulge and disk parameters. Bulge parameters, such as bulge-to-total fraction and bulge radius, show the strongest improvement. However, measurements of all parameters degrade for galaxies with total r-band magnitude below the SDSS spectroscopic limit, mr = 17.7. We plan to use the PS1 3π survey data to produce an updated catalog of bulge+disk decomposition measurements for the entire SDSS DR7 spectroscopic galaxy sample.

  7. The structure of galactic disks - Studying late-type spiral galaxies using SDSS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohlen, M.; Trujillo, I.

    Using imaging data from the SDSS survey, we present the g' and r' radial stellar light distribution of a complete sample of similar to 90 face-on to intermediate inclined, nearby, late-type (Sb-Sdm) spiral galaxies. The surface brightness profiles are reliable (1s uncertainty less than 0.2 mag) down

  8. VLBI Detections of Parsec-Scale Nonthermal Jets in Radio-Loud Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Akihiro; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kono, Yusuke; Oyama, Tomoaki; Fujisawa, Kenta; Takaba, Hiroshi; Sudou, Hiroshi; Wakamatsu, Ken-Ichi; Yamauchi, Aya; Murata, Yasuhiro; Mochizuki, Nanako; Wajima, Kiyoaki; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Nagayama, Takumi; Nakai, Naomasa; Sorai, Kazuo; Kawai, Eiji; Sekido, Mamoru; Koyama, Yasuhiro; VLBI Group At Geographical Survey Institute,; Asano, Shoichiro; Uose, Hisao

    2009-12-01

    We conducted radio detection observations at 8.4 GHz for 22 radio-loud broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release, by a very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) technique. The VLBI instrument we used was developed by the Optically ConnecTed Array for VLBI Exploration project (OCTAVE), which is operated as a subarray of the Japanese VLBI Network. We aimed to select BAL quasars with nonthermal jets suitable for measuring their orientation angles and ages by subsequent detailed VLBI imaging studies to evaluate two controversial issues of whether BAL quasars are viewed nearly edge-on, and of whether BAL quasars are in a short-lived evolutionary phase of the quasar population. We detected 20 out of 22 sources using the OCTAVE baselines, implying brightness temperatures greater than 105K, which presumably come from nonthermal jets. Hence, BAL outflows and nonthermal jets can be generated simultaneously in these central engines. We also found four inverted-spectrum sources, which are interpreted as Doppler-beamed, pole-on-viewed relativistic jet sources, or young radio sources: single edge-on geometry cannot describe all BAL quasars. We discuss the implications of the OCTAVE observations for investigations for the orientation and evolutionary stage of BAL quasars.

  9. Far-infrared emission in luminous quasars accompanied by nuclear outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Natasha; Jarvis, M. J.; Banerji, M.; Hewett, P. C.; Bourne, N.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Eales, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Maddox, S. J.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.

    2017-09-01

    Combining large-area optical quasar surveys with the new far-infrared (FIR) Herschel-ATLAS Data Release 1, we search for an observational signature associated with the minority of quasars possessing bright FIR luminosities. We find that FIR-bright quasars show broad C IV emission-line blueshifts in excess of that expected from the optical luminosity alone, indicating particularly powerful nuclear outflows. The quasars show no signs of having redder optical colours than the general ensemble of optically selected quasars, ruling out differences in line-of-sight dust within the host galaxies. We postulate that these objects may be caught in a special evolutionary phase, with unobscured, high black hole accretion rates and correspondingly strong nuclear outflows. The high FIR emission found in these objects is then either a result of star formation related to the outflow, or is due to dust within the host galaxy illuminated by the quasar. We are thus directly witnessing coincident small-scale nuclear processes and galaxy-wide activity, commonly invoked in galaxy simulations that rely on feedback from quasars to influence galaxy evolution.

  10. Fractal Quasar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottorff, Mark; Ferland, Gary

    2001-03-01

    This paper examines whether a fractal cloud geometry can reproduce the emission-line spectra of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The nature of the emitting clouds is unknown, but many current models invoke various types of magnetohydrodynamic confinement. Recent studies have argued that a fractal distribution of clouds, in which subsets of clouds occur in self-similar hierarchies, is a consequence of such confinement. Whatever the confinement mechanism, fractal cloud geometries are found in nature and may be present in AGNs too. We first outline how a fractal geometry can apply at the center of a luminous quasar. Scaling laws are derived that establish the number of hierarchies, typical sizes, column densities, and densities. Photoionization simulations are used to predict the integrated spectrum from the ensemble. Direct comparison with observations establishes all model parameters so that the final predictions are fully constrained. Theory suggests that denser clouds might form in regions of higher turbulence and that larger turbulence results in a wider dispersion of physical gas densities. An increase in turbulence is expected deeper within the gravitational potential of the black hole, resulting in a density gradient. We mimic this density gradient by employing two sets of clouds with identical fractal structuring but different densities. The low-density clouds have a lower column density and large covering factor similar to the warm absorber. The high-density clouds have high column density and smaller covering factor similar to the broad-line region (BLR). A fractal geometry can simultaneously reproduce the covering factor, density, column density, BLR emission-line strengths, and BLR line ratios as inferred from observation. Absorption properties of the model are consistent with the integrated line-of-sight column density as determined from observations of X-ray absorption, and when scaled to a Seyfert galaxy, the model is consistent with the number of

  11. New results on quasar outflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamann, Fred; Kanekar, Nissem; Prochaska, Jason X.; Murphy, Michael T.; Milutinovic, Nikola; Ellison, Sara; Ubachs, Wim; Ferland, Gary

    Accretion disk outflows are an important part of the quasar phenomenon. They might play a major role in distributing metals to the galactic surroundings, halting growth of the central black hole and providing kinetic energy "feedback" to regulate star formation in the host galaxies. Some models of

  12. THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY REVERBERATION MAPPING PROJECT: RAPID C iv BROAD ABSORPTION LINE VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grier, C. J.; Brandt, W. N.; Trump, J. R.; Schneider, D. P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Hall, P. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, ON M3J 1P3 (Canada); Shen, Yue [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Vivek, M.; Dawson, K. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Ak, N. Filiz [Faculty of Sciences, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey); Chen, Yuguang [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Denney, K. D.; Kochanek, C. S.; Peterson, B. M. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Green, Paul J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jiang, Linhua [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); McGreer, Ian D. [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Pâris, I. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); Tao, Charling [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS /IN2P3, 163, avenue de Luminy, Case 902, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 09 (France); Wood-Vasey, W. M. [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O’Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Bizyaev, Dmitry, E-mail: grier@psu.edu [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM, 88349-0059 (United States); and others

    2015-06-10

    We report the discovery of rapid variations of a high-velocity C iv broad absorption line trough in the quasar SDSS J141007.74+541203.3. This object was intensively observed in 2014 as a part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project, during which 32 epochs of spectroscopy were obtained with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey spectrograph. We observe significant (>4σ) variability in the equivalent width (EW) of the broad (∼4000 km s{sup −1} wide) C iv trough on rest-frame timescales as short as 1.20 days (∼29 hr), the shortest broad absorption line variability timescale yet reported. The EW varied by ∼10% on these short timescales, and by about a factor of two over the duration of the campaign. We evaluate several potential causes of the variability, concluding that the most likely cause is a rapid response to changes in the incident ionizing continuum. If the outflow is at a radius where the recombination rate is higher than the ionization rate, the timescale of variability places a lower limit on the density of the absorbing gas of n{sub e} ≳ 3.9 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup −3}. The broad absorption line variability characteristics of this quasar are consistent with those observed in previous studies of quasars, indicating that such short-term variability may in fact be common and thus can be used to learn about outflow characteristics and contributions to quasar/host-galaxy feedback scenarios.

  13. Extreme Variability in a Broad Absorption Line Quasar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Daniel; Jun, Hyunsung D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 169-221, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Donalek, Ciro; Drake, Andrew J.; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Steidel, Charles C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Arav, Nahum; Chamberlain, Carter [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Barth, Aaron J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Glikman, Eilat, E-mail: daniel.k.stern@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Physics, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT 05753 (United States)

    2017-04-20

    CRTS J084133.15+200525.8 is an optically bright quasar at z = 2.345 that has shown extreme spectral variability over the past decade. Photometrically, the source had a visual magnitude of V ∼ 17.3 between 2002 and 2008. Then, over the following five years, the source slowly brightened by approximately one magnitude, to V ∼ 16.2. Only ∼1 in 10,000 quasars show such extreme variability, as quantified by the extreme parameters derived for this quasar assuming a damped random walk model. A combination of archival and newly acquired spectra reveal the source to be an iron low-ionization broad absorption line quasar with extreme changes in its absorption spectrum. Some absorption features completely disappear over the 9 years of optical spectra, while other features remain essentially unchanged. We report the first definitive redshift for this source, based on the detection of broad H α in a Keck/MOSFIRE spectrum. Absorption systems separated by several 1000 km s{sup −1} in velocity show coordinated weakening in the depths of their troughs as the continuum flux increases. We interpret the broad absorption line variability to be due to changes in photoionization, rather than due to motion of material along our line of sight. This source highlights one sort of rare transition object that astronomy will now be finding through dedicated time-domain surveys.

  14. A Multi-Survey Approach to White Dwarf Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    magnitude-limited astrometric survey is conducted, such as Gaia or LSST . Only a subset of our WD candidates were able to be observed because of telescope...Higher Education Funding Council for England. The SDSS Web site is http://www.sdss.org/. The SDSS is managed by the Astrophysical Research Consortium

  15. Spectral Variability of Quasar SDSS J030639. 57+ 000343.1

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Hengxiao Guo1 2 Minfeng Gu1. Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030, China. University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquanlu, Beijing 100049, China.

  16. Identification of MgII Absorption Line Systems from SDSS Quasar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ranges as pseudo-continua, which are not affected by prominent emission lines and broad absorption lines, and then decompose the spectra into the following two components. 2.1 A power-law continuum to describe the emission from the active nucleus. The 11 line-free spectral regions are firstly selected from SDSS ...

  17. Extragalactic jets as probes of distant clusters of galaxies and the clusters occupied by bent radio AGN (COBRA) survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel; Wing, Joshua D.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Golden-Marx, Emmet; Brodwin, Mark; Douglass, E. M.; Randall, Scott W.; Clarke, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    We are conducting a large survey of distant clusters of galaxies using radio sources with bent jets and lobes as tracers. These radio sources are driven by AGN and achieve their bent morphologies through interaction with the surrounding gas found in clusters of galaxies. Based on low-redshift studies, these types of sources can be used to identify clusters very efficiently. We present initial results from our survey of 653 bent-double radio sources with optical hosts too faint to appear in the SDSS. The sample was observed in the infrared with Spitzer, and it has revealed ~200 distant clusters or proto-clusters in the redshift range z ~ 0.7 - 3.0. The sample of bent-doubles contains both quasars and radio galaxies enabling us to study both radiative and kinetic mode feedback in cluster and group environments at a wide range of redshifts.

  18. Galaxy evolution. Quasar quartet embedded in giant nebula reveals rare massive structure in distant universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennawi, Joseph F; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Arrigoni-Battaia, Fabrizio

    2015-05-15

    All galaxies once passed through a hyperluminous quasar phase powered by accretion onto a supermassive black hole. But because these episodes are brief, quasars are rare objects typically separated by cosmological distances. In a survey for Lyman-α emission at redshift z ≈ 2, we discovered a physical association of four quasars embedded in a giant nebula. Located within a substantial overdensity of galaxies, this system is probably the progenitor of a massive galaxy cluster. The chance probability of finding a quadruple quasar is estimated to be ∼10(-7), implying a physical connection between Lyman-α nebulae and the locations of rare protoclusters. Our findings imply that the most massive structures in the distant universe have a tremendous supply (≃10(11) solar masses) of cool dense (volume density ≃ 1 cm(-3)) gas, which is in conflict with current cosmological simulations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  19. Flamingos 2 Spectroscopy of Obscured and Unobscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Susan; Lacy, Mark; Urrutia, Tanya; Petric, Andreea

    2013-08-01

    We will use Flamingos-2 to obtain spectra of luminous AGN and quasars selected in the mid-infrared. Mid-infrared selection is much less biased with respect to obscuration than optical and X-ray techniques, and hence allows for finding obscured (Type-2) quasars as well as Type-1 quasars. Our survey so far has been very successful and has provided an unique opportunity to construct luminosity functions for both Type-1 and Type-2 quasars selected in the same way and covering similar redshifts and luminosities. We have quantifed the change in the obscured fraction with luminosity and redshift for the first time, and find interesting indications that at high redshift the obscured fraction rises, consistent with models for the joint formation of the galaxy and black hole populations. Our samples are, however, still quite incomplete at low fluxes (and therefore lower luminosities at a given redshift), particularly in the southern hemisphere. Near-infrared spectroscopy, such as that we have previously obtained with NIRI at Gemini N, offers us the best possibility of bringing these southern samples to a reasonable completeness level, and will greatly increase the number of high z quasars in our sample. This will allow us to better judge our tantalizing initial results on the redshift evolution of the obscured fraction. In addition, these southern targets can be followed up with ALMA and GEMS/GSAOI to study the morphologies and star-formation properties of the hosts, allowing further exploration of the relationship between the formation of massive bulges and supermassive blackholes in the early universe.

  20. A Quasar's Identity May Simply Be In The Eye Of The Beholder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have made the first detailed study of a peculiar type of quasar that is shrouded in clouds of gas and dust flowing outward at millions of miles per hour. The results support the idea that this outflow is a common feature of all quasars, highly active supermassive black holes that give the illusion of being different when viewed from various angles. Quasars are some of the most energetic and distant known objects in the universe. Most quasars are extremely bright in optical light, but about 10 percent appear 'shrouded,'or hidden, by absorbing clouds of gas and dust. In addition to these obscuring clouds, the same subset of quasars shows evidence of extremely energetic winds blasting outwards from the central regions. Astronomers have debated whether these shrouded quasars represent an early evolutionary stage of black holes when they vigorously consume matter, or whether these energetic outflows are present in all quasars, but detectable only when viewed in certain orientations. "Because high-energy X-rays can pierce through these clouds, we can use Chandra to observe close to the underlying black hole," said Paul Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and lead author of a paper to appear in The Astrophysical Journal. "Looking through these veils, we find that the extremely hot gas around these supermassive black holes shines just the same way as in non-shrouded quasars." Green and his colleagues used Chandra to survey ten shrouded quasars through a process known as spectroscopy, the study of how atoms absorb and emit light. X-ray spectroscopy provides astronomers with a unique ability to "fingerprint" very high-energy objects at great distances. BALQSO These two Chandra images demonstrate the different appearances of "normal" and "shrouded" quasars. Credit: NASA/CfA/P.Green et al. "Chandra is beginning to show us that these quasars are all the same underneath, regardless of what they are wearing

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV: Mapping the Milky Way, Nearby Galaxies, and the Distant Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, Michael R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Abolfathi, Bela; Albareti, Franco D.; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Almeida, Andres; Alonso-García, Javier; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett; Aquino-Ortíz, Erik; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Aubourg, Eric; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Bailey, Stephen; Barger, Kathleen A.; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Bartosz, Curtis; Bates, Dominic; Baumgarten, Falk; Bautista, Julian; Beaton, Rachael; Beers, Timothy C.; Belfiore, Francesco; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Bernardi, Mariangela; Beutler, Florian; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bolton, Adam S.; Boquien, Médéric; Borissova, Jura; van den Bosch, Remco; Bovy, Jo; Brandt, William N.; Brinkmann, Jonathan; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bundy, Kevin; Burgasser, Adam J.; Burtin, Etienne; Busca, Nicolás G.; Cappellari, Michele; Delgado Carigi, Maria Leticia; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Carrera, Ricardo; Chanover, Nancy J.; Cherinka, Brian; Cheung, Edmond; Gómez Maqueo Chew, Yilen; Chiappini, Cristina; Doohyun Choi, Peter; Chojnowski, Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Chung, Haeun; Cirolini, Rafael Fernando; Clerc, Nicolas; Cohen, Roger E.; Comparat, Johan; da Costa, Luiz; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Covey, Kevin; Crane, Jeffrey D.; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Garrido Cuadra, Daniel; Cunha, Katia; Damke, Guillermo J.; Darling, Jeremy; Davies, Roger; Dawson, Kyle; de la Macorra, Axel; Dell'Agli, Flavia; De Lee, Nathan; Delubac, Timothée; Di Mille, Francesco; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Cano-Díaz, Mariana; Donor, John; Downes, Juan José; Drory, Niv; du Mas des Bourboux, Hélion; Duckworth, Christopher J.; Dwelly, Tom; Dyer, Jamie; Ebelke, Garrett; Eigenbrot, Arthur D.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Emsellem, Eric; Eracleous, Mike; Escoffier, Stephanie; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Fernández-Alvar, Emma; Fernandez-Trincado, J. G.; Feuillet, Diane K.; Finoguenov, Alexis; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Fredrickson, Alexander; Freischlad, Gordon; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Fuentes, Carla E.; Galbany, Lluís; Garcia-Dias, R.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Gaulme, Patrick; Geisler, Doug; Gelfand, Joseph D.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Goddard, Daniel; Gonzalez-Perez, Violeta; Grabowski, Kathleen; Green, Paul J.; Grier, Catherine J.; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Guy, Julien; Hagen, Alex; Hahn, ChangHoon; Hall, Matthew; Harding, Paul; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hearty, Fred; Gonzalez Hernández, Jonay I.; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.; Holzer, Parker H.; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Hutchinson, Timothy A.; Hwang, Ho Seong; Ibarra-Medel, Héctor J.; da Silva Ilha, Gabriele; Ivans, Inese I.; Ivory, KeShawn; Jackson, Kelly; Jensen, Trey W.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Jones, Amy; Jönsson, Henrik; Jullo, Eric; Kamble, Vikrant; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Klaene, Mark; Knapp, Gillian R.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Lacerna, Ivan; Lane, Richard R.; Lang, Dustin; Law, David R.; Lazarz, Daniel; Lee, Youngbae; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Liang, Fu-Heng; Li, Cheng; Li, Hongyu; Lian, Jianhui; Lima, Marcos; Lin, Lihwai; Lin, Yen-Ting; Bertran de Lis, Sara; Liu, Chao; de Icaza Lizaola, Miguel Angel C.; Long, Dan; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; MacDonald, Nicholas K.; Deconto Machado, Alice; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Geimba Maia, Marcio Antonio; Maiolino, Roberto; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, Arturo; Mao, Shude; Maraston, Claudia; Marques-Chaves, Rui; Masseron, Thomas; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McDermid, Richard M.; McGrath, Brianne; McGreer, Ian D.; Medina Peña, Nicolás; Melendez, Matthew; Merloni, Andrea; Merrifield, Michael R.; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Meza, Andres; Minchev, Ivan; Minniti, Dante; Miyaji, Takamitsu; More, Surhud; Mulchaey, John; Müller-Sánchez, Francisco; Muna, Demitri; Munoz, Ricardo R.; Myers, Adam D.; Nair, Preethi; Nandra, Kirpal; Correa do Nascimento, Janaina; Negrete, Alenka; Ness, Melissa; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Nitschelm, Christian; Ntelis, Pierros; O'Connell, Julia E.; Oelkers, Ryan J.; Oravetz, Audrey; Oravetz, Daniel; Pace, Zach; Padilla, Nelson; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Alonso Palicio, Pedro; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parikh, Taniya; Pâris, Isabelle; Park, Changbom; Patten, Alim Y.; Peirani, Sebastien; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Penny, Samantha; Percival, Will J.; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, Marc; Pisani, Alice; Poleski, Radosław; Prada, Francisco; Prakash, Abhishek; Queiroz, Anna Bárbara de Andrade; Raddick, M. Jordan; Raichoor, Anand; Barboza Rembold, Sandro; Richstein, Hannah; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Riffel, Rogério; Rix, Hans-Walter; Robin, Annie C.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Roman-Lopes, A.; Román-Zúñiga, Carlos; Rosado, Margarita; Ross, Ashley J.; Rossi, Graziano; Ruan, John; Ruggeri, Rossana; Rykoff, Eli S.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Salvato, Mara; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Aguado, D. S.; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Santana, Felipe A.; Santiago, Basílio Xavier; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; da Silva Schimoia, Jaderson; Schlafly, Edward F.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Schuster, William J.; Schwope, Axel; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shao, Zhengyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shetrone, Matthew; Shull, Michael; Simon, Joshua D.; Skinner, Danielle; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Anže; Smith, Verne V.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Somers, Garrett; Souto, Diogo; Stark, David V.; Stassun, Keivan; Stauffer, Fritz; Steinmetz, Matthias; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Streblyanska, Alina; Stringfellow, Guy S.; Suárez, Genaro; Sun, Jing; Suzuki, Nao; Szigeti, Laszlo; Taghizadeh-Popp, Manuchehr; Tang, Baitian; Tao, Charling; Tayar, Jamie; Tembe, Mita; Teske, Johanna; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tissera, Patricia; Tojeiro, Rita; Hernandez Toledo, Hector; de la Torre, Sylvain; Tremonti, Christy; Troup, Nicholas W.; Valenzuela, Octavio; Martinez Valpuesta, Inma; Vargas-González, Jaime; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Villanova, Sandro; Vivek, M.; Vogt, Nicole; Wake, David; Walterbos, Rene; Wang, Yuting; Weaver, Benjamin Alan; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Weinberg, David H.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Whelan, David G.; Wild, Vivienne; Wilson, John; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Xiao, Ting; Yan, Renbin; Yang, Meng; Ybarra, Jason E.; Yèche, Christophe; Zakamska, Nadia; Zamora, Olga; Zarrouk, Pauline; Zasowski, Gail; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zheng, Zheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Guangtun B.; Zoccali, Manuela; Zou, Hu

    2017-07-01

    We describe the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV), a project encompassing three major spectroscopic programs. The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment 2 (APOGEE-2) is observing hundreds of thousands of Milky Way stars at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratios in the near-infrared. The Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey is obtaining spatially resolved spectroscopy for thousands of nearby galaxies (median z˜ 0.03). The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) is mapping the galaxy, quasar, and neutral gas distributions between z˜ 0.6 and 3.5 to constrain cosmology using baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions, and the shape of the power spectrum. Within eBOSS, we are conducting two major subprograms: the SPectroscopic IDentification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS), investigating X-ray AGNs and galaxies in X-ray clusters, and the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS), obtaining spectra of variable sources. All programs use the 2.5 m Sloan Foundation Telescope at the Apache Point Observatory; observations there began in Summer 2014. APOGEE-2 also operates a second near-infrared spectrograph at the 2.5 m du Pont Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory, with observations beginning in early 2017. Observations at both facilities are scheduled to continue through 2020. In keeping with previous SDSS policy, SDSS-IV provides regularly scheduled public data releases; the first one, Data Release 13, was made available in 2016 July.

  2. VICS82: The VISTA-CFHT Stripe 82 Near-infrared Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geach, J. E.; Lin, Y.-T.; Makler, M.; Kneib, J.-P.; Ross, N. P.; Wang, W.-H.; Hsieh, B.-C.; Leauthaud, A.; Bundy, K.; McCracken, H. J.; Comparat, J.; Caminha, G. B.; Hudelot, P.; Lin, L.; Van Waerbeke, L.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Mast, D.

    2017-07-01

    We present the VISTA-CFHT Stripe 82 (VICS82) survey: a near-infrared (J+K s ) survey covering 150 square degrees of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) equatorial Stripe 82 to an average depth of J = 21.9 AB mag and K s = 21.4 AB mag (80% completeness limits; 5σ point-source depths are approximately 0.5 mag brighter). VICS82 contributes to the growing legacy of multiwavelength data in the Stripe 82 footprint. The addition of near-infrared photometry to the existing SDSS Stripe 82 coadd ugriz photometry reduces the scatter in stellar mass estimates to δ {log}({M}\\star )≈ 0.3 dex for galaxies with {M}\\star > {10}9 {M}⊙ at z≈ 0.5, and offers improvement compared to optical-only estimates out to z≈ 1, with stellar masses constrained within a factor of approximately 2.5. When combined with other multiwavelength imaging of the Stripe, including moderate-to-deep ultraviolet (GALEX), optical and mid-infrared (Spitzer-IRAC) coverage, as well as tens of thousands of spectroscopic redshifts, VICS82 gives access to approximately 0.5 Gpc3 of comoving volume. Some of the main science drivers of VICS82 include (a) measuring the stellar mass function of {L}\\star galaxies out to z˜ 1; (b) detecting intermediate-redshift quasars at 2≲ z≲ 3.5; (c) measuring the stellar mass function and baryon census of clusters of galaxies, and (d) performing cross-correlation experiments of cosmic microwave background lensing in the optical/near-infrared that link stellar mass to large-scale dark matter structure. Here we define and describe the survey, highlight some early science results, and present the first public data release, which includes an SDSS-matched catalog as well as the calibrated pixel data themselves.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BAL QSOs from SDSS DR3 (Trump+, 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Reichard, T. A.; Richards, G. T.; Schneider, D. P.; vanden Berk, D. E.; Knapp, G. R.; Anderson, S. F.; Fan, X.; Brinkman, J.; Kleinman, S. J.; Nitta, A.

    2007-11-01

    We present a total of 4784 unique broad absorption line quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release (Cat. ). An automated algorithm was used to match a continuum to each quasar and to identify regions of flux at least 10% below the continuum over a velocity range of at least 1000km/s in the CIV and MgII absorption regions. The model continuum was selected as the best-fit match from a set of template quasar spectra binned in luminosity, emission line width, and redshift, with the power-law spectral index and amount of dust reddening as additional free parameters. We characterize our sample through the traditional balnicity index and a revised absorption index, as well as through parameters such as the width, outflow velocity, fractional depth, and number of troughs. (1 data file).

