WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey radiation testing

  1. Tests of HPGe- and scintillation-based backpack γ-radiation survey systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Jonas M C; Östlund, Karl; Söderberg, Joakim; Mattsson, Sören; Rääf, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    The performance of three different backpack-mounted γ-radiation survey systems has been investigated. The systems are based on a LaBr3:Ce detector and a NaI(Tl) detector both with active volume dimensions of 76.2 mm in diameter and 76.2 mm length and a 123% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The detection limits of the systems were tested in a controlled outdoor environment in Sweden, followed by field tests of the HPGe- and LaBr3:Ce-based systems at the site of a radioactive waste repository in Georgia (in the Caucasus region of Eurasia). The results showed that the high efficiency HPGe detector performed significantly better than similar sized LaBr3:Ce and NaI(Tl) detectors, however, the HPGe detector was significantly heavier than the other systems. The use of different analysis methods revealed that creating maps of the survey area was the best method for offline analysis of survey data collected from a large area. Using off-site personnel for analysis of the data proved to be beneficial.

  2. Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin Okada

    2010-09-16

    In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

  3. Assessment of a relative contribution of terrestrial background radiation in the test field by using RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdić Senada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the radiological investigation of terrestrial gamma radiation in the test field with soil samples from different minefields in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Measurements of ambient dose equivalent rate, commonly referred to as “air dose rate”, in the test field located in the Tuzla Canton, were performed by RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter, based on energy-compensated Geiger-Muller counter. Its performances were tested in the laboratory conditions with gamma point sources. Since all the samples in the test field were exposed to the same cosmic radiation, there was a possibility to assess a relative contribution of terrestrial gamma radiation due to soil samples of different composition. One set of measurements in the test field was performed with RADIAGEMTM 2000, at a height of about one meter above the ground and basic statistical parameters indicated that there was no significant difference of terrestrial gamma radiation from different soil samples. The other set of measurements was carried out with the same device placed on the ground in the test field. Processing of experimental data on terrestrial gamma radiation has shown that it was possible to make a difference between relative contributions of terrestrial gamma radiation from individual soil samples. The results of investigation could be useful for multiple purposes of public interest.

  4. Field tests of a portable tissue equivalent survey meter for monitoring mixed beta/gamma radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, D.E.; Rich, B.L.; Johnson, L.O.; Daniel, S.H. III

    1986-05-01

    A portable radiation survey meter that provides a tissue equivalent response to photons and beta particles has been designed and field tested. The detector is a very thin plastic scintillator that closely simulates the actual geometry and scattering properties of the relevant skin tissues. The meter reads out the D(0.07) dose rate directly, and indicates the tissue dose rates at other depths with the use of tissue equivalent filters of appropriate thicknesses. Data are presented which compare the D(0.07) and D(10) dose rates recorded by the Tissue Equivalent (TE) survey meter with dose rates recorded by two commercial ion chamber meters for a number of laboratory and field sources. Most commercial ion chamber meters fail to respond adequately to the extreme off-axis beta particles from extended beta sources, and hence require the application of large beta correction factors to change the instrument reading to the true D(0.07) dose rate. The tissue equivalent survey meter exhibits an angular response to beta particles that is very similar to the angular response of an extrapolation chamber. Consequently, there is close agreement between the TE meter and extrapolation chamber readings for a wide variety of beta and mixed beta-gamma rdiation fields. D(0.07), D(3), and D(10) dose rates, measured with the INEL TE meter at a number of typical work stations, are presented.

  5. [Radiation screening test for commercial food products and foodstuffs for food services using NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Masaru; Takanashi, Yoshimitsu; Kihara, Akiko; Tsutake, Toyoshige; Mitsui, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Screening tests were carried out for radioactive cesium in foods using a NaI (Tl) scintillation survey meter. The screening level was set at 250 Bq/kg, and specimens exceeding this level were scheduled to be sent to an external testing organization, which would conduct further tests using a germanium semiconductor detector. Some specimens that did not reach the screening level were also sent to the same organization. Foodstuffs used in commercial food products circulated in Chiba city were targeted, along with food services provided to schools and day care centers. In all, 495 specimens were tested; however, no specimens exceeded the screening level. The results of verification tests confirmed that no specimen exceeded the tentative regulatory limit.

  6. Arduino based radiation survey meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd, E-mail: nur-aira@nm.gov.my; Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Azman, Azraf; Dolah, Taufik; Jaafar, Zainudin; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ramli, Abd Aziz Mhd; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Said, Fazila; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Taat, Muhamad Zahidee [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Muzakkir, Amir [Sinaran Utama Teknologi Sdn Bhd, 43650, Bandar Baru Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    This paper presents the design of new digital radiation survey meter with LND7121 Geiger Muller tube detector and Atmega328P microcontroller. Development of the survey meter prototype is carried out on Arduino Uno platform. 16-bit Timer1 on the microcontroller is utilized as external pulse counter to produce count per second or CPS measurement. Conversion from CPS to dose rate technique is also performed by Arduino to display results in micro Sievert per hour (μSvhr{sup −1}). Conversion factor (CF) value for conversion of CPM to μSvhr{sup −1} determined from manufacturer data sheet is compared with CF obtained from calibration procedure. The survey meter measurement results are found to be linear for dose rates below 3500 µSv/hr.

  7. Arduino based radiation survey meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nur Aira Abd; Lombigit, Lojius; Abdullah, Nor Arymaswati; Azman, Azraf; Dolah, Taufik; Muzakkir, Amir; Jaafar, Zainudin; Mohamad, Glam Hadzir Patai; Ramli, Abd Aziz Mhd; Zain, Rasif Mohd; Said, Fazila; Khalid, Mohd Ashhar; Taat, Muhamad Zahidee

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design of new digital radiation survey meter with LND7121 Geiger Muller tube detector and Atmega328P microcontroller. Development of the survey meter prototype is carried out on Arduino Uno platform. 16-bit Timer1 on the microcontroller is utilized as external pulse counter to produce count per second or CPS measurement. Conversion from CPS to dose rate technique is also performed by Arduino to display results in micro Sievert per hour (μSvhr-1). Conversion factor (CF) value for conversion of CPM to μSvhr-1 determined from manufacturer data sheet is compared with CF obtained from calibration procedure. The survey meter measurement results are found to be linear for dose rates below 3500 µSv/hr.

  8. 10 CFR 39.67 - Radiation surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... from the logging tool before departure from the temporary jobsite, the licensee shall confirm that the logging tool is free of contamination by energizing the logging tool detector or by using a survey meter... REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Radiation...

  9. Thermal Radiation Source Test Facility,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    KEY WORDS (Continu on revers side I eesr and identify by block nuMb.,) Thermal Radiation Source Thermal Test Facility 20 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse...SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1-1 GENERAL Defense Nuclear Agency’s Field Command, located at Kirtland AFB in New Mexico, has recently upgraded its thermal test facility...is used to evaluate damage and survivability in a nuclear environment. The thermal test facility was first established in 1979 and used O large

  10. CHARM Facility Test Area Radiation Field Description

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Specification document summarising the radiation field of the CHARM facility test area. This will act as a guide to any potential users of the facility as to what they can expect in terms of radiation, given in the form of radiation spectra information and fluence for each test position, along with general radiation maps for the test area and Montrac test location.

  11. Radiation survey meters used for environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerke, H. (ed.) (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, NRPA (Norway)); Sigurdsson, T. (Icelandic Radiation Safety Authority, Geislavarnir Rikisins, GR (IS)); Meier Pedersen, K. (National Board of Health, Statens Institut for Straalebeskyttelse (SIS) (Denmark)); Grindborg, J.-E.; Persson, L. (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Straalsaekerhetsmyndigheten (SSM) (Sweden)); Siiskonen, T.; Hakanen, A.; Kosunen, A. (Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Saeteilyturvakeskus (STUK) (Finland))

    2012-01-15

    The Nordic dosimetry group set up the GammaRate project to investigate how its expertise could be used to assure appropriate usage of survey meters in environmental monitoring. Considerable expertise in calibrating radiation instruments exists in the Nordic radiation protection authorities. The Swedish, Finnish, Danish and Norwegian authorities operate Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs) that provide users with calibration traceable to internationally recognised primary standards. These authorities together with the Icelandic authorities have formally cooperated since 2002 in the field of radiation dosimetry. Dosimetry is the base for assesment of risk from ionising radiation and calibration of instruments is an imported part in dosimetry. The Nordic dosimetry group has been focused on cancer therapy. This work extends the cooperation to the dosimetry of radiation protection and environmental monitoring. This report contains the formal, theoretical and practical background for survey meter measurements. Nordic standards dosimetry laboratories have the capability to provide traceable calibration of instruments in various types of radiation. To verify and explore this further in radiation protection applications a set of survey instruments were sent between the five Nordic countries and each of the authority asked to provide a calibration coefficient for all instruments. The measurement results were within the stated uncertainties, except for some results from NRPA for the ionchamber based instrument. The comparison was shown to be a valuable tool to harmonize the calibration of radiation protection instruments in the Nordic countries. Dosimetry plays an important role in the emergency situations, and it is clear that better traceability and harmonised common guidelines will improve the emergency preparedness and health. (Author)

  12. Radiation survey of aircraft and heavy machinery scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idriss, Hajo; Salih, Isam; Gumaa, Elsadig; Yassin, Abbas; Yousif, E H; Abdel Hamid, Saad Eldeen M; Sam, A K

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted primarily to survey aircraft and heavy machinery at 30 locations within Khartoum State using handheld radiation survey meters to detect and identify any radiation sources that might be present and to estimate radiation dose levels. The survey has resulted in detection of 16 sealed sources of (90)Sr and one of (226)Ra in aircraft scrap. Of course, (90)Sr sources are used in military aircraft as temperature sensors while (226)Ra is used for indicating fuel levels. These sources were found intact without spreading radioactivity contamination; however, none was detected in heavy machine scrap. The levels of radiation dose measured at 0.1m from the source fall within the range of 25.1-40.2 μSv/h with an average value of 33.52 ± 4.06 μSv/h. These orphan sources have been separated from the scrap, tested for possible leakage, conditioned and stored in waste management facility. The result of this study has revealed without doubt that the scrap constitute a serious source of public exposure and highlights the importance of legislation making radiation monitoring of scrap in the country mandatory before it is sold to metal industry for reprocessing.

  13. Survey on radiation-induced xerostomia for head and neck malignancies by Japan radiation survey group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karasawa, Kumiko [Tokyo Women`s Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    We conducted nationwide multi-center survey on radiation induced salivary gland dysfunction. A total of 59 patients with head and neck malignancies were surveyed and analysed. Patients were evaluated for symptom, oral condition, foods intake, body weight and 5 minutes flow of saliva. The patients complained of moderate or more severe symptoms including oral and/or pharyngeal dryness and pain, difficulty in eating, and dysphagia. Body weights were significantly redused. The decrease of saliva flow appeared in the first week of radiation therapy. By the analysis of saliva contents, decrease of amylase was the most important prognostic factor. (author)

  14. High Voltage Pulse Testing Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    Cryogenic 23 E. Liquids 26 F. Solids 28 1. Polyethylene 28 2. Cross-Linked Polyethylene ( XLPE ) 29 3. Polyimide and Polyvenylchloride (PVC) 31 VI Benefits 35 A...Strength of XLPE Cables 29 vii * 4" I PROGRAM OBJECTIVES The Pulse Test Survey summarizes government, industry, and technical reports on high voltage pulse...system of silicone oil on a XLPE (cross-linked polyethylene) spacer tends to lower the impulse breakdown by approximately 10 percent. The negative impulse

  15. Environmental Ionizing Radiation Survey of Quarry Sites in Ilorin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJABS

    ABSTRACT: An environmental ionizing radiation survey around quarry sites in Ilorin was carried out using three. Radalert ... they live in areas with radiation doses above normal background .... also maintaining all exposure levels "as low as.

  16. A survey of veterinary radiation facilities in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, John; McEntee, Margaret C

    2014-01-01

    A survey of veterinary radiation therapy facilities in the United States, Canada, and Europe was done in 2010, using an online survey tool, to determine the type of equipment available, radiation protocols used, caseload, tumor types irradiated, as well as other details of the practice of veterinary radiation oncology. The results of this survey were compared to a similar survey performed in 2001. A total of 76 facilities were identified including 24 (32%) academic institutions and 52 (68%) private practice external beam radiation therapy facilities. The overall response rate was 51% (39/76 responded). Based on this survey, there is substantial variation among facilities in all aspects ranging from equipment and personnel to radiation protocols and caseloads. American College of Veterinary Radiology boarded radiation oncologists direct 90% of the radiation facilities, which was increased slightly compared to 2001. All facilities surveyed in 2010 had a linear accelerator. More facilities reported having electron capability (79%) compared to the 2001 survey. Eight facilities had a radiation oncology resident, and academic facilities were more likely to have residents. Patient caseload information was available from 28 sites (37% of radiation facilities), and based on the responses 1376 dogs and 352 cats were irradiated in 2010. The most frequently irradiated tumors were soft tissue sarcomas in dogs, and oral squamous cell carcinoma in cats.

  17. ALICE Transition Radiation Detector (TRD), test beam.

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Electrons and positrons can be discriminated from other charged particles using the emission of transition radiation - X-rays emitted when the particles cross many layers of thin materials. To develop such a Transition Radiation Detector(TRD) for ALICE many detector prototypes were tested in mixed beams of pions and electrons, as in the example shown here.

  18. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  19. Radiation tolerance tests of scintillating fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavardi, Laura; Albrecht, Johannes [TU Dortmund (Germany); Collaboration: LHCb-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    An upgrade of the LHCb detector is planned during the shutdown which will take place from mid 2018 to the end of 2019. The proposed upgrade for the tracking system is a detector composed of scintillating fibres read out by silicon photomultipliers. The tracking detector will be working in an environment exposed to radiation, so that the resistance of the fibres to radiation is an important quality, which needs to be investigated. In this talk tests of scintillating fibres tolerance to radiation will be presented.

  20. An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, T J; Riedhauser, S R

    1999-12-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys.

  1. 30 CFR 57.5047 - Gamma radiation surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gamma radiation surveys. 57.5047 Section 57.5047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL...) Standard N13.8-1973, entitled “Radiation Protection in Uranium Mines”, section 14.1 page 12, which...

  2. Advanced CMOS Radiation Effects Testing and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, J. A.; Marshall, P. W.; Rodbell, K. P.; Gordon, M. S.; LaBel, K. A.; Schwank, J. R.; Dodds, N. A.; Castaneda, C. M.; Berg, M. D.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.; Seidleck, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Presentation at the annual NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program Electronic Technology Workshop (ETW). The material includes an update of progress in this NEPP task area over the past year, which includes testing, evaluation, and analysis of radiation effects data on the IBM 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process. The testing was conducted using test vehicles supplied by directly by IBM.

  3. Tests of Exoplanet Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Joseph; Challener, Ryan; DeLarme, Emerson; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Foster, Austin; Garland, Justin

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric radiative transfer codes are used both to predict planetary spectra and in retrieval algorithms to interpret data. Observational plans, theoretical models, and scientific results thus depend on the correctness of these calculations. Yet, the calculations are complex and the codes implementing them are often written without modern software-verification techniques. In the process of writing our own code, we became aware of several others with artifacts of unknown origin and even outright errors in their spectra. We present a series of tests to verify atmospheric radiative-transfer codes. These include: simple, single-line line lists that, when combined with delta-function abundance profiles, should produce a broadened line that can be verified easily; isothermal atmospheres that should produce analytically-verifiable blackbody spectra at the input temperatures; and model atmospheres with a range of complexities that can be compared to the output of other codes. We apply the tests to our own code, Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) and to several other codes. The test suite is open-source software. We propose this test suite as a standard for verifying current and future radiative transfer codes, analogous to the Held-Suarez test for general circulation models. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G.

  4. Health survey of radiation workers. Results of questionnaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Aoyama, Takashi; Kawagoe, Yasumitsu; Sunayashiki, Tadashi; Tanaka, Kiyoshi; Nishitani, Motohiro; Yoshinaga, Nobuharu

    1998-11-01

    The Japanese Society of Radiological Technology asked radiation workers about the radiation doses and the state of their health as well as family. The reports by the Health and Welfare Ministry were referenced to compare radiation workers with others. The questionnaire was sent to about 4,000 members, and returned from 2,479. The survey showed that 684 persons (27.6%) felt health anxiety, 455 persons (18.4%) had medical check for recent one year, and 1,645 persons (66.4%) had anamnesis. Radiation doses for one year and cumulated doses varied according to engaging duration. (K.H.)

  5. Shock Radiation Tests for Saturn and Uranus Entry Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a test series in the Electric Arc Shock Tube at NASA Ames Research Center with the objective of quantifying shock-layer radiative heating magnitudes for future probe entries into Saturn and Uranus atmospheres. Normal shock waves are measured in Hydrogen/Helium mixtures (89:11 by mole) at freestream pressures between 13-66 Pa (0.1-0.5 Torr) and velocities from 20-30 km/s. No shock layer radiation is detected below 25 km/s, a finding consistent with predictions for Uranus entries. Between 25-30 km/s, radiance is quantified from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Near Infrared, with focus on the Lyman-alpha and Balmer series lines of Hydrogen. Shock profiles are analyzed for electron number density and electronic state distribution. The shocks do not equilibrate over several cm, and distributions are demonstrated to be non-Boltzmann. Radiation data are compared to simulations of Decadal survey entries for Saturn and shown to be significantly lower than predicted with the Boltzmann radiation model.

  6. Field test of a post-closure radiation monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, S.E. [Babcock & Wilcox, Alliance, OH (United States); Christy, C.E. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States); Heath, R.E. [FERMCO, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The DOE is conducting remedial actions at many sites contaminated with radioactive materials. After closure of these sites, long-term subsurface monitoring is typically required by law. This monitoring is generally labor intensive and expensive using conventional sampling and analysis techniques. The U.S. Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has contracted with Babcock and Wilcox to develop a Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitoring System (LPRMS) to reduce these monitoring costs. The system designed in Phase I of this development program monitors gamma radiation using a subsurface cesium iodide scintillator coupled to above-ground detection electronics using optical waveguide. The radiation probe can be installed to depths up to 50 meters using cone penetrometer techniques, and requires no downhole electrical power. Multiplexing, data logging and analysis are performed at a central location. A prototype LPRMS probe was built, and B&W and FERMCO field tested this monitoring probe at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in the fall of 1994 with funding from the DOE`s Office of Technology Development (EM-50) through METC. The system was used measure soil and water with known uranium contamination levels, both in drums and in situ depths up to 3 meters. For comparison purposes measurements were also performed using a more conventional survey probe with a sodium iodide scintillator directly butt-coupled to detection electronics.

  7. Reirradiation after radical radiation therapy: a survey of patterns of practice among Canadian radiation oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Kurian Jones; Al-Mandhari, Zahid; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew; Wu, Jackson; Ghosh, Sunita; Tai, Patricia; Lian, Jidong; Levin, Wilfred

    2008-12-01

    The objective of this study was to survey the use of reirradiation (Re-RT) for in-field failures after previous radical radiation treatment (RT) among Canadian radiation oncologists (ROs). An electronic survey was sent to 271 ROs in Canada. The completed surveys were received electronically via e-mail and the data were analyzed using SAS 9.1.3 software. A total of 183 ROs (67.5%) completed and returned the survey. The majority of the respondents were involved in the practice of either breast (48%) or genitourinary (43%) tumor sites. A total of 49% of the participants were interested in using Re-RT for the management of in-field recurrences. The goals of the therapy would be improvement of quality of life (99%), locoregional control (80%), or cure (32%). Most of the physicians believed that patients should have a minimum Karnofsky performance status of 50 or Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 3, a minimum life expectancy of 3 months, and a minimum interval from initial treatment of 3 months if Re-RT were to be given with curative intent. This survey showed that a wide variation existed among ROs in their approach to Re-RT. Newer technologies in RT planning and delivery would be employed to facilitate normal tissue avoidance. The results of this study suggested that a consensus meeting was needed to establish guidelines for the practice and prospective evaluation of Re-RT.

  8. The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Aalseth, Craig E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Asner, David M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bonebrake, Christopher A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Day, Anthony R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dorow, Kevin E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fuller, Erin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glasgow, Brian D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hossbach, Todd W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hyronimus, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jensen, Jeffrey L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Kenneth I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, David V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morgen, Gerald P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Scott J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullen, O Dennis [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Myers, Allan W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pitts, W. Karl [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rohrer, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Runkle, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Seifert, Allen [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shergur, Jason M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stave, Sean C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tatishvili, Gocha [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, Robert C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Todd, Lindsay C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Warren, Glen A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Willett, Jesse A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Lynn S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    The Multi-sensor Airborne Radiation Survey (MARS) project has developed a new single cryostat detector array design for high purity germanium (HPGe) gama ray spectrometers that achieves the high detection efficiency required for stand-off detection and actionable characterization of radiological threats. This approach, we found, is necessary since a high efficiency HPGe detector can only be built as an array due to limitations in growing large germanium crystals. Moreover, the system is ruggedized and shock mounted for use in a variety of field applications, including airborne and maritime operations.

  9. IVVS actuating system compatibility test to ITER gamma radiation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, 45 Via Enrico Fermi, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Collibus, M. Ferri de; Florean, M.; Monti, C.; Mugnaini, G.; Neri, C.; Pillon, M.; Pollastrone, F. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, 45 Via Enrico Fermi, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Baccaro, S.; Piegari, A. [ENEA CR Casaccia, 301 Via Anguillarese, 00123 Santa Maria di Galeria, Rome (Italy); Damiani, C.; Dubus, G. [Fusion For Energy c/Josep Pla, n° 2 Torres Diagonal Litoral, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA developed and tested a prototype of a laser In Vessel Viewing and ranging System (IVVS) for ITER. • One piezo-motor prototype has been tested on the ENEA Calliope gamma irradiation facility to verify its compatibility to ITER gamma radiation conditions. • After a total dose of more than 4 MGy the piezo-motor maintained almost the same working parameters monitored before test without any evident and significant degradation of functionality. • After the full gamma irradiation test, the same piezo-motor assembly will be tested with 14 MeV neutrons irradiation using ENEA FNG facility. -- Abstract: The In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) is a fundamental remote handling equipment, which will be used to make a survey of the status of the blanket first wall and divertor plasma facing components. A design and testing activity is ongoing, in the framework of a Fusion for Energy (F4E) grant agreement, to make the IVVS probe design compatible with ITER operating conditions and in particular, but not only, with attention to neutrons and gammas fluxes and both space constraints and interfaces. The paper describes the testing activity performed on the customized piezoelectric motors and the main components of the actuating system of the IVVS probe with reference to ITER gamma radiation conditions. In particular the test is performed on the piezoelectric motor, optical encoder and small scale optical samples .The test is carried out on the ENEA Calliope gamma irradiation facility at ITER relevant gamma fields at rate of about 2.5 kGy/h and doses of 4 MGy. The paper reports in detail the setup arrangement of the test campaign in order to verify significant working capability of the IVVS actuating components and the results are shown in terms of functional performances and parameters. The overall test campaign on IVVS actuating system will be completed on other ENEA testing facilities in order to verify compatibility to Magnetic field, neutrons and thermal

  10. Implict Monte Carlo Radiation Transport Simulations of Four Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, N

    2007-08-01

    Radiation transport codes, like almost all codes, are difficult to develop and debug. It is helpful to have small, easy to run test problems with known answers to use in development and debugging. It is also prudent to re-run test problems periodically during development to ensure that previous code capabilities have not been lost. We describe four radiation transport test problems with analytic or approximate analytic answers. These test problems are suitable for use in debugging and testing radiation transport codes. We also give results of simulations of these test problems performed with an Implicit Monte Carlo photonics code.

