WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey research conducted

  1. Using Electronic Mail to Conduct Survey Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thach, Liz

    1995-01-01

    Describes public and private online networks and the characteristics of electronic mail. Reviews the literature on survey research conducted via electronic mail, and examines the issues of design, implementation, and response. A table displays advantages and disadvantages of electronic mail surveys. (AEF)

  2. Designing and conducting survey research a comprehensive guide

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, Louis M

    2014-01-01

    The industry standard guide, updated with new ideas and SPSS analysis techniques Designing and Conducting Survey Research: A Comprehensive Guide Fourth Edition is the industry standard resource that covers all major components of the survey process, updated to include new data analysis techniques and SPSS procedures with sample data sets online. The book offers practical, actionable guidance on constructing the instrument, administrating the process, and analyzing and reporting the results, providing extensive examples and worksheets that demonstrate the appropriate use of survey and data tech

  3. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph S; Blount, Katrina L; Ritchie, Jessica D; Hodshon, Beth; Krumholz, Harlan M

    2015-01-01

    In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate post-market clinical studies or augment FDA post-market surveillance requirements for higher-risk devices that are most often approved via the FDA's pre-market approval (PMA) pathway. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 47 manufacturers with operations in California, Minnesota, and Massachusetts who market devices approved via the PMA pathway. Among 22 respondents (response rate =47%), nearly all self-reported conducting post-market clinical research studies, commonly between 1 and 5; only 1 respondent reported never conducting post-market clinical research studies. While manufacturers most often engaged in these studies to satisfy FDA requirements, other reasons were reported, including performance monitoring and surveillance and market acceptance initiatives. Risks of conducting and not conducting post-market clinical research studies were described through open-ended response to questions. Medical device manufacturers commonly initiate post-market clinical studies at the request of the FDA. Clinical data from these studies should be integrated into national post-market surveillance initiatives.

  4. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross JS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Joseph S Ross, Katrina L Blount, Jessica D Ritchie, Beth Hodshon, Harlan M Krumholz Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Background: In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate post-market clinical studies or augment FDA post-market surveillance requirements for higher-risk devices that are most often approved via the FDA's pre-market approval (PMA pathway. Methods and results: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 47 manufacturers with operations in California, Minnesota, and Massachusetts who market devices approved via the PMA pathway. Among 22 respondents (response rate =47%, nearly all self-reported conducting post-market clinical research studies, commonly between 1 and 5; only 1 respondent reported never conducting post-market clinical research studies. While manufacturers most often engaged in these studies to satisfy FDA requirements, other reasons were reported, including performance monitoring and surveillance and market acceptance initiatives. Risks of conducting and not conducting post-market clinical research studies were described through open-ended response to questions. Conclusion: Medical device manufacturers commonly initiate post-market clinical studies at the request of the FDA. Clinical data from these studies should be integrated into national post-market surveillance initiatives. Keywords: FDA, PMA pathway, post-market surveillance

  5. Development of a Survey Instrument to Measure TEFL Academics' Perceptions about, Individual and Workplace Characteristics for Conducting Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Li; Hudson, Peter; Millwater, Jan; Tones, Megan

    2013-01-01

    A 30-item survey was devised to determine Chinese TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) academics' potential for conducting research. A five-part Likert scale was used to gather data from 182 academics on four factors: (1) perceptions on teaching-research nexus, (2) personal perspectives for conducting research, (3) predispositions for…

  6. Using the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey to conduct research on Medicare-eligible veterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Jonk, PhD

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS is a longitudinal, multipurpose panel survey of a nationally representative sample of Medicare beneficiaries sponsored by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS. The MCBS serves as a comprehensive data source on self-reported health and socioeconomic status, health insurance, healthcare utilization and costs, and patient satisfaction. CMS uses Medicare claims data to validate self-reported Medicare Fee-For-Service (FFS utilization. Because the Veterans Health Administration (VHA does not bill for services, CMS imputes VHA costs. This article addresses the quality of the MCBS dataset for conducting research on Medicare-eligible veterans by addressing the sample's representativeness, quality of self-reported data, and accuracy of imputed VHA cost estimates. We compared demographic data from the 1992 and 2001 National Survey of Veterans (NSV with the MCBS 1992 and 2001 Cost and Use files. We compared self-reported VHA utilization and CMS's imputed costs with VHA administrative datasets. The VHA's Pharmacy Benefits Management (PBM database is available from fiscal year (FY 1999 onward, and the VHA Health Economics Resource Center's (HERC Average Cost datasets are available from FY1998 onward. While the samples were comparable in terms of age, sex, and race, the MCBS respondents were in better health, less likely to be married, and more likely to be widowed than NSV respondents. MCBS underreporting rates were higher for VHA than Medicare outpatient events. Underreporting and differences between CMS's and HERC's costing methodologies contributed to lower MCBS versus VHA administrative person- and event- level costs. Alternatively, average annual VHA prescription costs per capita were higher in the MCBS than in the PBM data. Differences in socioeconomic characteristics of the NSV and MCBS samples may be attributable to differences in sampling methodologies. Higher underreporting rates for VHA

  7. Conducting a Withdrawal Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Sue; Rowley, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    A survey at Edge Hill College of Higher Education in Canada, designed to be part of the mechanism for monitoring and evaluating the quality of the student experience, revealed that key factors influencing withdrawal were: course not as expected, traveling difficulties, institution not as expected, domestic difficulties, and financial difficulties.…

  8. A review of Delphi surveys conducted to establish research priorities by specialty nursing organizations from 1985 to 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, S F

    1996-01-01

    Many nursing specialty organizations have completed Delphi surveys to establish their research priorities. The Society of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Nurses (SOHN) is currently conducting its own Delphi survey to the same end. This paper reviews the various Delphi methods employed by specialty nursing organizations on their members between 1985 and 1995. The studies reviewed are carefully limited to those commissioned by specialty nursing organizations and exclusive of those conducted by independent researchers who may have utilized specialty organization members. It presents an introduction to and definition of the Delphi methodology, as well as delving into methodologic and practical aspects of implementing a Delphi survey. It adds to the literature some information previously lacking on cost and time lines for studies, and will serve as a useful guide for future specialty nursing organizations who undertake a Delphi study as a novice effort. It intentionally does not recount the research priorities identified because it does not want to influence, in any way, responses of SOHN members involved in the ongoing Round I Delphi.

  9. Conducting Rigorous Survey Research in the Study of School-Based Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Cynthia E.; Newman, Daniel S.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for school-based consultation practice and training is limited by a small number of studies, possibly due to unique challenges in researching consultation. For example, there are myriad variables to measure and idiosyncratic cultural and contextual factors to account for when investigating what works, for whom, and in what…

  10. Conducting Rigorous Survey Research in the Study of School-Based Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Cynthia E.; Newman, Daniel S.; Barrett, Courtenay A.

    2016-01-01

    The evidence base for school-based consultation practice and training is limited by a small number of studies, possibly due to unique challenges in researching consultation. For example, there are myriad variables to measure and idiosyncratic cultural and contextual factors to account for when investigating what works, for whom, and in what…

  11. Post-market clinical research conducted by medical device manufacturers: a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ross JS; Blount KL; Ritchie JD; Hodshon B; Krumholz HM

    2015-01-01

    Joseph S Ross, Katrina L Blount, Jessica D Ritchie, Beth Hodshon, Harlan M Krumholz Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation, Yale-New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA Background: In the US, once a medical device is made available for use, several requirements have been established by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to ensure ongoing post-market surveillance of device safety and effectiveness. Our objective was to determine how commonly medical device manufacturers initiate po...

  12. Responsible conduct of research

    CERN Document Server

    Shamoo, Adil E

    2015-01-01

    Since the early 2000s, the field of Responsible Conduct of Research has become widely recognized as essential to scientific education, investigation, and training. At present, research institutions with public funding are expected to have some minimal training and education in RCR for their graduate students, fellows and trainees. These institutions also are expected to have a system in place for investigating and reporting misconduct in research or violations of regulations in research with human subjects, or in their applications to federal agencies for funding. Public scrutiny of the conduct of scientific researchers remains high. Media reports of misconduct scandals, biased research, violations of human research ethics rules, and moral controversies in research occur on a weekly basis. Since the 2009 publication of the 2nd edition of Shamoo and Resnik's Responsible Conduct of Research, there has been a vast expansion in the information, knowledge, methods, and diagnosis of problems related to RCR and the ...

  13. EHRA research network surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Chen, Jian; Dagres, Nikolaos;

    2015-01-01

    of surveys covering the controversial issues in clinical electrophysiology (EP). With this in mind, an EHRA EP research network has been created, which included EP centres in Europe among which the surveys on 'hot topic' were circulated. This review summarizes the overall experience conducting EP wires over...

  14. Conducting Educational Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Reeves, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Educational design research blends scientific investigation with systematic development and implementation of solutions to educational problems. Empirical investigation is conducted in real learning settings--not laboratories--to craft usable and effective solutions. At the same time, the research is carefully structured to produce theoretical…

  15. Conducting Educational Design Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Reeves, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Educational design research blends scientific investigation with systematic development and implementation of solutions to educational problems. Empirical investigation is conducted in real learning settings--not laboratories--to craft usable and effective solutions. At the same time, the research is carefully structured to produce theoretical…

  16. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  17. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  18. Considerations for conducting Web-based survey research with people living with human immunodeficiency virus using a community-based participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Solomon, Patricia; Worthington, Catherine; Ibáñez-Carrasco, Francisco; Baxter, Larry; Nixon, Stephanie A; Baltzer-Turje, Rosalind; Robinson, Greg; Zack, Elisse

    2014-03-13

    considerations for researchers conducting community-based participatory Web-based survey research with people living with HIV.

  19. Ethical challenges in designing and conducting medicine quality surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Tabernero, P; Parker, M.; Ravinetto, R; Phanouvong, S; Yeung, S; Kitutu, FE; Cheah, PY; MAYXAY, M; Guerin, PJ; Newton, PN

    2016-01-01

    ObjectivesIn this paper we discuss the main ethical challenges related to the conduct of medicine quality surveys and make suggestions on how to address them. MethodMost evidence-based information regarding medicine quality derives from surveys. However, existing research ethical guidelines do not provide specific guidance for medicine quality surveys. Hence, those conducting surveys are often left wondering how to judge what counts as best practice. A list of the main ethical challenges in t...

  20. Developing a survey instrument to assess the readiness of primary care data, genetic and disease registries to conduct linked research: TRANSFoRm International Research Readiness (TIRRE survey instrument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Leppenwell

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Clinical data are collected for routine care in family practice; there are also a growing number of genetic and cancer registry data repositories. The Translational Research and Patient Safety in Europe (TRANSFoRm project seeks to facilitate research using linked data from more than one source. We performed a requirements analysis which identified a wide range of data and business process requirements that need to be met before linking primary care and either genetic or disease registry data.Objectives To develop a survey to assess the readiness of data repositories to participate in linked research – the Transform International Research Readiness (TIRRE survey.Method We develop the questionnaire based on our requirement analysis; with questions at micro-, meso- and macro levels of granularity, study-specific questions about diabetes and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD, and research track record. The scope of the data required was extensive. We piloted this instrument, conducting ten preliminary telephone interviews to evaluate the response to the questionnaire.Results Using feedback gained from these interviews we revised the questionnaire; clarifying questions that were difficult to answer and utilising skip logic to create different series of questions for the various types of data repository. We simplified the questionnaire replacing free-text responses with yes/no or picking list options, wherever possible. We placed the final questionnaire online and encouraged its use (www.clininf.eu/jointirre/info.html.Conclusion Limited field testing suggests that TIRRE is capable of collecting comprehensive and relevant data about the suitability and readiness of data repositories to participate in linked data research.

  1. Academic Librarians Would Benefit from Instruction on Conducting Research. A Review of: Kennedy, M. R., & Brancolini, K. R. (2012. Academic librarian research: A survey of attitudes, involvement, and perceived capabilities. College & Research Libraries, 73(5, 431-448.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie M. Hughes

    2013-06-01

    of performing research.The demographic section of the survey provided the authors with information regarding research support from institutions, and asked librarians if they are tenure track/promotion, promotion only, or not eligible for tenure and promotion. The results showed that 45% were eligible for tenure, 28% achieved tenure, 48% had been through the tenure process, and 40% had other degrees in addition to their LIS qualification.Conclusion – By surveying a sample of academic librarians, the authors were hoping to gather information about their confidence level, training level, and current practices with regard to research. The data was collected as a way to inform the authors as to how they could best design a curriculum for continuing education in research practice. The survey results show that academic librarians are confident with regard to consumption of the literature and developing research questions, but less confident with regard to gathering and analyzing data.The proposed curriculum would provide training on conducting research, and the authors’ eventual goal is to offer an “Institute for Research Design in Librarianship” that would help librarians, especially those who are required to do research for tenure and promotion purposes, to perform the more difficult aspects of research such as design and analysis. Librarians would complete the course and be able to return to their home institutions with the capability to perform all steps in the research process.

  2. National Survey of American Attitudes on Substance Abuse II: Teens and Their Parents Conducted by Luntz Research Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    Illegal drug use by adolescents is on the rise. This alarming trend was quantified in this national survey of the attitudes of teens and their parents (1,200 teens and 1,166 parents, including 819 sets of teens and parents from the same households) towards cigarettes, alcohol, inhalants, marijuana, LSD, cocaine, heroin, and other illegal drugs.…

  3. NSTA Conducts Nuclear Energy Survey for AIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1972

    1972-01-01

    A survey conducted to determine teacher's instructional resources, methods, materials, and attitudes toward various uses of nuclear energy resulted in nearly one thousand science teachers throughout the nation responding. Results of survey are presented and five recommendations for action are made. (DF)

  4. NSTA Conducts Nuclear Energy Survey for AIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1972

    1972-01-01

    A survey conducted to determine teacher's instructional resources, methods, materials, and attitudes toward various uses of nuclear energy resulted in nearly one thousand science teachers throughout the nation responding. Results of survey are presented and five recommendations for action are made. (DF)

  5. Conducting Service Research that Matters

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafsson, Anders; Aksoy, Lerzan; Brady, Michael; McColl-Kennedy, Janet; Sirianni, Nancy; Witell, Lars; Wünderlich, Nancy V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose –The purpose of this essay is to encourage the reader to think differently about service related issues, and to strive to conduct service research that makes a transformational impact on individuals, organizations, and society. The authors suggest that service researchers are in an excellent position to develop research that matters by making stronger connections with theory, and elevating purely applied research to research that is higher in both practical relevance and methodolo...

  6. Ethical challenges in designing and conducting medicine quality surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Patricia; Parker, Michael; Ravinetto, Raffaella; Phanouvong, Souly; Yeung, Shunmay; Kitutu, Freddy E; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Mayxay, Mayfong; Guerin, Philippe J; Newton, Paul N

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the main ethical challenges related to the conduct of medicine quality surveys and make suggestions on how to address them. Most evidence-based information regarding medicine quality derives from surveys. However, existing research ethical guidelines do not provide specific guidance for medicine quality surveys. Hence, those conducting surveys are often left wondering how to judge what counts as best practice. A list of the main ethical challenges in the design and conduct of surveys is presented. It is vital that the design and conduct of medicine quality surveys uphold moral and ethical obligations and analyse the ethical implications and consequences of such work. These aspects include the impact on the local availability of and access to medicines; the confidentiality and privacy of the surveyors and the surveyed; questions as to whether outlet staff personnel should be told they are part of a survey; the need of ethical and regulatory approvals; and how the findings should be disseminated. Medicine quality surveys should ideally be conducted in partnership with the relevant national Medicine Regulatory Authorities. An international, but contextually sensitive, model of good ethical practice for such surveys is needed. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. How to Conduct Ethnographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangasubana, Nisaratana

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe the process of conducting ethnographic research. Methodology definition and key characteristics are given. The stages of the research process are described including preparation, data gathering and recording, and analysis. Important issues such as reliability and validity are also discussed.

  8. An Astronomical Survey Conducted in Belgium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazé, Yaël; Fantaine, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the first survey conducted in Belgium about the interest in and knowledge of astronomy. Two samples were studied, the public at large (667 questionnaires) and students (2589 questionnaires), but the results are generally similar in both samples. We evaluated people's interest, main information source and…

  9. Guidelines for conducting geropsychotherapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areán, Patricia A; Cook, Beth L; Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Hegel, Mark T; Schulberg, Herbert C; Schulz, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Geropsychotherapy researchers have established specific methods that improve the reliability and generalizability of the data from this research. To date, there has been little formal dissemination of these methods. The authors present guidelines for the optimal conduct of psychotherapy research in older adults, which include selection of age-appropriate psychotherapies and control conditions, use of consumer-based methods for recruitment, evaluation of age-related treatment processes and outcomes, and adjusting the research design to accommodate age-specific life events and provide examples of how each guideline was used in their psychotherapy studies. Psychotherapy research with older adults has benefited from methodological advances that improve our ability to ascertain the impact of psychotherapy on late-life disorders. However, the field is still in need of better outcome and process measures, methods for measuring the therapeutic content of non-psychotherapy encounters, and methods for determining the impact of choice of treatment on outcome.

  10. The challenge of conducting gambling research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Responding to the survey of 5580 college students in South India in the study of George et al, the author discusses the universality of addictive gambling and its stereotyped nature. This study, together with work in North America and elsewhere, argues for more research that targets prevalence, risk factors, course, and treatment. The author points out the challenge of conducting research when funding is hard to obtain. Declaration of interests None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license.

  11. An astronomical survey conducted in Belgium

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Yael

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of the first survey conducted in Belgium about the interest and knowledge in astronomy. Two samples were studied, the public at large (667 questionnaires) and students (2589 questionnaires), but the results are generally similar in both samples. We evaluated people's interest, main information source, and attitudes towards astronomy, as well as their supposed and actual knowledge of the subject. The main conclusion is that, despite a poor self-confidence, people do know the basic astronomical concepts. However, that knowledge is not deeply rooted, as reasoning questions show well-spread misconceptions and/or misunderstandings.

  12. Conducting Mathematical Research with Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gareth E.

    2013-01-01

    The notion that undergraduates are capable of making profound and original contributions to mathematical research is rapidly gaining acceptance. Undergraduates bring their enthusiasm, creativity, curiosity, and perseverance to bona fide research problems. This article discusses some of the key issues concerning undergraduate mathematical research:…

  13. Survey design research: a tool for answering nursing research questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Sandra L; Butler, Robert S; Burchill, Christian N

    2015-01-01

    The clinical nurse specialist is in a unique position to identify and study clinical problems in need of answers, but lack of time and resources may discourage nurses from conducting research. However, some research methods can be used by the clinical nurse specialist that are not time-intensive or cost prohibitive. The purpose of this article is to explain the utility of survey methodology for answering a number of nursing research questions. The article covers survey content, reliability and validity issues, sample size considerations, and methods of survey delivery.

  14. Use of Internet panels to conduct surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Ron D; Liu, Honghu; Kapteyn, Arie

    2015-09-01

    The use of Internet panels to collect survey data is increasing because it is cost-effective, enables access to large and diverse samples quickly, takes less time than traditional methods to obtain data for analysis, and the standardization of the data collection process makes studies easy to replicate. A variety of probability-based panels have been created, including Telepanel/CentERpanel, Knowledge Networks (now GFK KnowledgePanel), the American Life Panel, the Longitudinal Internet Studies for the Social Sciences panel, and the Understanding America Study panel. Despite the advantage of having a known denominator (sampling frame), the probability-based Internet panels often have low recruitment participation rates, and some have argued that there is little practical difference between opting out of a probability sample and opting into a nonprobability (convenience) Internet panel. This article provides an overview of both probability-based and convenience panels, discussing potential benefits and cautions for each method, and summarizing the approaches used to weight panel respondents in order to better represent the underlying population. Challenges of using Internet panel data are discussed, including false answers, careless responses, giving the same answer repeatedly, getting multiple surveys from the same respondent, and panelists being members of multiple panels. More is to be learned about Internet panels generally and about Web-based data collection, as well as how to evaluate data collected using mobile devices and social-media platforms.

  15. Getting Back to the Basics of Survey Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbach, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Because surveys now can be implemented with relative ease and little cost, many researchers are overlooking the basic principles of survey research. This chapter discusses sources of error that researchers should consider when conducting a survey, and gives readers basic suggestions for reducing error. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  16. Getting Back to the Basics of Survey Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbach, Paul D.

    2005-01-01

    Because surveys now can be implemented with relative ease and little cost, many researchers are overlooking the basic principles of survey research. This chapter discusses sources of error that researchers should consider when conducting a survey, and gives readers basic suggestions for reducing error. (Contains 1 table and 1 figure.)

  17. 2010 Student Survey. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) conducts an annual survey of college students to identify: (1) how students approach the job market as they near graduation; (2) how responsive the market is to the graduating students; (3) the resources students use to seek their first full-time job after getting their degree; and (4) the…

  18. Conducting qualitative research in audiology: a tutorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Line V; Laplante-Lévesque, Ariane; Jones, Lesley; Preminger, Jill E; Nielsen, Claus; Lunner, Thomas; Hickson, Louise; Naylor, Graham; Kramer, Sophia E

    2012-02-01

    Qualitative research methodologies are being used more frequently in audiology as it allows for a better understanding of the perspectives of people with hearing impairment. This article describes why and how international interdisciplinary qualitative research can be conducted. This paper is based on a literature review and our recent experience with the conduction of an international interdisciplinary qualitative study in audiology. We describe some available qualitative methods for sampling, data collection, and analysis and we discuss the rationale for choosing particular methods. The focus is on four approaches which have all previously been applied to audiologic research: grounded theory, interpretative phenomenological analysis, conversational analysis, and qualitative content analysis. This article provides a review of methodological issues useful for those designing qualitative research projects in audiology or needing assistance in the interpretation of qualitative literature.

  19. Conduction Mechanism of Valence Change Resistive Switching Memory: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ee Wah Lim

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistive switching effect in transition metal oxide (TMO based material is often associated with the valence change mechanism (VCM. Typical modeling of valence change resistive switching memory consists of three closely related phenomena, i.e., conductive filament (CF geometry evolution, conduction mechanism and temperature dynamic evolution. It is widely agreed that the electrochemical reduction-oxidation (redox process and oxygen vacancies migration plays an essential role in the CF forming and rupture process. However, the conduction mechanism of resistive switching memory varies considerably depending on the material used in the dielectric layer and selection of electrodes. Among the popular observations are the Poole-Frenkel emission, Schottky emission, space-charge-limited conduction (SCLC, trap-assisted tunneling (TAT and hopping conduction. In this article, we will conduct a survey on several published valence change resistive switching memories with a particular interest in the I-V characteristic and the corresponding conduction mechanism.

  20. Initial nonresponse and survey response mode biases in survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Chen, Chao Ying

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated survey response factors (particularly initial nonresponse and survey mode) that may be associated with bias in survey research. We examined prevention-related beliefs and outcomes for initial mail survey responders (n=209), follow-up mail survey responders (n=78), and follow-up telephone survey responders (n=74). The Pearson chi-square test and analysis of variance identified beliefs and behavioral outcomes associated with survey response mode. Follow-up options to the initial mail survey improved response rates (22.0-38.0 percent). Initial mail survey responders more strongly believed topical fluoride protects teeth from cavities than others (P=0.04). A significantly larger proportion of parents completing a follow-up telephone survey (30.8 percent) refused topical fluoride for their child than those completing mail surveys (10.3-10.4 percent) (Psurveys with follow-up improve response rates. Initial nonresponse and survey response mode may be associated with biases in survey research. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  1. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  2. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  3. A quick guide to survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T L; Baxter, M A J; Khanduja, V

    2013-01-01

    Questionnaires are a very useful survey tool that allow large populations to be assessed with relative ease. Despite a widespread perception that surveys are easy to conduct, in order to yield meaningful results, a survey needs extensive planning, time and effort. In this article, we aim to cover the main aspects of designing, implementing and analysing a survey as well as focusing on techniques that would improve response rates.

  4. Surveys and questionnaires in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-06-17

    Surveys and questionnaires are often used in nursing research to elicit the views of large groups of people to develop the nursing knowledge base. This article provides an overview of survey and questionnaire use in nursing research, clarifies the place of the questionnaire as a data collection tool in quantitative research design and provides information and advice about best practice in the development of quantitative surveys and questionnaires.

  5. The Trauma Center Organizational Culture Survey: development and conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Matthew L; Wehbe-Janek, Hania; Subacius, Haris; Pinto, Ruxandra; Nathens, Avery B

    2015-01-01

    The Trauma Center Organizational Culture Survey (TRACCS) instrument was developed to assess organizational culture of trauma centers enrolled in the American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Program (ACS TQIP). The objective is to provide evidence on the psychometric properties of the factors of TRACCS and describe the current organizational culture of TQIP-enrolled trauma centers. A cross-sectional study was conducted by surveying a sampling of employees at 174 TQIP-enrolled trauma centers. Data collection was preceded by multistep survey development. Psychometric properties were assessed by an exploratory factor analysis (construct validity) and the item-total correlations and Cronbach alpha were calculated (internal reliability). Statistical outcomes of the survey responses were measured by descriptive statistics and mixed effect models. The response rate for trauma center participation in the study was 78.7% (n = 137). The factor analysis resulted in 16 items clustered into three factors as described: opportunity, pride, and diversity, trauma center leadership, and employee respect and recognition. TRACCS was found to be highly reliable with a Cronbach alpha of 0.90 in addition to the three factors (0.91, 0.90, and 0.85). Considerable variability of TRACCS overall and factor score among hospitals was measured, with the largest interhospital deviations among trauma center leadership. More than 80% of the variability in the responses occurred within rather than between hospitals. TRACCS was developed as a reliable tool for measuring trauma center organizational culture. Relationships between TQIP outcomes and measured organizational culture are under investigation. Trauma centers could apply TRACCS to better understand current organizational culture and how change tools can impact culture and subsequent patient and process outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Responsible conduct of research: enhancing local opportunities.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    funded collaborative studies are increasingly being con- ducted in developing countries. Therefore, standardized ... tural disparities in standards for scientific research.10 The statement ... Research misconduct should be approached from the perspective ... Page 3 .... electronic database systems, dynamic forms and protocol.

  7. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), conducted December 14 through 18, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SERI. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SERI, and interviews with site personnel. 33 refs., 22 figs., 21 tabs.

  8. Cooperative Research Pilot Flatfish Survey (Yellowtail)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An industry-based pilot flatfish survey of Georges Bank conducted aboard the F/V Mary K and the F/V Yankee Pride. The surveyed used a two-seam, two-bridle flounder...

  9. Conducting a large, multi-site survey about patients’ views on broad consent: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen E. Smith

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As biobanks play an increasing role in the genomic research that will lead to precision medicine, input from diverse and large populations of patients in a variety of health care settings will be important in order to successfully carry out such studies. One important topic is participants’ views towards consent and data sharing, especially since the 2011 Advanced Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM, and subsequently the 2015 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM were issued by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS and Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP. These notices required that participants consent to research uses of their de-identified tissue samples and most clinical data, and allowing such consent be obtained in a one-time, open-ended or “broad” fashion. Conducting a survey across multiple sites provides clear advantages to either a single site survey or using a large online database, and is a potentially powerful way of understanding the views of diverse populations on this topic. Methods A workgroup of the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE Network, a national consortium of 9 sites (13 separate institutions, 11 clinical centers supported by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI that combines DNA biorepositories with electronic medical record (EMR systems for large-scale genetic research, conducted a survey to understand patients’ views on consent, sample and data sharing for future research, biobank governance, data protection, and return of research results. Results Working across 9 sites to design and conduct a national survey presented challenges in organization, meeting human subjects guidelines at each institution, and survey development and implementation. The challenges were met through a committee structure to address each aspect of the project with representatives from all sites. Each committee’s output was integrated into the overall survey plan. A

  10. Ethical considerations in conducting pediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth-Cline, Michelle; Gerson, Jason; Bright, Patricia; Lee, Catherine S; Nelson, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    The critical need for pediatric research on drugs and biological products underscores the responsibility to ensure that children are enrolled in clinical research that is both scientifically necessary and ethically sound. In this chapter, we review key ethical considerations concerning the participation of children in clinical research. We propose a basic ethical framework to guide pediatric research, and suggest how this framework might be operationalized in linking science and ethics. Topics examined include: the status of children as a vulnerable population; the appropriate balance of risk and potential benefit in research; ethical considerations underlying study design, including clinical equipoise, placebo controls, and non-inferiority designs; the use of data monitoring committees; compensation; and parental permission and child assent to participate in research. We incorporate selected national (USA) and international guidelines, as well as regulatory approaches to pediatric studies that have been adopted in the USA, Canada, and Europe.

  11. Using electronic surveys in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2014-11-01

    Computer and Internet use in businesses and homes in the United States has dramatically increased since the early 1980s. In 2011, 76% of households reported having a computer, compared with only 8% in 1984 (File, 2013). A similar increase in Internet use has also been seen, with 72% of households reporting access of the Internet in 2011 compared with 18% in 1997 (File, 2013). This emerging trend in technology has prompted use of electronic surveys in the research community as an alternative to previous telephone and postal surveys. Electronic surveys can offer an efficient, cost-effective method for data collection; however, challenges exist. An awareness of the issues and strategies to optimize data collection using web-based surveys is critical when designing research studies. This column will discuss the different types and advantages and disadvantages of using electronic surveys in nursing research, as well as methods to optimize the quality and quantity of survey responses.

  12. Conducting Successful Interviews: Tips for Intrepid Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Patrick

    2000-01-01

    Demonstrates how nonacademic interviewing talents can inform how qualitative researchers perform and produce interviews, outlining key concepts and practices for better qualitative interviewing from journalists and other researchers and examining four elements of interview practice (background information, interview analysis, protocol creation and…

  13. Conducting Classroom Design Research with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Michelle. L.

    2015-01-01

    Design research is usually motivated by university members with experience and interest in building theory and instructional designs in collaboration with one teacher. Typically, the teacher is considered as a member of the research team, with the primary responsibility of implementing instruction. However, in this chapter, I describe a Classroom…

  14. Conducting Classroom Design Research with Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Michelle. L.

    2015-01-01

    Design research is usually motivated by university members with experience and interest in building theory and instructional designs in collaboration with one teacher. Typically, the teacher is considered as a member of the research team, with the primary responsibility of implementing instruction. However, in this chapter, I describe a Classroom…

  15. A survey of etiologic hypotheses among testicular cancer researchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, A; Trabert, B; Rusner, C

    2015-01-01

    the plausibility of the suggested etiologic hypotheses on a scale of 1 (very implausible) to 10 (very plausible). This report describes the methodology of the survey, the score distributions by individual hypotheses, hypothesis group, and the participants' major research fields, and discuss the hypotheses......Basic research results can provide new ideas and hypotheses to be examined in epidemiological studies. We conducted a survey among testicular cancer researchers on hypotheses concerning the etiology of this malignancy. All researchers on the mailing list of Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshops...

  16. Impact of methodological "shortcuts" in conducting public health surveys: Results from a vaccination coverage survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luman Elizabeth T

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of methodological rigor can cause survey error, leading to biased results and suboptimal public health response. This study focused on the potential impact of 3 methodological "shortcuts" pertaining to field surveys: relying on a single source for critical data, failing to repeatedly visit households to improve response rates, and excluding remote areas. Methods In a vaccination coverage survey of young children conducted in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in July 2005, 3 sources of vaccination information were used, multiple follow-up visits were made, and all inhabited areas were included in the sampling frame. Results are calculated with and without these strategies. Results Most children had at least 2 sources of data; vaccination coverage estimated from any single source was substantially lower than from all sources combined. Eligibility was ascertained for 79% of households after the initial visit and for 94% of households after follow-up visits; vaccination coverage rates were similar with and without follow-up. Coverage among children on remote islands differed substantially from that of their counterparts on the main island indicating a programmatic need for locality-specific information; excluding remote islands from the survey would have had little effect on overall estimates due to small populations and divergent results. Conclusion Strategies to reduce sources of survey error should be maximized in public health surveys. The impact of the 3 strategies illustrated here will vary depending on the primary outcomes of interest and local situations. Survey limitations such as potential for error should be well-documented, and the likely direction and magnitude of bias should be considered.

  17. Global thunderstorm activity research survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, S. C.

    1982-01-01

    The published literature on the subject of the monitoring of global thunderstorm activity by instrumented satellites was reviewed. A survey of the properties of selected physical parameters of the thunderstorm is presented. The concepts used by satellites to identify and to measure terrestrial lightning pulses are described. The experimental data acquired by satellites are discussed. The scientific achievements of the satellites are evaluated against the needs of scientists and the potential requirements of user agencies. The performances of the satellites are rated according to their scientific and operational achievements.

  18. The importance of survey research standards

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fincham, Jack E; Draugalis, Jolaine R

    2013-01-01

    .... A similar need for quality and standardization also exists for survey research and scholarship. The purpose of this paper is to clarify why this is important and crucial for the Journal and our academy.

  19. Survey and Certification - Transplant Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — University of Michigan Kidney Epidemiology and Cost Center (UMKECC) is contracted with Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to provide research and...

  20. Determination of hydraulic conductivity in three dimensions and its relation to dispersivity: Chapter D in Ground-water contamination by crude oil at the Bemidji, Minnesota, research site; US Geological Survey Toxic Waste--ground-water contamination study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Recent investigations suggest that dispersion in aquifers is scale dependent and a function of the heterogeneity of aquifer materials. Theoretical stochastic studies indicate that determining hydraulic-conductivity variability in three dimensions is important in analyzing the dispersion process. Even though field methods are available to approximate hydraulic conductivity in three dimensions, the methods are not generally used because of high cost of field equipment and because measurement and analysis techniques are cumbersome and time consuming. The hypothesis of this study is that field-determined values of dispersivity are scale dependent and that they may be described as a function of hydraulic conductivity in three dimensions. The objectives of the study at the Bemidji research site are to (1) determine hydraulic conductivity of the porous media in three dimensions, (2) determine field values of dispersivity and its scale dependence on hydraulic conductivity, and (3) develop and apply a computerized data-collection, storage, and analysis system for field use in comprehensive determination of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity. Plans for this investigation involve a variety of methods of analysis. Hydraulic conductivity will be determined separately in the horizontal and vertical planes of the hydraulic-conductivity ellipsoid. Field values of dispersivity will be determined by single-well and doublet-well injection or withdrawal tests with tracers. A computerized data-collection, storage, and analysis system to measure pressure, flow rate, tracer concentrations, and temperature will be designed for field testing. Real-time computer programs will be used to analyze field data. The initial methods of analysis will be utilized to meet the objectives of the study. Preliminary field data indicate the aquifer underlying the Bemidji site is vertically heterogeneous, cross-bedded outwash. Preliminary analysis of the flow field around a hypothetical doublet

  1. Survey practices in dental education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, J W; Kuster, C G

    1983-10-01

    Approximately 40 percent of the data-based articles reported in the Journal of Dental Education in the last five years have used survey research procedures. This study examines the use of one type of survey procedure, mailed questionnaires, in research on dental education. Specifically, the discussion identifies several factors that dental education researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors. These factors are discussed using examples of adequate and inadequate procedures reported in the method sections of studies in the Journal of Dental Education in the last five years.

  2. Who Sends the Email? Using Electronic Surveys in Violence Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Sutherland

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Students aged 16–24 years are at greatest risk for interpersonal violence and the resulting short and long-term health consequences. Electronic survey methodology is well suited for research related to interpersonal violence. Yet methodological questions remain about best practices in using electronic surveys. While researchers often indicate that potential participants receive multiple emails as reminders to complete the survey, little mention is made of the sender of the recruitment email. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the response rates from three violence-focused research studies when the recruitment emails are sent from a campus office, researcher or survey sampling firm. Methods: Three violence-focused studies were conducted about interpersonal violence among college students in the United States. Seven universities and a survey sampling firm were used to recruit potential participants to complete an electronic survey. The sender of the recruitment emails varied within and across the each of the studies depending on institutional review boards and university protocols.Results: An overall response rate of 30% was noted for the 3 studies. Universities in which researcher initiated recruitment emails were used had higher response rates compared to universities where campus officials sent the recruitment emails. Researchers found lower response rates to electronic surveys at Historically Black Colleges or Universities and that other methods were needed to improve response rates.Conclusion: The sender of recruitment emails for electronic surveys may be an important factor in response rates for violence-focused research. For researchers identification of best practices for survey methodology is needed to promote accurate disclosure and increase response rates. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:363–369.

  3. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Patuxent Research Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Patuxent Research Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to...

  4. Conducting Online Behavioral Research Using Crowdsourcing Services in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majima, Yoshimasa; Nishiyama, Kaoru; Nishihara, Aki; Hata, Ryosuke

    2017-01-01

    Recent research on human behavior has often collected empirical data from the online labor market, through a process known as crowdsourcing. As well as the United States and the major European countries, there are several crowdsourcing services in Japan. For research purpose, Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk) is the widely used platform among those services. Previous validation studies have shown many commonalities between MTurk workers and participants from traditional samples based on not only personality but also performance on reasoning tasks. The present study aims to extend these findings to non-MTurk (i.e., Japanese) crowdsourcing samples in which workers have different ethnic backgrounds from those of MTurk. We conducted three surveys (N = 426, 453, 167, respectively) designed to compare Japanese crowdsourcing workers and university students in terms of their demographics, personality traits, reasoning skills, and attention to instructions. The results generally align with previous studies and suggest that non-MTurk participants are also eligible for behavioral research. Furthermore, small screen devices are found to impair participants' attention to instructions. Several recommendations concerning this sample are presented.

  5. Rigour and Complexity in Educational Research. Conducting Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Kathleen; Kincheloe, Joe

    2004-01-01

    What does it mean to engage in rigorous research? What does a researcher need to know to produce such research? What is specifically involved in multiple method bricolage research? In an era where talk abounds about scientific rigour and evidence-based research in education, this groundbreaking book presents a new and compelling examination of…

  6. Expectancy Theory Analysis to Conduct Research at Malaysian Research University

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad Shakir Bin Ramli; Ahmad Bin Jusoh

    2015-01-01

    ...). In literature there are various general models for research and development analysis. Although many prior researchers have studied factors that influence research productivity, only a few have examined it from the behavioral perspective...

  7. A survey of big data research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hua; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Chanpaul Jin; Daneshmand, Mahmoud; Wang, Chonggang; Wang, Honggang

    2015-01-01

    Big data create values for business and research, but pose significant challenges in terms of networking, storage, management, analytics and ethics. Multidisciplinary collaborations from engineers, computer scientists, statisticians and social scientists are needed to tackle, discover and understand big data. This survey presents an overview of big data initiatives, technologies and research in industries and academia, and discusses challenges and potential solutions. PMID:26504265

  8. A survey of big data research

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Big data create values for business and research, but pose significant challenges in terms of networking, storage, management, analytics and ethics. Multidisciplinary collaborations from engineers, computer scientists, statisticians and social scientists are needed to tackle, discover and understand big data. This survey presents an overview of big data initiatives, technologies and research in industries and academia, and discusses challenges and potential solutions.

  9. Efficiency of workplace surveys conducted by Finnish occupational health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinainen, Minna; Oksa, Panu

    2011-07-01

    In Finland, workplace surveys are used to identify and assess health risks and problems caused by work and make suggestions for continuous improvement of the work environment. With the aid of the workplace survey, occupational health services can be tailored to a company. The aims of this study were to determine how occupational health professionals gather data via the workplace survey and the effect survey results have on companies. A total of 259 occupational health nurses and 108 occupational health physicians responded to the questionnaire: 84.2% were women and 15.8% were men. The mean age of the respondents was 48.8 years (range, 26 to 65 years). Usually occupational health nurses and foremen and sometimes occupational health physicians and occupational safety and health representatives initiate the workplace survey. More than 90% of the surveys were followed by action proposals, and about 50% of these were implemented. The proposals implemented most often concerned personal protective equipment and less often leadership. Survey respondents should have both the opportunity and the authority to affect resources, the work environment, work arrangements, and tools. Teamwork among occupational health and safety professionals, management, and employees is vital for cost-effectively solving today's complex problems at workplaces around the globe.

  10. Factors that Motivate Business Faculty to Conduct Research: An Expectancy Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Gupta, Ashok; Hoshower, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors used expectancy theory to examine key factors that motivate business faculty to conduct research. The survey results, from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, showed that faculty members who assign higher importance ratings to both the extrinsic and the intrinsic rewards of research exhibit higher research…

  11. Factors that Motivate Business Faculty to Conduct Research: An Expectancy Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Gupta, Ashok; Hoshower, Leon

    2006-01-01

    In this study, the authors used expectancy theory to examine key factors that motivate business faculty to conduct research. The survey results, from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, showed that faculty members who assign higher importance ratings to both the extrinsic and the intrinsic rewards of research exhibit higher research…

  12. Responsible conduct of research: Global trends, local opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa M. Rossouw

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Instances of research misconduct reported in the lay and scientific literature as well as international efforts to encourage research integrity and the responsible conduct of research are currently receiving considerable attention. In South Africa, however, the topic has not featured prominently in public debate and clear evidence of a national, coordinated effort to address the problem of research misconduct seems to be lacking. Given increasing globalisation of research efforts, the need exists to promote standardised approaches to interpretation and implementation of the principles and values that underlie responsible conduct of research as well as to create guidelines and structures to promote integrity in research in the country. We explore the notions of research misconduct and research integrity, focusing on initiatives that promote responsible conduct of research, and propose a framework for the South African context.

  13. Perceptions of research risk and undue influence: Implications for ethics of research conducted with cocaine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C; Stoops, William W

    2015-11-01

    Despite the prominence of human laboratory and clinical trial research in the development of interventions for substance use disorders, this research presents numerous ethical challenges. Ethical principles outlined in the Belmont Report, including respect for persons, beneficence, and justice, have traditionally guided research conduct. Few empirical studies exist examining substance abuse research ethics. The present study examined perceptions of beneficence and respect for persons in substance use research, including relative risk and desired monetary compensation, using an online sample of cocaine users. The study was conducted on Amazon.com's Mechanical Turk (mTurk), a crowdsourcing website used for survey-based research. Of 1764 individuals screened, 138 reported past year cocaine use. These respondents completed a battery of standardized and experimenter-designed questionnaires used to characterize each respondent's self-reported attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors about drug use and the relative risks and desired monetary compensation associated with research participation. Ratings of relative risk revealed that most respondents found common research practices as less than or equal to the relative risk of everyday life. Receiving experimental medication outside the hospital was rated as the most risky research activity, but on average was not rated as presenting more risk than everyday life. Desired compensation for research participation was associated with the perceived risk of research activities. Increases in desired compensation for participation were only observed for research perceived as much more risky than everyday activities. These findings indicate that cocaine users assess risk in a way that is consistent with standard research practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Conducting Sanitary Surveys of Water Supply Systems. Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    This workbook is utilized in connection with a 40-hour course on sanitary surveys of water supply systems for biologists, chemists, and engineers with experience as a water supply evaluator. Practical training is provided in each of the 21 self-contained modules. Each module outlines the purpose, objectives and content for that section. The course…

  15. African primary care research: performing surveys using questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Indiran; Mabuza, Langalibalele H; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A; Mash, Bob

    2014-04-25

    The aim of this article is to provide practical guidance on conducting surveys and the use of questionnaires for postgraduate students at a Masters level who are undertaking primary care research. The article is intended to assist with writing the methods section of the research proposal and thinking through the relevant issues that apply to sample size calculation, sampling strategy, design of a questionnaire and administration of a questionnaire. The articleis part of a larger series on primary care research, with other articles in the series focusing on the structure of the research proposal and the literature review, as well as quantitative data analysis.

  16. African primary care research: performing surveys using questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indiran Govender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to provide practical guidance on conducting surveys and the use of questionnaires for postgraduate students at a Masters level who are undertaking primary care research. The article is intended to assist with writing the methods section of the research proposal and thinking through the relevant issues that apply to sample size calculation, sampling strategy, design of a questionnaire and administration of a questionnaire. The article is part of a larger series on primary care research, with other articles in the series focusing on the structure of the research proposal and the literature review, as well as quantitative data analysis.

  17. Library Research Support in Queensland: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Joanna; Nolan-Brown, Therese; Loria, Pat; Bradbury, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    University libraries worldwide are reconceptualising the ways in which they support the research agenda in their respective institutions. This paper is based on a survey completed by member libraries of the Queensland University Libraries Office of Cooperation (QULOC), the findings of which may be informative for other university libraries. After…

  18. Conducting research literature reviews from the internet to the paper

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Arlene

    2014-01-01

    Providing readers with an accessible, in-depth look at how to synthesize research literature, Conducting Research Literature Reviews is perfect for students, researchers, marketers, planners, and policymakers who design and manage public and private agencies, conduct research studies, and prepare strategic plans and grant proposals. Bestselling author Arlene Fink shows readers how to explain the need for and significance of research, as well as how to explain a study’s findings. Offering a step-by-step approach to conducting literature reviews, the Fourth Edition features updated examples and covers: how to select databases and evaluate their quality; selecting and organizing key words and other terms in order to effectively search databases and the Web; setting standards for evaluating the quality of research and other literature; extracting and recording information from articles and studies; synthesizing what the reader finds either descriptively or via a meta-analysis; recording and storing the results ...