  4. The Alignment effect of brightest cluster galaxies in the SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Rita S.J.; Annis, Jim; Strauss, Michael A.; Lupton, Robert H.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Gunn, James E.; Kepner, Jeremy V.; Postman, Marc

    2001-10-01

    One of the most vital observational clues for unraveling the origin of Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCG) is the observed alignment of the BCGs with their host cluster and its surroundings. We have examined the BCG-cluster alignment effect, using clusters of galaxies detected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find that the BCGs are preferentially aligned with the principal axis of their hosts, to a much higher redshift (z >~ 0.3) than probed by previous studies (z <~ 0.1). The alignment effect strongly depends on the magnitude difference of the BCG and the second and third brightest cluster members: we find a strong alignment effect for the dominant BCGs, while less dominant BCGs do not show any departure from random alignment with respect to the cluster. We therefore claim that the alignment process originates from the same process that makes the BCG grow dominant, be it direct mergers in the early stage of cluster formation, or a later process that resembles the galactic cannibalism scenario. We do not find strong evidence for (or against) redshift evolution between 0SDSS cluster catalogs, which will provide us with better statistics for systematic investigations of the alignment with redshift, richness and morphology of both the cluster and the BCG.

  5. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Stripe 82 Imaging Data: Depth-Optimized Co-adds Over 300 deg$^2$ in Five Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Bian, Fuyan; McGreer, Ian D.; Strauss, Michael A.; Annis, James; Buck, Zoë; Green, Richard; Hodge, Jacqueline A.; Myers, Adam D.; Rafiee, Alireza; Richards, Gordon

    2014-06-25

    We present and release co-added images of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82. Stripe 82 covers an area of ~300 deg(2) on the celestial equator, and has been repeatedly scanned 70-90 times in the ugriz bands by the SDSS imaging survey. By making use of all available data in the SDSS archive, our co-added images are optimized for depth. Input single-epoch frames were properly processed and weighted based on seeing, sky transparency, and background noise before co-addition. The resultant products are co-added science images and their associated weight images that record relative weights at individual pixels. The depths of the co-adds, measured as the 5σ detection limits of the aperture (3.''2 diameter) magnitudes for point sources, are roughly 23.9, 25.1, 24.6, 24.1, and 22.8 AB magnitudes in the five bands, respectively. They are 1.9-2.2 mag deeper than the best SDSS single-epoch data. The co-added images have good image quality, with an average point-spread function FWHM of ~1'' in the r, i, and z bands. We also release object catalogs that were made with SExtractor. These co-added products have many potential uses for studies of galaxies, quasars, and Galactic structure. We further present and release near-IR J-band images that cover ~90 deg(2) of Stripe 82. These images were obtained using the NEWFIRM camera on the NOAO 4 m Mayall telescope, and have a depth of about 20.0-20.5 Vega magnitudes (also 5σ detection limits for point sources).

  6. The milky way tomography with sdss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juric, Mario; Ivezic, Zeljko; Brooks, Alyson; Lupton, Robert H.; Schlegel, David; Finkbeiner, Douglas; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Bond, Nicholas; Rockosi, Constance M.; Knapp,; Gunn, James E.; Sumi, Takahiro; Schneider, Donald; Barentine, J.C.; Brewington, Howard J.; Brinkmann, J.; Fukugita, Masataka; Harvanek, Michael; Kleinman, S.J.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Long, Dan; /Princeton U. Observ. /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Princeton U. /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys. /Apache Point Observ. /Tokyo U., ICRR

    2005-10-01

    Using the photometric parallax method, we estimate the distances to {approx}48 million stars detected by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and map their three-dimensional number density distribution in the Galaxy. The currently available data sample the distance range from 100 pc to 15 kpc and cover 6,500 deg{sup 2} of sky, mostly at high galactic latitudes (|b| > 25). These stellar number density maps allow an investigation of the Galactic structure without any a priori assumptions about its components. The data show strong evidence for a Galaxy consisting of an oblate halo, disk components, and a number of localized overdensities. The number density distribution of stars in the Solar neighborhood (D < 1.5kpc) favors a model having a ''thin'' and a ''thick'' exponential disk, with scale heights and lengths of H{sub 1} {approx} 280 pc and L{sub 1} {approx} 2400pc, and H{sub 2} {approx} 1200pc and L{sub 2} {approx} 3500pc, respectively, and local thick-to-thin disk normalization {rho}{sub thick} (R{sub {circle_dot}})/{rho}{sub thin}(R{sub {circle_dot}}) = 4%. Fits applied to the entire dataset are significantly more uncertain due to the presence of clumps and overdensities. The halo power law index is very poorly constrained, but we find an oblate halo with c/a {approx} 0.5 to be strongly preferred. While roughly consistent with this simple model, the measured density distribution shows a number of statistically significant deviations from the model predictions. In addition to known features, such as the Monoceros stream, a remarkable density enhancement covering over a thousand square degrees of sky is detected towards the constellation of Virgo, at distances of {approx} 5-15 kpc. Compared to counts in a region symmetric with respect to the l = 0 line and with the same Galactic latitude, it is responsible for a factor of 2 number density excess, and may be a nearby tidal stream or a low-surface brightness dwarf galaxy

  7. GBT Detection of Polarization-Dependent HI Absorption and HI Outflows in Local ULIRGs and Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L(sub 8 - 1000 micron) > 10(exp 12) solar L) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km/s in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the FIR-strong and FIR-weak quasars, respectively). We attribute this result to absorption of polarized continuum emission from these sources by foreground HI clouds. About 60% of the quasars displaying polarized spectra are radio-loud, far higher than the approx 10% observed in the general AGN population. This discrepancy suggests that radio jets play an important role in shaping the environments in these galaxies. These systems may represent a transition phase in the evolution of gas-rich mergers into "mature" radio galaxies.

  8. Detecting the First Quasars with ALMA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleicher, Dominik R. G.; Spaans, Marco; Klessen, Ralf S.

    We show that ALMA is the first telescope that can probe the dust-obscured central region of quasars at z > 5 with a maximum resolution of ~ 30 pc employing the 18 km baseline. We explore the possibility of detecting the first quasars with ALMA (Schleicher, Spaans, & Klessen 2009). For this purpose,

  9. Quasar polarization with ultralight (pseudo-)scalars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Recently, it was shown that the absence of circular polarization of visible light from quasars severely constrains the interpretation of axion-like particles (ALPs) as a solution for the generation of linear polarization. Furthermore, the new observation of linear polarization in radio wavelength from quasars, similar to ...

  10. Quasar polarization with ultralight (pseudo-) scalars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Recently, it was shown that the absence of circular polarization of visible light from quasars severely constrains the interpretation of axion-like particles (ALPs) as a solution for the generation of linear polarization. Furthermore, the new observation of linear polarization in radio wavelength from quasars, similar to the earlier ...

  11. MOTION VERIFIED RED STARS (MoVeRS): A CATALOG OF PROPER MOTION SELECTED LOW-MASS STARS FROM WISE, SDSS, AND 2MASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theissen, Christopher A.; West, Andrew A. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Dhital, Saurav, E-mail: ctheisse@bu.edu [Department of Physical Sciences, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Blvd., Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    We present a photometric catalog of 8,735,004 proper motion selected low-mass stars (KML-spectral types) within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) footprint, from the combined SDSS Data Release 10 (DR10), Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) point-source catalog (PSC), and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) AllWISE catalog. Stars were selected using r − i, i − z, r − z, z − J, and z − W1 colors, and SDSS, WISE, and 2MASS astrometry was combined to compute proper motions. The resulting 3,518,150 stars were augmented with proper motions for 5,216,854 earlier type stars from the combined SDSS and United States Naval Observatory B1.0 catalog (USNO-B). We used SDSS+USNO-B proper motions to determine the best criteria for selecting a clean sample of stars. Only stars whose proper motions were greater than their 2σ uncertainty were included. Our Motion Verified Red Stars catalog is available through SDSS CasJobs and VizieR.

  12. The SDSS Discovery of a Strongly Lensed Post-Starburst Galaxy at z=0.766

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Min-Su; Strauss, Michael A.; Oguri, Masamune; Inada, Naohisa; Falco, Emilio E.; Broadhurst, Tom; Gunn, James E.

    2008-09-30

    We present the first result of a survey for strong galaxy-galaxy lenses in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images. SDSS J082728.70+223256.4 was selected as a lensing candidate using selection criteria based on the color and positions of objects in the SDSS photometric catalog. Follow-up imaging and spectroscopy showed this object to be a lensing system. The lensing galaxy is an elliptical at z = 0.349 in a galaxy cluster. The lensed galaxy has the spectrum of a post-starburst galaxy at z = 0.766. The lensing galaxy has an estimated mass of {approx} 1.2 x 10{sup 12} M{sub {circle_dot}} and the corresponding mass to light ratio in the B-band is {approx} 26 M{sub {circle_dot}}/L{sub {circle_dot}} inside 1.1 effective radii of the lensing galaxy. Our study shows how catalogs drawn from multi-band surveys can be used to find strong galaxy-galaxy lenses having multiple lens images. Our strong lensing candidate selection based on photometry-only catalogs will be useful in future multi-band imaging surveys such as SNAP and LSST.

  13. Galaxy Zoo: finding offset discs and bars in SDSS galaxies★

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Sandor J.; Lintott, Chris J.; Simmons, Brooke D.; Bamford, Steven P.; Cardamone, Carolin N.; Fortson, Lucy; Hart, Ross E.; Häußler, Boris; Masters, Karen L.; Nichol, Robert C.; Schawinski, Kevin; Smethurst, Rebecca J.

    2017-08-01

    We use multiwavelength Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images and Galaxy Zoo morphologies to identify a sample of ˜270 late-type galaxies with an off-centre bar. We measure offsets in the range 0.2-2.5 kpc between the photometric centres of the stellar disc and stellar bar. The measured offsets correlate with global asymmetries of the galaxies, with those with largest offsets showing higher lopsidedness. These findings are in good agreement with predictions from simulations of dwarf-dwarf tidal interactions producing off-centre bars. We find that the majority of galaxies with off-centre bars are of Magellanic type, with a median mass of 109.6 M⊙, and 91 per cent of them having M⋆ < 3 × 1010 M⊙, the characteristic mass at which galaxies start having higher central concentrations attributed to the presence of bulges. We conduct a search for companions to test the hypothesis of tidal interactions, but find that a similar fraction of galaxies with offset bars have companions within 100 kpc as galaxies with centred bars. Although this may be due to the incompleteness of the SDSS spectroscopic survey at the faint end, alternative scenarios that give rise to offset bars such as interactions with dark companions or the effect of lopsided halo potentials should be considered. Future observations are needed to confirm possible low-mass companion candidates and to determine the shape of the dark matter halo, in order to find the explanation for the off-centre bars in these galaxies.

  14. On the level of cluster assembly bias in SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Ying; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Simet, Melanie; Rozo, Eduardo; Rykoff, Eli S.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, several studies have discovered a strong discrepancy between the large-scale clustering biases of two subsamples of galaxy clusters at the same halo mass, split by their average projected membership distances 〈Rmem〉. The level of this discrepancy significantly exceeds the maximum halo assembly bias predicted by Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM). We explore whether some of the large-scale bias differences could be caused by projection effects in 〈Rmem〉 due to other systems along the line of sight. We thoroughly investigate the assembly bias of the redMaPPer clusters in Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), by defining a new variant of the average membership distance estimator \\tilde{R}_{mem} that is robust against projection effects in the cluster membership identification. Using the angular mark correlation functions, we show that the large-scale bias differences when splitting by 〈Rmem〉 can be mostly attributed to projection effects. After splitting by \\tilde{R}_{mem}, the anomalously large signal is reduced, giving a ratio of 1.02 ± 0.14 between the two clustering biases as measured from weak lensing. Using a realistic mock cluster catalogue, we predict that the bias ratio between two \\tilde{R}_{mem}-split subsamples should be ≃1.10, which is >60 per cent weaker than the maximum halo assembly bias (1.24) when split by halo concentration. Therefore, our results demonstrate that the level of halo assembly bias exhibited by clusters in SDSS is consistent with the ΛCDM prediction. With a 10-fold increase in cluster numbers, deeper ongoing surveys will enable a more robust detection of halo assembly bias. Our findings also have important implications for quantifying the impact of projection effects on cosmological constraints using photometrically selected clusters.

  15. A Study of E+A Galaxies Through SDSS-MaNGA Integral Field Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wally, Muhammad; Weaver, Olivia A.; Anderson, Miguel Ricardo; Liu, Allen; Falcone, Julia; Wallack, Nicole Lisa; James, Olivia; Liu, Charles

    2017-01-01

    We outline the selection process and analysis of sixteen E+A galaxies observed by the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at the Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) survey as a part of the fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV). We present their Integral field spectroscopy and analyze their spatial distribution of stellar ages, metallicities and other stellar population properties. We can potentially study the variation in these properties as a function of redshift. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement #SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island. This work was also supported by grants to The American Museum of Natural History, and the CUNY College of Staten Island through The National Science Foundation.

  16. Formation et Evolution des Quasars et Contraintes cosmologiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia

    2000-06-01

    Cette thèse porte sur l'étude de l'évolution des quasars. Elle en aborde certains aspects théoriques et observationnels, ainsi que la construction des grands échantillons de quasars dans le but à long terme de combiner le tout dans un test cosmologique géométrique pour déterminer les valeurs des paramètres cosmologiques Omega et Lambda. Les paramètres cosmologiques Omegaspan>et Lambdaspan>décrivent la géométrie globale de l'Univers. En faisant des hypothèses raisonnables sur la distribution spatiale et l'évolution des objets astrophysiques (galaxies, amas des galaxies, quasars), on peut déterminer les valeurs de ces paramètres qui sont cohérentes avec ces hypothèses. Les tests cosmologiques traditionnels ont besoin de ''chandelles standards'', objets dont les propriétés intrinsèques sont indépendantes des distances. De tels objets sont probablement fictifs. Néanmoins, certains de ces tests cosmologiques peuvent être adaptés si l'évolution individuelle, ou au moins l'évolution statistique d'une population d'objets est connue. La question de la nature de l'évolution des quasars a très vite été posée et des réponses ''phénoménologiques'' ont d'abord été données. Ces réponses ne faisaient que donner une forme mathématique à l'évolution mais n'expliquaient rien de la physique duphénomène. Les premières tentatives de construction d'un modèle physique, liées au processus d'accrétion sur un trou noir et à la théorie de la formation de l'Univers ont commencé à la fin des années 80. Depuis, des dizaines de modèles tentent d'expliquer les observations, qui sont les résultats de l'étude d'objets de plus en plus nombreux. Au cours de cette thèse, le test V/Vmax a été appliqué sur l'échantillon du Large Bright Quasar Survey en montrant 1) que l'échantillon était biaisé à cause des critères de sélection et 2) que la (simple) loi de Pure Evolution en Luminosité n'était pas une bonne approximation à tout

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Million Quasars (Milliquas) catalog (V5.2) (Flesch, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, E. W.

    2017-08-01

    This is a compendium of 607,208 type-I QSOs and AGN, largely complete from the literature to 5-August-2017, including the release of SDSS-DR14. Also included are ~1.35M high-confidence (80%+ likelihood) quasar candidates from the NBCKDE, NBCKDE-v3, XDQSO, AllWISE and Peters photometric quasar catalogs (citations in Note 7 below) and from all-sky radio/X-ray associated objects which are calculated here. Type-II and Bl Lac objects are also included, bringing the total count to 1,998,464. Changes from version 5.1 are: (1) SDSS-DR14 and SDSS-DR14Q have been added, using the processing rules from the Half Million Quasars catalog (HMQ: Flesch 2015PASA...32...10F). (2) WISE quasar candidates have been added from Secrest et al, 2015, Cat. J/ApJS/221/12; these are ~430K candidates over the whole sky for which 2-color optical objects were found within a 2-arcsec radius. They have been processed into pQSOs from calibration against the SDSS-DR12Q multi-class superset, and photometric redshifts obtained using the four-color based method from the HMQ appendix 2. The four colors used were B-R, R-W1, W1-W2 & W2-W3. (3) Type-II narrow emission-line galaxies, (NELGs, class='N') are added as the luminosity class corresponding to the type-I AGN galaxies. High-luminosity type-II NLAGN (class='K') correspond to the type-I quasars. The NLAGN/NELG divider is the same luminosity/psf function which separates QSOs from AGNs. Type-II NELGs include unquantified contamination by LINERs and probably a few starbursts which eluded removal, so it serves as a catch-all category presented for completeness, rather than as a strict type-II class. (4) Small publications to 5 August 2017 have been added. (5) Positional fixes (of about 2 arcsec) have been applied to ~150 objects. Low-confidence or questionable objects (so deemed by their researchers) are not included in Milliquas. Additional quality cuts can be applied as detailed in Flesch 2015PASA...32...10F). Multiple lensed images are excluded and

  18. Giant Gas Cloud Made of Atoms Formed in First Stars Revealed in Universe's Most Distant Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-01

    is as much mass as we see in big galaxies today, and it had little time, astronomically speaking, to accumulate," said Carilli. Also, the most popular theory for how big galaxies formed is that they were built up over long spans of time by multiple mergers of smaller galaxies. "That's why it's so surprising to see such a massive galaxy so early in the Universe," said Walter. Studies of J1148+5251 and other distant objects yet to be discovered will help scientists find the answers to their questions about the Universe's early stars and galaxies. The radio observations of J1148+5251 gave astronomers a look at the galaxy itself, Walter emphasized, while optical telescopes showed only light coming from the bright quasar "engine" at the galaxy's core. Walter added that more VLA observations now being planned are aimed at producing an image of the young galaxy. Discovery Image of J1148+5251 SDSS Discovery Image of J1148+5251: Quasar is Red Dot Pointed Out by Arrow CREDIT: Sloan Digital Sky Survey At Apache Point Observatory (Click on Image for Larger Version) In addition, Walter also looks forward to studying other objects deeper into the era of reionization, both with the expanded VLA (EVLA) and with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), a joint North America-Europe project to be built in Chile. "With the EVLA and ALMA, we will be able to study the structures and dynamics of similar systems in great detail," Walter said. J1148+5251 was discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, using a 2.5-meter optical telescope at Apache Point, NM, earlier this year. At a distance of more than 12.8 billion light-years, it is the most distant quasar yet found in the Universe. Followup observations at the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii showed a clear signature of light absorption indicating that the object is seen at the end of the reionization era. This signature, found using a spectroscope to analyze light from the object, is known as the Gunn-Peterson Effect, after James Gunn

  19. Phylogenetic Analyses of Quasars and Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Fraix-Burnet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic approaches have proven to be useful in astrophysics. We have recently published a Maximum Parsimony (or cladistics analysis on two samples of 215 and 85 low-z quasars (z < 0.7 which offer a satisfactory coverage of the Eigenvector 1-derived main sequence. Cladistics is not only able to group sources radiating at higher Eddington ratios, to separate radio-quiet (RQ and radio-loud (RL quasars and properly distinguishes core-dominated and lobe-dominated quasars, but it suggests a black hole mass threshold for powerful radio emission as already proposed elsewhere. An interesting interpretation from this work is that the phylogeny of quasars may be represented by the ontogeny of their central black hole, i.e. the increase of the black hole mass. However these exciting results are based on a small sample of low-z quasars, so that the work must be extended. We are here faced with two difficulties. The first one is the current lack of a larger sample with similar observables. The second one is the prohibitive computation time to perform a cladistic analysis on more that about one thousand objects. We show in this paper an experimental strategy on about 1,500 galaxies to get around this difficulty. Even if it not related to the quasar study, it is interesting by itself and opens new pathways to generalize the quasar findings.

  20. Performance of the SDSS-III MARVELS New Data Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Ge, J.; Thomas, N. B.; Shi, J.; Petersen, E.; Ouyang, Y.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Sithajan, S.

    2013-01-01

    As one of the four surveys in the SDSS-III program, MARVELS (Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey) had monitored over 3,300 stars during 2008-2012 with each observed about 27 times over a 2-year window. MARVELS has successfully produced over 20 brown dwarf candidates and several hundreds of binaries. However, the early data pipeline has large long term systematic errors and cannot reliably produce giant planet candidates. Our new MARVELS pipeline team, with the assistance of UF Department of Mathematics, has made great progress in dealing with the long-term systematic errors over the past 9 months. We redesigned the entire pre-processing procedure to handle various types of systematic effects caused by the instrument (such as trace, slant and distortion) and observation condition changes (such as illumination profile). We explored several advanced methods to precisely extract the RV signal from the processed spectra. We also developed a new simulation program to model all of these effects and used it to test the performance of our new pipeline. Our goal is to deliver a new pipeline to meet the survey baseline performance 10-35 m/s for the survey stars) by the end of 2012. We will report the fundamental performance of the pipeline and lessons learned from the pipeline development.

  1. Robotic Monitoring of Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Goicoechea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on the first observational phase of the Liverpool Quasar Lens Monitoring (LQLM project. This mainly consisted of the optical follow-up of three lensed quasars using the 2 m Liverpool Robotic Telescope. The observational subprogram started in January 2005 and was completed in July 2007. We also describe our photometric approaches (including two pipelines to extract accurate and reliable fluxes of images of lensed quasars, the performance of the telescope when taking modest nightly exposures of lens systems, and the main scientific results from the observed light curves. The LQLM archive and the current status of the project (second phase are also outlined.

  2. Milliarcsecond Imaging of the Radio Emission from the Quasar with the Most Massive Black Hole at Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ran; Momjian, Emmanuel; Carilli, Chris L.; Wu, Xue-Bing; Fan, Xiaohui; Walter, Fabian; Strauss, Michael A.; Wang, Feige; Jiang, Linhua

    2017-02-01

    We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the z = 6.326 quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is by far the most optically luminous and is a radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z > 6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas ×5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6 ± 9.0 μJy beam-1 and a total flux density of 88 ± 19 μJy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to (7.1 ± 3.5) mas × (3.1 ± 1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40 ± 20) pc × (18 ± 10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be TB = (1.6 ± 1.2) × 107 K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star-forming galaxies, indicating an active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest-redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example for studying the radio activity in optically luminous and radio-quiet AGNs in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.

  3. Milliarcsecond Imaging of the Radio Emission from the Quasar with the Most Massive Black Hole at Reionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ran; Wu, Xue-Bing; Jiang, Linhua [Kavli Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics at Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Momjian, Emmanuel; Carilli, Chris L. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Fan, Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Königsstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Strauss, Michael A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wang, Feige [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2017-02-01

    We report Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) observations of the 1.5 GHz radio continuum emission of the z = 6.326 quasar SDSS J010013.02+280225.8 (hereafter J0100+2802). J0100+2802 is by far the most optically luminous and is a radio-quiet quasar with the most massive black hole known at z > 6. The VLBA observations have a synthesized beam size of 12.10 mas ×5.36 mas (FWHM), and detected the radio continuum emission from this object with a peak surface brightness of 64.6 ± 9.0 μ Jy beam{sup −1} and a total flux density of 88 ± 19 μ Jy. The position of the radio peak is consistent with that from SDSS in the optical and Chandra in the X-ray. The radio source is marginally resolved by the VLBA observations. A 2D Gaussian fit to the image constrains the source size to (7.1 ± 3.5) mas × (3.1 ± 1.7) mas. This corresponds to a physical scale of (40 ± 20) pc × (18 ± 10) pc. We estimate the intrinsic brightness temperature of the VLBA source to be T {sub B} = (1.6 ± 1.2) × 10{sup 7} K. This is significantly higher than the maximum value in normal star-forming galaxies, indicating an active galactic nucleus (AGN) origin for the radio continuum emission. However, it is also significantly lower than the brightness temperatures found in highest-redshift radio-loud quasars. J0100+2802 provides a unique example for studying the radio activity in optically luminous and radio-quiet AGNs in the early universe. Further observations at multiple radio frequencies will accurately measure the spectral index and address the dominant radiation mechanism of the radio emission.

  4. The large-scale quasar-Lyman α forest cross-correlation from BOSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Arnau, Eduard [Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (IEEC/UB), Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Miralda-Escudé, Jordi, E-mail: font@physik.uzh.ch, E-mail: edu.arnau.lazaro@gmail.com, E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.edu [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); and others

    2013-05-01

    We measure the large-scale cross-correlation of quasars with the Lyα forest absorption in redshift space, using ∼ 60000 quasar spectra from Data Release 9 (DR9) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The cross-correlation is detected over a wide range of scales, up to comoving separations r of 80 h{sup −1}Mpc. For r > 15 h{sup −1}Mpc, we show that the cross-correlation is well fitted by the linear theory prediction for the mean overdensity around a quasar host halo in the standard ΛCDM model, with the redshift distortions indicative of gravitational evolution detected at high confidence. Using previous determinations of the Lyα forest bias factor obtained from the Lyα autocorrelation, we infer the quasar bias factor to be b{sub q} = 3.64{sup +0.13}{sub −0.15} at a mean redshift z = 2.38, in agreement with previous measurements from the quasar auto-correlation. We also obtain a new estimate of the Lyα forest redshift distortion factor, β{sub F} = 1.1±0.15, slightly larger than but consistent with the previous measurement from the Lyα forest autocorrelation. The simple linear model we use fails at separations r < 15h{sup −1}Mpc, and we show that this may reasonably be due to the enhanced ionization due to radiation from the quasars. We also provide the expected correction that the mass overdensity around the quasar implies for measurements of the ionizing radiation background from the line-of-sight proximity effect.