  11. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) survey of radiation biology educators in U.S. and Canadian radiation oncology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Barry S; Held, Kathryn D; Rockwell, Sara; Williams, Jacqueline P; Zeman, Elaine M

    2009-11-01

    To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  12. Gravitational radiation theory. M.A. Thesis - Rice Univ.; [survey of current research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. L.

    1973-01-01

    A survey is presented of current research in the theory of gravitational radiation. The mathematical structure of gravitational radiation is stressed. Furthermore, the radiation problem is treated independently from other problems in gravitation. The development proceeds candidly through three points of view - scalar, rector, and tensor radiation theory - and the corresponding results are stated.

  13. ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker test-beam results

    CERN Document Server

    Åkesson, T; Baker, K; Baron, S; Benjamin, D; Bertelsen, H; Bondarenko, V; Bychkov, V; Callahan, J; Capéans-Garrido, M; Cardiel-Sas, L; Catinaccio, A; Cetin, S A; Cwetanski, Peter; Dam, M; Danielsson, H; Dittus, F; Dolgoshein, B A; Dressnandt, N; Driouichi, C; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Farthouat, Philippe; Fedin, O; Froidevaux, D; Gagnon, P; Grichkevitch, Y; Grigalashvili, N S; Hajduk, Z; Hansen, P; Kayumov, F; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Khristatchev, A; Konovalov, S; Koudine, L; Kovalenko, S; Kowalski, T; Kramarenko, V A; Krüger, K; Laritchev, A; Lichard, P; Luehring, F C; Lundberg, B; Maleev, V; Markina, I; McFarlane, K W; Mialkovski, V; Mitsou, V A; Mindur, B; Morozov, S; Munar, A; Muraviev, S; Nadtochy, A; Newcomer, F M; Ögren, H O; Oh, S H; Oleshko, S; Olszowska, J; Passmore, S; Patritchev, S; Peshekhonov, V D; Petti, R; Price, M; Rembser, C; Rohne, O; Romaniouk, A; Rust, D R; Ryabov, Yu; Shchegelskii, V; Seliverstov, D M; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Smirnov, S; Sosnovtsev, V V; Soutchkov, V; Spiridenkov, E; Tikhomirov, V; Van Berg, R; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vassilieva, L; Wang, C; Williams, H H; Zalite, A

    2004-01-01

    Several prototypes of the Transition Radiation Tracker for the ATLAS experiment at the LHC have been built and tested at the CERN SPS accelerator. Results from detailed studies of the straw-tube hit registration efficiency and drift-time measurements and of the pion and electron spectra without and with radiators are presented. (10 refs).

  14. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HISat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in LEO, will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HiSat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaDX), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. This paper discusses the development of the R3S experiment as made possible by use of the HiSat architecture. The system design and operational modes of the experiment are described, as well as the experiment interfaces to the HiSat satellite via the user defined adapter (UDA) provided by NovaWurks. This paper outlines the steps taken by the project to execute the R3S mission in the 4 months of design, build, and test. Finally, description of the engineering process is provided, including the use of facilitated rapid/concurrent engineering sessions, the associated documentation, and the review process employed.

  15. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good.

  16. Numerical Tests and Properties of Waves in Radiating Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B M; Klein, R I

    2009-09-03

    We discuss the properties of an analytical solution for waves in radiating fluids, with a view towards its implementation as a quantitative test of radiation hydrodynamics codes. A homogeneous radiating fluid in local thermodynamic equilibrium is periodically driven at the boundary of a one-dimensional domain, and the solution describes the propagation of the waves thus excited. Two modes are excited for a given driving frequency, generally referred to as a radiative acoustic wave and a radiative diffusion wave. While the analytical solution is well known, several features are highlighted here that require care during its numerical implementation. We compare the solution in a wide range of parameter space to a numerical integration with a Lagrangian radiation hydrodynamics code. Our most significant observation is that flux-limited diffusion does not preserve causality for waves on a homogeneous background.

  17. Radiation Testing at Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia – JPL Collaboration for Europa Lander

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Ion Beam Lab.; Olszewska-Wasiolek, Maryla Aleksandra [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gamma Irradiation Facility

    2017-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is assisting Jet Propulsion Laboratory in undertaking feasibility studies and performance assessments for the Planetary Protection aspect of the Europa Lander mission. The specific areas of interest for this project are described by task number. This white paper presents the evaluation results for Task 2, Radiation Testing, which was stated as follows: Survey SNL facilities and capabilities for simulating the Europan radiation environment and assess suitability for: A. Testing batteries, electronics, and other component and subsystems B. Exposing biological organisms to assess their survivability metrics.

  18. X-γ Radiation Dose Survey for HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGXiariying; LIXu; YANGJinwei

    2003-01-01

    X-γ radiation belong to the ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation sinks to energy in organism but produce a disservice to the organism. Just as medicine, the disservice of the radiation towards Organism is decided by to accept radiation quantify, the radiation quantify was named dose. Radiation protection's basic missions is to want to result the dose to fix quantify. In this survey the dose at workplace and its surroundings environments of HL-2A device was measured and the assessment was given out.

  19. Report on the Radiation Effects Testing of the Infrared and Optical Transition Radiation Camera Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, Michael Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-04-20

    Presented in this report are the results tests performed at Argonne National Lab in collaboration with Los Alamos National Lab to assess the reliability of the critical 99Mo production facility beam monitoring diagnostics. The main components of the beam monitoring systems are two cameras that will be exposed to radiation during accelerator operation. The purpose of this test is to assess the reliability of the cameras and related optical components when exposed to operational radiation levels. Both X-ray and neutron radiation could potentially damage camera electronics as well as the optical components such as lenses and windows. This report covers results of the testing of component reliability when exposed to X-ray radiation. With the information from this study we provide recommendations for implementing protective measures for the camera systems in order to minimize the occurrence of radiation-induced failure within a ten month production run cycle.

  20. Radiation tests on commercial instrumentation amplifiers, analog switches & DAC's

    CERN Document Server

    Agapito, J A; Cardeira, F M; Casas, C; Fernandes, A; Franco, F J; Gomes, P; Gonçalves, I C; Cachero, A H; Lozano-Bahilo, J; Marques, J G; Paz, A; Prata, M J; Ramalho, A J G; Rodríguez-Ruiz, M A; Santos, J P; Vieira, A

    2001-01-01

    A study of several commercial instrumentation amplifiers (INA110, INA111, INA114, INA116, INA118 & INA121) under neutron and vestigial gamma radiation was done. Some parameters (Gain, input offset voltage, input bias currents) were measured on-line and bandwidth, and slew rate were determined before and after radiation. The results of the testing of some voltage references REF102 and ADR290GR and the DG412 analog switch are shown. Finally, different digital-to-analog converters were tested under radiation. (6 refs).

  1. Initial Nuclear Radiation Hardness Validation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-03

    Test Business Management Division (TEDT-TMB) US Army Developmental Test Command 314 Longs Corner Road Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5055 11...Above Increase in VCE (Sat) Logic Devices TTL 10K - Above Not concern @ tactical GTD levels Memory - DRAM CMOS 3K – Above Data corruption and shift in...1E13 Not concern @ tactical NF levels Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) IGBT 8E11 - Above Increase in VCE (Sat) Logic Devices TTL > 1E13

  2. Radiation Testing of Electronics for the CMS Endcap Muon System

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00070357; Celik, A.; Durkin, L.S.; Gilmore, J.; Haley, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Lakdawala, S.; Liu, J.; Matveev, M.; Padley, B.P.; Roberts, J.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Suarez, I.; Wood, D.; Zawisza, I.

    2013-01-01

    The electronics used in the data readout and triggering system for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator at CERN are exposed to high radiation levels. This radiation can cause permanent damage to the electronic circuitry, as well as temporary effects such as data corruption induced by Single Event Upsets. Once the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) accelerator upgrades are completed it will have five times higher instantaneous luminosity than LHC, allowing for detection of rare physics processes, new particles and interactions. Tests have been performed to determine the effects of radiation on the electronic components to be used for the Endcap Muon electronics project currently being designed for installation in the CMS experiment in 2013. During these tests the digital components on the test boards were operating with active data readout while being irradiated with 55 MeV protons. In reactor tests, components were exposed to 30 years equivalent levels o...

  3. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  4. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  5. Development of radiation detection and measurement systems - The development of a domestic model of portable radiation survey meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Koo; Choi, Kang; Kim, Jong Nam; Son, Keum Jong; Kim, Ji Kwang [Radiation Technology Research Lab., Seoul (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The internal circuit board and operating program were developed for the portable radiation survey meter with a small GM tube, and then tested for the performance verification. The signal of GM tube in the detection unit is taken form the cathode and pulsed out to be a standard digital pulse by a signal processor. The control and operation unit counts the signals and also calculates the counting errors. The data of signal counts and errors are transferred to the display unit. The LCD panel of the display unit is manufactured as the design resulted from this work. The panel attached with EL back-light displays in multiplex mode. The whole circuit is designed to have a small power consumption sufficiently for the portable instrument. The operating program is coded by C language. The program is on-power performs a self-test on counting circuit and then operates the main functions of the pulse counting, switch scanning, LCD panel controlling and the battery voltage measuring of the detector system with the time-interrupter. The prototype board of the internal circuit is tested with respect to the functional operation, counting performance, signal response characteristics and battery life-time. It was founded that the circuit is operated as the design functions. Also, these test result shows that those performances of the prototype board are better than those of the existing foreign products. 23 refs., 27 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  6. Datasets for radiation network algorithm development and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Berry, M. L.. [New Jersey Institute of Technology; Wu, Qishi [University of Memphis; Grieme, M. [New Jersey Institute of Technology; Brooks, Richard R [ORNL; Cordone, G. [Clemson University

    2016-01-01

    Domestic Nuclear Detection Office s (DNDO) Intelligence Radiation Sensors Systems (IRSS) program supported the development of networks of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation counters for detecting, localizing, and identifying low-level radiation sources. Under this program, a series of indoor and outdoor tests were conducted with multiple source strengths and types, different background profiles, and various types of source and detector movements. Following the tests, network algorithms were replayed in various re-constructed scenarios using sub-networks. These measurements and algorithm traces together provide a rich collection of highly valuable datasets for testing the current and next generation radiation network algorithms, including the ones (to be) developed by broader R&D communities such as distributed detection, information fusion, and sensor networks. From this multiple TeraByte IRSS database, we distilled out and packaged the first batch of canonical datasets for public release. They include measurements from ten indoor and two outdoor tests which represent increasingly challenging baseline scenarios for robustly testing radiation network algorithms.

  7. Survey of current situation in radiation belt modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Shing F.

    2004-01-01

    The study of Earth's radiation belts is one of the oldest subjects in space physics. Despite the tremendous progress made in the last four decades, we still lack a complete understanding of the radiation belts in terms of their configurations, dynamics, and detailed physical accounts of their sources and sinks. The static nature of early empirical trapped radiation models, for examples, the NASA AP-8 and AE-8 models, renders those models inappropriate for predicting short-term radiation belt behaviors associated with geomagnetic storms and substorms. Due to incomplete data coverage, these models are also inaccurate at low altitudes (e.g., radiation data from modern space missions and advancement in physical modeling and data management techniques have now allowed the development of new empirical and physical radiation belt models. In this paper, we will review the status of modern radiation belt modeling. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  8. A national radiation oncology medical student clerkship survey: Didactic curricular components increase confidence in clinical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete one or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials An anonymous, internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012–2013 academic year. The survey was composed of three main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results The survey response rate was 37% (70/188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. 27% of respondents (19/70) completed at least one clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent’s confidence to function as a first- year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank-sum p = 0.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman’s rho p = 0.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman’s rho p = 0.43). Conclusions Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation

  9. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Raleigh, David R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, University of California–San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W., E-mail: dgolden@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These

  10. Survey of solar thermal test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masterson, K.

    1979-08-01

    The facilities that are presently available for testing solar thermal energy collection and conversion systems are briefly described. Facilities that are known to meet ASHRAE standard 93-77 for testing flat-plate collectors are listed. The DOE programs and test needs for distributed concentrating collectors are identified. Existing and planned facilities that meet these needs are described and continued support for most of them is recommended. The needs and facilities that are suitable for testing components of central receiver systems, several of which are located overseas, are identified. The central contact point for obtaining additional details and test procedures for these facilities is the Solar Thermal Test Facilities Users' Association in Albuquerque, N.M. The appendices contain data sheets and tables which give additional details on the technical capabilities of each facility. Also included is the 1975 Aerospace Corporation report on test facilities that is frequently referenced in the present work.

  11. Lap Shear Testing of Candidate Radiator Panel Adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, David; Briggs, Maxwell; McGowan, Randy

    2013-01-01

    During testing of a subscale radiator section used to develop manufacturing techniques for a full-scale radiator panel, the adhesive bonds between the titanium heat pipes and the aluminum face sheets failed during installation and operation. Analysis revealed that the thermal expansion mismatch between the two metals resulted in relatively large shear stresses being developed even when operating the radiator at moderate temperatures. Lap shear testing of the adhesive used in the original joints demonstrated that the two-part epoxy adhesive fell far short of the strength required. A literature review resulted in several candidate adhesives being selected for lap shear joint testing at room temperature and 398 K, the nominal radiator operating temperature. The results showed that two-part epoxies cured at room and elevated temperatures generally did not perform well. Epoxy film adhesives cured at elevated temperatures, on the other hand, did very well with most being sufficiently strong to cause yielding in the titanium sheet used for the joints. The use of an epoxy primer generally improved the strength of the joint. Based upon these results, a new adhesive was selected for the second subscale radiator section.

  12. Current clinical trials testing combinations of immunotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Marka; Kohrt, Holbrook; Levy, Ronald; Jones, Jennifer; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam; Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, most of these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators, in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology.

  13. Physicians' knowledge about ionizing radiation and radiological imaging techniques: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucel, Aylin; Alyesil, Cansu; Sim, Saadet

    2011-06-01

    Radiological examinations are critical for the evaluation of many disorders in daily practice. To determine the knowledge of ionizing radiation and radiological imaging techniques among physicians of various grades. A cross-sectional survey was carried out of 55 physicians with a mean age of 35.7 ± 6.0 years (age range 25-52 years) in a university hospital. A questionnaire which tested physicians' information about ionizing radiation and their risks was distributed by medical school students. Among the participants, 32 (58.2%) were consultants and 23 (41.8%) were residents. The mean score was 68.2 ± 11.1 (range 37.8-91.8) out of 100. Consultants' points were lower than residents (p = 0.040). Consultants had significantly higher frequency of incorrect answer than residents in the question about 'whether CT scan increases lifetime cancer risk' (p = 0.036). Medical practices in years do not enhance the level of the awareness regarding the ionizing radiation.

  14. Numerical test of an inverse polarized radiative transfer algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Viik, T

    2003-01-01

    A procedure is tested with which to determine the single-scattering albedo from polarization measurements of the angle-dependent intensity at two locations within, or on the boundaries of, a homogeneous finite or infinite atmosphere that scatters radiation according to the Rayleigh law with true absorption.

  15. Radiation Testing of PICA at the Solar Power Tower

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory's Solar Power Tower was used to irradiate specimens of Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablator (PICA), in order to evaluate whether this thermal protection system material responded differently to potential shock layer radiative heating than to convective heating. Tests were run at 50, 100 and 150 Watts per square centimeter levels of concentrated solar radiation. Experimental results are presented both from spectral measurements on 1- 10 mm thick specimens of PICA, as well as from in-depth temperature measurements on instrumented thicker test specimens. Both spectral measurements and measured in-depth temperature profiles showed that, although it is a porous, low-density material, PICA does not exhibit problematic transparency to the tested high levels of NIR radiation, for all pragmatic cm-to-inch scale thicknesses. PICA acted as a surface absorber to efficiently absorb the incident visible and near infrared incident radiation in the top 2 millimeter layer in the Solar Power Tower tests up to 150 Watts per square centimeter.

  16. Radiation Testing and Evaluation Issues for Modern Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lew M.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract. Changes in modern integrated circuit (IC) technologies have modified the way we approach and conduct radiation tolerance and testing of electronics. These changes include scaling of geometries, new materials, new packaging technologies, and overall speed and device complexity challenges. In this short course section, we will identify and discuss these issues as they impact radiation testing, modeling, and effects mitigation of modern integrated circuits. The focus will be on CMOS-based technologies, however, other high performance technologies will be discussed where appropriate. The effects of concern will be: Single-Event Effects (SEE) and steady state total ionizing dose (TID) IC response. However, due to the growing use of opto-electronics in space systems issues concerning displacement damage testing will also be considered. This short course section is not intended to provide detailed "how-to-test" information, but simply provide a snapshot of current challenges and some of the approaches being considered.

  17. Radiated Susceptibility Tests in Thermal Vacuum Chambers for Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anon Cancela, Manuel; Hernandez-Gomez, Daniel; Vazquez-Pascual, Mercedes; Lopez-Sanz, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    INTA EMC Area has a wide experience in performing Radiated Susceptibility (RS) tests according to civilian, military and aeronautical standards in Mode Tuned Chambers (MTC) for national and international projects; besides, INTA has two Thermal Vacuum Chamber (TVC) facilities in service for Space Systems tests. In order to perform RS tests to Space Systems in a more realistic environment, INTA EMC Area has stablished an internal research program to develop a procedure to perform this kind of tests inside a TVC as a Mode Tuned Chamber (MTC). In this paper the results of the TVC-04 validation measurements as a MTC are presented.

  18. A Survey of Pediatric CT Protocols and Radiation Doses in South Korean Hospitals to Optimize the Radiation Dose for Pediatric CT Scanning

    OpenAIRE

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jin Seong; KOO, HYUN JUNG

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Children are at greater risk of radiation exposure than adults because the rapidly dividing cells of children tend to be more radiosensitive and they have a longer expected life time in which to develop potential radiation injury. Some studies have surveyed computed tomography (CT) radiation doses and several studies have established diagnostic reference levels according to patient age or body size; however, no survey of CT radiation doses with a large number of patients has yet been...

  19. Test Predicting Alzheimer's Would Be Welcome, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162525.html Test Predicting Alzheimer's Would Be Welcome, Survey Finds 3 out of ... could tell them they were going to develop Alzheimer's disease, most American seniors would take it, a ...

  20. A national survey on radiation dose in CT in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, A.J. van der; Schilham, A.; Stoop, P.; Prokop, M.; Geleijns, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess radiation exposure due to CT in the Netherlands. Methods Twenty-one hospitals participated in a dose survey for the 21 most frequently used CT protocols. Hospitals completed a Web survey with detailed parameters for one patient per protocol, including the dose length product (

  1. Testing the adaptive radiation hypothesis for the lemurs of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, James P

    2017-01-01

    Lemurs, the diverse, endemic primates of Madagascar, are thought to represent a classic example of adaptive radiation. Based on the most complete phylogeny of living and extinct lemurs yet assembled, I tested predictions of adaptive radiation theory by estimating rates of speciation, extinction and adaptive phenotypic evolution. As predicted, lemur speciation rate exceeded that of their sister clade by nearly twofold, indicating the diversification dynamics of lemurs and mainland relatives may have been decoupled. Lemur diversification rates did not decline over time, however, as predicted by adaptive radiation theory. Optimal body masses diverged among dietary and activity pattern niches as lineages diversified into unique multidimensional ecospace. Based on these results, lemurs only partially fulfil the predictions of adaptive radiation theory, with phenotypic evolution corresponding to an 'early burst' of adaptive differentiation. The results must be interpreted with caution, however, because over the long evolutionary history of lemurs (approx. 50 million years), the 'early burst' signal of adaptive radiation may have been eroded by extinction.

  2. Radiation microscope for SEE testing using GeV ions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, Barney Lee; Knapp, James Arthur; Rossi, Paolo; Hattar, Khalid M.; Vizkelethy, Gyorgy; Brice, David Kenneth; Branson, Janelle V.

    2009-09-01

    Radiation Effects Microscopy is an extremely useful technique in failure analysis of electronic parts used in radiation environment. It also provides much needed support for development of radiation hard components used in spacecraft and nuclear weapons. As the IC manufacturing technology progresses, more and more overlayers are used; therefore, the sensitive region of the part is getting farther and farther from the surface. The thickness of these overlayers is so large today that the traditional microbeams, which are used for REM are unable to reach the sensitive regions. As a result, higher ion beam energies have to be used (> GeV), which are available only at cyclotrons. Since it is extremely complicated to focus these GeV ion beams, a new method has to be developed to perform REM at cyclotrons. We developed a new technique, Ion Photon Emission Microscopy, where instead of focusing the ion beam we use secondary photons emitted from a fluorescence layer on top of the devices being tested to determine the position of the ion hit. By recording this position information in coincidence with an SEE signal we will be able to indentify radiation sensitive regions of modern electronic parts, which will increase the efficiency of radiation hard circuits.

  3. Measurement of the Radiation Dose Rates of Patients Receiving Treatment with I-131 Using Telescopic Radiation Survey Meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia Lahfi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In order to discharge the patients receiving treatment with large radiation doses of 131I for thyroid cancer, it is necessary to measure and evaluate the external dose rates of these patients. The aim of the study was to assess a new method of external dose rate measurement, and to analyze the obtained results as a function of time. Materials and Methods In this study, a telescopic radiation survey meter was utilized to measure the external dose rates of a sample population of 192 patients receiving treatment with high-dose 131I at one, 24, and 48 hours after dose administration. Results The proposed technique could reduce the occupational radiation exposure of the physicist by a factor of 1/16. Moreover, the external dose rates of both genders rapidly decreased with time according to bi-exponential equations, which could be attributed to the additional factors associated with iodine excretion, as well as the physiology of the body in terms of 131I uptake. Conclusion According to the results of this study, telescopic radiation survey meter could be used to measure the external dose rates of patients receiving treatment with 131I. Furthermore, the average difference in the radiation exposure between female and male patients was calculated to be less than 17%.

  4. Correlation analysis of gamma dose rate from natural radiation in the test field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdic Senada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with correlation analysis of gamma dose rate measured in the test field with the five distinctive soil samples from a few minefields in Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The measurements of ambient dose equivalent rate, due to radionuclides present in each of the soil samples, were performed by the RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter, placed on the ground and 1m above the ground. The gamma spectrometric analysis of the same soil samples was carried out by GAMMA-RAD5 spectrometer. This study showed that there is a high correlation between the absorbed dose rate evaluated from soil radioactivity and the corresponding results obtained by the survey meter placed on the ground. Correlation analysis indicated that the survey meter, due to its narrow energy range, is not suitable for the examination of cosmic radiation contribution.

  5. Pulsar Timing Arrays and Gravity Tests in the Radiative Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K J

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on testing gravity theories in the radiative regime using pulsar timing array observations. After reviewing current techniques to measure the dispersion and alternative polarization of gravitational waves, we extend the framework to the most general situations, where the combinations of a massive graviton and alternative polarization modes are considered. The atlas of the Hellings-Downs functions is completed by the new calculations for these dispersive alternative polarization modes. We find that each mode and corresponding graviton mass introduce characteristic features in the Hellings-Downs function. Thus, in principal, we can not only detect each polarization mode, measure the corresponding graviton mass, but also discriminate the different scenarios. In this way, we can test gravity theories in the radiative regime in a generalized fashion, and such method is a direct experiment, where one can address the gauge symmetry of the gravity theories in their linearised limits. Although ...

  6. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Nevada Test Site, Mercury, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site (NTS), conducted June 22 through July 10, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team members are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the NTS. The Survey covers all environment media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations and activities performed at the NTS, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan is being executed by the Battelle Columbus Division under contract with DOE. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the NTS Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the NTS Survey. 165 refs., 42 figs., 52 tabs.

  7. Wake Shield Facility Modal Survey Test in Vibration Acoustic Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Ronald M. Sega stands beside the University of Houston's Wake Shield Facility before it undergoes a Modal Survey Test in the Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility Building 49, prior to being flown on space shuttle mission STS-60.