  19. Applications of scanning probe microscopy in intrinsically conducting polymer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tao; NIU Li; LI Zhuang; DONG Shaojun

    2007-01-01

    The applications of scanning probe microscopy(SPM)in intrinsically conducting polymer research is briefly reviewed,including morphology observation,nanofabrication,microcosmic electrical property measurements,electrochemistry researches,in-situ measurements of film thickness change,and so on.At the same time,some important variations of SPM and the related techniques are briefly introduced.Finally,the future development of SPM in the study of intrinsically conducting polymers is prospected.

  20. Just Another Student Survey?--Point-of-Contact Survey Feedback Enhances the Student Experience and Lets Researchers Gather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Warren; Boyd, William; Boyd, Wendy; Hellmundt, Suzi

    2017-01-01

    When student surveys are conducted within university environments, one outcome of feedback to the researcher is that it provides insight into the potential ways that curriculum can be modified and how content can be better delivered. However, the benefit to the current students undertaking the survey is not always evident. By modifying Biggs'…

  1. Challenges in conducting qualitative research in health: A conceptual paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankeh, Hamidreza; Ranjbar, Maryam; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali; Johansson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research focuses on social world and provides the tools to study health phenomena from the perspective of those experiencing them. Identifying the problem, forming the question, and selecting an appropriate methodology and design are some of the initial challenges that researchers encounter in the early stages of any research project. These problems are particularly common for novices. This article describes the practical challenges of using qualitative inquiry in the field of health and the challenges of performing an interpretive research based on professional experience as a qualitative researcher and on available literature. One of the main topics discussed is the nature of qualitative research, its inherent challenges, and how to overcome them. Some of those highlighted here include: identification of the research problem, formation of the research question/aim, and selecting an appropriate methodology and research design, which are the main concerns of qualitative researchers and need to be handled properly. Insights from real-life experiences in conducting qualitative research in health reveal these issues. The paper provides personal comments on the experiences of a researcher in conducting pure qualitative research in the field of health. It offers insights into the practical difficulties encountered when performing qualitative studies and offers solutions and alternatives applied by these authors, which may be of use to others.

  2. Conducting Science-Based Psychology Research in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinella, Lisa M., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    What are the common pitfalls experienced by school researchers and how can they be avoided? Edited by Lisa M. Dinella of Monmouth University, "Conducting Science-Based Psychology Research in Schools" includes the collective knowledge of both established and emerging names in the field, providing an unparalleled resource for those interested in…

  3. Stirling laboratory research engine survey report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. W.; Hoehn, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    As one step in expanding the knowledge relative to and accelerating the development of Stirling engines, NASA, through the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), is sponsoring a program which will lead to a versatile Stirling Laboratory Research Engine (SLRE). An objective of this program is to lay the groundwork for a commercial version of this engine. It is important to consider, at an early stage in the engine's development, the needs of the potential users so that the SLRE can support the requirements of educators and researchers in academic, industrial, and government laboratories. For this reason, a survey was performed, the results of which are described.

  4. National databases and rheumatology research II: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Krishnan, Eswar

    2004-11-01

    Three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were conducted in the United States between 1971 and 1994 to provide data on the nutritional and health status of the population and on specific target conditions. This article describes features of the surveys and provides examples of research on musculoskeletal disorders that used the survey data.

  5. Conducting research in clinical psychology practice: Barriers, facilitators, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirsten V; Thew, Graham R

    2017-09-01

    The combination of clinical psychologists' therapeutic expertise and research training means that they are in an ideal position to be conducting high-quality research projects. However, despite these skills and the documented benefits of research to services and service users, research activity in practice remains low. This article aims to give an overview of the advantages of, and difficulties in conducting research in clinical practice. We reviewed the relevant literature on barriers to research and reflected on our clinical and research experiences in a range of contexts to offer practical recommendations. We considered factors involved in the planning, sourcing support, implementation, and dissemination phases of research, and outline suggestions to improve the feasibility of research projects in post-qualification roles. We suggest that research leadership is particularly important within clinical psychology to ensure the profession's continued visibility and influence within health settings. Clinical implications Emerging evidence suggests that clinical settings that foster research are associated with better patient outcomes. Suggestions to increase the feasibility of research projects in clinical settings are detailed. Limitations The present recommendations are drawn from the authors' practical experience and may need adaptation to individual practitioners' settings. This study does not attempt to assess the efficacy of the strategies suggested. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  6. Conducting qualitative research within Clinical Trials Units: avoiding potential pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Cindy; O'Cathain, Alicia; Hind, Danny; Adamson, Joy; Lawton, Julia; Baird, Wendy

    2014-07-01

    The value of using qualitative research within or alongside randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is becoming more widely accepted. Qualitative research may be conducted concurrently with pilot or full RCTs to understand the feasibility and acceptability of the interventions being tested, or to improve trial conduct. Clinical Trials Units (CTUs) in the United Kingdom (UK) manage large numbers of RCTs and, increasingly, manage the qualitative research or collaborate with qualitative researchers external to the CTU. CTUs are beginning to explicitly manage the process, for example, through the use of standard operating procedures for designing and implementing qualitative research with trials. We reviewed the experiences of two UK Clinical Research Collaboration (UKCRC) registered CTUs of conducting qualitative research concurrently with RCTs. Drawing on experiences gained from 15 studies, we identify the potential for the qualitative research to undermine the successful completion or scientific integrity of RCTs. We show that potential problems can arise from feedback of interim or final qualitative findings to members of the trial team or beyond, in particular reporting qualitative findings whilst the trial is on-going. The problems include: We make recommendations for improving the management of qualitative research within CTUs.

  7. Conducting Qualitative Metasynthesis Research: Insights from a Metasynthesis Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara L. Paterson RN, PhD

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The need to synthesize qualitative research in order to inform fields of study has been highlighted as a critical imperative in recent years. Since that time, there have been a number of attempts to identify methodological approaches to achieving such a goal. Despite some notable efforts in this regard, the metasynthesis research approach continues to be somewhat elusive with regard to its steps and procedures. The authors of this article describe their experience conducting a metasynthesis of qualitative research regarding transformation in chronic illness and disability. The particular emphasis of the article will be the practical strategies and procedures that assisted them in conducting the project in a rigorous and meaningful way. The authors emphasize the need for continued dialogue about strategies and procedures in metasynthesis that will aid researchers who are contemplating this complex research approach.

  8. A survey of etiologic hypotheses among testicular cancer researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, A; Trabert, B; Rusner, C; Poole, C; Almstrup, K; Rajpert-De Meyts, E; McGlynn, K A

    2015-01-01

    Basic research results can provide new ideas and hypotheses to be examined in epidemiological studies. We conducted a survey among testicular cancer researchers on hypotheses concerning the etiology of this malignancy. All researchers on the mailing list of Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshops and corresponding authors of PubMed-indexed articles identified by the search term 'testicular cancer' and published within 10 years (in total 2750 recipients) were invited to respond to an e-mail-based survey. Participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop in May 2014 were subsequently asked to rate the plausibility of the suggested etiologic hypotheses on a scale of 1 (very implausible) to 10 (very plausible). This report describes the methodology of the survey, the score distributions by individual hypotheses, hypothesis group, and the participants' major research fields, and discuss the hypotheses that scored as most plausible. We also present plans for improving the survey that may be repeated at a next international meeting of experts in testicular cancer. Overall 52 of 99 (53%) registered participants of the 8th Copenhagen Testis Cancer Workshop submitted the plausibility rating form. Fourteen of 27 hypotheses were related to exposures during pregnancy. Hypotheses with the highest mean plausibility ratings were either related to pre-natal exposures or exposures that might have an effect during pregnancy and in post-natal life. The results of the survey may be helpful for triggering more specific etiologic hypotheses that include factors related to endocrine disruption, DNA damage, inflammation, and nutrition during pregnancy. The survey results may stimulate a multidisciplinary discussion about new etiologic hypotheses of testicular cancer.

  9. Conducting Surveys and Data Collection: From Traditional to Mobile and SMS-based Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Alam

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fresh, bias-free and valid data collected using different survey modes is considered an essential requirement for smooth functioning and evolution of an organization. Surveys play a major role in making in-time correct decisions and generating reports. The aim of this study is to compare and investigate state-of-the-art in different survey modes including print, email, online, mobile and SMS-based surveys. Results indicated that existing methods are neither complete nor sufficient to fulfil the overall requirements of an organization which primarily rely on surveys. Also, it shows that SMS is a dominant method for data collection due to its pervasiveness. However, existing SMS-based data collection has limitations like limited number of characters per SMS, single question per SMS and lake of multimedia support. Recent trends in data collection emphasis on data collection applications for smart phones. However, in developing countries low-end mobile devices are still extensively used which makes the data collection difficult from man in the street. The paper conclude that existing survey modes and methods should be improved to get maximum responses quickly in low cost manner. The study has contributed to the area of surveying and data collection by analysing different factors such as cost, time and response rate. The results of this study can help practitioners in creating a more successful surveying method for data collection that can be effectively used for low budget projects in developed as well as developing countries.

  10. Primary care research conducted in networks: getting down to business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, James W

    2012-01-01

    This seventh annual practice-based research theme issue of the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine highlights primary care research conducted in practice-based research networks (PBRNs). The issue includes discussion of (1) theoretical and methodological research, (2) health care research (studies addressing primary care processes), (3) clinical research (studies addressing the impact of primary care on patients), and (4) health systems research (studies of health system issues impacting primary care including the quality improvement process). We had a noticeable increase in submissions from PBRN collaborations, that is, studies that involved multiple networks. As PBRNs cooperate to recruit larger and more diverse patient samples, greater generalizability and applicability of findings lead to improved primary care processes.

  11. Reporting guidelines for survey research: an analysis of published guidance and reporting practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Carol; Khangura, Sara; Brehaut, Jamie C; Graham, Ian D; Moher, David; Potter, Beth K; Grimshaw, Jeremy M

    2010-08-01

    Research needs to be reported transparently so readers can critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the design, conduct, and analysis of studies. Reporting guidelines have been developed to inform reporting for a variety of study designs. The objective of this study was to identify whether there is a need to develop a reporting guideline for survey research. We conducted a three-part project: (1) a systematic review of the literature (including "Instructions to Authors" from the top five journals of 33 medical specialties and top 15 general and internal medicine journals) to identify guidance for reporting survey research; (2) a systematic review of evidence on the quality of reporting of surveys; and (3) a review of reporting of key quality criteria for survey research in 117 recently published reports of self-administered surveys. Fewer than 7% of medical journals (n = 165) provided guidance to authors on survey research despite a majority having published survey-based studies in recent years. We identified four published checklists for conducting or reporting survey research, none of which were validated. We identified eight previous reviews of survey reporting quality, which focused on issues of non-response and accessibility of questionnaires. Our own review of 117 published survey studies revealed that many items were poorly reported: few studies provided the survey or core questions (35%), reported the validity or reliability of the instrument (19%), defined the response rate (25%), discussed the representativeness of the sample (11%), or identified how missing data were handled (11%). There is limited guidance and no consensus regarding the optimal reporting of survey research. The majority of key reporting criteria are poorly reported in peer-reviewed survey research articles. Our findings highlight the need for clear and consistent reporting guidelines specific to survey research.

  12. Reporting Guidelines for Survey Research: An Analysis of Published Guidance and Reporting Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Carol; Khangura, Sara; Brehaut, Jamie C.; Graham, Ian D.; Moher, David; Potter, Beth K.; M. Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Background Research needs to be reported transparently so readers can critically assess the strengths and weaknesses of the design, conduct, and analysis of studies. Reporting guidelines have been developed to inform reporting for a variety of study designs. The objective of this study was to identify whether there is a need to develop a reporting guideline for survey research. Methods and Findings We conducted a three-part project: (1) a systematic review of the literature (including “Instructions to Authors” from the top five journals of 33 medical specialties and top 15 general and internal medicine journals) to identify guidance for reporting survey research; (2) a systematic review of evidence on the quality of reporting of surveys; and (3) a review of reporting of key quality criteria for survey research in 117 recently published reports of self-administered surveys. Fewer than 7% of medical journals (n = 165) provided guidance to authors on survey research despite a majority having published survey-based studies in recent years. We identified four published checklists for conducting or reporting survey research, none of which were validated. We identified eight previous reviews of survey reporting quality, which focused on issues of non-response and accessibility of questionnaires. Our own review of 117 published survey studies revealed that many items were poorly reported: few studies provided the survey or core questions (35%), reported the validity or reliability of the instrument (19%), defined the response rate (25%), discussed the representativeness of the sample (11%), or identified how missing data were handled (11%). Conclusions There is limited guidance and no consensus regarding the optimal reporting of survey research. The majority of key reporting criteria are poorly reported in peer-reviewed survey research articles. Our findings highlight the need for clear and consistent reporting guidelines specific to survey research. Please see

  13. Impacts of Colonialism: A Research Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Ziltener

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of colonialism in Africa and Asia have never been compared in a systematic manner for a large sample of countries. This research survey presents the results of a new and thorough assessment of the highly diverse phenomenon - including length ofdomination , violence, partition, proselytization, instrumentalization of ethno-linguistic and religious cleavages, trade, direct investment, settlements, plantations, and migration -organized through a dimensional analysis (political, social, and economic impacts. It is shown that while in some areas, colonial domination has triggered profound changes in economy and social structure, others have remained almost untouched.

  14. Environmental survey at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Looz, T.

    1995-04-01

    Results are presented of the environmental survey conducted in the neighbourhood of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories during 1993. No activity which could have originated from these laboratories was found in samples collected from possible human food chains. All low-level liquid and gaseous waste discharges were within authorised limits. The maximum possible annual dose to the general public from airborne discharges during this period is estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv, which is one per cent of the dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. A list of previous environmental survey reports is attached. 22 refs., 21 tabs., 4 figs.

  15. Environmental survey at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, E.L.; Looz, T.

    1995-04-01

    Results are presented of the environmental survey conducted in the neighbourhood of the Lucas Heights Research Laboratories during 1993. No activity which could have originated from these laboratories was found in samples collected from possible human food chains. All low-level liquid and gaseous waste discharges were within authorised limits. The maximum possible annual dose to the general public from airborne discharges during this period is estimated to be less than 0.01 mSv, which is one per cent of the dose limit for long term exposure that is recommended by the National Health and Medical Research Council. A list of previous environmental survey reports is attached. 22 refs., 21 tabs., 4 figs.

  16. The use of advanced web-based survey design in Delphi research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Christopher; Gardner, Anne; McInnes, Elizabeth

    2017-07-16

    A discussion of the application of metadata, paradata and embedded data in web-based survey research, using two completed Delphi surveys as examples. Metadata, paradata and embedded data use in web-based Delphi surveys has not been described in the literature. The rapid evolution and widespread use of online survey methods imply that paper-based Delphi methods will likely become obsolete. Commercially available web-based survey tools offer a convenient and affordable means of conducting Delphi research. Researchers and ethics committees may be unaware of the benefits and risks of using metadata in web-based surveys. Discussion paper. Two web-based, three-round Delphi surveys were conducted sequentially between August 2014 - January 2015 and April - May 2016. Their aims were to validate the Australian nurse practitioner metaspecialties and their respective clinical practice standards. Our discussion paper is supported by researcher experience and data obtained from conducting both web-based Delphi surveys. Researchers and ethics committees should consider the benefits and risks of metadata use in web-based survey methods. Web-based Delphi research using paradata and embedded data may introduce efficiencies that improve individual participant survey experiences and reduce attrition across iterations. Use of embedded data allows the efficient conduct of multiple simultaneous Delphi surveys across a shorter timeframe than traditional survey methods. The use of metadata, paradata and embedded data appears to improve response rates, identify bias and give possible explanation for apparent outlier responses, providing an efficient method of conducting web-based Delphi surveys. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Abnormal anuran surveys conducted at Lower Klamath Clear Lake and Modoc National Wildlife Refuge in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Abstract Abnormal anuran surveys were conducted on three National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in northern California in 2005. The three refuges selected were Lower...

  18. Best Manufacturing Practices. Report of Survey Conducted at Stafford County Public Schools, Stafford County, VA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1994-01-01

    During the week of August 8, 1994, a Best Manufacturing Practices (BMP) survey was conducted at the Stafford County Public Schools located in Stafford County, Virginia, considered one of the fastest growing counties in the state...

  19. Monte Vista Refuge : Instructions for conducting the waterfowl production survey based on duck nesting transects

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the protocol for conducting waterfowl production surveys based on duck nest transects for the Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge. The basic approach, field...

  20. Survey of research activity among multidisciplinary health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Andrea P; Roberts, Shelley; Baker, Mark J; Keijzers, Gerben; Young, Jessica; Stapelberg, N J Chris; Crilly, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the research activities being undertaken by health service employees within one Australian health service and explore their experiences with undertaking research.Methods The present mixed-methods study was conducted across one health service in Queensland, Australia, and included a cross-sectional online survey and interviews with healthcare service employees. The anonymous survey was a self-administered online questionnaire, distributed to all 6121 employees at the health service via email, asking about research activity and engagement. Willing participants were also interviewed on their perceptions and experiences with research and capacity building.Results In all, 151 participants responded to the survey and 22 participated in interviews. Three-quarters of respondents reported actively participating in research over the past 6 years and several research outputs, such as publications, conference presentations and competitive grant funding, were displayed. Four concepts emerged from interview findings, namely collaborative partnerships, skilled mentorship, embedding research and organisational support, which represented the overall theme 'opportunities for a research-infused health service'.Conclusion Employees of the health service recognised the importance of research and had a range of research skills, knowledge and experience. They also identified several opportunities for building research capacity in this service.What is known about the topic? Building research capacity among healthcare professionals is important for enabling the conduct of high-quality research in healthcare institutions. However, building research capacity is complex and influenced by the uniqueness of organisational context. In order to successfully build research capacity among employees at any health service, current research activity, skills and experience, as well as staff perceptions around building research capacity in that

  1. CAS conducts ex-post evaluation on research projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Under the auspices of the CAS Center for Project Supervision and Evaluation, a panel of experts recently conducted an ex-post evaluation on a research project entitled "the electrical system for an electric vehicle." The appraisal is the first of its kind in project management at CAS.

  2. Challenges Confronting Beginning Researchers in Conducting Literature Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Der-Thanq; Wang, Yu-Mei; Lee, Wei Ching

    2016-01-01

    Conducting literature review is a complicated, sometimes confusing and laborious process that beginning educational researchers, especially graduate students, often find challenging. However, in the past these challenges were hardly considered, but in more recent times they have been increasingly considered by various faculties and graduate…

  3. A Survey Data Quality Strategy: The Institutional Research Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin

    2009-01-01

    This paper intends to construct a survey data quality strategy for institutional researchers in higher education in light of total survey error theory. It starts with describing the characteristics of institutional research and identifying the gaps in literature regarding survey data quality issues in institutional research. Then it is followed by…

  4. Guidelines for Conducting Positivist Case Study Research in Information Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graeme Shanks

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The case study research approach is widely used in a number of different ways within the information systems community. This paper focuses on positivist, deductive case study research in information systems. It provides clear definitions of important concepts in positivist case study research and illustrates these with an example research study. A critical analysis of the conduct and outcomes of two recently published positivist case studies is reported. One is a multiple case study that validated concepts in a framework for viewpoint development in requirements definition. The other is a single case study that examined the role of social enablers in enterprise resource planning systems implementation. A number of guidelines for successfully undertaking positivist case study research are identified including developing a clear understanding of key concepts and assumptions within the positivist paradigm; providing clear and unambiguous definitions of the units and interactions when using any theory; carefully defining the boundary of the theory used in the case study; using hypotheses rather than propositions in the empirical testing of theory; using fuzzy or probabilistic propositions in recognising that reality can never be perfectly known; selecting case studies carefully, particularly single case studies; and recognising that generalisation from positivist, single case studies is inherently different from generalisation from single experiments. When properly undertaken, positivist, deductive case study research is a valuable research approach for information systems researchers, particularly when used within pluralist research programs that use a number of different research approaches from different paradigms.

  5. Conducting Field Research on Terrorism: a Brief Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Dolnik

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the practical aspects of field research on terrorism. Firstly, it  outlines some issues involved in the process of attaining a human research ethics/institutional review board clearance in order to be able to even begin the field research. It suggests some ways in which researchers can positively influence this review process in their favor. Secondly, the article focuses on the real and perceived dangers of field research, identifying practical steps and preparatory activities that can help researchers manage and reduce the risks involved. The article also covers the formalities and dilemmas involved in gaining access to the field. It then provides some insights into the topic of operating in conflict zones, followed by a section covering the ways of gaining access to sources, effective communication skills and influence techniques and addresses key issues involved in interviewing sources in the field. The final section focuses on identifying biases and interfering factors which researchers need to take into account when interpreting the data acquired through interviews. This article is a modest attempt to fill a gap in the literature on terrorism research by outlining some of the key issues involved in the process of doing field research. It incorporates insights from diverse disciplines as well as the author’s personal experiences of conducting field research on terrorism in places like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Chechnya, Ingushetia, Colombia, Mindanao, Uganda, Indonesia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, and India.

  6. Intercalibration of research survey vessels on Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, J.T.; Johnson, T.B.; Knight, C.T.; Bur, M.T.

    2006-01-01

    Fish abundance indices obtained from annual research trawl surveys are an integral part of fisheries stock assessment and management in the Great Lakes. It is difficult, however, to administer trawl surveys using a single vessel-gear combination owing to the large size of these systems, the jurisdictional boundaries that bisect the Great Lakes, and changes in vessels as a result of fleet replacement. When trawl surveys are administered by multiple vessel-gear combinations, systematic error may be introduced in combining catch-per-unit-effort (CPUE) data across vessels. This bias is associated with relative differences in catchability among vessel-gear combinations. In Lake Erie, five different research vessels conduct seasonal trawl surveys in the western half of the lake. To eliminate this systematic bias, the Lake Erie agencies conducted a side-by-side trawling experiment in 2003 to develop correction factors for CPUE data associated with different vessel-gear combinations. Correcting for systematic bias in CPUE data should lead to more accurate and comparable estimates of species density and biomass. We estimated correction factors for the 10 most commonly collected species age-groups for each vessel during the experiment. Most of the correction factors (70%) ranged from 0.5 to 2.0, indicating that the systematic bias associated with different vessel-gear combinations was not large. Differences in CPUE were most evident for vessels using different sampling gears, although significant differences also existed for vessels using the same gears. These results suggest that standardizing gear is important for multiple-vessel surveys, but there will still be significant differences in catchability stemming from the vessel effects and agencies must correct for this. With standardized estimates of CPUE, the Lake Erie agencies will have the ability to directly compare and combine time series for species abundance. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  7. Conducting perception research over the internet: a tutorial review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy T. Woods

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an overview of the recent literature on the use of internet-based testing to address important questions in perception research. Our goal is to provide a starting point for the perception researcher who is keen on assessing this tool for their own research goals. Internet-based testing has several advantages over in-lab research, including the ability to reach a relatively broad set of participants and to quickly and inexpensively collect large amounts of empirical data, via services such as Amazon’s Mechanical Turk or Prolific Academic. In many cases, the quality of online data appears to match that collected in lab research. Generally-speaking, online participants tend to be more representative of the population at large than those recruited for lab based research. There are, though, some important caveats, when it comes to collecting data online. It is obviously much more difficult to control the exact parameters of stimulus presentation (such as display characteristics with online research. There are also some thorny ethical elements that need to be considered by experimenters. Strengths and weaknesses of the online approach, relative to others, are highlighted, and recommendations made for those researchers who might be thinking about conducting their own studies using this increasingly-popular approach to research in the psychological sciences.

  8. Nature and governance of veterinary clinical research conducted in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fordyce, P; Mullan, S

    2017-01-21

    In order to quantify the amount of clinical research conducted on client-owned animals under the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966, and the nature and extent of any ethical review of that research, a questionnaire was sent to 6 UK veterinary schools, 1 charity veterinary clinic and 12 private referral clinics. The questionnaire examined whether and how much clinical research respondents undertook, and the composition of any ethical review panels examining research proposals. The questionnaire revealed a substantial amount of clinical research was conducted in the UK, with over 200 veterinary surgeons involved in the year of the survey, with at least 170 academic papers involving clinical research published by respondents in the same year. However, it proved impossible to quantify the full extent of clinical research in the UK. All UK veterinary schools required ethical review of clinical research. The composition and working practices of their ethical review panels generally reflected skill sets in ethical review panels set-up under statute to consider the ethics of non-clinical biomedical research on animals and clinical research conducted on human patients. The process for review of clinical research in the private sector was less clear. British Veterinary Association.

  9. Bibliometric Analysis of Current Web Survey Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qian; SHAO Peiji; FANG Jiaming

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, with the advancement of information technology and its application in survey activities, web surveys have not only greatly developed, but have also encountered many problems in China. An analysis of domestic research is important for better understanding of web surveys, to guide further research and application. This paper gives a bibliometric analysis of 120 domestic articles on web surveys from 1998 to 2006, on publication growth, author and organization distribution, journal distribution, and research subjects. Research on web surveys in China should make progress comparable with research abroad in comparative studies, specific studies, and technical application studies.

  10. Nationwide survey on barriers for dental research in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundendu Arya Bishen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Research in the dental field is progressing at mightier speed worldwide, but an unfortunately representation of India at this platform is negligible. The present study was undertaken to unearth the barriers for dental research among dental professionals in Indian scenario. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted on 1514 participant′s (Master of Dental Surgery and Bachelor of Dental Surgery staff and postgraduates in 40 dental colleges of India selected by multistage random sampling. The response rate was 75.7%. The survey was undertaken from July 2013 to December 2013. The survey instrument was 24-item, investigator developed, self-structured, close-ended, and self-administered questionnaire grouped into four categories that are, institutional/departmental support related barriers, financial/training support related barriers, time-related barriers, and general barriers. Results: Among all respondents 47.23% informed that they are administrative and educational work rather than research work as (P < 0.001. Overall 57.53% of study participants reported lack of administrative and technical support for research work as (P < 0.001. Overall 64.9% reported meager college funding was the barrier (P < 0.001. Overall 61.5% respondents reported lack of time to do research work due to clinical and teaching responsibilities (P < 0.001 was the barrier for research. Largely 80.25% agreed that, the lack of documentation and record maintenance are an obvious barrier for research (P < 0.001. Conclusions: Present study unearths certain barriers for research in an Indian scenario, which includes administrative overburden, lack of funds, and lack of documentation of the dental data. Governing authorities of dentistry in India have to make major interventions to make research non-intensive environment to research-friendly environment.

  11. Survey of NASA research on crash dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, R. G.; Carden, H. D.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ten years of structural crash dynamics research activities conducted on general aviation aircraft by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are described. Thirty-two full-scale crash tests were performed at Langley Research Center, and pertinent data on airframe and seat behavior were obtained. Concurrent with the experimental program, analytical methods were developed to help predict structural behavior during impact. The effects of flight parameters at impact on cabin deceleration pulses at the seat/occupant interface, experimental and analytical correlation of data on load-limiting subfloor and seat configurations, airplane section test results for computer modeling validation, and data from emergency-locator-transmitter (ELT) investigations to determine probable cause of false alarms and nonactivations are assessed. Computer programs which provide designers with analytical methods for predicting accelerations, velocities, and displacements of collapsing structures are also discussed.

  12. Ethical Conduct in Research Involving Human Beings In Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novaes, Maria Rita Garbi; Guilhem, Dirce; Lolas, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Objective Diagnose ethical conduct in research involving human beings in Brazil and the last 10 years of activity by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Health Department - Federal District - CEP/SES/DF. Methods This work was based on a documentary research, descriptive and retrospective. It examined the database containing records of cases brought before the CEP/SES/DF, corresponding the period of June 1997 to December 2007. Results were generated in Excel program, version 2007. Results CEP/SES/DF has presented increasing number of research projects submitted to appreciation (n = 1129), composing: 90.4% approved 1.7% disapproved, 7.4% removed/filed and 0.5% excluded. Of these projects, 83% belonged to Group III, 18% multi-centered projects and 10% protocols with foreign participation. Time for approval has decreased over the years (30 to 60 days). Frequent pendencies: End of Free and Informed Consent (30%), Cover Sheet (25%), Methodology (20%), Curriculum vitae (12%), Budget (9%), and Others (4%). Conclusion The assessment of the CEP/SES/DF activities, during a ten-year period has shown its commitment to the legitimacy of research ethics review and scientific production SES/DF. There were some weaknesses such as difficulty in monitoring the accompaniment of the research; interruption of works due to adverse drug reaction; gaps or errors in the protocol submitted by the researcher. These situations are the achieving targets for the elaboration of specific criteria. PMID:20981277

  13. Barriers and Solutions to Conducting Large International, Interdisciplinary Research Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischke, Erin C; Knowlton, Jessie L; Phifer, Colin C; Gutierrez Lopez, Jose; Propato, Tamara S; Eastmond, Amarella; de Souza, Tatiana Martins; Kuhlberg, Mark; Picasso Risso, Valentin; Veron, Santiago R; Garcia, Carlos; Chiappe, Marta; Halvorsen, Kathleen E

    2017-09-18

    Global environmental problems such as climate change are not bounded by national borders or scientific disciplines, and therefore require international, interdisciplinary teamwork to develop understandings of their causes and solutions. Interdisciplinary scientific work is difficult enough, but these challenges are often magnified when teams also work across national boundaries. The literature on the challenges of interdisciplinary research is extensive. However, research on international, interdisciplinary teams is nearly non-existent. Our objective is to fill this gap by reporting on results from a study of a large interdisciplinary, international National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education (NSF-PIRE) research project across the Americas. We administered a structured questionnaire to team members about challenges they faced while working together across disciplines and outside of their home countries in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Analysis of the responses indicated five major types of barriers to conducting interdisciplinary, international research: integration, language, fieldwork logistics, personnel and relationships, and time commitment. We discuss the causes and recommended solutions to the most common barriers. Our findings can help other interdisciplinary, international research teams anticipate challenges, and develop effective solutions to minimize the negative impacts of these barriers to their research.

  14. PRES 2013: Results from the Postgraduate Research Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Turner, Gosia

    2013-01-01

    This document outlines the results of the "2013 Postgraduate Research Experience Survey" ("PRES"), where 48,401 replies were received from 122 participating institutions. Redeveloped for 2013, our biennial survey is the only national survey to gather insight from postgraduate research students about their learning and…

  15. PRES 2013: Results from the Postgraduate Research Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Paul; Turner, Gosia

    2013-01-01

    This document outlines the results of the "2013 Postgraduate Research Experience Survey" ("PRES"), where 48,401 replies were received from 122 participating institutions. Redeveloped for 2013, our biennial survey is the only national survey to gather insight from postgraduate research students about their learning and…

  16. Orthopaedic nurses' perception of research utilization - A cross sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical...... knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire....... The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack...

  17. Finishing what was started: an analysis of theater research conducted from 2010 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukes, Susan; Tourtillott, Brandon; Bryant, Devin; Carter, Kristina; McNair, Shanelle; Maupin, Genny; Tamminga, Cindy

    2015-03-01

    The Joint Combat Casualty Research Team (JC2RT) is part of the human research protection regulatory system implemented in 2005 to oversee the conduct of research in a deployed military combatant command. In 2010, SharePoint, a web-based tool, was established to track study documents. This study conducted by JC2RT no. 13 describes characteristics of research studies under the purview of the JC2RT from 2010 through 2012. Of the 83 research studies reviewed, 34% were completed, 32% were not completed, and 34% were still in progress. Target sample sizes ranged from 12 to 70,000, with 96% of the research studying U.S. military members. The design of 61% of the studies was prospective, 20% surveys, and 14% retrospective reviews. Approximately one-half of the studies were conducted at single sites. Eighty-four percent of the studies that finished an institutional review board (IRB) were completed, whereas a large number of studies never made it to IRB approval. Even after studies have gone through the rigorous process of scientific review and IRB approval some continue to struggle for years to be completed in the theater of operations. The JC2RT is committed to helping facilitate the ethical conduct of research during war.

  18. Main academic institutions conducting research in the public transport area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, B.E. [Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden). Dept. of Traffic Planning and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    The international exchange of knowledge is becoming increasingly important for all activities. Within Europe, the need for simple reviews of institutions within one and the same subject area has become more tangible since the European Union started its public transport research program. The survey has been carried out in two stages. First a questionnaire was sent to those institutions, public transport authorities, public transport associations and individuals within the subject area that were known to the Department. In this questionnaire we asked for the names and addresses of institutions at colleges and universities where significant research on public transport is carried out. In a second stage, a list was compiled of the 48 institutions that were named in the results of the first questionnaire. This list was sent to these institutions with the request for a brief presentation of their research within the public transport sector and information on any institution they felt were missing in the list. We found further interesting institutions on the Internet. The final list contains more than 60 institutions outside the Nordic area. Within the Nordic countries we have exclusively followed our own address list of institutions with long-term research work within the subject area

  19. Few notes on conducting cultural comparisons in psychological research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Linkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Some problems of conducting cultural comparisons in psychological research are mentioned. First, the constructs and methods used often don't tell anything meaningful about cultures in question - as if we used temperature (construct and thermomether (method to compare water and nitrogen. Often, method developed to measure construct meaningful in culture A (or construct meaningful for comparison between culture A and other cultures is used to compare cultures B and C. As a result, the used method might measure something, which is relevant only for some of the compared cultures, or is not meaningful for such cultural comparison at all - cultures B and C might look similar when construct meaningful for description of difference between cultures A and D is used. Second, groups not being represented in academia in countries in question (often indigenous groups in these countries are often omitted from research. Researchers from some countries might be motivated to don't mention such groups in the published research. Third, researchers often generalize developed constructs and results to larger groups than they have actually knowledge and understanding about. Chauvinist idea that one's own culture is representative for geographically close cultures might be behind this behavior as well as pragmatic idea that the research stating its results to be valid for larger group of people has larger chance to be published. Fourth, constructs and methods developed by these types of research are published in psychological journals, which ignore these issues. Before preparing a cultural-comparative research it is recommended to get good knowledge about cultures in question and use this knowledge to judge meaningfulness of constructs used in psychological research. If there are no meaningful constructs for description of differences between cultures in question, it is better to develop a new construct.

  20. Workshop on Survey Methods in Education Research: Facilitator's Guide and Resources. REL 2017-214

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Jill; Redford, Jeremy; Bhatt, Monica P.

    2017-01-01

    This Workshop on Survey Methods in Education Research tool consists of a facilitator guide and workshop handouts. The toolkit is intended for use by state or district education leaders and others who want to conduct training on developing and administering surveys. The facilitator guide provides materials related to various phases of the survey…

  1. A Survey of Video Game Players in a Public, Urban Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunarayanan, M. O.; Vilchez, Manuel; Abreu, Liala; Ledesma, Cyntianna; Lopez, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    A survey was conducted in a public, research university located in a large and diverse metropolitan area in the southeastern part of the USA. The purpose of the survey was to determine both the positive and negative personal, educational, social, and work related consequences of playing video games. Nearly two-thirds of the 203 participants in…

  2. A Survey of Video Game Players in a Public, Urban Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirunarayanan, M. O.; Vilchez, Manuel; Abreu, Liala; Ledesma, Cyntianna; Lopez, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    A survey was conducted in a public, research university located in a large and diverse metropolitan area in the southeastern part of the USA. The purpose of the survey was to determine both the positive and negative personal, educational, social, and work related consequences of playing video games. Nearly two-thirds of the 203 participants in…

  3. [Epidemiological basis and results of the National Survey 2001 conducted in the Swiss pig population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadorn, D; Hauser, R; Stärk, K D C

    2002-10-01

    Free trade with animals and animal products requires transparency concerning health information of animal populations. On the basis of the bilateral agreement with the European Union (EU), Switzerland is obliged to document freedom from Aujeszky's disease (AD) in its pig population by conducting surveys on a regular basis. Such a survey was planned for the first time for the year 2001. In this context, it was evaluated whether additional pig diseases should be included in the survey. This article describes the evaluation procedure for the selection of pig diseases integrated in the survey 2001. Additionally, it reports and interprets the results of this survey. All of the 2537 farms and 41,719 blood samples were tested negative. Therefore, it could be documented with a confidence of 99.98% that the AD-prevalence in Switzerland is below 1%.

  4. Comparison of the National Survey of Compensation with other surveys of research and development professionals. Final report on universe update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newborg, J.; Spurgeon, M.; Price, B.; Evans, P.

    1981-10-01

    The National Survey of Compensation Paid Scientists and Engineers Engaged in Research and Development (NSC) has been conducted for the Department of Energy since 1967. During this time the NSC has come to be considered the most comprehensive survey of its kind available in the United States. Its methodology and results are reliable and highly useful to compensation personnel in research and development (R and D) establishments. Each year project staff pinpoint areas of improvement which are necessary and desirable. The three tasks that are the subject of this report have been undertaken to maintain and improve the NSC and increase its usefulness to participants. The three tasks are: an update of the universe listing; comparison of NSC survey methodology and results with other surveys of research and development professionals; and development of a methodology to project salaries for the near-term. Each task is described.

  5. Overcoming challenges of conducting research in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Catharine; Smythe, Analisa; Galant-Miecznikowska, Magdalena; Bentham, Peter; Oyebode, Jan

    2016-05-27

    In the UK, one third of the 850,000 people with dementia live in care homes. This article explores the process of carrying out research in nursing homes, identifying barriers and enabling factors, and making recommendations for researchers. The authors' experiences derive from an ongoing study investigating the effect of educational interventions to promote and embed person-centred care, designed for nurses caring for the people with dementia in nursing homes. Design issues arose from the need to use cluster randomisation which requires a large sample size, implementation fidelity, poor compliance and high numbers of participants lost to follow up. Further difficulties included gaining ethical approval, recruitment, raising concerns and the practicalities of participant retention. There are many benefits of conducting research in care homes, for the homes themselves, their staff and residents. These include training and education, networking and empowerment of staff and subsequent improved standards of care. For the research team, benefits include opportunities to contribute to an underserved setting, to advance care standards and improve nurses' working lives.

  6. Samples and data accessibility in research biobanks: an explorative survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Capocasa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biobanks, which contain human biological samples and/or data, provide a crucial contribution to the progress of biomedical research. However, the effective and efficient use of biobank resources depends on their accessibility. In fact, making bio-resources promptly accessible to everybody may increase the benefits for society. Furthermore, optimizing their use and ensuring their quality will promote scientific creativity and, in general, contribute to the progress of bio-medical research. Although this has become a rather common belief, several laboratories are still secretive and continue to withhold samples and data. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire-based survey in order to investigate sample and data accessibility in research biobanks operating all over the world. The survey involved a total of 46 biobanks. Most of them gave permission to access their samples (95.7% and data (85.4%, but free and unconditioned accessibility seemed not to be common practice. The analysis of the guidelines regarding the accessibility to resources of the biobanks that responded to the survey highlights three issues: (i the request for applicants to explain what they would like to do with the resources requested; (ii the role of funding, public or private, in the establishment of fruitful collaborations between biobanks and research labs; (iii the request of co-authorship in order to give access to their data. These results suggest that economic and academic aspects are involved in determining the extent of sample and data sharing stored in biobanks. As a second step of this study, we investigated the reasons behind the high diversity of requirements to access biobank resources. The analysis of informative answers suggested that the different modalities of resource accessibility seem to be largely influenced by both social context and legislation of the countries where the biobanks operate.

  7. A Survey of Venture Capital Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Da Rin, M.; Hellmann, T.; Puri, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    This survey reviews the growing body of academic work on venture capital. It lays out the major data sources used. It examines the work on venture capital investments in companies, looking at issues of selection, contracting, post-investment services and exits. The survey considers recent work on or

  8. Polymer matrix composites research: A survey of federally sponsored programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report identifies research conducted by agencies of the federal government other than the Department of Energy (DOE) in the area of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). DOE commissioned the report to avoid duplicating other agencies' efforts in planning its own research program for PMCs. PMC materials consist of high-strength, short or continuous fibers fused together by an organic matrix. Compared to traditional structural metals, PMCs provide greater strength and stiffness, reduced weight and increased heat resistance. The key contributors to PMC research identified by the survey are the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). The survey identified a total of 778 projects. More than half of the total projects identified emphasize materials research with a goal toward developing materials with improved performance. Although an almost equal number of identified materials projects focus on thermosets and thermoplastics receive more attention because of their increased impact resistance and their easy formability and re-formability. Slightly more than one third of projects identified target structures research. Only 15 percent of the projects identified focus on manufacturing techniques, despite the need for efficient, economical methods manufacturing products constructed of PMCs--techniques required for PMCs to gain widespread acceptance. Three issues to be addressed concerning PMCs research are economy of use, improvements in processing, and education and training. Five target technologies have been identified that could benefit greatly from increased use of PMCs: aircraft fuselages, automobile frames, high-speed machinery, electronic packaging, and construction.

  9. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  10. 30 CFR 250.1153 - When must I conduct a static bottomhole pressure survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false When must I conduct a static bottomhole pressure survey? 250.1153 Section 250.1153 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas...

  11. Education in the responsible conduct of research in psychology: methods and scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiLorenzo, Terry A; Becker-Fiegeles, Jill; Gibelman, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    In this mixed-method study of education in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) in psychology, phase one survey respondents (n = 141) reported that faculty and students were familiar with RCR standards and procedures to educate them were believed to be adequate. However, educational methods varied widely. In phase two, seven survey respondents completed in-depth interviews assessing RCR training and education and research review procedures. Educational methods through which RCR content was presented included the following ones: traditional (lectures), technical (web-based), and experiential (internships), but RCR was often minimally considered in the formal curriculum. Our results suggest that psychology training programs might benefit from more formal consideration of RCR education and training in the curriculum.

  12. Survey research: it's just a few questions, right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alan R; Voepel-Lewis, Terri

    2015-07-01

    While most anesthesiologists and other physician- or nurse-scientists are familiar with traditional descriptive, observational, and interventional study design, survey research has typically remained the preserve of the social scientists. To that end, this article provides a basic overview of the elements of good survey design and offers some rules of thumb to help guide investigators through the survey process.

  13. Geodetic surveying as part of archaeological research in Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Pacina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Surveying is an important part of any archaeological research. In this paper we focus on the archaeological research in north Sudan (6th Nile cataract and the surveying methods applicable under the local conditions. Surveying in the Third World countries is affected by the political situation (limited import of surveying tools, local conditions (lack of fixed points, GNSS correction signal, inaccessible basemaps and fixed point network. This article describes the methods and results obtained during the three archaeological seasons (2011-2014. The classical surveying methods were combined with KAP (Kite Aerial Photography to obtain the desired results in form of archaeological maps, detailed orthophoto images and other analyses results.

  14. Report of radioactivity survey research in fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    In National Institute of Radiological Sciences, a survey was made on radioactivities in the environment due to the substances released from nuclear installations and radioactive fall-out brought out by nuclear explosion tests since 1959. As the marked progress of non-military utilization of nuclear energy the national concern on environmental radioactivity has been increasing in Japan and thus it has become more and more important to make a survey research of radioactivities, which might affect the environment and human health. In these situations, the institute attempted to make the following six surveys in the fiscal year of 1996; `a survey on radioactive levels in environment, foods and human bodies`, `survey on the radioactive level in the regions around nuclear installations`, `works in radioactive data center`, `fundamental survey on the evaluation of the results from radioactivity survey`, `workshop for technical experts of environmental radioactivity monitoring` and `survey research on the measurement and countermeasures for emergency exposure`. (M.N.)

  15. Report of radioactivity survey research in fiscal year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    In National Institute of Radiological Sciences, a survey was made on radioactivities in the environment due to the substances released from nuclear installations and radioactive fall-out brought out by nuclear explosion tests since 1959. As the marked progress of non-military utilization of nuclear energy the national concern on environmental radioactivity has been increasing in Japan and thus it has become more and more important to make a survey research of radioactivities, which might affect the environment and human health. In these situations, the institute attempted to make the following six surveys in the fiscal year of 1997; `a survey on radioactive levels in environment, foods and human bodies`, `survey on the radioactive level in the regions around nuclear installations`, `works in radioactive data center`, `fundamental survey on the evaluation of the results from radioactivity survey`, `workshop for technical experts of environmental radioactivity monitoring` and `survey research on the measurement and countermeasures for emergency exposure`. (J.P.N.)