  5. Statistical Detection of the He ii Transverse Proximity Effect: Evidence for Sustained Quasar Activity for >25 Million Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias M. Schmidt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The reionization of helium at z ~ 3 is the final phase transition of the intergalactic medium and supposed to be driven purely by quasars. The He ii transverse proximity effect—enhanced He ii transmission in a background sightline caused by the ionizing radiation of a foreground quasar—therefore offers a unique opportunity to probe the morphology of He ii reionization and to investigate the emission properties of quasars, e.g., ionizing emissivity, lifetime and beaming geometry. We use the most-recent HST/COS far-UV dataset of 22 He ii absorption spectra and conduct our own dedicated optical spectroscopic survey to find foreground quasars around these He ii sightlines. Based on a set of 66 foreground quasars, we perform the first statistical analysis of the He ii transverse proximity effect. Despite a large object-to-object variance, our stacking analysis reveals an excess in the average He ii transmission near the foreground quasars at 3σ significance. This statistical evidence for the transverse proximity effect is corroborated by a clear dependence of the signal strength on the inferred He ii ionization rate at the background sightline. Our detection places, based on the transverse light crossing time, a geometrical limit on the quasar lifetime of tQ > 25 Myr. This evidence for sustained activity of luminous quasars is relevant for the morphology of H i and He ii reionization and helps to constrain AGN triggering mechanisms, accretion physics and models of black hole mass assembly. We show how future modeling of the transverse proximity effect can additionally constrain quasar emission geometries and e.g., clarify if the large observed object-to-object variance can be explained by current models of quasar obscuration.

  6. Twin Quasars Tango And It's No Mirage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    Scientists have unraveled a longstanding mystery about a rare double quasar system 11 billion light years from Earth using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. These "twin" quasars, previously thought to be an optical illusion, were instead probably created by merging galaxies and may have been more common in the dense universe soon after the Big Bang. "When galaxies interact or merge, they become more active and luminous and can excite quasar activity in their centers," said Paul Green of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Mass., who led the research team. "The quasars that make up these nearly identical twins appear to have been hatched in the same nest." The Chandra data show that the quasars - luminous galaxies powered by central supermassive black holes - are not mirror images caused by a cosmic phenomenon known as a "gravitational lens." Rather, these two quasars are distinct objects that were probably spawned when their host galaxies collided, energizing the flow of gas onto their central black holes. Quasar pairs that are seen close to one another on the sky and are at the same distance from Earth often turn out to be an illusion as part of a gravitationally lensed system. In these cases, the image of a single quasar has been split into two or more images as its light has been bent and focused on its way to Earth by the gravity of an intervening massive object like a galaxy, or a cluster of galaxies. Usually, the intervening mass shows up as a fainter galaxy or cluster of galaxies seen between or among the quasar images, confirming the cause of the illusion. The quasar pair Q2345+007 A, B was thought to be such an illusion because of the remarkably similar patterns of the light, or spectra, from the pair at both optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. Quasar Pair Q2345+007A,B X-ray/Optical Composite However, almost two decades after its discovery by optical astronomers, the identification of enough intervening material to "split" the

  7. Spectrophotometric Properties of E+A Galaxies in SDSS-IV MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Mariarosa; Dudley, Raymond; Edwards, Kay; Gonzalez, Andrea; Johnson, Amalya; Kerrison, Nicole; Melchert, Nancy; Ojanen, Winonah; Weaver, Olivia; Liu, Charles; SDSS-IV MaNGA

    2018-01-01

    Quenched post-starburst galaxies, or E+A galaxies, represent a unique and informative phase in the evolution of galaxies. We used a qualitative rubric-based methodology, informed by the literature, to manually select galaxies from the SDSS-IV IFU survey Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory (MaNGA) using the single-fiber spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8. Of the 2,812 galaxies observed so far in MaNGA, we found 39 galaxies meeting our criteria for E+A classification. Spectral energy distributions of these 39 galaxies from the far-UV to the mid-infrared demonstrate a heterogeneity in our sample emerging in the infrared, indicating many distinct paths to visually similar optical spectra. We used SDSS-IV MaNGA Pipe3D data products to analyze stellar population ages, and found that 34 galaxies exhibited stellar populations that were older at 1 effective radius than at the center of the galaxy. Given that our sample was manually chosen based on E+A markers in the single-fiber spectra aimed at the center of each galaxy, our E+A galaxies may have only experienced their significant starbursts in the central region, with a disk of quenched or quenching material further outward. This work was supported by grants AST-1460860 from the National Science Foundation and SDSS FAST/SSP-483 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  8. Satellite Galaxy Velocity Dispersions in the SDSS and Modified Gravity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Moffat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS provides data on several hundred thousand galaxies. The precise location of these galaxies in the sky, along with information about their luminosities and line-of-sight (Doppler velocities, allows one to construct a three-dimensional map of their location and estimate their line-of-sight velocity dispersion. This information, in principle, allows one to test dynamical gravity models, specifically models of satellite galaxy velocity dispersions near massive hosts. A key difficulty is the separation of true satellites from interlopers. We sidestep this problem by not attempting to derive satellite galaxy velocity dispersions from the data, but instead incorporate an interloper background into the mathematical models and compare the result to the actual data. We find that due to the presence of interlopers, it is not possible to exclude several gravitational theories on the basis of the SDSS data.

  9. The Milky Way Tomography with SDSS. 2. Stellar Metallicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivezic, Zeljko; /Washington U., Seattle; Sesar, Branimir; /Washington U., Seattle; Juric, Mario; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Bond, Nicholas; /Princeton U.; Dalcanton, Julianne; /Washington U., Seattle; Rockosi, Constance M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Yanny, Brian; /Fermilab; Newberg, Heidi J.; /Rensselaer Poly.; Beers, Timothy C.; /Michigan State U.; Prieto, Carlos Allende; /Texas U.; Wilhelm, Ron; /Texas Tech. /Michigan State U.

    2008-04-01

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is producing a massive spectroscopic database which already contains over 280,000 stellar spectra. Using effective temperature and metallicity derived from SDSS spectra for {approx}60,000 F and G type main sequence stars (0.2 < g-r < 0.6), we develop polynomial models, reminiscent of traditional methods based on the UBV photometry, for estimating these parameters from the SDSS u-g and g-r colors. These estimators reproduce SDSS spectroscopic parameters with a root-mean-square scatter of 100 K for effective temperature, and 0.2 dex for metallicity (limited by photometric errors), which are similar to random and systematic uncertainties in spectroscopic determinations. We apply this method to a photometric catalog of coadded SDSS observations and study the photometric metallicity distribution of {approx}200,000 F and G type stars observed in 300 deg{sup 2} of high Galactic latitude sky. These deeper (g < 20.5) and photometrically precise ({approx}0.01 mag) coadded data enable an accurate measurement of the unbiased metallicity distribution for a complete volume-limited sample of stars at distances between 500 pc and 8 kpc. The metallicity distribution can be exquisitely modeled using two components with a spatially varying number ratio, that correspond to disk and halo. The best-fit number ratio of the two components is consistent with that implied by the decomposition of stellar counts profiles into exponential disk and power-law halo components by Juric et al. (2008). The two components also possess the kinematics expected for disk and halo stars. The metallicity of the halo component can be modeled as a spatially invariant Gaussian distribution with a mean of [Fe/H] = -1.46 and a standard deviation of {approx}0.3 dex. The disk metallicity distribution is non-Gaussian, with a remarkably small scatter (rms {approx}0.16 dex) and the median smoothly decreasing with distance

  10. Expanding space, quasars and St. Augustine's fireworks

    CERN Document Server

    Chashchina, O I

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain time non-dilation allegedly observed in quasar light curves. The explanation is based on the assumption that quasar black holes are, in some sense, foreign for our Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe and do not participate in the Hubble flow. Although at first sight such a weird explanation requires unreasonably fine-tuned Big Bang initial conditions, we find a natural justification for it using the Milne cosmological model as an inspiration.

  11. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. IV. JOINT CONSTRAINTS ON THE CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM FROM ABSORPTION AND EMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Prochaska, J. Xavier, E-mail: xavier@ucolick.org [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-03-20

    We have constructed a sample of 29 close projected quasar pairs where the background quasar spectrum reveals absorption from optically thick H I gas associated with the foreground quasar. These unique sightlines allow us to study the quasar circumgalactic medium (CGM) in absorption and emission simultaneously, because the background quasar pinpoints large concentrations of gas where Ly{alpha} emission, resulting from quasar-powered fluorescence, resonant Ly{alpha} scattering, and/or cooling radiation, is expected. A sensitive search (1{sigma} surface-brightness limits of SB{sub Ly{alpha}}{approx_equal}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2} arcsec{sup -2}) for diffuse Ly{alpha} emission in the environments of the foreground (predominantly radio-quiet) quasars is conducted using Gemini/GMOS and Keck/LRIS slit spectroscopy. We fail to detect large-scale {approx}100 kpc Ly{alpha} emission, either at the location of the optically thick absorbers or in the foreground quasar halos, in all cases except a single system. We interpret these non-detections as evidence that the gas detected in absorption is shadowed from the quasar UV radiation due to obscuration effects, which are frequently invoked in unified models of active galactic nuclei. Small-scale R {approx}< 50 kpc extended Ly{alpha} nebulosities are detected in 34% of our sample, which are likely the high-redshift analogs of the extended emission-line regions (EELRs) commonly observed around low-redshift (z < 0.5) quasars. This may be fluorescent recombination radiation from a population of very dense clouds with a low covering fraction illuminated by the quasar. We also detect a compact high rest-frame equivalent width (W{sub Ly{alpha}} > 50 A) Ly{alpha}-emitter with luminosity L{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.1 {+-} 0.32 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41} erg s{sup -1} at small impact parameter R = 134 kpc from one foreground quasar, and argue that it is more likely to result from quasar-powered fluorescence

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Million Quasars (Milliquas) catalog (Flesch, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, E. W.

    2017-04-01

    This is a compendium of 452,794 type-I QSOs and AGN, largely complete from the literature to 21 June 2016. Also included are ~900K high-confidence quasar candidates from SDSS-based photometric quasar catalogs (of 90%+ likelihood) and from all-sky radio/X-ray associated objects (of 80%+ likelihood). Type-II and Bl Lac objects are also included, bringing the total count to 1,422,219. This version is the same as v4.8 but with these changes: (1) The 3XMM-DR6 X-ray source catalog (www.cosmos.esa.int/web/xmm-newton/xsa) has been added and new X-ray associations calculated. (2) Radio/X-ray data have been reprocessed in line with that of the new Million Optical Radio/X-ray (MORX) associations catalogue, in preparation. The catalog format is simple, each object is shown as one line bearing the J2000 coordinates, its original name, object class, red and blue optical magnitudes, PSF class, redshift, the citations for the name and redshift, plus up to four radio/X-ray identifiers where applicable. Questions/comments/praise/complaints may be directed to Eric Flesch at eric(at)flesch.org. (1 data file).

  13. SimBAL: A Spectral Synthesis Approach to Analyzing Broad Absorption Line Quasar Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terndrup, Donald M.; Leighly, Karen; Gallagher, Sarah; Richards, Gordon T.

    2017-01-01

    Broad Absorption Line quasars (BALQSOs) show blueshifted absorption lines in their rest-UV spectra, indicating powerful winds emerging from the central engine. These winds are essential part of quasars: they can carry away angular momentum and thus facilitate accretion through a disk, they can distribute chemically-enriched gas through the intergalactic medium, and they may inject kinetic energy to the host galaxy, influencing its evolution. The traditional method of analyzing BALQSO spectra involves measuring myriad absorption lines, computing the inferred ionic column densities in each feature, and comparing with the output of photonionization models. This method is inefficient and does not handle line blending well. We introduce SimBAL, a spectral synthesis fitting method for BALQSOs, which compares synthetic spectra created from photoionization model results with continuum-normalized observed spectra using Bayesian model calibration. We find that we can obtain an excellent fit to the UV to near-IR spectrum of the low-redshift BALQSO SDSS J0850+4451, including lines from diverse ionization states such as PV, CIII*, SIII, Lyalpha, NV, SiIV, CIV, MgII, and HeI*.

  14. A unique UV flare in the optical light curve of the quasar J004457.9+412344

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzidimitriou D.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We found that the nova candidate J004457.9+412344 is a radio-quiet quasar at z ∼ 2. Its optical long-term light curve, covering more than half a century, shows quasar typical flux variations superimposed by a spectacular single flare lasting more than one year (observer frame. We could not find comparable light curves among the several thousand catalogued radio-quiet quasars in the stripe 82 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The decreasing part of the flare light curve roughly follows a power law t−5/3. The quasar spectrum, the total energy of the flare, and the decline of the light curve are consistent with the tidal disruption of a ∼10 Mʘ giant star by a supermassive black hole of a few 108 Mʘ. We argue that the alternative explanation by gravitational microlensing is less likely, though it cannot be definitely excluded.

  15. Reverberation Mapping Quasars: X-ray and broadband SED properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merloni, A.; Simm, T.; Nandra, K.; Green, P.

    2017-10-01

    An ongoing SDSS reverberation mapping (RM) program (Shen et al. 2015) provides significantly improved black hole mass estimates for a large sample of QSOs out to redshift ˜3 in a single 7 square degree field. A recently approved large XMM-Newton program will complete the X-ray coverage of the field, contributing to a unique legacy sample of hundreds of QSOs with accurately measured bolometric luminosity, spectral energy distributions, Eddington ratios and variability properties. As illustration, we present here the X-ray spectral properties of the RM-QSOs derived from the analysis of all existing XMM-Newton and deep Chandra (AEGIS field) observations of the field. Taking advantage of the unprecedented multi-band, multi-epoch imaging and spectroscopy provided by the SDSS-RM campaign, the Pan-STARRS1 medium deep survey and the GALEX time domain survey we study in detail their instantaneous broadband spectral energy distributions to obtain accurate measures of the bolometric luminosity and to test accretion disk models. This data set allows us to dissect correlations between optical/X-ray spectral properties with black hole mass and Eddington ratio, as well as to constrain evolution of the radiative efficiency providing a first handle on black hole spin evolution in a large, statistical sample of AGN.

  16. Gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310: microlensing factory and time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea, L. J.; Shalyapin, V. N.

    2016-12-01

    We spectroscopically re-observed the gravitational lens system SDSS J1339+1310 using OSIRIS on the GTC. We also monitored the r-band variability of the two quasar images (A and B) with the LT over 143 epochs in the period 2009-2016. These new data in both the wavelength and time domains have confirmed that the system is an unusual microlensing factory. The C iv emission line is remarkably microlensed, since the microlensing magnification of B relative to that for A, μBA, reaches a value of 1.4 ( 0.4 mag) for its core. Moreover, the B image shows a red wing enhancement of C iv flux (relative to A), and μBA = 2 (0.75 mag) for the C iv broad-line emission. Regarding the nuclear continuum, we find a chromatic behaviour of μBA, which roughly varies from 5 (1.75 mag) at 7000 Å to 6 (1.95 mag) at 4000 Å. We also detect significant microlensing variability in the r band, and this includes a number of microlensing events on timescales of 50-100 d. Fortunately, the presence of an intrinsic 0.7 mag dip in the light curves of A and B, permitted us to measure the time delay between both quasar images. This delay is ΔtAB = 47 d (1σ confidence interval; A is leading), in good agreement with predictions of lens models. Tables 1-3 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A77

  17. QUASARS PROBING QUASARS. VI. EXCESS H I ABSORPTION WITHIN ONE PROPER Mpc OF z ∼ 2 QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lau, Marie Wingyee [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Hennawi, Joseph F.; Lee, Khee-Gan; Myers, Adam; Rubin, Kate H. R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Djorgovski, S. G. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ellison, Sara L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Finnerty Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8P 1A1 (Canada); Martin, Crystal L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-10-20

    With close pairs of quasars at different redshifts, a background quasar sightline can be used to study a foreground quasar's environment in absorption. We use a sample of 650 projected quasar pairs to study the H I Lyα absorption transverse to luminous, z ∼ 2 quasars at proper separations of 30 kpc < R < 1 Mpc. In contrast to measurements along the line-of-sight, regions transverse to quasars exhibit enhanced H I Lyα absorption and a larger variance than the ambient intergalactic medium, with increasing absorption and variance toward smaller scales. Analysis of composite spectra reveals excess absorption characterized by a Lyα equivalent width profile W = 2.3 Å (R /100 kpc){sup –0.46}. We also observe a high (≅ 60%) covering factor of strong, optically thick H I absorbers (H I column N{sub H{sub I}}>10{sup 17.3} cm{sup -2}) at separations R < 200 kpc, which decreases to ∼20% at R ≅ 1 Mpc, but still represents a significant excess over the cosmic average. This excess of optically thick absorption can be described by a quasar-absorber cross-correlation function ξ{sub QA}(r) = (r/r{sub 0}){sup γ} with a large correlation length r{sub 0} = 12.5{sup +2.7}{sub -1.4} h{sup -1} Mpc (comoving) and γ=1.68{sup +0.14}{sub -0.30}. The H I absorption measured around quasars exceeds that of any previously studied population, consistent with quasars being hosted by massive dark matter halos M{sub halo} ≈ 10{sup 12.5} M{sub ☉} at z ∼ 2.5. The environments of these massive halos are highly biased toward producing optically thick gas, and may even dominate the cosmic abundance of Lyman limit systems and hence the intergalactic opacity to ionizing photons at z ∼ 2.5. The anisotropic absorption around quasars implies the transverse direction is much less likely to be illuminated by ionizing radiation than the line-of-sight.

  18. X-ray Investigations of Quasars with XMM-Newton: Outflow Energetics and High- Redshift Intrinsic Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) are among the most extreme physical environments in the Universe, and it now appears that feedback from AGN winds and jets plays a critical role in the evolution of typical massive galaxies and larger-scale structures. This proposal requests funding to support work on two XMM-Newton guest investigator projects that have already won competitive observing time to study quasars, the most luminous examples of AGNs. The first project is an approved XMM-Newton Large Program that won 350 ks of priority A observation time in AO-9. This project involves an ambitious long-look observation that will obtain the first high-quality grating spectroscopy of a mini-Broad Absorption Line (mini-BAL) quasar, with the aim of assessing the kinetic luminosity of its outflow (the target is PG 1114+445). Grating spectroscopy of a small sample of local Seyfert galaxies has led to highly regarded accurate determinations of their wind properties. The planned extension of grating spectroscopy to the first mini-BAL quasar level AGN will determine if the outflow becomes as powerful as proposed in current AGN feedback scenarios. The 375,000 count EPIC CCD spectra from this long-look will enable unprecedented complementary studies of high-energy absorption features and iron K emission. The data for this project will be gathered over the coming year starting in 2010 May. The second project is an investigation of X-ray absorption in the most-distant radio-loud quasars. Here we are extending our systematic X-ray studies of the most-distant known quasars with XMM-Newton spectroscopy of typical radio-loud quasars (RLQs) at z ~ 4- 5. Our targets are more representative of the overall RLQ population than the small number of highly radio-loud blazars studied at these redshifts. We will search for X-ray absorption in the quasars' environments to determine if it is common among typical RLQs at the highest redshifts. We will also measure X-ray continuum shapes and search for

  19. AN APPARENT REDSHIFT DEPENDENCE OF QUASAR CONTINUUM: IMPLICATION FOR COSMIC DUST EXTINCTION?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Xiaoyi; Shen, Shiyin; Shao, Zhengyi; Yin, Jun, E-mail: ssy@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the luminosity and redshift dependence of the quasar continuum by means of the composite spectrum using a large non-BAL radio-quiet quasar sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Quasar continuum slopes in the UV-Opt band are measured at two different wavelength ranges, i.e., α{sub ν12} (1000 ∼ 2000 Å) and α{sub ν24} (2000 ∼ 4000 Å) derived from a power-law fitting. Generally, the UV spectra slope becomes harder (higher α{sub ν}) toward higher bolometric luminosity. On the other hand, when quasars are further grouped into luminosity bins, we find that both α{sub ν12} and α{sub ν24} show significant anti-correlations with redshift (i.e., the quasar continuum becomes redder toward higher redshift). We suggest that the cosmic dust extinction is very likely the cause of this observed α{sub ν} − z relation. We build a simple cosmic dust extinction model to quantify the observed reddening tendency and find an effective dust density nσ{sub v} ∼ 10{sup −5}h Mpc{sup −1} at z < 1.5. The other possibilities that could produce such a reddening effect have also been discussed.

  20. Understanding extreme quasar optical variability with CRTS - I. Major AGN flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, Andrew J.; Stern, Daniel; Mahabal, Ashish A.; Glikman, Eilat; Larson, Steve; Christensen, Eric

    2017-10-01

    There is a large degree of variety in the optical variability of quasars and it is unclear whether this is all attributable to a single (set of) physical mechanism(s). We present the results of a systematic search for major flares in active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey as part of a broader study into extreme quasar variability. Such flares are defined in a quantitative manner as being atop of the normal, stochastic variability of quasars. We have identified 51 events from over 900 000 known quasars and high-probability quasar candidates, typically lasting 900 d and with a median peak amplitude of Δm = 1.25 mag. Characterizing the flare profile with a Weibull distribution, we find that nine of the sources are well described by a single-point single-lens model. This supports the proposal by Lawrence et al. that microlensing is a plausible physical mechanism for extreme variability. However, we attribute the majority of our events to explosive stellar-related activity in the accretion disc: superluminous supernovae, tidal disruption events and mergers of stellar mass black holes.

  1. Discovery of a z = 0.65 post-starburst BAL quasar in the DES supernova fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mudd, Dale; Martini, Paul; Tie, Suk Sien; Lidman, Chris; McMahon, Richard; Banerji, Manda; Davis, Tamara; Peterson, Bradley; Sharp, Rob; Seymour, Nicholas; Childress, Michael; Lewis, Geraint; Tucker, Brad; Yuan, Fang; Abbot, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe; Allam, Sahar; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Camero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Carretero, Jorge; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, Thomas; Eifler, Tim; Finley, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Glazebrook, Karl; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; Gutierrez, Gaston; Hinton, Samuel; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolav; Macaulay, Edward; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Miquel, Ramon; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres; Riel, Kevin; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basillio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, Robert C.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly; Tarle, Gregory; Thomas, Daniel; Uddin, Syed; Walker, Alistair; Zhang, Bonnie

    2017-03-23

    We present the discovery of a z=0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad FeII (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.

  2. Discovery of a z = 0.65 post-starburst BAL quasar in the DES supernova fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Dale; Martini, Paul; Tie, Suk Sien; Lidman, Chris; McMahon, Richard; Banerji, Manda; Davis, Tamara; Peterson, Bradley; Sharp, Rob; Seymour, Nicholas; Childress, Michael; Lewis, Geraint; Tucker, Brad; Yuan, Fang; Abbot, Tim; Abdalla, Filipe; Allam, Sahar; Benoit-Lévy, Aurélien; Bertin, Emmanuel; Brooks, David; Camero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, Matias; Carretero, Jorge; da Costa, Luiz N.; Desai, Shantanu; Diehl, Thomas; Eifler, Tim; Finley, David; Flaugher, Brenna; Glazebrook, Karl; Gruen, Daniel; Gruendl, Robert; Gutierrez, Gaston; Hinton, Samuel; Honscheid, Klaus; James, David; Kuehn, Kyler; Kuropatkin, Nikolav; Macaulay, Edward; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Miquel, Ramon; Ogando, Ricardo; Plazas, Andres; Riel, Kevin; Sanchez, Eusebio; Santiago, Basillio; Schubnell, Michael; Sevilla-Noarbe, Ignacio; Smith, Robert C.; Soares-Santos, Marcelle; Sobreira, Flavia; Suchyta, Eric; Swanson, Molly; Tarle, Gregory; Thomas, Daniel; Uddin, Syed; Walker, Alistair; Zhang, Bonnie

    2017-07-01

    We present the discovery of a z = 0.65 low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) quasar in a post-starburst galaxy in data from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) and spectroscopy from the Australian Dark Energy Survey (OzDES). LoBAL quasars are a minority of all BALs, and rarer still is that this object also exhibits broad Fe II (an FeLoBAL) and Balmer absorption. This is the first BAL quasar that has signatures of recently truncated star formation, which we estimate ended about 40 Myr ago. The characteristic signatures of an FeLoBAL require high column densities, which could be explained by the emergence of a young quasar from an early, dust-enshrouded phase, or by clouds compressed by a blast wave. The age of the starburst component is comparable to estimates of the lifetime of quasars, so if we assume the quasar activity is related to the truncation of the star formation, this object is better explained by the blast wave scenario.

  3. Comparing pymorph and SDSS photometry - II. The differences are more than semantics and are not dominated by intracluster light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, M.; Fischer, J.-L.; Sheth, R. K.; Meert, A.; Huertas-Company, M.; Shankar, F.; Vikram, V.

    2017-07-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) pipeline photometry underestimates the brightnesses of the most luminous galaxies. This is mainly because (I) the SDSS overestimates the sky background, and (II) single-component or two-component Sérsic-based models better fit the surface brightness profile of galaxies, especially at high luminosities, than the de Vaucouleurs model used by the SDSS pipeline. We use the pymorph photometric reductions to isolate effect (II) and show that it is the same in the full sample as in small group environments, and for satellites in the most massive clusters as well. None of these are expected to be significantly affected by intracluster light (ICL). We only see an additional effect for centrals in the most massive haloes, but we argue that even this is not dominated by ICL. Hence, for the vast majority of galaxies, the differences between pymorph and SDSS pipeline photometry cannot be ascribed to the semantics of whether or not one includes the ICL when describing the stellar mass of massive galaxies. Rather, they likely reflect differences in star formation or assembly histories. Failure to account for the SDSS underestimate has significantly biased most previous estimates of the SDSS luminosity and stellar mass functions, and therefore halo model estimates of the z ˜ 0.1 relation between the mass of a halo and that of the galaxy at its centre. We also show that when one studies correlations, at fixed group mass, with a quantity that was not used to define the groups, then selection effects appear. We show why such effects arise and should not be mistaken for physical effects.