  8. The psychometric testing of the Nursing Teamwork Survey in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragadóttir, Helga; Kalisch, Beatrice J; Smáradóttir, Sigríður Bríet; Jónsdóttir, Heiður Hrund

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic (NTS-Icelandic), which was translated from US English to Icelandic. The Nursing Teamwork Survey, with 33 items, measures overall teamwork and five factors of teamwork: trust, team orientation, backup, shared mental models, and team leadership. The psychometric testing of the NTS-Icelandic was carried out on data from a pilot study and a national study. The sample for a pilot study included 123 nursing staff from five units, and the sample for a national study included 925 nursing staff from 27 inpatient units. The overall test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient in the pilot study was 0.693 (lower bound = 0.498, upper bound = 0.821) (p teamwork. The NTS-Icelandic tested valid and reliable in this study. Study findings support further use of the Nursing Teamwork Survey internationally.

  9. Laser system for testing radiation imaging detector circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubrzycka, Weronika; Kasinski, Krzysztof

    2015-09-01

    Performance and functionality of radiation imaging detector circuits in charge and position measurement systems need to meet tight requirements. It is therefore necessary to thoroughly test sensors as well as read-out electronics. The major disadvantages of using radioactive sources or particle beams for testing are high financial expenses and limited accessibility. As an alternative short pulses of well-focused laser beam are often used for preliminary tests. There are number of laser-based devices available on the market, but very often their applicability in this field is limited. This paper describes concept, design and validation of laser system for testing silicon sensor based radiation imaging detector circuits. The emphasis is put on keeping overall costs low while achieving all required goals: mobility, flexible parameters, remote control and possibility of carrying out automated tests. The main part of the developed device is an optical pick-up unit (OPU) used in optical disc drives. The hardware includes FPGA-controlled circuits for laser positioning in 2 dimensions (horizontal and vertical), precision timing (frequency and number) and amplitude (diode current) of short ns-scale (3.2 ns) light pulses. The system is controlled via USB interface by a dedicated LabVIEW-based application enabling full manual or semi-automated test procedures.

  10. Successful beam tests for ALICE Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Another round of beam tests of prototypes for the Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for ALICE has been completed and there are already some good results. Mass production of the components of the detector will start early next year.   Top view of the setup for the Transition Radiation Detector prototype tests at CERN.On the left, can be seen the full-scale TRD prototype together with four smaller versions. These are busy days for the TRD (Transition Radiation Detector) team of ALICE. Twenty people - mainly from Germany, but also from Russia and Japan - were working hard during the beam tests this autumn at CERN to assess the performance of their detector prototypes. Analysis of the data shows that the TRD can achieve the desired physics goal even for the highest conceivable multiplicities in lead-lead collisions at the LHC. In its final configuration in the ALICE experiment, the TRD will greatly help in identifying high-momentum electrons, which are 'needles in a haystack' that consists mostly of...

  11. Field Testing of a Portable Radiation Detector and Mapping System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, K.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hayes, D.W.; Eakle, R.F.

    1998-03-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have developed a man- portable radiation detector and mapping system (RADMAPS) which integrates the accumulation of radiation information with precise ground locations. RADMAPS provides field personnel with the ability to detect, locate, and characterize nuclear material at a site or facility by analyzing the gamma or neutron spectra and correlating them with position. the man-portable field unit records gamma or neutron count rate information and its location, along with date and time, using an embedded Global Positioning System (GPS). RADMAPS is an advancement in data fusion, integrating several off-the-shelf technologies with new computer software resulting in a system that is simple to deploy and provides information useful to field personnel in an easily understandable form. Decisions on subsequent actions can be made in the field to efficiently use available field resources. The technologies employed in this system include: recording GPS, radiation detection (typically scintillation detectors), pulse height analysis, analog-to-digital converters, removable solid-state (Flash or SRAM) memory cards, Geographic Information System (GIS) software and personal computers with CD-ROM supporting digital base maps. RADMAPS includes several field deployable data acquisition systems designed to simultaneously record radiation and geographic positions. This paper summarizes the capabilities of RADMAPS and some of the results of field tests performed with the system.

  12. Compilation of radiation damage test data cable insulating materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes radiation damage test data on commercially available organic cable insulation and jacket materials: ethylene- propylene rubber, Hypalon, neoprene rubber, polyethylene, polyurethane, polyvinylchloride, silicone rubber, etc. The materials have been irradiated in a nuclear reactor to integrated absorbed doses from 5*10/sup 5/ to 5*10/sup 6/ Gy. Mechanical properties, e.g. tensile strength, elongation at break, and hardness, have been tested on irradiated and non-irradiated samples. The results are presented in the form of tables and graphs, to show the effect of the absorbed dose on the measured properties. (13 refs).

  13. Test of radiation detectors used in homeland security applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibida, L; Minniti, R; O'Brien, M; Unterweger, M

    2005-05-01

    This work was performed as part of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) program to support the development of the new American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards N42.32-2003 and N42.33-2003 for hand-held detectors, and personal electronic dosimeters, as well as to support the Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in testing these types of detectors for their use by first responders. These instruments are required to operate over a photon energy range of 60 keV to 1.33 MeV and over a wide range of air-kerma rates. The performance and response of various radiation detectors, purchased by the NIST, was recorded when placed in 60Co, 137Cs, and x-ray beams at different air-kerma rates. The measurements described in this report were performed at the NIST x-ray and gamma-ray radiation calibration facilities. The instruments' response (exposure or dose rate readings) shows strong energy dependence but almost no dependence to different air-kerma rates. The data here reported provide a benchmark in support of current protocols that are being developed for radiation detection instrumentation used in homeland security applications. A future plan is to test these devices, plus other commercially available detectors, against ANSI standards N42.32-2003 and N42.33-2003.

  14. A field test of a simple stochastic radiative transfer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, N. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The problem of determining the effect of clouds on the radiative energy balance of the globe is of well-recognized importance. One can in principle solve the problem for any given configuration of clouds using numerical techniques. This knowledge is not useful however, because of the amount of input data and computer resources required. Besides, we need only the average of the resulting solution over the grid scale of a general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we are interested in estimating the average of the solutions of such fine-grained problems using only coarse grained data, a science or art called stochastic radiation transfer. Results of the described field test indicate that the stochastic description is a somewhat better fit to the data than is a fractional cloud cover model, but more data are needed. 1 ref., 3 figs.

  15. Correcting radiation survey data to account for increased leakage during intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kairn, T. [Premion Cancer Care, Wesley Medical Centre, Suite 1, 40 Chasely St, Auchenflower Qld 4066, Australia and Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia); Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V. [Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, G.P.O. Box 2434, Brisbane Qld 4000 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments require more beam-on time and produce more linac head leakage to deliver similar doses to conventional, unmodulated, radiotherapy treatments. It is necessary to take this increased leakage into account when evaluating the results of radiation surveys around bunkers that are, or will be, used for IMRT. The recommended procedure of applying a monitor-unit based workload correction factor to secondary barrier survey measurements, to account for this increased leakage when evaluating radiation survey measurements around IMRT bunkers, can lead to potentially costly overestimation of the required barrier thickness. This study aims to provide initial guidance on the validity of reducing the value of the correction factor when applied to different radiation barriers (primary barriers, doors, maze walls, and other walls) by evaluating three different bunker designs.Methods: Radiation survey measurements of primary, scattered, and leakage radiation were obtained at each of five survey points around each of three different radiotherapy bunkers and the contribution of leakage to the total measured radiation dose at each point was evaluated. Measurements at each survey point were made with the linac gantry set to 12 equidistant positions from 0° to 330°, to assess the effects of radiation beam direction on the results.Results: For all three bunker designs, less than 0.5% of dose measured at and alongside the primary barriers, less than 25% of the dose measured outside the bunker doors and up to 100% of the dose measured outside other secondary barriers was found to be caused by linac head leakage.Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that IMRT workload corrections are unnecessary, for survey measurements made at and alongside primary barriers. Use of reduced IMRT workload correction factors is recommended when evaluating survey measurements around a bunker door, provided that a subset of the measurements used in

  16. Shuttle active thermal control system development testing. Volume 7: Improved radiator coating adhesive tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, M. W.

    1973-01-01

    Silver/Teflon thermal control coatings have been tested on a modular radiator system projected for use on the space shuttle. Seven candidate adhesives have been evaluated in a thermal vacuum test on radiator panels similar to the anticipated flight hardware configuration. Several classes of adhesives based on polyester, silicone, and urethane resin systems were tested. These included contact adhesives, heat cured adhesives, heat and pressure cured adhesives, pressure sensitive adhesives, and two part paint on or spray on adhesives. The coatings attached with four of the adhesives, two silicones and two urethanes, had no changes develop during the thermal vacuum test. The two silicone adhesives, both of which were applied to the silver/Teflon as transfer laminates to form a tape, offered the most promise based on application process and thermal performance. Each of the successful silicone adhesives required a heat and pressure cure to adhere during the cryogenic temperature excursion of the thermal-vacuum test.

  17. [A questionnaire survey about public's image of radiation after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Abe, Toshiaki; Kuto, Tatsuhiko

    2012-03-01

    A questionnaire survey about the public's image of radiation was performed after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) accident. The survey was taken by general citizens (200 and 1640 in Fukushima and 52 outside of Fukushima) and doctors (63 in Fukushima and 1942 outside of Fukushima (53 in Oita, 44 in Sagamihara and 1,845 in Kitakyushu)) in and outside of Fukushima and second year medical students in the University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan. The questionnaire surveys were performed during lectures about radiation. The response rates were 86% for the general citizens in Fukushima, 91% for the general citizens outside of Fukushima, 86% for doctors in Fukushima, and 85% and 86% for doctors in Sagamihara and Oita, respectively. The questionnaire surveys were sent to clinics and hospitals in Fukushima where the general citizens answered with a response rate of 50%. When the questionnaire surveys were sent to clinics and hospitals in Kitakyushu, doctors answered, with a response rate of 17%. The percentages of anxiety about future radiation effects after the FDNPP accident were the highest among the general citizens (71.6% in Fukushima and 40.4% outside of Fukushima), in the middle among the doctors (30.2% in Fukushima and 26.2% outside of Fukushima) and the lowest among the medical students (12.2%). The doctors in Fukushima and the medical students were anxious about food and soil pollution. The general citizens and the doctors outside of Fukushima were anxious about health problems and food and soil pollution. We concluded that a high level of education about radiation decreased the anxiety about the radiation effects. It is important to spread knowledge about radiation.

  18. Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hienz, Robert; Davis, Catherine; Weed, Michael; Guida, Peter; Gooden, Virginia; Brady, Joseph; Roma, Peter

    Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests INTRODUCTION Risk assessment of the biological consequences of living in the space radiation environment represents one of the highest priority areas of NASA radiation research. Of critical importance is the need for a risk assessment of damage to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to functional cognitive/behavioral changes during long-term space missions, and the development of effective shielding or biological countermeasures to such risks. The present research focuses on the use of an animal model that employs neurobehavioral tests identical or homologous to those currently in use in human models of risk assessment by U.S. agencies such as the Depart-ment of Defense and Federal Aviation and Federal Railroad Administrations for monitoring performance and estimating accident risks associated with such variables as fatigue and/or alcohol or drug abuse. As a first approximation for establishing human risk assessments due to exposure to space radiation, the present work provides animal performance data obtained with the rPVT (rat Psychomotor Vigilance Test), an animal analog of the human PVT that is currently employed for human risk assessments via quantification of sustained attention (e.g., 'vigilance' or 'readiness to perform' tasks). Ground-based studies indicate that radiation can induce neurobehavioral changes in rodents, including impaired performance on motor tasks and deficits in spatial learning and memory. The present study is testing the hypothesis that radiation exposure impairs motor function, performance accuracy, vigilance, motivation, and memory in adult male rats. METHODS The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) was originally developed as a human cognitive neurobe-havioral assay for tracking the temporally dynamic changes in sustained attention, and has also been used to track changes in circadian rhythm. In humans the test requires responding to a small, bright

  19. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanov, V.M., E-mail: tsakanov@asls.candle.am [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Amatuni, G.A.; Amirkhanyan, Z.G.; Aslyan, L.V.; Avagyan, V.Sh.; Danielyan, V.A.; Davtyan, H.D.; Dekhtiarov, V.S.; Gevorgyan, K.L.; Ghazaryan, N.G.; Grigoryan, B.A.; Grigoryan, A.H.; Hakobyan, L.S. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Haroutiunian, S.G. [Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Ivanyan, M.I.; Khachatryan, V.G.; Laziev, E.M. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Manukyan, P.S. [State Engineering University of Armenia, 0009 Yerevan (Armenia); Margaryan, I.N.; Markosyan, T.M. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); and others

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  20. [Ionizing radiation in the aeronautics industry. Non-destructive testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Verde, R; Travaglini, C

    1983-08-25

    The constant increase in the non-military use of nuclear energy in various fields induced this study of one particular field: the aero industry. Alitalia has been using gammagraphy and industrial metallography for nondestructive testing for over 20 years. Workers exposed to ionising radiations at work are protected by precisely detailed standards based on extremely rigorous national and international legislation. The health and protection of these workers is entrusted to a Company Doctor and a Qualified Specialist. The latter is thought to be indispensable since he is responsible for primary preventions as well as prompt diagnosis.

  1. Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

    2013-04-30

    studied the effect of x-rays and γ-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

  2. TESTS AND METHODOLOGIES FOR THE SURVEY OF NARROW SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Perfetti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The research illustrated in this article aimed at identifying a good standard methodology to survey very narrow spaces during 3D investigation of Cultural Heritage. It is an important topic in today’s era of BIM modelling applied to Cultural Heritage. Spaces like staircases, corridors and passages are very common in the architectural or archaeological fields, and obtaining a 3D-oriented survey of those areas can be a very complex task when completeness of the model and high precision are requested. Photogrammetry appears to be the most promising solution in terms of versatility and manoeuvrability also considering the quality of the required data. Fisheye lenses were studied and tested in depth because of their significant advantage in the field of view if compared with rectilinear lenses. This advantage alone can be crucial to reduce the total amount of photos and, as a consequence, to obtain manageable data, to simplify the survey phase and to significantly reduce the elaboration time. In order to overcome the main issue that arise when using fisheye lenses, which is the lack of rules that can be employed to design the survey, a general mathematical formulation to precisely estimate the GSD (Ground Sampling Distance for every optical projection is presented here. A complete survey of a real complex case study was performed in order to test and stress the proposed methodology, and to handle a fisheye-based survey from beginning to end: the photogrammetric survey of the Minguzzi Staircase. It is a complex service spiral-staircase located in the Duomo di Milano with a total height of 25 meters and characterized by a narrow walkable space about 70 centimetres wide.

  3. Effects of testing conditions on conceptual survey results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ding

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Pre-testing and post-testing is a commonly used method in Physics Education Research to assess student learning gains. It is well recognized in the community that timings and incentives in delivering conceptual tests can impact test results. However, it is difficult to control these variables across different studies. As a common practice, a pre-test is often administered either at or near the beginning of a course, while a post-test can be given either at or near the end of a course. Also, in conducting such tests there often is no norm as to whether incentives should be offered to students. Because these variations can significantly affect test results, it is important to study and document their impact. We analyzed five years of data that were collected at The Ohio State University from over 2100 students, who took both the pre-test and post-test of the Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism under various timings and incentives. We observed that the actual time frame for giving a test has a marked effect on the test results and that incentive granting also has a significant influence on test outcomes. These results suggest that one should carefully monitor and document the conditions under which tests are administered.

  4. Shielding evaluation and acceptance testing of a prefabricated, modular, temporary radiation therapy treatment facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzell, Gary A

    2004-01-01

    We have recently commissioned a temporary radiation therapy facility that is novel in two aspects: it was constructed using modular components, and the LINAC was installed in one of the modular sections before it was lifted into position. Additional steel and granular fill was added to the modular sections on-site during construction. The building will be disassembled and removed when no longer needed. This paper describes the radiation shielding specifications and survey of the facility, as well as the ramifications for acceptance testing occasioned by the novel installation procedure. The LINAC is a Varian 21EX operating at 6 MV and 18 MV. The radiation levels outside the vault satisfied the design criteria, and no anomalous leakage was detected along the joints of the modular structure. At 18 MV and 600 monitor units (MU) per minute, the radiation level outside the primary barrier walls was 8.5 micro Sv/h of photons; there were no detectable neutrons. Outside the direct-shielded door, the levels were 0.4 micro Sv/h of photons and 3.0 micro Sv/h of neutrons. The isocentricity of the accelerator met the acceptance criteria and was not affected by its preinstallation into an integrated baseframe and subsequent transport to the building site.

  5. Recent Radiation Test Results for Trench Power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan C.; Wilcox, Edward P.; Phan, Anthony M.; Kim, Hak S.; Topper, Alyson D.; Ladbury, Raymond L.; Label, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Single-event effect (SEE) radiation test results are presented for various trench-gate power MOSFETs. The heavy-ion response of the first (and only) radiation-hardened trench-gate power MOSFET is evaluated: the manufacturer SEE response curve is verified and importantly, no localized dosing effects are measured, distinguishing it from other, non-hardened trench-gate power MOSFETs. Evaluations are made of n-type commercial and both n- and p-type automotive grade trench-gate device using ions comparable to of those on the low linear energy transfer (LET) side of the iron knee of the galactic cosmic ray spectrum, to explore suitability of these parts for missions with higher risk tolerance and shorter duration, such as CubeSats. Part-to-part variability of SEE threshold suggests testing with larger sample sizes and applying more aggressive derating to avoid on-orbit failures. The n-type devices yielded expected localized dosing effects including when irradiated in an unbiased (0-V) configuration, adding to the challenge of inserting these parts into space flight missions.

  6. Survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring: major update. Volume 3. Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    This is the third volume of a four-volume (seven-part) series, the culmination of a comprehensive survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to radiation monitoring. The results of the survey are given as descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Information is also given regarding the pollutants to be monitored, their characteristics and forms, their sources and pathways, their effects on the ecosystem, and the means of controlling them through process and regulatory controls. The discussion is presented under sections entitled radiation sources; instrumentation: by type of radiation or instrument type; and, instrumentation for specific radionuclides. (JGB)

  7. Breaking bad news issues: A survey among radiation oncologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milind Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Discussion of bad news and resuscitation in terminal cancer is an important but difficult and often neglected issue in day-to-day oncology practice. Materials and Methods: We interviewed 35 radiation oncologists using an indigenous 15-item questionnaire on their beliefs about breaking bad news and resuscitation to terminal cancer patients. Results: Most responders had an oncology experience of three to seven years (20/35.Thirty-two were comfortable discussing cancer diagnosis, prognosis and life expectancy-related issues. A similar number believed all cancer-related information should be disclosed, while only four believed in imparting all information in one visit. All agreed that disclosing sensitive information did not affect survival. When requested by relatives to withhold truth from patients, 11 said they would not comply, 22 agreed to tell the truth only if asked and two agreed to avoid difficult questions. Twenty responders denied having been adequately trained in breaking bad news and were keen on dedicated classes or sessions in this area of practice. Most (33/35 believed that Indian patients were keen on knowing their diagnosis and prognosis. Although all agreed to the importance of discussing resuscitation, only 17 believed patients should be involved. Majority (20/35 agreed that the issue needs to be discussed while the patient was conscious. Patients with unsalvageable disease were deemed unsuitable for aggressive resuscitation by 30 responders while the rest believed it should be offered to all. Most (21/35 admitted to feeling depressed after breaking bad news though only seven felt disclosure was more stressful than untruthful statements. Only four knew of a law regarding resuscitation in cancer. Conclusion: Observing the widely varied beliefs and practices for disclosing bad news, it is recommended that such training be a regular part of medicine curriculum, especially in the Oncology setting.

  8. Fault Based Techniques for Testing Boolean Expressions: A Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Badhera, Usha; Taruna, S

    2012-01-01

    Boolean expressions are major focus of specifications and they are very much prone to introduction of faults, this survey presents various fault based testing techniques. It identifies that the techniques differ in their fault detection capabilities and generation of test suite. The various techniques like Cause effect graph, meaningful impact strategy, Branch Operator Strategy (BOR), BOR+MI, MUMCUT, Modified Condition/ Decision Coverage (MCDC) has been considered. This survey describes the basic algorithms and fault categories used by these strategies for evaluating their performance. Finally, it contains short summaries of the papers that use Boolean expressions used to specify the requirements for detecting faults. These techniques have been empirically evaluated by various researchers on a simplified safety related real time control system.

  9. Field tests of a tissue-equivalent beta survey meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martz, D.E.; Johnson, L.O.; Rich, B.L.; Daniel, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent survey meter for monitoring the (dD/dt)(0.07) and (dD/dt)(10) dose rates produced by betas and photons has been designed and tested. The very thin tissue-equivalent plastic scintillator closely simulates the critical skin tissue layer between 4 mg.cm/sup -2/ and 9 mg.cm/sup -2/. The meter is calibrated to read the (dD/dt)(0.07) dose rate directly, and the (dD/dt)(10) dose rate behind a filter. Laboratory measurements of calibrated sources and field tests have demonstrated tissue-equivalent response of the survey meter to betas between 70 keV and 2500 keV and to photons with energies greater than about 30 keV.

  10. A pan-Canadian survey of peer review practices in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caissie, Amanda; Rouette, Julie; Jugpal, Paul; Davis, Carol-Anne; Hollenhorst, Helmut; O'Donnell, Jennifer; Mitera, Gunita; Brundage, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Peer review (PR) of treatment plans has been recognized internationally as a key component of quality care in radiation oncology programs (ROPs). We conducted a survey of Canadian ROPs to describe current PR practices and identify barriers/facilitators to PR optimization. A 42-item e-survey was sent to all Canadian ROPs (n = 44). Survey development was guided by expert consensus, literature review, and existing guidelines. One multidisciplinary response per ROP was requested. Response rate was 100.0% (44/44). All ROPs (100.0%) reported conducting some PR and rated its importance as 7/10 or higher (10 = extremely important). One-half of ROPs (52.3%) peer-reviewed >80% of curative treatment plans. ROPs reported performing PR "always/almost always" pretreatment (38.6%) or before 25% of radiation therapy delivery (52.3%). The majority of ROPs reported recommending major plan changes in ROPs perceive PR as highly important, but substantial variation in the extent, timing, and documentation of PR exists. The understanding of current PR activities, barriers, and facilitators will inform the development of initiatives to optimize PR in radiation oncology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Simulation and test of 3D silicon radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleta, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: c.fleta@physics.gla.ac.uk; Pennicard, D.; Bates, R.; Parkes, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, G.; Lozano, M. [Centro Nacional de Microelectronica, (CNM-IMB, CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Wright, V. [Diamond Light Source, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Piemonte, C.; Pozza, A.; Ronchin, S.; Zorzi, N. [ITC-IRST, Trento (Italy)

    2007-09-01

    The work presented here is the result of the collaborative effort between the University of Glasgow, ITC-IRST (Trento) and IMB-CNM (Barcelona) in the framework of the CERN-RD50 Collaboration to produce 3D silicon radiation detectors and study their performance. This paper reports on two sets of 3D devices. IRST and CNM have fabricated a set of single-type column 3D detectors, which have columnar electrodes of the same doping type and an ohmic contact located at the backplane. Simulations of the device behaviour and electrical test results are presented. In particular, current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and charge collection efficiency measurements are reported. Other types of structures called double-sided 3D detectors are currently being fabricated at CNM. In these detectors the sets of n and p columns are made on opposite sides of the device. Electrical and technological simulations and first processing results are presented.