  16. Research Review: DSM-V Conduct Disorder--Research Needs for an Evidence Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Terrie E.; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R.; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C.; Odgers, Candice L.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Viding, Essi

    2008-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to…

  17. Conducting qualitative research in mental health: Thematic and content analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Marie; Inder, Maree; Porter, Richard

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe two methods of qualitative analysis - thematic analysis and content analysis - and to examine their use in a mental health context. A description of the processes of thematic analysis and content analysis is provided. These processes are then illustrated by conducting two analyses of the same qualitative data. Transcripts of qualitative interviews are analysed using each method to illustrate these processes. The illustration of the processes highlights the different outcomes from the same set of data. Thematic and content analyses are qualitative methods that serve different research purposes. Thematic analysis provides an interpretation of participants' meanings, while content analysis is a direct representation of participants' responses. These methods provide two ways of understanding meanings and experiences and provide important knowledge in a mental health context. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  18. Academic Achievement Survey and Educational Assessment Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Koji

    2009-01-01

    The recent "Nationwide academic achievement and study situation survey" was clearly influenced by the idea of "authentic assessment", an educational assessment perspective focused on "quality" and "engagement". However, when "performance assessment", the assessment method corresponding to this…

  19. Environmental Survey preliminary report, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research, Bartlesville, Oklahoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Team members are being provided by private contractors. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NIPER. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NIPER and interviews with site personnel. 35 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. A Survey on Clinical Research Training Status and Needs in Public Hospitals from Shenzhen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ping; Wang, Haibo; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Min; Zhou, Liping; Xiao, Ping; Wang, Yanfang; Wu, Yangfeng

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To obtain information on the current clinical research training status and evaluate the training needs comprehensively for medical staff in hospitals. Methods: This survey was initiated and conducted by the Health and Family Planning Commission of Shenzhen in conjunction with the Peking University Clinical Research Institute (Shenzhen)…

  1. How to conduct research on burnout: Advantages and disadvantages of a unidimensional approach in burnout research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenninkmeijer, V.; Van Yperen, N.W.

    2003-01-01

    When conducting research on burnout, it may be difficult to decide whether one should report results separately for each burnout dimension or whether one should combine the dimensions. Although the multidimensionality of the burnout concept is widely acknowledged, for research purposes it is sometim

  2. How to conduct research on burnout: Advantages and disadvantages of a unidimensional approach in burnout research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenninkmeijer, V.; Van Yperen, N.W.

    When conducting research on burnout, it may be difficult to decide whether one should report results separately for each burnout dimension or whether one should combine the dimensions. Although the multidimensionality of the burnout concept is widely acknowledged, for research purposes it is

  3. Current Practice Patterns Regarding the Conduct of Thyroidectomy and Parathyroidectomy amongst Surgeons - A Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LR Henry, LB Helou, NP Solomon, A Chang, SK Libutti, A Stojadinovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Heterogeneity of surgical care exists among surgeons regarding the conduct of thyroidectomy and parathyroidectomy.Aim: To identify the current patterns of technical conduct of operation amongst surgeons performing thyroidectomy or parathyroidectomy.Methods: A survey was designed and beta-tested on five surgical oncologists for face validity and usability. The final version of this survey was constructed and disseminated using the professional version of the internet-based survey mechanism Survey Monkey and consisted of two eligibility questions and 22 questions regarding thyroidectomy/parathyroidectomy treatment patterns. The survey was disseminated electronically to American Association of Endocrine Surgeons (AAES and American College of Surgeons (ACS members. Survey results were collected, tabulated and analyzed. Responses among groups were compared using two sample T- tests. Significant responses were subsequently analyzed in generalized linear models to ascertain if significance remained with control of covariates.Results: Of 420 initial web survey visits, 236 (56.2% surveys were completed. The majority of respondents reported being 'fellowship trained', experienced and 'high-volume' surgeons. The most common fellowship trainings were endocrine (46%, oncology (22%, head & neck (13%, or combinations of the three fellowships (14%. Most surgeons reported that they dissect the course of the recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN without using neuromonitoring. Nearly a third of respondents reported routinely using the Harmonic scalpel during the conduct of the operations. Significant differences emerged regarding operative technique according to residency training type, fellowship training, surgeon volume, and practice setting, but only those associated with residency training type and annual surgeon surgical volume remained significant within generalized linear models.Conclusion: Most surgeons who responded to this survey do not routinely

  4. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  5. A survey of patients' attitudes to clinical research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, A

    2011-04-01

    Every year hundreds of patients voluntarily participate in clinical trials across Ireland. However, little research has been done as to how patients find the experience. This survey was conducted in an attempt to ascertain clinical trial participants\\' views on their experience of participating in a clinical trial and to see and how clinical trial participation can be improved. One hundred and sixty-six clinical trial participants who had recently completed a global phase IV cardiovascular endpoint clinical trial were sent a 3-page questionnaire. Ninety-one (91%) respondents found the experience of participating in a clinical trial a good one with 85 (84.16%) respondents saying they would recommend participating in a clinical trial to a friend or relative and eighty-five (87.63%) respondents feeling they received better healthcare because they had participated in a clinical trial.

  6. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Dempsey, Gregg [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States); Klemovich, Ron [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  7. Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Reasor, R. Scott [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Campbell, Claire L. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including

  8. Survey Practices in Dental Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Kuster, Curtis G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of mailed questionnaires in research on dental education is examined, and several factors that researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors are identified. Examples from the "Journal of Dental Education" are used. (Author/MLW)

  9. Survey Practices in Dental Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Kuster, Curtis G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of mailed questionnaires in research on dental education is examined, and several factors that researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors are identified. Examples from the "Journal of Dental Education" are used. (Author/MLW)

  10. Guidance for researchers developing and conducting clinical trials in practice-based research networks (PBRNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Schmit, Kristine M; Graham, Deborah G; Fox, Chester H; Baldwin, Laura Mae

    2014-01-01

    There is increased interest nationally in multicenter clinical trials to answer questions about clinical effectiveness, comparative effectiveness, and safety in real-world community settings. Primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs), comprising community- and/or academically affiliated practices committed to improving medical care for a range of health problems, offer ideal settings for these trials, especially pragmatic clinical trials. However, many researchers are not familiar with working with PBRNs. Experts in practice-based research identified solutions to challenges that researchers and PBRN personnel experience when collaborating on clinical trials in PBRNs. These were organized as frequently asked questions in a draft document presented at a 2013 Agency for Health care Research and Quality PBRN conference workshop, revised based on participant feedback, then shared with additional experts from the DARTNet Institute, Clinical Translational Science Award PBRN, and North American Primary Care Research Group PBRN workgroups for further input and modification. The "Toolkit for Developing and Conducting Multi-site Clinical Trials in Practice-Based Research Networks" offers guidance in the areas of recruiting and engaging practices, budgeting, project management, and communication, as well as templates and examples of tools important in developing and conducting clinical trials. Ensuring the successful development and conduct of clinical trials in PBRNs requires a highly collaborative approach between academic research and PBRN teams. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  11. Conducting Qualitative Research: A Practical Guide for School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Nancy K.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of school counselor as researcher. Qualitative research is defined, explained, and differentiated from quantitative research. School counselor questions that lend themselves to qualitative research are explored. The article also discusses the steps of qualitative research in depth, including developing questions,…

  12. Survey of cogeneration: Advanced cogeneration research study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonski, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The consumption of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil was surveyed. The potential electricity that could be generated in the SCE service territory using cogeneration technology was estimated. It was found that an estimated 3700 MWe could potentially be generated in Southern California using cogenerated technology. It is suggested that current technology could provide 2600 MWe and advanced technology could provide 1100 MWe. Approximately 1600 MWt is considered not feasible to produce electricity with either current or advanced cogeneration technology.

  13. Survey of Argentine health researchers on the use of evidence in policymaking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrijana Corluka

    Full Text Available In this study, Argentine health researchers were surveyed regarding their perceptions of facilitators and barriers to evidence-based policymaking in Argentina, as well as their publication activities, and research environment satisfaction.A self-administered online survey was sent to health researchers in Argentina. The survey questions were based on a preceding qualitative study of Argentine health researchers, as well as the scientific literature.Of the 647 researchers that were reached, 226 accessed the survey, for a response rate of 34.9%. Over 80% of researchers surveyed had never been involved in or contributed to decision-making, while over 90% of researchers indicated they would like to be involved in the decision-making process. Decision-maker self-interest was perceived to be the driving factor in the development of health and healthcare policies. Research conducted by a research leader was seen to be the most influential factor in influencing health policy, followed by policy relevance of the research. With respect to their occupational environment, researchers rated highest and most favourably the opportunities available to present, discuss and publish research results and their ability to further their education and training. Argentine researchers surveyed demonstrated a strong interest and willingness to contribute their work and expertise to inform Argentine health policy development.Despite Argentina's long scientific tradition, there are relatively few institutionalized linkages between health research results and health policymaking. Based on the results of this study, the disconnect between political decision-making and the health research system, coupled with fewer opportunities for formalized or informal researcher/decision-maker interaction, contribute to the challenges in evidence informing health policymaking in Argentina. Improving personal contact and the building of relationships between researchers and policymakers in

  14. Guidelines for Conducting Positivist Case Study Research in Information Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graeme Shanks

    2002-01-01

    .... This paper focuses on positivist, deductive case study research in information systems. It provides clear definitions of important concepts in positivist case study research and illustrates these with an example research study...

  15. Research review: DSM-V conduct disorder: research needs for an evidence base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Terrie E; Arseneault, Louise; Jaffee, Sara R; Kim-Cohen, Julia; Koenen, Karestan C; Odgers, Candice L; Slutske, Wendy S; Viding, Essi

    2008-01-01

    This article charts a strategic research course toward an empirical foundation for the diagnosis of conduct disorder in the forthcoming DSM-V. Since the DSM-IV appeared in 1994, an impressive amount of new information about conduct disorder has emerged. As a result of this new knowledge, reasonable rationales have been put forward for adding to the conduct disorder diagnostic protocol: a childhood-limited subtype, family psychiatric history, callous-unemotional traits, female-specific criteria, preschool-specific criteria, early substance use, and biomarkers from genetics, neuroimaging, and physiology research. This article reviews the evidence for these and other potential changes to the conduct disorder diagnosis. We report that although there is a great deal of exciting research into each of the topics, very little of it provides the precise sort of evidence base required to justify any alteration to the DSM-V. We outline specific research questions and study designs needed to build the lacking evidence base for or against proposed changes to DSM-V conduct disorder.

  16. Cross-linked survey analysis is an approach for separating cause and effect in survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Lustig, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new research approach, called cross-linked survey analysis, to explore how an acute exposure might lead to changes in survey responses. The goal was to identify associations between exposures and outcomes while reducing some ambiguities related to interpreting cause and effect in survey responses from a population-based community questionnaire. Cross-linked survey analysis differs from a cross-sectional, longitudinal, and panel survey analysis by individualizing the timeline to the unique history of each respondent. Cross-linked survey analysis, unlike a repeated-measures self-matching design, does not track changes in a repeated survey question given to the same respondent at multiple time points. Pilot data from three analyses (n = 1,177 respondents) illustrate how a cross-linked survey analysis can control for population shifts, temporal trends, and reverse causality. Accompanying graphs provide an intuitive display to readers, summarize results, and show differences in response distributions. Population-based individual-level linkages also reduce selection bias and increase statistical power compared with a single-center cross-sectional survey. Cross-linked survey analysis has limitations related to unmeasured confounding, pragmatics, survivor bias, statistical models, and the underlying artifacts in survey responses. We suggest that a cross-linked survey analysis may help in epidemiology science using survey data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ensuring PhD development of responsible conduct of research behaviors: who's responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, Sandra L; Ballou, Janice M

    2014-03-01

    The importance of public confidence in scientific findings and trust in scientists cannot be overstated. Thus, it becomes critical for the scientific community to focus on enhancing the strategies used to educate future scientists on ethical research behaviors. What we are lacking is knowledge on how faculty members shape and develop ethical research standards with their students. We are presenting the results of a survey with 3,500 research faculty members. We believe this is the first report on how faculty work with and educate their PhD students on basic research standards. Specifically, we wanted to determine whether individual faculty members, who are advisors or mentors, differ in how they implemented components of responsible conduct of research (RCR) with their PhD students. Mentors were more likely than advisors or supervisors to report working with all of their PhDs, who graduated in the last 5 years, on the 17 recognized critical components of RCR training and research skill development. We also found about half of the faculty members believe RCR is an institutional responsibility versus a faculty responsibility. Less than a quarter have had opportunities to participate in faculty training to be a better mentor, advisor, or research teacher, and about one third of faculty did not or could not remember whether they had guidelines related to their responsibilities to PhD students. We discuss the implications of our findings and focus on ways that PhD research mentoring can be enhanced.

  18. The Status of Action Research Conducted in Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    teachers' engagement in action research in government secondary schools. INTRODUCTION. Research is ... Department of Educational Planning and Management, Addis Ababa University .... understand teachers' involvement in traditional ...

  19. Ethics Review of Survey Research: A Mandatory Requirement for Publication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Danielle; Wu, Albert W

    2015-12-01

    National regulations governing human subjects research differ with regard to whether they require survey research to be overseen by institutional ethics boards or committees. In cases where ethical review has been waived, or was provided by an individual or group other than an institutional ethics board, journals may question the appropriateness of the waiver or alternative review when making determinations about whether to accept the manuscript for publication. The purpose of this article is to provide guidance for journals to consider when making determinations about the necessity of ethical review for survey research projects. We review the functions of ethics oversight and consider the importance of those functions within the context of survey research. In survey research, no intervention is delivered to research participants. As a result, there is no risk of physical harm to individuals who participate. However, there can be a risk of informational or psychological harms. In situations where there is greater than minimal risk of informational or psychological harms, the survey research should have received institutional ethics oversight. Additionally, survey research projects that enroll vulnerable individuals with diminished autonomy should receive institutional ethics oversight. We hope that this article leads to further guidance on this subject by authoritative group such as the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors.

  20. Attributes of researchers and their strategies to recruit minority populations: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Sandra Crouse; Butler, James; Fryer, Craig S; Garza, Mary A; Kim, Kevin H; Ryan, Christopher; Thomas, Stephen B

    2012-11-01

    Despite NIH mandates for inclusion, recruiting minorities is challenging for biomedical and public health researchers. Little is known about how attributes of researchers affect their choice of recruitment strategies. The purpose of this study was to address this gap by examining how use of recruitment strategies relates to other researcher characteristics. To do this, we conducted an online survey from May to August 2010 with researchers (principal investigators, research staff, and IRB members) in which we measured the number and types of recruitment strategies utilized, along with other characteristics of the researchers and their research. We identified two clusters of researchers: comprehensive researchers who utilized a greater number and more diverse and active recruitment strategies, and traditional researchers, who utilized fewer and more passive strategies. Additional characteristics that distinguished the two groups were that comprehensive researchers were more likely than traditional researchers to 1) report racial and ethnic differences as one of their specific aims or hypotheses, 2) receive federal (CDC and NIH) funding, 3) conduct behavioral or epidemiological research, and 4) have received training in conducting research with and recruiting minorities. Traditional researchers, on the other hand, were more likely to conduct clinical research and a greater (though non-significant) percentage received funding from pharmaceutical sources. This study provides a novel description of how researcher attributes are related to their recruitment strategies and raises a number of future research questions to further examine the implications of this relationship.

  1. Research Integrity and Research Ethics in Professional Codes of Ethics: Survey of Terminology Used by Professional Organizations across Research Disciplines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Komić

    Full Text Available Professional codes of ethics are social contracts among members of a professional group, which aim to instigate, encourage and nurture ethical behaviour and prevent professional misconduct, including research and publication. Despite the existence of codes of ethics, research misconduct remains a serious problem. A survey of codes of ethics from 795 professional organizations from the Illinois Institute of Technology's Codes of Ethics Collection showed that 182 of them (23% used research integrity and research ethics terminology in their codes, with differences across disciplines: while the terminology was common in professional organizations in social sciences (82%, mental health (71%, sciences (61%, other organizations had no statements (construction trades, fraternal social organizations, real estate or a few of them (management, media, engineering. A subsample of 158 professional organizations we judged to be directly involved in research significantly more often had statements on research integrity/ethics terminology than the whole sample: an average of 10.4% of organizations with a statement (95% CI = 10.4-23-5% on any of the 27 research integrity/ethics terms compared to 3.3% (95% CI = 2.1-4.6%, respectively (P<0.001. Overall, 62% of all statements addressing research integrity/ethics concepts used prescriptive language in describing the standard of practice. Professional organizations should define research integrity and research ethics issues in their ethics codes and collaborate within and across disciplines to adequately address responsible conduct of research and meet contemporary needs of their communities.

  2. Understanding Sample Surveys: Selective Learning about Social Science Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin-Percival, Mary; Johnson, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate differences in what students learn about survey methodology in a class on public opinion presented in two critically different ways: with the inclusion or exclusion of an original research project using a random-digit-dial telephone survey. Using a quasi-experimental design and data obtained from pretests and posttests in two public…

  3. Understanding Sample Surveys: Selective Learning about Social Science Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currin-Percival, Mary; Johnson, Martin

    2010-01-01

    We investigate differences in what students learn about survey methodology in a class on public opinion presented in two critically different ways: with the inclusion or exclusion of an original research project using a random-digit-dial telephone survey. Using a quasi-experimental design and data obtained from pretests and posttests in two public…

  4. A Survey of Campus Coordinators of Undergraduate Research Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Merinda Kaye; Shreeves, Sarah L.; Davis-Kahl, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Interest in supporting undergraduate research programs continues to grow within academic librarianship. This article presents how undergraduate research program coordinators perceive and value library support of their programs. Undergraduate research coordinators from a variety of institutions were surveyed on which elements of libraries and…

  5. Research engagement of health sciences librarians: a survey of research-related activities and attitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Lessick, MA, MLS, AHIP, FMLA

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The extent to which health sciences librarians are engaged in research is a little-studied question. This study assesses the research activities and attitudes of Medical Library Association (MLA members, including the influence of work affiliation. Methods: An online survey was designed using a combination of multiple-choice and open-ended questions and distributed to MLA members. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics, content analysis, and significance testing. The authors used statistical tools and categorized openended question topics by the constant comparative method, also applying the broad subject categories used in a prior study. Pearson’s chi-square analysis was performed on responses to determine significant differences among respondents employed in three different institutional environments. Results: Analysis showed that 79% of respondents read research articles at least once a month; 58% applied published research studies to practice; 44% had conducted research; 62% reported acting on research had enhanced their libraries; 38% had presented findings; and 34% had authored research articles. Hospital librarians were significantly less likely than academic librarians to have participated in research activities. Highly ranked research benefits, barriers, and competencies of health sciences librarians are described. Conclusions: Findings indicate that health sciences librarians are actively engaged in research activities. Practice implications for practitioners, publishers, and stakeholders are discussed. Results suggest that practitioners can use published research results and results from their own research to affect practice decisions and improve services. Future studies are needed to confirm and extend these findings, including the need for intervention studies to increase research and writing productivity.

  6. Are Corporate Universities (CU possible in emerging countries? A survey conducted in Argentina showed impacting results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro A. Viltard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available At the time of our investigation, the CU was not a widespread concept in Argentina, being viewed as a “foreign - far long project” (coming from developed countries and standing for the long term. It is suggested that the rate of CU evolution, in emerging countries like Argentina, is more related to mentality issues than to CU strategic or operative limitations. Although the executives who replied to a survey were not the only power factor in their organization, their comments allow us to think that, in those countries, the CU may have a better future perspective. The research used a quali-quantitative methodology, which was based on a survey to top executives of different kinds of companies located in Argentina. The research design was not experimental and transversal, as it was limited to a specific moment in time.

  7. The role and importance of victim surveys in criminal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Kenan Gül

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing crime rates, insufficient policies and the limitations of the official statistics, victim surveys are being used as an alternative crime measurement technique. These types of surveys are inspired most of the criminological theories and regarded as a data source especially in shaping the crime policies of the Anglo-Saxon countries. Even though they have developed over time, victim surveys have limitations which create an obstacle in measuring crime. However, these surveys could be used as a useful data source in analyzing victims, their needs and behaviors. The recent victim surveys, which were conducted in Turkey, revealed significant findings. In the future, it is inevitable to use victim surveys as a management instrument in the field of security policies in Turkey. This study first examines the birth and development of the victim surveys, then it discusses the theoretical and methodological problems and the victim surveys conducted in Turkey. In conclusion section, this article provides recommendations related to the topic.

  8. Research Integrity and Research Ethics in Professional Codes of Ethics: Survey of Terminology Used by Professional Organizations across Research Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komić, Dubravka; Marušić, Stjepan Ljudevit; Marušić, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Professional codes of ethics are social contracts among members of a professional group, which aim to instigate, encourage and nurture ethical behaviour and prevent professional misconduct, including research and publication. Despite the existence of codes of ethics, research misconduct remains a serious problem. A survey of codes of ethics from 795 professional organizations from the Illinois Institute of Technology’s Codes of Ethics Collection showed that 182 of them (23%) used research integrity and research ethics terminology in their codes, with differences across disciplines: while the terminology was common in professional organizations in social sciences (82%), mental health (71%), sciences (61%), other organizations had no statements (construction trades, fraternal social organizations, real estate) or a few of them (management, media, engineering). A subsample of 158 professional organizations we judged to be directly involved in research significantly more often had statements on research integrity/ethics terminology than the whole sample: an average of 10.4% of organizations with a statement (95% CI = 10.4-23-5%) on any of the 27 research integrity/ethics terms compared to 3.3% (95% CI = 2.1–4.6%), respectively (Pethics concepts used prescriptive language in describing the standard of practice. Professional organizations should define research integrity and research ethics issues in their ethics codes and collaborate within and across disciplines to adequately address responsible conduct of research and meet contemporary needs of their communities. PMID:26192805

  9. Research Integrity and Research Ethics in Professional Codes of Ethics: Survey of Terminology Used by Professional Organizations across Research Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komić, Dubravka; Marušić, Stjepan Ljudevit; Marušić, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Professional codes of ethics are social contracts among members of a professional group, which aim to instigate, encourage and nurture ethical behaviour and prevent professional misconduct, including research and publication. Despite the existence of codes of ethics, research misconduct remains a serious problem. A survey of codes of ethics from 795 professional organizations from the Illinois Institute of Technology's Codes of Ethics Collection showed that 182 of them (23%) used research integrity and research ethics terminology in their codes, with differences across disciplines: while the terminology was common in professional organizations in social sciences (82%), mental health (71%), sciences (61%), other organizations had no statements (construction trades, fraternal social organizations, real estate) or a few of them (management, media, engineering). A subsample of 158 professional organizations we judged to be directly involved in research significantly more often had statements on research integrity/ethics terminology than the whole sample: an average of 10.4% of organizations with a statement (95% CI = 10.4-23-5%) on any of the 27 research integrity/ethics terms compared to 3.3% (95% CI = 2.1-4.6%), respectively (Pethics concepts used prescriptive language in describing the standard of practice. Professional organizations should define research integrity and research ethics issues in their ethics codes and collaborate within and across disciplines to adequately address responsible conduct of research and meet contemporary needs of their communities.

  10. Promoting responsible research conduct in a developing world ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-22

    Jun 22, 2013 ... ARTICLE. June 2013, Vol. 6, No. 1 SAJBL 21 ... research, irregularities involving research on human participants continue to emerge. ... from 51 countries, it contains 4 principles and 14 responsibilities and has been formally ...

  11. Apparel Merchandising Students Learn Customer Service Strategies while Conducting Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, V, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Apparel merchandising students participated in a cooperative research project in which they observed customer service techniques by posing as customers in retail stores. The project taught research processes, collaboration, and principles of customer service. (SK)

  12. Apparel Merchandising Students Learn Customer Service Strategies while Conducting Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulins, V, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Apparel merchandising students participated in a cooperative research project in which they observed customer service techniques by posing as customers in retail stores. The project taught research processes, collaboration, and principles of customer service. (SK)

  13. 48 CFR 32.202-3 - Conducting market research about financing terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conducting market research... 32.202-3 Conducting market research about financing terms. Contract financing may be a subject included in the market research conducted in accordance with part 10. If market research for...

  14. Methods for integrated use of fisheries research survey information in understanding marine fish population ecology and better management advice : improving methods for evaluation of research survey information under consideration of survey fish detection and catch efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The thesis developed and improved methods for the integrated analysis of different types of fishery independent research surveys (trawl surveys, acoustic surveys, hydrographical surveys, and gillnet surveys) to study the distribution, density, abundance, migration and

  15. [Survey of research on acupoints compatibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong-Ren

    2010-05-01

    The research papers that meet the criteria of evidence-based medicine and randomized controlled trial were retrieved in Chinese journals data bases (CNKI knowledge network) from 1992 to 2009. Twenty-five papers indicate that acupoints compatibility rules are closely related to organism regional anatomy, nerve, the blood vessel and the endocrine gland; acupoints compatibility rules produce synergism, inhibit or antagonistic effect that affect the clinical effectiveness. The acupoints compatibility rules based on experimental researches are applied to clinic practice is the key to improve the acupuncture clinical effectiveness.

  16. Basic Project Management Methodologies for Survey Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Robert H.

    To be effective, project management requires a heavy dependence on the document, list, and computational capability of a computerized environment. Now that microcomputers are readily available, only the rediscovery of classic project management methodology is required for improved resource allocation in small research projects. This paper provides…

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, Davis, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-03-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), conducted November 16 through 20, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the LEHR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation, and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the LEHR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the LEHR at UC Davis. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LEHR Survey. 75 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. Importance of Philosophy in the Conduct of Educational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Pring

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Educational questions, whether in policy or in practice and thus in educational research, make assumptions which are philosophical in nature ' in values, theory of knowledge, philosophy of mind, social philosophy and so on. The paper illustrates this through several examples of educational research, showing how, in the absence of philosophical questioning, the intelligence is often bewitched by the misuse of language, thereby invalidating soGcalled educational research.

  19. A Survey of European Robotics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-27

    The material and operations of the US Navy. information in this report is based on Material will be influenced first--by on-site visits to 21 of the...in Table I these areas will make the acquisition were chosen from the results of a and maintenance of the materials neces- literature review...analysis, and lic actuators. Dr. Burckhardt expected gray level image processing techniques. future robot research in gray scale The Laboratorio per

  20. Rancho Santiago College Climate Survey Report. Research, Planning and Resource Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slark, Julie; And Others

    In February 1990, a study was conducted by the Rancho Santiago College (RSC) Research Committee and Planning Council to assess institutional effectiveness, using college climate as one correlate of RSC's success. A staff morale survey instrument, distributed to all full- and part-time faculty and staff, yielded an overall response rate of 36%, and…

  1. Support Services for Higher Degree Research Students: A Survey of Three Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pujitha; Woodman, Karen; Taji, Acram; Travelyan, James; Samani, Shamim; Sharda, Hema; Narayanaswamy, Ramesh; Lucey, Anthony; Sahama, Tony; Yarlagadda, Prasad K. D. V.

    2016-01-01

    A survey was conducted across three Australian universities to identify the types and format of support services available for higher degree research (HDR, or MA and Ph.D.) students. The services were classified with regards to availability, location and accessibility. A comparative tool was developed to help institutions categorise their services…

  2. Using Phenomenology to Conduct Environmental Education Research: Experience and Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazir, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Recently, I applied a phenomenological methodology to study environmental education at an outdoor education center. In this article, I reflect on my experience of doing phenomenological research to highlight issues researchers may want to consider in using this type of methodology. The main premise of the article is that phenomenology, with its…

  3. Getting grounded: using Glaserian grounded theory to conduct nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Cheri Ann

    2010-03-01

    Glaserian grounded theory is a powerful research methodology for understanding client behaviour in a particular area. It is therefore especially relevant for nurse researchers. Nurse researchers use grounded theory more frequently than other qualitative analysis research methods because of its ability to provide insight into clients' experiences and to make a positive impact. However, there is much confusion about the use of grounded theory.The author delineates key components of grounded theory methodology, areas of concern, and the resulting implications for nursing knowledge development. Knowledge gained from Glaserian grounded theory research can be used to institute measures for enhancing client-nurse relationships, improving quality of care, and ultimately improving client quality of life. In addition, it can serve to expand disciplinary knowledge in nursing because the resulting substantive theory is a middle-range theory that can be subjected to later quantitative testing.

  4. Conducting Research with Vulnerable Populations: Cautions and Considerations in Interpreting Outliers in Disparities Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghani, Salimah H; Byun, Eeeseung; Chittams, Jesse

    Addressing the needs of understudied and vulnerable populations first and foremost necessitate correct application and interpretation of research that is designed to understand sources of disparities in healthcare or health systems outcomes. In this brief research report, we discuss some important concerns and considerations in handling "outliers" when conducting disparities-related research. To illustrate these concerns, we use data from our recently completed study that investigated sources of disparities in cancer pain outcomes between African Americans and Whites with cancer-related pain. A choice-based conjoint (CBC) study was conducted to compare preferences for analgesic treatment for cancer pain between African Americans and Whites. Compared to Whites, African Americans were both disproportionately more likely to make pain treatment decisions based on analgesic side-effects and were more likely to have extreme values for the CBC-elicited utilities for analgesic "side-effects." Our findings raise conceptual and methodological consideration in handling extreme values when conducting disparities-related research. Extreme values or outliers can be caused by random variations, measurement errors, or true heterogeneity in a clinical phenomenon. The researchers should consider: 1) whether systematic patterns of extreme values exist and 2) if systematic patterns of extreme values are consistent with a clinical pattern (e.g., poor management of cancer pain and side-effects in racial/ethnic subgroups as documented by many previous studies). As may be evident, these considerations are particularly important in health disparities research where extreme values may actually represent a clinical reality, such as unequal treatment or disproportionate burden of symptoms in certain subgroups. Approaches to handling outliers, such as non-parametric analyses, log transforming clinically important extreme values, or removing outliers may represent a missed opportunity in

  5. Nuclear power and the public: an update of collected survey research on nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rankin, W.L.; Melber, B.D.; Overcast, T.D.; Nealey, S.M.

    1981-12-01

    The purpose of this research was to collect, analyze, and summarize all of the nuclear power-related surveys conducted in the United States through June 1981, that we could obtain. The surveys collected were national, statewide, and areawide in scope. Slightly over 100 surveys were collected for an earlier, similar effort carried out in 1977. About 130 new surveys were added to the earlier survey data. Thus, about 230 surveys were screened for inclusion in this report. Because of space limitations, national surveys were used most frequently in this report, followed distantly by state surveys. In drawing our conclusions about public beliefs and attitudes toward nuclear power, we placed most of our confidence in survey questions that were used by national polling firms at several points in time. A summary of the research findings is presented, beginning with general attitudes toward nuclear power, followed by a summary of beliefs and attitudes about nuclear power issues, and ended by a summary of beliefs and attitudes regarding more general energy issues.

  6. Using action research to improve learning and formative assessment to conduct research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Etkina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports on how educational research informed and supported both the process of refinement of introductory physics laboratory instruction and student development of scientific abilities. In particular we focus on how the action research approach paradigm combined with instructional approaches such as scaffolding and formative assessment can be used to design the learning environment, investigate student learning, revise curriculum materials, and conduct subsequent assessment. As the result of the above efforts we found improvement in students’ scientific abilities over the course of three years. We suggest that the process used to improve the curriculum under study can be extended to many instructional innovations.

  7. A Survey of Voice over IP Security Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    We present a survey of Voice over IP security research. Our goal is to provide a roadmap for researchers seeking to understand existing capabilities and, and to identify gaps in addressing the numerous threats and vulnerabilities present in VoIP systems. We also briefly discuss the implications of our findings with respect to actual vulnerabilities reported in a variety VoIP products.

  8. The OCLC Research Survey of Special Collections and Archives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie M. Dooley

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the outcomes of the 2009 OCLC Research survey of 275 research libraries in the United States and Canada regarding the current status of their special collections and archives. The resulting report, Taking Our Pulse: The OCLC Research Survey of Special Collections and Archives, includes detailed analysis of the data and thirteen recommendations for community action. The three most common challenges named by respondents were space, digitization, and born-digital materials. Collections are growing dramatically, use of all types of material has increased, substantial backlogs remain, and 75% of library budgets have been reduced in recent years.

  9. Hydroclimatic variability and predictability: a survey of recent research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Koster

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research in large-scale hydroclimatic variability is surveyed, focusing on five topics: (i variability in general, (ii droughts, (iii floods, (iv land–atmosphere coupling, and (v hydroclimatic prediction. Each surveyed topic is supplemented by illustrative examples of recent research, as presented at a 2016 symposium honoring the career of Professor Eric Wood. Taken together, the recent literature and the illustrative examples clearly show that current research into hydroclimatic variability is strong, vibrant, and multifaceted.

  10. Engaging research participants to inform the ethical conduct of mobile imaging, pervasive sensing, and location tracking research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebeker, Camille; Lagare, Tiffany; Takemoto, Michelle; Lewars, Brittany; Crist, Katie; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Kerr, Jacqueline

    2016-12-01

    Researchers utilize mobile imaging, pervasive sensing, social media, and location tracking (MISST) technologies to observe and intervene with participants in their natural environment. The use of MISST methods and tools introduces unique ethical issues due to the type and quantity of data, and produces raising new challenges around informed consent, risk assessment, and data management. Since MISST methods are relatively new in behavioral research, there is little documented evidence to guide institutional review board (IRB) risk assessment and inform appropriate risk management strategies. This study was conducted to contribute the participant perspectives when considering ethical and responsible practices. Participants (n = 82) enrolled in an observational study where they wore several MISST devices for 1 week completed an exit survey. Survey items focused on the following: 1-device comfort, 2-informed consent, 3-privacy protections, and 4-bystander engagement. The informed consent process reflected participant actual experience. Device comfort and privacy were raised as concerns to both the participants and bystanders. While the majority of the participants reported a positive experience, it is important to note that the participants were volunteers who were not mandated to wear tracking devices and that persons who are mandated may not have a similar response. Findings support strategies proposed in the Kelly et al. (2013) ethical framework, which emphasizes procedures to improve informed consent, protect privacy, manage data, and respect bystander rights when using a wearable camera.

  11. Development of Guidelines for the Conduct of HIV Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Guidelines for HIV Research Monitoring by Ethics Committees ... Public Health, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Osun State, Nigeria; 3Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, .... workplace practices; and (vii) training related to.

  12. Using UAVs to Conduct Student-led Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.; Lewis, P. M., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Recreational drones can inspire students to initiate research projects. These "toys" have a low cost (Arduino board, SABEL collects temperature, humidity, and GPS position. This presentation will provide examples of student-led investigations, instructions for building the SABEL sensor package, and the status of the new e-book compilation of student-focused activities using recreational drones to pursue science, math, engineering, and technology research investigations.

  13. A SURVEY OF CURRENT RESEARCH ON CAPTCHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid Khalifa Abdullah Hasan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The internet has been playing an increasingly important role in our daily life, with the availability of many web services such as email and search engines. However, these are often threatened by attacks from computer programs such as bots. To address this problem, CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing Test to Tell Computers and Humans Apart was developed to distinguish between computer programs and human users. Although this mechanism offers good security and limits automatic registration to web services, some CAPTCHAs have several weaknesses which allow hackers to infiltrate the mechanism of the CAPTCHA. This paper examines recent research on various CAPTCHA methods and their categories. Moreover it discusses the weakness and strength of these types.

  14. Mathematics without boundaries surveys in interdisciplinary research

    CERN Document Server

    Rassias, Themistocles

    2014-01-01

    This volume consists of chapters written by eminent scientists and engineers from the international community and presents significant advances in several theories, and applications of an interdisciplinary research. These contributions focus on both old and recent developments of Global Optimization Theory, Convex Analysis, Calculus of Variations, and Discrete Mathematics and Geometry, as well as several applications to a large variety of concrete problems, including  applications of computers  to the study of smoothness and analyticity of functions, applications to epidemiological diffusion, networks, mathematical models of elastic and piezoelectric fields, optimal algorithms, stability of neutral type vector functional differential equations, sampling and rational interpolation for non-band-limited signals, recurrent neural network for convex optimization problems, and experimental design.  The book also contains some review works, which could prove particularly useful for a broader audience of readers i...

  15. Measurement of thermal conductivity and diffusivity in situ: Literature survey and theoretical modelling of measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukkonen, I.; Suppala, I. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-01-01

    In situ measurements of thermal conductivity and diffusivity of bedrock were investigated with the aid of a literature survey and theoretical simulations of a measurement system. According to the surveyed literature, in situ methods can be divided into `active` drill hole methods, and `passive` indirect methods utilizing other drill hole measurements together with cutting samples and petrophysical relationships. The most common active drill hole method is a cylindrical heat producing probe whose temperature is registered as a function of time. The temperature response can be calculated and interpreted with the aid of analytical solutions of the cylindrical heat conduction equation, particularly the solution for an infinite perfectly conducting cylindrical probe in a homogeneous medium, and the solution for a line source of heat in a medium. Using both forward and inverse modellings, a theoretical measurement system was analysed with an aim at finding the basic parameters for construction of a practical measurement system. The results indicate that thermal conductivity can be relatively well estimated with borehole measurements, whereas thermal diffusivity is much more sensitive to various disturbing factors, such as thermal contact resistance and variations in probe parameters. In addition, the three-dimensional conduction effects were investigated to find out the magnitude of axial `leak` of heat in long-duration experiments. The radius of influence of a drill hole measurement is mainly dependent on the duration of the experiment. Assuming typical conductivity and diffusivity values of crystalline rocks, the measurement yields information within less than a metre from the drill hole, when the experiment lasts about 24 hours. We propose the following factors to be taken as basic parameters in the construction of a practical measurement system: the probe length 1.5-2 m, heating power 5-20 Wm{sup -1}, temperature recording with 5-7 sensors placed along the probe, and

  16. 78 FR 44624 - Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire); Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire)] Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire); Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...) 395-7316. Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point of Care Research...

  17. 78 FR 9108 - Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire) Activity...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire) Activity... refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire)'' in any... Questionnaire, VA Form 10-0557. OMB Control Number: 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research...

  18. Trials and tribulations of conducting bio-behavioral surveys in prisons: implementation science and lessons from Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azbel, Lyuba; Grishaev, Yevgeny; Wickersham, Jeffrey A; Chernova, Olena; Dvoryak, Sergey; Polonsky, Maxim; Altice, Frederick L

    2016-06-13

    Purpose - Ukraine is home to Europe's worst HIV epidemic, overwhelmingly fueled by people who inject drugs who face harsh prison sentences. In Ukraine, HIV and other infectious diseases are concentrated in prisons, yet the magnitude of this problem had not been quantified. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the systematic health survey of prisoners in the former Soviet Union (FSU). Design/methodology/approach - Qualitative interviews were carried out with research and prison administrative staff to assess the barriers and facilitators to conducting a bio-behavioral survey in Ukrainian prisons. Findings - Crucial barriers at the institutional, staff, and participant level require addressing by: first, ensuring Prison Department involvement at every stage; second, tackling pre-conceived attitudes about drug addiction and treatment among staff; and third, guaranteeing confidentiality for participants. Originality/value - The burden of many diseases is higher than expected and much higher than in the community. Notwithstanding the challenges, scientifically rigorous bio-behavioral surveys are attainable in criminal justice systems in the FSU with collaboration and careful consideration of this specific context.

  19. A GIS approach to conducting biogeochemical research in wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, David P.; Irish, Gary J.

    1985-01-01

    A project was initiated to develop an environmental data base to address spatial aspects of both biogeochemical cycling and resource management in wetlands. Specific goals are to make regional methane flux estimates and site specific water level predictions based on man controlled water releases within a wetland study area. The project will contribute to the understanding of the Earth's biosphere through its examination of the spatial variability of methane emissions. Although wetlands are thought to be one of the primary sources for release of methane to the atmosphere, little is known about the spatial variability of methane flux. Only through a spatial analysis of methane flux rates and the environmental factors which influence such rates can reliable regional and global methane emissions be calculated. Data will be correlated and studied from Landsat 4 instruments, from a ground survey of water level recorders, precipitation recorders, evaporation pans, and supplemental gauges, and from flood gate water release; and regional methane flux estimates will be made.

  20. Tracklines of Sidescan-Sonar Survey conducted within Gulf of Farallones, 1989, by the U.S. Geological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — In 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began a major geologic and oceanographic investigation of the Gulf of the Farallones continental shelf system, designed to...

  1. A survey of the ways master's level nursing students learn the research process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, F L; Timmons, M E

    1999-03-01

    Because of the need for advanced practice nurses to perform more outcome measurement, a survey was conducted in the fall of 1997 to determine how master's level students learned the research process. Three hundred four surveys were mailed to schools with master's programs, and 222 were returned for a return rate of 73%. Sixty-six percent of the programs surveyed required a thesis and/or a research project. However, there was great variation in the research projects. A comprehensive examination was used to measure research ability by 36 programs (16%), either in conjunction with a thesis or research project or alone. One hundred forty-six programs (66%) offered only one option, be it a thesis, research project, comprehensive examination, or the many other alternative activities described by respondents. Seventy-six programs (34%) offered a variety of options from which students could select. The major differences between the thesis and the research project were related to three issues: a) the nature of the supervision; b) whether the activity was an individual or group project; and c) the amount of participation of the students. Because of the variability of expectations and the ways students are taught research, it was recommended nurse educators determine whether master's level nurse graduates were prepared to conduct outcome measurement and whether the means used to teach the research process were effective considering that endeavor.

  2. Survey Of Wind Tunnels At Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Report presented at AIAA 14th Aerodynamic Testing Conference on current capabilities and planned improvements at NASA Langley Research Center's major wind tunnels. Focuses on 14 major tunnels, 8 unique in world, 3 unique in country. Covers Langley Spin Tunnel. Includes new National Transonic Facility (NTF). Also surveys Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). Addresses resurgence of inexpensive simple-to-operate research tunnels. Predicts no shortage of tools for aerospace researcher and engineer in next decade or two.

  3. Survey Of Wind Tunnels At Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Robert E.

    1989-01-01

    Report presented at AIAA 14th Aerodynamic Testing Conference on current capabilities and planned improvements at NASA Langley Research Center's major wind tunnels. Focuses on 14 major tunnels, 8 unique in world, 3 unique in country. Covers Langley Spin Tunnel. Includes new National Transonic Facility (NTF). Also surveys Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT). Addresses resurgence of inexpensive simple-to-operate research tunnels. Predicts no shortage of tools for aerospace researcher and engineer in next decade or two.

  4. Survey on research and development of reconfigurable modular robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinguo Liu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive survey of reconfigurable modular robots, which covers the origin, history, the state of the art, key technologies, challenges, and applications of reconfigurable modular robots. An elaborative classification of typical reconfigurable modular robots is proposed based on the characteristics of the modules and the reconfiguration mechanism. As the system characteristics of reconfigurable modular robots are mainly dependent on the functions of modules, the mechanical and electrical design features of modules of typical reconfigurable modular robots are discussed in detail. Furthermore, an in-depth comparison analysis is conducted, which encompasses discussions of module shape, module degrees of freedom, module attribute, connection mechanisms, interface autonomy, locomotion modes, and workspace. Meanwhile, many reconfigurable modular robot researches focus on the study of self-X capabilities (i.e. self-reconfiguration, self-assembly, self-adaption, etc., which embodies autonomy performance of reconfigurable modular robots in certain extent. An evolutionary cobweb evaluation model is proposed in this article to evaluate the autonomy level of reconfigurable modular robots. Although various reconfigurable modular robots have been developed and some of them have been put into practical applications such as search and rescue missions, there still exist many open theoretical, technical, and practical challenges in this field. This work is hopefully to offer a reference for the further developments of reconfigurable modular robots.

  5. Conducting industrial and organizational psychological research: institutional review of research in work organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgen, D R; Bell, B S

    2001-01-01

    Although informed consent is a primary mechanism for ensuring the ethical treatment of human participants in research, both federal guidelines and American Psychological Association ethical standards recognize that exceptions to it are reasonable under certain conditions. However, agreement about what constitutes a reasonable exception to informed consent is sometimes lacking. We presented the same protocols to samples of respondents drawn from 4 populations: Institutional review board (IRB) members, managers, employees, and university faculty who were not members of IRBs. Differences in perceptions of IRB members from the other samples with respect to the risks of the protocols without informed consent and on the feasibility of conducting the research in employment organizations are discussed in terms of implications for industrial and organizational psychology research.