  4. Spatially Resolved Patchy Ly α Emission within the Central Kiloparsec of a Strongly Lensed Quasar Host Galaxy at z = 2.8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Bordoloi, Rongmon [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Sharon, Keren; Runnoe, Jessie; Johnson, Traci; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 1085 S. University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Acharyya, Ayan; Bian, Fuyan; Kewley, Lisa [RSAA, Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Gladders, Michael D. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Rigby, Jane R. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dahle, Hakon [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029, Blindern, NO-0315 Oslo (Norway); Florian, Michael, E-mail: mbayliss@mit.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2017-08-20

    We report the detection of extended Ly α emission from the host galaxy of SDSS J2222+2745, a strongly lensed quasar at z = 2.8. Spectroscopic follow-up clearly reveals extended Ly α in emission between two images of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We reconstruct the lensed quasar host galaxy in the source plane by applying a strong lens model to HST imaging and resolve spatial scales as small as ∼200 pc. In the source plane, we recover the host galaxy morphology to within a few hundred parsecs of the central AGN and map the extended Ly α emission to its physical origin on one side of the host galaxy at radii ∼0.5–2 kpc from the central AGN. There are clear morphological differences between the Ly α and rest-frame ultraviolet stellar continuum emission from the quasar host galaxy. Furthermore, the relative velocity profiles of quasar Ly α , host galaxy Ly α , and metal lines in outflowing gas reveal differences in the absorbing material affecting the AGN and host galaxy. These data indicate the presence of patchy local intervening gas in front of the central quasar and its host galaxy. This interpretation is consistent with the central luminous quasar being obscured across a substantial fraction of its surrounding solid angle, resulting in strong anisotropy in the exposure of the host galaxy to ionizing radiation from the AGN. This work demonstrates the power of strong-lensing-assisted studies to probe spatial scales that are currently inaccessible by other means.

  5. Spatially Resolved Patchy Lyα Emission within the Central Kiloparsec of a Strongly Lensed Quasar Host Galaxy at z = 2.8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Matthew B.; Sharon, Keren; Acharyya, Ayan; Gladders, Michael D.; Rigby, Jane R.; Bian, Fuyan; Bordoloi, Rongmon; Runnoe, Jessie; Dahle, Hakon; Kewley, Lisa; Florian, Michael; Johnson, Traci; Paterno-Mahler, Rachel

    2017-08-01

    We report the detection of extended Lyα emission from the host galaxy of SDSS J2222+2745, a strongly lensed quasar at z = 2.8. Spectroscopic follow-up clearly reveals extended Lyα in emission between two images of the central active galactic nucleus (AGN). We reconstruct the lensed quasar host galaxy in the source plane by applying a strong lens model to HST imaging and resolve spatial scales as small as ˜200 pc. In the source plane, we recover the host galaxy morphology to within a few hundred parsecs of the central AGN and map the extended Lyα emission to its physical origin on one side of the host galaxy at radii ˜0.5-2 kpc from the central AGN. There are clear morphological differences between the Lyα and rest-frame ultraviolet stellar continuum emission from the quasar host galaxy. Furthermore, the relative velocity profiles of quasar Lyα, host galaxy Lyα, and metal lines in outflowing gas reveal differences in the absorbing material affecting the AGN and host galaxy. These data indicate the presence of patchy local intervening gas in front of the central quasar and its host galaxy. This interpretation is consistent with the central luminous quasar being obscured across a substantial fraction of its surrounding solid angle, resulting in strong anisotropy in the exposure of the host galaxy to ionizing radiation from the AGN. This work demonstrates the power of strong-lensing-assisted studies to probe spatial scales that are currently inaccessible by other means.

  6. Mining the SDSS SkyServer SQL queries log

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Vitor M.; Santos, Rafael; Raddick, Jordan; Thakar, Ani

    2016-05-01

    SkyServer, the Internet portal for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) astronomic catalog, provides a set of tools that allows data access for astronomers and scientific education. One of SkyServer data access interfaces allows users to enter ad-hoc SQL statements to query the catalog. SkyServer also presents some template queries that can be used as basis for more complex queries. This interface has logged over 330 million queries submitted since 2001. It is expected that analysis of this data can be used to investigate usage patterns, identify potential new classes of queries, find similar queries, etc. and to shed some light on how users interact with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and how scientists have adopted the new paradigm of e-Science, which could in turn lead to enhancements on the user interfaces and experience in general. In this paper we review some approaches to SQL query mining, apply the traditional techniques used in the literature and present lessons learned, namely, that the general text mining approach for feature extraction and clustering does not seem to be adequate for this type of data, and, most importantly, we find that this type of analysis can result in very different queries being clustered together.

  7. Orbital periods of cataclysmic variables identified by the SDSS. VII. Four new eclipsing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southworth, J.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Pyrzas, S.

    2010-02-01

    We present photometry of nine cataclysmic variable stars identified by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, aimed at measuring the orbital periods of these systems. Four of these objects show deep eclipses, from which we measure their orbital periods. The light curves of three of the eclipsing systems are also analysed using the lcurve code, and their mass ratios and orbital inclinations determined. SDSS J075059.97+141150.1 has an orbital period of 134.1564 ± 0.0008 min, making it a useful object with which to investigate the evolutionary processes of cataclysmic variables. SDSS J092444.48+080150.9 has a period of 131.2432 ± 0.0014 min and is probably magnetic. The white dwarf ingress and egress phases are very deep and short, and there is no clear evidence that this object has an accretion disc. SDSS J115207.00+404947.8 and SDSS J152419.33+220920.1 are nearly identical twins, with periods of 97.5 ± 0.4 and 93.6 ± 0.5 min and mass ratios of 0.14 ± 0.03 and 0.17 ± 0.03, respectively. Their eclipses have well-defined white dwarf and bright spot ingress and egress features, making them excellent candidates for detailed study. All four of the orbital periods presented here are shorter than the 2-3 h period gap observed in the known population of cataclysmic variables. The reduced observational data presented in this work are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/510/A100 and at http://www.astro.keele.ac.uk/ jkt/.

  8. Highly Accreting Quasars at High Redshift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L. Martínez-Aldama

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present preliminary results of a spectroscopic analysis for a sample of type 1 highly accreting quasars (L/LEdd ~ 1.0 at high redshift, z ~2–3. The quasars were observed with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC 10.4 m telescope located at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos in La Palma. The highly accreting quasars were identified using the 4D Eigenvector 1 formalism, which is able to organize type 1 quasars over a broad range of redshift and luminosity. The kinematic and physical properties of the broad line region have been derived by fitting the profiles of strong UV emission lines such as Aliiiλ1860, Siiii]λ1892 and Ciii]λ1909. The majority of our sources show strong blueshifts in the high-ionization lines and high Eddington ratios which are related with the productions of outflows. The importance of highly accreting quasars goes beyond a detailed understanding of their physics: their extreme Eddington ratio makes them candidates standard candles for cosmological studies.

  9. Update on the SDSS-III MARVELS data pipeline development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Ge, J.; Thomas, N. B.; Petersen, E.; Wang, J.; Ma, B.; Sithajan, S.; Shi, J.; Ouyang, Y.; Chen, Y.

    2014-01-01

    MARVELS (Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey), as one of the four surveys in the SDSS-III program, has monitored over 3,300 stars during 2008-2012, with each being visited an average of 26 times over a 2-year window. Although the early data pipeline was able to detect over 20 brown dwarf candidates and several hundreds of binaries, no giant planet candidates have been reliably identified due to its large systematic errors. Learning from past data pipeline lessons, we re-designed the entire pipeline to handle various types of systematic effects caused by the instrument (such as trace, slant, distortion, drifts and dispersion) and observation condition changes (such as illumination profile and continuum). We also introduced several advanced methods to precisely extract the RV signals. To date, we have achieved a long term RMS RV measurement error of 14 m/s for HIP-14810 (one of our reference stars) after removal of the known planet signal based on previous HIRES RV measurement. This new 1-D data pipeline has been used to robustly identify four giant planet candidates within the small fraction of the survey data that has been processed (Thomas et al. this meeting). The team is currently working hard to optimize the pipeline, especially the 2-D interference-fringe RV extraction, where early results show a 1.5 times improvement over the 1-D data pipeline. We are quickly approaching the survey baseline performance requirement of 10-35 m/s RMS for 8-12 solar type stars. With this fine-tuned pipeline and the soon to be processed plates of data, we expect to discover many more giant planet candidates and make a large statistical impact to the exoplanet study.

  10. Evidence for the Thermal Sunyaev Zeldovich Effect Associated with Quasar Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crichton, Devin; Gralla, Megan B.; Hall, Kirsten; Marriage, Tobias A.; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Battaglia, Nick; Bond, J. Richard; Devlin, Mark J.; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; hide

    2016-01-01

    Using a radio-quiet subsample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectroscopic quasar catalogue, spanning redshifts 0.5-3.5, we derive the mean millimetre and far-infrared quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) via a stacking analysis of Atacama Cosmology Telescope and Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver data. We constrain the form of the far-infrared emission and find 3 sigma-4 sigma evidence for the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect, characteristic of a hot ionized gas component with thermal energy (6.2 plus or minus 1.7) × 10 (exp 60) erg. This amount of thermal energy is greater than expected assuming only hot gas in virial equilibrium with the dark matter haloes of (1-5) × 10(exp 12) h(exp -1) solar mass that these systems are expected to occupy, though the highest quasar mass estimates found in the literature could explain a large fraction of this energy. Our measurements are consistent with quasars depositing up to (14.5 +/- 3.3)tau (sub 8)(exp -1) per cent of their radiative energy into their circumgalactic environment if their typical period of quasar activity is tau(sub 8) x 108 yr. For high quasar host masses, approximately 10(exp 13) h(exp -1) solar mass, this percentage will be reduced. Furthermore, the uncertainty on this percentage is only statistical and additional systematic uncertainties enter at the 40 per cent level. The SEDs are dust dominated in all bands and we consider various models for dust emission. While sufficiently complex dust models can obviate the SZ effect, the SZ interpretation remains favoured at the 3 sigma-4 sigma level for most models.

  11. New Constraints on the Hard Ionizing Photon Budget and the Lifetime and Obscuration of Quasars During the Epoch of Helium Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Frederick

    2017-08-01

    The epoch of helium reionization was a major milestone in the history of the Universe, a direct consequence of supermassive black hole growth and the cumulative output of hard ionizing photons by quasars. Our observations of the He II Ly-alpha forest with HST/COS in 26 quasar sightlines show strong fluctuations at z 3, consistent with our state-of-the-art simulations of the He II reionization epoch. However, our detection of transmission at z > 3.5 is inconsistent with all He II reionization models. Resolving this puzzle requires an extensive parameter study of He II reionization, which we propose to carry out using our fast, efficient simulations. The He II Ly-alpha forest is also sensitive to the effect of quasar radiation illuminating the intergalactic medium, known as the proximity effect. We have performed an ambitious ground-based imaging and spectroscopic survey for z 3 quasars in the foreground of HeII sightlines observed with HST/COS, and statistically detected the transverse proximity effect for the first time. The strength of this effect depends on both the quasar lifetime and the opening angle of quasar emission (or the fraction of obscured quasars), and we propose to use our He II reionization simulations to interpret this new measurement. Finally, the line-of-sight proximity effect due to the background quasar provides an independent constraint on the quasar lifetime. Our preliminary comparison of He II spectra to our radiative transfer simulations suggests a quasar lifetime > 10 Myr. We propose to use our He II reionization simulations to model this diverse set of observations and fully capitalize on the far-UV legacy of HST.

  12. Probing Extragalactic Planets Using Quasar Microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xinyu; Guerras, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    Previously, planets have been detected only in the Milky Way galaxy. Here, we show that quasar microlensing provides a means to probe extragalactic planets in the lens galaxy, by studying the microlensing properties of emission close to the event horizon of the supermassive black hole of the background quasar, using the current generation telescopes. We show that a population of unbound planets between stars with masses ranging from Moon to Jupiter masses is needed to explain the frequent Fe Kα line energy shifts observed in the gravitationally lensed quasar RXJ 1131–1231 at a lens redshift of z = 0.295 or 3.8 billion lt-yr away. We constrain the planet mass-fraction to be larger than 0.0001 of the halo mass, which is equivalent to 2000 objects ranging from Moon to Jupiter mass per main-sequence star.

  13. Quasar Elemental Abundances at High Redshifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, M.; Hamann, F.; Shields, J. C.

    2003-01-01

    We examine rest-frame ultraviolet spectra of 70 high redshift quasars (z>3.5) to study the chemical enrichment history of the gas closely related to the quasars, and thereby estimate the epoch of first star formation. The fluxes of several ultraviolet emission lines were investigated within...... scale of t_evol = 0.5 - 0.8 Gyrs for the chemical enrichment of the gas, the first major star formation for quasars with z>=4 should have started at a redshift of z_f = 6 - 8, corresponding to an age of the universe of several 10^8 yrs (H_o = 65 km/s/Mpc, Omega_M = 0.3, Omega_Lambda = 0.7). We note...

  14. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG RED QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrutia, Tanya [Leibniz Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Lacy, Mark [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Spoon, Henrik [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, 219 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Glikman, Eilat [Department of Physics, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Petric, Andreea [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schulz, Bernhard, E-mail: turrutia@aip.de, E-mail: mlacy@nrao.edu, E-mail: spoon@isc.astro.cornell.edu, E-mail: eilat.glikman@yale.edu, E-mail: ap@astro.caltech.edu, E-mail: bschulz@ipac.caltech.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MC 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We present mid-infrared spectra and photometry of 13 redshift 0.4 < z < 1 dust reddened quasars obtained with Spitzer IRS and MIPS. We compare properties derived from their infrared spectral energy distributions (intrinsic active galactic nucleus (AGN) luminosity and far-infrared luminosity from star formation) to the host luminosities and morphologies from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, and black hole masses estimated from optical and/or near-infrared spectroscopy. Our results are broadly consistent with models in which most dust reddened quasars are an intermediate phase between a merger-driven starburst triggering a completely obscured AGN, and a normal, unreddened quasar. We find that many of our objects have high accretion rates, close to the Eddington limit. These objects tend to fall below the black hole mass-bulge luminosity relation as defined by local galaxies, whereas most of our low accretion rate objects are slightly above the local relation, as typical for normal quasars at these redshifts. Our observations are therefore most readily interpreted in a scenario in which galaxy stellar mass growth occurs first by about a factor of three in each merger/starburst event, followed sometime later by black hole growth by a similar amount. We do not, however, see any direct evidence for quasar feedback affecting star formation in our objects, for example, in the form of a relationship between accretion rate and star formation. Five of our objects, however, do show evidence for outflows in the [O III]5007 A emission line profile, suggesting that the quasar activity is driving thermal winds in at least some members of our sample.

  15. Post common envelope binaries from SDSS. XII. The orbital period distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Schreiber, M. R.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Schwope, A. D.; Southworth, J.; Aungwerojwit, A.; Bothe, M.; Davis, P. J.; Kolb, U.; Müller, M.; Papadaki, C.; Pyrzas, S.; Rabitz, A.; Rodríguez-Gil, P.; Schmidtobreick, L.; Schwarz, R.; Tappert, C.; Toloza, O.; Vogel, J.; Zorotovic, M.

    2011-12-01

    Context. The complexity of the common-envelope phase and of magnetic stellar wind braking currently limits our understanding of close binary evolution. Because of their intrinsically simple structure, observational population studies of white dwarf plus main sequence (WDMS) binaries can potentially test theoretical models and constrain their parameters. Aims: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) has provided a large and homogeneously selected sample of WDMS binaries, which we characterise in terms of orbital and stellar parameters. Methods: We have obtained radial velocity information for 385 WDMS binaries from follow-up spectroscopy and for an additional 861 systems from the SDSS subspectra. Radial velocity variations identify 191 of these WDMS binaries as post common-envelope binaries (PCEBs). Orbital periods of 58 PCEBs were subsequently measured, predominantly from time-resolved spectroscopy, bringing the total number of SDSS PCEBs with orbital parameters to 79. Observational biases inherent to this PCEB sample were evaluated through extensive Monte Carlo simulations. Results: We find that 21-24% of all SDSS WDMS binaries have undergone common-envelope evolution, which is in good agreement with published binary population models and high-resolution HST imaging of WDMS binaries unresolved from the ground. The bias-corrected orbital period distribution of PCEBs ranges from 1.9 h to 4.3 d and approximately follows a normal distribution in log (Porb), peaking at ~10.3 h. There is no observational evidence for a significant population of PCEBs with periods in the range of days to weeks. Conclusions: The large and homogeneous sample of SDSS WDMS binaries provides the means to test fundamental predictions of binary population models, hence to observationally constrain the evolution of all close compact binaries. Figures 3-6, Tables 1, 5 and Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgFull Tables 3, 4, and 6 are only available at the CDS via

  16. A Time-domain Analysis of Nitrogen-rich Quasars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmann, Alexander; Liu, Xin; Shen, Yue; Jiang, Linhua

    2018-01-01

    A small population of quasars exhibit anomalously high nitrogen-to-carbon ratios (N/C) in their emission lines. These “nitrogen-rich” (N-rich) quasars have been difficult to explain. Few of the possible mechanism are natural, since stellar populations with abnormally high metallicities are required to produce an N-rich interstellar medium. N-rich quasars are also more likely to be “radio-loud” than average quasars, which is difficult to explain by invoking higher metallicity alone. Recently, tidal disruption events (TDEs) have been proposed as a mechanism for N-rich quasars. Such a TDE would occur between a supersolar mass star and a supermassive black hole. The CNO cycle creates a surplus of N-rich and carbon-deficient material that could naturally explain the N/C observed in N-rich quasars. The TDE hypothesis explains N-rich quasars without requiring extremely exotic stellar populations. A testable difference differentiating the TDE explanation and exotic stellar population scenarios is that TDEs do not produce enough N-rich material to pollute the quasar environment for extended periods of time, in which case N-rich phenomena in quasars would be transient. By analyzing changes in nitrogen and carbon line widths in time-separated spectra of N-rich quasars, we have studied nitrogen abundance in quasars which had previously been identified as nitrogen rich. We have found that over time-frames of greater than one year in the quasar rest frame, nitrogen abundance tends to systematically decrease. The observed decrease is larger than our estimate of the effects of noise based on spectra separated by smaller time frames. Additionally, x-ray observations of one N-rich quasar have demonstrated that its x-ray emission is an outlier among the quasar population, but similar to confirmed TDEs.

  17. The Fourteenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey and from the second phase of the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfathi, Bela; Aguado, D. S.; Aguilar, Gabriela; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Almeida, Andres; Ananna, Tonima Tasnim; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Andrews, Brett H.; Anguiano, Borja; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Argudo-Fernandez, Maria; Armengaud, Eric; Ata, Metin; Aubourg, Eric

    2017-01-01

    The fourth generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) has been in operation since July 2014. This paper describes the second data release from this phase, and the fourteenth from SDSS overall (making this, Data Release Fourteen or DR14). This release makes public data taken by SDSS-IV in its first two years of operation (July 2014-2016). Like all previous SDSS releases, DR14 is cumulative, including the most recent reductions and calibrations of all data taken by SDSS since the firs...

  18. Mean and extreme radio properties of quasars and the origin of radio emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Rachael M.; Richards, Gordon T. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the evolution of both the radio-loud fraction (RLF) and (using stacking analysis) the mean radio loudness of quasars. We consider how these properties evolve as a function of redshift and luminosity, black hole (BH) mass and accretion rate, and parameters related to the dominance of a wind in the broad emission-line region. We match the FIRST source catalog to samples of luminous quasars (both spectroscopic and photometric), primarily from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. After accounting for catastrophic errors in BH mass estimates at high redshift, we find that both the RLF and the mean radio luminosity increase for increasing BH mass and decreasing accretion rate. Similarly, both the RLF and mean radio loudness increase for quasars that are argued to have weaker radiation line driven wind components of the broad emission-line region. In agreement with past work, we find that the RLF increases with increasing optical/UV luminosity and decreasing redshift, while the mean radio loudness evolves in the exact opposite manner. This difference in behavior between the mean radio loudness and the RLF in L−z may indicate selection effects that bias our understanding of the evolution of the RLF; deeper surveys in the optical and radio are needed to resolve this discrepancy. Finally, we argue that radio-loud (RL) and radio-quiet (RQ) quasars may be parallel sequences, but where only RQ quasars at one extreme of the distribution are likely to become RL, possibly through slight differences in spin and/or merger history.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia-PS1-SDSS (GPS1) proper motion catalog (Tian+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H.-J.; Gupta, P.; Sesar, B.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F.; Liu, C.; Goldman, B.; Platais, I.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Waters, C. Z.

    2018-02-01

    In order to construct proper motions, we analyze and model catalog positions from four different imaging surveys, as discussed below. Gaia DR1 is based on observations collected between 2014 July 25 and 2015 September 16. PS1 observations were collected between 2010 and 2014. The SDSS DR9 data used here were obtained in the years between 2000 and 2008. The images from 2MASS were taken between 1997 and 2001. (1 data file).

  20. Cosmological and astrophysical parameters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey flux power spectrum and hydrodynamical simulations of the Lyman α forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viel, Matteo; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2006-01-01

    The flux power spectrum of the Lyman α forest in quasar [quasi-stellar object (QSO)] absorption spectra is sensitive to a wide range of cosmological and astrophysical parameters and instrumental effects. Modelling the flux power spectrum in this large parameter space to an accuracy comparable to the statistical uncertainty of large samples of QSO spectra is very challenging. We use here a coarse grid of hydrodynamical simulations run with GADGET-2 to obtain a `best-guess' model around which we calculate a finer grid of flux power spectra using a Taylor expansion of the flux power spectrum to first order. In this way, we investigate how the interplay between astrophysical and cosmological parameters affects their measurements using the recently published flux power spectrum obtained from 3035 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) QSOs. We find that the SDSS flux power spectrum alone is able to constrain a wide range of parameters including the amplitude of the matter power spectrum σ8, the matter density Ωm, the spectral index of primordial density fluctuations n, the effective optical depth τeff and its evolution. The thermal history of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is, however, poorly constrained and the SDSS data favour either an unplausibly large temperature or an unplausibly steep temperature-density relation. By enforcing a thermal history of the IGM consistent with that inferred from high-resolution QSO spectra, we find the following values for the best-fitting model (assuming a flat universe with a cosmological constant and zero neutrino mass): Ωm= 0.28 +/- 0.03, n= 0.95 +/- 0.04 and σ8= 0.91 +/- 0.07 (1σ error bars). The values for σ8 and n are consistent with those obtained by McDonald et al. with different simulations for similar assumptions. We argue, however, that the major uncertainties in this measurement are still systematic rather than statistical.

  1. Feedback from Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartas, George; Saez, C.

    2008-03-01

    The fraction of the total bolometric energy released over an AGN's lifetime into the ISM and IGM in the form kinetic energy injection scales as the outflow velocity to the third power so we expect that powerful broad absorption line (BAL) quasars may have mass outflow rates that are large enough to influence significantly the formation of the host galaxy and to regulate the growth of the central black hole. One of the most promising radio quiet quasars for studying the properties of the outflow is the lensed BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. The large flux magnification by a factor of about 100 provided by the gravitational lens effect combined with the large redshift (z = 3.91) of the quasar have provided the highest S/N X-ray spectra of a quasar containing X-ray BALs. We present results from recent monitoring observations of APM 08279+5255. performed with the Suzaku, XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories. Significant variability of the X-ray BALs is detected on timescales as short as 4 days (proper time) implying launching radii of about 6 times the Schwarzschild radius. The fitted width of the X-ray absorption troughs imply a large gradient in the outflow velocity of the X-ray absorbers with projected outflow velocities of up to 0.5c. The notch-like shape of the detected X-ray BALs are similar to those produced in recent numerical simulations (i.e. Schurch & Done 2007) that include radiative transfer calculations through highly ionized X-ray absorbers outflowing at near relativistic velocities. We provide preliminary constraints of the outflows properties.

  2. Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Adam D.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Gallagher, John S.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Tremonti, Christina A.; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-III Collaboration, SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Committee on the Participation of Women in the SDSS (CPWS) was formed by the SDSS to evaluate the gender climate within the collaboration. The CPWS seeks to foster gender balance in our collaboration by fielding concerns from our members and by recommending best practices for establishing the SDSS leadership team. An important aspect of the mission of the CPWS is to regularly assess gender diversity and inclusiveness within the SDSS. Against the backdrop of the transition from SDSS-III to SDSS-IV, the CPWS has been collecting data relevant to gender issues through interviews and surveys. In April, 2014, the CPWS surveyed 251 SDSS-IV members (~50% of active membership) regarding gender and leadership. Broad findings from this survey include that the male-to-female ratio in SDSS-IV is about 3:1 and that the male-to-female ratio among those that identify themselves as being in an SDSS-IV leadership role is also close to 3:1. About 35% of those surveyed self-identify as an SDSS-IV "leader," though we recognize the possibility that active stakeholders might be more likely to respond to a demographics survey. About 80% of those that self-identify as leaders consider their leadership role within SDSS-IV to be officially acknowledged, regardless of gender. The fraction of women in SDSS leadership roles appears to be a weak function of current job position in that 6 of 32 (19%) senior faculty that are SDSS leaders are women, compared to 4 of 13 (31%) postdocs. Similarly, the fraction of SDSS leaders who are women is highest (32%) amongst those leaders who received their PhDs 6-10 years ago, while the fraction of female leaders amongst other age demographics is somewhat lower (20%). Although these are small sample sizes, this hints at a trend where women are most likely to fill SDSS leadership roles at certain stages of their lives and careers. The CPWS intends to use this initial survey data to establish a baseline for tracking SDSS-IV demographics, and thus hopes to

  3. The Halo Boundary of Galaxy Clusters in the SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Eric; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Sheth, Ravi K. [Center for Particle Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Chang, Chihway; Kravtsov, Andrey [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Adhikari, Susmita; Dalal, Neal [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); More, Surhud [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba, 277-8583 (Japan); Rozo, Eduardo [Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Rykoff, Eli, E-mail: ebax@sas.upenn.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, P.O. Box 2450, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-05-20

    Analytical models and simulations predict a rapid decline in the halo density profile associated with the transition from the “infalling” regime outside the halo to the “collapsed” regime within the halo. Using data from SDSS, we explore evidence for such a feature in the density profiles of galaxy clusters using several different approaches. We first estimate the steepening of the outer galaxy density profile around clusters, finding evidence for truncation of the halo profile. Next, we measure the galaxy density profile around clusters using two sets of galaxies selected on color. We find evidence of an abrupt change in galaxy colors that coincides with the location of the steepening of the density profile. Since galaxies that have completed orbits within the cluster are more likely to be quenched of star formation and thus appear redder, this abrupt change in galaxy color can be associated with the transition from single-stream to multi-stream regimes. We also use a standard model comparison approach to measure evidence for a “splashback”-like feature, but find that this approach is very sensitive to modeling assumptions. Finally, we perform measurements using an independent cluster catalog to test for potential systematic errors associated with cluster selection. We identify several avenues for future work: improved understanding of the small-scale galaxy profile, lensing measurements, identification of proxies for the halo accretion rate, and other tests. With upcoming data from the DES, KiDS, and HSC surveys, we can expect significant improvements in the study of halo boundaries.