  12. Surface Radiation Survey at the Shepley’s Hill Remediation Site, Devens, Massachusettes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Giles; C. P. Oertel; L. G. Roybal

    2009-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) provided technical support for ongoing environmental remediation activities at the Shepley’s Hill remediation site, near Devens, MA. The technical support included the completion of a radiation survey of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) at Shepley’s Hill, Shepley’s Hill landfill cover, and Red Cove areas. The objective of the radiation survey was to assess the ability of the INL backpack sodium iodide spectroscopy (BaSIS) system to detect elevated levels of NORM that may be associated with radon-222 emanation from near surface and subsurface fractures in the area. It is postulated that these fracture zones provide subsurface conduits for the transport of environmental contaminants. As such, location of these fracture sets will proved EPA Region 1 with the means for completing the development of an accurate site conceptual model. The results of the radiological survey show that some of the radiological anomalies correlate with currently mapped rock outcrops; however, not all of the rock outcrops in the surveyed area have been mapped. As such, it is not conclusive that all of the radiological anomalies correspond with surface rock outcrops. EPA Region 1 intends to perform a more comprehensive correlation of the radiation data collected with the BaSIS system with additional data sets such as detailed bedrock structural mapping, 2-dimensional resistivity profiling, and high-resolution topographic mapping. The results of this effort will be used in consideration of designing a potential follow-on effort for mapping of radon.

  13. TESTING DIFFERENT SURVEY TECHNIQUES TO MODEL ARCHITECTONIC NARROW SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mandelli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the architectural survey field, there has been the spread of a vast number of automated techniques. However, it is important to underline the gap that exists between the technical specification sheet of a particular instrument and its usability, accuracy and level of automation reachable in real cases scenario, especially speaking about Cultural Heritage (CH field. In fact, even if the technical specifications (range, accuracy and field of view are known for each instrument, their functioning and features are influenced by the environment, shape and materials of the object. The results depend more on how techniques are employed than the nominal specifications of the instruments. The aim of this article is to evaluate the real usability, for the 1:50 architectonic restitution scale, of common and not so common survey techniques applied to the complex scenario of dark, intricate and narrow spaces such as service areas, corridors and stairs of Milan’s cathedral indoors. Tests have shown that the quality of the results is strongly affected by side-issues like the impossibility of following the theoretical ideal methodology when survey such spaces. The tested instruments are: the laser scanner Leica C10, the GeoSLAM ZEB1, the DOT DPI 8 and two photogrammetric setups, a full frame camera with a fisheye lens and the NCTech iSTAR, a panoramic camera. Each instrument presents advantages and limits concerning both the sensors themselves and the acquisition phase.

  14. Testing Different Survey Techniques to Model Architectonic Narrow Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelli, A.; Fassi, F.; Perfetti, L.; Polari, C.

    2017-08-01

    In the architectural survey field, there has been the spread of a vast number of automated techniques. However, it is important to underline the gap that exists between the technical specification sheet of a particular instrument and its usability, accuracy and level of automation reachable in real cases scenario, especially speaking about Cultural Heritage (CH) field. In fact, even if the technical specifications (range, accuracy and field of view) are known for each instrument, their functioning and features are influenced by the environment, shape and materials of the object. The results depend more on how techniques are employed than the nominal specifications of the instruments. The aim of this article is to evaluate the real usability, for the 1:50 architectonic restitution scale, of common and not so common survey techniques applied to the complex scenario of dark, intricate and narrow spaces such as service areas, corridors and stairs of Milan's cathedral indoors. Tests have shown that the quality of the results is strongly affected by side-issues like the impossibility of following the theoretical ideal methodology when survey such spaces. The tested instruments are: the laser scanner Leica C10, the GeoSLAM ZEB1, the DOT DPI 8 and two photogrammetric setups, a full frame camera with a fisheye lens and the NCTech iSTAR, a panoramic camera. Each instrument presents advantages and limits concerning both the sensors themselves and the acquisition phase.

  15. ON THE NECESSITY OF RADIATION SURVEY OF THE BUILDINGS AFTER THE CONSTRUCTION, REPAIR OR RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Gorsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents regulation of radon concentration in the air of dwellings and public buildings in Russia in the historical aspect. It is shown with a specific reference to Saint-Petersburg that implementation of obligatory radiation survey of new buildings has led to the significant reduction of radon concentration in the dwelling air and, consequently, the levels of population exposure due to natural sources.

  16. Radiation Protection in Pediatric Radiology: Results of a Survey Among Dutch Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijwaard, Harmen; Valk, Doreth; de Waard-Schalkx, Ischa

    2016-10-01

    A survey about radiation protection in pediatric radiology was conducted among 22 general and seven children's hospitals in the Netherlands. Questions concerned, for example, child protocols used for CT, fluoroscopy and x-ray imaging, number of images and scans made, radiation doses and measures taken to reduce these, special tools used for children, and quality assurance issues. The answers received from 27 hospitals indicate that radiation protection practices differ considerably between general and children's hospitals but also between the respective general and children's hospitals. It is recommended that hospitals consult each other to come up with more uniform best practices. Few hospitals were able to supply doses that can be compared to the national Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs). The ones that could be compared exceeded the DRLs in one in five cases, which is more than was expected beforehand.

  17. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ben H; Baudin, Rémy; Franck, Antoine; Hugel, Sylvain; Strasberg, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis) can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species). A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between islands.

  18. Predicting Where a Radiation Will Occur: Acoustic and Molecular Surveys Reveal Overlooked Diversity in Indian Ocean Island Crickets (Mogoplistinae: Ornebius.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H Warren

    Full Text Available Recent theory suggests that the geographic location of island radiations (local accumulation of species diversity due to cladogenesis can be predicted based on island area and isolation. Crickets are a suitable group for testing these predictions, as they show both the ability to reach some of the most isolated islands in the world, and to speciate at small spatial scales. Despite substantial song variation between closely related species in many island cricket lineages worldwide, to date this characteristic has not received attention in the western Indian Ocean islands; existing species descriptions are based on morphology alone. Here we use a combination of acoustics and DNA sequencing to survey these islands for Ornebius crickets. We uncover a small but previously unknown radiation in the Mascarenes, constituting a three-fold increase in the Ornebius species diversity of this archipelago (from two to six species. A further new species is detected in the Comoros. Although double archipelago colonisation is the best explanation for species diversity in the Seychelles, in situ cladogenesis is the best explanation for the six species in the Mascarenes and two species of the Comoros. Whether the radiation of Mascarene Ornebius results from intra- or purely inter- island speciation cannot be determined on the basis of the phylogenetic data alone. However, the existence of genetic, song and ecological divergence at the intra-island scale is suggestive of an intra-island speciation scenario in which ecological and mating traits diverge hand-in-hand. Our results suggest that the geographic location of Ornebius radiations is partially but not fully explained by island area and isolation. A notable anomaly is Madagascar, where our surveys are consistent with existing accounts in finding no Ornebius species present. Possible explanations are discussed, invoking ecological differences between species and differences in environmental history between

  19. Correlation Results for a Mass Loaded Vehicle Panel Test Article Finite Element Models and Modal Survey Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maasha, Rumaasha; Towner, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    High-fidelity Finite Element Models (FEMs) were developed to support a recent test program at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The FEMs correspond to test articles used for a series of acoustic tests. Modal survey tests were used to validate the FEMs for five acoustic tests (a bare panel and four different mass-loaded panel configurations). An additional modal survey test was performed on the empty test fixture (orthogrid panel mounting fixture, between the reverb and anechoic chambers). Modal survey tests were used to test-validate the dynamic characteristics of FEMs used for acoustic test excitation. Modal survey testing and subsequent model correlation has validated the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the FEMs. The modal survey test results provide a basis for the analysis models used for acoustic loading response test and analysis comparisons

  20. Testing Quasar Unification: Radiative Transfer in Clumpy Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, James H; Long, Knox S; Sim, Stuart A; Higginbottom, Nick; Mangham, Sam W

    2016-01-01

    Various unification schemes interpret the complex phenomenology of quasars and luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) in terms of a simple picture involving a central black hole, an accretion disc and an associated outflow. Here, we continue our tests of this paradigm by comparing quasar spectra to synthetic spectra of biconical disc wind models, produced with our state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Previously, we have shown that we could produce synthetic spectra resembling those of observed broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, but only if the X-ray luminosity was limited to $10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$. Here, we introduce a simple treatment of clumping, and find that a filling factor of $\\sim0.01$ moderates the ionization state sufficiently for BAL features to form in the rest-frame UV at more realistic X-ray luminosities. Our fiducial model shows good agreement with AGN X-ray properties and the wind produces strong line emission in, e.g., Ly \\alpha\\ and CIV 1550\\AA\\ at low inclinations. At high ...

  1. Test Of Astronomy STandards TOAST Survey of K-12 Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Stork, Debra J.

    2015-01-01

    Discipline-based education research in astronomy is focused on understanding the underlying mental mechanisms used by students when learning astronomy and teachers when teaching astronomy. Systematic surveys of K-12 teacher' knowledge in the domain of astronomy are conducted periodically in order to better focus and improve professional development. These surveys are most often done when doing contemporary needs assessments or when new assessment instruments are readily available. Designed by Stephanie J. Slater of the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research, the 29-item multiple-choice format Test Of Astronomy STandards - TOAST is a carefully constructed, criterion-referenced instrument constructed upon a solid list of clearly articulated and widely agreed upon learning objectives. The targeted learning concepts tightly align with the consensus learning goals stated by the American Astronomical Society - Chair's Conference on ASTRO 101, the American Association of the Advancement of Science's Project 2061 Benchmarks, and the National Research Council's 1996 National Science Education Standards. Without modification, the TOAST is also aligned with the significantly less ambitious 2013 Next Generation Science Standards created by Achieve, Inc., under the auspices of the National Research Council. This latest survey reveals that K-12 teachers still hold many of the same fundamental misconceptions uncovered by earlier surveys. This includes misconceptions about the size, scale, and structure of the cosmos as well as misconceptions about the nature of physical processes at work in astronomy. This suggests that professional development in astronomy is still needed and that modern curriculum materials are best served if they provide substantial support for implementation.

  2. Testing a Model of IR Radiative Losses: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignola, F.; Long, C. N.; Reda, I.

    2009-08-01

    Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global and diffuse shortwave measurements made with first class thermopile based instruments. Pyrgeometers can be used to measure the sky temperature and are used to calculate the pyranometer?s IR radiative losses.

  3. Cosmological tests of general relativity with future tomographic surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Pogosian, Levon; Silvestri, Alessandra; Zylberberg, Joel

    2009-12-11

    Future weak lensing surveys will map the evolution of matter perturbations and gravitational potentials, yielding a new test of general relativity on cosmic scales. They will probe the relations between matter overdensities, local curvature, and the Newtonian potential. These relations can be modified in alternative gravity theories or by the effects of massive neutrinos or exotic dark energy fluids. We introduce two functions of time and scale which account for any such modifications in the linear regime. We use a principal component analysis to find the eigenmodes of these functions that cosmological data will constrain. The number of constrained modes gives a model-independent forecast of how many parameters describing deviations from general relativity could be constrained, along with w(z). The modes' scale and time dependence tell us which theoretical models will be better tested.

  4. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  5. Research on the test method of using injection as an equivalent substitute for electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X. D.; Wei, G. H.; Lu, X. F.; Li, K.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents a method to carry out high intensity radiated field (HIRF) effect experiments by using injection as an equivalent substitute for electromagnetic radiation. In allusion to typical interconnected system, the equal response voltage on the equipment cable port is regarded as an equivalent basis of injection and radiation methods. The equivalent relation formula between injected voltage and radiated field is derived theoretically. The conditions needed for extrapolating injected voltage in HIRF are confirmed, and the extrapolation method is proposed. On the basis of the above research, the electromagnetic environment effect test new method combined injection with radiation for interconnected system is summarized. The typical nonlinear interconnected system is selected as equipment under test, and the single frequency continuous wave radiation and injection effect experiments are carried out separately. The test results indicate that the relation between radiated field and injected voltage is linear, and the equivalent injected voltage used to substitute HIRF can be obtained by linear extrapolation.

  6. A survey and evaluation of lantern tests of color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, B L; Vingrys, A J

    1982-04-01

    This paper reports a survey of the lantern tests that have been or are used to evaluate the color vision of people who wish to enter occupations that require the ability to recognize colored signal lights reliably. The origin of each lantern is traced and the principal features of each are described. The available data concerning failure rate of normals, the failure rate of people with defective color vision, and the extent to which scores on lantern tests correlate with field trials are summarized. Despite the fact that lantern tests have been used since the turn of the century and that some lanterns have been in use for more than 30 years and some for much longer periods, the available validation data are incomplete and sometimes conflicting. However, the data do indicate that some lanterns may fail a significant proportion of normals and that there is considerable variation between lanterns in the proportion of color vision defectives that will fail. It is noted that most lanterns will pass some protanomals despite their reduced sensitivity to red light and correspondingly short visual range for red signals. The view of Cameron is supported that a more rational approach would be to made a clinical diagnosis of the type of color vision defect, to reject protanopes, deuteranopes, and protanomals and to use a lantern test only to determine which deuteranomals should be accepted.

  7. Spine Metastasis Practice Patterns among Korean, Chinese, and Japanese Radiation Oncologists: A Multinational Online Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Ahn, Yong Chan; Gao, Xian-Shu; Wang, Jun-Jie; Zeng, Zhao-Chong; Ito, Yoshinori; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Yasumasa

    2017-01-01

    This online survey of practising radiation oncologists from Korea, China and Japan was conducted to investigate the current practices in radiotherapy (RT) for spine metastasis and to compare these practices across the three countries. The questionnaire included nine general information questions and two clinical scenarios (representing ‘typical’ and ‘good’ prognosis spine metastasis), with seven questions for each scenario. An anonymous web-based survey using Google Docs® was undertaken from 2 September 2014 to 9 April 2015. A total of 54 Korean, 107 Chinese and 104 Japanese radiation oncologists participated in the study. The first scenario involved a typical case of spine metastasis (~25% expected 1-year survival rate), and the preferred fractionation scheme was 10 fractions of 3 Gy, though the pattern was slightly different in each country. The second scenario involved a good prognosis case (>50% expected 1-year survival rate), and 10 fractions of 3 Gy was the preferred practice in all three countries (however, use of a larger fraction dose with a smaller fraction number was more common in Korea). A more conformal RT technique was more prominent in China and Korea, especially for patients with a good prognosis. Avoidance of reirradiation was notable in China. In summary, a preference for multiple fractionation in RT for spine metastasis was observed in the majority of Korean, Chinese and Japanese radiation oncologists, although there were slight differences in practice preferences, especially for patients with a favorable prognosis. PMID:27672099

  8. Testing quasar unification: radiative transfer in clumpy winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, J. H.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.; Sim, S. A.; Higginbottom, N.; Mangham, S. W.

    2016-05-01

    Various unification schemes interpret the complex phenomenology of quasars and luminous active galactic nuclei (AGN) in terms of a simple picture involving a central black hole, an accretion disc and an associated outflow. Here, we continue our tests of this paradigm by comparing quasar spectra to synthetic spectra of biconical disc wind models, produced with our state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. Previously, we have shown that we could produce synthetic spectra resembling those of observed broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, but only if the X-ray luminosity was limited to 1043 erg s-1. Here, we introduce a simple treatment of clumping, and find that a filling factor of ˜0.01 moderates the ionization state sufficiently for BAL features to form in the rest-frame UV at more realistic X-ray luminosities. Our fiducial model shows good agreement with AGN X-ray properties and the wind produces strong line emission in, e.g., Lyα and C IV 1550 Å at low inclinations. At high inclinations, the spectra possess prominent LoBAL features. Despite these successes, we cannot reproduce all emission lines seen in quasar spectra with the correct equivalent-width ratios, and we find an angular dependence of emission line equivalent width despite the similarities in the observed emission line properties of BAL and non-BAL quasars. Overall, our work suggests that biconical winds can reproduce much of the qualitative behaviour expected from a unified model, but we cannot yet provide quantitative matches with quasar properties at all viewing angles. Whether disc winds can successfully unify quasars is therefore still an open question.

  9. Relativistic Radiation Magnetohydrodynamics in Dynamical Spacetimes: Numerical Methods and Tests

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Many systems of current interest in relativistic astrophysics require a knowledge of radiative transfer in a magnetized gas flowing in a strongly-curved, dynamical spacetime. Such systems include coalescing compact binaries containing neutron stars or white dwarfs, disks around merging black holes, core collapse supernovae, collapsars, and gamma-ray burst sources. To model these phenomena, all of which involve general relativity, radiation (photon and/or neutrino), and magnetohydrodynamics, w...

  10. The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) Mission Using the HiSat Conformal Satellite Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nathanael A.; Norman, Ryan B.; Soto, Hector L.; Stewart, Victor A.; Jones, Mark L.; Kowalski, Matthew C.; Ben Shabat, Adam; Gough, Kerry M.; Stavely, Rebecca L.; Shim, Alex C.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Rapid Response Radiation Survey (R3S) experiment, designed as a quick turnaround mission to make radiation measurements in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), will fly as a hosted payload in partnership with NovaWurks using their Hyper-integrated Satlet (HISat) architecture. The need for the mission arises as the Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionization Radiation for Aviation Safety (NAIRAS) model moves from a research effort into an operational radiation assessment tool. Currently, airline professionals are the second largest demographic of radiation workers and to date their radiation exposure is undocumented in the USA. The NAIRAS model seeks to fill this information gap. The data collected by R3S, in addition to the complementary data from a NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) atmospheric balloon mission entitled Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X), will validate exposure prediction capabilities of NAIRAS. The R3S mission collects total dose and radiation spectrum measurements using a Teledyne µDosimeter and a Liulin-6SA2 LED spectrometer. These two radiation sensors provide a cross correlated radiometric measurement in combination with the Honeywell HMR2300 Smart Digital Magnetometer. The magnetometer assesses the Earth's magnetic field in the LEO environment and allows radiation dose to be mapped as a function of the Earth's magnetic shielding. R3S is also unique in that the radiation sensors will be exposed on the outer surface of the spacecraft, possibly making this the first measurements of the LEO radiation environment with bare sensors. Viability of R3S as an extremely fast turnaround mission is due, in part, to the nature of the robust, well-defined interfaces of the conformal satellite HiSat Architecture. The HiSat architecture, which was developed with the support of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA's) Phoenix Program, enabled the R3S system to advance from the first concept to delivery of preliminary design review (PDR) level documents in

  11. Design and calibration of a novel transient radiative heat flux meter for a spacecraft thermal test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chunchen; Hu, Peng; Cheng, Xiaofang

    2016-06-01

    Radiative heat flux measurement is significantly important for a spacecraft thermal test. To satisfy the requirements of both high accuracy and fast response, a novel transient radiative heat flux meter was developed. Its thermal receiver consists of a central thermal receiver and two thermal guarded annular plates, which ensure the temperature distribution of the central thermal receiver to be uniform enough for reasonably applying lumped heat capacity method in a transient radiative heat flux measurement. This novel transient radiative heat flux meter design can also take accurate measurements regardless of spacecraft surface temperature and incident radiation spectrum. The measurement principle was elaborated and the coefficients were calibrated. Experimental results from testing a blackbody furnace and an Xenon lamp show that this novel transient radiative heat flux meter can be used to measure transient radiative heat flux up to 1400 W/m2 with high accuracy and the response time of less than 10 s.

  12. Monte Carlo Radiation Hydrodynamics: Methods, Tests and Application to Supernova Type Ia Ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Noebauer, U M; Kromer, M; Röpke, F K; Hillebrandt, W

    2012-01-01

    In astrophysical systems, radiation-matter interactions are important in transferring energy and momentum between the radiation field and the surrounding material. This coupling often makes it necessary to consider the role of radiation when modelling the dynamics of astrophysical fluids. During the last few years, there have been rapid developments in the use of Monte Carlo methods for numerical radiative transfer simulations. Here, we present an approach to radiation hydrodynamics that is based on coupling Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques with finite-volume hydrodynamical methods in an operator-split manner. In particular, we adopt an indivisible packet formalism to discretize the radiation field into an ensemble of Monte Carlo packets and employ volume-based estimators to reconstruct the radiation field characteristics. In this paper the numerical tools of this method are presented and their accuracy is verified in a series of test calculations. Finally, as a practical example, we use our approach...

  13. Establishment of Testing Device for Shielding Performance of X and Gamma Ray Radiation Protection Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Ming-zhe; WEI; Ke-xin; HOU; Jin-bing; WANG; Hong-yu; GAO; Fei; NI; Ning

    2015-01-01

    X and gamma ray radiation protective material shielding performance testing device was built based on the international standard IEC61331.1-2014.The device can be used to test attenuation ratio,attenuation equivalent and lead equivalent of radiation protective material in"narrow beam condition","broad beam condition"and"inverse

  14. Radiation Testing on State-of-the-Art CMOS: Challenges, Plans, and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2009-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007 and 2008, we discussed a variety of challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices and technologies [1, 2]. In this presentation, we provide more specific details in this on-going investigation focusing on out-of-the-box lessons observed for providing radiation effects assurances as well as preliminary test results.

  15. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee F Schroeder

    Full Text Available Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda.Test types (identity and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI. AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015.Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954 of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests, moderate (33 tests, and minimal (55 tests availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83-$3.46.One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46.

  16. Laboratory Diagnostics Market in East Africa: A Survey of Test Types, Test Availability, and Test Prices in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Lee F; Elbireer, Ali; Jackson, J Brooks; Amukele, Timothy K

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic laboratory tests are routinely defined in terms of their sensitivity, specificity, and ease of use. But the actual clinical impact of a diagnostic test also depends on its availability and price. This is especially true in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa. We present a first-of-its-kind report of diagnostic test types, availability, and prices in Kampala, Uganda. Test types (identity) and availability were based on menus and volumes obtained from clinical laboratories in late 2011 in Kampala using a standard questionnaire. As a measure of test availability, we used the Availability Index (AI). AI is the combined daily testing volumes of laboratories offering a given test, divided by the combined daily testing volumes of all laboratories in Kampala. Test prices were based on a sampling of prices collected in person and via telephone surveys in 2015. Test volumes and menus were obtained for 95% (907/954) of laboratories in Kampala city. These 907 laboratories offered 100 different test types. The ten most commonly offered tests in decreasing order were Malaria, HCG, HIV serology, Syphilis, Typhoid, Urinalysis, Brucellosis, Stool Analysis, Glucose, and ABO/Rh. In terms of AI, the 100 tests clustered into three groups: high (12 tests), moderate (33 tests), and minimal (55 tests) availability. 50% and 36% of overall availability was provided through private and public laboratories, respectively. Point-of-care laboratories contributed 35% to the AI of high availability tests, but only 6% to the AI of the other tests. The mean price of the most commonly offered test types was $2.62 (range $1.83-$3.46). One hundred different laboratory test types were in use in Kampala in late 2011. Both public and private laboratories were critical to test availability. The tests offered in point-of-care laboratories tended to be the most available tests. Prices of the most common tests ranged from $1.83-$3.46.

  17. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  18. A robotic system to conduct radiation and contamination surveys on nuclear waste transport casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrigan, R.W.; Sanders, T.L.

    1990-06-01

    The feasibility of performing, numerous spent fuel cask operations using fully integrated robotic systems is under evaluation. Using existing technology, operational and descriptive software and hardware in the form of robotic end effectors are being designed in conjunction with interfacing cask components. A robotic radiation and contamination survey system has been developed and used on mock-up cask hardware to evaluate the impact of such fully automated operations on cask design features and productivity. Based on experience gained from the survey system, numerous health physics operations can be reliably performed with little human intervention using a fully automated system. Such operations can also significantly reduce time requirements for cask-receiving operations. 7 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D T [comp.; Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Ingersoll, J K [comp.; Tec-Com, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  20. Optimization of spectroscopic surveys for testing non-Gaussianity

    OpenAIRE

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Dore, Olivier; Dalal, Neal

    2015-01-01

    We investigate optimization strategies to measure primordial non-Gaussianity with future spectroscopic surveys. We forecast measurements coming from the 3D galaxy power spectrum and compute constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity parameters f_(NL) and n_(NG). After studying the dependence on those parameters upon survey specifications such as redshift range, area, number density, we assume a reference mock survey and investigate the trade-off between number density and area surveyed. We the...