  6. How to Conduct Clinical Qualitative Research on the Patient's Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2011-01-01

    From a perspective of patient-centered healthcare, exploring patients' (a) preconceptions, (b) treatment experiences, (c) quality of life, (d) satisfaction, (e) illness understandings, and (f) design are all critical components in improving primary health care and research. Utilizing qualitative approaches to discover patients' experiences can…

  7. Staying theoretically sensitive when conducting grounded theory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reay, Gudrun; Bouchal, Shelley Raffin; A Rankin, James

    2016-09-01

    Background Grounded theory (GT) is founded on the premise that underlying social patterns can be discovered and conceptualised into theories. The method and need for theoretical sensitivity are best understood in the historical context in which GT was developed. Theoretical sensitivity entails entering the field with no preconceptions, so as to remain open to the data and the emerging theory. Investigators also read literature from other fields to understand various ways to construct theories. Aim To explore the concept of theoretical sensitivity from a classical GT perspective, and discuss the ontological and epistemological foundations of GT. Discussion Difficulties in remaining theoretically sensitive throughout research are discussed and illustrated with examples. Emergence - the idea that theory and substance will emerge from the process of comparing data - and staying open to the data are emphasised. Conclusion Understanding theoretical sensitivity as an underlying guiding principle of GT helps the researcher make sense of important concepts, such as delaying the literature review, emergence and the constant comparative method (simultaneous collection, coding and analysis of data). Implications for practice Theoretical sensitivity and adherence to the GT research method allow researchers to discover theories that can bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  8. Documentation of ethical conduct of human subject research published in Saudi medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gaai, E A; Hammami, M M; Al Eidan, M

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the documentation of ethical conduct (obtaining institutional review board approval and consent and following ethical guidelines) of human subject research studies published in Saudi Arabian medical journals between 1979 and 2007. Studies were classified as retrospective, prospective noninterventional, interventional or survey/interview. Of 1838 studies published in 286 journal issues of 11 Saudi Arabian medical journals, only 0.9% documented the ethical guidelines followed, with a significantly higher rate for studies published after year 2000 (1.7%). Of 821 studies requiring institutional review board approval, 8.6% documented obtaining the approval and informed consent, with a significantly higher rate for interventional studies (19.4%), post-year 2000 studies (19.7%) and studies performed outside Saudi Arabia (15.9%). The low documentation rate suggests editor's lack of rigor and/or investigators' ignorance of guidelines. The higher documentation rate after year 2000 suggests an ongoing improvement.

  9. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers related to research utilization: a survey among pharmacists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Yee; Hatah, Ernieda

    2017-04-01

    Background Research utilization is part of evidence-based practice referring to the process of reviewing and critiquing scientific research and applying the findings to one's own clinical practice. Many studies on research utilization have been conducted with doctors and nurses, but to our knowledge, none have been investigated amongst pharmacists. Objective To assess research utilization and its barriers among pharmacists and identify potential influencing factors. Setting Malaysia. Methods This cross-sectional survey was administered online and by mail to a convenient sample of pharmacists working in hospitals, health clinics, and retail pharmacies in rural and urban areas. Main outcome measure Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Results Six hundred surveys were mailed to potential respondents, and 466 were returned (77.7% response rate). Twenty-eight respondents completed the survey online. The respondents' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices were found to be moderate. Research utilization was associated with respondents' knowledge and attitude scores (P research utilization were modelled, higher educational level was associated with higher level of research utilization (P research utilization, respectively. The main reported barrier to research utilization was lack of sufficient authority to change patient care procedures. Conclusion Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices can be improved by encouraging pharmacists to pursue higher degrees, promoting active participation in institutions' journal clubs, and introducing senior clinical pharmacist specialization.

  10. Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... community in the design, conduct and/or evaluation of these activities. ... During Phase I of the mixed-methods research design, data were collected by ... A questionnaire survey was administered to all students registered for ... Data analysis.

  11. Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)--Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics I", they present a historical overview of the evolution of…

  12. Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)--Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Jennifer; Minifie, Fred D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In this series of articles--"Research Ethics I", "Research Ethics II", and "Research Ethics III"--the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In "Research Ethics I", they present a historical overview of the evolution of…

  13. Characterizing researchers by strategies used for retaining minority participants: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James; Quinn, Sandra C; Fryer, Craig S; Garza, Mary A; Kim, Kevin H; Thomas, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    Limited attention has been given to the optimal strategies for retaining racial and ethnic minorities within studies and during the follow-up period. High attrition limits the interpretation of results and reduces the ability to translate findings into successful interventions. This study examined the retention strategies used by researchers when retaining minorities in research studies. From May to August 2010, we conducted an online survey with researchers (principal investigators, research staff, and IRB members) and examined their use of seven commonly used retention strategies. The number and type of retention strategies used, how these strategies differ by researcher type, and other characteristics (e.g., funding) were explored. We identified three clusters of researchers: comprehensive retention strategy researchers - utilized the greatest number of retention strategies; moderate retention strategy researchers - utilized an average number of retention strategies; and limited retention strategy researchers - utilized the least number of retention strategies. The comprehensive and moderate retention strategy researchers were more likely than the limited retention strategy researchers to conduct health outcomes research, work with a community advisory board, hire minority staff, use steps at a higher rate to overcome retention barriers, develop new partnerships with the minority community, modify study materials for the minority population, and allow staff to work flexible schedules. This study is a novel effort to characterize researchers, without implying a value judgment, according to their use of specific retention strategies. It provides critical information for conducting future research to determine the effectiveness of using a combination of retention strategies.

  14. Learning lessons from field surveys in humanitarian contexts: a case study of field surveys conducted in North Kivu, DRC 2006-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grellety Emmanuel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Survey estimates of mortality and malnutrition are commonly used to guide humanitarian decision-making. Currently, different methods of conducting field surveys are the subject of debate among epidemiologists. Beyond the technical arguments, decision makers may find it difficult to conceptualize what the estimates actually mean. For instance, what makes this particular situation an emergency? And how should the operational response be adapted accordingly. This brings into question not only the quality of the survey methodology, but also the difficulties epidemiologists face in interpreting results and selecting the most important information to guide operations. As a case study, we reviewed mortality and nutritional surveys conducted in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC published from January 2006 to January 2009. We performed a PubMed/Medline search for published articles and scanned publicly available humanitarian databases and clearinghouses for grey literature. To evaluate the surveys, we developed minimum reporting criteria based on available guidelines and selected peer-review articles. We identified 38 reports through our search strategy; three surveys met our inclusion criteria. The surveys varied in methodological quality. Reporting against minimum criteria was generally good, but presentation of ethical procedures, raw data and survey limitations were missed in all surveys. All surveys also failed to consider contextual factors important for data interpretation. From this review, we conclude that mechanisms to ensure sound survey design and conduct must be implemented by operational organisations to improve data quality and reporting. Training in data interpretation would also be useful. Novel survey methods should be trialled and prospective data gathering (surveillance employed wherever feasible.

  15. Learning lessons from field surveys in humanitarian contexts: a case study of field surveys conducted in North Kivu, DRC 2006-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grais, Rebecca F; Luquero, Francisco J; Grellety, Emmanuel; Pham, Heloise; Coghlan, Benjamin; Salignon, Pierre

    2009-09-10

    Survey estimates of mortality and malnutrition are commonly used to guide humanitarian decision-making. Currently, different methods of conducting field surveys are the subject of debate among epidemiologists. Beyond the technical arguments, decision makers may find it difficult to conceptualize what the estimates actually mean. For instance, what makes this particular situation an emergency? And how should the operational response be adapted accordingly. This brings into question not only the quality of the survey methodology, but also the difficulties epidemiologists face in interpreting results and selecting the most important information to guide operations. As a case study, we reviewed mortality and nutritional surveys conducted in North Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) published from January 2006 to January 2009. We performed a PubMed/Medline search for published articles and scanned publicly available humanitarian databases and clearinghouses for grey literature. To evaluate the surveys, we developed minimum reporting criteria based on available guidelines and selected peer-review articles. We identified 38 reports through our search strategy; three surveys met our inclusion criteria. The surveys varied in methodological quality. Reporting against minimum criteria was generally good, but presentation of ethical procedures, raw data and survey limitations were missed in all surveys. All surveys also failed to consider contextual factors important for data interpretation. From this review, we conclude that mechanisms to ensure sound survey design and conduct must be implemented by operational organisations to improve data quality and reporting. Training in data interpretation would also be useful. Novel survey methods should be trialled and prospective data gathering (surveillance) employed wherever feasible.

  16. Horizon 2020 priorities in clinical mental health research : Results of a consensus-based ROAMER expert survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elfeddali, I.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C.M.; van Os, J.; Knappe, S.; Vieta, E.; Wittchen, H.-U.; Obradors-Tarragó, C.

    2014-01-01

    Within the ROAMER project, which aims to provide a Roadmap for Mental Health Research in Europe, a two-stage Delphi survey among 86 European experts was conducted in order to identify research priorities in clinical mental health research. Expert consensus existed with regard to the importance of

  17. A survey of NAPNAP members' clinical and professional research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Kathleen J; Lewin, Linda C; Niederhauser, Victoria P; Brady, Margaret A; Jones, Dolores; Butz, Arlene; Gallo, Agatha M; Schindler, Christine A; Trent, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this methodological article is to describe the development, implementation, and analysis of the survey used to determine NAPNAP members' ranking of research priorities, to describe the top priorities ranked by participants, and to determine if priorities differed by area of practice (primary, acute, or specialty care) or participant age. A cross-sectional descriptive design with an online survey was used. Completed by 324 NAPNAP members, the survey consisted of a demographic section and 90 statements in two domains: Clinical Priorities and Professional Role Priorities. Survey respondents strongly supported the top priorities with an average overall mean score of 4.0 or above on a 5-point Likert scale. Only three of the top 10 clinical and professional priorities differed by area of practice. No clinical priorities and only three professional priorities differed by age. The survey results were used to develop the NAPNAP Research Agenda. Both the survey results and the agenda can provide guidance for the NAPNAP Board, committees and interests groups as they develop initiatives and programs. Copyright © 2012 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Improvement Research Priorities: USA Survey and Expert Consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen R. Stevens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify stakeholder views about national priorities for improvement science and build agreement for action in a national improvement and implementation research network in the USA. This was accomplished using three stages of identification and consensus. (1 Topics were identified through a multipronged environmental scan of the literature and initiatives. (2 Based on this scan, a survey was developed, and stakeholders (n=2,777 were invited to rate the resulting 33-topic, 9-category list, via an online survey. Data from 560 respondents (20% response were analyzed. (3 An expert panel used survey results to further refine the research priorities through a Rand Delphi process. Priorities identified were within four categories: care coordination and transitions, high-performing clinical systems and microsystems improvement approaches, implementation of evidence-based improvements and best practices, and culture of quality and safety. The priorities identified were adopted by the improvement science research network as the research agenda to guide strategy. The process and conclusions may be of value to quality improvement research funding agencies, governments, and research units seeking to concentrate their resources on improvement topics where research is capable of yielding timely and actionable answers as well as contributing to the knowledge base for improvement.

  19. 30 CFR 280.11 - What must I do before I may conduct scientific research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Apply for a Permit or File a Notice § 280.11 What must I do before I may conduct scientific research? You may conduct G&G scientific research activities related to hard minerals on the OCS only after you... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do before I may conduct scientific...

  20. A Survey on Educational Data Mining and Research Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Jindal

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Educational Data Mining (EDM is an emerging fieldexploring data in educational context by applyingdifferent Data Mining (DM techniques/tools. It provides intrinsic knowledge of teaching and learningprocess for effective education planning. In this survey work focuses on components, research trends (1998to 2012 of EDM highlighting its related Tools, Techniques and educational Outcomes. It also highlightsthe Challenges EDM.

  1. A Survey on Educational Data Mining and Research Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Rajni Jindal; Malaya Dutta Borah

    2013-01-01

    Educational Data Mining (EDM) is an emerging fieldexploring data in educational context by applyingdifferent Data Mining (DM) techniques/tools. It provides intrinsic knowledge of teaching and learningprocess for effective education planning. In this survey work focuses on components, research trends (1998to 2012) of EDM highlighting its related Tools, Techniques and educational Outcomes. It also highlightsthe Challenges EDM.

  2. Response to ERIS 2014 States' Research Needs Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is ORD’s response to the states’ needs and priorities, as identified in the 2014 survey. ORD identified existing methods, models, tools and databases on these topics, as well as near-term research and development efforts, that could assist states in thei...

  3. Adaptation of the methodology of sample surveys for marketing researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kataev Andrey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the theory of adaptation of sample survey for the purposes of marketing, that allows to answer the fundamental question of any marketing research – how many objects should be studied for drawing adequate conclusions.

  4. A Survey of Instructional Support for Undergraduate Research Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Merinda Kaye

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate research and other high-impact educational practices simulate real-world learning environments and present an opportunity for high-level information literacy teaching to be better incorporated into the curriculum. The purpose of this survey is to examine efforts of libraries currently offering IL instruction to undergraduate research…

  5. Using Conducting Gestures To Teach Music Concepts: A Review of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Steven N.

    1999-01-01

    Explores research relating to the use of conducting gestures as instructional tools to teach musical concepts, focusing on the effects of conducting on musical understanding and conducting as an organizational and management tool. Discusses why teachers fail to focus on conducting activities. (CMK)

  6. Doctoral Students' Understanding of Legal and Ethical Obligations in Conducting Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achinewhu-Nworgu, Elizabeth; Nworgu, Queen Chioma; Azaiki, Steve; Dikeh, Charles Nna

    2015-01-01

    Conducting education research requires researchers to observe key legal and ethical obligations and to respect the rights of research participants. Legislation pertaining to data protection, in particular, has important implications for the way in which research data is collected, used, stored and shared. Researchers are also required to conduct…

  7. A Survey of Library Support for Formal Undergraduate Research Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Merinda Kaye; Shreeves, Sarah L.; Davis-Kahl, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate research is defined by the Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR) as "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate student that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." This study serves as a snapshot of current library practices in relation to formal undergraduate research…

  8. Survey on astrobiology research and teaching activities within the United kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Burchell, Mark J

    2009-10-01

    While astrobiology is apparently growing steadily around the world, in terms of the number of researchers drawn into this interdisciplinary area and teaching courses provided for new students, there have been very few studies conducted to chart this expansion quantitatively. To address this deficiency, the Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB) conducted a questionnaire survey of universities and research institutions nationwide to ascertain the current extent of astrobiology research and teaching in the UK. The aim was to provide compiled statistics and an information resource for those who seek research groups or courses of study, and to facilitate new interdisciplinary collaborations. The report here summarizes details gathered on 33 UK research groups, which involved 286 researchers (from undergraduate project students to faculty members). The survey indicates that around 880 students are taking university-level courses, with significant elements of astrobiology included, every year in the UK. Data are also presented on the composition of astrobiology students by their original academic field, which show a significant dominance of physics and astronomy students. This survey represents the first published systematic national assessment of astrobiological academic activity and indicates that this emerging field has already achieved a strong degree of penetration into the UK academic community.

  9. Becoming a Scientist: Research Findings on STEM Students' Gains from Conducting Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A.; Laursen, S.; Thiry, H.; Seymour, E.

    2006-12-01

    Undergraduate research is widely believed to enhance STEM students' education and increase their persistence to graduate education and careers in the sciences. Yet until very recently, little evidence from research and evaluation studies was available to substantiate such claims and document what students gain from doing undergraduate research or how these gains come about. We have conducted a three-year qualitative research study of STEM students participating in UR at four liberal arts colleges with a strong tradition of faculty-led summer research apprenticeships. Benefits to students reported by both students and their faculty advisors are categorized into six main categories of gains in skills, knowledge, "thinking like a scientist," career preparation, career development, and personal and professional growth. Student and faculty observations are strongly corroborative, but also differ in interesting ways that reflect the distinct perspectives of each group: students are still in the midst of discovering their own career paths while faculty advisors have observed the later career development of their past research students. While not all students find UR to heighten their interest in graduate school, they do find it a powerful growth experience that clarifies their career ambitions by providing a "real world" experience of science. For students whose interest in science is reinforced, UR has a significant role in their professional socialization into the culture and norms of science, which we call "becoming a scientist," through interactions that draw them into the scientific community and experiences that deepen their understanding of the nature of research. Cumulatively, the qualitative data set of nearly 350 interviews offers a rich portrayal of the UR enterprise from a variety of perspectives. Longitudinal data enable us to track the influence of UR on students' career and education trajectories in the years after college, and comparative data from a group

  10. The state of web-based research: A survey and call for inclusion in curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, John H; Reips, Ulf-Dietrich

    2017-04-13

    The first papers that reported on conducting psychological research on the web were presented at the Society for Computers in Psychology conference 20 years ago, in 1996. Since that time, there has been an explosive increase in the number of studies that use the web for data collection. As such, it seems a good time, 20 years on, to examine the health and adoption of sound practices of research on the web. The number of studies conducted online has increased dramatically. Overall, it seems that the web can be a method for conducting valid psychological studies. However, it is less clear that students and researchers are aware of the nature of web research. While many studies are well conducted, there is also a certain laxness appearing regarding the design and conduct of online studies. This laxness appears both anecdotally to the authors as managers of large sites for posting links to online studies, and in a survey of current researchers. One of the deficiencies discovered is that there is no coherent approach to educating researchers as to the unique features of web research.

  11. Biomimetics for NASA Langley Research Center: Year 2000 Report of Findings From a Six-Month Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Anders, John B., Jr.; Cox, David E.; Jegley, Dawn C.; Fox, Robert L.; Katzberg, Stephen J.

    2002-01-01

    This report represents an attempt to see if some of the techniques biological systems use to maximize their efficiency can be applied to the problems NASA faces in aeronautics and space exploration. It includes an internal survey of resources available at NASA Langley Research Center for biomimetics research efforts, an external survey of state of the art in biomimetics covering the Materials, Structures, Aerodynamics, Guidance and Controls areas. The Biomimetics Planning team also included ideas for potential research areas, as well as recommendations on how to implement this new program. This six-month survey was conducted in the second half of 1999.

  12. Research culture and capacity in community health services: results of a structured survey of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Emma L; Comino, Elizabeth J

    2016-08-17

    Developing research capacity is recognised as an important endeavour. However, little is known about the current research culture, capacity and supports for staff working in community-based health settings. A structured survey of Division of Community Health staff was conducted using the research capacity tool. The survey was disseminated by email and in paper format. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. In total, 109 usable responses were received, giving a response rate of 26%. Respondents were predominately nurses (n=71, 65.7%), with ~50% reporting post-graduate vocational qualifications. The highest levels of skills or organisational success were in using evidence to plan, promote and guide clinical practice. Most participants were unsure of organisational and team level skills and success at generating research. Few reported recent experience in research-generating activities. Barriers to undertaking research included lack of skills, time and access to external support and funding. Lack of skills and success in accessing external funding and resources to protect research time or to 'buy-in' technical expertise appeared to exacerbate these barriers. Community health staff have limited capacity to generate research with current levels of skill, funding and time. Strategies to increase research capacity should be informed by knowledge of clinicians' research experience and interests, and target development of skills to generate research. Resources and funding are needed at the organisational and team levels to overcome the significant barriers to research generation reported.

  13. A Survey Research on Market Orientation and Market Orientation- Performance Relationship in Hotel Companies

    OpenAIRE

    ÇAKICI, A.Celil; EREN, Duygu

    2005-01-01

    Market orientation is considered as the implementation of marketing philosophy. From managerial perspective, market orientation has three dimensions: 1) market intelligence, 2) dissemination of intelligence, and 3) responsiveness. In order to determine market orientation level of hotel companies and relationship between market orientation and performance of hotels, a survey research was conducted at four and five star hotels operating in Turkey in 2002. The original MARKOR (market orientation...

  14. Survey of Four Decades of Addiction Prevalence Researches in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Sarrami

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The main aim of this research is the survey of addiction and drug abuse and psychotropic drugs prevalence researches which have been done in our country in last decades Method: To do this research all addiction and drug abuse prevalence researches that have been taken place were collected and analyzed. Results: the results of the researches show that the statistics of addiction has been in an oscillation as in 1390, the survey in 15 to 64 years old people (according to 1385 census that is 50 million people, is equal to one million and three hundred thousand and twenty five persons. Conclusion: the results of the four decades of addiction prevalence in Iran show that in according to the size of the threat of drugs and psychotropic drugs and addiction prevalence and also the change of gender, matrimony, age, job and the level of addicts education, less attention has been given to the drug abuse prevalence researches in public, youngsters, students and governmental and governmental non- officials.

  15. 14 CFR 1275.105 - Conduct of the OIG investigation of research misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... research misconduct. 1275.105 Section 1275.105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION RESEARCH MISCONDUCT § 1275.105 Conduct of the OIG investigation of research misconduct. (a) The OIG shall make every reasonable effort to complete a NASA research misconduct investigation and...

  16. 77 FR 47676 - Comment Request: Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Jurisdictional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... Comment Request: Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Jurisdictional Survey AGENCY... Research Jurisdictional Survey Evaluation for the National Science Foundation. OMB Number: 3145-NEW. Type... strengthen science and engineering research potential and education at all levels throughout the...

  17. Estimating spatial variations in soil water content from electrical conductivity surveys across semiarid Mediterranean agrosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekki, Insaf; Jaiez, Zeineb; Jacob, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is an important driver for number of soil, water and energy fluxes at different temporal and spatial scales. The non-invasive electromagnetic induction sensor, such as EM38, that measures the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa), has been widely used to infer spatial and temporal patterns of soil properties. The objective of this study has been to explore the opportunity for estimating and mapping the soil water content (SWC) based on in-situ data collected in different fields and during dry and wet soil conditions in a hilly landscape. The experiment was carried out during two campaigns under dry and wet conditions to represent the major soil association, land use and topographic attributes at the cultivated semiarid Mediterranean Lebna catchment, northeastern Tunisia. The temporal evolution of SWC is a dry-wet-dry pattern. Gravimetric soil water content sampling and ECa measured with EM38 (Geonics Ltd., Ontario, Canada) surveys have been performed simultaneously. ECa measurements, geo-referenced with GPS, were collected raising the EM38 to sample at various depths of the soil. The EM38 was placed in both horizontal and vertical dipole modes on a PVC stand 150 cm above the soil surface. The number of investigated points varied between n=70 in February to n=38 in October 2012. Results showed that different SWC related to the soil spatial variability and lead to differences in ECa averaged values and a substantial changes in the ECa as SWC changed. The relationship between SWC an ECa in a separate vertical and horizontal mode using all possible sets of surveys was tested with linear regression. The correlation coefficient between ECa and SWC for the horizontal mode was lower than the vertical mode. Coefficients of determination of linear regressions between SWC in 0-100 cm soil depth and ECa in the vertical mode were, r²=0.74, in February 2013, r²=0.52 in October 2012. The lowest correlations were found in horizontal mode when SWC

  18. Measuring Substance Use and Misuse via Survey Research: Unfinished Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy P

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews unfinished business regarding the assessment of substance use behaviors by using survey research methodologies, a practice that dates back to the earliest years of this journal's publication. Six classes of unfinished business are considered including errors of sampling, coverage, non-response, measurement, processing, and ethics. It may be that there is more now that we do not know than when this work began some 50 years ago.

  19. 78 FR 32228 - Cotton Research and Promotion Program: Determination of Whether To Conduct a Referendum Regarding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Cotton Research and Promotion Program: Determination of Whether To Conduct a Referendum Regarding 1990 Amendments to the Cotton Research and Promotion Act AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing... review by the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), that it is not necessary to conduct a...

  20. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 272 - Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Pt. 272, App. A Appendix A to Part 272—Principles for the Conduct and Support of Basic Research 1. Basic research is an investment. The DoD Components are to view and manage basic...

  1. Descriptive survey of the contextual support for nursing research in 15 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Leana R; Newhouse, Robin P; Oweis, Arwa; Liang, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    Global research productivity depends on the presence of contextual factors, such as a doctorally prepared faculty, graduate programmes, publication options, that enable the conduct and publication of studies to generate knowledge to inform nursing practice. The current study aimed to develop and test an instrument that measures the level of contextual support for nursing research within a specific country, allowing comparisons between countries. After development of a 20-item survey with seven factors and 11 criteria based on a literature review, a quantitative descriptive e-mail survey design was used. Nurse researchers (N=100) from 22 countries were invited to participate. The response rate was 39% from 15 countries. Ethics approval was obtained by investigators in their country of origin. Results showed wide variation in the level of contextual support. The average total level of support across all countries was 26.8% (standard deviation [SD]=14.97). The greatest variability was in the area of availability of publishing opportunities (ranging between no suitable journals in a country to over 100). The least variability was in the area of availability of local enabling support (SD=7.22). This research showed wide differences in the level of contextual support for nursing research. The survey instrument can be utilised as a country assessment that can be used to strategically plan the building of infrastructure needed to support nursing research. Contextual support for nursing research is an antecedent of strong science. Building infrastructure for nursing science is a priority for global health.

  2. Conducting The Deepest All-Sky Pulsar Survey Ever: The All-Sky High Time Resolution Universe Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Ng, Cherry

    2014-01-01

    The extreme conditions found in and around pulsars make them fantastic natural laboratories, providing insights to a rich variety of fundamental physics and astronomy. To discover more pulsars we have begun the High Time Resolution Universe (HTRU) survey: a blind survey of the northern sky with the 100-m Effelsberg radio telescope in Germany and a twin survey of the southern sky with the 64-m Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The HTRU is an international collaboration with expertise shared among the MPIfR in Germany, ATNF/CASS and Swinburne University of Technology in Australia, University of Manchester in the UK and INAF in Italy. The HTRU survey uses multi-beam receivers and backends constructed with recent advancements in technology, providing unprecedentedly high time and frequency resolution, allowing us to probe deeper into the Galaxy than ever before. While a general overview of HTRU has been given by Keith at this conference, here we focus on three further aspects of HTRU discoveries and highlights...

  3. Understanding Our Learners and Developing Reflective Practice: Conducting Action Research with English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowa, Patience A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the ways in which action research projects can be used to socialize teachers to the teaching of English language learners (ELLs) as well as help these teachers develop reflective practice. Drawing on surveys, action research projects conduced with ELLs and reflection papers as data, the study explored the teachers' statements…

  4. A telephone survey of factors affecting willingness to participate in health research surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, D C; Kelsall, H L; Slegers, C; Forbes, A B; Loff, B; Zion, D; Fritschi, L

    2015-10-05

    In recent years, reduced participation has been encountered across all epidemiological study designs, both in terms of non-response as well as refusal. A low response rate may reduce the statistical power but, more importantly, results may not be generalizable to the wider community. In a telephone survey of 1413 randomly selected members of the Australian general population and of 690 participants sourced from previous studies, we examined factors affecting people's stated willingness to participate in health research. The majority of participants (61 %) expressed willingness to participate in health research in general but the percentage increased when provided with more specific information about the research. People were more willing if they have personal experience of the disease under study, and if the study was funded by government or charity rather than pharmaceutical companies. Participants from previous studies, older people and women were the groups most willing to participate. Younger men preferred online surveys, older people a written questionnaire, and few participants in any age and sex groups preferred a telephone questionnaire. Despite a trend toward reduced participation rates, most participants expressed their willingness to participate in health research. However, when seeking participants, researchers should be concrete and specific about the nature of the research they want to carry out. The preferred method of recommended contact varies with the demographic characteristics.

  5. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  6. Engaging Students in Survey Research Projects across Research Methods and Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovekamp, William E.; Soboroff, Shane D.; Gillespie, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    One innovative way to help students make sense of survey research has been to create a multifaceted, collaborative assignment that promotes critical thinking, comparative analysis, self-reflection, and statistical literacy. We use a short questionnaire adapted from the Higher Education Research Institute's Cooperative Institutional Research…

  7. Engaging Students in Survey Research Projects across Research Methods and Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovekamp, William E.; Soboroff, Shane D.; Gillespie, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    One innovative way to help students make sense of survey research has been to create a multifaceted, collaborative assignment that promotes critical thinking, comparative analysis, self-reflection, and statistical literacy. We use a short questionnaire adapted from the Higher Education Research Institute's Cooperative Institutional Research…

  8. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  9. Identificação de oportunidades de pesquisa a partir de um levantamento da implantação da produção enxuta em empresas do Brasil e do exterior Identification of research opportunities based on a survey on lean production implementation conducted in Brazilian and foreign companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarcisio Abreu Saurin

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta um levantamento do processo de implantação da Produção Enxuta (PE em 47 empresas do Brasil e do exterior. Entre os principais resultados, o levantamento revelou que: os temas de maior interesse em ampliar conhecimentos são a cultura organizacional enxuta e o mapeamento do fluxo de valor; os principais motivos para adotar a PE são a necessidade de melhorar a competitividade e a adequação da PE ao combate de problemas críticos da produção; as principais dificuldades na implantação da PE são a resistência das pessoas e a dificuldade na adaptação de conceitos e práticas; as práticas mais utilizadas são a padronização do trabalho e o gerenciamento visual; a produção puxada é a prática prioritária no momento. Os resultados deste levantamento, aliados a observações realizadas durante visitas em algumas das empresas, permitiram a identificação de necessidades e oportunidades para pesquisas sobre a implantação da PE, as quais são sumarizadas no final do artigo.This paper presents a survey on the lean production (LP implementation process in 47 Brazilian and foreign companies. Among the main results, the survey pointed out that the respondents are mostly interested in learning about lean organizational culture and value stream mapping. The main drivers for adopting LP are improving competitiveness and the fact that LP is adequate to solve critical production problems. People resistance to changes and difficulties to adapt concepts and practices are the main difficulties during LP implementation. The most frequently used practices are work standardization and visual management. Pull production implementation is the practice of highest priority. The results of this survey, along with the observation data collected during visits to some of the investigated companies, permitted the identification of research opportunities on LP implementation, which are summarized at the end of this article.

  10. Using a web-based survey tool to undertake a Delphi study: application for nurse education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Fenella J; Leslie, Gavin D; Grech, Carol; Latour, Jos M

    2013-11-01

    The Internet is increasingly being used as a data collection medium to access research participants. This paper reports on the experience and value of using web-survey software to conduct an eDelphi study to develop Australian critical care course graduate practice standards. The eDelphi technique used involved the iterative process of administering three rounds of surveys to a national expert panel. The survey was developed online using SurveyMonkey. Panel members responded to statements using one rating scale for round one and two scales for rounds two and three. Text boxes for panel comments were provided. For each round, the SurveyMonkey's email tool was used to distribute an individualized email invitation containing the survey web link. The distribution of panel responses, individual responses and a summary of comments were emailed to panel members. Stacked bar charts representing the distribution of responses were generated using the SurveyMonkey software. Panel response rates remained greater than 85% over all rounds. An online survey provided numerous advantages over traditional survey approaches including high quality data collection, ease and speed of survey administration, direct communication with the panel and rapid collation of feedback allowing data collection to be undertaken in 12 weeks. Only minor challenges were experienced using the technology. Ethical issues, specific to using the Internet to conduct research and external hosting of web-based software, lacked formal guidance. High response rates and an increased level of data quality were achieved in this study using web-survey software and the process was efficient and user-friendly. However, when considering online survey software, it is important to match the research design with the computer capabilities of participants and recognize that ethical review guidelines and processes have not yet kept pace with online research practices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Conducting research in risk communication that is both beneficial for stakeholders and scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2015-04-01

    One of the key tasks for disaster risk reduction is raising awareness. On way to increase it is through risk communication, including visual risk communication. Previous research showed that visual risk communication linked to natural hazards is mostly evaluated in terms of user's requirements, ability to understand the content, or satisfaction with the diverse components of the tool(s): Its impact on risk awareness is not researched. Most of the risk communication evaluations are performed in a lab-type environments and thus their conclusions might not be fully valid in real life settings. Our approach differs in the sense that we decided to test a real communication effort. However, we did not use an existing one but designed our own. This process was conducted according to collaborative research principles, meaning that we created the communication effort in collaboration with the local stakeholders in order to respect the social environment of the case study. Moreover, our research activity should be beneficial and significant for the community in which we work as well as for science. This contribution will present the process that allowed us to design an exhibition in the Ubaye Valley (France) and the methodology that was developed to measure changes in risk awareness. During a 2-years project, we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). Informal meetings with local stakeholders were organized to determine what they perceived as the needs in term of risk communication and to investigate the potential to develop activities that would benefit both them and us. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. We proposed the content and this was adjusted in interaction with the stakeholders. Later local technicians and inhabitants contributed to the content of the exhibition and regional stakeholders helped with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, employees of the public library took

  12. Teacher Researchers: Technology and Ethical Considerations while Conducting an Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Altinay Aksal, Fahriye; Altinay Gazi, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    The research study stimulates critical approach to research and practice, with an increasing emphasis on ethics and ethical decision making of the teacher researchers within action research process by using technology in its process. The study investigates the impact of technology within the action research, ethical considerations and dilemmas…

  13. Relationships between the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) and self-reported research practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, A Lauren; Martinson, Brian C; Thrush, Carol R

    2013-09-01

    The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) is a validated tool to facilitate promotion of research integrity and research best practices. This work uses the SORC to assess shared and individual perceptions of the research climate in universities and academic departments and relate these perceptions to desirable and undesirable research practices. An anonymous web- and mail-based survey was administered to randomly selected biomedical and social science faculty and postdoctoral fellows in the United States. Respondents reported their perceptions of the research climates at their universities and primary departments, and the frequency with which they engaged in desirable and undesirable research practices. More positive individual perceptions of the research climate in one's university or department were associated with higher likelihoods of desirable, and lower likelihoods of undesirable, research practices. Shared perceptions of the research climate tended to be similarly predictive of both desirable and undesirable research practices as individuals' deviations from these shared perceptions. Study results supported the central prediction that more positive SORC-measured perceptions of the research climate were associated with more positive reports of research practices. There were differences with respect to whether shared or individual climate perceptions were related to desirable or undesirable practices but the general pattern of results provide empirical evidence that the SORC is predictive of self-reported research behavior.

  14. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  15. Human Nutrition Research Conducted at State Agricultural Experiment Stations and 1890/Tuskegee Agricultural Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driskell, Judy A.; Myers, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Cooperative State Research Service-administered and state-appropriated State Agriculture Experiment Station funds for human nutrition research increased about two-fold from FY70-FY86, while the percentage of budget expended for this research decreased. (JOW)

  16. Implementing Project Based Survey Research Skills to Grade Six ELP Students with "The Survey Toolkit" and "TinkerPlots"[R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    "Survey Toolkit Collecting Information, Analyzing Data and Writing Reports" (Walsh, 2009a) is discussed as a survey research curriculum used by the author's sixth grade students. The report describes the implementation of "The Survey Toolkit" curriculum and "TinkerPlots"[R] software to provide instruction to students learning a project based…

  17. Implementing Project Based Survey Research Skills to Grade Six ELP Students with "The Survey Toolkit" and "TinkerPlots"[R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Thomas, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    "Survey Toolkit Collecting Information, Analyzing Data and Writing Reports" (Walsh, 2009a) is discussed as a survey research curriculum used by the author's sixth grade students. The report describes the implementation of "The Survey Toolkit" curriculum and "TinkerPlots"[R] software to provide instruction to students learning a project based…

  18. Green Cellular Networks: A Survey, Some Research Issues and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Hasan, Ziaul; Bhargava, Vijay K

    2011-01-01

    Energy efficiency in cellular networks is a growing concern for cellular operators to not only maintain profitability, but also to reduce the overall environment effects. This emerging trend of achieving energy efficiency in cellular networks is motivating the standardization authorities and network operators to continuously explore future technologies in order to bring improvements in the entire network infrastructure. In this article, we present a brief survey of methods to improve the power efficiency of cellular networks, explore some research issues and challenges and suggest some techniques to enable an energy efficient or "green" cellular network. Since base stations consume a maximum portion of the total energy used in a cellular system, we will first provide a comprehensive survey on techniques to obtain energy savings in base stations. Next, we discuss how heterogenous network deployment based on micro, pico and femto-cells can be used to achieve this goal. Since cognitive radio and cooperative rela...

  19. "Tele Pour Tous" in Rural Ivory Coast: Audience, Impact, Perceptions: Report of Two Surveys Conducted in January and April, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etaix, Mireille; Lenglet, Frans

    This report presents the results of two surveys conducted in January and April 1977 in the Ivory Coast to assess the impact of the "Tele Pour Tous" programs on rural audiences in terms of awareness, learning, and action. Descriptions of the socio-economic characteristics of the audience and their viewing patterns were sought, and…

  20. E-Learning in European Higher Education Institutions: Results of a Mapping Survey Conducted in October-December 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaebel, Michael; Kupriyanova, Veronika; Morais, Rita; Colucci, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The present study on e-learning intends to contribute to closing a data gap and to stimulate the discussion on the further development of national and European policies on the issue and to support its systematic institutional take-up. It draws upon a survey conducted by the European University Association between October and December 2013. 249…

  1. A Portrait of the Audience for Instruction in Web Searching: Results of a Survey Conducted at Two Canadian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillotson, Joy

    2003-01-01

    Describes a survey that was conducted involving participants in the library instruction program at two Canadian universities in order to describe the characteristics of students receiving instruction in Web searching. Examines criteria for evaluating Web sites, search strategies, use of search engines, and frequency of use. Questionnaire is…

  2. The role of the pharmacist in palliative care: results of a survey conducted in Australia and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbar, Peter; Stefaniuk, Kimberley

    2002-01-01

    A survey was conducted to determine what pharmaceutical services are provided to palliative care sites in Australia and Canada, and the pharmacist's role on the interdisciplinary team. Questionnaires were sent to 100 selected sites in each country. Questions pertained to demographics and the level of duties performed. Australian 42/76 (55.3%) and Canadian 59/69 (85.5%) sites employed palliative care pharmacists. Most Australians (83.3%) and Canadians (69.8%) worked under 20 hours/week on the palliative care service. Administrative duties and basic drug supply functions were more common in Australia, whilst Canadians had greater participation in team meetings and rounds. Medication review was the most common clinical duty; approximately 70% of respondents in each country provided specific advice on pharmacotherapy, administration, treatment, adverse effects, and incompatibilities. Education was universally important, but active participation in conferences, publication, and research was infrequent. Pharmacists in both Australia and Canada are important members of the palliative care team, and provide a similar high level of unique and valuable services to patients and their families.

  3. Survey of biomass gasification. Volume III. Current technology and research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-04-01

    This survey of biomass gasification was written to aid the Department of Energy and the Solar Energy Research Institute Biological and Chemical Conversion Branch in determining the areas of gasification that are ready for commercialization now and those areas in which further research and development will be most productive. Chapter 8 is a survey of gasifier types. Chapter 9 consists of a directory of current manufacturers of gasifiers and gasifier development programs. Chapter 10 is a sampling of current gasification R and D programs and their unique features. Chapter 11 compares air gasification for the conversion of existing gas/oil boiler systems to biomass feedstocks with the price of installing new biomass combustion equipment. Chapter 12 treats gas conditioning as a necessary adjunct to all but close-coupled gasifiers, in which the product is promptly burned. Chapter 13 evaluates, technically and economically, synthesis-gas processes for conversion to methanol, ammonia, gasoline, or methane. Chapter 14 compiles a number of comments that have been assembled from various members of the gasifier community as to possible roles of the government in accelerating the development of gasifier technology and commercialization. Chapter 15 includes recommendations for future gasification research and development.

  4. Airborne geophysical surveys conducted in western Nebraska, 2010: contractor reports and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2014-01-01

    This report contains three contractor reports and data files for an airborne electromagnetic survey flown from June 28 to July 7, 2010. The first report; “SkyTEM Survey: Nebraska, USA, Data” describes data aquisition and processing from a time-domain electromagnetic and magnetic survey performed by SkyTEM Canada, Inc. (the North American SkyTEM subsidiary), in western Nebraska, USA. Digital data for this report are given in Appendix 1. The airborne geophysical data from the SkyTEM survey subsequently were processed and inverted by Aarhus Geophysics ApS, Aarhus, Denmark, to produce resistivity depth sections along each flight line. The result of that processing is described in two reports presented in Appendix 2, “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–13” and “Processing and inversion of SkyTEM data from USGS Area UTM–14.” Funding for these surveys was provided by the North Platte Natural Resources District, the South Platte Natural Resources District, and the Twin Platte Natural Resources District, in Scottsbluff, Sidney, and North Platte, Nebraska, respectively. Any additional information concerning the geophysical data may be obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey Crustal Geophysics and Geochemistry Science Center, Denver Colorado.

  5. Extent, Awareness and Perception of Dissemination Bias in Qualitative Research: An Explorative Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Ingrid; Glenton, Claire; Lewin, Simon; Berg, Rigmor C; Noyes, Jane; Booth, Andrew; Marusic, Ana; Malicki, Mario; Munthe-Kaas, Heather M; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative research findings are increasingly used to inform decision-making. Research has indicated that not all quantitative research on the effects of interventions is disseminated or published. The extent to which qualitative researchers also systematically underreport or fail to publish certain types of research findings, and the impact this may have, has received little attention. A survey was delivered online to gather data regarding non-dissemination and dissemination bias in qualitative research. We invited relevant stakeholders through our professional networks, authors of qualitative research identified through a systematic literature search, and further via snowball sampling. 1032 people took part in the survey of whom 859 participants identified as researchers, 133 as editors and 682 as peer reviewers. 68.1% of the researchers said that they had conducted at least one qualitative study that they had not published in a peer-reviewed journal. The main reasons for non-dissemination were that a publication was still intended (35.7%), resource constraints (35.4%), and that the authors gave up after the paper was rejected by one or more journals (32.5%). A majority of the editors and peer reviewers "(strongly) agreed" that the main reasons for rejecting a manuscript of a qualitative study were inadequate study quality (59.5%; 68.5%) and inadequate reporting quality (59.1%; 57.5%). Of 800 respondents, 83.1% "(strongly) agreed" that non-dissemination and possible resulting dissemination bias might undermine the willingness of funders to support qualitative research. 72.6% and 71.2%, respectively, "(strongly) agreed" that non-dissemination might lead to inappropriate health policy and health care. The proportion of non-dissemination in qualitative research is substantial. Researchers, editors and peer reviewers play an important role in this. Non-dissemination and resulting dissemination bias may impact on health care research, practice and policy. More

  6. A Survey of Theoretical and Experimental Coaxial Rotor Aerodynamic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Colin P.

    1997-01-01

    The recent appearance of the Kamov Ka-50 helicopter and the application of coaxial rotors to unmanned aerial vehicles have renewed international interest in the coaxial rotor configuration. This report addresses the aerodynamic issues peculiar to coaxial rotors by surveying American, Russian, Japanese, British, and German research. (Herein, 'coaxial rotors' refers to helicopter, not propeller, rotors. The intermeshing rotor system was not investigated.) Issues addressed are separation distance, load sharing between rotors, wake structure, solidity effects, swirl recovery, and the effects of having no tail rotor. A general summary of the coaxial rotor configuration explores the configuration's advantages and applications.

  7. Integrating a framework for conducting public health systems research into statewide operations-based exercises to improve emergency preparedness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter Jennifer C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the uncommon nature of large-scale disasters and emergencies, public health practitioners often turn to simulated emergencies, known as “exercises”, for preparedness assessment and improvement. Under the right conditions, exercises can also be used to conduct original public health systems research. This paper describes the integration of a research framework into a statewide operations-based exercise program in California as a systems-based approach for studying public health emergency preparedness and response. Methods We developed a research framework based on the premise that operations-based exercises conducted by medical and public health agencies can be described using epidemiologic concepts. Using this framework, we conducted a survey of key local and regional medical and health agencies throughout California following the 2010 Statewide Medical and Health Exercise. The survey evaluated: (1 the emergency preparedness capabilities activated and functions performed in response to the emergency scenario, and (2 the major challenges to inter-organizational communications and information management. Results Thirty-five local health departments (LHDs, 24 local emergency medical services (EMS agencies, 121 hospitals, and 5 Regional Disaster Medical and Health Coordinators/Specialists (RDMHC responded to our survey, representing 57%, 77%, 26% and 83%, respectively, of target agencies in California. We found two sets of response capabilities were activated during the 2010 Statewide Exercise: a set of core capabilities that were common across all agencies, and a set of agency-specific capabilities that were more common among certain agency types. With respect to one response capability in particular, inter-organizational information sharing, we found that the majority of respondents’ comments were related to the complete or partial failure of communications equipment or systems. Conclusions Using the 2010 Statewide

  8. An international survey to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of research studies most likely to change orthopaedic practice

    OpenAIRE

    Thornley, P; de SA, D.; Evaniew, N.; Farrokhyar, F.; Bhandari, M.; Ghert, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence -based medicine (EBM) is designed to inform clinical decision-making within all medical specialties, including orthopaedic surgery. We recently published a pilot survey of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) membership and demonstrated that the adoption of EBM principles is variable among Canadian orthopaedic surgeons. The objective of this study was to conduct a broader international survey of orthopaedic surgeons to identify characteristics of research studies per...