  4. On the fairness of the main galaxy sample of SDSS

    OpenAIRE

    Meng, Kelai; Ma, Bin; Pan, Jun; Feng, Longlong

    2010-01-01

    Flux-limited and volume-limited galaxy samples are constructed from SDSS data releases DR4, DR6 and DR7 for statistical analysis. The two-point correlation functions $\\xi(s)$, monopole of three-point correlation functions $\\zeta_0$, projected two-point correlation function $w_p$ and pairwise velocity dispersion $\\sigma_{12}$ are measured to test if galaxy samples are fair for these statistics. We find that with increment of sky coverage of SDSS, $\\xi(s)$ of flux-limited sample is extremely ro...

  5. Do Quasar Ley Lines Really Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A.

    1982-10-01

    The hypothesis that the distribution of the quasars on the celestial sphere contains an unexpectedly large number of well-aligned triples is tested by applying, to the Cerro Tololo objective-prism sample, a shape-statistic which was originally developed to investigate whether neolithic standing stones were deliberately sited on ley lines. It is found that alignment in triples is not a conspicuous feature of the quasars in this sample. The sample does contain one well-aligned triple whose properties resemble those of two triples found earlier in a different field by Arp & Hazard, but the probability of this being a chance alignment is not low. The same authors have noted a total of four well-collimated triples which they consider remarkable, but an approximate probability calculation based on the shape-statistic indicates that they need not have a low probability of occurring by chance.

  6. Microlensing of quasar ultraviolet iron emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, Vía Láctea S/N, La Laguna 38200, Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Física Teórica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, 18071 Granada (Spain); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 4055 McPherson Lab, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Muñoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Falco, E. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Motta, V.; Rojas, K. [Departamento de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Avda. Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2013-12-01

    We measure the differential microlensing of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission line blends between 14 quasar image pairs in 13 gravitational lenses. We find that the UV iron emission is strongly microlensed in four cases with amplitudes comparable to that of the continuum. Statistically modeling the magnifications, we infer a typical size of r{sub s}∼4√(M/M{sub ⊙}) light-days for the Fe line-emitting regions, which is comparable to the size of the region generating the UV continuum (∼3-7 light-days). This may indicate that a significant part of the UV Fe II and Fe III emission originates in the quasar accretion disk.

  7. Spectral Analysis, Synthesis, & Energy Distributions of Nearby E+A Galaxies Using SDSS-IV MaNGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Olivia A.; Anderson, Miguel Ricardo; Wally, Muhammad; James, Olivia; Falcone, Julia; Liu, Allen; Wallack, Nicole; Liu, Charles; SDSS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing data from the Mapping Nearby Galaxies at APO (MaNGA) Survey (MaNGA Product Launch-4, or MPL-4), of the latest generation of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV), we identified nine post-starburst (E+A) systems that lie within the Green Valley transition zone. We identify the E+A galaxies by their SDSS single fiber spectrum and u-r color, then confirmed their classification as post-starburst by coding/plotting methods and spectral synthesis codes (FIREFLY and PIPE3D), as well as with their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) from 0.15 µm to 22 µm, using GALEX, SDSS, 2MASS, and WISE data. We produced maps of gaussian-fitted fluxes, equivalent widths, stellar velocities, metallicities and age. We also produced spectral line ratio diagrams to classify regions of stellar populations of the galaxies. We found that our sample of E+As retain their post-starburst properties across the entire galaxy, not just at their center. We detected matching a trend line in the ultraviolet and optical bands, consistent with the expected SEDs for an E+A galaxy, and also through the J, H and Ks bands, except for one object. We classified one of the nine galaxies as a luminous infrared galaxy, unusual for a post-starburst object. Our group seeks to further study stellar population properties, spectral energy distributions and quenching properties in E+A galaxies, and investigate their role in galaxy evolution as a whole. This work was supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation via the SDSS-IV Faculty and Student Team (FAST) initiative, ARC Agreement #SSP483 to the CUNY College of Staten Island. This work was also supported by grants to The American Museum of Natural History, and the CUNY College of Staten Island through from National Science Foundation.

  8. Reverberation Mapping of High-Luminosity Quasars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Kaspi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past three decades reverberation mapping (RM has been applied to about 100 AGNs. Their broad line region (BLR sizes were measured and yielded mass estimates of the black holes in their center. However, very few attempts were carried out for high-luminosity quasars, at luminosities higher than 1046 erg/sec in the optical. Most of these attempts failed since RM of such quasars is difficult due to a number of reasons, mostly due to the long time needed to monitor these objects. During the past two decades we carried out a RM campaign on six high-luminosity quasars. This contribution presents some of the final light curves of that RM campaign in which we measured the BLR size in C iv of three of the objects (S5 0836+71, SBS 1116+603, and SBS 1425+606. We present the C iv BLR size and luminosity relation over eight orders of magnitude in luminosity, pushing the luminosity limit to its highest point so far.

  9. Towards a comprehensive picture of powerful quasars, their host galaxies and quasar winds at z ˜ 0.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; Liu, Guilin; Obied, Georges

    2016-03-01

    Luminous type-2 quasars in which the glow from the central black hole is obscured by dust are ideal targets for studying their host galaxies and the quasars' effect on galaxy evolution. Such feedback appears ubiquitous in luminous obscured quasars where high-velocity-ionized nebulae have been found. We present rest-frame yellow-band (˜5000 Å) observations using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for a sample of 20 luminous quasar host galaxies at 0.2 host galaxy observations with geometric measurements of quasar illumination using blue-band HST observations and [O III] integral field unit observations probing the quasar winds. The HST images reveal bright merger signatures in about half the galaxies; a significantly higher fraction than in comparison inactive ellipticals. We show that the host galaxies are primarily bulge-dominated, with masses close to M*, but belong to host galaxies' high star formation rates and bright merger signatures, we suggest that this low-redshift outbreak of luminous quasar activity is triggered by recent minor mergers. Combining these novel observations, we present new quasar unification tests, which are in agreement with expectations of the orientation-based unification model for quasars.

  10. The Second Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Abazajian, Kevork; ̈ueros, Marcel A. Ag; Allam, Sahar S.; Anderson, KurtS. J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Baldry, Ivan K.; StevenBastian; Berlind, Andreas; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R.; BochanskiJr., John J.; Boroski, William N.; Briggs, John W.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert J.; ́ari, Tam ́asBudav; Carey, Larry N.; Carliles, Samuel; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, A. J.; Csabai, Istvan; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Friedman, Scott D.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, RoyR.; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Gurbani, Vijay K.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hamabe, Masaru; Harris, Frederick H.; C.Harris, Hugh; Harvanek, Michael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Hendry, John S.; Hennessy, Gregory S.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Hogan, Craig J.; Hogg, David W.; Holmgren, Donald J.; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E.; Jorgensen, AndersM.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S. J.; Knapp, G. R.; Kniazev, Alexei Yu.; Kron, Richard G.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z.; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Q.Lamb, Donald; Lampeitl, Hubert; Lee, Brian C.; Leger, R. French; Li, Nolan; Lin, Huan; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Long, Daniel C.; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H.; Malik, Tanu; BruceMargon; Matsubara, Takahiko; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McKay, Timothy A.; AveryMeiksin; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Nakajima, Reiko; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Eric H. Jr.; JoNewberg, Heidi; Newman, Peter R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Okamura, Sadanori; O'Mullane, William; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Pope, Adrian C.; Quinn, Thomas R.; Richards, Gordon T.; Richmond, Michael W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, Erin; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Smith, J. Allyn; ́c, Vernesa Smolči; Snedden, Stephanie A.; AlbertStebbins; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istv ́an; Szkody, Paula; Szokoly, Gyula P.; Tegmark, Max; Teodoro, Luis; Thakar, AniruddhaR.; Tremonti, Christy; Tucker, Douglas L.; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S.; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P.; M.Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wang, Shu-i; Weinberg, David H.; West, Andrew A.; White, Simon D.M.; Wilhite, BrianC.; Xu, Yongzhong; Yanny, Brian; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D. R.; York, Donald G.; Zehavi, Idit; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2004-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its Second Data Release. This data release consists of 3324 square degrees of five-band (u g r i z) imaging data with photometry for over 88 million unique objects, 367,360 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 2627 degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data reach a depth of r ~ 22.2 (95% completeness limit for point sources) and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The imaging data have all been processed through a new version of the SDSS imaging pipeline, in which the most important improvement since the last data release is fixing an error in the model fits to each object. The result is that model magnitudes are now a good proxy for point spread function (PSF) magnitudes for point sources, and Petrosian magnitudes for extended sources. The spectroscopy extends from 38...

  11. ALMA Examines a Distant Quasar Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-04-01

    The dust continuum (top) and the [CII] emission (bottom) maps for the region around J1120+0641. [Adapted from Venemans et al. 2017]A team of scientists has used the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) to explore the host galaxy of the most distant quasar known. Their observations may help us to build a picture of how the first supermassive black holes in the universe formed and evolved.Faraway Monsters and Their GalaxiesWe know that quasars the incredibly luminous and active centers of some distant galaxies are powered by accreting, supermassive black holes. These monstrous powerhouses have been detected out to redshifts of z 7, when the universe was younger than a billion years old.Though weve observed over a hundred quasars at high redshift, we still dont understand how these early supermassive black holes formed, or whether the black holes and the galaxies that host them co-evolved. In order to answer questions like these, however, we first need to gather information about the properties and behavior of various supermassive black holes and their host galaxies.A team of scientists led by Bram Venemans (Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Germany) recently used the unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution of ALMA as well as the Very Large Array and the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer to examine the most distant quasar currently known, J1120+0641, located at a redshift of z = 7.1.A High-Resolution LookThe teams observations of the dust and gas emission from the quasars host galaxy revealed a number of intriguing things:The red and blue sides of the [CII] emission line are shown here as contours, demonstrating that theres no ordered rotational motion of the gas on kpc scales. [Adapted from Venemans et al. 2017]The majority of the galaxys emission is very compact. Around 80% of the observed flux came from a region of only 11.5 kpc in diameter.Despite the fact that the 2.4-billion-solar-mass black hole at the galaxys center is accreting at

  12. The Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II Supernova Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sako, Masao; Bassett, Bruce; C. Becker, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey conducted between 2005 and 2007. Light curves, spectra, classifications, and ancillary data are presented for 10,258 variable and transient sources discovered through repeat ugriz imaging of SDSS......, making this the largest sample of supernova candidates ever compiled. We present a new method for SN host-galaxy identification and derive host-galaxy properties including stellar masses, star-formation rates, and the average stellar population ages from our SDSS multi-band photometry. We derive SALT2...

  13. Constraint on neutrino masses from SDSS-III/BOSS Ly$\\alpha$ forest and other cosmological probes

    CERN Document Server

    Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Lesgourgues, Julien; Rossi, Graziano; Borde, Arnaud; Viel, Matteo; Aubourg, Eric; Kirkby, David; LeGoff, Jean-Marc; Rich, James; Roe, Natalie; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Weinberg, David

    2015-02-27

    We present constraints on the parameters of the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model in the presence of massive neutrinos, using the one-dimensional Ly$\\alpha$ forest power spectrum obtained with the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by Palanque-Delabrouille et al. (2013), complemented by additional cosmological probes. The interpretation of the measured Ly$\\alpha$ spectrum is done using a second-order Taylor expansion of the simulated power spectrum. BOSS Ly$\\alpha$ data alone provide better bounds than previous Ly$\\alpha$ results, but are still poorly constraining, especially for the sum of neutrino masses $\\sum m_\

  14. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Standard Star Catalog for Stripe 82: The Dawn of Industrial 1% Optical Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    lists photometric data for 215 million unique objects observed in 8000 deg2 of sky; see http://www.sdss.org/dr5/. 21 Transmission curves for the SDSS...energy distribu- tions, such as quasars and supernovae , the errors may be several times larger. See also Maı́z Apellániz (2006). IVEZIĆ ET AL.974 Vol...with such an accuracy is important for many applications (e.g., photometric redshifts of galaxies, Type Ia supernova cosmology, and testing of

  15. The population of white dwarf-main sequence binaries in the SDSS DR 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocaru, R.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.; Torres, S.; García-Berro, E.

    2017-09-01

    We present a Monte Carlo population synthesis study of white dwarf-main sequence (WD+MS) binaries in the Galactic disc aimed at reproducing the ensemble properties of the entire population observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 12. Our simulations take into account all known observational biases and use the most up-to-date stellar evolutionary models. This allows us to perform a sound comparison between the simulations and the observational data. We find that the properties of the simulated and observed parameter distributions agree best when assuming low values of the common envelope efficiency (0.2-0.3), a result that is in agreement with previous findings obtained by observational and population synthesis studies of close SDSS WD+MS binaries. We also show that all synthetic populations that result from adopting an initial mass ratio distribution with a positive slope are excluded by observations. Finally, we confirm that the properties of the simulated WD+MS binary populations are nearly independent of the age adopted for the thin disc, on the contribution of WD+MS binaries from the thick disc (0-17 per cent of the total population) and on the assumed fraction of the internal energy that is used to eject the envelope during the common envelope phase (0.1-0.5).

  16. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS bulge, disk and total stellar mass estimates (Mendel+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, J. T.; Simard, L.; Palmer, M.; Ellison, S. L.; Patton, D. R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalog of bulge, disk, and total stellar mass estimates for ~660000 galaxies in the Legacy area of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data (SDSS) Release 7. These masses are based on a homogeneous catalog of g- and r-band photometry described by Simard et al. (2011, Cat. J/ApJS/196/11), which we extend here with bulge+disk and Sersic profile photometric decompositions in the SDSS u, i, and z bands. We discuss the methodology used to derive stellar masses from these data via fitting to broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and show that the typical statistical uncertainty on total, bulge, and disk stellar mass is ~0.15 dex. Despite relatively small formal uncertainties, we argue that SED modeling assumptions, including the choice of synthesis model, extinction law, initial mass function, and details of stellar evolution likely contribute an additional 60% systematic uncertainty in any mass estimate based on broadband SED fitting. We discuss several approaches for identifying genuine bulge+disk systems based on both their statistical likelihood and an analysis of their one-dimensional surface-brightness profiles, and include these metrics in the catalogs. Estimates of the total, bulge and disk stellar masses for both normal and dust-free models and their uncertainties are made publicly available here. (4 data files).

  17. The fall of the Northern Unicorn: tangential motions in the Galactic anticentre with SDSS and Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, T. J. L.; Belokurov, V.; Koposov, S. E.

    2018-01-01

    We present the first detailed study of the behaviour of the stellar proper motion across the entire Galactic anticentre area visible in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data. We use recalibrated SDSS astrometry in combination with positions from Gaia DR1 to provide tangential motion measurements with a systematic uncertainty <5 km s-1 for the Main Sequence stars at the distance of the Monoceros Ring. We demonstrate that Monoceros members rotate around the Galaxy with azimuthal speeds of ∼230 km s-1, only slightly lower than that of the Sun. Additionally, both vertical and azimuthal components of their motion are shown to vary considerably but gradually as a function of Galactic longitude and latitude. The stellar overdensity in the anti-centre region can be split into two components, the narrow, stream-like ACS and the smooth Ring. According to our analysis, these two structures show very similar but clearly distinct kinematic trends, which can be summarized as follows: the amplitude of the velocity variation in vϕ and vz in the ACS is higher compared to the Ring, whose velocity gradients appear to be flatter. Currently, no model available can explain the entirety of the data in this area of the sky. However, the new accurate kinematic map introduced here should provide strong constraints on the genesis of the Monoceros Ring and the associated substructure.

  18. Clues to quasar broad-line region geometry and kinematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vestergaard, M; Wilkes, BJ; Barthel, PD

    2000-01-01

    We present evidence that the high-velocity C IV lambda 1549 emission-line gas of radio-loud quasars may originate in a disklike configuration, in close proximity to the accretion disk often assumed to emit the low-ionization lines. For a sample of 36 radio-loud z approximate to 2 quasars, we find

  19. Emission line imaging of 3CR quasars and radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hes, R; Barthel, PD; Fosbury, RAE

    Optical emission line images and spectra of sixteen 3CR powerful radio galaxies and quasars are presented. Extended line emission is detected in both radio galaxies and quasars. We show that line luminosities, derived from the spatially integrated [OII]lambda 3727 narrow emission line, are on

  20. The radio structure of radio-quiet quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leipski, C.; Falcke, H.D.E.; Bennert, N.; Hüttemeister, S.

    2006-01-01

    Aims.We investigate the radio emitting structures of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei with an emphasis on radio-quiet quasars to study their connection to Seyfert galaxies.
    Methods: .We present and analyse high-sensitivity VLA radio continuum images of 14 radio-quiet quasars and six Seyfert

  1. Using Quasars as Standard Clocks for Measuring Cosmological Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang; Starkman, Glenn D.; Stojkovic, Branislav; Stojkovic, Dejan; Weltman, Amanda

    2012-06-01

    We report hitherto unnoticed patterns in quasar light curves. We characterize segments of the quasar’s light curves with the slopes of the straight lines fit through them. These slopes appear to be directly related to the quasars’ redshifts. Alternatively, using only global shifts in time and flux, we are able to find significant overlaps between the light curves of different pairs of quasars by fitting the ratio of their redshifts. We are then able to reliably determine the redshift of one quasar from another. This implies that one can use quasars as standard clocks, as we explicitly demonstrate by constructing two independent methods of finding the redshift of a quasar from its light curve.

  2. A Study of Galaxies and Quasars in the Background of the Andromeda Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Atirath; McConnell, Kaela; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Roy, Namrata; Waite, Jurij

    2018-01-01

    The SPLASH (Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo) survey is based on wide-field ground-based optical images (KPNO 4-m/Mosaic, CFHT 3.6-m/MegaCam imager, and Subaru 8-m/Suprime-Cam), deep Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet/optical/near infrared images (ACS and WFC3), and medium resolution spectra (Keck II 10-m/DEIMOS). The SPLASH survey data set contains two main categories of (non-M31) contaminants (SPLASH trash, if you will): foreground Milky Way stars and compact background galaxies/quasars. In this poster, we present the discovery and characterization of galaxies and quasars behind M31. Such objects were identified based on the presence of redshifted emission lines and other galaxy/quasar spectral features (e.g., Ca H+K absorption and IGM absorption). The redshift of each galaxy was measured by cross-correlating its spectrum against an emission line galaxy spectral template. The cross-correlation results (spectrum and best-fit template) were visually inspected to identify cases of incorrect matching of emission lines. Many of these incorrect redshift estimates were corrected by using the second or third highest cross-correlation peak. Quasar redshifts were determined based on cross-correlation against a quasar spectral template. Most of the galaxies in our sample are star forming galaxies with strong emission lines. We analyze their emission line flux ratios in a BPT diagram to learn more about the ionization source and metallicity. Finally, the properties of these compact galaxies behind M31 are compared to those of galaxies selected in a more standard way in the DEEP2 redshift survey to explore the effects of morphological pre-selection (compact vs. extended) on the properties of the resulting galaxy sample.This research was supported by NASA/STScI and the National Science Foundation. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of the Science Internship Program (SIP) at UC Santa Cruz.

  3. THE MASS-RICHNESS RELATION OF MaxBCG CLUSTERS FROM QUASAR LENSING MAGNIFICATION USING VARIABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Anne H. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai, CSIC/IEEC, F. de Ciencies, Torre C5 par-2, Barcelona 08193 (Spain); Baltay, Charles; Ellman, Nancy; Jerke, Jonathan; Rabinowitz, David; Scalzo, Richard, E-mail: bauer@ieec.uab.es [Yale University, Department of Physics, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    Accurate measurement of galaxy cluster masses is an essential component not only in studies of cluster physics but also for probes of cosmology. However, different mass measurement techniques frequently yield discrepant results. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey MaxBCG catalog's mass-richness relation has previously been constrained using weak lensing shear, Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ), and X-ray measurements. The mass normalization of the clusters as measured by weak lensing shear is {approx}>25% higher than that measured using SZ and X-ray methods, a difference much larger than the stated measurement errors in the analyses. We constrain the mass-richness relation of the MaxBCG galaxy cluster catalog by measuring the gravitational lensing magnification of type I quasars in the background of the clusters. The magnification is determined using the quasars' variability and the correlation between quasars' variability amplitude and intrinsic luminosity. The mass-richness relation determined through magnification is in agreement with that measured using shear, confirming that the lensing strength of the clusters implies a high mass normalization and that the discrepancy with other methods is not due to a shear-related systematic measurement error. We study the dependence of the measured mass normalization on the cluster halo orientation. As expected, line-of-sight clusters yield a higher normalization; however, this minority of haloes does not significantly bias the average mass-richness relation of the catalog.

  4. Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Won-Kee; Pak, Soojong; Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Jeon, Yiseul; Chang, Seunghyuk; Jeong, Hyeonju; Lim, Juhee; Kim, Eunbin

    2012-08-01

    We describe the overall characteristics and the performance of an optical CCD camera system, Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN), which has been used at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory since 2010 August. CQUEAN was developed for follow-up imaging observations of red sources such as high-redshift quasar candidates (z ≳ 5), gamma-ray bursts, brown dwarfs, and young stellar objects. For efficient observations of the red objects, CQUEAN has a science camera with a deep-depletion CCD chip, which boasts a higher quantum efficiency at 0.7-1.1 μm than conventional CCD chips. The camera was developed in a short timescale () and has been working reliably. By employing an autoguiding system and a focal reducer to enhance the field of view on the classical Cassegrain focus, we achieve a stable guiding in 20 minute exposures, an imaging quality with FWHM≥0.6‧‧ over the whole field (4.8‧ × 4.8‧), and a limiting magnitude of z = 23.4 AB mag at 5-σ with 1 hr total integration time. This article includes data taken at the McDonald Observatory of The University of Texas at Austin.

  5. Simple stellar population modelling of low S/N galaxy spectra and quasar host galaxy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, G.; Tremonti, C. A.; Hooper, E. J.; Wolf, M. J.; Sheinis, A. I.; Richards, J. W.

    2015-02-01

    To study the effect of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) on their host galaxies it is important to study the hosts when the SMBH is near its peak activity. A method to investigate the host galaxies of high luminosity quasars is to obtain optical spectra at positions offset from the nucleus where the relative contribution of the quasar and host is comparable. However, at these extended radii the galaxy surface brightness is often low (20-22 mag arcsec-2) and the resulting spectrum might have such low signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) that it hinders analysis with standard stellar population modelling techniques. To address this problem, we have developed a method that can recover galaxy star formation histories (SFHs) from rest-frame optical spectra with S/N ˜ 5 Å-1. This method uses the statistical technique diffusion k-means to tailor the stellar population modelling basis set. Our diffusion k-means minimal basis set, composed of four broad age bins, is successful in recovering a range of galaxy SFHs. Additionally, using an analytic prescription for seeing conditions, we are able to simultaneously model scattered quasar light and the SFH of quasar host galaxies (QHGs). We use synthetic data to compare results of our novel method with previous techniques. We also present the modelling results on a previously published QHG and show that galaxy properties recovered from a diffusion k-means basis set are less sensitive to noise added to this QHG spectrum. Our new method has a clear advantage in recovering information from QHGs and could also be applied to the analysis of other low S/N galaxy spectra such as those typically obtained for high redshift objects or integral field spectroscopic surveys.

  6. Exploring a Potential Bias in Dark Matter Investigations Using Strongly Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Jen-Wei; Fassnacht, Christopher; Vegetti, Simona; Springola, Cristiana; Oldham, Lindsay; Despali, Giulia; Auger, Matthew; Xu, Dandan; Metcalf, Benton; McKean, John; Koopmans, Leon; Lagattuta, David

    2018-01-01

    Simulations based on ΛCDM cosmology predict thousands of substructures under galactic scale have not been detected in the local universe. One hypothesis proposes that most of these substructures are dark for various astrophysical reasons. Gravitational lensing provides a powerful alternative way to probe dark substructures in distant galaxies by detecting their gravitational perturbations and therefore provides insights into the nature of dark matter. Lensed quasars with certain image configurations are especially promising for probing substructure abundance in lens galaxy halos. When the observed flux ratios of the lensed quasar images deviate from the smooth mass model predictions, these “flux-ratio anomalies” are considered to be the evidence of gravitational perturbations. While the standard analysis of flux-ratio anomalies assumes that substructures are the only cause of anomalies, we found that in two edge-on disk lenses, B1555+375 and B0712+472, their flux anomalies can be explained by including disk components into their mass models. Our results bring up a concern with a potential bias in the previous analyses of flux-ratio anomalies. To further investigate the baryonic effects in flux-ratio anomalies, we create mock quasar lenses by selecting disk and elliptical galaxies in the Illustris simulation. Our analysis shows that baryon-induced flux anomalies can be found in all morphological types of lens galaxies. The baryonic effects increase the probability of finding lenses with strong anomalies by 8% in ellipticals and 10~20% in disk lenses, showing that the baryonic effects are unneglectable in the analysis. As future large-scale surveys are expected to bring numerous lensed quasar samples, further investigations on baryonic effects should be done in order to achieve precise constraints on dark matter in the future.