  1. Gaps in Radiation Therapy Awareness: Results From an Educational Multi-institutional Survey of US Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaverdian, Narek; Yoo, Sun Mi; Cook, Ryan; Chang, Eric M; Jiang, Naomi; Yuan, Ye; Sandler, Kiri; Steinberg, Michael; Lee, Percy

    2017-08-01

    Internists and primary care providers play a growing role in cancer care. We therefore evaluated the awareness of radiation therapy in general and specifically the clinical utility of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) among current US internal medicine residents. A web-based institutional review board-approved multi-institutional survey was distributed to US internal medicine residency programs. The survey evaluated trainee demographic characteristics, baseline radiation oncology awareness, knowledge of the role of SBRT for early-stage NSCLC, and whether the survey successfully improved awareness. Thirty US internal medicine programs participated, with an overall participant response rate of 46% (1177 of 2551). Of the trainees, 93% (n=1076) reported no radiation oncology education in their residency, 39% (n=452) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in an oncologic emergency, and 26% (n=293) reported confidence in knowing when to consult radiation oncology in the setting of a newly diagnosed cancer. Of the participants, 76% (n=850) correctly identified that surgical resection is the standard treatment in operable early-stage NSCLC, but only 50% (n=559) of participants would recommend SBRT to a medically inoperable patient, followed by 31% of participants (n=347) who were unsure of the most appropriate treatment, and 10% (n=117) who recommended waiting to offer palliative therapy. Ninety percent of participants (n=1029) agreed that they would benefit from further training on when to consult radiation oncology. Overall, 96% (n=1072) indicated that the survey increased their knowledge and awareness of the role of SBRT. The majority of participating trainees received no education in radiation oncology in their residency, reported a lack of confidence regarding when to consult radiation oncology, and overwhelmingly agreed that they would benefit from further training. These findings

  2. Radiation tests on erbium-doped garnet crystals for spaceborne CH4-Lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Ansgar; Kreitler, Martin; Cubera, Miroslaw; Kucirek, Philipp; Gronloh, Bastian; Esser, Dominik; Höfer, Marco; Hoffmann, Hans-Dieter

    2015-02-01

    A test campaign for assessing the radiation hardness of different Erbium-doped garnet crystals including Er:YAG and a compositionally tuned Er:YAG/Er:LuAG mixed garnet is reported. Tests with proton and gamma radiation have been performed with parameters mimicking a 3-year low-earth-orbit satellite mission like MERLIN or ADM-Aeolus. For each test sample broadband transmission spectra in the wavelength range of 500 nm - 1700 nm and characteristic laser curves from a test laser oscillator have been measured. Radiation-induced losses have been calculated from the obtained data. The results indicate that gamma radiation is the dominant loss source with about 0.5 %/cm radiation-induced losses for the nominal dose of the chosen mission scenario.

  3. Survey of pediatric MDCT radiation dose from university hospitals in Thailand. A preliminary for national dose survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla Univ., Hat Yai (Thailand)], e-mail: supikak@yahoo.com; Trinavarat, Panruethai [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand); Visrutaratna, Pannee [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai Univ., Chiang Mai (Thailand)

    2012-09-15

    Background: Increasing pediatric CT usage worldwide needs the optimization of CT protocol examination. Although there are previous published dose reference level (DRL) values, the local DRLs should be established to guide for clinical practice and monitor the CT radiation. Purpose: To determine the multidetector CT (MDCT) radiation dose in children in three university hospitals in Thailand in four age groups using the CT dose index (CTDI) and dose length product (DLP). Material and Methods: A retrospective review of CT dosimetry in pediatric patients (<15 years of age) who had undergone head, chest, and abdominal MDCT in three major university hospitals in Thailand was performed. Volume CTDI (CTDIvol) and DLP were recorded, categorized into four age groups: <1 year, 1- < 5 years, 5- <10 years, and 10- <15 years in each scanner. Range, mean, and third quartile values were compared with the national reference dose levels for CT in pediatric patients from the UK and Switzerland according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendation. Results: Per age group, the third quartile values for brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were, respectively, in terms of CTDIvol: 25, 30, 40, and 45 mGy; 4.5, 5.7, 10, and 15.6 mGy; 8.5, 9, 14, and 17 mGy; and in terms of DLP: 400, 570, 610, and 800 mGy cm; 80, 140, 305, and 470 mGy cm; and 190, 275, 560,765 mGy cm. Conclusion: This preliminary national dose survey for pediatric CT in Thailand found that the majority of CTDIvol and DLP values in brain, chest, and abdominal CTs were still below the diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) from the UK and Switzerland regarding to ICRP recommendation.

  4. Perceived risks from radiation and nuclear testing near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan: a comparison between physicians, scientists, and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis-Roberts, Kathleen L; Werner, Cynthia A; Frank, Irene

    2007-04-01

    Determining the difference in perception of risk between experts, or more educated professionals, and laypeople is important so that a potential hazard can be effectively communicated to the public. Many surveys have been conducted to better understand the difference between expert and public opinions, and often laypeople exhibit higher perceptions of risk to hazards in comparison to experts. This is especially true when health risk is due to radiation, nuclear power, and nuclear waste. This article focuses on one section of a risk perception survey given to two groups of individuals with a more specialized education (scientists and physicians) and laypeople (villagers) in the Semipalatinsk region of Kazakhstan. All of these groups live near the former Soviet nuclear test site. Originally, it was expected that the scientists and physicians would have similar perceptions of radiation risk, while the public perceptions would be higher, but this was not always the case. For example, when perceptions of risk pertain to the health impacts of nuclear testing or the dose-response nature of radiation exposure, the physicians tend to agree with the laypeople, not the scientists. The villagers are always the most risk-averse group, followed by the physicians and then the scientists. These differences are likely due to different frames of reference for each of the populations.

  5. Testing CCDM Cosmology with the Radiation Temperature-Redshift Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, I; Lima, J A S

    2016-01-01

    The standard $\\Lambda$CDM model can be mimicked at the background and perturbative levels (linear and non-linear) by a class of gravitationally induced particle production cosmology dubbed CCDM cosmology. However, the radiation component in the CCDM model follows a slightly different temperature-redshift $T(z)$-law which depends on an extra parameter, $\

  6. Community Surveys: Low Dose Radiation. Fernald, Ohio and Rocky Flats, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. K. Mertz; James Flynn; Donald G. MacGregor; Theresa Satterfield; Stephen M. Johnson; Seth Tuler; Thomas Webler

    2002-10-16

    This report is intended to present a basic description of the data from the two community surveys and to document the text of the questions; the methods used for the survey data collection; and a brief overview of the results. Completed surveys were conducted at local communities near the Rocky Flats, Colorado and the Fernald, Ohio sites; no survey was conducted for the Brookhaven, New York site. Fernald. The Fernald sample was randomly selected from 98% of all potential residential telephones in the townships of Ross, Morgan, and Crosby. The only telephone exchanges not used for the Fernald study had 4%, or fewer, of the holders of the telephone numbers actually living in either of the three target townships. Surveying started on July 24, 2001 and finished on August 30, 2001. A total of 399 completed interviews were obtained resulting in a CASRO response rate of 41.8%. The average length of an interview was 16.5 minutes. Rocky Flats. The sample was randomly selected from all potential residential telephones in Arvada and from 99% of the potential telephones in Westminster. Surveying started on August 10, 2001 and finished on September 25, 2001. A total of 401 completed interviews were obtained with a CASRO response rate of 32.5%. The average length of an interview was 15.7 minutes. Overall, respondents hold favorable views of science. They indicate an interest in developments in science and technology, feel that the world is better off because of science, and that science makes our lives healthier, easier, and more comfortable. However, respondents are divided on whether science should decide what is safe or not safe for themselves and their families. The majority of the respondents think that standards for exposure to radiation should be based on what science knows about health effects of radiation and on what is possible with today's technology. Although few respondents had visited the sites, most had heard or read something about Fernald or Rocky Flat s in

  7. Nationwide radiation dose survey of computed tomography for fetal skeletal dysplasias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Osamu [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sawai, Hideaki [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nishinomiya-shi, Hyogo (Japan); Murotsuki, Jun [Miyagi Children' s Hospital, Department of Maternal and Fetal Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Advanced Fetal and Developmental Medicine, Sendai-shi, Miyagi (Japan); Nishimura, Gen [Tokyo Metropolitan Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Imaging, Fuchu-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Horiuchi, Tetsuya [National Center for Child Health and Development, Department of Radiology, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Osaka University, Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Course of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, computed tomography (CT) has been used to diagnose fetal skeletal dysplasia. However, no surveys have been conducted to determine the radiation exposure dose and the diagnostic reference level (DRL). To collect CT dose index volume (CTDIvol) and dose length product (DLP) data from domestic hospitals implementing fetal skeletal 3-D CT and to establish DRLs for Japan. Scan data of 125 cases of 20 protocols from 16 hospitals were analyzed. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum values of CTDIvol and DLP were determined. The time-dependent change in radiation dose setting in hospitals with three or more cases with scans was also examined. The minimum, first-quartile, median, third-quartile and maximum CTDIvol values were 2.1, 3.7, 7.7, 11.3 and 23.1 mGy, respectively, and these values for DLP were 69.0, 122.3, 276.8, 382.6 and 1025.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Six of the 12 institutions reduced the dose setting during the implementation period. The DRLs of CTDIvol and DLP for fetal CT were 11.3 mGy and 382.6 mGy.cm, respectively. Institutions implementing fetal CT should use these established DRLs as the standard and make an effort to reduce radiation exposure by voluntarily decreasing the dose. (orig.)

  8. Radiation dose from multidetector CT studies in children: results from the first Italian nationwide survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, Claudio [IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Origgi, Daniela; Palorini, Federica [Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Department of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Matranga, Domenica [University of Palermo, Department of Sciences for Health Promotion and Mother and Child Care ' ' G. D' Alessandro' ' , Palermo (Italy); Salerno, Sergio [University of Palermo, Department of Medical and Forensic Biopathology and Biotechnologies, Section of Radiology, Palermo (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Multidetector CT (MDCT) scanners have contributed to the widespread use of CT in paediatric imaging. However, concerns are raised for the associated radiation exposure. Very few surveys on radiation exposure from MDCT studies in children are available. The aim of this study was to outline the status of radiation exposure in children from MDCT practice in Italy. In this retrospective multicentre study we asked Italian radiology units with an MDCT scanner with at least 16 slices to provide dosimetric and acquisition parameters of CT examinations in three age groups (1-5, 6-10, 11-15 years) for studies of head, chest and abdomen. The dosimetric results were reported in terms of third-quartile volumetric CT dose index (CTDI{sub vol}) (mGy), size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) (mGy), dose length product (DLP) (mGy cm), and total DLP for multiphase studies. These results were compared with paediatric European and adult Italian published data. A multivariate analysis assessed the association of CTDI{sub vol} with patient characteristics and scanning modalities. We collected data from 993 MDCT examinations performed at 25 centres. For age groups 1-5 years, 6-10 years and 11-15 years, the CTDI{sub vol}, DLP and total DLP values were statistically significantly below the values observed in our analogous national survey in adults, although the difference decreased with increasing age. CTDI{sub vol} variability among centres was statistically significant (variance = 0.07; 95% confidence interval = 0.03-0.16; P < 0.001). This study reviewed practice in Italian centres performing paediatric imaging with MDCT scanners. The variability of doses among centres suggests that the use of standardised CT protocols should be encouraged. (orig.)

  9. Testing of environmental radiation monitors using the Risø low-level radiation measurement stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2000-01-01

    To harmonise the measurement of environmental dose rates from photon radiation within the EU countries. an EU sponsored intercomparison of environmental dose rate meters used for early warning of nuclear accidents was performed in June 1999. The intercomparison was organised by the EURADOS......, Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (Germany) and the Riso National Laboratory (Denmark). This paper describes the free-field irradiation facilities at Rise and some details of the field intercomparison experiments performed at the Riso Natural Environmental Radiation Measurement Station during 3rd and 4th...... June, 1999. The chief aims of such experiments are to allow the participants to check their home calibrations of their detectors and to compare the responses of the individual environmental radiation measurement systems used in the different EU member states and making a link between the different...

  10. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  11. Designing, Testing, and Validating an Attitudinal Survey on an Environmental Topic: A Groundwater Pollution Survey Instrument for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacosta-Gabari, Idoya; Fernandez-Manzanal, Rosario; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Research in environmental attitudes' assessment has significantly increased in recent years. The development of specific attitude scales for specific environmental problems has often been proposed. This paper describes the Groundwater Pollution Test (GPT), a 19-item survey instrument using a Likert-type scale. The survey has been used with…

  12. GEM detectors development for radiation environment: neutron tests and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernyshova, Maryna; Jednoróg, Sławomir; Malinowski, Karol; Czarski, Tomasz; Ziółkowski, Adam; Bieńkowska, Barbara; Prokopowicz, Rafał; Łaszyńska, Ewa; Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, Ewa; Poźniak, Krzysztof T.; Kasprowicz, Grzegorz; Zabołotny, Wojciech; Wojeński, Andrzej; Krawczyk, Rafał D.; Linczuk, Paweł; Potrykus, Paweł; Bajdel, Barcel

    2016-09-01

    One of the requests from the ongoing ITER-Like Wall Project is to have diagnostics for Soft X-Ray (SXR) monitoring in tokamak. Such diagnostics should be focused on tungsten emission measurements, as an increased attention is currently paid to tungsten due to a fact that it became a main candidate for the plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactor. In addition, such diagnostics should be able to withstand harsh radiation environment at tokamak during its operation. The presented work is related to the development of such diagnostics based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. More specifically, an influence of neutron radiation on performance of the GEM detectors is studied both experimentally and through computer simulations. The neutron induced radioactivity (after neutron source exposure) was found to be not pronounced comparing to an impact of other secondary neutron reaction products (during the exposure).

  13. Development and Implementation of Radiation-Hydrodynamics Verification Test Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcath, Matthew J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Matthew Y. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ramsey, Scott D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-22

    Analytic solutions to the radiation-hydrodynamic equations are useful for verifying any large-scale numerical simulation software that solves the same set of equations. The one-dimensional, spherically symmetric Coggeshall No.9 and No.11 analytic solutions, cell-averaged over a uniform-grid have been developed to analyze the corresponding solutions from the Los Alamos National Laboratory Eulerian Applications Project radiation-hydrodynamics code xRAGE. These Coggeshall solutions have been shown to be independent of heat conduction, providing a unique opportunity for comparison with xRAGE solutions with and without the heat conduction module. Solution convergence was analyzed based on radial step size. Since no shocks are involved in either problem and the solutions are smooth, second-order convergence was expected for both cases. The global L1 errors were used to estimate the convergence rates with and without the heat conduction module implemented.

  14. Tsunami Questionnaire Survey in Heraklion Test Site, Crete Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Antonia; Tsimi, Christina; Orfanogiannaki, Katerina; Papadopoulos, Gerassimos; Sachpazi, Maria; Lavigne, Franck; Grancher, Delphine

    2015-04-01

    The Heraklion city (Crete Island, Greece) has been chosen as one of the test-sites for the EU-FP7ASTARTE tsunami project. Heraklion is the biggest city in Crete Isl. and the fourth biggest in Greece with a population of about 120,000 which, however, during the summer vacation period nearly doubles. In the past, Heraklion was hit by strong, destructive tsunamis such as the ones of AD 8 August 1303, 10 October 1650 and 9 July 1956. The first and the third were caused by large tectonic earthquakes associated with the eastern segment of the Hellenic Arc the first and with the back-arc extensional regime the third. The one of 1650 was associated with the eruption of the Columbo submarine volcano in the Santorini volcanic complex. One of the activities scheduled for WP9 of ASTARTE project, which aims at building tsunami resilient societies in Europe, is dedicated to organize questionnaire surveys among the populations of the several ASTARTE test-sites. Although the questionnaire is comprised by more than 50 questions, the central concept is to better understand what people know about tsunamis and if they are ready to cope with risks associated with future tsunami occurrences. In Heraklion the survey was conducted during tourism peak season of July 2014, thus questionnaires were collected by both local people and tourists, thus representing a variety of countries. We attempted to keep balance between males and females, while the age ranged from 15 to 65. Totally, 113 persons were interviewed of which 62 were females and 51 males. From the point of view of origin, 58 out of 113 were local people and residents, 22 were Greek tourists and 29 foreign tourists. Generally, the questionnaire consists of four parts. In the first, people were asked about their relation with the area of Heraklion. In the second part, the questions considered the knowledge that people have on tsunamis as a natural, hazardous phenomenon. More precisely, people were asked questions such as what a

  15. Qualification of the radiation environment in the TCC2 experimental test area.

    CERN Document Server

    Fynbo, C A

    2000-01-01

    This report qualifies the radiation environment to be found in the area behind the beam dump in the TCC2 experimental hall where tests are being performed on the radiation hardness and sensitivity to Single Event Upsets of electronics to be installed near the LHC machine. A comparison is made with the radiation environment expected for the LHC, and we conclude that the environment found in the test area matches that of LHC such that tests performed here will provide a valid simulation of electronics performance under LHC running conditions.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of the complex field in the LHC radiation test facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoulou, A; Rausch, R; Wijnands, Thijs

    2004-01-01

    The hard radiation environment of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) demands for a careful choice of COTS (Components Off The Shelf) that will be installed in the tunnel. All the electronic equipment should be tested in a mixed radiation field, similar to that of the LHC. To obtain optimum results it is essential to study thoroughly the complex radiation field in the test facility at CERN. For this purpose a detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the test area was carried out and the calculations were compared with the dosimetry measurements already available.

  17. Gamma Radiation Reduced Toxicity of Azoxystrobin Tested on Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, P; Zdarsky, M; Benova, K; Falis, M; Tomko, M

    2016-06-01

    Fungicide azoxystrobin toxicity was monitored by means of a 96-h biotest with Artemia franciscana nauplius stages after exposure to solutions with concentrations of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mg L(-1) irradiated with (60)Co gamma radiation with doses of 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 kGy. The effects of ionization radiation on azoxystrobin toxicity were mainly manifested by a statistically significant reduction of lethality after 72- and 96-h exposure. A maximum reduction of lethality of 72 % was achieved using doses of 1-5 kGy for an azoxystrobin initial concentration of 0.4 mg L(-1) and after 72 h of exposure. At a 96-h exposure, a difference of lethal effects reached up to 70 % for a dose of 10 kGy. The observed effect of gamma ionizing radiation on azoxystrobin toxicity suggest that this approach can be applied as an alternative for a reduction of azoxystrobin residua in food.

  18. Radiation survey on Fukushima Medical University premises about four years after the Fukushima nuclear disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yasutaka; Wakamatsu, Hiroaki; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted on the Fukushima Medical University (FMU) premises (in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture) about four years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Its objectives were (1) to create a map of the ambient gamma dose rate (air-kerma rate) distribution, (2) to evaluate the air-kerma rate originating from natural radionuclides, and (3) to investigate the effects of snow cover on changes in the air-kerma rate. This man-borne survey revealed that the air-kerma rate varies widely, ranging from 0.038 μGy h-1 to 0.520 μGy h-1, and is higher on grass than on the other investigated surface types, such as soil, asphalt, and bricks. In this area, the mean air-kerma rate from natural radiation was evaluated to be 0.03 ± 0.01 μGy h-1, which is close to 0.04 μGy h-1, which was measured in central Fukushima City by a local authority.Furthermore, snowfall was found to reduce the air-kerma rate by 5%-30%. This reduction was attributed to attenuation of the primary radiation while passing through the snow cover, and the measured contribution of scattered radiation to the air-kerma rate reduction was small. The reduction rate was found to depend on the initial snow depth but to maintain a similar value for a couple of days, after the snow had partially melted and its depth had decreased. Finally, analysis of the daily dose due to external exposure received on the FMU premises revealed that no further health effects due to chronic radiation exposure at this site are to be expected. PMID:26911302

  19. Radiation survey on Fukushima Medical University premises about four years after the Fukushima nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Yasutaka; Wakamatsu, Hiroaki; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2016-06-08

    This study was conducted on the Fukushima Medical University (FMU) premises (in Fukushima City, Fukushima Prefecture) about four years after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Its objectives were (1) to create a map of the ambient gamma dose rate (air-kerma rate) distribution, (2) to evaluate the air-kerma rate originating from natural radionuclides, and (3) to investigate the effects of snow cover on changes in the air-kerma rate. This man-borne survey revealed that the air-kerma rate varies widely, ranging from 0.038 μGy h(-1) to 0.520 μGy h(-1), and is higher on grass than on the other investigated surface types, such as soil, asphalt, and bricks. In this area, the mean air-kerma rate from natural radiation was evaluated to be 0.03 ± 0.01 μGy h(-1), which is close to 0.04 μGy h(-1), which was measured in central Fukushima City by a local authority.Furthermore, snowfall was found to reduce the air-kerma rate by 5%-30%. This reduction was attributed to attenuation of the primary radiation while passing through the snow cover, and the measured contribution of scattered radiation to the air-kerma rate reduction was small. The reduction rate was found to depend on the initial snow depth but to maintain a similar value for a couple of days, after the snow had partially melted and its depth had decreased. Finally, analysis of the daily dose due to external exposure received on the FMU premises revealed that no further health effects due to chronic radiation exposure at this site are to be expected.

  20. Compilation of radiation damage test data part III: materials used around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Beynel, P; Schönbacher, H; CERN. Geneva

    1982-01-01

    For pt.II see CERN report 79-08 (1979). This handbook gives the results of radiation damage tests on various engineering materials and components intended for installation in radiation areas of the CERN high-energy particle accelerators. It complements two previous volumes covering organic cable-insulating materials and thermoplastic and thermosetting resins.

  1. Special Operations of CERES for Radiation Experiment Tests (SOCRATES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Z. Peter

    The Clouds and Earth Radiant Energy System project flew a scanning radiometer (PFM) aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission TRMM satellite, and two each aboard the Terra (FM1 FM2) and Aqua spacecraft (FM3 FM4). The primary objectives of the pairs of in-struments were for one to scan cross-track to map the geographical distribution of reflected solar radiation and Earth-emitted radiation and for the other to scan in azimuth as well as in elevation angle to provide data from which to develop models to describe the directionally-dependent dis-tribution of reflected solar radiance and Earth-emitted radiance. The Programmable Azimuth Plane Scan (PAPS) feature of the CERES instrument is a variant of the latter, and enables a scanner to target ground stations, or to match other satellite instruments viewing geometry to generate data sets for various scientific investigations. This paper presents special operations of CERES using the PAPS mode with the objective to collect data for comparison at the radiance level with other Earth Radiation Budget (ERB) instruments, and also shows numerical results of such comparisons. The following campaigns are covered in the paper: (i) In 1998, the CERES instrument (PFM) was rotated in azimuth so its scan plane coincided with the cross-track scan plane of the ScaRAB-2 instrument when the orbits of their spacecraft intersected. In this data set, both instruments viewed the same scenes from the same directions within a few minutes of each other, so the radiance measured by both instruments could be compared. (ii) In March of 2000, the scan plane of CERES Terra (FM1 and FM2) was rotated to coincide with the cross-track scan of the PFM aboard TRMM satellite. Data collected over up to 10 orbital crossings per day are used to compare radiance measurements of PFM and FM1 or FM2. (iii) In July of 2002, radiance measurements of scanners on Terra and Aqua satellites are compared. Since both satellites are in a polar orbit, the scan planes

  2. A tuberculin skin test survey among Ghanaian school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.K. Addo; S. van den Hof; G.I. Mensah; A. Hesse; C. Bonsu; K.A. Koram; F.K. Afutu; F.A. Bonsu

    2010-01-01

    Ghana has not conducted a national tuberculin survey or tuberculosis prevalence survey since the establishment of the National Tuberculosis Control Programme. The primary objective of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence of tuberculin skin sensitivity in Ghanaian school children aged

  3. A tuberculin skin test survey among Ghanaian school children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Addo, K.K.; van den Hof, S.; Mensah, G.I.; Hesse, A.; Bonsu, C.; Koram, K.A.; Afutu, F.K.; Bonsu, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    Ghana has not conducted a national tuberculin survey or tuberculosis prevalence survey since the establishment of the National Tuberculosis Control Programme. The primary objective of this study was therefore to determine the prevalence of tuberculin skin sensitivity in Ghanaian school children aged

  4. Optimization of spectroscopic surveys for testing non-Gaussianity

    CERN Document Server

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Dalal, Neal

    2014-01-01

    We investigate optimization strategies to measure primordial non-Gaussianity with future spectroscopic surveys. We forecast measurements coming from the 3D galaxy power spectrum and compute constraints on primordial non-Gaussianity parameters f_NL and n_NG. After studying the dependence on those parameters upon survey specifications such as redshift range, area, number density, we assume a reference mock survey and investigate the trade-off between number density and area surveyed. We then define the observational requirements to reach the detection of f_NL of order 1. Our results show that while power spectrum constraints on non-Gaussianity from future spectroscopic surveys can be competitive with current CMB limits, measurements from higher-order statistics will be needed to reach a sub unity precision in the measurements of the non-Gaussianity parameter f_NL.