  9. Survey Instrument Validity Part I: Principles of Survey Instrument Development and Validation in Athletic Training Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Laura J.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Instrument validation is an important facet of survey research methods and athletic trainers must be aware of the important underlying principles. Objective: To discuss the process of survey development and validation, specifically the process of construct validation. Background: Athletic training researchers frequently employ the use of…

  10. A survey of attitudes toward clinical research among physicians at Kyoto University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Eriko; Murayama, Toshinori; Yokode, Masayuki

    2009-12-22

    In Japan, only clinical research related to investigational new drug trials must be notified to regulatory bodies, and this lack of a uniform standard for clinical research has caused a number of difficulties. The objective of this study was to assess the willingness of physicians to participate in clinical research and to identify effective methods to promote and enhance clinical research. We conducted a cross-sectional survey by administrating questionnaires to physicians in 31 departments in Kyoto University Hospital from October through November 2007. A total of 51.5% (310 of 602) of physicians completed the questionnaire. More than two-thirds of them reported currently participating in clinical research, and nearly all believed that clinical research is necessary for physicians. Less than 20% of respondents had specific training regarding clinical research, and most reported a need to acquire concepts and skills regarding clinical research, especially those related to statistics. "Paperwork was complicated and onerous" was the most frequently cited obstacle in conducting clinical research, followed by "few eligible patients" and "lack of time". Previous participation in and prospective participation in clinical research, previous writing a research protocol were positively associated with current participation in clinical research. Physicians in university hospitals need more training regarding clinical research, particularly in biostatistics. They also require administrative assistance. Our findings indicate that the quality of clinical research could be improved if training in clinical research methodology and biostatistics were provided, and if greater assistance in the preparation of study documents requested by the institutional Independent Ethics Committee were available.

  11. A survey of attitudes toward clinical research among physicians at Kyoto University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokode Masayuki

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Japan, only clinical research related to investigational new drug trials must be notified to regulatory bodies, and this lack of a uniform standard for clinical research has caused a number of difficulties. The objective of this study was to assess the willingness of physicians to participate in clinical research and to identify effective methods to promote and enhance clinical research. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey by administrating questionnaires to physicians in 31 departments in Kyoto University Hospital from October through November 2007. Results A total of 51.5% (310 of 602 of physicians completed the questionnaire. More than two-thirds of them reported currently participating in clinical research, and nearly all believed that clinical research is necessary for physicians. Less than 20% of respondents had specific training regarding clinical research, and most reported a need to acquire concepts and skills regarding clinical research, especially those related to statistics. "Paperwork was complicated and onerous" was the most frequently cited obstacle in conducting clinical research, followed by "few eligible patients" and "lack of time". Previous participation in and prospective participation in clinical research, previous writing a research protocol were positively associated with current participation in clinical research. Conclusions Physicians in university hospitals need more training regarding clinical research, particularly in biostatistics. They also require administrative assistance. Our findings indicate that the quality of clinical research could be improved if training in clinical research methodology and biostatistics were provided, and if greater assistance in the preparation of study documents requested by the institutional Independent Ethics Committee were available.

  12. Non-Chinese Researchers Conducting Research in Chinese Cultures: Critical Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Kokila Roy; King, Mark Edward

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses some fundamental methodological and ethical issues confronting non-Chinese researchers undertaking research in Hong Kong Chinese society. Among other things, it considers problems pertaining to data collection, the challenges of data interpretation, and the implication that this has for research. Whilst the issues are by no…

  13. Non-Chinese Researchers Conducting Research in Chinese Cultures: Critical Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Kokila Roy; King, Mark Edward

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses some fundamental methodological and ethical issues confronting non-Chinese researchers undertaking research in Hong Kong Chinese society. Among other things, it considers problems pertaining to data collection, the challenges of data interpretation, and the implication that this has for research. Whilst the issues are by no…

  14. SOCIAL PERCEPTION OF THE EDUCATION SYSTEM REFORM. SURVEY CONDUCTED IN UPPER HIGH SCHOOLS OF BIHOR COUNTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabau Remus Mircea

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Between the elements which mark the global processes, we can include educational issues, the management of processes in pre-university education. Therefore, the synthetic approach to educational problems in Romania, studied in terms of the processes and the phenomena of social development, but also due to the need for submiting the pre-university Romanian educational process to the European Union requirements, appears to be current and important. This analysis focuses on the decentralization of education. This theme is a true significant of the stage and of the the changing potential of the management practice in the public area. Its actuality is also hard to contest under the conditions in which changes in this area have been slow compared to those of the other countries that joined the European Union (Hungary, Czech Republic, Poland, contradictory and inconsistent (Herczynski and Levitas, 2001: 1-2. The legislative changes, training facilities, as well as the constant institutional reorganization of pre-university education show the presence of an active interest in this matter. However, the real reform of university education still requires essential improvements. This study analyzes the social perception of performers in pre-university system, establishes positive and negative aspects of the reform in pre-university education, all from the perspective of teachers. The research was conducted between March 1st, 2011 and April 1st, 2011. During this time the questionnaire was applied and the data interpreted. The data obtained from the questionnaire interpretation were introduced into the SPSS program. For the analysis and interpretation of data we used SPSS 15.0. under Windows license. My investigation efforts were directed towards the impact of decentralization on the performers in pre-university education system and on their perception. The main purpose of the experimental study was to determine the essential perceptions of the performers

  15. Embedding Responsible Conduct in Learning and Research into an Australian Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lynette B.

    2017-01-01

    Responsible conduct in learning and research (RCLR) was progressively introduced into the pharmacology curriculum for undergraduate science students at The University of Western Australia. In the second year of this undergraduate curriculum, a lecture introduces students to issues such as the use of animals in teaching and responsible conduct of…

  16. Future Directions for Research on the Development and Prevention of Early Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes our state of knowledge regarding the development and prevention of conduct problems in early childhood, then identifies directions that would benefit future basic and applied research. Our understanding about the course and risk factors associated with early-developing conduct problems has been significantly enhanced during…

  17. Embedding Responsible Conduct in Learning and Research into an Australian Undergraduate Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Lynette B.

    2017-01-01

    Responsible conduct in learning and research (RCLR) was progressively introduced into the pharmacology curriculum for undergraduate science students at The University of Western Australia. In the second year of this undergraduate curriculum, a lecture introduces students to issues such as the use of animals in teaching and responsible conduct of…

  18. Ethical Considerations in Conducting Research on Autism Spectrum Disorders in Low and Middle Income Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Tamara C.; Singhal, Nidhi; Krishnamurthy, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is being identified in an ever-increasing number of countries, including many that are low or middle income (LMIC). Research conducted in these countries requires awareness of unique ethical issues. Drawing on the experience of two organizations that have been involved in conducting and collaborating in ASD research…

  19. Recruiting and retaining youth and young adults: challenges and opportunities in survey research for tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, Jennifer; Hair, Elizabeth C; Smith, Alexandria; Bennett, Morgane; Rath, Jessica Miller; Thomas, Randall K; Fahimi, Mansour; Dennis, J Michael; Vallone, Donna

    2017-04-21

    Evaluation studies of population-based tobacco control interventions often rely on large-scale survey data from numerous respondents across many geographic areas to provide evidence of their effectiveness. Significant challenges for survey research have emerged with the evolving communications landscape, particularly for surveying hard-to-reach populations such as youth and young adults. This study combines the comprehensive coverage of an address-based sampling (ABS) frame with the timeliness of online data collection to develop a nationally representative longitudinal cohort of young people aged 15-21. We constructed an ABS frame, partially supplemented with auxiliary data, to recruit this hard-to-reach sample. Branded and tested mail-based recruitment materials were designed to bring respondents online for screening, consent and surveying. Once enrolled, respondents completed online surveys every 6 months via computer, tablet or smartphone. Numerous strategies were utilized to enhance retention and representativeness RESULTS: Results detail sample performance, representativeness and retention rates as well as device utilization trends for survey completion among youth and young adult respondents. Panel development efforts resulted in a large, nationally representative sample with high retention rates. This study is among the first to employ this hybrid ABS-to-online methodology to recruit and retain youth and young adults in a probability-based online cohort panel. The approach is particularly valuable for conducting research among younger populations as it capitalizes on their increasing access to and comfort with digital communication. We discuss challenges and opportunities of panel recruitment and retention methods in an effort to provide valuable information for tobacco control researchers seeking to obtain representative, population-based samples of youth and young adults in the U.S. as well as across the globe. © Article author(s) (or their employer

  20. Factors associated with survey response in hand surgery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, Arjan G J; Anderson, Jade A; Neuhaus, Valentin; Ring, David

    2013-10-01

    A low response rate is believed to decrease the validity of survey studies. Factors associated with nonresponse to surveys are poorly characterized in orthopaedic research. This study addressed whether (1) psychologic factors; (2) demographics; (3) illness-related factors; and (4) pain are predictors of a lower likelihood of a patient returning a mailed survey. One hundred four adult, new or return patients completed questionnaires including the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire-9 depression scale, Short Health Anxiety Index, demographics, and a pain scale (0-10) during a routine visit to a hand and upper extremity surgeon. Of these patients, 38% had undergone surgery and the remainder was seen for various other conditions. Six months after their visit, patients were mailed the DASH questionnaire and a scale to rate their satisfaction with the visit (0-10). Bivariate analysis and logistic regression were used to determine risk factors for being a nonresponder to the followup of this study. The cohort consisted of 57 women and 47 men with a mean age of 51 years with various diagnoses. Thirty-five patients (34%) returned the questionnaire. Responders were satisfied with their visit (mean satisfaction, 8.7) and had a DASH score of 9.6. Compared with patients who returned the questionnaires, nonresponders had higher pain catastrophizing scores, were younger, more frequently male, and had more pain at enrollment. In logistic regression, male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.6), pain (OR, 1.3), and younger age (OR, 1.03) were associated with not returning the questionnaire. Survey studies should be interpreted in light of the fact that patients who do not return questionnaires in a hand surgery practice differ from patients who do return them. Hand surgery studies that rely on questionnaire evaluation remote from study enrollment should include tactics to improve the response of younger, male patients with more pain. Level II, prognostic study. See

  1. Overcoming practical challenges to conducting clinical research in the inpatient stroke rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grace B; Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Whyte, Ellen M; Matthews, Judith T

    2015-10-01

    There is a shortage of published empirical studies conducted in acute inpatient stroke rehabilitation, though such studies are greatly needed in order to shed light on the most efficacious inpatient stroke rehabilitation interventions. The inherent challenges of inpatient research may dissuade researchers from undertaking this important work. This paper describes our institution's experience devising practical solutions to research barriers in this setting. Through concentrated efforts to overcome research barriers, such as by cultivating collaborative relationships and capitalizing on unanticipated benefits, we successfully facilitated conduct of five simultaneous inpatient stroke studies. Tangible benefits realized include increased effectiveness of research participant identification and enrollment, novel collaborative projects, innovative clinical care initiatives, and enhanced emotional and practical support for patients and their families. We provide recommendations based on lessons learned during our experience, and discuss benefits of this collaboration for our research participants, clinical staff, and the research team.

  2. A Survey Data Quality Strategy: The Institutional Research Perspective. IR Applications, Volume 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin

    2012-01-01

    This discussion constructs a survey data quality strategy for institutional researchers in higher education in light of total survey error theory. It starts with describing the characteristics of institutional research and identifying the gaps in literature regarding survey data quality issues in institutional research and then introduces the…

  3. Difficult Groups in Survey Research and the Development of Tailor-made Approach Strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feskens, R.C.W.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with ‘difficult groups’ in survey research, which are currently under-represented groups in survey research. The focus is on ethnic minorities and people living in non-private households. Ethnic minorities are under-represented in survey research because they have below-average

  4. Faculty beliefs, perceptions, and level of community involvement in their research: a survey at one urban academic institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg-Freeman, Clara; Kass, Nancy; Gielen, Andrea; Tracey, Patricia; Bates-Hopkins, Barbara; Farfel, Mark

    2010-12-01

    Health researchers are increasingly interested in how best to engage communities in their health-related research studies. To help determine how researchers have interacted with community members in their research, we conducted a survey of full-time faculty from the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions regarding researchers' beliefs and experiences with community-based research. Approximately 41% of respondents who conducted human subject studies had enrolled local residents in their research. Researchers whose studies were based in the surrounding community were significantly more likely to involve community members in all stages of their research (e.g., selection of the problem, project planning, data collection, interpretation and dissemination of results, or developing an intervention) than were faculty whose studies enrolled community members as research participants but whose studies were not set in the community. Over 90% of all faculty respondents agree that community involvement improves the relevance of their research, although almost 60% had not done so. Most faculty value community involvement, but they want more institutional support for such activities and they seek better skills to involve community. Few studies have surveyed researchers who enroll community members as research participants to document practices regarding community involvement in the research process. Given that the majority (73.6%) of faculty responded that they intend to include local residents in their upcoming studies, future research to evaluate interventions designed to facilitate community involvement, especially in the inner city, would help stakeholders identify best practices for involving and engaging communities in health research.

  5. Advancing vector biology research: a community survey for future directions, research applications and infrastructure requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Alain; Pondeville, Emilie; Schnettler, Esther; Crisanti, Andrea; Supparo, Clelia; Christophides, George K; Kersey, Paul J; Maslen, Gareth L; Takken, Willem; Koenraadt, Constantianus J M; Oliva, Clelia F; Busquets, Núria; Abad, F Xavier; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Levashina, Elena A; Wilson, Anthony J; Veronesi, Eva; Pichard, Maëlle; Arnaud Marsh, Sarah; Simard, Frédéric; Vernick, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Vector-borne pathogens impact public health, animal production, and animal welfare. Research on arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, sandflies, and midges which transmit pathogens to humans and economically important animals is crucial for development of new control measures that target transmission by the vector. While insecticides are an important part of this arsenal, appearance of resistance mechanisms is increasingly common. Novel tools for genetic manipulation of vectors, use of Wolbachia endosymbiotic bacteria, and other biological control mechanisms to prevent pathogen transmission have led to promising new intervention strategies, adding to strong interest in vector biology and genetics as well as vector-pathogen interactions. Vector research is therefore at a crucial juncture, and strategic decisions on future research directions and research infrastructure investment should be informed by the research community. A survey initiated by the European Horizon 2020 INFRAVEC-2 consortium set out to canvass priorities in the vector biology research community and to determine key activities that are needed for researchers to efficiently study vectors, vector-pathogen interactions, as well as access the structures and services that allow such activities to be carried out. We summarize the most important findings of the survey which in particular reflect the priorities of researchers in European countries, and which will be of use to stakeholders that include researchers, government, and research organizations.

  6. Towards the development of a comprehensive framework: Qualitative systematic survey of definitions of clinical research quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Niederhäusern, Belinda; Schandelmaier, Stefan; Mi Bonde, Marie; Brunner, Nicole; Hemkens, Lars G; Rutquist, Marielle; Bhatnagar, Neera; Guyatt, Gordon H; Pauli-Magnus, Christiane; Briel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    To systematically survey existing definitions, concepts, and criteria of clinical research quality, both developed by stakeholder groups as well as in the medical literature. This study serves as a first step in the development of a comprehensive framework for the quality of clinical research. We systematically and in duplicate searched definitions, concepts and criteria of clinical research quality on websites of stakeholders in clinical research until no further insights emerged and in MEDLINE up to February 2015. Stakeholders included governmental bodies, regulatory agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, academic and commercial contract research organizations, initiatives, research ethics committees, patient organizations and funding agencies from 13 countries. Data synthesis involved descriptive and qualitative analyses following the Framework Method on definitions, concepts, and criteria of clinical research quality. Descriptive codes were applied and grouped into clusters to identify common and stakeholder-specific quality themes. Stakeholder concepts on how to assure quality throughout study conduct or articles on quality assessment tools were common, generally with no a priori definition of the term quality itself. We identified a total of 20 explicit definitions of clinical research quality including varying quality dimensions and focusing on different stages in the clinical research process. Encountered quality dimensions include ethical conduct, patient safety/rights/priorities, internal validity, precision of results, generalizability or external validity, scientific and societal relevance, transparency and accessibility of information, research infrastructure and sustainability. None of the definitions appeared to be comprehensive either in terms of quality dimensions, research stages, or stakeholder perspectives. Clinical research quality is often discussed but rarely defined. A framework defining clinical research quality across stakeholders

  7. Mom, Dad and research object: The ethics of conducting research based on your own children's everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiesen, Noomi Christine Linde; Szulevicz, Thomas

    researchers to do studies based on the researcher’s own life and experiences, establishing both a practical and an ideological reasoning: firstly, in the increasingly neo-liberal organization of university life, finding time and resources to conduct research is demanding, especially considering the challenge...

  8. Long-Term Research in Ecology and Evolution (LTREE): 2015 survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Mark A; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Feinberg, Geoffrey; Rosenthal, Seth A; Lau, Jennifer A

    2017-09-08

    To systematically assess views on contributions and future activities for long-term research in ecology and evolution (LTREE), we conducted and here provide data responses and associated metadata for a survey of ecological and evolutionary scientists. The survey objectives were to: 1) Identify and prioritize research questions that are important to address through long-term, ecological field experiments; and 2) Understand the role that these experiments might play in generating and applying ecological and evolutionary knowledge. The survey was developed adhering to the standards of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. It was administered online using Qualtrics Survey Software. Survey creation was a multi-step process, with questions and format developed and then revised with, for example, input from an external advisory committee comprising senior and junior ecological and evolutionary researchers. The final questionnaire was released to ~100 colleagues to ensure functionality and then fielded two days later (January 7(th) 2015). Two professional societies distributed it to their membership, including the Ecological Society of America, and it was posted to three list serves. The questionnaire was available through February 8(th) 2015 and completed by 1,179 respondents. The distribution approach targeted practicing ecologists and evolutionary biologists in the U.S. Quantitative (both ordinal and categorical) closed-ended questions used a pre-defined set of response categories, facilitating direct comparison across all respondents. Qualitative, open-ended questions, provided respondents the opportunity to develop their own answers. We employed quantitative questions to score views on the extent to which long-term experimental research has contributed to understanding in ecology and evolutionary biology; its role compared to other approaches (e.g. short-term experiments); justifications for and caveats to long-term experiments; and the relative

  9. CCS to conduct Construction survey for China's first deep water semi-submersible drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On March 15,the grand signing ceremony on the contract between China National Offshore Oil Corp.(CNOOC)and China Classification Society(CCS)for the construction survey of deep water semi-submersible drilling unit was held at CCS Headquarters in Beijing.

  10. CCS to conduct construction survey for China's first deep water semi-submersible drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ On March 15,the grand signing ceremony on the contract between China National Offshore Oil Corp.(CNOOC) and China Classification Society(CCS) for the construction survey of deep water semi-submersible drilling unit was held at CCS Headquarters in Beijing.

  11. Methodology for conduct of epidemiologic surveys and randomized controlled trials of diabetic polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyck, Peter James

    2014-01-01

    This chapter outlines: (1) the reasons why epidemiologic surveys and randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) of diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) are difficult and expensive, and often poorly done, (2) primary and secondary neuropathy end points, (3) single versus composite neuropathic end points, (4) adequate reference values from study of population representative cohorts, and (5) the issue of clinical proficiency.

  12. Survey of Research Resources in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, John M.

    1979-01-01

    A survey of research resources in 24 veterinary colleges in the US and Canada reports information on university-wide research facilities, college-wide research facilities, personnel, and instrumentation resources. Corporate research resource management was compared with university research resource management. The survey form is outlined.…

  13. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  14. Responsible Conduct of Research Assessment of Doctor of Education Candidates, Graduate Faculty, and Curriculum Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    The study included an assessment of doctoral students, graduate faculty, and curriculum considerations to determine the degree of infusion of research integrity and responsible conduct of research (RCR) principles within a Doctor of Education program. Study results showed substantial increases in doctoral candidates' knowledge levels of RCR,…

  15. Conducting Research with the Disability Community: A Rights-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munger, Kelly M.; Mertens, Donna M.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores philosophical and theoretical frameworks that are useful for the conduct of research with people with disabilities. It then uses these frameworks as a basis for discussion of research practices, with a specific focus on differences that occur because of specific impairments and various cultural meanings of disability. The…

  16. Conducting Video Research in the Learning Sciences: Guidance on Selection, Analysis, Technology, and Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Sharon J.; Pea, Roy D.; Barron, Brigid; Engle, Randi A.; Erickson, Frederick; Goldman, Ricki; Hall, Rogers; Koschmann, Timothy; Lemke, Jay L.; Sherin, Miriam Gamoran; Sherin, Bruce L.

    2010-01-01

    Focusing on expanding technical capabilities and new collaborative possibilities, we address 4 challenges for scientists who collect and use video records to conduct research in and on complex learning environments: (a) Selection: How can researchers be systematic in deciding which elements of a complex environment or extensive video corpus to…

  17. Responsible Conduct of Research Assessment of Doctor of Education Candidates, Graduate Faculty, and Curriculum Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    The study included an assessment of doctoral students, graduate faculty, and curriculum considerations to determine the degree of infusion of research integrity and responsible conduct of research (RCR) principles within a Doctor of Education program. Study results showed substantial increases in doctoral candidates' knowledge levels of RCR,…

  18. Developmental Pathways to Conduct Disorder: Implications for Future Directions in Research, Assessment, and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Research has indicated that there are several common pathways through which children and adolescents develop conduct disorder, each with different risk factors and each with different underlying developmental mechanisms leading to the child's aggressive and antisocial behavior. The current article briefly summarizes research on these pathways,…

  19. The university and the responsible conduct of research: who is responsible for what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredo, Katherine; Hart, Hillary

    2011-09-01

    Research misconduct has been thoroughly discussed in the literature, but mainly in terms of definitions and prescriptions for proper conduct. Even when case studies are cited, they are generally used as a repository of "lessons learned." What has been lacking from this conversation is how the lessons of responsible conduct of research are imparted in the first place to graduate students, especially those in technical fields such as engineering. Nor has there been much conversation about who is responsible for what in training students in Responsible Conduct of Research or in allocating blame in cases of misconduct. This paper explores three seemingly disparate cases of misconduct-the 2004 plagiarism scandal at Ohio University; the famous Robert Millikan article of 1913, in which his reported data selection did not match his notebooks; and the 1990 fabrication scandal in Dr. Leroy Hood's research lab. Comparing these cases provides a way to look at the relationship between the graduate student (or trainee) and his/her advisor (a relationship that has been shown to be the most influential one for the student) as well as at possibly differential treatment for established researchers and researchers-in-training, in cases of misconduct. This paper reflects on the rights and responsibilities of research advisers and their students and offers suggestions for clarifying both those responsibilities and the particularly murky areas of research-conduct guidelines.

  20. Potential Guidelines for Conducting and Reporting Environmental Education Research: Qualitative Methods of Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Sebasto, N. J.

    2000-01-01

    Presents guidelines for conducting and reporting qualitative environmental education research developed during a 10-hour, 1-1/2 day workshop sponsored by the North American Commission on Environmental Education Research (NCEER) during the 1997 annual meeting of the North American Association for Environmental Education (NAAEE). (Author/CCM)

  1. Potential Guidelines for Conducting and Reporting Environmental Education Research: Quantitative Methods of Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Sebasto, N. J.

    2001-01-01

    Presents potential guidelines for conducting and reporting environmental education research using quantitative methods of inquiry that were developed during a 10-hour (1-1/2 day) workshop sponsored by the North American Commission on Environmental Education Research during the 1998 annual meeting of the North American Association for Environmental…

  2. Health, human rights, and the conduct of clinical research within oppressed populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mills Edward J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating interventions for infectious diseases require enrolling participants that are vulnerable to infection. As clinical trials are conducted in increasingly vulnerable populations, issues of protection of these populations become challenging. In settings where populations are forseeably oppressed, the conduct of research requires considerations that go beyond common ethical concerns and into issues of international human rights law. Discussion Using examples of HIV prevention trials in Thailand, hepatitis-E prevention trials in Nepal and malaria therapeutic trials in Burma (Myanmar, we address the inadequacies of current ethical guidelines when conducting research within oppressed populations. We review existing legislature in the United States and United Kingdom that may be used against foreign investigators if trial hardships exist. We conclude by making considerations for research conducted within oppressed populations.

  3. Social Media and Unprofessional Pharmacist Conduct: A Cross-Sectional Survey of Boards of Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey Elmore, PharmD, BCPS

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine how often boards of pharmacy (BOPs receive complaints related to licensee’s online behavior, and what types of online behaviors may prompt an investigation of a licensee.Methods: A survey (consisting of questions related to BOP’s management of complaints against licensee online behavior and 10 case vignettes was adapted from a previous survey of United States medical boards. Vignettes encompassed themes such as patient confidentiality, derogatory language, alcohol use, false or misleading product claims, and others. Following institutional review board approval, survey materials were distributed via email by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy to 63 domestic and international boards of pharmacy. Completed surveys were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The proportion of respondents who indicated that the vignette would “very likely” or “likely” result in an investigation was used to determine consensus. Proportions of >75%, 50%-75% and <50% were classified as high, moderate and low consensus, respectively.Results: Fourteen completed surveys (22.2% were received. Sixty percent of respondents stated that their board has been involved in managing a complaint regarding the online behavior of a licensee, and that disciplinary actions including revocation or suspension of license, letter of reprimand, and monetary fines have been enacted. While 79% of responding BOPs have a policy regarding Internet usage, 36% are unsure whether the policies are sufficient to cover online professionalism. One vignette, where a pharmacist made misleading claims regarding a compounded product, achieved high consensus for likelihood to prompt an investigation. Moderate consensus was achieved for a breach of patient confidentiality, inappropriate alcohol use, and misrepresentation of professional credentials.Conclusion: Boards of pharmacy are widely varied in what types of online behaviors may prompt an investigation

  4. Bridges and Barriers to Developing and Conducting Interdisciplinary Graduate-Student Team Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayde Cameron. Morse

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding complex socio-environmental problems requires specialists from multiple disciplines to integrate research efforts. Programs such as the National Science Foundation's Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship facilitate integrated research efforts and change the way academic institutions train future leaders and scientists. The University of Idaho and the Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center in Costa Rica collaborate on a joint research program focusing on biodiversity conservation and sustainable production in fragmented landscapes. We first present a spectrum of integration ranging from disciplinary to transdisciplinary across seven aspects of the research process. We then describe our experiences and lessons learned conducting interdisciplinary graduate student team research. Using our program as a case study, we examine the individual, disciplinary, and programmatic bridges and barriers to conducting interdisciplinary research that emerged during our student team research projects. We conclude with a set of recommendations for exploiting the bridges and overcoming the barriers to conducting interdisciplinary research, especially as part of graduate education programs.

  5. Conducting HIV research in racial and ethnic minority communities: building a successful interdisciplinary research team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanco, Frinny R; Dominguez, Dinora C; Grady, Christine; Stoll, Pamela; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, Joann M; Miranda-Acevedo, Robert; Morgan, Marcela; Aizvera, Jeasmine; Purdie, Lori; Koziol, Deloris; Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection occurs in disproportionately high rates among racial and ethnic minorities in the United States, making it imperative that individuals from these groups be included in research studies. However, it is often difficult to recruit HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans in clinical trials, but a skilled interdisciplinary team that includes researchers with racial and ethnic diversity can help. This article describes a successful approach for building an interdisciplinary team that values the participation of racial and ethnic minorities in clinical trials and has the skills to work with these groups. The success of the Adelante (a Spanish word meaning forward) Team can be attributed to team members who actively participate in decision-making, are empowered, and function in a cohesive manner. Successful research teams build relationships with research participants to increase the probability that racial and ethnic minorities will enroll and participate fully in research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. A Framework for Conducting Deceased Donor Research in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Alexandra K; Heffernan, Kate Gallin; Rodrigue, James R

    2015-11-01

    There are a number of regulatory barriers both perceived and real that have hampered widespread clinical research in the field of donation and transplantation. This article sets forth a framework clarifying the existing legal requirements and their application to the conduct of research on deceased donors and donor organs within the United States. Recommendations are focused on resolving some of the ambiguity surrounding deceased donor authorization for research, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act requirements and the role of institutional review board oversight. The successful conduct of clinical research in the field of donation and transplantation requires an understanding of these regulatory nuances as well as identification of important ethical principles to consider. Facilitation of these concepts will ultimately provide support for innovative research designed to increase the availability of organs for transplantation. Further work identifying the optimal infrastructure for overview of clinical research in the field should be given priority.

  7. A practical field guide to conducting nursing research in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBaron, Virginia T; Iribarren, Sarah J; Perri, Seneca; Beck, Susan L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to offer practical guidance to nurse investigators interested in international research in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Lessons learned and strategies for planning and implementing an international research project are addressed. Four nurse researchers who conducted studies in diverse international settings (Argentina, India, South Africa, and Tanzania) describe their collective experiences regarding study planning and implementation; data collection using a variety of methods; and cultural, contextual and ethical considerations. Nurses who undertake international health research projects, particularly in LMICs, can face unique challenges and opportunities. Recommendations for success include advance planning, remaining flexible, having a backup plan, cultivating an attitude of curiosity and cultural humility, establishing collaborative and respectful partnerships, and budgeting adequate time. Nurse scientists often receive little training and support to conduct international research. Guidance to undertake research projects in LMICs can build capacity for nurses to make significant contributions to global health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Doing global science a guide to responsible conduct in the global research enterprise

    CERN Document Server

    InterAcademy Partnership

    2016-01-01

    This concise introductory guide explains the values that should inform the responsible conduct of scientific research in today's global setting. Featuring accessible discussions and ample real-world scenarios, Doing Global Science covers proper conduct, fraud and bias, the researcher's responsibilities to society, communication with the public, and much more. The book places special emphasis on the international and highly networked environment in which modern research is done, presenting science as an enterprise that is being transformed by globalization, interdisciplinary research projects, team science, and information technologies. Accessibly written by an InterAcademy Partnership committee comprised of leading scientists from around the world, Doing Global Science is required reading for students, practitioners, and anyone concerned about the responsible conduct of science today.

  9. Guidelines for conducting ethical research in psychosocial issues in palliative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkes Colin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available While it is unethical to introduce services for the terminally ill and their families that are not well founded or evaluated there are special problems in research conducted with this population. This has deterred some from carrying out research in this field and has caused others to place obstacles in the way of would-be researchers. This paper describes the ethical difficulties and provides guidelines that should enable worthwhile research to be carried out without harm to those who offer their help and without vitiating the scientific value of the research.

  10. The development of scientific identification theory to conduct operation research in education management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardhienata, S.

    2017-01-01

    Operations research is a general method used in the study and optimization of a system through modeling of the system. In the field of education, especially in education management, operations research has not been widely used. This paper gives an exposition of ideas about how operations research can be used to conduct research and optimization in the field of education management by developing SITOREM (Scientific Identification Theory for Operation Research in Education Management). To clarify the intent of the idea, an example of applying SITOREM to enhance the professional commitment of lecturers associated with achieving the vision of university will be described.

  11. A robotic system to conduct radiation and contamination surveys on nuclear waste transport casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.; Sanders, T.L.

    1990-06-01

    The feasibility of performing, numerous spent fuel cask operations using fully integrated robotic systems is under evaluation. Using existing technology, operational and descriptive software and hardware in the form of robotic end effectors are being designed in conjunction with interfacing cask components. A robotic radiation and contamination survey system has been developed and used on mock-up cask hardware to evaluate the impact of such fully automated operations on cask design features and productivity. Based on experience gained from the survey system, numerous health physics operations can be reliably performed with little human intervention using a fully automated system. Such operations can also significantly reduce time requirements for cask-receiving operations. 7 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Refinement of Research Surveying in Software Methodologies by Analogy: finding your patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Doroshenko

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available To enhance research surveying in software methodologies, a model is introduced that can indicate field maturity based on vocabulary and relevant literature. This model is developed by drawing analogies with software methodologies. Two analogies are used: software models and software life cycles or processes. How this model can reduce research surveying problems for researchers is described using extracts from application results as examples. Although the model does support research surveying activities, it cannot choose the subject for the researcher.

  13. Creating a Three-Parent Child: An Educational Paradigm for the Responsible Conduct of Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth L. Fischbach

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of assisted reproduction is renowned for its remarkable advances and constant pushing forward of research boundaries in an effort to offer innovative and effective methods for enhancing fertility. Accompanying these advances, however, are physiological, psychological, and bioethical consequences that must be considered. These concomitant advances and consequences make assisted reproduction an excellent educational paradigm for inculcating responsible conduct in both research and clinical practice. Ultimately, responsible conduct rests on the ethical researcher and clinician. Here, we present the as-yet unapproved, contentious assisted reproductive technology of mitochondrial replacement transfer (MRT as an ideal educational platform to foster the responsible conduct of research by advancing dialogue among multidisciplinary scholars, researchers, and students. Using a likely future case, we present the basic science, legal, and ethical considerations, and the pedagogical principles and strategies for using MRT as an effective educational paradigm. Society will benefit when the ethical issues inherent in creating children with three genetic parents as well as germline interference are discussed across multiple academic levels that include researchers, legal experts, bioethicists, and government-appointed commissions. Furthermore, undergraduate and graduate students should be included because they will likely determine the ethical fates of these biotechnologies. While emerging assisted reproduction technologies such as MRT are highly complex and will take years to be readily available for patients in need, now is the time to consider their scientific, legal, ethical, and cultural/religious implications for ensuring the responsible conduct of research.

  14. A Survey: Recent Advances and Future Trends in Honeypot Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L. Bringer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a survey on recent advances in honeypot research from a review of 80+ papers on honeypots and related topics mostly published after year 2005. This paper summarizes 60 papers that had significant contribution to the field. In reviewing the literature, it became apparent that the research can be broken down into five major areas:  new types of honeypots to cope with emergent new security threats,  utilizing honeypot output data to improve the accuracy in threat detections,  configuring honeypots to reduce the cost of maintaining honeypots as well as to improve the accuracy in threat detections,  counteracting honeypot detections by attackers, and  legal and ethical issues in using honeypots. Our literature reviews indicate that the advances in the first four areas reflect the recent changes in our networking environments, such as those in user demography and the ways those diverse users use new applications. Our literature reviews on legal and ethical issues in using honeypots reveals that there has not been widely accepted agreement on the legal and ethical issues about honeypots, which must be an important agenda in future honeypot research.

  15. Using Person Fit Statistics to Detect Outliers in Survey Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt, John M; Castaneda, Ruben; Tiemensma, Jitske; Depaoli, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Context: When working with health-related questionnaires, outlier detection is important. However, traditional methods of outlier detection (e.g., boxplots) can miss participants with "atypical" responses to the questions that otherwise have similar total (subscale) scores. In addition to detecting outliers, it can be of clinical importance to determine the reason for the outlier status or "atypical" response. Objective: The aim of the current study was to illustrate how to derive person fit statistics for outlier detection through a statistical method examining person fit with a health-based questionnaire. Design and Participants: Patients treated for Cushing's syndrome (n = 394) were recruited from the Cushing's Support and Research Foundation's (CSRF) listserv and Facebook page. Main Outcome Measure: Patients were directed to an online survey containing the CushingQoL (English version). A two-dimensional graded response model was estimated, and person fit statistics were generated using the Zh statistic. Results: Conventional outlier detections methods revealed no outliers reflecting extreme scores on the subscales of the CushingQoL. However, person fit statistics identified 18 patients with "atypical" response patterns, which would have been otherwise missed (Zh > |±2.00|). Conclusion: While the conventional methods of outlier detection indicated no outliers, person fit statistics identified several patients with "atypical" response patterns who otherwise appeared average. Person fit statistics allow researchers to delve further into the underlying problems experienced by these "atypical" patients treated for Cushing's syndrome. Annotated code is provided to aid other researchers in using this method.

  16. Cross-sectional online survey of research productivity in young Japanese nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Yumiko; Fukahori, Hiroki; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Narama, Miho; Kono, Ayumi; Atogami, Fumi; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Okaya, Keiko; Takamizawa, Emiko; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the factors affecting the research productivity of young nursing faculty in Japan. An online survey targeting young nursing scholars (aged ≤ 39 years) who were members of the Japan Academy of Nursing Science was conducted from October to November 2012. Of 1634 potential respondents, 648 completed the survey (39.7%), and 400 full-time faculty of a baccalaureate degree program were selected for the analysis. The numbers of English-language and Japanese publications in the past 3 years were regressed onto personal characteristics, such as academic degree and type of university. The mean numbers of publications in English and Japanese in the past 3 years were 0.41 and 1.63, respectively. Holding a doctoral degree was significantly related to a higher number of publications in English and Japanese (e(β) = 5.78 and e(β) = 1.89, respectively). Working at a national university (e(β) = 2.15), having a research assistant (e(β) = 2.05), and the ability to read research articles in English (e(β) = 2.27) were significantly related to more English-language publications. Having the confidence to conduct quantitative research (e(β) = 1.67) was related to a larger number of Japanese publications. The lack of mentoring (e(β) = 0.97) and university workload (e(β) = 0.96) were associated with a lesser number of Japanese publications. The research productivity of young nursing faculty appeared to be quite low. Strategies to enhance research productivity in young nursing faculty, such as encouraging the achievement of a doctoral degree or enrichment of research resources, should be undertaken. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  17. Identifying the barriers to conducting outcomes research in integrative health care clinic settings - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findlay-Reece Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrative health care (IHC is an interdisciplinary blending of conventional medicine and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM with the purpose of enhancing patients' health. In 2006, we designed a study to assess outcomes that are relevant to people using such care. However, we faced major challenges in conducting this study and hypothesized that this might be due to the lack of a research climate in these clinics. To investigate these challenges, we initiated a further study in 2008, to explore the reasons why IHC clinics are not conducting outcomes research and to identify strategies for conducting successful in-house outcomes research programs. The results of the latter study are reported here. Methods A total of 25 qualitative interviews were conducted with key participants from 19 IHC clinics across Canada. Basic content analysis was used to identify key themes from the transcribed interviews. Results Barriers identified by participants fell into four categories: organizational culture, organizational resources, organizational environment and logistical challenges. Cultural challenges relate to the philosophy of IHC, organizational leadership and practitioner attitudes and beliefs. Participants also identified significant issues relating to their organization's lack of resources such as funding, compensation, infrastructure and partnerships/linkages. Environmental challenges such as the nature of a clinic's patient population and logistical issues such as the actual implementation of a research program and the applicability of research data also posed challenges to the conduct of research. Embedded research leadership, integration of personal and professional values about research, alignment of research activities and clinical workflow processes are some of the factors identified by participants that support IHC clinics' ability to conduct outcomes research. Conclusions Assessing and enhancing the broader

  18. Fundamentalism, multiculturalism and problems of conducting research with populations in developing nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, N J; Holcomb, L; Weiss, J

    2001-09-01

    A growing number of nurse researchers travel globally to conduct research in poor and underserved populations in developing nations. These researchers, while well versed in research ethics, often find it difficult to apply traditional ethical standards to populations in developing countries. The problem of applying ethical standards across cultures is explained by a long-standing debate about the nature of ethical principles. Fundamentalism is the philosophical stance that ethical principles are universal, while the anthropologically-based 'multicultural' model claims the philosophical position that principles are culturally bound. The authors explicate the two philosophical stances and advocate a morally sensitive but moderate position of 'ethical multiculturalism' rather than favouring either of the above philosophical positions. The final section suggests ways to promote ethical multiculturalism while planning and conducting nursing research.

  19. Attitudes toward medical and genetic confidentiality in the Saudi research biobank: An exploratory survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmad, Ghiath; Hifnawy, Tamer; Abbasi, Badaruddin; Dierickx, Kris

    2016-03-01

    Achieving a balance between giving access to information and respecting donors' confidentiality is a crucial issue for any biobank, with its large number of samples and associated information. Despite the existence of much empirical literature on confidentiality, there are too few surveys in the Middle East about the topic, particularly in the Saudi context. A survey was conducted of 200 respondents at King Abdulaziz Medical City in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, among 5 groups of equal size, comprised of researchers, physicians, medical students, donors and laypersons, respectively. The majority of participants agreed that confidentiality is an important issue and that it is well protected in the Saudi biobank. All 5 groups showed different attitudes toward disclosing information to various third parties. They were in favor of allowing treating physicians, and to a certain extent family members, to have access to medical and genetic results from research. No significant differences were found between views on medical and genetic confidentiality. The majority of respondents agreed that confidentiality might be breached in cases with specific justified reasons. Even considering differences in religion, culture and other factors, the results of the study were consistent with those reported in the literature and research conducted in other countries. We therefore place emphasis on the importance of protecting and promoting patient/donor confidentiality and privacy.

  20. Simulating the LSST OCS for conducting survey simulations using the LSST scheduler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Michael A.; Cook, Kem H.; Delgado, Francisco; Petry, Catherine E.; Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2016-08-01

    The Operations Simulator was used to prototype the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Scheduler. Currently, the Scheduler is being developed separately to interface with the LSST Observatory Control System (OCS). A new Simulator is under concurrent development to adjust to this new architecture. This requires a package simulating enough of the OCS to allow execution of realistic schedules. This new package is called the Simulated OCS (SOCS). In this paper we detail the SOCS construction plan, package structure, LSST communication middleware platform use, provide some interesting use cases that the separated architecture allows and the software engineering practices used in development.

  1. White Researchers Conducting Multicultural Counseling Research: Can Their Efforts Be "Mo Betta"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Thomas A.

    1993-01-01

    Responds to earlier article by Mio and Iwamasa (1993) on white researchers investigating ethnic-minority populations and other cross-cultural issues. Presents remarks on symposium summarized by Mio and Iwamasa in framework of movies produced by Spike Lee and reviews author's own participation in the symposium and the interpretation of his comments…

  2. Standardization of soil apparent electrical conductivity using multi-temporal surveys across multiple production fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) is an efficient technique for understanding within-field variability of physical and chemical soil characteristics. Commercial devices are readily available for collecting ECa on whole fields and used broadly for crop management in precision agriculture; h...

  3. Nursing Informatics Research Priorities for the Future: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    We present one part of the results of an international survey exploring current and future nursing informatics (NI) research trends. The study was conducted by the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA-NISIG) Student Working Group. Based on findings from this cross-sectional study, we identified future NI research priorities. We used snowball sampling technique to reach respondents from academia and practice. Data were collected between August and September 2015. Altogether, 373 responses from 44 countries were analyzed. The identified top ten NI trends were big data science, standardized terminologies (clinical evaluation/implementation), education and competencies, clinical decision support, mobile health, usability, patient safety, data exchange and interoperability, patient engagement, and clinical quality measures. Acknowledging these research priorities can enhance successful future development of NI to better support clinicians and promote health internationally.

  4. Challenges in conducting community-driven research created by differing ways of talking and thinking about science: a researcher's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, Amy; Geary, Janis; Goodman, Karen J

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, health scientists are becoming aware that research collaborations that include community partnerships can be an effective way to broaden the scope and enhance the impact of research aimed at improving public health. Such collaborations extend the reach of academic scientists by integrating a variety of perspectives and thus strengthening the applicability of the research. Communication challenges can arise, however, when attempting to address specific research questions in these collaborations. In particular, inconsistencies can exist between scientists and community members in the use and interpretation of words and other language features, particularly when conducting research with a biomedical component. Additional challenges arise from differing perceptions of the investigative process. There may be divergent perceptions about how research questions should and can be answered, and in expectations about requirements of research institutions and research timelines. From these differences, misunderstandings can occur about how the results will ultimately impact the community. These communication issues are particularly challenging when scientists and community members are from different ethnic and linguistic backgrounds that may widen the gap between ways of talking and thinking about science, further complicating the interactions and exchanges that are essential for effective joint research efforts. Community-driven research that aims to describe the burden of disease associated with Helicobacter pylori infection is currently underway in northern Aboriginal communities located in the Yukon and Northwest Territories, Canada, with the goal of identifying effective public health strategies for reducing health risks from this infection. This research links community representatives, faculty from various disciplines at the University of Alberta, as well as territorial health care practitioners and officials. This highly collaborative work will be used to

  5. A Survey of Research in Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Army Research Laboratory A Survey of Research in Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition ( SCADA ) by Sidney C Smith ARL-TR-7093 September 2014...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5067 ARL-TR-7093 September 2014 A Survey of Research in Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition ( SCADA ) Sidney C...A Survey of Research in Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition ( SCADA ) ARL-TR-7093 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. August

  6. Multipath Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks: Survey and Research Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Radi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks.