  7. Imprints of the super-Eddington accretion on the quasar clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oogi, Taira; Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Makiya, Ryu; Nagashima, Masahiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Shirakata, Hikari

    2017-10-01

    Super-Eddington mass accretion has been suggested as an efficient mechanism to grow supermassive black holes. We investigate the imprint left by the radiative efficiency of the super-Eddington accretion process on the clustering of quasars using a new semi-analytic model of galaxy and quasar formation based on large-volume cosmological N-body simulations. Our model includes a simple model for the radiative efficiency of a quasar, which imitates the effect of photon trapping for a high mass accretion rate. We find that the model of radiative efficiency affects the relation between the quasar luminosity and the quasar host halo mass. The quasar host halo mass has only weak dependence on quasar luminosity when there is no upper limit for quasar luminosity. On the other hand, it has significant dependence on quasar luminosity when the quasar luminosity is limited by its Eddington luminosity. In the latter case, the quasar bias also depends on the quasar luminosity, and the quasar bias of bright quasars is in agreement with observations. Our results suggest that the quasar clustering studies can provide a constraint on the accretion disc model.

  8. Development and Application of a Spreadsheet-Based Spatial Decision Support System (SDSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Dossay Oryspayev; Ramanathan Sugumaran; John DeGroote

    2011-01-01

    Spatial decision support systems (SDSS) are decision support tools which have been used widely in addressing complicated issues involving a spatial component. The use of SDSS has increased greatly over the last few decades especially in fields such as planning, natural resources management, and environmental science. Traditionally, SDSS have been developed with Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology as a major component and used in application areas in which the use of GIS technology...

  9. Rapidly star-forming galaxies adjacent to quasars at redshifts exceeding 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decarli, R; Walter, F; Venemans, B P; Bañados, E; Bertoldi, F; Carilli, C; Fan, X; Farina, E P; Mazzucchelli, C; Riechers, D; Rix, H-W; Strauss, M A; Wang, R; Yang, Y

    2017-05-24

    The existence of massive (1011 solar masses) elliptical galaxies by redshift z ≈ 4 (refs 1, 2, 3; when the Universe was 1.5 billion years old) necessitates the presence of galaxies with star-formation rates exceeding 100 solar masses per year at z > 6 (corresponding to an age of the Universe of less than 1 billion years). Surveys have discovered hundreds of galaxies at these early cosmic epochs, but their star-formation rates are more than an order of magnitude lower. The only known galaxies with very high star-formation rates at z > 6 are, with one exception, the host galaxies of quasars, but these galaxies also host accreting supermassive (more than 109 solar masses) black holes, which probably affect the properties of the galaxies. Here we report observations of an emission line of singly ionized carbon ([C ii] at a wavelength of 158 micrometres) in four galaxies at z > 6 that are companions of quasars, with velocity offsets of less than 600 kilometres per second and linear offsets of less than 100 kiloparsecs. The discovery of these four galaxies was serendipitous; they are close to their companion quasars and appear bright in the far-infrared. On the basis of the [C ii] measurements, we estimate star-formation rates in the companions of more than 100 solar masses per year. These sources are similar to the host galaxies of the quasars in [C ii] brightness, linewidth and implied dynamical mass, but do not show evidence for accreting supermassive black holes. Similar systems have previously been found at lower redshift. We find such close companions in four out of the twenty-five z > 6 quasars surveyed, a fraction that needs to be accounted for in simulations. If they are representative of the bright end of the [C ii] luminosity function, then they can account for the population of massive elliptical galaxies at z ≈ 4 in terms of the density of cosmic space.

  10. High-redshift Post-starburst Galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattarakijwanich, Petchara

    Post-starburst galaxies are a rare class of galaxy that show the spectral signature of recent, but not ongoing, star-formation activity, and are thought to have their star formation suddenly quenched within the one billion years preceding the observations. In other words, these are galaxies in the transitional stage between blue, star-forming galaxies and red, quiescent galaxies, and therefore hold important information regarding our understanding of galaxy evolution. This class of objects can be used to study the mechanisms responsible for star-formation quenching, which is an important unsettled question in galaxy evolution. In this thesis, we study this class of galaxies through a number of different approaches. First of all, we systematically selected a large, statistical sample of post-starburst galaxies from the spectroscopic dataset of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This sample contains 13219 objects in total, with redshifts ranging from local universe to z ˜ 1.3 and median redshift zmedian = 0.59. This is currently the largest sample of post-starburst galaxies available in the literature. Using this sample, we calculated the luminosity functions for a number of redshift bins. A rapid downsizing redshift evolution of the luminosity function is observed, whereby the number density of post-starburst galaxies at fixed luminosity is larger at higher redshift. From the luminosity functions, we calculated the amount of star-formation quenching accounted for in post-starburst galaxies, and compared to the amount required by the global decline of star-formation rate of the universe. We found that only a small fraction (˜ 0.2%) of all star-formation quenching in the universe goes through the post-starburst galaxy channel, at least for the luminous sources in our sample. We also searched the SDSS spectroscopic database the post-starburst quasars, which are an even more special class of objects that show both a post-starburst stellar population and AGN activity

  11. Are high-redshift quasars hidden by dusty galaxies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Edward L.

    1990-04-01

    A Monte Carlo technique has been developed to compute the joint probability distribution for the reddening and extinction of quasars by galaxies along the line of sight with a realistic dust extinction curve including the 220 nm feature. Galaxies are treated as disks with random inclinations, having exponential or modified Gaussian radial profiles. This technique is used to find the distribution of the reddened quasars on multicolor diagrams such as the (U-J, J-F) plots used by Koo and Kron (1982) to find faint quasars. The multicolor search technique is not a simple UV excess approach, and the resulting color selection does not add significantly to the flux selection discussed by Wright (1981), Ostriker and Heisler (1984), and Heisler and Ostriker (1988). The quasar reddening trend observed by Wright and Malkan (1987) is about 0.35 + or - 0.50 times the mean reddening of the selected sample predicted by the Heisler and Ostriker model.

  12. The Doppler Effect: A Consideration of Quasar Redshifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Kurtiss J.

    1980-01-01

    Provides information on the calculation of the redshift to blueshift ratio introduced by the transverse Doppler effect at relativistic speeds. Indicates that this shift should be mentioned in discussions of whether quasars are "local" rather than "cosmological" objects. (GS)

  13. How Quasar Feedback May Shape the Co-evolutionary Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wako Ishibashi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Observations point toward some form of “co-evolutionary sequence,” from dust-enshrouded starbursts to luminous unobscured quasars. Active galactic nucleus (AGN feedback is generally invoked to expel the obscuring dusty gas in a blow-out event, eventually revealing the hidden central quasar. However, the physical mechanism driving AGN feedback, either due to winds or radiation, remains uncertain and is still a source of much debate. We consider quasar feedback, based on radiation pressure on dust, which directly acts on the obscuring dusty gas. We show that AGN radiative feedback is capable of efficiently removing the obscuring cocoon, and driving powerful outflows on galactic scales, consistent with recent observations. I will discuss how such quasar feedback may provide a natural physical interpretation of the observed evolutionary path, and the physical implications in the broader context of black hole-host galaxy co-evolution.

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies from SDSS-DR12 (Rakshit+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakshit, S.; Stalin, C. S.; Chand, H.; Zhang, X.-G.

    2017-06-01

    We present a new catalog of narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 12 (SDSS DR12). This was obtained by a systematic analysis through modeling of the continuum and emission lines of the spectra of all the 68859 SDSS-DR12 objects that are classified as "QSO" by the SDSS spectroscopic pipeline with z2/pixel. This catalog contains a total of 11101 objects, which is about 5 times larger than the previously known NLSy1 galaxies. Their monochromatic continuum luminosity at 5100Å is found to be strongly correlated with Hβ, Hα, and [OIII] emission line luminosities. The optical FeII strength in NLSy1 galaxies is about two times larger than the broad-line Seyfert 1 (BLSy1) galaxies. About 5% of the catalog sources are detected in the FIRST survey. The Eddington ratio ({xi}Edd) of NLSy1 galaxies has an average of log({xi}Edd) of -0.34, much higher than -1.03 found for BLSy1 galaxies. Their black hole masses (MBH) have an average of log(MBH) of 6.9Mȯ, which is less than BLSy1 galaxies, which have an average of log(MBH) of 8.0Mȯ. The MBH of NLSy1 galaxies is found to be correlated with their host galaxy velocity dispersion. Our analysis suggests that geometrical effects playing an important role in defining NLSy1 galaxies and their MBH deficit is perhaps due to their lower inclination compared to BLSy1 galaxies. (1 data file).

  15. Confirmation of the Most Distant Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilvi, Vithal

    2017-08-01

    We propose for 8-orbit G141 grism observations to confirm the AGN nature of a z=7.51 galaxy, currently the most distant quasar candidate identified via NV line detection using deep G102 grism observations. The AGN evidence is further supported by a weak line detection in the ground-based MOSFIRE spectrum. Here we request grism observations to better understand the physical processes occurring in this unique galaxy, and confirm its AGN nature via additional lines: CIV, HeII and CIII. Detection of CIV alone will unambiguously confirm its AGN nature. Currently, WFC3 grism is the most efficient instrument for observing these lines as our recent work shows that the flux loss from ground-based slit-spectrographs is significant (>4x) compared with the grism measurements. Furthermore, the CIII line falls on to a bright atmospheric line making it nearly impossible to observe from the ground. Confirmation of the AGN nature of our target will be a tremendous achievement because this discovery implies that the black hole accretion was already in place within the first few million years after the big bang. This also means that at least some fraction of Lyman-break selected galaxies host AGNs, which can enhance the escape of ionizing radiation and thus contribute to the reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM). Currently there are no observations of faint quasars, M(UV)>-23.2 mag, at z>7. Our proposed observations will push the discoveries to fainter limits, which consequently will start building an excellent base-sample for James Webb Space Telescope for studying the physical nature of sources responsible for reionizing the universe.

  16. Implications of the enthalpy flux carried by powerful quasar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Daniel; Marshall, Herman L.; Worrall, Diana; Birkinshaw, Mark; Perlman, Eric; Lovell, James; Jauncey, David; Murphy, David; Gelbord, Jonathan; Godfrey, Leith; Bicknell, Geoffrey Vincent

    2015-08-01

    We have detected 31 X-ray jets as counterparts to radio jets observed in a survey of 54 quasars (Marshall et al., 2005; 2011). With the most likely interpretation that the X-rays result from inverse Compton boosting of the cosmic microwave background photons, one can estimate the rest frame magnetic field strength, and the particle energy density via the minimum total energy assumption. To reconcile these quantities so that the same spectrum of electrons produces the GHz radio synchrotron emission and its extension to lower energy produces the X-ray, the jets must be in relativistic motion. Another approximation, for example that the bulk Lorentz factor of the jet equals the Doppler factor, is needed to estimate the Lorentz factor. That cannot becorrect for individual jets, but for the ensemble of 31 objects it results in reasonable estimates for the angle of the jet to the line of sight. We can then calculate the enthalpy flux of these jets, which are typically (5--10) x 10^46 erg/s if protons balance the electron charge, and about 5 times smaller if the jets contain only electronsand positrons. Either case represents a signficant, and sometimes dominant, portion of the Eddington luminosity of the black hole.

  17. LARGE-SCALE STAR-FORMATION-DRIVEN OUTFLOWS AT 1 < z < 2 IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, Britt F.; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Bezanson, Rachel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Nelson, Erica; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Wake, David; Whitaker, Katherine [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Brammer, Gabriel [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Casilla 19001, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Franx, Marijn; Fumagalli, Mattia; Labbe, Ivo; Patel, Shannon [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Da Cunha, Elizabete; Rix, Hans Walter; Schmidt, Kasper [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Erb, Dawn K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Fan Xiaohui [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kriek, Mariska [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo [Physics and Astronomy Department, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); and others

    2012-11-20

    We present evidence of large-scale outflows from three low-mass (log(M {sub *}/M {sub Sun }) {approx} 9.75) star-forming (SFR > 4 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}) galaxies observed at z = 1.24, z = 1.35, and z = 1.75 in the 3D-HST Survey. Each of these galaxies is located within a projected physical distance of 60 kpc around the sight line to the quasar SDSS J123622.93+621526.6, which exhibits well-separated strong (W {sup {lambda}2796} {sub r} {approx}> 0.8 A) Mg II absorption systems matching precisely to the redshifts of the three galaxies. We derive the star formation surface densities from the H{alpha} emission in the WFC3 G141 grism observations for the galaxies and find that in each case the star formation surface density well exceeds 0.1 M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}, the typical threshold for starburst galaxies in the local universe. From a small but complete parallel census of the 0.65 < z < 2.6 galaxies with H {sub 140} {approx}< 24 proximate to the quasar sight line, we detect Mg II absorption associated with galaxies extending to physical distances of 130 kpc. We determine that the W{sub r} > 0.8 A Mg II covering fraction of star-forming galaxies at 1 < z < 2 may be as large as unity on scales extending to at least 60 kpc, providing early constraints on the typical extent of starburst-driven winds around galaxies at this redshift. Our observations additionally suggest that the azimuthal distribution of W{sub r} > 0.4 A Mg II absorbing gas around star-forming galaxies may evolve from z {approx} 2 to the present, consistent with recent observations of an increasing collimation of star-formation-driven outflows with time from z {approx} 3.

  18. Development of SED Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN)

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Sanghyuk; Jeon, Yiseul; Lee, Hye-In; Park, Woojin; Ji, Tae-Geun; Hyun, Minhee; Choi, Changsu; Im, Myungshin; Pak, Soojong

    2016-01-01

    We describe the characteristics and performance of a camera system, Spectral energy distribution Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (SQUEAN). It was developed to measure SEDs of high redshift quasar candidates (z $\\gtrsim$ 5) and other targets, e.g., young stellar objects, supernovae, and gamma-ray bursts, and to trace the time variability of SEDs of objects such as active galactic nuclei (AGNs). SQUEAN consists of an on-axis focal plane camera module, an auto-guiding system, and mechanical...

  19. Probing Planets in Extragalactic Galaxies Using Quasar Microlensing

    OpenAIRE

    Dai, Xinyu; Guerras, Eduardo

    2018-01-01

    Previously, planets have been detected only in the Milky Way galaxy. Here, we show that quasar microlensing provides a means to probe extragalactic planets in the lens galaxy, by studying the microlensing properties of emission close to the event horizon of the supermassive black hole of the background quasar, using the current generation telescopes. We show that a population of unbound planets between stars with masses ranging from Moon to Jupiter masses is needed to explain the frequent Fek...

  20. Recent Seven Years of Radio and Optical Variabilities of Quasar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We analyzed the radio (4.8, 8.0 and 14.5 GHz) light curves from UMRAO database and the optical data of quasar 1156 + 295 and found that the quasar exhibited remarkable quasi-periodic long-term flux variations in both radio and optical bands with a similar variability timescale of 1.2 ± 0.3 yr. In addition, when a ...

  1. Host galaxies of high-redshift quasars with extreme outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakamska, Nadia

    2016-10-01

    Feedback from accreting supermassive black holes is now a standard ingredient in galaxy formation models. It has long been speculated that powerful quasars, triggered in major gas-rich mergers, had a profound impact on galaxy formation via quasar-driven winds. This process must have been at its peak during the epoch of most active galaxy formation and quasar activity at z=2-3, yet there is not yet any direct observational support for this long-hypothesized process. We have discovered a population of extremely luminous (L>1e47 erg/s) red quasars with peculiar line properties at z=2-3 which show unprecedented signatures of powerful v>2000 km/s outflows in their [OIII]5007A lines. We propose to image eleven of these objects with the HST in two filters, one probing rest-frame UV and one probing the rest-frame optical. The rest-frame optical observations will directly probe the dynamical state and extent of the hosts of luminous obscured quasars and search for companions and merger signatures. We will determine the masses of the stellar component to determine if the bulges of the quasar hosts have already become apparent in this epoch. Using the rest-frame UV observations, we will probe the distribution of the gas in quasar hosts by observing the morphology of ongoing star formation and scattered light from the central engine. Our targets are the best candidates to probe the long-speculated merger-driven scenario for quasar activity, and our proposed HST observations will definitively determine whether this process drives the evolution of massive galaxies.

  2. The X-ray properties of z 6 luminous quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, R.; Vignali, C.; Gilli, R.; Moretti, A.; Brandt, W. N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a systematic analysis of X-ray archival data of all the 29 quasars (QSOs) at z> 5.5 observed so far with Chandra, XMM-Newton and Swift-XRT, including the most-distant quasar ever discovered, ULAS J1120+0641 (z = 7.08). This study allows us to place constraints on the mean spectral properties of the primordial population of luminous Type 1 (unobscured) quasars. Eighteen quasars are detected in the X-ray band, and we provide spectral-fitting results for their X-ray properties, while for the others we provide upper limits to their soft (0.5-2.0 keV) X-ray flux. We measured the power-law photon index and derived an upper limit to the column density for the five quasars (J1306+0356, J0100+2802, J1030+0524, J1148+5251, J1120+0641) with the best spectra (>30 net counts in the 0.5-7.0 keV energy range) and find that they are consistent with values from the literature and lower-redshift quasars. By stacking the spectra of ten quasars detected by Chandra in the redshift range 5.7 ≤ z ≤ 6.1 we find a mean X-ray power-law photon index of Γ = 1.92-0.27+0.28 and a neutral intrinsic absorption column density of NH ≤ 1023 cm-2. These results suggest that the X-ray spectral properties of luminous quasars have not evolved up to z ≈ 6. We also derived the optical-X-ray spectral slopes (αox) of our sample and combined them with those of previous works, confirming that αox strongly correlates with UV monochromatic luminosity at 2500 Å. These results strengthen the non-evolutionary scenario for the spectral properties of luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN).

  3. Toward understanding environmental effects in SDSS clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einasto, Jaan; Tago, E.; Einasto, M.; Saar, E.; Suhhonenko, I.; /Tartu Observ.; Heinamaki, P.; /Tartu Observ. /Tuorla Observ.; Hutsi, G.; /Tartu Observ. /Garching, Max; Tucker, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    We find clusters and superclusters of galaxies using the Data Release 1 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We determine the luminosity function of clusters and find that clusters in a high-density environment have a luminosity a factor of {approx}5 higher than in a low-density environment. We also study clusters and superclusters in numerical simulations. Simulated clusters in a high-density environment are also more massive than those in a low-density environment. Comparison of the density distribution at various epochs in simulations shows that in large low-density regions (voids) dynamical evolution is very slow and stops at an early epoch. In contrast, in large regions of higher density (superclusters) dynamical evolution starts early and continues until the present; here particles cluster early, and by merging of smaller groups very rich systems of galaxies form.

  4. NuSTAR J033202-2746.8: direct constraints on the Compton reflection in a heavily obscured quasar at z ≈ 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Moro, A.; Mullaney, J. R.; Alexander, D. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) observations of NuSTAR J033202-2746.8, a heavily obscured, radio-loud quasar detected in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South, the deepest layer of the NuSTAR extragalactic survey (∼400 ks, at its deepest). NuSTAR J033202-2746.8 is reliabl...

  5. A DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE LINEAR BIAS OF MID-INFRARED-SELECTED QUASARS AT z ≈ 1 USING COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND LENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geach, J. E. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Hickox, R. C.; Hainline, K. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Laboratory, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Bleem, L. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bhattacharya, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Holder, G. P.; De Haan, T.; Dobbs, M. A.; Dudley, J. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Cho, H.-M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); George, E. M.; Holzapfel, W. L. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Halverson, N. W., E-mail: j.geach@herts.ac.uk [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences and Department of Physics, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); and others

    2013-10-20

    We measure the cross-power spectrum of the projected mass density as traced by the convergence of the cosmic microwave background lensing field from the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and a sample of Type 1 and 2 (unobscured and obscured) quasars at (z) ∼ 1 selected with the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, over 2500 deg{sup 2}. The cross-power spectrum is detected at ≈7σ, and we measure a linear bias b = 1.61 ± 0.22, consistent with clustering analyses. Using an independent lensing map, derived from Planck observations, to measure the cross-spectrum, we find excellent agreement with the SPT analysis. The bias of the combined sample of Type 1 and 2 quasars determined in this work is similar to that previously determined for Type 1 quasars alone; we conclude that obscured and unobscured quasars trace the matter field in a similar way. This result has implications for our understanding of quasar unification and evolution schemes.

  6. SLoWPoKES-II: 100,000 WIDE BINARIES IDENTIFIED IN SDSS WITHOUT PROPER MOTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhital, Saurav [Department of Physical Sciences, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Blvd., Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States); West, Andrew A.; Schluns, Kyle J.; Massey, Angela P. [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Stassun, Keivan G., E-mail: dhitals@erau.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 6301 Stevenson Center, Nashville, TN, 37235 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We present the Sloan Low-mass Wide Pairs of Kinematically Equivalent Stars (SLoWPoKES)-II catalog of low-mass visual binaries identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) by matching photometric distances. The candidate pairs are vetted by comparing the stellar information. The candidate pairs are vetted by comparing the stellar density at their respective Galactic positions to Monte Carlo realizations of a simulated Milky Way. In this way, we are able to identify large numbers of bona fide wide binaries without the need for proper motions. Here, 105,537 visual binaries with angular separations of ∼1–20″ were identified, each with a probability of chance alignment of ≤5%. This is the largest catalog of bona fide wide binaries to date, and it contains a diversity of systems—in mass, mass ratios, binary separations, metallicity, and evolutionary states—that should facilitate follow-up studies to characterize the properties of M dwarfs and white dwarfs. There is a subtle but definitive suggestion of multiple populations in the physical separation distribution, supporting earlier findings. We suggest that wide binaries are composed of multiple populations, most likely representing different formation modes. There are 141 M7 or later wide binary candidates, representing a seven-fold increase over the number currently known. These binaries are too wide to have been formed via the ejection mechanism. Finally, we found that 6% of spectroscopically confirmed M dwarfs are not included in the SDSS STAR catalog; they are misclassified as extended sources due to the presence of a nearby or partially resolved companion. The SLoWPoKES-II catalog is publicly available to the entire community on the World Wide Web via the Filtergraph data visualization portal.

  7. Brave New World: Data Intensive Science with SDSS and the VO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, A. R.; Szalay, A. S.; O'Mullane, W.; Nieto-Santisteban, M.; Budavari, T.; Li, N.; Carliles, S.; Haridas, V.; Malik, T.; Gray, J.

    2004-12-01

    With the advent of digital archives and the VO, astronomy is quickly changing from a data-hungry to a data-intensive science. Local and specialized access to data will remain the most direct and efficient way to get data out of individual archives, especially if you know what you are looking for. However, the enormous sizes of the upcoming archives will preclude this type of access for most institutions, and will not allow researchers to tap the vast potential for discovery in cross-matching and comparing data between different archives. The VO makes this type of interoperability and distributed data access possible by adopting industry standards for data access (SQL) and data interchange (SOAP/XML) with platform independence (Web services). As a sneak preview of this brave new world where astronomers may need to become SQL warriors, we present a look at VO-enabled access to catalog data in the SDSS Catalog Archive Server (CAS): CasJobs - a workbench environment that allows arbitrarily complex SQL queries and your own personal database (MyDB) that you can share with collaborators; OpenSkyQuery - an IVOA (International Virtual Observatory Alliance) compliant federation of multiple archives (OpenSkyNodes) that currently links nearly 20 catalogs and allows cross-match queries (in ADQL - Astronomical Data Query Language) between them; Spectrum and Filter Profile Web services that provide access to an open database of spectra (registered users may add their own spectra); and VO-enabled Mirage - a Java visualizatiion tool developed at Bell Labs and enhanced at JHU that allows side-by-side comparison of SDSS catalog and FITS image data. Anticipating the next generation of Petabyte archives like LSST by the end of the decade, we are developing a parallel cross-match engine for all-sky cross-matches between large surveys, along with a 100-Terabyte data intensive science laboratory with high-speed parallel data access.

  8. Structure of Quasar Continuum Emission Regions and Cosmology from Optical and X-Ray Microlensing in Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-02

    15. NUMBER OF PAGES 42 14. SUBJECT TERMS cosmology : observations — accretion, accretion disks — dark matter — gravitational lensing...black hole. Subject headings: cosmology : observations — accretion, accretion disks — dark matter — gravitational lensing — quasars: general 2...U.S.N.A. – Trident Scholar project report; no. 365 (2008) STRUCTURE OF QUASAR CONTINUUM EMISSION REGIONS AND COSMOLOGY FROM OPTICAL AND X-RAY

  9. X-RAY ABSORPTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eitan, Assaf; Behar, Ehud, E-mail: sassafe@tx.technion.ac.il, E-mail: behar@physics.technion.ac.il [Physics Department, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2013-09-01

    The soft X-ray photoelectric absorption of high-z quasars has been known for two decades, but has no unambiguous astrophysical context. We construct the largest sample to date of 58 high-redshift quasars (z > 0.45) selected from the XMM-Newton archive based on a high photon count criterion (>1800). We measure the optical depth {tau} at 0.5 keV and find that 43% of the quasars show significant absorption. We aim to find which physical parameters of the quasars, e.g., redshift, radio luminosity, radio loudness, or X-ray luminosity, drive their observed absorption. We compare the absorption behavior with redshift with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We also compare the absorption with a comparison sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows. Although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with diffuse IGM absorption, many intermediate-z (0.45 < z < 2) quasars are not sufficiently absorbed for this scenario, and are appreciably less absorbed than GRBs. Only 10/37 quasars at z < 2 are absorbed, and only 5/30 radio-quiet quasars are absorbed. We find a weak correlation between {tau} and z, and an even weaker correlation between {tau} and radio luminosity. These findings lead to the conclusion that although a diffuse IGM origin for the quasar absorption is unlikely, the optical depth does seem to increase with redshift, roughly as (1 + z){sup 2.2{+-}0.6}, tending to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 at high redshifts, similar to the high-z GRBs. This result can be explained by an ionized and clumpy IGM at z < 2, and a cold, diffuse IGM at higher redshift. If, conversely, the absorption occurs at the quasar, and owing to the steep L{sub x} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 7.1{+-}0.5} correlation in the present sample, the host column density scales as N{sub H}{proportional_to}L{sub x}{sup 0.7{+-}0.1}.