  5. Impact of Scaled Technology on Radiation Testing and Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of some of the radiation challenges facing emerging scaled digital technologies with implications on using consumer grade electronics and next generation hardening schemes. Commercial semiconductor manufacturers are recognizing some of these issues as issues for terrestrial performance. Looking at means of dealing with soft errors. The thinned oxide has indicated improved TID tolerance of commercial products hardened by "serendipity" which does not guarantee hardness or say if the trend will continue. This presentation also focuses one reliability implications of thinned oxides.

  6. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  7. Testing of environmental radiation monitors using the Risø low-level radiation measurement stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    2000-01-01

    a simulation of a radioactive plume passing over the monitors during a certain time was made using a specially designed source set up in the field that was able to vary the air kerma rate from low activity Cs-137 sources additional to the natural air kerma rate. It is demonstrated that a typical environmental...... radiation detector can distinguish an increase of the ambient air kerma rate of less than 3%....

  8. Testing the accuracy of radiative cooling approximations in SPH simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wilkins, Daniel R

    2011-01-01

    Hydrodynamical simulations of star formation have stimulated a need to develop fast and robust algorithms for evaluating radiative cooling. Here we undertake a critical evaluation of what is currently a popular method for prescribing cooling in SPH simulations, i.e. the polytropic cooling due originally to Stamatellos et al. This method uses the local density and potential to estimate the column density and optical depth to each particle and then uses these quantities to evaluate an approximate expression for the net radiative cooling. We evaluate the algorithm by considering both spherical and disc-like systems with analytic density and temperature structures. In spherical systems, the total cooling rate computed by the method is within around 20 for the astrophysically relevant case of opacity dominated by ice grains and is correct to within a factor of order unity for a range of opacity laws. In disc geometry, however, the method systematically under-estimates the cooling by a large factor at all heights i...

  9. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xianwen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal control system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the normal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indicate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection performance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 °C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large spacecraft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  10. An equivalent ground thermal test method for single-phase fluid loop space radiator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Xianwen; Wang Yuying; Zhang Jiaxun; Liu Dongxiao

    2015-01-01

    Thermal vacuum test is widely used for the ground validation of spacecraft thermal con-trol system. However, the conduction and convection can be simulated in normal ground pressure environment completely. By the employment of pumped fluid loops’ thermal control technology on spacecraft, conduction and convection become the main heat transfer behavior between radiator and inside cabin. As long as the heat transfer behavior between radiator and outer space can be equivalently simulated in normal pressure, the thermal vacuum test can be substituted by the nor-mal ground pressure thermal test. In this paper, an equivalent normal pressure thermal test method for the spacecraft single-phase fluid loop radiator is proposed. The heat radiation between radiator and outer space has been equivalently simulated by combination of a group of refrigerators and thermal electrical cooler (TEC) array. By adjusting the heat rejection of each device, the relationship between heat flux and surface temperature of the radiator can be maintained. To verify this method, a validating system has been built up and the experiments have been carried out. The results indi-cate that the proposed equivalent ground thermal test method can simulate the heat rejection per-formance of radiator correctly and the temperature error between in-orbit theory value and experiment result of the radiator is less than 0.5 ?C, except for the equipment startup period. This provides a potential method for the thermal test of space systems especially for extra-large space-craft which employs single-phase fluid loop radiator as thermal control approach.

  11. A multigroup radiation diffusion test problem: Comparison of code results with analytic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestakov, A I; Harte, J A; Bolstad, J H; Offner, S R

    2006-12-21

    We consider a 1D, slab-symmetric test problem for the multigroup radiation diffusion and matter energy balance equations. The test simulates diffusion of energy from a hot central region. Opacities vary with the cube of the frequency and radiation emission is given by a Wien spectrum. We compare results from two LLNL codes, Raptor and Lasnex, with tabular data that define the analytic solution.

  12. Survey of radiation protection programmes for transport; Etude des programmes de radioprotection pour les transports de matieres radioactives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizot, M.T.; Perrin, M.L.; Sert, G. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, Dept. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 (France); Lange, F.; Schwarz, G.; Feet, H.J.; Christ, R. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen-und Reaktorsicherheit, GRS, mbH, Cologne (Germany); Shaw, K.B.; Hughes, J.S.; Gelder, R. [National Radiological Protection Board (NRPB), Oxon, OX (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The survey of radiation protection programmes for transport has been jointly performed by three scientific organisations I.P.S.N. (France), G.R.S. ( Germany), and N.R.P.B. (United kingdom) on behalf of the European Commission and the pertaining documentation summarises the findings and conclusions of the work that was undertaken with the principal objectives to provide guidance on the establishment, implementation and application of radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials by operators and the assessment and evaluation of such programmes by the competent authority and to review currently existing radiation protection programmes for the transport of radioactive materials. (N.C.)

  13. On background radiation gradients--the use of airborne surveys when searching for orphan sources using mobile gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Peder; Rääf, Christopher; Samuelsson, Christer

    2014-02-01

    Systematic background radiation variations can lead to both false positives and failures to detect an orphan source when searching using car-borne mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. The stochastic variation at each point is well described by Poisson statistics, but when moving in a background radiation gradient the mean count rate will continually change, leading to inaccurate background estimations. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) surveys conducted on the national level, usually in connection to mineral exploration, exist in many countries. These data hold information about the background radiation gradients which could be used at the ground level. This article describes a method that aims to incorporate the systematic as well as stochastic variations of the background radiation. We introduce a weighted moving average where the weights are calculated from existing AGS data, supplied by the Geological Survey of Sweden. To test the method we chose an area with strong background gradients, especially in the thorium component. Within the area we identified two roads which pass through the high-variability locations. The proposed method is compared with an unweighted moving average. The results show that the weighting reduces the excess false positives in the positive background gradients without introducing an excess of failures to detect a source during passage in negative gradients.

  14. Preliminary survey on site-adaptation techniques for satellite-derived and reanalysis solar radiation datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, J.; Wilbert, S.; Ruiz-Arias, J. A.; Meyer, R.; Gueymard, C.; Súri, M.; Martín, L.; Mieslinger, T.; Blanc, P.; Grant, I.; Boland, J.; Ineichen, P.; Remund, J.; Escobar, R.; Troccoli, A.; Sengupta, M.; Nielsen, K. P.; Renne, D.; Geuder, N.; Cebecauer, T.

    2016-07-01

    At any site, the bankability of a projected solar power plant largely depends on the accuracy and general quality of the solar radiation data generated during the solar resource assessment phase. The term 'site adaptation' has recently started to be used in the framework of solar energy projects to refer to the improvement that can be achieved in satellite-derived solar irradiance and model data when short-term local ground measurements are used to correct systematic errors and bias in the original dataset. This contribution presents a preliminary survey of different possible techniques that can improve long-term satellite-derived and model-derived solar radiation data through the use of short-term on-site ground measurements. The possible approaches that are reported here may be applied in different ways, depending on the origin and characteristics of the uncertainties in the modeled data. This work, which is the first step of a forthcoming in-depth assessment of methodologies for site adaptation, has been done within the framework of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 46 'Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting.'

  15. Radiation shielding aspects for long manned mission to space: Criteria, survey study, and preliminary model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sztejnberg Manuel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The prospect of manned space missions outside Earth's orbit is limited by the travel time and shielding against cosmic radiation. The chemical rockets currently used in the space program have no hope of propelling a manned vehicle to a far away location such as Mars due to the enormous mass of fuel that would be required. The specific energy available from nuclear fuel is a factor of 106 higher than chemical fuel; it is therefore obvious that nuclear power production in space is a must. On the other hand, recent considerations to send a man to the Moon for a long stay would require a stable, secured and safe source of energy (there is hardly anything beyond nuclear power that would provide a useful and reliably safe sustainable supply of energy. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA anticipates that the mass of a shielding material required for long travel to Mars is the next major design driver. In 2006 NASA identified a need to assess and evaluate potential gaps in existing knowledge and understanding of the level and types of radiation critical to astronauts' health during the long travel to Mars and to start a comprehensive study related to the shielding design of a spacecraft finding the conditions for the mitigation of radiation components contributing to the doses beyond accepted limits. In order to reduce the overall space craft mass, NASA is looking for the novel, multi-purpose and multi-functional materials that will provide effective shielding of the crew and electronics on board. The Laboratory for Neutronics and Geometry Computation in the School of Nuclear Engineering at Purdue University led by Prof. Tatjana Jevremović began in 2004 the analytical evaluations of different lightweight materials. The preliminary results of the design survey study are presented in this paper.

  16. An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

    1995-08-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting {sup 238}U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected {sup 241}Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area.

  17. Design and Implementation of the HJ-1-C Satellite SAR Full-power Radiation Test

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Hua-chun; Tao Xin; Ni Jiang; Yu Wei-dong

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the HJ-1-C SAR full-power radiation test design is presented. For the new problems caused by SAR high-power concentrated emissions, the radar-receiving channel-leakage power test is proposed to ensure the safety of the radar-receiving path, and the transceiver channel closed-loop radar system test is discussed. The experimental results show that the proposed HJ-1-C SAR full-power radiation test scheme is reasonable and feasible, with the desired outcome.

  18. Design and Implementation of the HJ-1-C Satellite SAR Full-power Radiation Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hua-chun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the HJ-1-C SAR full-power radiation test design is presented. For the new problems caused by SAR high-power concentrated emissions, the radar-receiving channel-leakage power test is proposed to ensure the safety of the radar-receiving path, and the transceiver channel closed-loop radar system test is discussed. The experimental results show that the proposed HJ-1-C SAR full-power radiation test scheme is reasonable and feasible, with the desired outcome.

  19. Automated test bench for simulation of radiation electrification of spacecraft structural dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, A. M.; Bezhayev, A. Yu; Zykov, V. M.; Isaychenko, V. I.; Lukashchuk, A. A.; Lukonin, S. E.

    2017-01-01

    The paper describes the test bench “Prognoz-2” designed in Testing Center, Institute of Non-Destructive Testing, Tomsk Polytechnic University, which can be used: for ground testing of individual samples of spacecraft structural materials (e.g. thermal control coatings or cover glasses for solar batteries) or ceramics of the plasma thruster discharge channel), and whole spacecraft units or instruments (e.g. instruments of solar and stellar orientation or correcting plasma thrusters) exposed to radiation electrification factors; to verify the calculation mathematical models of radiation electrification of structural dielectrics under the impact of space factors in different orbits.

  20. Synthesis of functional materials by radiation and qualification testing of organic materials in nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nho, Young Chang; Kim, Ki Yup; Kang, Phil Hyun and others [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Hong Jae [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Dong Hak; Lee, Young Moo [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Byung Kak [Chungju National Univ., Chungju (Korea, Republic of); Bae, You Han [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-05-01

    The radiation crosslinking and grafting can be easily adjusted and is easily reproducible by controlling the radiation dose. These studies aim to develop new biomaterials such as covering for burns and wound, and controlled release of drug. A radiation technology was used to develop PTC materials useful in devices that limit electric fault currents. Radiation-curing of fiber-matrix composites is a promising application. There are a number of advantages to radiation curing of composites, compared with conventional thermal processing. Radiation curing at ambient temperature allows tighter control of part dimensions, and elimination of internal stresses which otherwise occur on cooling and which reduce material strength. These studies involved radiation curing of epoxy resins with various fibers and filler for structural application for aerospace and sport goods. The chain scission is the basis of other radiation treatments aimed at enhancing processing characteristics of polymers. These studies aim to make PTFE powder from PTFE scrap using the radiation degradation which allows incorporation of the material into coatings, inks etc. Low density polyethylene, crosslinked polyethylene, ethylene propylene rubber, and acrylonitrile butadiene rubber as cable insulating, seathing and sealing materials were irradiated for the accelerated ageing tests. Degradation was investigated by measuring dielectric analysis, thermogravimetric analysis, and dynamic mechanical analysis. Dielectric tan{delta}, storage modulus and loss modulus were increased with irradiation doses. However, decomposition temperature decreased with irradiation doses.

  1. Team Update on North American Proton Facilities for Radiation Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Turflinger, Thomas; Haas, Thurman; George, Jeffrey; Moss, Steven; Davis, Scott; Kostic, Andrew; Wie, Brian; Reed, Robert; Guertin, Steven; Wert, Jerry; Foster, Charles

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the closure of the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF), this presentation provides an overview of the options for North American proton facilities. This includes those in use by the aerospace community as well as new additions from the cancer therapy regime. In addition, proton single event testing background is provided for understanding the criteria needed for these facilities for electronics testing.

  2. Infrared Heater Used in Qualification Testing of International Space Station Radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemke, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Two heat rejection radiator systems for the International Space Station (ISS) have undergone thermal vacuum qualification testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Plum Brook Station, Sandusky, Ohio. The testing was performed in the Space Power Facility (SPF), the largest thermal vacuum chamber in the world. The heat rejection system radiator was tested first; it removes heat from the ISS crew living quarters. The second system tested was the photovoltaic radiator (PVR), which rejects heat from the ISS photovoltaic arrays and the electrical power-conditioning equipment. The testing included thermal cycling, hot- and cold-soaked deployments, thermal gradient deployments, verification of the onboard heater controls, and for the PVR, thermal performance tests with ammonia flow. Both radiator systems are orbital replacement units for ease of replacement on the ISS. One key to the success of these tests was the performance of the infrared heater system. It was used in conjunction with a gaseous-nitrogen-cooled cryoshroud in the SPF vacuum chamber to achieve the required thermal vacuum conditions for the qualification tests. The heater, which was designed specifically for these tests, was highly successful and easily met the test requirements. This report discusses the heating requirements, the heater design features, the design approach, and the mathematical basis of the design.

  3. Characteristics of radiated power for various TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, C.E.; Schivell, J.; McNeill, D.H.; Medley, S.S.; Hendel, H.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stratton, B.C.; Dylla, H.F.; Grek, B.; Johnson, D.W.; Taylor, G.; Ulrickson, M.; Wieland, R.M.

    1988-04-01

    Power loss studies were carried out to determine the impurity radiation and energy transport characteristics of various TFTR operation and confinement regimes including L-Mode, detached plasma, co-only neutral beam injection (energetic ion regime), and the enhanced confinement (''supershot'') regime. Combined bolometric, spectroscopic, and infrared photometry measurements provide a picture of impurity behavior and power accounting in TFTR. The purpose of this paper is to make a survey of the various regimes with the aim of determining the radiated power signatures of each. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Testing prototypes of novel radiator for LHCb-RICH

    CERN Document Server

    Saini, Divya

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN aims to look for signals for physics beyond the standard model in particle physics. The data from Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector (RICH) in LHCb are used to identify the hadronic particles that are produced in proton-proton collisions in different momentum ranges. The particle identification performance of the current detector in the 1-10 GeV/c range needs a significant improvement. For this an R&D project to use a new type of radiator using photonic crystals is underway. In a laboratory at CERN, prototypes of crystals will be exposed to charged particles from a source and the Cherenkov photons created will be detected using multianode photomultiplier tubes (MaPMTs). The data collected will be compared with expectations from optical simulations. These simulations use the solutions of Maxwell’s equations based on the quantum mechanical properties of the crystals. The MaPMTs and the optical components outside the crystals are simulated using GEANT4 and analysis involve using t...

  5. Test plan for validation of the radiative transfer equation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricks, Allen Joseph; Grasser, Thomas W.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Jernigan, Dann A.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-09-01

    As the capabilities of numerical simulations increase, decision makers are increasingly relying upon simulations rather than experiments to assess risks across a wide variety of accident scenarios including fires. There are still, however, many aspects of fires that are either not well understood or are difficult to treat from first principles due to the computational expense. For a simulation to be truly predictive and to provide decision makers with information which can be reliably used for risk assessment the remaining physical processes must be studied and suitable models developed for the effects of the physics. A set of experiments are outlined in this report which will provide soot volume fraction/temperature data and heat flux (intensity) data for the validation of models for the radiative transfer equation. In addition, a complete set of boundary condition measurements will be taken to allow full fire predictions for validation of the entire fire model. The experiments will be performed with a lightly-sooting liquid hydrocarbon fuel fire in the fully turbulent scale range (2 m diameter).

  6. Jupiter radiation test levels and their expected impact on an encounter mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barengoltz, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    The upper limit, of electron and proton fluences for a thermoelectric outer planet spacecraft mission in a near-Jupiter environment, for use as radiation design restraints, were extracted from a model of the Jovian trapped radiation belts. Considerations of radiation effects in semiconductor devices were employed to construct simplified radiation test levels based on the design restraints. Corresponding levels, based on the nominal belt models, are one to three orders of magnitude smaller. In terms of expected radiation-induced degradation in semiconductor devices, an encounter with an environment as severe as the design restraints would require hardening the system in order to guarantee high reliability. On the other hand, the nominal levels would only necessitate care in the selection of components and the avoidance of certain semiconductor components.

  7. The Survey for Awareness of Radiation Dose of CT and General X-ray Examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young Cheol; Cho, Han Byul [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Cheong Hwan; Jung, Hong Ryang; You, In Gyu; Yang, Oh Nam; Kim, Min Cheol [Dept. of Radiological Science, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Joon [Dept. of Radiotechnolgy, Dongnam Health College, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The goal of this study is to awaken about risk occurred by CT examination. For radio-technologists working at 'S medical center' located in Seoul, we investigated a recognition about dose and risk CT and normal X-ray examination according by working experience in hospital, experience about CT examination and radiation source. For subjects of investigation, radio-technologists working at 'S medical center' located in Seoul helped us. We collected 131 questionnaires for a test of hypothesis. Cronbach coefficients of questionnaires were 0.825988 and 0.767161 and a rejection rate of p-value was below 0.05. SAS 9.1(SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC, USA.) statistic package was used for hypothesis test. We used Mann-Whitney test, Kruskai-Wallis test, Two sample T-test, Two sample T-test with Bonferroni's Correction and One-way ANOVA methods. P-values of hypothesis about dose of CT and normal X-ray examination were 0.2291-0.9663. p-values of hypothesis about risk were 0.1924-1.0000. All of hypothesis is over rejection rate(<0.05). This study shows that radio-technologists of S medical center recognized that CT has higher dose and risk than general X-ray examination.

  8. 36 CFR 9.42 - Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. 9.42 Section 9.42 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Well records and reports, plots and maps, samples, tests and surveys. Any technical data...

  9. 105KE Basin Area Radiation Monitor System (ARMS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KINKEL, C.C.

    1999-12-14

    This procedure is intended for the Area Radiation Monitoring System, ARMS, that is replacing the existing Programmable Input-Output Processing System, PIOPS, radiation monitoring system in the 105KE basin. The new system will be referred to as the 105KE ARMS, 105KE Area Radiation Monitoring System. This ATP will ensure calibration integrity of the 105KE radiation detector loops. Also, this ATP will test and document the display, printing, alarm output, alarm acknowledgement, upscale check, and security functions. This ATP test is to be performed after completion of the 105KE ARMS installation. The alarm outputs of the 105KE ARMS will be connected to the basin detector alarms, basin annunciator system, and security Alarm Monitoring System, AMS, located in the 200 area Central Alarm Station (CAS).

  10. 105KE Basin Area Radiation Monitor System (ARMS) Acceptance Test Procedure

    CERN Document Server

    Kinkel, C C

    1999-01-01

    This procedure is intended for the Area Radiation Monitoring System, ARMS, that is replacing the existing Programmable Input-Output Processing System, PIOPS, radiation monitoring system in the 105KE basin. The new system will be referred to as the 105KE ARMS, 105KE Area Radiation Monitoring System. This ATP will ensure calibration integrity of the 105KE radiation detector loops. Also, this ATP will test and document the display, printing, alarm output, alarm acknowledgement, upscale check, and security functions. This ATP test is to be performed after completion of the 105KE ARMS installation. The alarm outputs of the 105KE ARMS will be connected to the basin detector alarms, basin annunciator system, and security Alarm Monitoring System, AMS, located in the 200 area Central Alarm Station (CAS).

  11. Influence of radiation on endotoxin test using the PTSTM for 18-FDG radiopharmaceutical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Oliveira, Ralph, E-mail: roliveira@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Div. de Radiofarmacia

    2010-07-15

    F-18 FDG (2-[18-F] fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) is the most frequently used radiopharmaceutical for PET and PET CT imaging exams. The FDA recently approved the use of the PTS{sup TM} (Portable Test System) as an alternative to the standard test proposed by the United States Pharmacopeia using the LAL (Limulus Amebocyte Lysates), that takes longer to perform (about 1h) than the PTS{sup TM} (15 min). Recent studies have demonstrated that radiation could interfere with the PTS{sup TM} test. In order to study the effects of radiation on the PTS{sup TM} test and/or equipment, 27 batches of F-18 FDG produced in the Nuclear Engineering Institute were analyzed. The results showed that no direct correlation with radiation was found in any of the cases. (author)

  12. Proton radiation testing of laser optical components for NASA Jupiter Europa Orbiter Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomes, W. Joe, Jr.; Cavanaugh, John F.; Ott, Melanie N.

    2011-09-01

    The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) is NASA's element of the joint Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM). Based on current trajectories, the spacecraft will spend a significant amount of time in the Jovian radiation belts. Therefore, research endeavors are underway to study the radiation effects on the various parts and components needed to implement the instruments. Data from these studies will be used for component selection and system design to ensure reliable operation throughout the mission duration. The radiation environment en route to Jupiter is nothing new for NASA designed systems, however, the long durations orbiting Jupiter and Europa present new challenges for radiation exposure. High-energy trapped electrons and protons at Jupiter dominate the expected radiation environment. Therefore, most of the initial component level radiation testing is being conducted with proton exposure. In this paper we will present in-situ monitoring of the optical transmission of various laser optical components during proton irradiation. Radiation induced optical attenuation of some components is less than would be expected, based on the authors experiences, and is attributed to the interaction of the protons with the materials. The results are an encouraging first step in screening these optical materials for spaceflight in a high radiation environment.

  13. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  14. Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoffel, T; Riordan, C; Bigger, J

    1992-11-01

    Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

  15. Monitoring system for testing the radiation hardness of a KINTEX-7 FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocariu, L. N.; Placinta, V. M.; Dumitru, L.

    2016-03-01

    A much more efficient Ring Imaging Cherenkov sub-detector system will be rebuilt in the second long shutdown of Large Hadron Collider for the LHCb experiment. Radiation-hard electronic components together with Commercial Off-The-Shelf ones will be used in the new Cherenkov photon detection system architecture. An irradiation program was foreseen to determine the radiation tolerance for the new electronic devices, including a Field Programmable Gate Array from KINTEX-7 family of XILINX. An automated test bench for online monitoring of the XC7K70T KINTEX-7 device operation in radiation conditions was designed and implemented by the LHCb Romanian group.