  7. Multipath routing in wireless sensor networks: survey and research challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radi, Marjan; Dezfouli, Behnam; Abu Bakar, Kamalrulnizam; Lee, Malrey

    2012-01-01

    A wireless sensor network is a large collection of sensor nodes with limited power supply and constrained computational capability. Due to the restricted communication range and high density of sensor nodes, packet forwarding in sensor networks is usually performed through multi-hop data transmission. Therefore, routing in wireless sensor networks has been considered an important field of research over the past decade. Nowadays, multipath routing approach is widely used in wireless sensor networks to improve network performance through efficient utilization of available network resources. Accordingly, the main aim of this survey is to present the concept of the multipath routing approach and its fundamental challenges, as well as the basic motivations for utilizing this technique in wireless sensor networks. In addition, we present a comprehensive taxonomy on the existing multipath routing protocols, which are especially designed for wireless sensor networks. We highlight the primary motivation behind the development of each protocol category and explain the operation of different protocols in detail, with emphasis on their advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, this paper compares and summarizes the state-of-the-art multipath routing techniques from the network application point of view. Finally, we identify open issues for further research in the development of multipath routing protocols for wireless sensor networks.

  8. Guidelines for conducting rigorous health care psychosocial cross-cultural/language qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriaza, Pablo; Nedjat-Haiem, Frances; Lee, Hee Yun; Martin, Shadi S

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to synthesize and chronicle the authors' experiences as four bilingual and bicultural researchers, each experienced in conducting cross-cultural/cross-language qualitative research. Through narrative descriptions of experiences with Latinos, Iranians, and Hmong refugees, the authors discuss their rewards, challenges, and methods of enhancing rigor, trustworthiness, and transparency when conducting cross-cultural/cross-language research. The authors discuss and explore how to effectively manage cross-cultural qualitative data, how to effectively use interpreters and translators, how to identify best methods of transcribing data, and the role of creating strong community relationships. The authors provide guidelines for health care professionals to consider when engaging in cross-cultural qualitative research.

  9. The effects of conducting authentic field-geology research on high school students' understanding of the nature of science, and their views of themselves as research scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millette, Patricia M.

    Authentic field geology research is a inquiry method that encourages students to interact more with their local environment, and by solving genuine puzzles, begin to increase their intuitive understanding of the nature and processes of science. The goal of the current study was to determine if conducting authentic field research and giving high school students the opportunity to present findings to adult audiences outside of the school setting 1) enhances students' understanding of the nature of science, and 2) affects students views of themselves as researchers. To accomplish this, ninth-grade students from a public school in northern New England engaged in a community-initiated glacial geology problem, completed a field research investigation, and presented their findings at several professional conferences. Following the completion of this student-centered field research, I investigated its effects by using a mixed methods approach consisting of qualitative and quantitative data from two sources. These included selected questions from an open-response survey (VNOS-c), and interviews that were conducted with fifteen of the students of different ages and genders. Findings show that conducting original field research seems to have a positive influence on these students' understanding of the NOS as well as the processes of science. Many of the students reported feelings of accomplishment, acceptance of responsibility for the investigation, a sense of their authentic contribution to the body of scientific knowledge in the world, and becoming scientists. This type of authentic field investigation is significant because recent reforms in earth-science education stress the importance of students learning about the nature and processes of scientific knowledge along with science content.

  10. Awareness about medical research among resident doctors in a tertiary care hospital: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dattatray B Pawar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Every medical practitioner should strive to contribute to the generation of evidence by conducting research. For carrying out research, adequate knowledge, practical skills, and development of the right attitude are crucial. A literature review shows that data regarding knowledge, attitude, and practices toward medical research, among resident doctors in India, is lacking. Aims: This study was conducted to assess research-related knowledge, attitude, and practices among resident doctors. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a pretested, structured, and pre-validated questionnaire. Materials and Methods: With approval of the Institutional Ethics Committee and a verbal consent, a cross-sectional survey among 100 resident doctors pursuing their second and third years in the MD and MS courses was conducted using a structured and pre-validated questionnaire. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the results. Results: The concept of research hypothesis was known to 58% of the residents. Ninety-eight percent of the residents were aware of the procedure to obtain informed consent. Seventy-six percent agreed that research training should be mandatory. Although 88% of the residents were interested in conducting research in future, 50% had participated in research other than a dissertation project, 28% had made scientific presentations, and only 4% had publications. Lack of time (74%, lack of research curriculum (42%, and inadequate facilities (38% were stated as major obstacles for pursuing research. Conclusions: Although resident doctors demonstrated a fairly good knowledge and positive attitude toward research, it did not translate into practice for most of them. There is a need to improve the existing medical education system to foster research culture among resident doctors

  11. Results of the 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys Conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmoyer, R. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Truett, Tykey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cooper, Christy [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Chew, Andrea [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2010-04-01

    This report presents results of a 2008/2009 survey of hydrogen and fuel cell awareness conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 2008/2009 survey follows up on a similar DOE survey conducted in 2004, measuring levels of awareness and understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in four populations: (1) the general public, (2) students, (3) personnel in state and local governments, and (4) potential end users of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in business and industry. The 2008/2009 survey includes these four groups and adds a fifth group, safety and code officials. The same survey methods were used for both surveys; the 2008/2009 survey report includes a comparison of 2004 and 2008/2009 findings. Information from these surveys will be used to enhance hydrogen and fuel cell education strategies.

  12. Surveys on the Prevalence of Pediatric Bronchial Asthma in Japan: A Comparison between the 1982, 1992, and 2002 Surveys Conducted in the Same Region Using the Same Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankei Nishima

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: BA prevalence in the third survey increased 2.1 and 1.4 times respectively compared to the first survey and second survey, indicating an upward trend in all regions and age groups surveyed.

  13. Integrating Responsible Conduct of Research Education into Undergraduate Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Laboratory Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Tamara L.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a requirement for directed responsible conduct in research (RCR) education has become a priority in the United States and elsewhere. In the US, both the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation require RCR education for all students who are financially supported by federal awards. The guidelines produced by these…

  14. Demands of proper administrative conduct A research project into the ombudsprudence of the Dutch National Ombudsman

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langbroek, P.M.; Rijpkema, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we explain and summarize a research project on the content and development of principles of proper administrative conduct as operated in complaints proceedings before the Dutch National Ombudsman and some local Ombudsman institutions. It shows how the project evolved into mainly a pr

  15. Conducting research that is both ethical and responsive to the health needs of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Wah Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no substantial difference in conducting research that is both ethical and responsive to the health needs in developing and developed nations. Differences are in financial constraints, technological expertise in identification and addressing needs, and in the perception of equal partnership of all stakeholders. There will be differences in emphasis of research but this is slowly blurred due to globalisation. Public health emergencies in developing countries need timely and effective global collaborative research to implement control strategies. Research needs should be based on predictive models with learning from past emergencies, technological advances, strategic critical appraisal of local and global health information, and dialogue with all stakeholders. Adequate funding will be challenging and resources from national, international and aid foundations will be needed. Issues associated with such funding include deployment of international rapid response teams, collaborating researchers, transfer of technology, and intellectual property ownership. While all types of research ranging from basic, applied, clinical studies, meta-analysis, and translational research are relevant, the relative importance and specific allocation of resources to these may differ. Is the choice related to responsiveness or based on researchers’ perception of their contributions to evidence-based practice and research? Ethical issues relating to vulnerable groups, risk distribution, quality issues, research integrity and oversight are just as important. Internationally funded research including clinical trials must be sensitive to such issues to avoid allegations of exploitation. Thus the potential of utilisation and buy-in of research findings and recommendations must be considered.

  16. Mach 6 flowfield survey at the engine inlet of a research airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. B.; Lawing, P. L.

    1977-01-01

    A flowfield survey was conducted to better define the nature of vehicle forebody flowfield at the inlet location of an airframe-integrated scramjet engine mounted on the lower surface of a high-speed research airplane to be air launched from a B-52 and rocket boosted to Mach 6. The tests were conducted on a 1/30-scale brass model in a Mach-6 20-in. wind tunnel at Reynolds number of 11,200,000 based on distance to engine inlet. Boundary layer profiles at five spanwise locations indicate that the boundary layer in the area of the forebody centerline is more than twice as thick as the boundary layer at three outboard stations. It is shown that the cold streak found in heating contours on the centerline of the forebody is caused by a thickening of the boundary layer on the centerline, and that this thickening decreases with angle of attack.

  17. Radiological survey support activities for the decommissioning of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1984-09-01

    At the request of the Engineering Support Division of the US Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office and in accordance with the programmatic overview/certification responsibilities of the Department of Energy Environmental and Safety Engineering Division, the Argonne National Laboratory Radiological Survey Group conducted a series of radiological measurements and tests at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor located in Ames, Iowa. These measurements and tests were conducted during 1980 and 1981 while the reactor building was being decontaminated and decommissioned for the purpose of returning the building to general use. The results of these evaluations are included in this report. Although the surface contamination within the reactor building could presumably be reduced to negligible levels, the potential for airborne contamination from tritiated water vapor remains. This vapor emmanates from contamination within the concrete of the building and should be monitored until such time as it is reduced to background levels. 2 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Eating Animals to Build Rapport: Conducting Research as Vegans or Vegetarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie MacDonald

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Notions of hospitality, community, and the fostering of rapport and connection are foundational concerns for conducting research across difference. Drawing on methodological literature, this paper considers how access to various communities and “good” data is structured by the notion that in order to develop rapport researchers accept the “food”, specifically “meat” offered by their hosts. When researchers are vegetarians or vegans, this can entail a conflict in which questions of hospitality, relationships, and responsibility to ethical commitments come to the fore. As such, we analyze methodological literature in which the logic of nonhuman animal sacrifice is considered a means to the ends of research through the development of “rapport”—often coded as an ethical relationship of respect to the participant. We draw on experiences of veg*n researchers to explore how this assumption functions to position the consumption of meat as a necessary undertaking when conducting research, and in turn, denies nonhuman animal subjecthood. We interrogate the assumption that culture and communities are static inasmuch as this literature suggests ways to enter and exit spaces leaving minimal impact, and that posits participants will not trust researchers nor understand their decisions against eating nonhuman animals. We argue that because food consumption is figured as a private and individual choice, animals are not considered subjects in research. Thus, we articulate a means to consider vegan and/or vegetarians politics, not as a marker of difference, but as an attempt to engage in ethical relationships with nonhuman animals. In so doing, we call for the inclusion of nonhuman animals in relationships of hospitality, and thereby attempt to politicize the practice of food consumption while conducting research.

  19. 14 CFR 1230.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or... agencies will conduct or support research covered by this policy only if the institution has an...

  20. 10 CFR 745.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or... PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 745.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported... successor office. (b) Departments and agencies will conduct or support research covered by this policy...

  1. 40 CFR 26.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 26.120... SUBJECTS Basic EPA Policy for Protection of Subjects in Human Research Conducted or Supported by EPA § 26.120 Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

  2. GESE: A Small UV Space Telescope to Conduct a Large Spectroscopic Survey of Z-1 Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara R.; Gong, Qian; Hull, Tony; Kruk, Jeffrey; Purves, Lloyd

    2013-01-01

    One of the key goals of NASA's astrophysics program is to answer the question: How did galaxies evolve into the spirals and elliptical galaxies that we see today? We describe a space mission concept called Galaxy Evolution Spectroscopic Explorer (GESE) to address this question by making a large spectroscopic survey of galaxies at a redshift, z is approximately 1 (look-back time of approximately 8 billion years). GESE is a 1.5-meter space telescope with an ultraviolet (UV) multi-object slit spectrograph that can obtain spectra of hundreds of galaxies per exposure. The spectrograph covers the spectral range, 0.2-0.4 micrometers at a spectral resolving power, R approximately 500. This observed spectral range corresponds to 0.1-0.2 micrometers as emitted by a galaxy at a redshift, z=1. The mission concept takes advantage of two new technological advances: (1) light-weighted, wide-field telescope mirrors, and (2) the Next- Generation MicroShutter Array (NG-MSA) to be used as a slit generator in the multi-object slit spectrograph.

  3. Total Survey Error & Institutional Research: A Case Study of the University Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Total Survey Error (TSE) is a component of Total Survey Quality (TSQ) that supports the assessment of the extent to which a survey is "fit-for-purpose". While TSQ looks at a number of dimensions, such as relevance, credibility and accessibility, TSE is has a more operational focus on accuracy and minimising errors. Mitigating survey…

  4. Best Manufacturing Practices Survey Conducted at Northrop Aircraft Division, Hawthorne, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-03-01

    Secretary of the Navy REPORT NUMBER (Research, Development & Adquisition ) Product Integrity Directorate1 , z -- ( - . Washington, D.C. , k /- - k,’ 9...line, video conferencing, and the transfer of data. For major suppliers, STARS will use a third party commercial communications network, which is...The APT language was developed in the 1950’s and requires a very highly skilled programmer with many hours of machine shop experience. NAD’s solution

  5. A survey of conductivity of nanotubes indirectly doped with nitrogen using equations Kramerz-Kronig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Keshtmand

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Doping of carbon nanotubes with nitrogen should provide more control over the nanocarbon electronic structure. In addition to the chemical and arc-discharge alternative methods used nowadays, we suggest ion irradiationas an alternative way to introduce N impurities into nanotubes. The impinging ions can directly occupy the sp2 positions in the nanotube atomic network. As an alternative way N nitrogen atoms are introduced due to the same atomic radius. In this work we studied the defects caused by exposure to N2 with various energies with the Raman spectroscopy. Kramers–Kronig analysisis determined the optical conductivityof multiwall carbon nanotudes. Electrical measurements showed that conductivity of samples increases with enhancement of irradiation of MWCNTs, clearly due to creation of more defects and N-C and irradiation-mediated doping of nanotubes is a promising way to control the nanotubes electronic structure.

  6. Research use and support needs, and research activity in social care: a cross-sectional survey in two councils with social services responsibilities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jo; Bacigalupo, Ruth; Halladay, Linsay; Norwood, Hayley

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of research activity, research use, research interests and research skills in the social care workforce in two UK councils with social service responsibilities (CSSRs). A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the social care workforce in two CSSRs (n = 1512) in 2005. The sample was identified in partnership with the councils, and included employees with professional qualifications (social workers and occupational therapists); staff who have a role to assess, plan and monitor care; service managers; commissioners of services; and those involved with social care policy, information management and training. The survey achieved a response rate of 24% (n = 368). The Internet was reported as an effective source of research information; conversely, research-based guidelines were reported to have a low impact on practice. Significant differences were found in research use, by work location, and postgraduate training. Most respondents saw research as useful for practice (69%), and wanted to collaborate in research (68%), but only 11% were planning to do research within the next 12 months. Having a master's degree was associated with a greater desire to lead or collaborate in research. A range of research training needs, and the preferred modes of delivery were identified. Support to increase research activity includes protected time and mentorship. The study concludes that a range of mechanisms to make research available for the social care workforce needs to be in place to support evidence-informed practice. Continual professional development to a postgraduate level supports the use and production of evidence in the social care workforce, and promotes the development of a research culture. The term research is used to include service user consultations, needs assessment and service evaluation. The findings highlight a relatively large body of the social care workforce willing to collaborate and conduct research

  7. The National Marine Mammal's California Current Ecosystem Program and Cascadia Research Collective: Aerial and small boat line transect surveys conducted in waters of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia, Canada from 1989-07-13 to 2003-08-29 (NCEI Accession 0141100)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Marine Mammal Laboratory (NMML), a division of NOAA's Alaska Fisheries Science Center (Seattle, WA) and Cascadia Research Collective (Olympia, WA),...

  8. DIAGNOSTIC BEHAVIOR OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA: SURVEY CONDUCTED IN SOME REGIONS OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Wei; DENG Wei-wu

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the spectrum of microbiological agents causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in recent years. We also investigated the procedure of diagnosis as well as the empirical treatment for this disease in OPD (outpatient department) of pulmonary disease. Methods A total of 7097 patients from 150 hospitals in 24 provinces in China were enrolled in the study from Nov. 2002 to Mar. 2003. Every patient was diagnosed, treated and registered at the same time. Diagnostic behavior for doctors include chest radiograph and/or CT examination of the lung, as well as collecting sputum samples at the time of diagnosis for bacteria culture to identify the pathogen. Appointed staff fulfilled the questionnaires and information sheets in each center. After that,data were computerized and analyzed. Results There were 7404 valid information sheets and 7097 questionnaires taken into count. The majority CAP patients were from cities ( 77.3% ), most of those who had medical insurance. Most CAP patients had productive cough (81.1% ), and 76.7% and 18.2% CAP patients received chest film and CT examination respectively for diagnosis. Only 24% patients received sputum sample tested and with 36% got positive results. Streptococcus pneumoniae remained the main pathogen of CAP (43. 2% ). Most doctors used to prescribe β-lactam antibiotics as the first line of empirical therapy of CAP (51.1%) with oral taken as the main method for drug using (66.3% ). Conclusion This survey provides a key point of empirical therapy in China.The procedure for diagnosing as well as the empirical treatment of CAP in OPD of pulmonary disease in China still to be improved, especially in accessing the pathogen. Guidelines developed to recognize and evaluate CAP should base on epidemiological information of the pathogen prevalence, then could offer a rational approach to the initial management of the CAP patients.

  9. Chagas disease: national survey of seroprevalence in children under five years of age conducted in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Russomando

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Since the early 1990s, programs to control Chagas disease in South America have focused on eradicating domiciliary Triatoma infestans, the main vector. Seroprevalence studies of the chagasic infection are included as part of the vector control programs; they are essential to assess the impact of vector control measures and to monitor the prevention of vector transmission. OBJECTIVE To assess the interruption of domiciliary vector transmission of Chagas disease by T. infestans in Paraguay by evaluating the current state of transmission in rural areas. METHODS A survey of seroprevalence of Chagas disease was carried out in a representative sample group of Paraguayans aged one to five years living in rural areas of Paraguay in 2008. Blood samples collected on filter paper from 12,776 children were tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Children whose serology was positive or undetermined (n = 41 were recalled to donate a whole blood sample for retesting. Their homes were inspected for current triatomine infestation. Blood samples from their respective mothers were also collected and tested to check possible transmission of the disease by a congenital route. FINDINGS A seroprevalence rate of 0.24% for Trypanosoma cruzi infection was detected in children under five years of age among the country’s rural population. Our findings indicate that T. cruzi was transmitted to these children vertically. The total number of infected children, aged one to five years living in these departments, was estimated at 1,691 cases with an annual incidence of congenital transmission of 338 cases per year. MAIN CONCLUSION We determined the impact of vector control in the transmission of T. cruzi, following uninterrupted vector control measures employed since 1999 in contiguous T. infestans-endemic areas of Paraguay, and this allowed us to estimate the degree of risk of congenital transmission in the country.

  10. Why Don't Our Students Respond? Understanding Declining Participation in Survey Research among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschepikow, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Declining response rates among college students threaten the effectiveness of survey research at institutions of higher education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the conditions that promote participation in survey research among this population. The researcher identified three themes through this study. First, participants…

  11. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  12. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  13. Why Don't Our Students Respond? Understanding Declining Participation in Survey Research among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschepikow, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Declining response rates among college students threaten the effectiveness of survey research at institutions of higher education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the conditions that promote participation in survey research among this population. The researcher identified three themes through this study. First, participants…

  14. A survey of animal welfare needs in Soweto : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.E. McCrindle

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The diagnostic phase of an interactive research evaluation model was used in the investigation of the animal welfare needs of a low-income urban community in South Africa. Data were gathered by means of a structured interview and direct observations by animal welfare officers. During the survey of 871 animal owners in Soweto, it was found that dogs were owned by 778 households and cats by 88 households. The dog to human ratio was estimated at 1:12.4. Respondents were asked whether they enjoyed owning animals and 96.1 % said that they did. Only 26.3 % mentioned that they had problems with their own animals and 16.6 % had problems with other people's animals. Treatment of sick animals (29.7 % was seen as a priority. However, less than 1 % (n = 6 used the services of private veterinarians. Others took their animals to welfare organisations or did not have them treated. Perceptions of affordable costs of veterinary treatments were also recorded. In addition to treatment, respondents indicated a need for vaccination (22.5 %, sterilisation (16.5 %, control of internal (3.7 % and external (8.8 % parasites, education and extension (6.6 %, prevention of cruelty to animals (3.2 % and expansion of veterinary clinics to other parts of Soweto (1.3 %.

  15. A Methodology for Conducting Integrative Mixed Methods Research and Data Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe González; Kellison, Joshua G.; Boyd, Stephen J.; Kopak, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Mixed methods research has gained visibility within the last few years, although limitations persist regarding the scientific caliber of certain mixed methods research designs and methods. The need exists for rigorous mixed methods designs that integrate various data analytic procedures for a seamless transfer of evidence across qualitative and quantitative modalities. Such designs can offer the strength of confirmatory results drawn from quantitative multivariate analyses, along with “deep structure” explanatory descriptions as drawn from qualitative analyses. This article presents evidence generated from over a decade of pilot research in developing an integrative mixed methods methodology. It presents a conceptual framework and methodological and data analytic procedures for conducting mixed methods research studies, and it also presents illustrative examples from the authors' ongoing integrative mixed methods research studies. PMID:22167325

  16. HRP Chief Scientist's Office: Conducting Research to Enable Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, J. B.; Fogarty, J.; Vega, L.; Cromwell, R. L.; Haven, C. P.; McFather, J. C.; Savelev, I.

    2017-01-01

    The HRP Chief Scientist's Office sets the scientific agenda for the Human Research Program. As NASA plans for deep space exploration, HRP is conducting research to ensure the health of astronauts, and optimize human performance during extended duration missions. To accomplish this research, HRP solicits for proposals within the U.S., collaborates with agencies both domestically and abroad, and makes optimal use of ISS resources in support of human research. This session will expand on these topics and provide an opportunity for questions and discussion with the HRP Chief Scientist. Presentations in this session will include: NRA solicitations - process improvements and focus for future solicitations, Multilateral Human Research Panel for Exploration - future directions (MHRPE 2.0), Extramural liaisons - National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Defense (DOD), Standardized Measures for spaceflight, Ground-based Analogs - international collaborations, and International data sharing.

  17. Mind the gap: Griffith University's approach to the governance of ethical conduct in human research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Gary

    2007-01-01

    It is perhaps not coincidental that, at the same time the apparent institutional risks associated with the conduct of human research are increasing, so are the complaints from researchers about research ethics committees. Rather than seeking to implement systems that more efficiently catch wrong-doing, in 2003 Griffith University began implementing an alternative approach. This new approach focused on resourcing the reflective practice of researchers through every stage of their work--well before, and long after, they seek ethical clearance for that work. Institutions have a key role to play in human research ethics, and this can be usefully situated within the broader framework of the institution's governance framework. This paper summarises the new approach that Griffith University adopted in 2003, the implementation of this 'model', the experience to date, and the road ahead.

  18. A Methodology for Conducting Integrative Mixed Methods Research and Data Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Felipe González; Kellison, Joshua G; Boyd, Stephen J; Kopak, Albert

    2010-09-20

    Mixed methods research has gained visibility within the last few years, although limitations persist regarding the scientific caliber of certain mixed methods research designs and methods. The need exists for rigorous mixed methods designs that integrate various data analytic procedures for a seamless transfer of evidence across qualitative and quantitative modalities. Such designs can offer the strength of confirmatory results drawn from quantitative multivariate analyses, along with "deep structure" explanatory descriptions as drawn from qualitative analyses. This article presents evidence generated from over a decade of pilot research in developing an integrative mixed methods methodology. It presents a conceptual framework and methodological and data analytic procedures for conducting mixed methods research studies, and it also presents illustrative examples from the authors' ongoing integrative mixed methods research studies.

  19. Extent, Awareness and Perception of Dissemination Bias in Qualitative Research: An Explorative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toews, Ingrid; Glenton, Claire; Lewin, Simon; Berg, Rigmor C.; Noyes, Jane; Booth, Andrew; Marusic, Ana; Malicki, Mario; Munthe-Kaas, Heather M.; Meerpohl, Joerg J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Qualitative research findings are increasingly used to inform decision-making. Research has indicated that not all quantitative research on the effects of interventions is disseminated or published. The extent to which qualitative researchers also systematically underreport or fail to publish certain types of research findings, and the impact this may have, has received little attention. Methods A survey was delivered online to gather data regarding non-dissemination and dissemination bias in qualitative research. We invited relevant stakeholders through our professional networks, authors of qualitative research identified through a systematic literature search, and further via snowball sampling. Results 1032 people took part in the survey of whom 859 participants identified as researchers, 133 as editors and 682 as peer reviewers. 68.1% of the researchers said that they had conducted at least one qualitative study that they had not published in a peer-reviewed journal. The main reasons for non-dissemination were that a publication was still intended (35.7%), resource constraints (35.4%), and that the authors gave up after the paper was rejected by one or more journals (32.5%). A majority of the editors and peer reviewers “(strongly) agreed” that the main reasons for rejecting a manuscript of a qualitative study were inadequate study quality (59.5%; 68.5%) and inadequate reporting quality (59.1%; 57.5%). Of 800 respondents, 83.1% “(strongly) agreed” that non-dissemination and possible resulting dissemination bias might undermine the willingness of funders to support qualitative research. 72.6% and 71.2%, respectively, “(strongly) agreed” that non-dissemination might lead to inappropriate health policy and health care. Conclusions The proportion of non-dissemination in qualitative research is substantial. Researchers, editors and peer reviewers play an important role in this. Non-dissemination and resulting dissemination bias may impact on

  20. THE PREVAILING CONSUME OF CIGASRRETTES SURVEY CONDUCTED AT PONTIFICIA UNIVERSIDAD JAVERIANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAIRO BÁEZ PARRA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking has become a public health issue, deserving the attention of many different institutionsthat have been doing research in order to describe the phenomenon in our country. A study ispresented here that took epidemiological measures on the use of cigarette by the community of theJaveriana University (employees, teachers and students. The findings are in agreement with those ofother studies performed in Colombia, and suggest the need for more attention to the issue of thepsychoactivant substances consumption in the University.

  1. Challenges conducting comparative effectiveness research: the Clinical and Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness (CHOICE experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedly JL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Janna L Friedly,1,4 Zoya Bauer,2,4 Bryan A Comstock,3,4 Emily DiMango,5 Assiamira Ferrara,6 Susan S Huang,7 Elliot Israel,8 Jeffrey G Jarvik,2,4 Andrew A Nierenberg,9 Michael K Ong,10 David F Penson,11 Rebecca Smith-Bindman,12 Arthur E Stillman,13 William M Vollmer,6 Stephen M Warren,14 Chunliu Zhan,15 David Chu-Wen Hsia,15 Anne Trontell15 1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Biostatistics, 4Comparative Effectiveness, Cost and Outcomes Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 5Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, 6Kaiser Foundation Research Institute, Oakland, 7Division of Infectious Diseases and Health Policy Research Institute, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, 8Harvard Medical School, Pulmonary and Critical Care, Allergy and Immunology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, 9Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 10Division of General Internal Medicine & Health Services Research, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, 11Vanderbilt University and Tennessee Valley VAHCC, Nashville, TN, 12Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, Health Policy, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, SF, 13Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 14Department of Plastic Surgery, Division of Clinical and Translational Research, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, 15Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Rockville, MD, USA Abstract: The Clinical and Health Outcomes Initiative in Comparative Effectiveness (CHOICE program, which includes 12 ongoing comparative effectiveness research (CER trials funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, has had firsthand experience in dealing with the unique challenges of conducting CER since the trials started in the fall of 2010. This paper will explore the collective experience

  2. EdD Students’ Self-Efficacy and Interest in Conducting Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica R Kerrigan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Today’s educational practitioners are expected to know how to gather, analyze, and report on data for accountability purposes and to use that information to improve student outcomes. However, there is little understanding of how to support practitioners’ learning of and engagement with research and few studies on the research experiences of students enrolled in Doctorate of Education (EdD programs. The success of students enrolled in Doctor of Philosophy (PhD programs in conducting research has been found to be related to students’ self-efficacy and interest, but these concepts have not been explored with EdD students who are more likely to engage in applied research in their workplace than to create a research-focused career. This study sought to understand the self-efficacy and interest that EdD students enrolled in an Educational Leadership program have in research skills and tasks in order to improve research course offerings. Our findings with EdD students are consistent with existing research on PhD students regarding research self-efficacy but we did not observe significant changes in students’ interest over time. We suggest avenues for future study in light of current accountability reporting requirements for practitioners.

  3. 45 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or... successor office. (b) Departments and agencies will conduct or support research covered by this policy...

  4. 30 CFR 280.21 - What must I do in conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... scientific research? 280.21 Section 280.21 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... prospecting or scientific research? While conducting G&G prospecting or scientific research activities under a... you are prospecting or conducting scientific research activities. (b) Consult and coordinate your G&G...

  5. Aerial Survey of Ames Research Center - Flight Simulation Complex' Flight simulators create an

    Science.gov (United States)

    1967-01-01

    Aerial Survey of Ames Research Center - Flight Simulation Complex' Flight simulators create an authentic aircraft environment by generating the appropriate physical cues that provide the sensations of flight.

  6. Report on the fiscal 1996 research cooperation promotion project, `the research cooperation diagnosis survey`; 1996 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku jigyo `kenkyu kyoryoku shindan chosa` hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    A diagnosis survey was conducted for Japan to cooperate in researching subjects on technical development in developing countries. In fiscal 1996, surveys were made on the following: (1) establishment of the industrial base (Vietnam), (2) preservation of biological diversification and the continuous utilization (Brazil), (3) fostering of the industry of automobile parts (Thailand), (4) finding out of items on environment related fields (India), (5) environmental response type system for effective use of water resource (the Philippines), (6) small size geothermal exploration in remote islands (Indonesia). (1) is research cooperation for welding technology, powder metallurgy technology, hypoid gear manufacturing technology, and iron making technology by the direct reduction method. In (2), research/development are conducted in cooperation with research institutes in Brazil on survey/identification/utilization of bioactive substances from biological resources in Brazil. In (4), an examination was made of the seeds for research cooperation in technical fields such as environment and energy. Having a strong relation with the industrial circle, SCIR is carrying out researches on aerospace, petrochemical, biology, electronics, medicines/drug, etc., which indicated fulfillment of intellectual infrastructure in India. 52 figs.

  7. PARTAKE survey of public knowledge and perceptions of clinical research in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tal Burt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A public that is an informed partner in clinical research is important for ethical, methodological, and operational reasons. There are indications that the public is unaware or misinformed, and not sufficiently engaged in clinical research but studies on the topic are lacking. PARTAKE - Public Awareness of Research for Therapeutic Advancements through Knowledge and Empowerment is a program aimed at increasing public awareness and partnership in clinical research. The PARTAKE Survey is a component of the program. OBJECTIVE: To study public knowledge and perceptions of clinical research. METHODS: A 40-item questionnaire combining multiple-choice and open-ended questions was administered to 175 English- or Hindi-speaking individuals in 8 public locations representing various socioeconomic strata in New Delhi, India. RESULTS: Interviewees were 18-84 old (mean: 39.6, SD ± 16.6, 23.6% female, 68.6% employed, 7.3% illiterate, 26.3% had heard of research, 2.9% had participated and 58.9% expressed willingness to participate in clinical research. The following perceptions were reported (% true/% false/% not aware: 'research benefits society' (94.1%/3.5%/2.3%, 'the government protects against unethical clinical research' (56.7%/26.3%/16.9%, 'research hospitals provide better care' (67.2%/8.7%/23.9%, 'confidentiality is adequately protected' (54.1%/12.3%/33.5%, 'participation in research is voluntary' (85.3%/5.8%/8.7%; 'participants treated like 'guinea pigs'' (20.7%/53.2%/26.0%, and 'compensation for participation is adequate' (24.7%/12.9%/62.3%. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest the Indian public is aware of some key features of clinical research (e.g., purpose, value, voluntary nature of participation, and supports clinical research in general but is unaware of other key features (e.g., compensation, confidentiality, protection of human participants and exhibits some distrust in the conduct and reporting of clinical trials. Larger, cross

  8. Global priorities for research and the relative importance of different research outcomes: an international Delphi survey of malaria research experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jo-Ann; Conteh, Lesong

    2016-12-06

    As global research investment increases, attention inevitably turns to assessing and measuring the outcomes and impact from research programmes. Research can have many different outcomes such as producing advances in scientific knowledge, building research capacity and, ultimately, health and broader societal benefits. The aim of this study was to test the use of a Delphi methodology as a way of gathering views from malaria research experts on research priorities and eliciting relative valuations of the different types of health research impact. An international Delphi survey of 60 malaria research experts was used to understand views on research outcomes and priorities within malaria and across global health more widely. The study demonstrated the application of the Delphi technique to eliciting views on malaria specific research priorities, wider global health research priorities and the values assigned to different types of research impact. In terms of the most important past research successes, the development of new anti-malarial drugs and insecticide-treated bed nets were rated as the most important. When asked about research priorities for future funding, respondents ranked tackling emerging drug and insecticide resistance the highest. With respect to research impact, the panel valued research that focuses on health and health sector benefits and informing policy and product development. Contributions to scientific knowledge, although highly valued, came lower down the ranking, suggesting that efforts to move research discoveries to health products and services are valued more highly than pure advances in scientific knowledge. Although the Delphi technique has been used to elicit views on research questions in global health this was the first time it has been used to assess how a group of research experts value or rank different types of research impact. The results suggest it is feasible to inject the views of a key stakeholder group into the research

  9. Recent researches concerning the obtaining of functional textiles based on conductive yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, A. L.; Manea, L. R.; Hristian, L.

    2016-08-01

    Modem textile industry is influenced both by consumers' lifestyle and by novel materials. Functional textiles can be included into the group of technical textiles. The functional activity can be shortly interpreted as "sense - react - adapt" to the environment while traditional materials meet only passive protective role, a barrier between body and environment. Functional materials cross the conventional limits because they are designed for specific performances, being part of domains as: telemedicine, medicine, aeronautics, biotechnology, nanotechnology, protective clothes, sportswear, etc. This paper highlights the most recent developments in the field of using conductive yarns for obtaining functional textiles. Conductive fabrics can be done by incorporating into the textile structure the conductive fibers / yarns. The technologies differ from embroidering, sewing, weaving, knitting to braiding and obtaining nonwovens. The conductive fabrics production has a quickly growth because it is a high demand for these textiles used for data transfer in clothing, monitoring vital signs, germ-free garments, brain-computer interface, etc. Nowadays it is of high interest surface treatments of fibers/yarns which can be considered as a novel kind of textile finishing. There are presented some researches related to obtaining conductive yarns by coating PET and PP yarns with PANi conductive polymer.

  10. Research Misconduct in the Croatian Scientific Community: A Survey Assessing the Forms and Characteristics of Research Misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupovac, Vanja; Prijić-Samaržija, Snježana; Petrovečki, Mladen

    2017-02-01

    The prevalence and characteristics of research misconduct have mainly been studied in highly developed countries. In moderately or poorly developed countries such as Croatia, data on research misconduct are scarce. The primary aim of this study was to determine the rates at which scientists report committing or observing the most serious forms of research misconduct, such as falsification , fabrication, plagiarism, and violation of authorship rules in the Croatian scientific community. Additionally, we sought to determine the degree of development and the extent of implementation of the system for defining and regulating research misconduct in a typical scientific community in Croatia. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed among 1232 Croatian scientists at the University of Rijeka in 2012/2013 and 237 (19.2 %) returned the survey. Based on the respondents who admitted having committed research misconduct, 9 (3.8 %) admitted to plagiarism, 22 (9.3 %) to data falsification, 9 (3.8 %) to data fabrication, and 60 (25.3 %) respondents admitted to violation of authorship rules. Based on the respondents who admitted having observed research misconduct of fellow scientists, 72 (30.4 %) observed plagiarism, 69 (29.1 %) observed data falsification, 46 (19.4 %) observed data fabrication, and 132 (55.7 %) respondents admitted having observed violation of authorship rules. The results of our study indicate that the efficacy of the system for managing research misconduct in Croatia is poor. At the University of Rijeka there is no document dedicated exclusively to research integrity, describing the values that should be fostered by a scientist and clarifying the forms of research misconduct and what constitutes a questionable research practice. Scientists do not trust ethical bodies and the system for defining and regulating research misconduct; therefore the observed cases of research misconduct are rarely reported. Finally, Croatian scientists are not formally

  11. 2011 Internship & Co-Op Survey. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Association of Colleges and Employers' (NACE's) "2011 Internship & Co-op Survey" indicates that internships are an integral and ever-important part of the college recruiting scene. The survey finds that employers expect to increase internship hiring by about 7 percent this year and co-op positions by nearly 9 percent. Furthermore,…

  12. Towards Horizon 2020: challenges and advances for clinical mental health research – outcome of an expert survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina M; van Os, Jim; Knappe, Susanne; Schumann, Gunter; Vieta, Eduard; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lewis, Shôn W; Elfeddali, Iman; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Linszen, Donald; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Haro, Josep Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The size and increasing burden of disease due to mental disorders in Europe poses substantial challenges to its population and to the health policy of the European Union. This warrants a specific research agenda concerning clinical mental health research as one of the cornerstones of sustainable mental health research and health policy in Europe. The aim of this research was to identify the top priorities needed to address the main challenges in clinical research for mental disorders. Methods The research was conducted as an expert survey and expert panel discussion during a scientific workshop. Results Eighty-nine experts in clinical research and representing most European countries participated in this survey. Identified top priorities were the need for new intervention studies, understanding the diagnostic and therapeutic implications of mechanisms of disease, and research in the field of somatic-psychiatric comorbidity. The “subjectivity gap” between basic neuroscience research and clinical reality for patients with mental disorders is considered the main challenge in psychiatric research, suggesting that a shift in research paradigms is required. Conclusion Innovations in clinical mental health research should bridge the gap between mechanisms underlying novel therapeutic interventions and the patient experience of mental disorder and, if present, somatic comorbidity. Clinical mental health research is relatively underfunded and should receive specific attention in Horizon 2020 funding programs. PMID:25061300

  13. Critical Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling: A Survey of U.S. and International Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-08-01

    The Nation’s health, wealth, and security rely on the production and distribution of certain goods and services. The array of physical assets, processes, and organizations across which these goods and services move are called "critical infrastructures".1 This statement is as true in the U.S. as in any country in the world. Recent world events such as the 9-11 terrorist attacks, London bombings, and gulf coast hurricanes have highlighted the importance of stable electric, gas and oil, water, transportation, banking and finance, and control and communication infrastructure systems. Be it through direct connectivity, policies and procedures, or geospatial proximity, most critical infrastructure systems interact. These interactions often create complex relationships, dependencies, and interdependencies that cross infrastructure boundaries. The modeling and analysis of interdependencies between critical infrastructure elements is a relatively new and very important field of study. The U.S. Technical Support Working Group (TSWG) has sponsored this survey to identify and describe this current area of research including the current activities in this field being conducted both in the U.S. and internationally. The main objective of this study is to develop a single source reference of critical infrastructure interdependency modeling tools (CIIMT) that could be applied to allow users to objectively assess the capabilities of CIIMT. This information will provide guidance for directing research and development to address the gaps in development. The results will inform researchers of the TSWG Infrastructure Protection Subgroup of research and development efforts and allow a more focused approach to addressing the needs of CIIMT end-user needs. This report first presents the field of infrastructure interdependency analysis, describes the survey methodology, and presents the leading research efforts in both a cumulative table and through individual datasheets. Data was

  14. Getting from neuron to checkmark: Models and methods in cognitive survey research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Holleman; J.M.J. Murre

    2008-01-01

    Since the 1980s much work has been done in the field of Cognitive Survey Research. In an interdisciplinary endeavour, survey methodologists and cognitive psychologists (as well as social psychologists and linguists) have worked to unravel the cognitive processes underlying survey responses: to impro

  15. Challenges and strategies for conducting sensitive research with an Arab American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timraz, Shahrazad M; Alhasanat, Dalia I; Albdour, Maha M; Lewin, Linda; Giurgescu, Carmen; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Recruiting minority groups such as Arab Americans (Ar-Am) for research studies has been challenging. To date no studies were found that explicitly addressed challenges to recruit Ar-Am for sensitive research. The purpose of this article is to present the challenges across three pilot studies that involved Ar-Am samples and the strategies that were implemented to overcome these challenges. The challenges faced with conducting studies with Ar-Am included difficulty for participants to express emotions, influence of male/female authority to consent for the study, lack of trust to disclose sensitive information, language barrier, and slow recruitment. Having bilingual female recruiters of Arabic descent, engaging the women's family members in the consent process, and addressing the sensitive topics in culturally appropriate language were effective strategies to overcome these challenges. These strategies might be helpful for other researchers who recruit Ar-Am for sensitive research.

  16. Increasing value and reducing waste in research design, conduct, and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, John P A; Greenland, Sander; Hlatky, Mark A; Khoury, Muin J; Macleod, Malcolm R; Moher, David; Schulz, Kenneth F; Tibshirani, Robert

    2014-01-11

    Correctable weaknesses in the design, conduct, and analysis of biomedical and public health research studies can produce misleading results and waste valuable resources. Small effects can be difficult to distinguish from bias introduced by study design and analyses. An absence of detailed written protocols and poor documentation of research is common. Information obtained might not be useful or important, and statistical precision or power is often too low or used in a misleading way. Insufficient consideration might be given to both previous and continuing studies. Arbitrary choice of analyses and an overemphasis on random extremes might affect the reported findings. Several problems relate to the research workforce, including failure to involve experienced statisticians and methodologists, failure to train clinical researchers and laboratory scientists in research methods and design, and the involvement of stakeholders with conflicts of interest. Inadequate emphasis is placed on recording of research decisions and on reproducibility of research. Finally, reward systems incentivise quantity more than quality, and novelty more than reliability. We propose potential solutions for these problems, including improvements in protocols and documentation, consideration of evidence from studies in progress, standardisation of research efforts, optimisation and training of an experienced and non-conflicted scientific workforce, and reconsideration of scientific reward systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Conducting research in a resource-constrained environment: avoiding the pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine I. Munsamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Practical challenges affected the conducting of a retrospective drug use evaluation (DUE on the rational use of tenofovir in a resourceconstrained South African Antiretroviral Treatment Programme. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patient records compliant with DUE criteria using initiation prescriptions from March 2009 to February 2010. Health system challenges encountered included stringent institutional administrative procedures, lack of efficient communication channels, reliance on overburdened personnel and fear of audit. Forty percent (222 of 556 of patient records identified for inclusion in the study had to be excluded, mainly due to poor record keeping. Research budgetary constraints also limited data collection. This experience highlighted real, unforeseen challenges when conducting a retrospective study in a resource-constrained environment. A sound understanding of the environment and adequate preparation is recommended. The lessons learnt may prove valuable to both firsttime and experienced researchers in a resource-limited setting using a similar methodology.

  18. Involvement of consumers in studies run by the Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit: Results of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vale Claire L

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to establish levels of consumer involvement in randomised controlled trials (RCTs, meta-analyses and other studies carried out by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC Clinical Trials Unit across the range of research programs, predominantly in cancer and HIV. Methods Staff responsible for studies that were included in a Unit Progress Report (MRC CTU, April 2009 were asked to complete a semi-structured questionnaire survey regarding consumer involvement. This was defined as active involvement of consumers as partners in the research process and not as subjects of that research. The electronic questionnaires combined open and closed questions, intended to capture quantitative and qualitative information on whether studies had involved consumers; types of activities undertaken; recruitment and support; advantages and disadvantages of involvement and its perceived impact on aspects of the research. Results Between October 2009 and April 2010, 138 completed questionnaires (86% were returned. Studies had been conducted over a 20 year period from 1989, and around half were in cancer; 30% in HIV and 20% were in other disease areas including arthritis, tuberculosis and blood transfusion medicine. Forty-three studies (31% had some consumer involvement, most commonly as members of trial management groups (TMG [88%]. A number of positive impacts on both the research and the researcher were identified. Researchers generally felt involvement was worthwhile and some felt that consumer involvement had improved the credibility of the research. Benefits in design and quality, trial recruitment, dissemination and decision making were also perceived. Researchers felt they learned from consumer involvement, albeit that there were some barriers. Conclusions Whilst most researchers identified benefits of involving consumers, most of studies included in the survey had no involvement. Information from this survey will inform the development

  19. A Survey of Research Performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Impact Dynamics Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, K. E.; Fasanella, E. L.

    2003-01-01

    The Impact Dynamics Research Facility (IDRF) is a 240-ft-high gantry structure located at NASA Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The facility was originally built in 1963 as a lunar landing simulator, allowing the Apollo astronauts to practice lunar landings under realistic conditions. The IDRF was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1985 based on its significant contributions to the Apollo Program. In 1972, the facility was converted to a full-scale crash test facility for light aircraft and rotorcraft. Since that time, the IDRF has been used to perform a wide variety of impact tests on full-scale aircraft and structural components in support of the General Aviation (GA) aircraft industry, the US Department of Defense, the rotorcraft industry, and NASA in-house aeronautics and space research programs. The objective of this paper is to describe most of the major full-scale crash test programs that were performed at this unique, world-class facility since 1974. The past research is divided into six sub-topics: the civil GA aircraft test program, transport aircraft test program, military test programs, space test programs, basic research, and crash modeling and simulation.