  10. DISCOVERY OF DRAMATIC OPTICAL VARIABILITY IN SDSS J1100+4421: A PECULIAR RADIO-LOUD NARROW-LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Morokuma, Tomoki; Doi, Mamoru; Kikuchi, Yuki [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Itoh, Ryosuke [Department of Physical Sciences, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Akitaya, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.; Kawabata, Koji S. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiko; Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Stawarz, Łukasz [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Gandhi, Poshak [Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1-3LE (United Kingdom); Ali, Gamal; Essam, Ahmad; Hamed, Gamal [National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics, Helwan, Cairo (Egypt); Aoki, Tsutomu [Kiso Observatory, Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Kiso, Nagano 397-0101 (Japan); Contreras, Carlos; Hsiao, Eric Y. [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Colina El Pino, Casilla 601 (Chile); Iwata, Ikuru, E-mail: masaomi.tanaka@nao.ac.jp [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); and others

    2014-10-01

    We present our discovery of dramatic variability in SDSS J1100+4421 by the high-cadence transient survey Kiso Supernova Survey. The source brightened in the optical by at least a factor of three within about half a day. Spectroscopic observations suggest that this object is likely a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1) at z = 0.840, however, with unusually strong narrow emission lines. The estimated black hole mass of ∼10{sup 7} M {sub ☉} implies bolometric nuclear luminosity close to the Eddington limit. SDSS J1100+4421 is also extremely radio-loud, with a radio loudness parameter of R ≅ 4 × 10{sup 2}-3 × 10{sup 3}, which implies the presence of relativistic jets. Rapid and large-amplitude optical variability of the target, reminiscent of that found in a few radio- and γ-ray-loud NLS1s, is therefore produced most likely in a blazar-like core. The 1.4 GHz radio image of the source shows an extended structure with a linear size of about 100 kpc. If SDSS J1100+4421 is a genuine NLS1, as suggested here, this radio structure would then be the largest ever discovered in this type of active galaxies.

  11. A Gaia-PS1-SDSS (GPS1) Proper Motion Catalog Covering 3/4 of the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hai-Jun; Gupta, Prashansa; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martin, Nicolas F.; Liu, Chao; Goldman, Bertrand; Platais, Imants; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Waters, Christopher Z.

    2017-09-01

    We combine Gaia DR1, PS1, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and 2MASS astrometry to measure proper motions for 350 million sources across three-fourths of the sky down to a magnitude of {m}r˜ 20. Using positions of galaxies from PS1, we build a common reference frame for the multi-epoch PS1, single-epoch SDSS and 2MASS data, and calibrate the data in small angular patches to this frame. As the Gaia DR1 excludes resolved galaxy images, we choose a different approach to calibrate its positions to this reference frame: we exploit the fact that the proper motions of stars in these patches are linear. By simultaneously fitting the positions of stars at different epochs of—Gaia DR1, PS1, SDSS, and 2MASS—we construct an extensive catalog of proper motions dubbed GPS1. GPS1 has a characteristic systematic error of less than 0.3 {mas} {{yr}}-1 and a typical precision of 1.5-2.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1. The proper motions have been validated using galaxies, open clusters, distant giant stars, and QSOs. In comparison with other published faint proper motion catalogs, GPS1's systematic error ( 2.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1). Similarly, its precision (˜1.5 {mas} {{yr}}-1) is a four-fold improvement relative to PPMXL and UCAC4 (˜6.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1). For QSOs, the precision of GPS1 is found to be worse (˜2.0-3.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1), possibly due to their particular differential chromatic refraction. The GPS1 catalog will be released online and be available via the VizieR Service and VO Service.

  12. Star Formation Quenching in Quasar Host Galaxies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Carniani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Galaxy evolution is likely to be shaped by negative feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN. In the whole range of redshifts and luminosities studied so far, galaxies hosting an AGN frequently show fast and extended outflows consisting in both ionized and molecular gas. Such outflows could potentially quench the start formation within the host galaxy, but a clear evidence of negative feedback in action is still missing. Hereby I will analyse integral-field spectroscopic data for six quasars at z ~ 2.4 obtained with SINFONI in the H- and K-band. All the quasars show [Oiii]λ5007 line detection of fast, extended outflows. Also, the high signal-to-noise SINFONI observations allow the identification of faint narrow Hα emission (FWHM < 500 km/s, which is spatially extended and associated with star formation in the host galaxy. On paper fast outflows are spatially anti-correlated with star-formation powered emission, i.e., star formation is suppressed in the area affected by the outflow. Nonetheless as narrow, spatially-extended Hα emission, indicating star formation rates of at least 50–100 M⊙ yr−1, has been detected, either AGN feedback is not affecting the whole host galaxy, or star formation is completely quenched only by several feedback episodes. On the other hand, a positive feedback scenario, supported by narrow emission in Hα extending along the edges of the outflow cone, suggests that galaxy-wide outflows could also have a twofold role in the evolution of the host galaxy. Finally, I will present CO(3-2 ALMA data for three out of the six QSOs observed with SINFONI. Flux maps obtained for the CO(3-2 transition suggest that molecular gas within the host galaxy is swept away by fast winds. A negative-feedback scenario is supported by the inferred molecular gas mass in all three objects, which is significantly below what observed in non-active main-sequence galaxies at high-z.

  13. Fifty Years of Quasars From Early Observations and Ideas to Future Research

    CERN Document Server

    Marziani, Paola; Sulentic, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The 50th anniversary of the discovery of quasars in 1963 presents an interesting opportunity to ask questions about the current state of quasar research. Formatted as a series of interviews with noted researchers in the field, each of them asked to address a specific set of questions covering topics selected by the editors, this book deals with the historical development of quasar research and discusses how advances in instrumentation and computational capabilities have benefitted quasar astronomy and have changed our basic understanding of quasars. In the last part of the book the interviews address the current topic of the role of quasars in galaxy evolution. They summarise open issues in understanding active galactic nuclei and quasars and present an outlook regarding what future observational facilities both on the ground and in space might reveal. Its interview format, the fascinating topic of quasars and black holes, and the lively recollections and at times controversial views of the contributors make ...

  14. Cosmological Constraints From SDSS MaxBCG Cluster Abundances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozo, Eduardo; /Ohio State U. /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KICP, Chicago /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Koester, Benjamin P.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David; /Caltech, JPL; Sheldon, Erin S.; /CCPP, New York; Annis, James; /Fermilab; Frieman, Joshua A.; /KICP,

    2007-03-26

    We perform a maximum likelihood analysis of the cluster abundance measured in the SDSS using the maxBCG cluster finding algorithm. Our analysis is aimed at constraining the power spectrum normalization {sigma}{sub 8}, and assumes flat cosmologies with a scale invariant spectrum, massless neutrinos, and CMB and supernova priors {Omega}{sub m}h{sup 2} = 0.128 {+-} 0.01 and h = 0.72 {+-} 0.05 respectively. Following the method described in the companion paper Rozo et al. (2007), we derive {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.92 {+-} 0.10 (1{sigma}) after marginalizing over all major systematic uncertainties. We place strong lower limits on the normalization, {sigma}{sub 8} > 0.76 (95% CL) (> 0.68 at 99% CL). We also find that our analysis favors relatively low values for the slope of the Halo Occupation Distribution (HOD), {alpha} = 0.83 {+-} 0.06. The uncertainties of these determinations will substantially improve upon completion of an ongoing campaign to estimate dynamical, weak lensing, and X-ray cluster masses in the SDSS maxBCG cluster sample.

  15. A kiloparsec-scale hyper-starburst in a quasar host less than 1 gigayear after the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Fabian; Riechers, Dominik; Cox, Pierre; Neri, Roberto; Carilli, Chris; Bertoldi, Frank; Weiss, Axel; Maiolino, Roberto

    2009-02-05

    The host galaxy of the quasar SDSS J114816.64+525150.3 (at redshift z = 6.42, when the Universe was less than a billion years old) has an infrared luminosity of 2.2 x 10(13) times that of the Sun, presumably significantly powered by a massive burst of star formation. In local examples of extremely luminous galaxies, such as Arp 220, the burst of star formation is concentrated in a relatively small central region of <100 pc radius. It is not known on which scales stars are forming in active galaxies in the early Universe, at a time when they are probably undergoing their initial burst of star formation. We do know that at some early time, structures comparable to the spheroidal bulge of the Milky Way must have formed. Here we report a spatially resolved image of [C ii] emission of the host galaxy of J114816.64+525150.3 that demonstrates that its star-forming gas is distributed over a radius of about 750 pc around the centre. The surface density of the star formation rate averaged over this region is approximately 1,000 year(-1) kpc(-2). This surface density is comparable to the peak in Arp 220, although about two orders of magnitude larger in area. This vigorous star-forming event is likely to give rise to a massive spheroidal component in this system.

  16. Are Quasar Jets Dominated by Poynting Flux?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, M

    2005-02-02

    The formation of relativistic astrophysical jets is presumably mediated by magnetic fields threading accretion disks and central, rapidly rotating objects. As it is accelerated by magnetic stresses, the jet's kinetic energy flux grows at the expense of its Poynting flux. However, it is unclear how efficient is the conversion from magnetic to kinetic energy and whether there are any observational signatures of this process. We address this issue in the context of jets in quasars. Using data from all spatial scales, we demonstrate that in these objects the conversion from Poynting-flux-dominated to matter-dominated jets is very likely to take place closer to the black hole than the region where most of the Doppler boosted radiation observed in blazars is produced. We briefly discuss the possibility that blazar activity can be induced by global MHD instabilities, e.g., via the production of localized velocity gradients that lead to dissipative events such as shocks or magnetic reconnection, where acceleration of relativistic particles and production of non-thermal flares is taking place.

  17. Hubble Space Telescope Ultraviolet spectroscopy of 14 low-redshift quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganguly, R.; Kaastra, J.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070911134

    2007-01-01

    We present low-resolution ultraviolet spectra of 14 low-redshift quasars observed with the Hubble Space Telescope STIS as part of a Snapshot project to understand the relationship between quasar outflows and luminosity. The quasar is radio-loud but has a steep spectral index and a lobe-dominated

  18. The SCUBA-2 850 μm Follow-up of WISE-selected, Luminous Dust-obscured Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lulu; Jones, Suzy F.; Han, Yunkun; Knudsen, Kirsten K.

    2017-12-01

    Hot dust-obscured galaxies (Hot DOGs) are a new population recently discovered in the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer All-Sky survey. Multiwavelength follow-up observations suggest that they are luminous, dust-obscured quasars at high redshift. Here we present the JCMT SCUBA-2 850 μm follow-up observations of 10 Hot DOGs. Four out of ten Hot DOGs have been detected at >3σ level. Based on the IR SED decomposition approach, we derive the IR luminosities of AGN torus and cold dust components. Hot DOGs in our sample are extremely luminous with most of them having {L}{IR}{tot}> {10}14 {L}⊙ . The torus emissions dominate the total IR energy output. However, the cold dust contribution is still non-negligible, with the fraction of the cold dust contribution to the total IR luminosity (˜8%-24%) being dependent on the choice of torus model. The derived cold dust temperatures in Hot DOGs are comparable to those in UV bright quasars with similar IR luminosity, but much higher than those in SMGs. Higher dust temperatures in Hot DOGs may be due to the more intense radiation field caused by intense starburst and obscured AGN activities. Fourteen and five submillimeter serendipitous sources in the 10 SCUBA-2 fields around Hot DOGs have been detected at >3σ and >3.5σ levels, respectively. By estimating their cumulative number counts, we confirm the previous argument that Hot DOGs lie in dense environments. Our results support the scenario in which Hot DOGs are luminous, dust-obscured quasars lying in dense environments, and being in the transition phase between extreme starburst and UV-bright quasars.

  19. The Properties of Quasar 2175 Å Dust Absorbers at z = 1.0-2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jingzhe; Ge, Jian; Prochaska, Jason; Zhao, Yinan; Zhang, Shaohua; Ji, Tuo; Lundgren, Britt; Zhou, Hongyan; Lu, Honglin; Schneider, Donald

    2018-01-01

    Quasar 2175 Å dust absorbers (2DAs) are a population of quasar absorption line systems identified by the broad absorption feature centered around rest-frame 2175 Å, which is ubiquitously seen in the Milky Way extinction curves. These absorbers are excellent tracers of gas and dust properties, metal abundances, chemical evolution, physical conditions, as well as kinematics in the absorbing galaxies. We present the metallicity, depletion pattern, kinematics, and the cold neutral content (HI and CI gas) of a sample of 2DAs at z = 1.0-2.5 that were initially selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and followed up with Keck and MMT spectrographs. We perform a correlation analysis between metallicity, redshift, depletion level, velocity width, and explore relationships between 2DAs and other absorption line systems. The 2DAs on average have higher metallicity, higher depletion levels, and larger velocity widths than Damped Lyman-α absorbers (DLAs) or subDLAs. The correlation between [Zn/H] and [Fe/Zn] or [Zn/H] and logΔV90 can be used as alternative stellar mass estimators based on the well-established mass-metallicity relation. The relationship with other quasar absorption line systems can be described as (1) 2DAs are a subset of Mg II and Fe II absorbers, (2) 2DAs are preferentially metal-strong DLAs/subDLAs, (3) More importantly, all of the 2DAs show CI detections with N(CI) > 14.0 cm-2, (4) 2DAs can be used as molecular gas tracers. Their host galaxies are likely to be chemically enriched, evolved, and massive galaxies (more massive than typical DLA/subDLA galaxies). In addition, we have, for the first time, identified the host galaxy of a 2DA beyond the local Universe using HST IR direct imaging and grism spectroscopy.

  20. Evidence that the AGN dominates the radio emission in z ˜ 1 radio-quiet quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah V.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Kalfountzou, Eleni; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Verma, Aprajita; Cao Orjales, José M.; Stevens, Jason

    2017-06-01

    In order to understand the role of radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) in galaxy evolution, we must determine the relative levels of accretion and star-formation activity within these objects. Previous work at low radio flux densities has shown that accretion makes a significant contribution to the total radio emission, in contrast with other quasar studies that suggest star formation dominates. To investigate, we use 70 RQQs from the Spitzer-Herschel Active Galaxy Survey. These quasars are all at z ˜ 1, thereby minimizing evolutionary effects, and have been selected to span a factor of ˜100 in optical luminosity, so that the luminosity dependence of their properties can be studied. We have imaged the sample using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA), whose high sensitivity results in 35 RQQs being detected above 2σ. This radio data set is combined with far-infrared luminosities derived from grey-body fitting to Herschel photometry. By exploiting the far-infrared-radio correlation observed for star-forming galaxies, and comparing two independent estimates of the star-formation rate, we show that star formation alone is not sufficient to explain the total radio emission. Considering RQQs above a 2σ detection level in both the radio and the far-infrared, 92 per cent are accretion dominated, and the accretion process accounts for 80 per cent of the radio luminosity when summed across the objects. The radio emission connected with accretion appears to be correlated with the optical luminosity of the RQQ, whilst a weaker luminosity dependence is evident for the radio emission connected with star formation.

  1. Parametrization and Classification of 20 Billion LSST Objects: Lessons from SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivezic, Z.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Axelrod, T.; /Large Binocular Telescope, Tucson; Becker, A.C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Becla, J.; /SLAC; Borne, K.; /George Mason U.; Burke, David L.; /SLAC; Claver, C.F.; /NOAO, Tucson; Cook, K.H.; /LLNL, Livermore; Connolly, A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Gilmore, D.K.; /SLAC; Jones, R.L.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Juric, M.; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study; Kahn, Steven M.; /SLAC; Lim, K-T.; /SLAC; Lupton, R.H.; /Princeton U.; Monet, D.G.; /Naval Observ., Flagstaff; Pinto, P.A.; /Arizona U.; Sesar, B.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Stubbs, Christopher W.; /Harvard U.; Tyson, J.Anthony; /UC, Davis

    2011-11-10

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be a large, wide-field ground-based system designed to obtain, starting in 2015, multiple images of the sky that is visible from Cerro Pachon in Northern Chile. About 90% of the observing time will be devoted to a deep-wide-fast survey mode which will observe a 20,000 deg{sup 2} region about 1000 times during the anticipated 10 years of operations (distributed over six bands, ugrizy). Each 30-second long visit will deliver 5{sigma} depth for point sources of r {approx} 24.5 on average. The co-added map will be about 3 magnitudes deeper, and will include 10 billion galaxies and a similar number of stars. We discuss various measurements that will be automatically performed for these 20 billion sources, and how they can be used for classification and determination of source physical and other properties. We provide a few classification examples based on SDSS data, such as color classification of stars, color-spatial proximity search for wide-angle binary stars, orbital-color classification of asteroid families, and the recognition of main Galaxy components based on the distribution of stars in the position-metallicity-kinematics space. Guided by these examples, we anticipate that two grand classification challenges for LSST will be (1) rapid and robust classification of sources detected in difference images, and (2) simultaneous treatment of diverse astrometric and photometric time series measurements for an unprecedentedly large number of objects.

  2. Quasar-mode Feedback in Nearby Type 1 Quasars: Ubiquitous Kiloparsec-scale Outflows and Correlations with Black Hole Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupke, David S. N.; Gültekin, Kayhan; Veilleux, Sylvain

    2017-11-01

    The prevalence and properties of kiloparsec-scale outflows in nearby Type 1 quasars have been the subject of little previous attention. This work presents Gemini integral field spectroscopy of 10 Type 1 radio-quiet quasars at z \\equiv ) of 200–1300 {km} {{{s}}}-1 and peak velocities (maximum {v}98 % ) of 500–2600 {km} {{{s}}}-1. These minor-axis outflows are powered primarily by the central active galactic nucleus, reach scales of 3–12 kpc, and often fill the field of view. Including molecular data and Type 2 quasar measurements, nearby quasars show a wide range in mass outflow rates ({dM}/{dt}=1 to > 1000 {M}ȯ {{yr}}-1) and momentum boosts [(c {dp}/{dt})/{L}{AGN}=0.01{--}20]. After extending the mass scale to Seyferts, dM/dt and dE/dt correlate with black hole mass ({dM}/{dt}∼ {M}{BH}0.7+/- 0.3 and {dE}/{dt}∼ {M}{BH}1.3+/- 0.5). Thus, the most massive black holes in the local universe power the most massive and energetic quasar-mode winds.

  3. The catalog of edge-on disk galaxies from SDSS. I. The catalog and the structural parameters of stellar disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizyaev, D. V. [Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, Sunspot, NM, 88349 (United States); Kautsch, S. J. [Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33314 (United States); Mosenkov, A. V. [Central Astronomical Observatory of RAS (Russian Federation); Reshetnikov, V. P.; Sotnikova, N. Ya.; Yablokova, N. V. [St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Hillyer, R. W. [Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present a catalog of true edge-on disk galaxies automatically selected from the Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). A visual inspection of the g, r, and i images of about 15,000 galaxies allowed us to split the initial sample of edge-on galaxy candidates into 4768 (31.8% of the initial sample) genuine edge-on galaxies, 8350 (55.7%) non-edge-on galaxies, and 1865 (12.5%) edge-on galaxies not suitable for simple automatic analysis because these objects either show signs of interaction and warps, or nearby bright stars project on it. We added more candidate galaxies from RFGC, EFIGI, RC3, and Galaxy Zoo catalogs found in the SDSS footprints. Our final sample consists of 5747 genuine edge-on galaxies. We estimate the structural parameters of the stellar disks (the stellar disk thickness, radial scale length, and central surface brightness) in the galaxies by analyzing photometric profiles in each of the g, r, and i images. We also perform simplified three-dimensional modeling of the light distribution in the stellar disks of edge-on galaxies from our sample. Our large sample is intended to be used for studying scaling relations in the stellar disks and bulges and for estimating parameters of the thick disks in different types of galaxies via the image stacking. In this paper, we present the sample selection procedure and general description of the sample.

  4. GALAXIES IN FILAMENTS HAVE MORE SATELLITES: THE INFLUENCE OF THE COSMIC WEB ON THE SATELLITE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION IN THE SDSS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Quan; Libeskind, N. I. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Tempel, E., E-mail: qguo@aip.de [Tartu Observatory, Observatooriumi 1, 61602 Tõravere (Estonia)

    2015-02-20

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M {sub sat.} < M {sub prim.} + 2.0) by a factor of ∼2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  5. Galaxies in Filaments have More Satellites: The Influence of the Cosmic Web on the Satellite Luminosity Function in the SDSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Quan; Tempel, E.; Libeskind, N. I.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate whether the satellite luminosity function (LF) of primary galaxies identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) depends on whether the host galaxy is in a filament or not. Isolated primary galaxies are identified in the SDSS spectroscopic sample, and potential satellites (that are up to four magnitudes fainter than their hosts) are searched for in the much deeper photometric sample. Filaments are constructed from the galaxy distribution by the Bisous process. Isolated primary galaxies are divided into two subsamples: those in filaments and those not in filaments. We examine the stacked mean satellite LF of both the filament and nonfilament samples and find that, on average, the satellite LF of galaxies in filaments is significantly higher than those of galaxies not in filaments. The filamentary environment can increase the abundance of the brightest satellites (M sat. 2.0) by a factor of ~2 compared with nonfilament isolated galaxies. This result is independent of the primary galaxy magnitude, although the satellite LF of galaxies in the faintest magnitude bin is too noisy to determine if such a dependence exists. Because our filaments are extracted from a spectroscopic flux-limited sample, we consider the possibility that the difference in satellite LF is due to a redshift, color, or environmental bias, finding these to be insufficient to explain our result. The dependence of the satellite LF on the cosmic web suggests that the filamentary environment may have a strong effect on the efficiency of galaxy formation.

  6. Probability distributions for the magnification of quasars due to microlensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambsganss, Joachim

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational microlensing can magnify the flux of a lensed quasar considerably and therefore possibly influence quasar source counts or the observed quasar luminosity function. A large number of distributions of magnification probabilities due to gravitational microlensing for finite sources are presented, with a reasonable coverage of microlensing parameter space (i.e., surface mass density, external shear, mass spectrum of lensing objects). These probability distributions were obtained from smoothing two-dimensional magnification patterns with Gaussian source profiles. Different source sizes ranging from 10 exp 14 cm to 5 x 10 exp 16 cm were explored. The probability distributions show a large variety of shapes. Coefficients of fitted slopes for large magnifications are presented.

  7. Black hole mass estimates and emission-line properties of a sample of redshift z > 6.5 quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Rosa, Gisella; Peterson, Bradley M.; Frank, Stephan [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Venemans, Bram P.; Decarli, Roberto; Walter, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Gennaro, Mario [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Simcoe, Robert A. [MIT-Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Dietrich, Matthias [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Clippinger Lab 251B, Athens, OH 45701 (United States); McMahon, Richard G.; Hewett, Paul C. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Mortlock, Daniel J. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Simpson, Chris [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool Science Park, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    We present the analysis of optical and near-infrared spectra of the only four z > 6.5 quasars known to date, discovered in the UKIDSS-LAS and VISTA-VIKING surveys. Our data set consists of new Very Large Telescope/X-Shooter and Magellan/FIRE observations. These are the best optical/NIR spectroscopic data that are likely to be obtained for the z > 6.5 sample using current 6-10 m facilities. We estimate the black hole (BH) mass, the Eddington ratio, and the Si IV/C IV, C III]/C IV, and Fe II/Mg II emission-line flux ratios. We perform spectral modeling using a procedure that allows us to derive a probability distribution for the continuum components and to obtain the quasar properties weighted upon the underlying distribution of continuum models. The z > 6.5 quasars show the same emission properties as their counterparts at lower redshifts. The z > 6.5 quasars host BHs with masses of ∼10{sup 9} M{sub ☉} that are accreting close to the Eddington luminosity ((log(L{sub Bol}/L{sub Edd})) = –0.4 ± 0.2), in agreement with what has been observed for a sample of 4.0 < z < 6.5 quasars. By comparing the Si IV/C IV and C III]/C IV flux ratios with the results obtained from luminosity-matched samples at z ∼ 6 and 2 ≤ z ≤ 4.5, we find no evidence of evolution of the line ratios with cosmic time. We compare the measured Fe II/Mg II flux ratios with those obtained for a sample of 4.0 < z < 6.4 sources. The two samples are analyzed using a consistent procedure. There is no evidence that the Fe II/Mg II flux ratio evolves between z = 7 and z = 4. Under the assumption that the Fe II/Mg II traces the Fe/Mg abundance ratio, this implies the presence of major episodes of chemical enrichment in the quasar hosts in the first ∼0.8 Gyr after the Big Bang.