  16. Testing of SLA-561V in NASA-Ames' Turbulent Flow Duct with Augmented Radiative Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepka, Steven A.; Kornienko, Robert S.; Radbourne, Chris A.

    2010-01-01

    As part of Mars Science Laboratory s (MSL) heatshield development program, SLA-561 was tested in NASA Ames Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD) Facility. For these tests, the TFD facility was modified to include a ceramic plate located in the wall opposite to the test model. Normally the TFD wall opposite to the test model is water-cooled steel. Installing a noncooled ceramic plate allows the ceramic to absorb convective heating and radiate the energy back to the test model as the plate heats up. This work was an effort to increase the severity of TFD test conditions. Presented here are the results from these tests.

  17. Concepts, tools, and strategies for effluent testing: An international survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whole effluent testing (also called Direct Toxicity Assessment) remains a critical long-term assessment tool for aquatic environmental protection. Use of animal alternative approaches for wastewater testing is expected to increase as more regulatory authorities routinely require ...

  18. Pulsed mixed n, {gamma} radiation fields for electronic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurdin, G.; Becret, C.; Jaureguy, J.C. [Etablissement Technique Central de l`Armement (ETCA), 94 - Arcueil (France); Vie, M.; Baboulet, J.P.; Lapeyre, P.; Ramisse, D. [D.G.A., 46 - Gramat (France)

    1994-12-31

    For combined n, {gamma} TREE testing we have modified the CALIBAN Fast Burst Reactor Field with CdO/Epoxy converters to cover the range [10{sup 11} -10{sup 12}] n.cm{sup -2} (1 MeV Si), [10{sup 7} - 10{sup 8}] cGy(Si).s{sup -1}. Activation and fission {sigma} {phi}vector, 1 MeV(Si) fluences, neutron spectra, total exposures and dose rates were predicted with good agreement by n, {gamma} photon transport codes. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The CLASS blazar survey: testing the blazar sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the properties of the sources in the CLASS Blazar survey which aims at the selection of low radio power (P(5GHz)<10^25 W Hz^-1) blazars. We use VLA data from available catalogues and from our own observations to constrain the radio core-dominance of the sample which, together with the flat radio spectral index, is a signature of the blazar activity. X-ray data from the ROSAT All Sky Survey were also collected in order to constrain the radio-to-X-ray luminosity ratio (alpha_RX) of the sources. The data analysis shows that more than 30% of sources at low radio power (P(5 GHz)<10^25 W Hz^-1) have an alpha_RX steeper than that expected in the framework of the ``blazar sequence'' recently put forward to unify the high and low power blazars. The possibility that this result is influenced by contaminating sources in the current sample is discussed. The conclusion is that, even if a number of non-blazars (typically CSO/GPS sources) are expected in the survey, it is unlikely that this constitutes the ...

  20. Ophthalmologic survey of atomic bomb survivors in Japan, 1949. Atomic bomb radiation cataract case report with histopathologic study. Medical examination of Hiroshima patients with radiation cataracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogan, D.G.; Martin, S.F.; Kimura, S.J.; Ikui, Hiroshi; Fillmore, P.G.

    1959-01-01

    This document contains 3 reports dealing with the delayed effects of radiation on the eyes of survivors of the atomic explosions in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In the first study, 1000 persons who were listed as having been in the open and within two kilometers of the hypocenter at the time of the explosion were selected at random from the census files of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission for study. In addition, 231 others, comprising the total available number of surviving persons listed at present in the census files as having been within one kilometer of the hypocenter, were examined, as were several hundred others who were contacted through newspaper publicity, referrals from local ophthalmologists, or through hearsay. The survey resulted in bringing in persons having, or having had, a variety of ocular conditions. Those connected with the atomic bomb included the following diagnoses; multiple injuries of eyes and eyelids; keratoconjunctivitis from ultraviolet and ionizing radiations; thermal burn of the cornea and of the retina; retinitis proliferans; and radiation cataracts. The cataracts were the only delayed manifestations of ocular injury from the atomic bomb. The second paper is a case report of a histopathologic study of atomic bomb radiation cataract. The third paper presents the results of medical examinations of survivors having radiation induced cataracts. 32 references, 8 figures. (DMC)

  1. Patient Radiation Exposure Tracking: Worldwide Programs and Needs—Results from the First IAEA Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehani, Madan M.; Frush, Donald P.; Berris, Theocharis; Einstein, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of patient radiation exposure tracking internationally, gauge interest and develop recommendations for implementation. A survey questionnaire was distributed to representatives of countries to obtain information, including the existence of a patient exposure tracking program currently available in the country, plans for future programs, perceived needs and goals of future programs, which examinations will be tracked, whether procedure tracking alone or dose tracking is planned, and which dose quantities will be tracked. Responses from 76 countries, including all of the six most populous countries and 16 of the 20 most populous, showed that although no country has yet implemented a patient exposure tracking program at a national level, there is increased interest in this issue. Eight countries (11%) indicated that such a program is actively being planned and 3 (4%) stated that they have a program for tracking procedures only, but not for dose. Twenty-two (29%) feel that such a program will be “extremely useful”, 46 (60%) “very useful” and 8 (11%) “moderately useful”, with no respondents stating “Mildly useful” or “Not useful”. Ninety-nine percent of countries indicated an interest in developing and promoting such a program. In a first global survey covering 76 countries, it is clear that no country has yet achieved exposure tracking at a national level, although there are successful examples at sub-national level. Almost all have indicated interest and some have plans to achieve dose tracking in the near future. PMID:22840382

  2. Web测试综述%A Survey of Web Testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许蕾; 徐宝文; 陈振强

    2003-01-01

    With the extensive application of Web technology,it becomes more and more critical of the request to thequality and reliability of Web applications. Then it is crucial to test Web applications automaticly,entirely and thor-oughly. So we make a study of some Web testing methods and technologies. First,we discuss the necessity of Webtesting,then analyze where the faults may take place based on the architecture of the Web ,next discuss various meth-ods of Web testing in details. Then,based on the ideology of Object-Oriented,we build a model for Web testing,anddiscuss the method of doing some pertinence testing on pages when we utilize the information of statistic. At last,weintroduce some tools for white-box testing.

  3. Stress Testing Credit Risk: A Survey of Authorities' Aproaches

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella Foglia

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the quantitative methods developed at selected authorities for stress testing credit risk, focusing in particular on the methods used to link macroeconomic drivers of stress with bank-specific measures of credit risk (macro stress test). Authorities with a mandate for financial stability are particularly interested in quantifying the macro-to-micro linkages and have developed specific modeling expertise in this field. Stress testing credit risk is also an essential element ...

  4. Participation of the pineal gland in the response of rat testes to ionizing radiation. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnicki, T.; Boguslawski, A. (Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    The study was aimed to determine influence of pineal stimulation by light restriction on the response of rat testes to single, locally administered exposure dose of 7.79x10-2 C/kg of X-rays. Different arrangements of light-dark cycles before and after irradiation were used. It was found that stimulation of the pineal by light deprivation before and after irradiation may be accelerated by displacing the animals after irradiation to normal conditions.

  5. Radiation Tests for a Single-GEM Loaded Gaseous Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Kyong Sei; Kim, Sang Yeol; Park, Sung Keun

    2014-01-01

    We report on the systematic study of a single-gas-electron-multiplication (GEM) loaded gaseous detector developed for precision measurements of high-energy particle beams and dose-verification measurements. In the present study, a 256-channel prototype detector with an active area of 16$\\times$16 cm$^{2}$, operated in a continuous current-integration-mode signal-processing method, was manufactured and tested with x rays emitted from a 70-kV x-ray generator and 43-MeV protons provided by the MC50 proton cyclotron at the Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science (KIRAMS). The amplified detector response was measured for the x rays with an intensity of about 5$\\times$10$^{6}$ Hz cm$^{-2}$. The linearity of the detector response to the particle flux was examined and validated by using 43-MeV proton beams. The non-uniform development of the amplification for the gas electrons in space was corrected by applying proper calibration to the channel responses of the measured beam-profile data. We concluded fro...

  6. Radiation Tolerance Tests of Ultrasonic Oxygen Deficiency Sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brodzinski, K; Gizicki, W; Jedrusyna, A; Ostropolski, W; Riddone, G

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, will contain about 96 tons of high-density helium (liquid and supercritical), mostly located in the underground components of the LHC machine. To detect a dangerous decrease of oxygen concentration in the atmosphere caused by a potential release of helium, the Oxygen Deficiency Hazard Detection system will be applied for the LHC operation in the tunnel and other selected areas. The oxygen concentration is derived on the assumption that the gas added to the air is helium alone. A novel concept of oxygen deficiency detection system, built at the Wroclaw University of Technology (WUT) in Poland, allows verifying the oxygen concentration in the air by means of sound velocity measurements. The paper describes the design and functionality of two prototypes of ultrasonic ODH detection system tested by the WUT. In order to qualify the systems to be used in the LHC tunnel, the stability of ultrasonic transducers and electronics has been checked und...

  7. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for radiative heating and contamination in the W40 complex

    CERN Document Server

    Rumble, D; Pattle, K; Kirk, H; Wilson, T; Buckle, J; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Johnstone, D; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Walker-Smith, S; Di Francesco, J; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Bastien, P; Bresnahan, D; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Mowat, C; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Sadavoy, S; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2016-01-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450{\\mu}m and 850{\\mu}m observations of the W40 complex in the Serpens-Aquila region as part of the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) Gould Belt Survey (GBS) of nearby star-forming regions. We investigate radiative heating by constructing temperature maps from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes using a fixed dust opacity spectral index, {\\beta} = 1.8, and a beam convolution kernel to achieve a common 14.8" resolution. We identify 82 clumps ranging between 10 and 36K with a mean temperature of 20{\\pm}3K. Clump temperature is strongly correlated with proximity to the external OB association and there is no evidence that the embedded protostars significantly heat the dust. We identify 31 clumps that have cores with densities greater than 105cm{^{-3}}. Thirteen of these cores contain embedded Class 0/I protostars. Many cores are associated with bright-rimmed clouds seen in Herschel 70 {\\mu}m images. From JCMT HARP observations of the 12CO 3-2 line, we find contamination of the 850{\\mu}m band of up ...

  8. Radon survey in the high natural radiation region of Niska Banja, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Z S; Yarmoshenko, I V; Birovljev, A; Bochicchio, F; Quarto, M; Obryk, B; Paszkowski, M; Celiković, I; Demajo, A; Ujić, P; Budzanowski, M; Olko, P; McLaughlin, J P; Waligorski, M P R

    2007-01-01

    A radon survey has been carried out around the town of Niska Banja (Serbia) in a region partly located over travertine formations, showing an enhanced level of natural radioactivity. Outdoor and indoor radon concentrations were measured seasonally over the whole year, using CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors. Outdoor measurements were performed at 56 points distributed over both travertine and alluvium sediment formations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured in 102 living rooms and bedrooms of 65 family houses. In about 50% of all measurement sites, radon concentration was measured over each season separately, making it possible to estimate seasonal variations, which were then used to correct values measured over different periods, and to estimate annual values. The average annual indoor radon concentration was estimated at over 1500 Bq/m3 and at about 650 Bq/m3 in parts of Niska Banja located over travertine and alluvium sediment formations, respectively, with maximum values exceeding 6000 Bq/m3. The average value of outdoor annual radon concentration was 57 Bq/m3, with a maximum value of 168 Bq/m3. The high values of indoor and outdoor radon concentrations found at Niska Banja make this region a high natural background radiation area. Statistical analysis of our data confirms that the level of indoor radon concentration depends primarily on the underlying soil and building characteristics.

  9. Radon survey in the high natural radiation region of Niska Banja, Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunic, Z.S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Yarmoshenko, I.V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ivy@ecko.uran.ru; Birovljev, A. [Radonlab Ltd., Akersveien 24C, 0177 Oslo (Norway); Bochicchio, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita - Italian National Institute of Health, Department of Technology and Health, Rome (Italy); Quarto, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita - Italian National Institute of Health, Department of Technology and Health, Rome (Italy); Obryk, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Paszkowski, M. [Institute of Geological Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences, Senacka 1, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Celikovic, I. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Demajo, A. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Ujic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Budzanowski, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); McLaughlin, J.P. [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Waligorski, M.P.R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Centre of Oncology, Cracow (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    A radon survey has been carried out around the town of Niska Banja (Serbia) in a region partly located over travertine formations, showing an enhanced level of natural radioactivity. Outdoor and indoor radon concentrations were measured seasonally over the whole year, using CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors. Outdoor measurements were performed at 56 points distributed over both travertine and alluvium sediment formations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured in 102 living rooms and bedrooms of 65 family houses. In about 50% of all measurement sites, radon concentration was measured over each season separately, making it possible to estimate seasonal variations, which were then used to correct values measured over different periods, and to estimate annual values. The average annual indoor radon concentration was estimated at over 1500 Bq/m{sup 3} and at about 650 Bq/m{sup 3} in parts of Niska Banja located over travertine and alluvium sediment formations, respectively, with maximum values exceeding 6000 Bq/m{sup 3}. The average value of outdoor annual radon concentration was 57 Bq/m{sup 3}, with a maximum value of 168 Bq/m{sup 3}. The high values of indoor and outdoor radon concentrations found at Niska Banja make this region a high natural background radiation area. Statistical analysis of our data confirms that the level of indoor radon concentration depends primarily on the underlying soil and building characteristics.

  10. A survey of radiation treatment planning peer-review activities in a provincial radiation oncology programme: current practice and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Michael; Foxcroft, Sophie; McGowan, Tom; Gutierrez, Eric; Sharpe, Michael; Warde, Padraig

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe current patterns of practice of radiation oncology peer review within a provincial cancer system, identifying barriers and facilitators to its use with the ultimate aim of process improvement. Design A survey of radiation oncology programmes at provincial cancer centres. Setting All cancer centres within the province of Ontario, Canada (n=14). These are community-based outpatient facilities overseen by Cancer Care Ontario, the provincial cancer agency. Participants A delegate from each radiation oncology programme filled out a single survey based on input from their multidisciplinary team. Outcome measures Rated importance of peer review; current utilisation; format of the peer-review process; organisation and timing; case attributes; outcomes of the peer-review process and perceived barriers and facilitators to expanding peer-review processes. Results 14 (100%) centres responded. All rated the importance of peer review as at least 8/10 (10=extremely important). Detection of medical error and improvement of planning processes were the highest rated perceived benefits of peer review (each median 9/10). Six centres (43%) reviewed at least 50% of curative cases; four of these centres (29%) conducted peer review in more than 80% of cases treated with curative intent. Fewer than 20% of cases treated with palliative intent were reviewed in most centres. Five centres (36%) reported usually conducting peer review prior to the initiation of treatment. Five centres (36%) recorded the outcomes of peer review on the medical record. Thirteen centres (93%) planned to expand peer-review activities; a critical mass of radiation oncologists was the most important limiting factor (median 6/10). Conclusions Radiation oncology peer-review practices can vary even within a cancer system with provincial oversight. The application of guidelines and standards for peer-review processes, and monitoring of implementation and outcomes, will require effective knowledge

  11. Offsite environmental monitoring report; radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Huff, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs). No nuclear weapons testing was conducted in 1996 due to the continuing nuclear test moratorium. During this period, R and IE personnel maintained readiness capability to provide direct monitoring support if testing were to be resumed and ascertained compliance with applicable EPA, DOE, state, and federal regulations and guidelines. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no airborne radioactivity from diffusion or resuspension detected by the various EPA monitoring networks surrounding the NTS. There was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater and no radiation exposure above natural background was received by the offsite population. All evaluated data were consistent with previous data history.

  12. Testing Ultra-Light Dark Matter Axions Using Galaxy Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Emery; Smith, Tristan L.; Grin, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The axion is a particle that has been strongly motivated by symmetry arguments in particle physics since the 1970s and has recently become promising in a cosmological context as well. Ultra-light axions are among the candidates for dark matter and would produce a characteristic suppression of the matter power spectrum at high wavenumbers. The strength of this suppression is heavily dependent on both the mass of the axion and on what fraction of the dark matter it constitutes. In this work, we forecast the sensitivity of future galaxy surveys to determine the ultra-light axion abundance at a variety of axion masses, using Fisher-matrix analysis.

  13. Radiation monitoring for the HTTR rise-to-power test (1) and (2)'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakazawa, Takashi; Yoshino, Toshiaki; Yasu, Katsuji; Ashikagaya, Yoshinobu; Kikuchi, Toshiki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is the first high temperature gas-cooled research reactor in Japan. This reactor is a helium-gas-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor with a thermal output of 30 MW. The rated operation temperature of the outlet coolant is 850degC. (During high temperature test operation, this reaches 950degC). The first criticality of the HTTR was attained in November 1998. The single loaded, parallel loaded operation with a thermal output of 9 MW (called the HTTR Rise-to-Power Test (1)) was completed between September 16, 1999 and July 8, 2000. The single loaded, parallel loaded continuous operation with a thermal output of 20 MW (called the HTTR Rise-to-Power Test (2)) has also been carried out, but it was shutdown at the halfway stage by a single from the reactor, when the thermal output was 16.5 MW and the reactor outlet coolant temperature was 500degC. This report describes the radiation monitoring carried out during the HTTR Rise-to-Power Tests (1) and (2)'. The data measured by the various radiation monitors is also reported. These data will be used for the estimation of radiation levels (such as the radiation dose equivalent rate, the radioactive concentration in effluents, etc.) for the next HTTR Rise-to-Power Test, and for periodic inspections. (author)

  14. Self-testing for cancer: a community survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzmaurice David A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer-related self-tests are currently available to buy in pharmacies or over the internet, including tests for faecal occult blood, PSA and haematuria. Self-tests have potential benefits (e.g. convenience but there are also potential harms (e.g. delays in seeking treatment. The extent of cancer-related self-test use in the UK is not known. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of cancer-related self-test use. Methods Adults (n = 5,545 in the West Midlands were sent a questionnaire that collected socio-demographic information and data regarding previous and potential future use of 18 different self-tests. Prevalence rates were directly standardised to the England population. The postcode based Index of Multiple Deprivation 2004 was used as a proxy measure of deprivation. Results 2,925 (54% usable questionnaires were returned. 1.2% (95% CI 0.83% to 1.66% of responders reported having used a cancer related self test kit and a further 36% reported that they would consider using one in the future. Logistic regression analyses suggest that increasing age, deprivation category and employment status were associated with cancer-related self-test kit use. Conclusion We conclude that one in 100 of the adult population have used a cancer-related self-test kit and over a third would consider using one in the future. Self-test kit use could alter perceptions of risk, cause psychological morbidity and impact on the demand for healthcare.

  15. Online fault diagnostics and testing of area gamma radiation monitor using wireless network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Padi Srinivas; Kumar, R. Amudhu Ramesh; Mathews, M. Geo; Amarendra, G.

    2017-07-01

    Periodical surveillance, checking, testing, and calibration of the installed Area Gamma Radiation Monitors (AGRM) in the nuclear plants are mandatory. The functionality of AGRM counting electronics and Geiger-Muller (GM) tube is to be monitored periodically. The present paper describes the development of online electronic calibration and testing of the GM tube from the control room. Two electronic circuits were developed, one for AGRM electronic test and another for AGRM detector test. A dedicated radiation data acquisition system was developed using an open platform communication server and data acquisition software. The Modbus RTU protocol on ZigBee based wireless communication was used for online monitoring and testing. The AGRM electronic test helps to carry out the three-point electronic calibration and verification of accuracy. The AGRM detector test is used to verify the GM threshold voltage and the plateau slope of the GM tube in-situ. The real-time trend graphs generated during these tests clearly identified the state of health of AGRM electronics and GM tube on go/no-go basis. This method reduces the radiation exposures received by the maintenance crew and facilitates quick testing with minimum downtime of the instrument.

  16. Radiation Testing, Characterization and Qualification Challenges for Modern Microelectronics and Photonics Devices and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2008-01-01

    At GOMAC 2007, we discussed a selection of the challenges for radiation testing of modern semiconductor devices focusing on state-of-the-art memory technologies. This included FLASH non-volatile memories (NVMs) and synchronous dynamic random access memories (SDRAMs). In this presentation, we extend this discussion in device packaging and complexity as well as single event upset (SEU) mechanisms using several technology areas as examples including: system-on-a-chip (SOC) devices and photonic or fiber optic systems. The underlying goal is intended to provoke thought for understanding the limitations and interpretation of radiation testing results.

  17. Mouse Models for Efficacy Testing of Agents against Radiation Carcinogenesis — A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Rivina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As the number of cancer survivors treated with radiation as a part of their therapy regimen is constantly increasing, so is concern about radiation-induced cancers. This increases the need for therapeutic and mitigating agents against secondary neoplasias. Development and efficacy testing of these agents requires not only extensive in vitro assessment, but also a set of reliable animal models of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. The laboratory mouse (Mus musculus remains one of the best animal model systems for cancer research due to its molecular and physiological similarities to man, small size, ease of breeding in captivity and a fully sequenced genome. This work reviews relevant M. musculus inbred and F1 hybrid animal models and methodologies of induction of radiation-induced leukemia, thymic lymphoma, breast, and lung cancer in these models. Where available, the associated molecular pathologies are also included.

  18. Radiation Hardness Tests of SiPMs for the JLab Hall D Barrel Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Qiang, Yi; Barbosa, Fernando; Smith, Elton

    2012-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the neutron radiation hardness of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation in Japan and SensL in Ireland. Samples from both companies were irradiated by neutrons created by a 1 GeV electron beam hitting a thin lead target at Jefferson Lab Hall A. More tests regarding the temperature dependence of the neutron radiation damage and self-annealing were performed on Hamamatsu SiPMs using a calibrated Am-Be neutron source from the Jefferson Lab Radiation Control group. As the results of all irradiation, both dark current and dark noise increase linearly as a function of the 1 MeV equivalent neutron fluence and a temperature dependent self-annealing effect is observed together with the radiation damage.

  19. The Swift UVOT Stars Survey: I. Methods and Test Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Siegel, Michael H; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S; Bond, Howard E; Holland, Stephen T; Hoversten, Erik A; Berrier, Joshua L; Breeveld, Alice A; Brown, Peter J; Gronwall, Caryl A

    2014-01-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stel- lar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) aboard the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, NUV sensitivity, and 2.3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the NUV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems spe- cific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color-magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M 67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M 79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, pro- ducing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M 79 and easily identifies a known post-...

  20. The swift UVOT stars survey. I. Methods and test clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Michael H.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Linevsky, Jacquelyn S.; Bond, Howard E.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Berrier, Joshua L.; Gronwall, Caryl A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Holland, Stephen T. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Breeveld, Alice A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Brown, Peter J., E-mail: siegel@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: blp14@psu.edu, E-mail: heb11@psu.edu, E-mail: caryl@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: sholland@stsci.edu, E-mail: aab@mssl.ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: grbpeter@yahoo.com [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    We describe the motivations and background of a large survey of nearby stellar populations using the Ultraviolet Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission. UVOT, with its wide field, near-UV sensitivity, and 2.″3 spatial resolution, is uniquely suited to studying nearby stellar populations and providing insight into the near-UV properties of hot stars and the contribution of those stars to the integrated light of more distant stellar populations. We review the state of UV stellar photometry, outline the survey, and address problems specific to wide- and crowded-field UVOT photometry. We present color–magnitude diagrams of the nearby open clusters M67, NGC 188, and NGC 2539, and the globular cluster M79. We demonstrate that UVOT can easily discern the young- and intermediate-age main sequences, blue stragglers, and hot white dwarfs, producing results consistent with previous studies. We also find that it characterizes the blue horizontal branch of M79 and easily identifies a known post-asymptotic giant branch star.