  20. Research on consumer awareness of safe food and buying tendency——Based on the survey conducted in Beijing%消费者对安全食品的认知和购买行为倾向研究——基于北京市的调查数据

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宗泰

    2013-01-01

    对调研数据的统计分析,发现安全食品还没有得到消费者更清晰的认知.影响消费者对安全食品购买意愿的因素有:价格、消费者的收入和教育水平、消费者的认知与评价、社会人际评价、公共服务机构的信息的可信度等.政府应加强对安全食品的监管,提供充分、真实、可靠的信息,增强市场信心;各种媒体应强化对安全食品的宣传,提高市场认知度;企业应大力维护产品信誉,积极营销,促成购买安全食品的偏好.%The survey indicated that consumers had not gain a clear awareness of safe food. The key factors that influenced on consumers' purchase intention of safety food included: price, income, education levels, recognition and evaluation of consumer, social interpersonal evaluation, as well as the credibility of information provided by public service institutions. The government should strengthen food safety supervision and provide complete, factual and reliable information to optimize the market insight. Enterprises should maintain good product images, promote their products, and make continued efforts to contribute to safe food preferences.

  1. Beyond responsible conduct in research: new pedagogies to address macroethics of nanobiotechnologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallero, Daniel Alan

    2007-01-01

    A team of engineers, scientists, ethicists, and educational specialists are enhancing Duke University's Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) program to ensure that graduate-level researchers in emerging fields are adequately prepared when confronted with macroethical issues associated with applications of new and emerging medical technologies. The focus is on nanoscale laboratory research conducted in the Center for Biologically Inspired Materials and Material Systems and the Center for Biological Tissue Engineering. Most present RCR programs address methodological ethics of the individual researcher or practitioner (i.e., microethical) issues, analogous to Kohlberg's theory of moral development. The resultant model from this project is the basis for departmental, center, and other more targeted ethical challenges stemming from research in emerging technologies, designed to provide comprehensive RCR training. The research successfully identified new ways of teaching students about macroethical issues (i.e., those that affect society). Three main dimensions of ethics in nanotechnology-related research are being stressed, namely, awareness, ethical decision making, and behavior. Workshops appear to enhance awareness of the ethical issues associated with emerging technologies. To date, attempts to affect decision making have been difficult, although in this study workshops were an effective means of identifying strategies to address ethical issues. A principal lesson learned has been the importance of providing a context for macroethical issues. For example, the workshop where an expert presented the technical aspects of environmental consequences of carbon nanotubes led to statistically significant differences between pre- and postworkshop understanding of societal risks. Conversely, in a workshop without the technical introduction, little difference was observed. This indicates that the stage of students' ethical understanding is an important determinant of

  2. Survey of organizational research climates in three research intensive, doctoral granting universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, James A; Thrush, Carol R; Martinson, Brian C; May, Terry A; Stickler, Michelle; Callahan, Eileen C; Klomparens, Karen L

    2014-12-01

    The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SOuRCe) is a new instrument that assesses dimensions of research integrity climate, including ethical leadership, socialization and communication processes, and policies, procedures, structures, and processes to address risks to research integrity. We present a descriptive analysis to characterize differences on the SOuRCe scales across departments, fields of study, and status categories (faculty, postdoctoral scholars, and graduate students) for 11,455 respondents from three research-intensive universities. Among the seven SOuRCe scales, variance explained by status and fields of study ranged from 7.6% (Advisor-Advisee Relations) to 16.2% (Integrity Norms). Department accounted for greater than 50% of the variance explained for each of the SOuRCe scales, ranging from 52.6% (Regulatory Quality) to 80.3% (Integrity Inhibitors). It is feasible to implement this instrument in large university settings across a broad range of fields, department types, and individual roles within academic units. Published baseline results provide initial data for institutions using the SOuRCe who wish to compare their own research integrity climates.

  3. Educational Research: Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research, Enhanced Pearson eText with Loose-Leaf Version--Access Card Package. Fifth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    2015-01-01

    "Educational Research: Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research" offers a truly balanced, inclusive, and integrated overview of the processes involved in educational research. This text first examines the general steps in the research process and then details the procedures for conducting specific types…

  4. Educational Research: Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research, Enhanced Pearson eText with Loose-Leaf Version--Access Card Package. Fifth Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    2015-01-01

    "Educational Research: Planning, Conducting, and Evaluating Quantitative and Qualitative Research" offers a truly balanced, inclusive, and integrated overview of the processes involved in educational research. This text first examines the general steps in the research process and then details the procedures for conducting specific types…

  5. A research on the professional moral conducts of teachers in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Li

    2007-01-01

    Developing a professional ethics is crucial towards amassing the ranks of high-quality teachers,which contributes to the improvement of national education.This study bases its analysis on the survey of humanistic qualities of Chinese citizens.3348 teachers at three different levels from 31 provinces,autonomous regions and municipalities of China are investigated into their professional moral conducts in terms of sense of responsibility and initiative.The result shows that the professional moral levels differ distinctly among teachers from universities,junior or senior high schools and primary schools.The results suggest that professional ethics is vulnerable to external factors.It is essential for the construction of teachers'professional ethics to improve their moral culture.

  6. The HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute: Training Early-Career Scientists to Conduct Research on Research Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Celia B; Yuko, Elizabeth

    2015-12-01

    The responsible conduct of HIV/drug abuse prevention research requires investigators with both the knowledge of and ability to generate empirical data that can enhance global ethical practices and policies. This article describes a multidisciplinary program offering early-career professionals a 2-year intensive summer curriculum along with funding to conduct a mentored research study on a wide variety of HIV/drug abuse research ethics topics. Now in its fifth year, the program has admitted 29 trainees who have to date demonstrated increased knowledge of research ethics, produced 17 peer-reviewed publications, 46 professional presentations, and submitted or been awarded five related federal grants. The institute also hosts a global information platform providing general and HIV/drug abuse relevant research ethics educational and research resources that have had more than 38,800 unique visitors from more than 150 countries.

  7. The assessment of activities conducted by companies in social media in light of research concerning their users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Gregor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Social media are not losing their popularity. Despite their long (sometimes a few years long presence on the Internet, portals from this category are gradually strengthening their position with regard to the number of registered users. In July 2014 the biggest social media portal – Facebook – had 1,320,000,000 active accounts around the whole world. In Poland in July 2014 the number of active users of the portal reached 12,000,000. In the period from April 12 to May 25, 2014, the Department of Marketing of the Faculty of Management of University of Lodz conducted a research aimed at the assessment of activities conducted by companies in social media. The goal of the research was to reach people using social media and investigate how particular measures taken by companies in social media are assessed by them, as well as to identify which of these actions boost engagement and influence making a purchasing decision. In course of the research the method of Internet questionnaire was applied. 302 respondents took part in the survey and almost 90% of them declared that they use social media portals. The most popular social network among the respondents is Facebook. YouTube also plays a major role. This may be seen as evidence that the marketing potential of video contents published on the Internet is huge. The conducted research shows that among the biggest benefits associated with having an account on a social media portal is the possibility of fast communication, chance to find and follow friends, as well as accumulation of the most important information in one place. Over 70% of the surveyed follows well-known companies and brands in social media. Fashion brands and brands associated with the food and electronics branches are followed most often. What the respondents most often named as one of the advantages of following brands in social media is the possibility of continuously following novelties, opportunity to receive discount coupons, as

  8. The Laboratory Course Assessment Survey: A Tool to Measure Three Dimensions of Research-Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Lisa A.; Runyon, Christopher; Robinson, Aspen; Dolan, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are increasingly being offered as scalable ways to involve undergraduates in research. Yet few if any design features that make CUREs effective have been identified. We developed a 17-item survey instrument, the Laboratory Course Assessment Survey (LCAS), that measures students' perceptions…

  9. Bowhead whale aerial abundance survey conducted by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2011-04-19 to 2011-06-11 (NCEI Accession 0133937)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial photographic surveys for bowhead whales were conducted near Point Barrow, Alaska, from 19 April to 6 June in 2011. Approximately 4,594 photographs containing...

  10. Groundfish/Shrimp and Red Snapper trawl surveys conducted in the Gulf of Mexico from 1990-01-01 to 2014-12-30 (NCEI Accession 0147703)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Southeast Fisheries Science Center Mississippi Laboratories has conducted standardized groundfish trawl surveys in the Gulf of Mexico since 1987. Prior to 1987,...

  11. 49 CFR 11.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  12. 34 CFR 97.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted... Subjects (Basic ED Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects) § 97.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution...

  13. 38 CFR 16.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. 16.103 Section 16.103....103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is...

  14. 22 CFR 225.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a...

  15. 40 CFR 26.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a Federal... support research covered by this policy only if the institution has an assurance approved as provided...

  16. 28 CFR 46.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a federal... support research covered by this policy only if the institution has an assurance approved as provided...

  17. 15 CFR 27.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which is conducted or supported by a... support research covered by this policy only if the institution has an assurance approved as provided...

  18. 45 CFR 46.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 46.120 Section 46.120... SUBJECTS Basic HHS Policy for Protection of Human Research Subjects § 46.120 Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. (a)...

  19. Aerial surveys conducted along the Garden Route coastline, South Africa, to determine patterns in shore fishing effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kyle S. Smith

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Coastal environments provide a wide range of leisure opportunities, including recreational fishing. Understanding spatial and temporal fishing patterns is important in ensuring wise management and sustainable use. To provide information on shore angler effort and distribution, randomised aerial surveys of the Garden Route coast between the eastern border of the Tsitsikamma Marine Protected Area and the Kaaimans River mouth in the west were undertaken between December 2008 and November 2009. A total of 15 flights were conducted, with six flights taking place over weekends, two on public holidays and the balance on normal week days. Angler effort was not uniformly distributed along the coastline, and spatial analysis highlighted coastal areas both inside and outside marine protected areas that had increased angler effort. In general, fishing effort was highest around more densely populated areas and concentrated in areas with easy access. Although angler counts were highly variable, the seasonality of shore angling effort showed a slight increase during autumn and winter and angling effort was significantly higher on weekends.Conservation implications: Data obtained during these surveys can assist management with future conservation planning exercises, whilst also guiding daily law enforcement patrols to maximise angler encounters.

  20. Fish Structural Habitat Surveys from Grays Reef National Marine Sanctuary Research Open Management Zones

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In situ visual surveys were conducted to generate size estimates and species composition of fish community habitat measurements (ledge height, macroalgal ht, sessile...

  1. INVESTIGATIVE RESEARCH PROJECTS RELATED TO THE TOHOKU EARTHQUAKE (THE GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE) CONDUCTED IN FUKUSHIMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ohno, Kikuo; Ohto, Hitoshi; Abe, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    On March 11(th) 2011, the Tohoku region of Japan was struck by catastrophic disasters. Thousands of people were killed due to a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and its subsequent tsunami. Furthermore, a serious nuclear crisis occurred in Fukushima Prefecture as a result of the disasters, and an emergency evacuation was ordered to people living near the nuclear power plants. There was a lot of anxiety regarding lost families as well as the influences of radioactivity on the health of people and their children. Based on these urgent and uncertain situations, a number of research projects were developed at many institutes both inside and outside Fukushima. We herein report the investigative research projects related to the Tohoku Earthquake (The Great East Japan Earthquake) conducted after the disasters. The research projects were reviewed by the Institutional Review Board in Fukushima Medical University during the two years following the disasters. The research projects conducted in universities other than Fukushima Medical University were also examined using questionnaire analysis. Among the research projects conducted in Fukushima Medical University (n=424), 7% (n=32) were disaster-related investigative research. The mean duration planned to pursue the projects was 25.5 months. Among these projects, those focusing on the health of Fukushima citizens were most common (n=9), followed by the influence of chronic exposure of radiation on chronic inflammatory disorders (n=6), and the mental health of Fukushima citizens (n=5). They were carefully reviewed for the purpose, suitability, and necessity from ethical as well as scientific viewpoints. The majority of the research projects focused on the effects of the Tohoku Earthquake and/or chronic exposure to low-dose radioactivity on the health of children and pregnant women, as well as on various disorders, such as mental health and chronic inflammatory diseases. On the other hand, among 58 projects we collected from 22

  2. Research on key techniques of expendable conductivity temperature depth measuring system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Guangyuan; DU; Libin; HE; Haijing; LEI; Zhuo; ZHANG; Qisheng; WU; Chengxuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper analysis the developing of expendable conductivity temperature depth measuring system(XCTD)and introduce its principle of measuring about temperature,salinity and depth of ocean.Some key techniques are put forward.According to the real needs of XCTD,conductivity sensor with high sensitivity is designed by principle of electromagnetic induce,the ocean conductivity from induced electromotive force has been calculated.Adding temperature correction circuit would help to reduce error of conductivity measurement because of sharply changing temperature.Advanced temperature measuring circuit of high precision and the constant current source is used to weaken effect of self-heating of resistance and fluctuation of the source.On respect of remote data transmission,LVDS is a good choice for the purpose of guarantee the quality of data transmitted and the transmission distance is reaching to thousand meters in the seawater.Modular programming method is also brought into this research aimed at improve the stability,reliability and maintainability of the whole measuring system.In February,2015,the trials in South China Sea demonstrate that the developed XCTD realize effective measurement at a speed of 6 knots and detection depth at 800 m.The consistency coefficient of the acquired data is greater than 0.99 and the success rate of probe launching is above 90%.

  3. Partnership‐Driven Resources to Improve and Enhance Research (PRIMER): A Survey of Community‐Engaged Researchers and Creation of an Online Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J.; Greene, Sarah M.; Thompson, Ella; Baldwin, Laura‐Mae; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This project aimed to develop an open‐access website providing adaptable resources to facilitate best practices for multisite research from initiation to closeout. Methods: A web‐based assessment was sent to the leadership of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) Community Engagement Key Functions Committee (n= 38) and the CTSA‐affiliated Primary Care Practice‐based Research Networks (PBRN, n= 55). Respondents rated the benefits and barriers of multisite research, the utility of available resources, and indicated their level of interest in unavailable resources. Then, existing research resources were evaluated for relevance to multisite research, adaptability to other projects, and source credibility. Results: Fifty‐five (59%) of invited participants completed the survey. Top perceived benefits of multisite research were the ability to conduct community‐relevant research through academic–community partnerships (34%) and accelerating translation of research into practice (31%). Top perceived barriers were lack of research infrastructure to support PBRNs and community partners (31%) and inadequate funding to support multisite collaborations (26%). Over 200 resources were evaluated, of which 120 unique resources were included in the website. Conclusion: The PRIMER Research Toolkit (http://www.researchtoolkit.org) provides an array of peer‐reviewed resources to facilitate translational research for the conduct of multisite studies within PBRNs and community‐based organizations. Clin Trans Sci 2011; Volume 4: 259–265 PMID:21884512

  4. Advanced cogeneration research study. Survey of cogeneration potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonski, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-five facilities that consumed substantial amounts of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil were surveyed by telephone in 1983. The primary objective of the survey was to estimate the potential electricity that could be generated in the SCE service territory using cogeneration technology. An estimated 3667 MW sub e could potentially be generated using cogenerated technology. Of this total, current technology could provide 2569 MW sub p and advanced technology could provide 1098 MW sub e. Approximately 1611 MW sub t was considered not feasible to produce electricity with either current or advanced cogeneration technology.

  5. Orthopaedic nurses' attitudes towards clinical nursing research - A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-05-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire. The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack of acceptance from colleagues and section head nurses and a shortage of time. This study forms a baseline as a part of a larger study and contributes knowledge useful to other orthopaedic departments with an interest in optimizing nursing research to improve orthopaedic nursing care quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Common definition for categories of clinical research: a prerequisite for a survey on regulatory requirements by the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN)

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kubiak, Christine

    2009-10-16

    Abstract Background Thorough knowledge of the regulatory requirements is a challenging prerequisite for conducting multinational clinical studies in Europe given their complexity and heterogeneity in regulation and perception across the EU member states. Methods In order to summarise the current situation in relation to the wide spectrum of clinical research, the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) developed a multinational survey in ten European countries. However a lack of common classification framework for major categories of clinical research was identified, and therefore reaching an agreement on a common classification was the initial step in the development of the survey. Results The ECRIN transnational working group on regulation, composed of experts in the field of clinical research from ten European countries, defined seven major categories of clinical research that seem relevant from both the regulatory and the scientific points of view, and correspond to congruent definitions in all countries: clinical trials on medicinal products; clinical trials on medical devices; other therapeutic trials (including surgery trials, transplantation trials, transfusion trials, trials with cell therapy, etc.); diagnostic studies; clinical research on nutrition; other interventional clinical research (including trials in complementary and alternative medicine, trials with collection of blood or tissue samples, physiology studies, etc.); and epidemiology studies. Our classification was essential to develop a survey focused on protocol submission to ethics committees and competent authorities, procedures for amendments, requirements for sponsor and insurance, and adverse event reporting following five main phases: drafting, consensus, data collection, validation, and finalising. Conclusion The list of clinical research categories as used for the survey could serve as a contribution to the, much needed, task of harmonisation and simplification of the

  7. Common definition for categories of clinical research: a prerequisite for a survey on regulatory requirements by the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanz Nuria

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thorough knowledge of the regulatory requirements is a challenging prerequisite for conducting multinational clinical studies in Europe given their complexity and heterogeneity in regulation and perception across the EU member states. Methods In order to summarise the current situation in relation to the wide spectrum of clinical research, the European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN developed a multinational survey in ten European countries. However a lack of common classification framework for major categories of clinical research was identified, and therefore reaching an agreement on a common classification was the initial step in the development of the survey. Results The ECRIN transnational working group on regulation, composed of experts in the field of clinical research from ten European countries, defined seven major categories of clinical research that seem relevant from both the regulatory and the scientific points of view, and correspond to congruent definitions in all countries: clinical trials on medicinal products; clinical trials on medical devices; other therapeutic trials (including surgery trials, transplantation trials, transfusion trials, trials with cell therapy, etc.; diagnostic studies; clinical research on nutrition; other interventional clinical research (including trials in complementary and alternative medicine, trials with collection of blood or tissue samples, physiology studies, etc.; and epidemiology studies. Our classification was essential to develop a survey focused on protocol submission to ethics committees and competent authorities, procedures for amendments, requirements for sponsor and insurance, and adverse event reporting following five main phases: drafting, consensus, data collection, validation, and finalising. Conclusion The list of clinical research categories as used for the survey could serve as a contribution to the, much needed, task of harmonisation and

  8. Variable conductance heat pipe technology. [research project resulting in heat pipe experiment on OAO-3 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. T.; Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Marcus, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    A research and development program in variable conductance heat pipe technology is reported. The project involved: (1) theoretical and/or experimental studies in hydrostatics, (2) hydrodynamics, (3) heat transfer into and out of the pipe, (4) fluid selection, and (5) materials compatibility. The development, fabrication, and test of the space hardware resulted in a successful flight of the heat pipe experiment on the OAO-3 satellite. A summary of the program is provided and a guide to the location of publications on the project is included.

  9. The use of the Delphi survey as a research tool in understanding church trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Elkington

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the practical theological research process, as in most disciplines, extant literature is vital in assisting a researcher to formulate a foundational understanding of the topic under review. A literature review is also valuable in understanding the meta-theoretical aspects of the research topic. What does a researcher do, though, if there is little current literature on the topic under scrutiny? If there is a small corpus of literature around a subject, the Delphi method can serve as an extremely helpful research tool. This article discussed the use of the Delphi survey in a practical theological research endeavour and surveyed its history from inception to current usage. The article also reviewed the various types of Delphi survey and supported the use of the Lockean Delphi survey in this particular example of practical theological research. The article finished with an actual Delphi survey of Canadian Evangelical church pastors as an example of how the Delphi method can be used as a research tool in practical theology. The article concluded that the Delphi survey is an extremely useful research tool across the wide domain of social science research.

  10. Anticipated Changes in Conducting Scientific Data-Analysis Research in the Big-Data Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Seablom, Michael; Clune, Thomas; Ramachandran, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    A Big-Data environment is one that is capable of orchestrating quick-turnaround analyses involving large volumes of data for numerous simultaneous users. Based on our experiences with a prototype Big-Data analysis environment, we anticipate some important changes in research behaviors and processes while conducting scientific data-analysis research in the near future as such Big-Data environments become the mainstream. The first anticipated change will be the reduced effort and difficulty in most parts of the data management process. A Big-Data analysis environment is likely to house most of the data required for a particular research discipline along with appropriate analysis capabilities. This will reduce the need for researchers to download local copies of data. In turn, this also reduces the need for compute and storage procurement by individual researchers or groups, as well as associated maintenance and management afterwards. It is almost certain that Big-Data environments will require a different "programming language" to fully exploit the latent potential. In addition, the process of extending the environment to provide new analysis capabilities will likely be more involved than, say, compiling a piece of new or revised code.We thus anticipate that researchers will require support from dedicated organizations associated with the environment that are composed of professional software engineers and data scientists. A major benefit will likely be that such extensions are of higherquality and broader applicability than ad hoc changes by physical scientists. Another anticipated significant change is improved collaboration among the researchers using the same environment. Since the environment is homogeneous within itself, many barriers to collaboration are minimized or eliminated. For example, data and analysis algorithms can be seamlessly shared, reused and re-purposed. In conclusion, we will be able to achieve a new level of scientific productivity in the Big

  11. Student Use of Communication Technologies--Parent/Guardian Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julka, Ashley; Stehr, Grady; Parks, Denise; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how middle school students and their parents are using technologies and what programs citizens of Wisconsin might need with respect to these technologies. During the month of February 2010, staff from the Survey Research Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Lori…

  12. Large Scale Survey Data in Career Development Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Large scale survey datasets have been underutilized but offer numerous advantages for career development scholars, as they contain numerous career development constructs with large and diverse samples that are followed longitudinally. Constructs such as work salience, vocational expectations, educational expectations, work satisfaction, and…

  13. SATELLITE GRAVITY SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH OF EARTH'S GRAVITY FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Jinsheng

    2003-01-01

    This is a summarized paper. Two topics are discussed: Firstly, the concept, development and application of four kinds of satellite gravity surveying technology are introduced; Secondly, some problems of theory and method, which must be considered in the study of the Earth's gravity field based on satellite gravity data, are expounded.

  14. Reexamining traditional issues in survey research: Just how evil is the anathema of low response rate?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, S.B. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, TN (United States). Science/Engineering Education Division; Boser, J.A. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Survey researchers have long been exhorted to strive for high response rates in order to maximize the likelihood that the respondents are representative of the population being surveyed. It is not surprising then, that much survey research has been directed towards examining the effects of various manipulatable factors on response rate. It is clear that attempts to reach the goal of minimizing the likelihood of nonresponse bias through testing various methods of increasing survey response rates have consumed much research and debate. The results obtained in this research have been inconsistent. Some studies have found significant differences, others have found none. The present study was designed to determine the extent to which the results of an employment survey of former graduates of a teacher preparation program would have been affected by changes in response rate.

  15. Geothermal Research Program of the US Geological Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffield, W.A.; Guffanti, M.

    1981-01-01

    The beginning of the Geothermal Research Program, its organization, objectives, fiscal history, accomplishments, and present emphasis. The projects of the Geothermal Research Program are presented along with a list of references.

  16. Raw navigation files logged with HYPACK Survey software during a geophysical survey conducted by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  17. Raw navigation files logged with HYPACK Survey software during a geophysical survey conducted by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS),...

  18. Raw navigation files logged with HYPACK Survey software during a geophysical survey conducted by the USGS within Red Brook Harbor, MA, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data were collected under a cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Coastal...

  19. Creating an infrastructure for training in the responsible conduct of research: the University of Pittsburgh's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Barbara E; Friedman, Charles P; Rosenberg, Jerome L; Russell, Joanne; Beedle, Ari; Levine, Arthur S

    2006-02-01

    In response to public concerns about the consequences of research misconduct, academic institutions have become increasingly cognizant of the need to implement comprehensive, effective training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) for faculty, staff, students, and external collaborators. The ability to meet this imperative is challenging as universities confront declining financial resources and increasing complexity of the research enterprise. The authors describe the University of Pittsburgh's design, implementation, and evaluation of a Web-based, institution-wide RCR training program called Research and Practice Fundamentals (RPF). This project, established in 2000, was embedded in the philosophy, organizational structure, and technology developed through the Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems grant from the National Library of Medicine. Utilizing a centralized, comprehensive approach, the RPF system provides an efficient mechanism for deploying content to a large, diverse cohort of learners and supports the needs of research administrators by providing access to information about who has successfully completed the training. During its first 3 years of operation, the RPF served over 17,000 users and issued more than 38,000 training certificates. The 18 modules that are currently available address issues required by regulatory mandates and other content areas important to the research community. RPF users report high levels of satisfaction with content and ease of using the system. Future efforts must explore methods to integrate non-RCR education and training into a centralized, cohesive structure. The University of Pittsburgh's experience with the RPF demonstrates the importance of developing an infrastructure for training that is comprehensive, scalable, reliable, centralized, affordable, and sustainable.

  20. Geoscience and Political Instability: Policies and Philosophies for Conducting Research in the Political Terra Infirma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmelis, J.

    2006-12-01

    Earth scientists must conduct their work on, in or above the Earth, wherever the scientific questions can best be answered. This can put the scientist in harms way. Although the science itself can be policy or politics neutral, it may not be viewed that way in some locations. Still, the geosciences are a foundation of national security in the strictest statist sense as well as in the evolving concept of security, which incorporates the many sectors of society. On one extreme of this multi axis framework they inform military operations and on another, sustainable development cannot be conducted without them. Some geoscience issues are truly global and none respect borders unless the borders are defined by the earth itself. Yet, they are problematic in they require field work, which sometimes must logically cross political rift zones into erupting political conflicts. Describing the landscape of conflict is difficult. It can change rapidly due to internal or external variables. It can be redefined by the by the viewer as the political landscape shifts under his or her feet. As a result, there is no single policy for conducting scientific research in areas of political conflict, but a collection of policies, some fairly constant and some changing. Issues such as bi- and multi-lateral relations, legal aspects of scientific and technological exchange, and potential health and safety of the scientists must be considered along with the type of scientific work to be conducted. In fact, the organization from which the scientist originates is a concern in some areas as well. In this presentation I discuss several types of conflict, the United States' Country Level Foreign Assistance Framework, the objectives of U.S. foreign policy strategy, transformational diplomacy, and the importance of earth and natural sciences to them. I consider several cases involving different nations, different types and levels of conflict, and different scientific activities. I also ask the earth

  1. Definition of spectrally separable classes for soil survey research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipra, J. E.; Swain, P. H.; Gill, J. H.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Kristof, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A procedure is outlined for defining spectral classes such that the differences between classes can be quantified. It also facilitates determination of a number of classes such that the classes are spectrally discriminable. This is accomplished by partitioning the data into many classes and then combining similar spectral classes on the basis of appropriate criteria. Multispectral data were collected over a 12-mile flightline in White County, Indiana, in connection with the 1971 Corn Blight Watch Experiment. Data were collected in May by the University of Michigan airborne scanning spectrometer at an altitude of 5000 feet. Spectral maps resulting from the analysis were compared to existing soil surveys of the National Cooperative Soil Survey. The method should help determine the extent to which spectral properties of soil surfaces can be associated with morphologic and topographic differences of interest to soil surveyors engaged in operational soil mapping.

  2. Nuclear power and the public: analysis of collected survey research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melber, B.D.; Nealey, S.M.; Hammersla, J.; Rankin, W.L.

    1977-11-01

    This executive summary highlights the major findings of a comprehensive synthesis and analysis of over 100 existing surveys dealing with public attitudes toward nuclear power issues. Questions of immediate policy relevance to the nuclear debate are posed and answered on the basis of these major findings. For each issue area, those sections of the report in which more-detailed discussion and presentation of relevant data may be found are indicated.

  3. Student Opinion Survey, 1976. Research Report: BCC 1-77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Norman

    A student opinion survey was administered to a sample of 1,100 students at Bronx Community College (BCC) in 1976. Respondent ethnicity distribution was 46.2% black, 29.1% hispanic, 17.0% white, 1.5% Oriental, and 6.3% other. More than half of the respondents were in either liberal arts and music (42.8%) or business curricula (21.8%). Results…

  4. Frog Call Survey Summary 2002-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Since 2002, Patuxent Research Refuge has conducted frog surveys on South Tract, Central Tract, and North Tract locations. These surveys are conducted by Patuxent...

  5. Survey of supersonic combustion ramjet research at Langley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. B.; Anderson, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The Hypersonic Propulsion Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has maintained an active research program in supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) and high speed ramjet propulsion since the 1960s. The focus for this research has centered on propulsion for manned reuseable vehicles with cryogenic hydrogen fuel. This paper presents some highlights of this research. The design philosophy of the Langley fixed-geometry airframe-integrated modular scramjet is discussed. The component development and research programs that have supported the successful demonstration of the engine concept using subscale engine module hardware is reviewed and a brief summary of the engine tests presented. An extensive bibliography of research supported by the Langley program is also included.

  6. Survey of supersonic combustion ramjet research at Langley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. B.; Anderson, G. Y.

    1986-01-01

    The Hypersonic Propulsion Branch at NASA Langley Research Center has maintained an active research program in supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) and high speed ramjet propulsion since the 1960s. The focus for this research has centered on propulsion for manned reuseable vehicles with cryogenic hydrogen fuel. This paper presents some highlights of this research. The design philosophy of the Langley fixed-geometry airframe-integrated modular scramjet is discussed. The component development and research programs that have supported the successful demonstration of the engine concept using subscale engine module hardware is reviewed and a brief summary of the engine tests presented. An extensive bibliography of research supported by the Langley program is also included.

  7. Survey and research on precision polymerization polymeric materials; Seimitsu jugo kobunshi zairyo ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Survey and research on the precision control of primary structure of polymeric materials and the precision evaluation technology have been conducted to develop advanced polymeric materials. It is proposed that the three basic processes of polymer synthesis, i.e., addition, condensation, and biomimesis, in forming the precision polymerization skeleton are to be covered through a centralized joint research effort with participation of industry, academia, and the government institute and under the leadership of researchers from academic institutions as the team leaders. For the study of technology trends, international conferences held in UK, Germany, and Hawaii are introduced, and domestic meetings, i.e., Annual Polymer Congress and Polymer Conference, are summarized. In addition, Precision Polymerization Forum and International Workshop on Precision Polymerization were held. The basic studies include a quantum-chemical elucidation of the elementary process in polymerization reaction, time-resolved analysis of polymerization process and polymer properties, synthesis of polymers with controlled microstructures by coordination polymerization using metal complexes, synthesis of polymer with controlled microstructures by precision polycondensation, molecular recognition in catalyst-reaction site, and synthesis of imprinting polymers. 246 refs., 117 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Research Priorities for NCD Prevention and Climate Change: An International Delphi Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Colagiuri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate change and non-communicable diseases (NCDs are arguably the greatest global challenges of the 21st Century. However, the confluence between them remains under-examined and there is little evidence of a comprehensive, systematic approach to identifying research priorities to mitigate their joint impact. Consequently, we: (i convened a workshop of academics (n = 25 from the Worldwide Universities Network to identify priority areas at the interface between NCDs and climate change; (ii conducted a Delphi survey of international opinion leaders in public health and relevant other disciplines; and (iii convened an expert panel to review and advise on final priorities. Three research areas (water security; transport; conceptualising NCD harms to support policy formation were listed among the top 10 priorities by >90% of Delphi respondents, and ranked among the top 12 priorities by >60% of respondents who ranked the order of priority. A fourth area (reducing the carbon footprint of cities was ranked highest by the same >60% of respondents. Our results are consistent with existing frameworks on health and climate change, and extends them by focusing specifically on NCDs. Researching these priorities could progress understanding of climate change and NCDs, and inform global and national policy decisions for mitigating associated harms.

  9. 28 CFR 46.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 46.120....120 Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported... and proposals involving human subjects submitted to the department or agency through such officers...

  10. 16 CFR 1028.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 1028.120... SUBJECTS § 1028.120 Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted... applications and proposals involving human subjects submitted to the department or agency through such...

  11. 49 CFR 11.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 11.120 Section 11.120... disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. The department or agency head will evaluate all applications and proposals involving...

  12. 7 CFR 1c.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 1c.120 Section 1c.120... disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. (a) The department or agency head will evaluate all applications and proposals involving...

  13. 22 CFR 225.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 225.120 Section 225... Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. The department or agency head will evaluate all applications and...

  14. 15 CFR 27.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 27.120... § 27.120 Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or... applications and proposals involving human subjects submitted to the department or agency through such...

  15. 14 CFR 1230.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 1230.120... SUBJECTS § 1230.120 Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted... applications and proposals involving human subjects submitted to the department or agency through such...

  16. 32 CFR 219.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. 219.120 Section 219...) MISCELLANEOUS PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.120 Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal Department or Agency. (a) The department...

  17. 10 CFR 745.120 - Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal department or agency. The... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation and disposition of applications and proposals for research to be conducted or supported by a Federal department or agency. 745.120 Section...

  18. A survey of core research in information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sidorova, Anna; Torres, Russell; Johnson, Vess

    2013-01-01

    The Information Systems (IS) discipline was founded on the intersection of computer science and organizational sciences, and produced a rich body of research on topics ranging from database design and the strategic role of IT to website design and online consumer behavior. In this book, the authors provide an introduction to the discipline, its development, and the structure of IS research, at a level that is appropriate for emerging and current IS scholars. Guided by a bibliometric study of all research articles published in eight premier IS research journals over a 20-year period, the author

  19. A Practical, Global Perspective on Using Administrative Data to Conduct Intensive Care Unit Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Allan; Gershengorn, Hayley B; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Reider, Nadia; Wilcox, M Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Various data sources can be used to conduct research on critical illness and intensive care unit (ICU) use. Most published studies derive from randomized controlled trials, large-scale clinical databases, or retrospective chart reviews. However, few investigators have access to such data sources or possess the resources to create them. Hospital administrative data, also called health claims data, constitute an important alternative data source that can be used to address a broad range of research questions, including many that would be difficult to study in interventional studies. Such data often contain information that allows identification of ICU care, specific types of critical illness, and ICU-related procedures. The strengths of using administrative databases are that many are population-based, cover broad geographic regions, and are large enough to provide high statistical power and precise effect estimates. Linking hospital data to other databases regarding chronic care facilities, home care services, or rehabilitation services, for example, can expand the scope of research questions that can be answered. However, the limitations of administrative data must be recognized. They are not collected for research purposes; thus, data elements may vary in accuracy, and key clinical variables such as ICU-specific physiologic and laboratory data are usually lacking. Specific efforts should be made to validate the data elements used, as has been done in several world regions. As with any other research question, it is imperative that the analysis plan be carefully defined in advance and that appropriate attention be paid to potential sources of bias and confounding.

  20. Conducting Biobehavioral Research in Patients With Advanced Cancer: Recruitment Challenges and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson-White, Stephanie; Bohr, Nicole; Wickersham, Karen E

    2017-01-01

    Despite significant advances in cancer treatment and symptom management interventions over the last decade, patients continue to struggle with cancer-related symptoms. Adequate baseline and longitudinal data are crucial for designing interventions to improve patient quality of life and reduce symptom burden; however, recruitment of patients with advanced cancer in longitudinal research is difficult. Our purpose is to describe challenges and solutions to recruitment of patients with advanced cancer in two biobehavioral research studies examining cancer-related symptoms. Study 1: Symptom data and peripheral blood for markers of inflammation were collected from newly diagnosed patients receiving chemotherapy on the first day of therapy and every 3-4 weeks for up to 6 months. Study 2: Symptom data, blood, and skin biopsies were collected from cancer patients taking epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors at specific time points over 4 months. Screening and recruitment results for both studies are summarized. Timing informed consent with baseline data collection prior to treatment initiation was a significant recruitment challenge for both the studies. Possible solutions include tailoring recruitment to fit clinic needs, increasing research staff availability during clinic hours, and adding recruitment sites. Identifying solutions to these challenges will permit the conduct of studies that may lead to identification of factors contributing to variability in symptoms and development of tailored patient interventions for patients with advanced cancer.

  1. The potential influence of Internet-based social networking on the conduct of clinical research studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickman, Seth W; Galhenage, Sam; McNair, Lindsay; Barber, Zachry; Patel, Keyur; Schulman, Kevin A; McHutchison, John G

    2012-02-01

    The rapid growth of internet usage has led to an explosion of social networking sites for discussion of health issues. This provides a forum for subjects to communicate with one another during the course of the studies. Previous studies have raised concerns about the quality of health information on social networking sites, although none have evaluated content related to ongoing clinical trials. We reviewed material posted in virtual communities by self-identified clinical trial participants. We identified material posted in online health forums that could introduce bias into clinical research studies; we believe that this issue warrants further study and discussion. Physicians and others who conduct clinical trials should be aware of this issue. Study investigators and research teams should also talk to their study subjects about where and how they are obtaining information in order to prevent behaviors and correct misinformation that could put a subject's safety or the study objectives at risk. Given the rapid increase in Internet use for health care, a broader evaluation of both the benefits and potential risks of social networking among research participants during the course of a clinical trial appears warranted.

  2. Use of modular amphibious vehicles for conducting research in coastal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeziulin, Denis; Makarov, Vladimir; Belyaev, Alexander; Beresnev, Pavel; Kurkin, Andrey

    2016-04-01

    The project aims to create workable running systems of research complexes, moving along the bottom of coastal areas (in shallow waters) for investigation of waves, currents, sediment transport; investigation of ecosystems and biodiversity assessment of organisms; inspection and monitoring environmental conditions and anthropogenic load on nature; bathymetric studies. With all the variety of functional capabilities of modern robotic systems, possibilities of their application in the context of the study of coastal zones are extremely limited. Conducting research using aerial vehicles is limited to safety conditions of flight. Use of floating robotic systems in environmental monitoring and ecosystem research is only possible in conditions of relatively «soft» wave climate of the coastal zone. For these purposes, there are special amphibians such as remote-controlled vehicle Surf Rover [Daily, William R., Mark A. Johnson, and Daniel A. Oslecki. «Initial Development of an Amphibious ROV for Use in Big Surf.» Marine Technology Society 28.1 (1994): 3-10. Print.], mobile system MARC-1 [«The SPROV'er.» Florida Institute of Technology: Department of Marine and. Environmental Systems. Web. 05 May 2010.]. The paper describes methodological approaches to the selection of the design parameters of a new system.

  3. Developing a framework for assessing responsible conduct of research education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Lynne E

    2010-03-01

    Education in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) in the United States has evolved over the past decade from targeting trainees to including educational efforts aimed at faculty and staff. In addition RCR education has become more focused as federal agencies have moved to recommend specific content and to mandate education in certain areas. RCR education has therefore become a research-compliance issue necessitating the development of policies and the commitment of resources to develop or expand systems for educating faculty and staff and for assuring compliance. These changes implied the need to develop a program evaluation model that could be applied to institutional RCR education programs, which were expected to differ from traditional academic credit-bearing courses targeting trainees. Information gleaned from the examination of corporate compliance models was analyzed in order to create a program evaluation module that could be used to document and assess educational programs focused on teaching RCR. A programmed series of questions for each of the nine RCR content areas identified by the United States Office of Research Integrity was created based on a performance-monitoring evaluation model. The questions focus on educational goals, resources provided to support the educational efforts, educational content, content delivery, educational outcomes, compliance requirements and feedback. Answers collected in response to the questions could be used to both document and continually improve the quality of RCR educational programs through on-going formative assessment and feedback.

  4. Preliminary Survey on Empirical Research Practices in Requirements Engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Condori-Fernandez, Nelly; Daneva, Maia; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    2012-01-01

    [Context and Motivation]. Based on published output in the premium RE conferences and journals, we observe a growing body of research using both quantitative and qualitative research methods to help understand which RE technique, process or tool work better in which context. Also, more and more

  5. Abstracts of the 2. survey of research symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The abstracts presented in this issue show scientific accomplishments of scientists working in the Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Interest of research teams gradually moved from classic biochemistry and physiological chemistry toward molecular biology. One line of research is focused on repair of DNA damages caused by X-rays and UV.

  6. Recent Progress in DIB Research: Survey of PAHS and DIBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Galazutdinov, G.; Krelowski, J.; Biennier, L.; Beletsky, Y.; Song, I.

    2013-01-01

    The spectra of several neutral and ionized PAHs isolated in the gas phase at low temperature have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars [1, 2]. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data provide upper limits for the abundances of specific neutral PAH molecules and ions along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from infrared observations alone. We present the characteristics of the laboratory facility (COSmIC) that was developed for this study and discuss the findings resulting from the comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. COSmIC combines a supersonic free jet expansion with discharge plasma and high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy and provides experimental conditions that closely mimic the interstellar conditions. The column densities of the individual neutral PAH molecules and ions probed in these surveys are derived from the comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data lead to clear and unambiguous conclusions regarding the expected abundances for PAHs of various sizes and charge states in the interstellar environments probed in the surveys. Band profile comparisons between laboratory and astronomical spectra lead to information regarding the molecular structures and characteristics associated with the DIB carriers in the corresponding lines-of-sight. These quantitative surveys of neutral and ionized PAHs in the optical range open the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs and complex organics in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments.

  7. Surveying the Field: The Research Model of Women in Librarianship, 1882-1898

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Women who promoted library services to children in the United States in the late nineteenth century introduced the systematic use of survey research on library practice to the field of professional librarianship. They created a series of qualitative survey-based reports, the "Reading of the Young" reports, which were presented at ALA conferences…

  8. Survey Team On: Conceptualisation of the Role of Competencies, Knowing and Knowledge in Mathematics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niss, Mogens; Bruder, Regina; Planas, Núria; Turner, Ross; Villa-Ochoa, Jhony Alexander

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of the work of the ICME 13 Survey Team on "Conceptualisation and the role of competencies, knowing and knowledge in mathematics education research". It surveys a variety of historical and contemporary views and conceptualisations of what it means to master mathematics, focusing on notions such as…

  9. Bird, mammal, and vegetation community surveys of research natural areas in the Tongass National Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.P. Smith; M.J. Stotts; B.A. Andres; J.M. Melton; A. Garibaldi; K. Boggs

    2001-01-01

    In June 1977, we surveyed seven research natural areas (RNAs) in the Tongass National Forest (Tongass). We documented the composition of biotic communities using rare plant and tidal community surveys, targeted searches for rare animals, and samples of permanent vegetation plots. Birds were sampled once along each transect with 10-minute point counts at stations 8...

  10. Researching the Family: A Guide to Survey and Statistical Data on U.S. Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zill, Nicholas, Ed.; Daily, Margaret, Ed.

    This guide catalogs and describes over 60 major survey and statistical databases containing useful information about the characteristics, experiences, and behavior of U.S. families and is designed to assist researchers in locating suitable databases. The surveys described deal with substantive issues, including health, education, employment and…

  11. Patient Engagement Practices in Clinical Research among Patient Groups, Industry, and Academia in the United States: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sophia K; Selig, Wendy; Harker, Matthew; Roberts, Jamie N; Hesterlee, Sharon; Leventhal, David; Klein, Richard; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Abernethy, Amy P

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered clinical trial design and execution is becoming increasingly important. No best practice guidelines exist despite a key stakeholder declaration to create more effective engagement models. This study aims to gain a better understanding of attitudes and practices for engaging patient groups so that actionable recommendations may be developed. Individuals from industry, academic institutions, and patient groups were identified through Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Drug Information Association rosters and mailing lists. Objectives, practices, and perceived barriers related to engaging patient groups in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials were reported in an online survey. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of survey data followed a literature review to inform survey questions. Survey respondents (n = 179) valued the importance of involving patient groups in research; however, patient group respondents valued their contributions to research protocol development, funding acquisition, and interpretation of study results more highly than those contributions were valued by industry and academic respondents (all p research is needed to define and optimize key success factors.