  8. E+A Galaxy Properties and Post-Starburst Galaxy Evolution Data through SDSS-IV MaNGA and Illustris: A Co-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojanen, Winonah; Dudley, Raymond; Edwards, Kay; Gonzalez, Andrea; Johnson, Amalya; Kerrison, Nicole; Marinelli, Mariarosa; Melchert, Nancy; Liu, Charles; Sloan Collaboration, SDSS-IV MaNGA

    2018-01-01

    E+A galaxies (Elliptical + A-type stars) are post-starburst galaxies that have experienced a sudden quenching phase. Using previous research methods, 39 candidates out of 2,812 galaxies observed, or 1.4%, were selected from the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey. We then identified morphological characteristics of the 39 galaxies including stellar kinematics, Gini coefficient, gas density and distribution and stellar ages. To study the origin of how E+A galaxies evolved to their present state, galaxy simulation data from the Illustris simulation was utilized to identify similar quenched post-starburst candidates. Seven post-starburst candidates were identified through star formation rate histories of Illustris simulated galaxies. The evolution of these galaxies is studied from 0 to 13.8 billion years ago to identify what caused the starburst and quenching of the Illustris candidates. Similar morphological characteristics of Illustris post-starburst candidates are pulled from before, during, and post-starburst and compared to the same morphological characteristics of the E+A galaxies from SDSS-IV MaNGA. The characteristics and properties of the Illustris galaxies are used to identify the possible evolutionary histories of the observed E+A galaxies. This work was supported by grants AST-1460860 from the National Science Foundation and SDSS FAST/SSP-483 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to the CUNY College of Staten Island.

  9. The near-to-mid infrared spectrum of quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernán-Caballero, Antonio; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Mateos, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    We analyse a sample of 85 luminous (log (νLν(3 μm)/erg s-1) > 45.5) quasars with rest frame ˜2-11 μm spectroscopy from AKARI and Spitzer. Their high luminosity allows a direct determination of the near-infrared quasar spectrum free from host galaxy emission. A semi-empirical model consisting of a single template for the accretion disc and two blackbodies for the dust emission successfully reproduces the 0.1-10 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Excess emission at 1-2 μm over the best-fitting model suggests that hotter dust is necessary in addition to the ˜1200 K blackbody and the disc to reproduce the entire near-infrared spectrum. Variation in the extinction affecting the disc and in the relative strength of the disc and dust components accounts for the diversity of individual SEDs. Quasars with higher dust-to-disc luminosity ratios show slightly redder infrared continua and less prominent silicate emission. We find no luminosity dependence in the shape of the average infrared quasar spectrum. We generate a new quasar template that covers the rest-frame range 0.1-11 μm, and separate templates for the disc and dust components. Comparison with other infrared quasar composites suggests that previous ones are less reliable in the 2-4 μm range. Our template is the first one to provide a detailed view of the infrared emission on both sides of the 4 μm bump.

  10. Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse (CQUEAN)

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Won-Kee; Pak, Soojong; Im, Myungshin; Choi, Changsu; Jeon, Yiseul; Chang, Seunghyuk; Jeong, Hyeonju; Lim, Juhee; Kim, Eunbin

    2012-01-01

    We describe the overall characteristics and the performance of an optical CCD camera system, Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse (CQUEAN), which is being used at the 2.1 m Otto Struve Telescope of the McDonald Observatory since 2010 August. CQUEAN was developed for follow-up imaging observations of red sources such as high redshift quasar candidates (z >= 5), Gamma Ray Bursts, brown dwarfs, and young stellar objects. For efficient observations of the red objects, CQUEAN has a science camera ...

  11. Measuring Quasar Spin via X-ray Continuum Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Matthew; Pooley, David; Rappaport, Saul; Steiner, Jack

    2018-01-01

    We have identified several quasars whose X-ray spectra appear very soft. When fit with power-law models, the best-fit indices are greater than 3. This is very suggestive of thermal disk emission, indicating that the X-ray spectrum is dominated by the disk component. Galactic black hole binaries in such states have been successfully fit with disk-blackbody models to constrain the inner radius, which also constrains the spin of the black hole. We have fit those models to XMM-Newton spectra of several of our identified soft X-ray quasars to place constraints on the spins of the supermassive black holes.

  12. Clues to Quasar Broad Line Region Geometry and Kinematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Wilkes, B. J.; Barthel, P. D.

    2000-01-01

    We present evidence that the high-velocity CIV lambda 1549 emission line gas of radio-loud quasars may originate in a disk-like configuration, in close proximity to the accretion disk often assumed to emit the low-ionization lines. For a sample of 36 radio-loud z~2 quasars we find the 20--30% peak...... width to show significant inverse correlations with the fractional radio core-flux density, R, the radio axis inclination indicator. Highly inclined systems have broader line wings, consistent with a high-velocity field perpendicular to the radio axis. By contrast, the narrow line-core shows...

  13. Quasar Formation and Energy Emission in Black Hole Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang T. X.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Formation and energy emission of quasars are investigated in accord with the black hole universe, a new cosmological model recently developed by Zhang. According to this new cosmological model, the universe originated from a star-like black hole and grew through a supermassive black hole to the present universe by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. The origin, structure, evolution, expansion, and cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe have been fully ex- plained in Paper I and II. This study as Paper III explains how a quasar forms, ignites and releases energy as an amount of that emitted by dozens of galaxies. A main sequence star, after its fuel supply runs out, will, in terms of its mass, form a dwarf, a neutron star, or a black hole. A normal galaxy, after its most stars have run out of their fuels and formed dwarfs, neutron stars, and black holes, will eventually shrink its size and collapse towards the center by gravity to form a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses. This collapse leads to that extremely hot stellar black holes merge each other and further into the massive black hole at the center and meantime release a huge amount of radiation energy that can be as great as that of a quasar. Therefore, when the stellar black holes of a galaxy collapse and merge into a supermassive black hole, the galaxy is activated and a quasar is born. In the black hole universe, the observed dis- tant quasars powered by supermassive black holes can be understood as donuts from the mother universe. They were actually formed in the mother universe and then swallowed into our universe. The nearby galaxies are still very young and thus quiet at the present time. They will be activated and further evolve into quasars after billions of years. At that time, they will enter the universe formed by the currently observed distant quasars as similar to the distant quasars entered our universe

  14. A large anisotropy in the sky distribution of 3CRR quasars and other radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singal, Ashok K.

    2015-06-01

    We report the presence of large anisotropies in the sky distributions of powerful extended quasars as well as some other sub-classes of radio galaxies in the 3CRR survey, the most reliable and most intensively studied complete sample of strong steep-spectrum radio sources. The anisotropies lie about a plane passing through the equinoxes and the north celestial pole. Out of a total of 48 quasars in the sample, 33 of them lie in one half of the observed sky and the remaining 15 in the other half. The probability that in a random distribution of 3CRR quasars in the sky, statistical fluctuations could give rise to an asymmetry in observed numbers up to this level is only ˜1 %. Also only about 1/4th of Fanaroff-Riley 1 (FR1) type of radio galaxies lie in the first half of the observed sky and the remainder in the second half. If we include all the observed asymmetries in the sky distributions of quasars and radio galaxies in the 3CRR sample, the probability of their occurrence by a chance combination reduces to ˜2×10-5. Two pertinent but disturbing questions that could be raised here are—firstly why should there be such large anisotropies present in the sky distribution of some of the strongest and most distant discrete sources, implying inhomogeneities in the universe at very large scales (covering a fraction of the universe)? Secondly why should such anisotropies lie about a great circle decided purely by the orientation of earth's rotation axis and/or the axis of its revolution around the sun? It seems yet more curious when we consider the other anisotropies, e.g., an alignment of the four normals to the quadrupole and octopole planes in the CMBR with the cosmological dipole and the equinoxes. Then there is the other recently reported large dipole anisotropy in the NVSS radio source distribution differing in magnitude from the CMBR dipole by a factor of four, and therefore not explained as due to the peculiar motion of the Solar system, yet aligned with the CMBR

  15. Models of the Strongly Lensed Quasar DES J0408-5354

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agnello, A.; et al.

    2017-02-01

    We present gravitational lens models of the multiply imaged quasar DES J0408-5354, recently discovered in the Dark Energy Survey (DES) footprint, with the aim of interpreting its remarkable quad-like configuration. We first model the DES single-epoch $grizY$ images as a superposition of a lens galaxy and four point-like objects, obtaining spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and relative positions for the objects. Three of the point sources (A,B,D) have SEDs compatible with the discovery quasar spectra, while the faintest point-like image (G2/C) shows significant reddening and a `grey' dimming of $\\approx0.8$mag. In order to understand the lens configuration, we fit different models to the relative positions of A,B,D. Models with just a single deflector predict a fourth image at the location of G2/C but considerably brighter and bluer. The addition of a small satellite galaxy ($R_{\\rm E}\\approx0.2$") in the lens plane near the position of G2/C suppresses the flux of the fourth image and can explain both the reddening and grey dimming. All models predict a main deflector with Einstein radius between $1.7"$ and $2.0",$ velocity dispersion $267-280$km/s and enclosed mass $\\approx 6\\times10^{11}M_{\\odot},$ even though higher resolution imaging data are needed to break residual degeneracies in model parameters. The longest time-delay (B-A) is estimated as $\\approx 85$ (resp. $\\approx125$) days by models with (resp. without) a perturber near G2/C. The configuration and predicted time-delays of J0408-5354 make it an excellent target for follow-up aimed at understanding the source quasar host galaxy and substructure in the lens, and measuring cosmological parameters. We also discuss some lessons learnt from J0408-5354 on lensed quasar finding strategies, due to its chromaticity and morphology.

  16. The X-Ray and Mid-infrared Luminosities in Luminous Type 1 Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Ting J.; Hickox, Ryan C.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Stern, Daniel; Assef, Roberto; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Brown, Michael J. I.; Harrison, Chris M.; Hainline, Kevin N.; Alberts, Stacey; Alexander, David M.; Brodwin, Mark; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel

    2017-03-01

    Several recent studies have reported different intrinsic correlations between the active galactic nucleus (AGN) mid-IR luminosity ({L}{MIR}) and the rest-frame 2-10 keV luminosity (L X) for luminous quasars. To understand the origin of the difference in the observed {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations, we study a sample of 3247 spectroscopically confirmed type 1 AGNs collected from Boötes, XMM-COSMOS, XMM-XXL-North, and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the Swift/XRT footprint spanning over four orders of magnitude in luminosity. We carefully examine how different observational constraints impact the observed {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations, including the inclusion of X-ray-nondetected objects, possible X-ray absorption in type 1 AGNs, X-ray flux limits, and star formation contamination. We find that the primary factor driving the different {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relations reported in the literature is the X-ray flux limits for different studies. When taking these effects into account, we find that the X-ray luminosity and mid-IR luminosity (measured at rest-frame 6 μ {{m}}, or {L}6μ {{m}}) of our sample of type 1 AGNs follow a bilinear relation in the log-log plane: {log}{L}{{X}}=(0.84+/- 0.03)× {log}{L}6μ {{m}}/{10}45 erg s-1 + (44.60 ± 0.01) for {L}6μ {{m}}< {10}44.79 erg s-1, and {log}{L}{{X}}=(0.40+/- 0.03)× {log}{L}6μ {{m}}/{10}45 erg s-1 + (44.51 ± 0.01) for {L}6μ {{m}} ≥slant {10}44.79 erg s-1. This suggests that the luminous type 1 quasars have a shallower {L}{{X}}{--}{L}6μ {{m}} correlation than the approximately linear relations found in local Seyfert galaxies. This result is consistent with previous studies reporting a luminosity-dependent {L}{{X}}{--}{L}{MIR} relation and implies that assuming a linear {L}{{X}}{--}{L}6μ {{m}} relation to infer the neutral gas column density for X-ray absorption might overestimate the column densities in luminous quasars.

  17. The Prevalence of Ionized Gas Outflow Signatures in SDSS-IV MaNGA Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Anthony M.; Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia

    2018-01-01

    Actively accreting supermassive black holes (AGN) can have a variety of effects on their host galaxies, from generating large regions of hot, photoionized gas, to driving AGN feedback in the form of galaxy wide outflows that may affect the evolution of the galaxy over time by quenching their star formation and by thus setting limits to the total mass of their host galaxy. The focus of this work is to assess the prevalence of AGN-driven outflows in low-redshift AGN of moderate power using IFU observations of 2778 galaxies available through SDSS-IV MaNGA.SDSS-IV MaNGA is an optical spectroscopic IFU survey which will have obtained spatially resolved spectroscopic observations of ~10,000 galaxies at z ≤ 0.1 and with stellar masses >10^9 solar masses over the next three years, allowing us to describe the kinematic properties of a large galaxy sample across different spatial regions.We have re-mapped the kinematics of the [O III] emission line to account for asymmetries and secondary kinematic components in the emission line brought on by potential AGN-driven outflows. Using all galaxies currently in the MaNGA survey, we implement a new fitting procedure to help determine the prevalence of these secondary components. Specifically, we use the non-parametric W80 value as a proxy for velocity dispersion, which we expect to be affected especially in the case of asymmetries and broadening of the emission lines. Separating these galaxies into two samples of independently identified AGN candidates and non-AGN, I will show that broad secondary components are twice as common in MaNGA-selected AGN compared to galaxies in MaNGA not classified as AGN. Moreover, when the underlying distribution of W80 values are compared between samples, I will show that the differences in these distributions are statistically significant. This demonstrates that large IFU survey like SDSS-IV MaNGA will uncover many previously unknown AGN and AGN feedback signatures. Outflows and feedback from low

  18. Evidence for Active Galactic Nucleus Driven Outflows in Young Radio Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minjin; Ho, Luis C.; Lonsdale, Carol J.; Lacy, Mark; Blain, Andrew W.; Kimball, Amy E.

    2013-05-01

    We present near-infrared spectra of young radio quasars (P 1.4 GHz ≈ 26-27 W Hz-1) selected from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer. The detected objects have typical redshifts of z ≈ 1.6-2.5 and bolometric luminosities ~1047 erg s-1. Based on the intensity ratios of narrow emission lines, we find that these objects are mainly powered by active galactic nuclei (AGNs), although star formation contribution cannot be completely ruled out. The host galaxies experience moderate levels of extinction, AV ≈ 0-1.3 mag. The observed [O III] λ5007 luminosities and rest-frame J-band magnitudes constrain the black hole masses to lie in the range ~108.9-109.7 M ⊙. From the empirical correlation between black hole mass and host galaxy mass, we infer stellar masses of ~1011.3-1012.2 M ⊙. The [O III] line is exceptionally broad, with FWHM ~1300-2100 km s-1, significantly larger than that of ordinary distant quasars. We argue that these large line widths can be explained by jet-induced outflows, as predicted by theoretical models of AGN feedback. This paper includes data gathered with the 6.5 meter Magellan Telescopes located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  19. GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE QUASAR PKS 1441+25: STORY OF AN ESCAPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Archambault, S. [Physics Department, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Archer, A.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Aune, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Barnacka, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Benbow, W.; Cerruti, M. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Bird, R. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Biteau, J. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Cardenzana, J. V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, X. [Institute of Physics and Astronomy, University of Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam-Golm (Germany); Christiansen, J. L. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 94307 (United States); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Coppi, P. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Dickinson, H. J.; Dumm, J., E-mail: matteo.cerruti@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: caajohns@ucsc.edu, E-mail: jbiteau@ucsc.edu, E-mail: biteau@ipno.in2p3.fr, E-mail: mcerruti@lpnhe.in2p3.fr, E-mail: mark.lang@nuigalway.ie [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Collaboration: VERITAS; SPOL; ASAS-SN; OVRO; NuSTAR; CRTS; and others

    2015-12-20

    Outbursts from gamma-ray quasars provide insights on the relativistic jets of active galactic nuclei and constraints on the diffuse radiation fields that fill the universe. The detection of significant emission above 100 GeV from a distant quasar would show that some of the radiated gamma-rays escape pair-production interactions with low-energy photons, be it the extragalactic background light (EBL), or the radiation near the supermassive black hole lying at the jet’s base. VERITAS detected gamma-ray emission up to ∼200 GeV from PKS 1441+25 (z = 0.939) during 2015 April, a period of high activity across all wavelengths. This observation of PKS 1441+25 suggests that the emission region is located thousands of Schwarzschild radii away from the black hole. The gamma-ray detection also sets a stringent upper limit on the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared EBL intensity, suggesting that galaxy surveys have resolved most, if not all, of the sources of the EBL at these wavelengths.

  20. Texas Urban Triangle : pilot study to implement a spatial decision support system (SDSS) for sustainable mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    This project addressed sustainable transportation in the Texas Urban Triangle (TUT) by conducting a pilot : project at the county scale. The project tested and developed the multi-attribute Spatial Decision Support : System (SDSS) developed in 2009 u...

  1. Detection of Rest-frame Optical Lines from X-shooter Spectroscopy of Weak Emission Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Richard M.; Shemmer, Ohad; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Fan, Xiaohui; Gallo, Elena; Lira, Paulina; Luo, Bin; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.; Wu, Jianfeng

    2015-06-01

    Over the past 15 yr, examples of exotic radio-quiet quasars with intrinsically weak or absent broad emission line regions (BELRs) have emerged from large-scale spectroscopic sky surveys. Here, we present spectroscopy of seven such weak emission line quasars (WLQs) at moderate redshifts (z = 1.4-1.7) using the X-shooter spectrograph, which provides simultaneous optical and near-infrared spectroscopy covering the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) through optical. These new observations effectively double the number of WLQs with spectroscopy in the optical rest-frame, and they allow us to compare the strengths of (weak) high-ionization emission lines (e.g., C iv) to low-ionization lines (e.g., Mg ii, Hβ, Hα) in individual objects. We detect broad Hβ and Hα emission in all objects, and these lines are generally toward the weaker end of the distribution expected for typical quasars (e.g., Hβ has rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 15-40 Å). However, these low-ionization lines are not exceptionally weak, as is the case for high-ionization lines in WLQs. The X-shooter spectra also display relatively strong optical Fe ii emission, Hβ FWHM ≲ 4000 km s-1, and significant C iv blueshifts (≈1000-5500 km s-1) relative to the systemic redshift; two spectra also show elevated UV Fe ii emission, and an outflowing component to their (weak) Mg ii emission lines. These properties suggest that WLQs are exotic versions of “wind-dominated” quasars. Their BELRs either have unusual high-ionization components, or their BELRs are in an atypical photoionization state because of an unusually soft continuum. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program IDs 088.B-0355 and 090.B-0438.

  2. MONITORING OF THE SUPERLUMINAL QUASAR 4C 34.47

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOOIMEYER, JRA; BARTHEL, PD; SCHILIZZI, RT; MILEY, GK

    10.7 GHz VLBI observations of the giant double-lobed quasar 4C 34.47 (1721 + 343) are presented. Previous VLBI monitoring at 5 GHz indicated the presence of superluminal motion in the core of this large radio source, at velocities of approximately 2.5h-1 c (Barthel et al. 1989). In the present

  3. Measurement of Black Hole Mass Radio-Loud Quasars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this work, we construct a sample of 1585 radio-loud quasars to measure their black hole masses using broad emission lines. We compare our black hole masses with the virial black hole masses measured by Shen et al. (2010).We find that there is a large deviation between them if our black hole mass is ...

  4. Rapid interstellar scintillation of quasar PKS 1257-326

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignall, Hayley E.; Jauncey, David L.; Lovell, James E. J.; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Engvold, O

    2005-01-01

    PKS 1257-326 is one of three quasars known to show unusually large and rapid, intra-hour intensity variations, as a result of scintillation in the turbulent Galactic interstellar medium. We have measured time delays in the variability pattern arrival times at the VLA and the ATCA, as well as an

  5. Microlensing makes lensed quasar time delays significantly time variable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, S. S.; Kochanek, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    The time delays of gravitationally lensed quasars are generally believed to be unique numbers whose measurement is limited only by the quality of the light curves and the models for the contaminating contribution of gravitational microlensing to the light curves. This belief is incorrect - gravitational microlensing also produces changes in the actual time delays on the ∼day(s) light-crossing time-scale of the emission region. This is due to a combination of the inclination of the disc relative to the line of sight and the differential magnification of the temperature fluctuations producing the variability. We demonstrate this both mathematically and with direct calculations using microlensing magnification patterns. Measuring these delay fluctuations can provide a physical scale for microlensing observations, removing the need for priors on either the microlens masses or the component velocities. That time delays in lensed quasars are themselves time variable likely explains why repeated delay measurements of individual lensed quasars appear to vary by more than their estimated uncertainties. This effect is also a new important systematic problem for attempts to use time delays in lensed quasars for cosmology or to detect substructures (satellites) in lens galaxies.

  6. Radio imaging of core-dominated high redshift quasars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, PD; Vestergaard, M; Lonsdale, CJ

    VLA imaging at kiloparsec-scale resolution of sixteen core-dominated radio-loud QSOs is presented. Many;objects appear to display variable radio emission and their radio morphologies are significantly smaller than those of steep-spectrum quasars, consistent with these objects being observed at sight

  7. Determination of astrophysical parameters of quasars within the Gaia mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delchambre, L.

    2018-01-01

    We describe methods designed to determine the astrophysical parameters of quasars based on spectra coming from the red and blue spectrophotometers of the Gaia satellite. These methods principally rely on two already published algorithms that are the weighted principal component analysis and the weighted phase correlation. The presented approach benefits from a fast implementation, an intuitive interpretation as well as strong diagnostic tools on the potential errors that may arise during predictions. The production of a semi-empirical library of spectra as they will be observed by Gaia is also covered and subsequently used for validation purpose. We detail the pre-processing that is necessary in order for these spectra to be fully exploitable by our algorithms along with the procedures that are used to predict the redshifts of the quasars, their continuum slopes, the total equivalent width of their emission lines and whether these are broad absorption line (BAL) quasars or not. Performances of these procedures were assessed in comparison with the extremely randomized trees learning method and were proven to provide better results on the redshift predictions and on the ratio of correctly classified observations though the probability of detection of BAL quasars remains restricted by the low resolution of these spectra as well as by their limited signal-to-noise ratio. Finally, the triggering of some warning flags allows us to obtain an extremely pure subset of redshift predictions where approximately 99 per cent of the observations come along with absolute errors that are below 0.1.

  8. Gemini Near-infrared Spectroscopy of Luminous z~6 Quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Linhua; Fan, Xiaohui; Vestergaard, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    We present Gemini near-infrared spectroscopic observations of six luminous quasars at z=5.8$\\sim$6.3. Five of them were observed using Gemini-South/GNIRS, which provides a simultaneous wavelength coverage of 0.9--2.5 $\\mu$m in cross dispersion mode. The other source was observed in K band with Ge...

  9. Report on the Dynamical Evolution of an Axially Symmetric Quasar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The role of the angular momentum in the regular or chaotic character of motion in an axially symmetric quasar model is examined. It is found that, for a given value of the critical angular momentum , there are two values of the mass of the nucleus for which transition from regular to chaotic motion occurs.

  10. Using Quasars as Standard Candles for Studying Dark Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denney, Kelly D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Watson, D.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently demonstrated (Watson et al. 2011, ApJ, 740, L49) that quasars, or more generally active galactic nuclei (AGNs), can be used as standard candles for measuring distances in the universe, similar to Type Ia supernovae (SNe). Here, we present the initial findings of this new method...

  11. A multi-wavelength perspective on quasar fundamental properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnoe, Jessie C.

    The goal of this thesis is to use a multi-wavelength perspective to advance the methods used to estimate fundamental properties of quasars. Based on a sample of the 85 most detailed quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs) observed to date, this work focuses on calculating bolometric luminosity and black hole mass and understanding the role of orientation in determining these properties. Because quasars emit over a broad range of wavelengths, it can be challenging to determine bolometric luminosity and accretion rate (expressed as the Eddington ratio). I determine new bolometric corrections, taking particular care to address the difficulties that arise during the derivation process. Of the bolometric corrections in the infrared, optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray, those in the ultraviolet have the least dispersion and are preferred. X-ray bolometric corrections have very large dispersion and should be avoided. Black hole masses can be estimated for any quasar with a single-epoch spectrum using the single-epoch mass scaling relationships that are calibrated for a variety of emission lines, including Hbeta, Mg II lambda2798, and C IV lambda1549. I identify two sources of scatter, orientation and contamination from emission of non-virialized gas in the C IV line, between masses estimated from different emission lines and determine corrections for these effects. The application of both of these corrections reduces scatter between black hole masses estimated from different emission lines. Orientation plays an important role in determining the observed SEDs of quasars. In order to quantify this effect, I investigate quasar SEDs and their properties as a function of orientation. I find that infrared through X-ray monochromatic luminosities are orientation dependent, although the shape of the SED and estimates of the covering fraction of the circumnuclear dust are not. The sum of these investigations is to motivate the field to use a multi-wavelength approach and multi

  12. Chemical enrichment and accretion of nitrogen-loud quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, K.; Nagao, T.; Maiolino, R.; Marconi, A.; Park, D.; Taniguchi, Y.

    2017-12-01

    We present rest-frame optical spectra of 12 "nitrogen-loud" quasars at z 2.2, whose rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) spectra show strong nitrogen broad emission lines. To investigate their narrow-line region (NLR) metallicities, we measure the equivalent width (EW) of the [O III]λ5007 emission line: if the NLR metallicity is remarkably high, as suggested by the strong UV nitrogen lines, the [O III]λ5007 line flux should be very weak due to the low equilibrium temperature of the ionized gas owing to significant metal cooling. In the result we found that our spectra show moderate EW of the [O III]λ5007 line similar to general quasars. This indicates that nitrogen-loud quasars do not have extremely metal-rich gas clouds in NLRs. This suggests that strong nitrogen lines from broad-line regions (BLRs) originate from exceptionally high abundances of nitrogen relative to oxygen without very high BLR metallicities. This result indicates that broad emission lines of nitrogen are not good indicators of the BLR metallicity in some cases. On the other hand, we also investigate virial black hole masses and Eddington ratios by using the Hβ and C IVλ1549 lines for our sample. As a result, we found that black hole masses and Eddington ratios of nitrogen-loud