  12. Survey Research in the Forest Science Journals - Insights from Journal Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Stevanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose: Survey research is one of the most commonly applied approaches in the social sciences. In the forest research it has been used for more than five decades. In spite of that or the fact that the amount of survey-based articles in the forest science journals has increased during the last decade, their share in all articles published in 20 forest science journals (9,372 articles, 2005-2014 is quite modest (3.2%. In our paper we look at the opinions and attitudes of forest science journal editors towards survey research, as their perspective might enlarge our understanding of the use of this approach in the field of forestry. Materials and Methods: We selected 20 forest science journals - 15 from the SCI list and five non-SCI journals and contacted editors of these journals with the self-administered e-mail questionnaire. Data were collected in October 2014 and analyzed by descriptive statistics. The overall response rate was 75%. The assumptions for the study were based on the evidence addressing opinions and attitudes of journal editors from other research fields (finance since no similar study was found in the field of forestry. Results: The majority of editors reported the same review process for survey-based articles as for all others. In two journals, articles with the survey-based content are screened more rigorously and in two journals their publishing is generally discouraged. 40% of journal editors hold the view that no difference should be made between survey research and other types of original research, and another 40% think that survey research should in the first place play a complementary role. As the main strength of survey research editors see the possibility to obtain data unavailable from other sources. They perceive adverse selection and the difficulty to generalize results as the main weaknesses. Conclusions: Editors of forest science journals have similar opinion on survey research as those from the

  13. Acceptability of self-conducted home-based HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Brazil: data from an on-line survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippman, Sheri A; Périssé, André R S; Veloso, Valdiléa G; Sullivan, Patrick S; Buchbinder, Susan; Sineath, R Craig; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2014-04-01

    The Brazilian HIV/AIDS epidemic is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM), however HIV testing rates among MSM are not commensurate with their risk. Strategies to expand early diagnosis may include use of self-conducted home-based testing kits, which are now available for purchase in the US. In April 2011 we conducted a survey with Brazilian MSM using Facebook to assess HIV testing preferences and acceptability of home-based testing. Among 356 previously tested, HIV-negative MSM, 47% reported a preference for home-based testing, 27% preferred clinic-based testing, and 26% had no preference. Less frequent testers and those who had considered testing but failed to test were more likely to prefer home-based testing. Close to 90% reported that they would use self-test kits; 62% and 54% said they would use home-based testing to make choices about unprotected sex with regular and new partners, respectively. Concerns included difficulty to understand the tests (32%) and receiving results alone (23%). Overall, home-based testing may appeal to MSM and result in increased testing frequency. Research on feasibility and utilization of self-tests in practice is needed.

  14. Acceptability of self-conducted home-based HIV testing among men who have sex with men in Brazil: data from an on-line survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri A. Lippman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Brazilian HIV/AIDS epidemic is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM, however HIV testing rates among MSM are not commensurate with their risk. Strategies to expand early diagnosis may include use of self-conducted home-based testing kits, which are now available for purchase in the US. In April 2011 we conducted a survey with Brazilian MSM using Facebook to assess HIV testing preferences and acceptability of home-based testing. Among 356 previously tested, HIV-negative MSM, 47% reported a preference for home-based testing, 27% preferred clinic-based testing, and 26% had no preference. Less frequent testers and those who had considered testing but failed to test were more likely to prefer home-based testing. Close to 90% reported that they would use self-test kits; 62% and 54% said they would use home-based testing to make choices about unprotected sex with regular and new partners, respectively. Concerns included difficulty to understand the tests (32% and receiving results alone (23%. Overall, home-based testing may appeal to MSM and result in increased testing frequency. Research on feasibility and utilization of self-tests in practice is needed.

  15. Making Meaningful Measurement in Survey Research: The Use of Person and Item Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth D.

    2009-01-01

    Quality measurement is essential in every form of research, including institutional research and assessment. Unfortunately, most survey research today (both published and unpublished) is lacking with regards to quality measurement. Reporting means and standard deviations based on ordinal measures is an inappropriate, yet widespread practice in the…

  16. [Cutaneous depigmentation in black female population for cosmetic purposes: results of a KAP survey conducted in Abidjan (Ivory Coast)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourouma, Sarah; Gbery, Ildevert Patrice; Kaloga, Mamadou; Ecra, Elidjé Joseph; Sangaré, Abdoulaye; Kouassi, Isidore Yao; Kassi, Komenan; Kouassi, Alexandre Kouamé; Yoboué, Pauline Yao

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous depigmentation for cosmeticis purposes is a widespread practice among black African women. It has many complications that have been well documented for decades. However, the reasons of practitioners are not well known. The aim of our study was to understand the motivating reasons of these women in order to conduct a communication campaign for behavior change. We performed a cross-sectional KAP survey (Knowledge/Attitudes/Practices) at the Dermatology Department of the University Hospital of Treichville (Abidjan) Data were analyzed using Epi Info 3.5.1. and 6.04 software. Practitioners were mostly young urban single, literate and professionally active women (20-40 years). Cutaneous depigmentation and its consequences were known to women, however, they thought that women with the lightest complexion were more attractive. They were influenced by media and friends. The most frequently observed complications were exogenous ochronosis and stretch marks. The local means of communication remained what essentially sustained the information needs of these women, because they help them to change their behavior. The development of local communication strategies for behavior change seems necessary to stop the phenomenon of cutaneous depigmentation for cosmetic purposes in black female population in Abidjan.

  17. Service utilization by children with conduct disorders: findings from the 2004 Great Britain child mental health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivram, Raghuram; Bankart, John; Meltzer, Howard; Ford, Tamsin; Vostanis, Panos; Goodman, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Children with conduct disorders (CD) and their families are in contact with multiple agencies, but there is limited evidence on their patterns of service utilization. The aim of this study was to establish the patterns, barriers and correlates of service use by analysing the cohort of the 2004 Great Britain child mental health survey (N = 7,977). Use of social services was significantly higher by children with CD than emotional disorders (ED) in the absence of co-morbidity, while use of specialist child mental health and paediatric was significantly higher by children with hyperkinetic disorders (HD) than CD. Children who had comorbid physical disorders used more primary healthcare services compared to those without physical disorders. Utilization of specialist child mental heath and social services was significantly higher among children with unsocialized CD than socialized CD and oppositional defiant disorders. Services utilization and its correlates varied with the type of service. Overall, specialist services use was associated with co-morbidity with learning disabilities, physical and psychiatric disorders. Several correlates of services use in CD appeared non-specific, i.e. associated with use of different services indicating the possibility of indiscriminate use of different types of services. The findings led to the conclusion that there is the need for effective organization and co-ordination of services, and clear care pathways. Involvement of specialist child mental health services should be requested in the presence of mental health co-morbidity.

  18. NASA's Rodent Research Project: Validation of Capabilities for Conducting Long Duration Experiments in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungshin Y.; Cole, Nicolas; Reyes, America; Lai, San-Huei; Klotz, Rebecca; Beegle, Janet E.; Wigley, Cecilia L.; Pletcher, David; Globus, Ruth K.

    2015-01-01

    Research using rodents is an essential tool for advancing biomedical research on Earth and in space. Prior rodent experiments on the Shuttle were limited by the short flight duration. The International Space Station (ISS) provides a new platform for conducting rodent experiments under long duration conditions. Rodent Research (RR)-1 was conducted to validate flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities that were developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. Twenty C57BL6J adult female mice were launched on Sept 21, 2014 in a Dragon Capsule (SpaceX-4), then transferred to the ISS for a total time of 21-22 days (10 commercial mice) or 37 days (10 validation mice). Tissues collected on-orbit were either rapidly frozen or preserved in RNAlater at -80C (n2group) until their return to Earth. Remaining carcasses on-orbit were rapidly frozen for dissection post-flight. The three controls groups at Kennedy Space Center consisted of: Basal mice euthanized at the time of launch, Vivarium controls housed in standard cages, and Ground Controls (GC) housed in flight hardware within an environmental chamber. Upon return to Earth, there were no differences in body weights between Flight (FLT) and GC at the end of the 37 days in space. Liver enzyme activity levels of FLT mice and all control mice were similar in magnitude to those of the samples that were processed under optimal conditions in the laboratory. Liver samples dissected on-orbit yielded high quality RNA (RIN8.99+-0.59, n7). Liver samples dissected post-flight from the intact, frozen FLT carcasses yielded RIN of 7.27 +- 0.52 (n6). Additionally, wet weights of various tissues were measured. Adrenal glands and spleen showed no significant differences in FLT compared to GC although thymus and livers weights were significantly greater in FLT compared to GC. Over 3,000 tissue aliquots collected post-flight from the four groups of mice were deposited into the Ames Life Science Data Archives for future Biospecimen

  19. A survey of metallurgical research on several actinides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivas, J.D.; Schonfeld, F.W.

    1993-11-01

    A Los Alamos perspective on metallurgical research on neptunium, plutonium, americium, curium, and californium is presented. Alloying behaviors of these metals are discussed. Metal fabrication technologies, principally for plutonium, are emphasized.

  20. A review of methodology and analysis of nutrition and mortality surveys conducted in humanitarian emergencies from October 1993 to April 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiegel Paul B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malnutrition prevalence and mortality rates are increasingly used as essential indicators to assess the severity of a crisis, to follow trends, and to guide decision-making, including allocation of funds. Although consensus has slowly developed on the methodology to accurately measure these indicators, errors in the application of the survey methodology and analysis have persisted. The aim of this study was to identify common methodological weaknesses in nutrition and mortality surveys and to provide practical recommendations for improvement. Methods Nutrition (N = 368 and crude mortality rate (CMR; N = 158 surveys conducted by 33 non-governmental organisations and United Nations agencies in 17 countries from October 1993 to April 2004 were analysed for sampling validity, precision, quality of measurement and calculation according to several criteria. Results One hundred and thirty (35.3% nutrition surveys and 5 (3.2% CMR surveys met the criteria for quality. Quality of surveys varied significantly depending on the agency. The proportion of nutrition surveys that met criteria for quality rose significantly from 1993 to 2004; there was no improvement for mortality surveys during this period. Conclusion Significant errors and imprecision in the methodology and reporting of nutrition and mortality surveys were identified. While there was an improvement in the quality of nutrition surveys over the years, the quality of mortality surveys remained poor. Recent initiatives aimed at standardising nutrition and mortality survey quality should be strengthened. There are still a number of methodological issues in nutrition and mortality surveys in humanitarian emergencies that need further study.

  1. For a public sociology on participatory democracy. Reflexive feedback on research conducted in an association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nez, Héloïse

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a reflexive approach on the relations between research and action in works on participatory democracy; a topic in which bridges are numerous between academic, political and activist fields. It aims at analyzing the impact of the close links between sociologists and actors on the methods and results of research and, reciprocally, the role of sociology in developing participatory practices. Relying on Michael Burawoy’s reflection on “public sociology”, our own research experience in an association, and other research studies conducted in Europe, we define five ways sociologists carry out research on participatory democracy in collaboration with the actors. Beyond a reflection on the social reception of our research, the challenge is to develop a critical and committed sociology on participatory democracy with a view to contributing to the political debate and public action from a critical viewpoint.

    Este artículo desarrolla un enfoque reflexivo sobre las relaciones entre investigación y acción en los trabajos sobre democracia participativa, una temática en la que los vínculos entre los campos académicos, políticos y militantes son numerosos. El objetivo es analizar el impacto de las estrechas relaciones entre sociólogos y actores sociales en los métodos y resultados de la investigación y, al mismo tiempo, el papel de la sociología en el desarrollo de las prácticas participativas. Apoyándose en la reflexión de Michael Burawoy sobre la “sociología pública”, en nuestra propia experiencia de investigación en una asociación y en otras investigaciones en Europa, se definen cinco posturas de sociólogos que trabajan en colaboración con los actores sociales sobre la democracia participativa. Más allá de una reflexión sobre la receptividad social de nuestras investigaciones, el desafío consiste en desarrollar una sociología a la vez crítica y comprometida sobre la democracia participativa, para

  2. An international survey to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of research studies most likely to change orthopaedic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, P; de Sa, D; Evaniew, N; Farrokhyar, F; Bhandari, M; Ghert, M

    2016-04-01

    Evidence -based medicine (EBM) is designed to inform clinical decision-making within all medical specialties, including orthopaedic surgery. We recently published a pilot survey of the Canadian Orthopaedic Association (COA) membership and demonstrated that the adoption of EBM principles is variable among Canadian orthopaedic surgeons. The objective of this study was to conduct a broader international survey of orthopaedic surgeons to identify characteristics of research studies perceived as being most influential in informing clinical decision-making. A 29-question electronic survey was distributed to the readership of an established orthopaedic journal with international readership. The survey aimed to analyse the influence of both extrinsic (journal quality, investigator profiles, etc.) and intrinsic characteristics (study design, sample size, etc.) of research studies in relation to their influence on practice patterns. A total of 353 surgeons completed the survey. Surgeons achieved consensus on the 'importance' of three key designs on their practices: randomised controlled trials (94%), meta-analyses (75%) and systematic reviews (66%). The vast majority of respondents support the use of current evidence over historical clinical training; however subjective factors such as journal reputation (72%) and investigator profile (68%) continue to influence clinical decision-making strongly. Although intrinsic factors such as study design and sample size have some influence on clinical decision-making, surgeon respondents are equally influenced by extrinsic factors such as investigator reputation and perceived journal quality.Cite this article: Dr M. Ghert. An international survey to identify the intrinsic and extrinsic factors of research studies most likely to change orthopaedic practice. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:130-136. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.54.2000578. © 2016 Ghert et al.

  3. Survey of Clustering based Financial Fraud Detection Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Sorin SABAU

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Given the current global economic context, increasing efforts are being made to both prevent and detect fraud. This is a natural response to the ascendant trend in fraud activities recorded in the last couple of years, with a 13% increase only in 2011. Due to ever increasing volumes of data needed to be analyzed, data mining methods and techniques are being used more and more often. One domain data mining can excel at, suspicious transaction monitoring, has emerged for the first time as the most effective fraud detection method in 2011. Out of the available data mining techniques, clustering has proven itself a constant applied solution for detecting fraud. This paper surveys clustering techniques used in fraud detection over the last ten years, shortly reviewing each one.

  4. Research on Geological Survey Data Management and Automatic Mapping Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The data management of a large geological survey is not an easy task. To efficiently store and manage the huge datasets, a database of geological information on the basis of Microsoft Access has been created. By using the database of geological information, we can make easily and scientifically store and manage the large geological information. The geological maps—borehole diagrams, the rose diagrams for the joint trends, and joint isointensity diagrams—are traditionally drawn by hand, which is not efficient way; next, it is not easily possible to modify. Therefore, to solve those problems, the automatic mapping method and associated interfaces have been developed by using VS2010 and geological information database; these developments are presented in this article. This article describes the theoretical basis of the new method in detail and provides a case study of practical engineering to demonstrate its application.

  5. Survey of research on unsteady aerodynamic loading of delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, H.; Vaneck, T.; Katz, J.; Jarrah, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    For aeronautical applications, there has been recent interest in accurately determining the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by low-aspect-ratio wings performing transient maneuvers which go to angles of attack as high as 90 deg. Focusing on the delta planform with sharp leading edges, the paper surveys experimental and theoretical investigations dealing with the associated unsteady flow phenomena. For maximum angles above a value between 30 and 40 deg, flow details and airloads are dominated by hysteresis in the 'bursting' instability of intense vortices which emanate from the leading edge. As examples of relevant test results, force and moment histories are presented for a model series with aspect ratios 1, 1.5 and 2. Influences of key parameters are discussed, notably those which measure unsteadiness. Comparisons are given with two theories: a paneling approximation that cannot capture bursting but clarifies other unsteady influences, and a simplified estimation scheme which uses measured bursting data.

  6. Survey of research on unsteady aerodynamic loading of delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, H.; Vaneck, T.; Katz, J.; Jarrah, M. A.

    1991-01-01

    For aeronautical applications, there has been recent interest in accurately determining the aerodynamic forces and moments experienced by low-aspect-ratio wings performing transient maneuvers which go to angles of attack as high as 90 deg. Focusing on the delta planform with sharp leading edges, the paper surveys experimental and theoretical investigations dealing with the associated unsteady flow phenomena. For maximum angles above a value between 30 and 40 deg, flow details and airloads are dominated by hysteresis in the 'bursting' instability of intense vortices which emanate from the leading edge. As examples of relevant test results, force and moment histories are presented for a model series with aspect ratios 1, 1.5 and 2. Influences of key parameters are discussed, notably those which measure unsteadiness. Comparisons are given with two theories: a paneling approximation that cannot capture bursting but clarifies other unsteady influences, and a simplified estimation scheme which uses measured bursting data.

  7. International variation in policies and practices related to informed consent in acute cardiovascular research: Results from a 44 country survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belle, Gerald; Mentzelopoulos, Spyros D; Aufderheide, Tom; May, Susanne; Nichol, Graham

    2015-06-01

    Research in an emergency setting such as that with an acute cardiovascular event is challenging because the window of opportunity to treat may be short and may preclude time to obtain informed consent from the patient or their representative. Some perceive that requiring informed consent in emergency situations has limited improvements in care. Vulnerable populations including minorities or residents of low-income countries are at greatest risk of need for resuscitation. Lack of enrollment of such patients would increase uncertainties in treatment benefit or harm in those at greater risk of need for resuscitation. We sought to assess international variation in policies and procedures related to exception from informed consent (EFIC) or deferred consent for emergency research. A brief survey instrument was developed and modified by consensus among the investigators. Included were multiple choice and open-ended responses. The survey included an illustrative example of a hypothetical randomized study. Elicited information included the possibility of conducting such a study in the respondent's country, as well as approvals required to conduct the study. The population of interest was emergency physicians or other practitioners of acute cardiovascular event research. Usable responses were obtained from 44 countries (76% of surveyed). Community opposition to EFIC was noted in 6 (14%) countries. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers in 8 (20%) countries were judged unable or unwilling to participate. A majority of countries (36, 82%) required approval by a Research Ethics Committee or similar. Government approval was required in 25 (57%) countries. There is international variation in practices and policies related to consent for emergency research. There is an ongoing need to converge regulations based on the usefulness of multinational emergency research to benefit both affluent and disadvantaged populations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Report on the fiscal 1995 research cooperation promotion project, `the research cooperation diagnosis survey`; 1995 nendo kenkyu kyoryoku suishin jigyo `kenkyu kyoryoku shindan chosa` hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    A diagnosis survey was conducted for Japan to cooperate in researching subjects on technical development in developing countries. In fiscal 1995, surveys were made on the following: (1) recycling technology of biomass industrial waste in the tropical region, (2) small size geothermal exploration in remote islands, (3) waste water recycling system using activated carbon, etc., (4) upgrading of proofreading technology of measuring standards, (5) technology to simply set up conditions for forming engineering plastics, (6) assessment of safety of chemical substances. In (1), energy and useful matters are recovered from oil palm of Indonesia by thermal decomposition technology. In (2), a system is constructed which can effectively explore geothermal energy in remote islands in the east Indonesia. As to (3), a survey is conducted in the Philippines. (4) contributes to upgrading of length measuring standards in Thailand. (5) attempts to improve technology of forming engineering plastics. In (6), research cooperation is made for preventing environmental pollution and health damage by chemical substances from happening in Thailand and for technology for assessing safety of chemical substances which contributes to the proper use of the hazardous material law in Thailand. 28 figs.

  9. Social Media, Peer Review, and Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) in Chemistry: Trends, Pitfalls, and Promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogalekar, Ashutosh S

    2015-01-01

    Over the last two decades, various themes inherent in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) in chemistry have been brought to light through prominent cases of research misconduct. This article will describe a few of these cases especially through the lens of social media such as blogs and Twitter. A case will be made that these wholly novel modalities of online discussion are now complementing, and in some cases even circumventing some of the limitations of traditional peer review in chemistry. We present in detail our evaluation of three recent cases of RCR along with several other social media illustrations. These cases have been selected to be representative and showcase several of the most prominent issues at the intersection of traditional and social-media based peer review. In each case, basic details are presented along with a brief discussion of the underlying issues-readers interested in deeper analysis of each subject are referred to a collection of relevant articles and websites. This perspective focuses on the most important RCR issues that have arisen in the past decade, a time which we believe coincides with the serious participation of the scientific community in general, and the chemistry community in particular, in social media-based, citizen-enabled peer-review. A discussion of important trends in RCR in the age of social media, outstanding developments in this area, and questions of enduring interest for the near future concludes the article.

  10. A qualitative approach to Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training development: identification of metacognitive strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligyte, Vykinta; Marcy, Richard T; Sevier, Sydney T; Godfrey, Elaine S; Mumford, Michael D

    2008-03-01

    Although Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training is common in the sciences, the effectiveness of RCR training is open to question. Three key factors appear to be particularly important in ensuring the effectiveness of ethics education programs: (1) educational efforts should be tied to day-to-day practices in the field, (2) educational efforts should provide strategies for working through the ethical problems people are likely to encounter in day-to-day practice, and (3) educational efforts should be embedded in a broader program of on-going career development efforts. This article discusses a complex qualitative approach to RCR training development, based on a sensemaking model, which strives to address the afore-mentioned training concerns. Ethnographic observations and prior RCR training served the purpose of collecting information specific to a multi-disciplinary and multi-university research center with the goal of identifying metacognitive reasoning strategies that would facilitate ethical decision-making. The extensive qualitative analyses resulted in the identification of nine metacognitive reasoning strategies on which future RCR training will be developed. The implications of the findings for RCR training in the sciences are discussed.

  11. Towards the responsible conduct of scientific research: is ethics education enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novossiolova, Tatyana; Sture, Judi

    2012-01-01

    Much of the discourse on ‘beyond the laboratory door’ biosecurity to date has focused on the need to raise awareness among the scientific community of the risks posed by the rapid advancement of biotechnology in recent decades. While education is undoubtedly important, a growing body of evidence suggests that ethics education does not necessarily translate into ethical behaviour. This trend has already been reported in clinical settings, where research has highlighted doctors’ own reports of ethically dubious practices and challenges when confronted with moral dilemmas in their everyday work. The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the practical value of ethics education and show why it is an essential, although insufficient, measure for promoting a culture of responsible conduct of research. We conclude by highlighting the importance of continuing professional development as a way of maintaining life scientists’ engagement with biosecurity issues and supporting them in active roles in the effective implementation of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BWC). PMID:22606762

  12. 10 CFR 35.604 - Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote afterloader unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated... Stereotactic Radiosurgery Units § 35.604 Surveys of patients and human research subjects treated with a remote... shall survey the patient or the human research subject and the remote afterloader unit with a...

  13. Exploring Graduate Students’ Attitudes towards Team Research and Their Scholarly Productivity: A Survey Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianlan Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the attitudinal and motivational factors underlying graduate students’ attitudes towards team research. Guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior, we hypothesize that attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control are three major determinants of graduate students’ intentions to conduct team research. An instrument was developed to measure the influences of these factors on students’ intentions and relevant scholarly productivity. A total of 281 graduate students from a large, comprehensive university in the southwest United States participated in the survey. Descriptive statistics reveal that around two-thirds of graduate students have no co-authored manuscripts submitted for publication since they started graduate school. Factor analyses validated the factor structure of the instrument, and the results of Structural Equation Modeling show that (a graduate students’ attitudes towards team research have a positive correlation with their attitudes towards individual research; (b attitude towards team research, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control, along with students’ discipline/major areas and classification, account for 58% of the variance in the intention to conduct team research; and (c subjective norm appears to be the most influential factor in the model, followed by attitude; while perceived behavioral control is not of much importance. These findings provide implications for academic departments and programs to promote graduate students’ team research. Specifically, creating a climate for collaborative research in academic programs/disciplines/universities may work jointly with enhancing students’ appraisals of such collaborations.

  14. A Model Incorporating the Rationale and Purpose for Conducting Mixed-Methods Research in Special Education and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Sutton, Ida L.

    2006-01-01

    This article provides a typology of reasons for conducting mixed-methods research in special education. The mixed-methods research process is described along with the role of the rationale and purpose of study. The reasons given in the literature for utilizing mixed-methods research are explicated, and the limitations of these reason frameworks…

  15. 32 CFR 219.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... HUMAN SUBJECTS § 219.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal Department or Agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy...

  16. 45 CFR 690.103 - Assuring compliance with this policy-research conducted or supported by any Federal department or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assuring compliance with this policy-research... § 690.103 Assuring compliance with this policy—research conducted or supported by any Federal department or agency. (a) Each institution engaged in research which is covered by this policy and which...

  17. Using detection dogs to conduct simultaneous surveys of northern spotted (Strix occidentalis caurina and barred owls (Strix varia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel K Wasser

    Full Text Available State and federal actions to conserve northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina habitat are largely initiated by establishing habitat occupancy. Northern spotted owl occupancy is typically assessed by eliciting their response to simulated conspecific vocalizations. However, proximity of barred owls (Strix varia-a significant threat to northern spotted owls-can suppress northern spotted owl responsiveness to vocalization surveys and hence their probability of detection. We developed a survey method to simultaneously detect both species that does not require vocalization. Detection dogs (Canis familiaris located owl pellets accumulated under roost sites, within search areas selected using habitat association maps. We compared success of detection dog surveys to vocalization surveys slightly modified from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Draft 2010 Survey Protocol. Seventeen 2 km × 2 km polygons were each surveyed multiple times in an area where northern spotted owls were known to nest prior to 1997 and barred owl density was thought to be low. Mitochondrial DNA was used to confirm species from pellets detected by dogs. Spotted owl and barred owl detection probabilities were significantly higher for dog than vocalization surveys. For spotted owls, this difference increased with number of site visits. Cumulative detection probabilities of northern spotted owls were 29% after session 1, 62% after session 2, and 87% after session 3 for dog surveys, compared to 25% after session 1, increasing to 59% by session 6 for vocalization surveys. Mean detection probability for barred owls was 20.1% for dog surveys and 7.3% for vocal surveys. Results suggest that detection dog surveys can complement vocalization surveys by providing a reliable method for establishing occupancy of both northern spotted and barred owl without requiring owl vocalization. This helps meet objectives of Recovery Actions 24 and 25 of the Revised Recovery Plan for the

  18. Surveying and Comparing Thermal Conductivity and Physical Properties of Oil Base NanoFluids Containing Carbon and Metal Oxide Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ahmadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, nano materials with tubular structures are added to SAE 20W50 engine oil to study the rate of their effects on the properties of engine oil. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and vanadium oxide nanotubes (VONTs has been used as two different additive materials, one of them is carbonic and the other is metallic oxides and their effect on  different parameters containing viscosity, thermal conductivity coefficient, flash point and pour point of engine oil as the quality properties of engine oil has been studied and compared. The samples of two concentrations 0.1 and 0.2 wt% with using planetary ball mill were made. The obtained results show that MWCNTs in all cases, which  have been evaluated, had better functionality with respect to vanadium oxide nanotubes. In the 0.1 wt% concentration, flash point of MWCNTs/oil and VONTs/oil increased about 9.3% and 5.8% respectively. In addition, thermal conductivity of them increased 13.2% and 10.2% respectively.

  19. Using the Indian National Sample Survey data in public health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Anuradha; Singh, Prabal V; Samarth, Amit; Bergkvist, Sofi; Rao, Mala

    2013-01-01

    The National Sample Survey (NSS), instituted in 1950, was the brainchild of Professor Mahalanobis, widely regarded as the father of Indian statistics.1 His ambition was to obtain and quantify comprehensive information on an annual basis on the socio- economic, demographic, agricultural and other profiles of the country, both at the national and state levels. The NSS is a multi- stage, multi-subject and multi-purpose cross-sectional survey, which is conducted annually and covers topics of current interest.

  20. Surveys of Health Professions Trainees: Prevalence, Response Rates, and Predictive Factors to Guide Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Andrew W; Friedman, Benjamin T; Utrankar, Amol; Ta, Andrew Q; Reddy, Shalini T; Durning, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    To establish a baseline overall response rate for surveys of health professions trainees, determine strategies associated with improved response rates, and evaluate for the presence of nonresponse bias. The authors performed a comprehensive analysis of all articles published in Academic Medicine, Medical Education, and Advances in Health Sciences Education in 2013, recording response rates. Additionally, they reviewed nonresponse bias analyses and factors suggested in other fields to affect response rate including survey delivery method, prenotification, and incentives. The search yielded 732 total articles; of these, 356 were research articles, and of these, 185 (52.0%) used at least one survey. Of these, 66 articles (35.6%) met inclusion criteria and yielded 73 unique surveys. Of the 73 surveys used, investigators reported a response rate for 63.0% of them; response rates ranged from 26.6% to 100%, mean (standard deviation) 71.3% (19.5%). Investigators reported using incentives for only 16.4% of the 73 surveys. The only survey methodology factor significantly associated with response rate was single- vs. multi-institutional surveys (respectively, 74.6% [21.2%] vs. 62.0% [12.8%], P = .022). Notably, statistical power for all analyses was limited. No articles evaluated for nonresponse bias. Approximately half of the articles evaluated used a survey as part of their methods. Limited data are available to establish a baseline response rate among health professions trainees and inform researchers which strategies are associated with higher response rates. Journals publishing survey-based health professions education research should improve reporting of response rate, nonresponse bias, and other survey factors.

  1. Using smartphones in survey research: a multifunctional tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nathalie Sonck; Henk Fernee

    2013-01-01

    Smartphones and apps offer an innovative means of collecting data from the public. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research | SCP has been engaged in one of the first experiments involving the use of a smartphone app to collect time use data recorded by means of an electronic diary. Is it feasi

  2. Using smartphones in survey research: a multifunctional tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nathalie Sonck; Henk Fernee

    2013-01-01

    Smartphones and apps offer an innovative means of collecting data from the public. The Netherlands Institute for Social Research | SCP has been engaged in one of the first experiments involving the use of a smartphone app to collect time use data recorded by means of an electronic diary. Is it

  3. A review of brain-computer interface games and an opinion survey from researchers, developers and users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Minkyu; Lee, Mijin; Choi, Jinyoung; Jun, Sung Chan

    2014-08-11

    In recent years, research on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) technology for healthy users has attracted considerable interest, and BCI games are especially popular. This study reviews the current status of, and describes future directions, in the field of BCI games. To this end, we conducted a literature search and found that BCI control paradigms using electroencephalographic signals (motor imagery, P300, steady state visual evoked potential and passive approach reading mental state) have been the primary focus of research. We also conducted a survey of nearly three hundred participants that included researchers, game developers and users around the world. From this survey, we found that all three groups (researchers, developers and users) agreed on the significant influence and applicability of BCI and BCI games, and they all selected prostheses, rehabilitation and games as the most promising BCI applications. User and developer groups tended to give low priority to passive BCI and the whole head sensor array. Developers gave higher priorities to "the easiness of playing" and the "development platform" as important elements for BCI games and the market. Based on our assessment, we discuss the critical point at which BCI games will be able to progress from their current stage to widespread marketing to consumers. In conclusion, we propose three critical elements important for expansion of the BCI game market: standards, gameplay and appropriate integration.

  4. A Review of Brain-Computer Interface Games and an Opinion Survey from Researchers, Developers and Users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkyu Ahn

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, research on Brain-Computer Interface (BCI technology for healthy users has attracted considerable interest, and BCI games are especially popular. This study reviews the current status of, and describes future directions, in the field of BCI games. To this end, we conducted a literature search and found that BCI control paradigms using electroencephalographic signals (motor imagery, P300, steady state visual evoked potential and passive approach reading mental state have been the primary focus of research. We also conducted a survey of nearly three hundred participants that included researchers, game developers and users around the world. From this survey, we found that all three groups (researchers, developers and users agreed on the significant influence and applicability of BCI and BCI games, and they all selected prostheses, rehabilitation and games as the most promising BCI applications. User and developer groups tended to give low priority to passive BCI and the whole head sensor array. Developers gave higher priorities to “the easiness of playing” and the “development platform” as important elements for BCI games and the market. Based on our assessment, we discuss the critical point at which BCI games will be able to progress from their current stage to widespread marketing to consumers. In conclusion, we propose three critical elements important for expansion of the BCI game market: standards, gameplay and appropriate integration.

  5. DRIVING AND LIMITING FACTORS IN THE FARM MANAGEMENT BY YOUNG FARMERS IN THE CONTEXT OF SURVEY RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kiełbasa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify driving and limiting factors of farm management in a region of fragmented agriculture. The paper presents the results of the research conducted in the South-Eastern Poland (Macroregion of Małopolska and Pogórze. The survey was conducted in 2014 in the farms managed by young farmers, i.e. the benefi ciaries of the measure “Setting up of young farmers” from the RDP 2007–2013, with the use of a survey method with a questionnaire interview. The research was empirical, and its main goal was to present a case study of the farm management by young farmers in terms of specifi c management barriers. The results of the studies pointed to the fragmented agrarian structure as the one of the biggest barriers of the eff ective farm management. The young farmers pointed that fragmented agrarian structure signifi cantly impedes the purchase or lease of agricultural land, and the farm development in the same way. The survey pointed to the factors that contribute to the young farmers: the entrepreneurial attitude, activity and creativity, training, the management knowledge and better access to the Common Agricultural Policy instruments.

  6. Priorities for mental health research in Europe: A survey among national stakeholders' associations within the ROAMER project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorillo, Andrea; Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Sampogna, Gaia; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Maj, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Within the ROAMER project, funded by the European Commission, a survey was conducted with national associations/organizations of psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, users and/or carers, and psychiatric trainees in the 27 countries of the European Union, aiming to explore their views about priorities for mental health research in Europe. One hundred and eight associations/organizations returned the questionnaire. The five most frequently selected research priorities were early detection and management of mental disorders, quality of mental health services, prevention of mental disorders, rehabilitation and social inclusion, and new medications for mental disorders. All these areas, except the last one, were among the top ten research priorities according to all categories of stakeholders, along with stigma and discrimination. These results seem to support the recent argument that some rebalancing in favor of psychosocial and health service studies may be needed in psychiatric research. PMID:23737426

  7. Assessing the Incidence of Ciguatera Fish Poisoning with Two Surveys Conducted in Culebra, Puerto Rico, during 2005 and 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luber, George; Conklin, Laura; Tosteson, Thomas R.; Granade, Hudson R.; Dickey, Robert W.; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP) is the most common seafood intoxication worldwide, its burden has been difficult to establish because there are no biomarkers to diagnose human exposure. Objective: We explored the incidence of CFP, percentage of CFP case-patients with laboratory-confirmed ciguatoxic meal remnants, cost of CFP illness, and potential risk factors for CFP. Methods: During 2005 and again during 2006, we conducted a census of all occupied households on the island of Culebra, Puerto Rico, where locally caught fish are a staple food. We defined CFP case-patients as persons with gastrointestinal symptoms (abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, or nausea) and neurological symptoms (extremity paresthesia, arthralgia, myalgia, malaise, pruritus, headache, dizziness, metallic taste, visual disturbance, circumoral paresthesia, temperature reversal, or toothache) or systemic symptoms (e.g., bradycardia) within 72 hr of eating fish during the previous year. Participants were asked to save fish remnants eaten by case-patients for ciguatoxin analysis at the Food and Drug Administration laboratory in Dauphin Island, Alabama (USA). Results: We surveyed 340 households during 2005 and 335 households during 2006. The estimated annual incidence of possible CFP was 4.0 per 1,000 person-years, and that of probable CFP was 7.5 per 1,000 person-years. One of three fish samples submitted by probable case-patients was positive for ciguatoxins. None of the case-patients required respiratory support. Households that typically consumed barracuda were more likely to report CFP (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Our estimates, which are consistent with previous studies using similar case findings, contribute to the overall information available to support public health decision making about CFP prevention. PMID:22275728

  8. Synergies between exoplanet surveys and variable star research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Geza

    2017-09-01

    With the discovery of the first transiting extrasolar planetary system back in 1999, a great number of projects started to hunt for other similar systems. Because the incidence rate of such systems was unknown and the length of the shallow transit events is only a few percent of the orbital period, the goal was to monitor continuously as many stars as possible for at least a period of a few months. Small aperture, large field of view automated telescope systems have been installed with a parallel development of new data reduction and analysis methods, leading to better than 1% per data point precision for thousands of stars. With the successful launch of the photometric satellites CoRoT and Kepler, the precision increased further by one-two orders of magnitude. Millions of stars have been analyzed and searched for transits. In the history of variable star astronomy this is the biggest undertaking so far, resulting in photometric time series inventories immensely valuable for the whole field. In this review we briefly discuss the methods of data analysis that were inspired by the main science driver of these surveys and highlight some of the most interesting variable star results that impact the field of variable star astronomy.

  9. Compassionate use of interventions: results of a European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) survey of ten European countries

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whitfield, Kate

    2010-11-12

    Abstract Background \\'Compassionate use\\' programmes allow medicinal products that are not authorised, but are in the development process, to be made available to patients with a severe disease who have no other satisfactory treatment available to them. We sought to understand how such programmes are regulated in ten European Union countries. Methods The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) conducted a comprehensive survey on clinical research regulatory requirements, including questions on regulations of \\'compassionate use\\' programmes. Ten European countries, covering approximately 70% of the EU population, were included in the survey (Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the UK). Results European Regulation 726\\/2004\\/EC is clear on the intentions of \\'compassionate use\\' programmes and aimed to harmonise them in the European Union. The survey reveals that different countries have adopted different requirements and that \\'compassionate use\\' is not interpreted in the same way across Europe. Four of the ten countries surveyed have no formal regulatory system for the programmes. We discuss the need for \\'compassionate use\\' programmes and their regulation where protection of patients is paramount. Conclusions \\'Compassionate use\\' is a misleading term and should be replaced with \\'expanded access\\'. There is a need for expanded access programmes in order to serve the interests of seriously ill patients who have no other treatment options. To protect these patients, European legislation needs to be more explicit and informative with regard to the regulatory requirements, restrictions, and responsibilities in expanded access programmes.

  10. A Survey of Research on Service-Spacecraft Orbit Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yue; ZHANG Jian-xin; ZHANG Qiang; WEI Xiao-peng

    2013-01-01

    On-orbit service spacecraft orbit problem has been addressed for decades. The research of on-orbit service spacecraft orbit can be roughly divided into orbit design and orbit optimization. The paper mainly focuses on the orbit design problem. We simply summarize of the previous works, and point out the main content of the on-orbit service spacecraft orbit design. We classify current on-orbit service spacecraft orbit design problem into parking-orbit design, maneuvering-orbit design and servicing-orbit design. Then, we give a detail description of the three specific orbits, and put forward our own ideas on the existed achievements. The paper will provide a meaningful reference for the on-orbit service spacecraft orbital design research.

  11. A Survey of Astronomical Research: An Astronomy for Development Baseline

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeiro, V A R M; Cardenas-Avendano, A

    2013-01-01

    Measuring scientific development is a difficult task. Different metrics have been put forward to evaluate scientific development; in this paper we explore a metric that uses the number of peer-reviewed research research articles as an indicator of development in the field of astronomy. We analyzed the available publication record, using the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Database System, by country affiliation in the time span between 1950 and 2011 for countries with a Gross National Income of less than 14,365 USD in 2010. This represents 149 countries. We propose that this metric identifies countries in `astronomy development' with a culture of research publishing. We also propose that for a country to develop astronomy it should invest in outside expert visits, send their staff abroad to study and establish a culture of scientific publishing. Furthermore, we propose that this paper may be used as a baseline to measure the success of major international projects, such as the International Year of Astronomy 2009.

  12. Federal Funds for Research and Development: Fiscal Years 1980, 1981, and 1982. Volume XXX. Detailed Statistical Tables. Surveys of Science Resources Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.

    During the March through July 1981 period a total of 36 Federal agencies and their subdivisions (95 individual respondents) submitted data in response to the Annual Survey of Federal Funds for Research and Development, Volume XXX, conducted by the National Science Foundation. The detailed statistical tables presented in this report were derived…

  13. Response rate, response time, and economic costs of survey research: A randomized trial of practicing pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardigan, Patrick C; Popovici, Ioana; Carvajal, Manuel J

    2016-01-01

    There is a gap between increasing demands from pharmacy journals, publishers, and reviewers for high survey response rates and the actual responses often obtained in the field by survey researchers. Presumably demands have been set high because response rates, times, and costs affect the validity and reliability of survey results. Explore the extent to which survey response rates, average response times, and economic costs are affected by conditions under which pharmacist workforce surveys are administered. A random sample of 7200 U.S. practicing pharmacists was selected. The sample was stratified by delivery method, questionnaire length, item placement, and gender of respondent for a total of 300 observations within each subgroup. A job satisfaction survey was administered during March-April 2012. Delivery method was the only classification showing significant differences in response rates and average response times. The postal mail procedure accounted for the highest response rates of completed surveys, but the email method exhibited the quickest turnaround. A hybrid approach, consisting of a combination of postal and electronic means, showed the least favorable results. Postal mail was 2.9 times more cost effective than the email approach and 4.6 times more cost effective than the hybrid approach. Researchers seeking to increase practicing pharmacists' survey participation and reduce response time and related costs can benefit from the analytical procedures tested here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A review and evaluation of the Langley Research Center's scientific and technical information program. Results of phase 1: Knowledge and attitudes survey, LaRC research personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Glassman, M.; Cross, E. M.

    1980-01-01

    The effectiveness of the Langley STI program was assessed using feedback obtained from Langley engineers and scientists. A survey research procedure was conducted in two stages. Personal interviews with 64 randomly selected Langley engineers and scientists were used to obtain information for questionnaire development. Data were then collected by means of the questionnaire which covered various aspects of the Langley STI program, utilized both open and closed ended questions and was pretested for finalization. The questions were organized around the six objectives for Phase 1. The completed questionnaires were analyzed. From the analysis of the data, recommendations were made for improving the Langley STI program.

  15. SOLID participatory research from Denmark: Use of herbs in pastures for dairy cows: Farmers’ experience, pasture coverage analyses, and literature survey of Danish research results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kudahl, Anne Braad; Karydi, Emmanouela; Vaarst, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Semi-structured qualitative research interviews were conducted with eight organic dairy farmers (producers and shareholders of Thise Dairy Company), in which they shared their experience with growing herbs on grass fields on long-term basis for both grazing and silage production. Growing herbs......, grasses and clover dominated and Lucerne became dominating. Among the herbs, only chicory and caraway was found after 5-6 years. A literature survey was undertaken with focus on Danish studies, and 17 studies were in-depth reviewed with focus on pasture characteristics and qualities as well as milk...

  16. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  17. Surveys of research in the Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grazis, B.M. [ed.

    1992-11-01

    Research reports are presented on reactive intermediates in condensed phase (radiation chemistry, photochemistry), electron transfer and energy conversion, photosynthesis and solar energy conversion, metal cluster chemistry, chemical dynamics in gas phase, photoionization-photoelectrons, characterization and reactivity of coal and coal macerals, premium coal sample program, chemical separations, heavy elements coordination chemistry, heavy elements photophysics/photochemistry, f-electron interactions, radiation chemistry of high-level wastes (gas generation in waste tanks), ultrafast molecular electronic devices, and nuclear medicine. Separate abstracts have been prepared. Accelerator activites and computer system/network services are also reported.

  18. A Survey of Astronomical Research: A Baseline for Astronomical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, V. A. R. M.; Russo, P.; Cárdenas-Avendaño, A.

    2013-12-01

    Measuring scientific development is a difficult task. Different metrics have been put forward to evaluate scientific development; in this paper we explore a metric that uses the number of peer-reviewed, and when available non-peer-reviewed, research articles as an indicator of development in the field of astronomy. We analyzed the available publication record, using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory/NASA Astrophysics Database System, by country affiliation in the time span between 1950 and 2011 for countries with a gross national income of less than 14,365 USD in 2010. This represents 149 countries. We propose that this metric identifies countries in "astronomical development" with a culture of research publishing. We also propose that for a country to develop in astronomy, it should invest in outside expert visits, send its staff abroad to study, and establish a culture of scientific publishing. Furthermore, we propose that this paper may be used as a baseline to measure the success of major international projects, such as the International Year of Astronomy 2009.

  19. Historical Survey of Research in Physics Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, David E.

    2017-01-01

    There have been efforts to provide specialized preparation for prospective physics teachers for over 100 years, both in the U.S. and elsewhere. However, systematic research investigations of these efforts are much more scarce, particularly in the U.S. I will review some highlights of research in physics teacher preparation reported in the U.S. and in several other countries as early as the 1920s. The more recent investigations (beginning around 1970) reveal a pattern of teacher preparation practices emphasizing multiple, extended experiences in analyzing physical systems-and making and testing hypotheses of experimental outcomes-by developing and reflecting on laboratory-based physics activities that are often subsequently taught (as simulated ``micro-teaching'' or in actual classrooms), all under close guidance and intensive coaching from expert physics-teacher educators. Outcomes reported include improvements in the quality of experiment design (emphasizing student-generated explanations rather than rote procedures), and in ability to communicate, better awareness of physics teachers' pedagogical knowledge, and improved learning gains by the teachers' students on tests of conceptual understanding. Supported in part by NSF DUE #1256333.

  20. Telecommunications Research in the United States and Selected Foreign Countries: A Preliminary Survey. Volume I, Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academy of Engineering, Washington, DC. Committee on Telecommunications.

    At the request of the National Science Foundation, the Panel on Telecommunications Research of the Committee on Telecommunications of the National Academy of Engineering has made a preliminary survey of the status and trends of telecommunications research in the United States and selected foreign countries. The status and trends were identified by…