  1. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

  2. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

  3. Thermal Vacuum Test of Ice as a Phase Change Material Integrated with a Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steve A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan; Le, Hung V.

    2010-01-01

    Water may be used as radiation shielding for Solar Particle Events (SPE) to protect crewmembers in the Lunar Electric Rover (LER). Because the water is already present for radiation protection, it could also provide a mass efficient solution to the vehicle's thermal control system. This water can be frozen by heat rejection from a radiator and used as a Phase Change Material (PC1V1) for thermal storage. Use of this water as a PCM can eliminate the need for a pumped fluid loop thermal control system as well as reduce the required size of the radiator. This paper describes the testing and analysis performed for the Rover Engineering Development Unit (REDU), a scaled-down version of a water PCM heat sink for the LER. The REDU was tested in a thermal-vacuum chamber at environmental temperatures similar to those of a horizontal radiator panel on the lunar surface. Testing included complete freeze and melt cycles along with scaled transient heat load profiles simulating a 24-hour day for the rover.

  4. Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Flotard, R.D.; Fontana, C.A.; Hennessey, P.A.; Maunu, H.K.; Mouck, T.L.; Mullen, A.A.; Sells, M.D.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the Offsite Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (OREMP) conducted during 1997 by the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPAs), Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory, Las Vegas, Nevada. This laboratory operated an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling and analyzing milk, water, and air; by deploying and reading thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs); and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs) to measure ambient gamma exposure rates with a sensitivity capable of detecting low level exposures not detected by other monitoring methods.

  5. An extension of the Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test for complex sample survey data

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Sundar; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; FITZMAURICE, GARRETT M.; SINHA, DEBAJYOTI; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Haas, Jennifer; Gellad, Walid

    2012-01-01

    In complex survey sampling, a fraction of a finite population is sampled. Often, the survey is conducted so that each subject in the population has a different probability of being selected into the sample. Further, many complex surveys involve stratification and clustering. For generalizability of the sample to the finite population, these features of the design are usually incorporated in the analysis. While the Wilcoxon rank sum test is commonly used to compare an ordinal variable in bivar...

  6. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Schwarz, Dominik J.; Bacon, David; Chen, Song; Clarkson, Chris; Huterer, Dragan; Kunz, Martin; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rubart, Matthias; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational test...

  7. The value of the internship for radiation oncology training: results of a survey of current and recent trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Stephen R; Romero, Michelle J; Geannette, Christian; Patel, Amish

    2009-07-15

    Although a 12-month clinical internship is the traditional precursor to a radiation oncology residency, the continuance of this mandated training sequence has been questioned. This study was performed to evaluate the perceptions of current radiation oncology residents with respect to the value of their internship experience. A survey was sent to all US radiation oncology residents. Each was queried about whether they considered the internship to be a necessary prerequisite for a career as a radiation oncologist and as a physician. Preferences were listed on a Likert scale (1 = not at all necessary to 5 = absolutely necessary). Seventy-one percent considered the internship year mostly (Likert Scale 4) or absolutely necessary (Likert Scale 5) for their development as a radiation oncologist, whereas 19.1% answered hardly or not at all (Likert Scale 2 and 1, respectively). With respect to their collective considerations about the impact of the internship year on their development as a physician, 89% had a positive response, 5.8% had a negative response, and 4.7% had no opinion. Although both deemed the preliminary year favorably, affirmative answers were more frequent among erstwhile internal medicine interns than former transitional program interns. A majority of radiation oncology residents positively acknowledged their internship for their development as a specialist and an even greater majority valued it for their development as a physician. This affirmative opinion was registered more frequently by those completing an internal medicine internship compared with a transitional internship.

  8. Radiation Tolerance Qualification Tests of the Final Source Interface Unit for the ALICE Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Dénes, E; Futó, E; Kerék, A; Kiss, T; Molnár, J; Novák, D; Soós, C; Tölyhi, T; Van de Vyvre, P

    2007-01-01

    The ALICE Detector Data Link (DDL) is a high-speed optical link designed to interface the readout electronics of ALICE sub-detectors to the DAQ computers. The Source Interface Unit (SIU) of the DDL will operate in radiation environment. Previous tests showed that a configuration loss of SRAM-based FPGA devices may happen and the frequency of undetected data errors in the FPGA user memory area is also not acceptable. Therefore, we redesigned the SIU card using another FPGA based on flash technology. In order to detect bit errors in the user memory we added parity check logic to the design. The new SIU has been extensively tested using neutron and proton irradiation to verify its radiation tolerance. In this paper we summarize the design changes, introduce the final design, and the results of the radiation tolerance measurements on the final card.

  9. Infrared Testing of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Telescope Grism Using Computer Generated Holograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Content, David A.; Gong, Qian; Griesmann, Ulf; Hagopian, John G.; Marx, Catherine T; Whipple, Arthur L.

    2017-01-01

    Infrared Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) were designed, manufactured and used to measure the performance of the grism (grating prism) prototype which includes testing Diffractive Optical Elements (DOE). The grism in the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) will allow the surveying of a large section of the sky to find bright galaxies.

  10. A critical experimental test of synchrotron radiation theory with 3rd generation light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    A recent ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS apparently demonstrated that after a microbunched electron beam is kicked on a large angle compared to the divergence of the FEL radiation, the microbunching wave front is readjusted along the new direction of motion of the kicked beam. Therefore, coherent radiation from an undulator placed after the kicker is emitted along the kicked direction without suppression. This strong emission of coherent undulator radiation in the kicked direction cannot be explained in the framework of conventional synchrotron radiation theory. In a previous paper we explained this puzzle. We demonstrated that, in accelerator physics, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of results from particle dynamics treated according to the absolute time convention and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell equations treated according to the standard (Einstein) synchronization convention. Here lies the misconception which led to the strong qualitative disagreement between theory and experiment. After the ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS, it became clear that the conventional theory of synchrotron radiation cannot ensure the correct description of coherent and spontaneous emission from a kicked electron beam, nor the emission from a beam with finite angular divergence, in an undulator or a bending magnet. However, this result requires further experimental confirmation. In this publication we propose an uncomplicated and inexpensive experiment to test synchrotron radiation theory at 3rd generation light sources.

  11. Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

    1983-07-01

    A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

  12. Radiation Protection Report of the First Hot Test at China Reprocessing and Radiochemistry Laboratory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI; Yang; LIU; Ning; JIAO; Xiao-yan; XU; Xin; MA; Hao-ran; WANG; Xiang-li

    2015-01-01

    The first hot test has been completed at China Reprocessing and Radiochemistry Laboratory in September to December 2015.In order to ensure the safety of personal,facility and environment,security group wrote safety management regulation,drew up the specialized radiation monitoring plan and organized emergency exercise.

  13. Performance Testing Of Selected Types of Electronic Personal Dosimeters in X- and Gamma Radiation Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kržanović, Nikola; Živanović, Miloš; Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Lazarević, Đorđe; Ćeklić, Sandra; Stanković, Srboljub

    2017-10-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) are increasingly being used alongside conventional thermoluminescent dosimeters to measure the dose of legal record in terms of personal dose equivalent. Therefore, it is of great importance to execute performance tests of these dosimeters in photon fields of various energies and at various angles of incidence. This testing is done in order to simulate the behavior of these dosimeters in realistic multidirectional polyenergetic ionizing radiation fields. Tests of accuracy, linearity, energy response, and angular response have been performed on 10 EPDs from multiple manufacturers. Various radiation qualities have been used in the energy range from 33 keV to 1.33 MeV and for angles of incidence 0° to 80°. This research proves that many of the EPDs tested performed according to the manufacturer's specifications and the requirements of the international standards regarding personal dosimetry.

  14. A Survey of Pediatric CT Protocols and Radiation Doses in South Korean Hospitals to Optimize the Radiation Dose for Pediatric CT Scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Do, Kyung-Hyun; Yang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Young Ah; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Lee, Jin Seong; Koo, Hyun Jung

    2015-12-01

    Children are at greater risk of radiation exposure than adults because the rapidly dividing cells of children tend to be more radiosensitive and they have a longer expected life time in which to develop potential radiation injury. Some studies have surveyed computed tomography (CT) radiation doses and several studies have established diagnostic reference levels according to patient age or body size; however, no survey of CT radiation doses with a large number of patients has yet been carried out in South Korea. The aim of the present study was to investigate the radiation dose in pediatric CT examinations performed throughout South Korea. From 512 CT (222 brain CT, 105 chest CT, and 185 abdominopelvic CT) scans that were referred to our tertiary hospital, a dose report sheet was available for retrospective analysis of CT scan protocols and dose, including the volumetric CT dose index (CTDIvol), dose-length product (DLP), effective dose, and size-specific dose estimates (SSDE). At 55.2%, multiphase CT was the most frequently performed protocol for abdominopelvic CT. Tube current modulation was applied most often in abdominopelvic CT and chest CT, accounting for 70.1% and 62.7%, respectively. Regarding the CT dose, the interquartile ranges of the CTDIvol were 11.1 to 22.5 (newborns), 16.6 to 39.1 (≤1 year), 14.6 to 41.7 (2-5 years), 23.5 to 44.1 (6-10 years), and 31.4 to 55.3 (≤15 years) for brain CT; 1.3 to 5.7 (≤1 year), 3.9 to 6.8 (2-5 years), 3.9 to 9.3 (6-10 years), and 7.7 to 13.8 (≤15 years) for chest CT; and 4.0 to 7.5 (≤1 year), 4.2 to 8.9 (2-5 years), 5.7 to 12.4 (6-10 years), and 7.6 to 16.6 (≤15 years) for abdominopelvic CT. The SSDE and CTDIvol were well correlated for patients CT in South Korea. The CTDIvol, DLP, and effective dose were generally lower than in German and UK surveys, except in certain age groups.

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine in radiation oncology : Survey of patients' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettner, Sabrina; Kessel, Kerstin A; Combs, Stephanie E

    2017-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are gaining in importance, but objective data are mostly missing. However, in previous trials, methods such as acupuncture showed significant advantages compared to standard therapies. Thus, the aim was to evaluate most frequently used methods, their significance and the general acceptance amongst cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). A questionnaire of 18 questions based on the categorical classification released by the National Centre for Complementary and Integrative Health was developed. From April to September 2015, all patients undergoing RT at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University of Munich, completed the survey. Changes in attitude towards CAM were evaluated using the questionnaire after RT during the first follow-up visit (n = 31). Of 634 patients, 333 answered the questionnaire (52.5%). Of all participants, 26.4% used CAM parallel to RT. Before RT, a total of 39.3% had already used complementary medicine. The most frequently applied methods during therapy were vitamins/minerals, food supplements, physiotherapy/manual medicine, and homeopathy. The majority (71.5%) did not use any complementary treatment, mostly stating that CAM was not offered to them (73.5%). The most common reasons for use were to improve the immune system (48%), to reduce side effects (43.8%), and to not miss an opportunity (37.8%). Treatment integrated into the individual therapy concept, e.g. regular acupuncture, would be used by 63.7% of RT patients. In comparison to other studies, usage of CAM parallel to RT in our department is considered to be low. Acceptance amongst patients is present, as treatment integrated into the individual oncology therapy would be used by about two-third of patients.

  16. Surveying trends in radiation oncology medical physics in the Asia Pacific Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Tomas; Healy, Brendan; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2016-07-01

    Our study aims to assess and track work load, working conditions and professional recognition of radiation oncology medical physicists (ROMPs) in the Asia Pacific Region over time. A structured questionnaire was mailed in 2008, 2011 and 2014 to senior medical physicists representing 23 countries. The questionnaire covers 7 themes: education and training including certification; staffing; typical tasks; professional organisations; resources; research and teaching; job satisfaction. Across all surveys the response rate was >85% with the replies representing practice affecting more than half of the world's population. The expectation of ROMP qualifications (MSc and between 1 and 3years of clinical experience) has not changed much over the years. However, compared to 2008, the number of medical physicists in many countries has doubled. Formal professional certification is only available in a small number of countries. The number of experienced ROMPs is small in particular in low and middle income countries. The increase in staff numbers from 2008 to 2014 is matched by a similar increase in the number of treatment units which is accompanied by an increase in treatment complexity. Many ROMPs are required to work overtime and not many find time for research. Resource availability has only improved marginally and ROMPs still feel generally overworked, but professional recognition, while varying widely, appears to be improving slowly. While number of physicists and complexity of treatment techniques and technologies have increased significantly, ROMP practice remains essentially unchanged over the last 6years in the Asia Pacific Region. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Multi-frequency survey of background radiations of the Universe. The "Cosmological Gene" project. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhel'Skii, N. A.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Grechkin, A. A.; Zharov, V. I.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Majorova, E. K.; Semenova, T. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskii, R. Yu.; Khaikin, V. B.

    2011-10-01

    The results of the first stage of the "Cosmological Gene" project of the Russian Academy of Sciences are reported. These results consist in the accumulation of multi-frequency data in 31 frequency channels in the wavelength interval 1-55 cm with maximum achievable statistical sensitivity limited by the noise of background radio sources at all wavelengths exceeding 1.38 cm. The survey region is determined by constraints 00 h microwave background are reported as well as the contribution of these noise components in millimeter-wave experiments to be performed in the nearest years. The role of dipole radio emission of fullerene-type dust nanostructures is shown to be small. The most precise estimates of the role of background radio sources with inverted spectra are given and these sources are shown to create no serious interference in experiments. The average spectral indices of the weakest sources of the NVSS and FIRST catalogs are estimated. The "saturation" data for all wavelengths allowed a constraint to be imposed on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich noise (the SZ noise) at all wavelengths, and made it possible to obtain independent estimates of the average sky temperature from sources, substantially weaker than those listed in the NVSS catalog. These estimates are inconsistent with the existence of powerful extragalactic synchrotron background associated with radio sources. Appreciable "quadrupole" anisotropy in is detected in the distribution of the spectral index of the synchrotron radiation of the Galaxy, and this anisotropy should be taken into account when estimating the polarization of the cosmic microwave background on small l. All the results are compared to the results obtained by foreign researchers in recent years.

  18. Testing foundations of modern cosmology with SKA all-sky surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, Dominik J; Chen, Song; Clarkson, Chris; Huterer, Dragan; Kunz, Martin; Maartens, Roy; Raccanelli, Alvise; Rubart, Matthias; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Continuum and HI surveys with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will allow us to probe some of the most fundamental assumptions of modern cosmology, including the Cosmological Principle. SKA all-sky surveys will map an enormous slice of space-time and reveal cosmology at superhorizon scales and redshifts of order unity. We illustrate the potential of these surveys and discuss the prospects to measure the cosmic radio dipole at high fidelity. We outline several potentially transformational tests of cosmology to be carried out by means of SKA all-sky surveys.

  19. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  20. Quadrupolar gravitational radiation as a test-bed for f(R)-gravity

    CERN Document Server

    De Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2011-01-01

    The debate concerning the viability of f(R)-gravity as a natural extension of General Relativity could be realistically addressed by using results coming from binary pulsars like PSR 1913+16. To this end, we develop a quadrupolar approach to the gravitational radiation for a class of ana- lytic f(R)-models. We show that experimental results are compatible with a consistent range of f(R)-models. This means that f(R)-gravity is not ruled out by the observations and gravitational radiation (in strong field regime) could be a test-bed for such theories.

  1. Radiative transfer with finite elements. Pt. 1. Basic method and tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richling, S. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Astrophysik; Meinkoehn, E. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Astrophysik]|[Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Mathematik; Kryzhevoi, N. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Astrophysik]|[Heidelberg Univ. (DE). Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Wissenschaftliches Rechnen (IWR); Kanschat, G. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Angewandte Mathematik]|[Heidelberg Univ. (DE). Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum fuer Wissenschaftliches Rechnen (IWR)

    2001-10-01

    A finite element method for solving the monochromatic radiation transfer equation including scattering in three dimensions is presented. The algorithm employs unstructured grids which are adaptively refined. Adaptivity as well as ordinate parallelization reduce memory requirements and execution time and make it possible to calculate the radiation field across several length scales for objects with strong opacity gradients. An a posteriori error estimate for one particular quantity is obtained by solving the dual problem. The application to a sample of test problems reveals the properties of the implementation. (orig.)

  2. Gamma radiation grafted polymers for immobilization of Brucella antigen in diagnostic test studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docters, E. H.; Smolko, E. E.; Suarez, C. E.

    The radiation grafting process has a wide field of industrial applications, and in the recent years the immobilization of biocomponents in grafted polymeric materials obtained by means of ionizing radiations is a new and important contribution to biotechnology. In the present work, gamma preirradiation grafting method was employed to produce acrylics hydrogels onto polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polystyrene (PS). Two monomers were used to graft the previously mentioned polymers: methacrylic acid (MAAc) and acrylamide (AAm), and several working conditions were considered as influencing the degree of grafting. All this grafted polymers were used to study the possibility of a subsequent immobilization of Brucella antigen (BAg) in diagnostic test studies (ELISA).

  3. Radiation detection method and system using the sequential probability ratio test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karl E.; Valentine, John D.; Beauchamp, Brock R.

    2007-07-17

    A method and system using the Sequential Probability Ratio Test to enhance the detection of an elevated level of radiation, by determining whether a set of observations are consistent with a specified model within a given bounds of statistical significance. In particular, the SPRT is used in the present invention to maximize the range of detection, by providing processing mechanisms for estimating the dynamic background radiation, adjusting the models to reflect the amount of background knowledge at the current point in time, analyzing the current sample using the models to determine statistical significance, and determining when the sample has returned to the expected background conditions.

  4. Testing of Radiation Hardness in the Extreme-Ultraviolet Spectral Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, U.; Ermanoski, I.; Tarrio, C.; Grantham, S.; Hill, S.; Dhez, P.; Lucatorto, T. B.

    2007-01-01

    Currently we are commissioning a second multilayer-based beamline to study the radiation hardness of multilayers under extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation in an oxidizing atmosphere. Multilayer lifetime is one of the most important issues for the commercialization of extreme-ultraviolet lithography. The beamline employs a spherical multilayer mirror and a beryllium filter. The mirror demagnifies the source and reflects 13.4 nm radiation as well as visible light. The beryllium filter suppresses the visible light reflected by the mirror and provides also a barrier between the extremely clean storage ring vacuum and the water atmosphere of the test chamber.

  5. Targeting Tuberculin testing: Significance and application. A survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Karachalios

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Targeted tuberculin testing is a strategic component of tuberculosis (TB control that identifies persons at high risk for developing TB who would benefit by treatment of TB, if detected. The appearance of an indurated area of 5mm or more 48 to 72 hours after administration of purified protein derivative (PPD is considered a positive reaction in persons who have recently had close contact with an individual with active tuberculosis, in persons with radiographic findings consistent with a past history of tuberculosis or in persons with known or suspected human immunodeficiency virus infection. Ten or more millimeters of induration is considered a positive reaction in persons at increased risk of tuberculosis. Induration of 15mm or more is considered a positive result in all other persons. Ten percent to 25% of people with active tuberculosis have false‐negative test results, especially early in treatment. Some people who are not infected have a reaction due to infection with other mycobacterial species or to bacilli Calmette‐Guerin vaccine BCG.

  6. Can positron emission tomography be more than a diagnostic tool? A survey on clinical practice among radiation oncologists in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HMT Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the survey was to understand the role of positron emission tomography (PET in clinical radiotherapy practice among the radiation oncologists′ in India. Settings and Design: An online questionnaire was developed to survey the oncologists on their use of PET, viewing protocols, contouring techniques practiced, the barriers on the use of PET and the need for training in use of PET in radiotherapy. The questionnaire was sent to about 500 oncologists and 76 completed responses were received. Results: The survey shows that radiation oncologists use PET largely to assess treatment response and staging but limitedly use it for radiotherapy treatment planning. Only manual contouring and fixed threshold based delineation techniques (e.g. 40% maximum standard uptake value [SUV max ] or SUV 2.5 are used. Cost is the major barrier in the wider use of PET, followed by limited availability of FDG radionuclide tracer. Limited or no training was available for the use of PET. Conclusions: Our survey revealed the vast difference between literature suggestions and actual clinical practice on the use of PET in radiotherapy. Additional training and standardization of protocols for use of PET in radiotherapy is essential for fully utilizing the capability of PET.

  7. PSA Solar furnace: A facility for testing PV cells under concentrated solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Reche, J.; Canadas, I.; Sanchez, M.; Ballestrin, J.; Yebra, L.; Monterreal, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Garcia, G. [Concentration Solar Technologies, Plataforma Solar de Almeria-CIEMAT P.O. Box 22, Tabernas, E-04200 (Almeria) (Spain); Alonso, M.; Chenlo, F. [Photovoltaic Components and Systems, Renewable Energies Department-CIEMAT Avda. Complutense, 22, Madrid, E-28040 (Spain)

    2006-09-22

    The Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA), the largest centre for research, development and testing of concentration solar thermal technologies in Europe, has started to apply its knowledge, facilities and resources to development of the Concentration PV technology in an EU-funded project HiConPV. A facility for testing PV cells under solar radiation concentrated up to 2000x has recently been completed. The advantages of this facility are that, since it is illuminated by solar radiation, it is possible to obtain the appropriate cell spectral response directly, and the flash tests can be combined with prolonged PV-cell irradiation on large surfaces (up to 150cm{sup 2}), so the thermal response of the PV cell can be evaluated simultaneously. (author)

  8. Effect of radiation in utero on mouse testes lactate dehydrogenase-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, N.; Prasad, R.; Bushong, S.C.

    1976-01-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-X(LDH-X), a sperm specific isozyme of mammals, can be used as a marker for active spermatogenesis. LDH-X electrophoretic patterns may also be affected in radiation-induced sterility following in utero irradiation. To investigate this relationship pregnant female mice were given 100 rad x radiation on day 10, 13, and 17 following gestation. All male offspring were sacrificed 20 days after birth and testes tissues obtained. The testes were homogenized to obtain crude extracts for starch gel electrophoresis and zymogram staining for LDH-X. Results to date show that the LDH-X is not expressed in the testis when fetal irradiation occurred at 10 and 13 days following gestation. Faint bands of LDH-X were observed in testes homogenates of mice whose mothers were irradiated 17 days following gestation. Pronounced LDH-X bands were present in all control preparations.

  9. Testing astrophysical radiation hydrodynamics codes with hypervelocity jet experiments on the nova laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estabrook, K; Farley, D; Glendinning, S G; Remington, B A; Stone, J; Turner, N

    1999-09-22

    Recent shock tube experiments using the Nova laser facility have demonstrated that strong shocks and highly supersonic flows similar to those encountered in astrophysical jets can be studied in detail through carefully controlled experiment. We propose the use of high power lasers such as Nova, Omega, and NIF to perform experiments on radiation hydrodynamic problems such as jets involving the multidimensional dynamics of strong shocks. High power lasers are the only experimental facilities that can reach the very high Mach number regime. The experiments will serve both as diagnostics of astrophysically interesting gas dynamic problems, and could also form the basis of test problems for numerical algorithms for astrophysical radiation hydrodynamic codes, The potential for experimentally achieving a strongly radiative jet seems very good.

  10. Radiation stability test on multiphase glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ming; Kossoy, Anna; Jarvinen, Gordon; Crum, Jarrod; Turo, Laura; Riley, Brian; Brinkman, Kyle; Fox, Kevin; Amoroso, Jake; Marra, James

    2014-05-01

    A radiation stability study was performed on glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic waste forms. These materials are candidate host materials for immobilizing alkali/alkaline earth (Cs/Sr-CS) + lanthanide (LN) + transition metal (TM) fission product waste streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, glass ceramics were fabricated using a borosilicate glass as a matrix in which to incorporate CS/LN/TM combined waste streams. The major phases in these multiphase materials are powellite, oxyaptite, pollucite, celsian, and durable residual glass phases. Al2O3 and TiO2 were combined with these waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites, pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. For the radiation stability test, selected glass ceramic and crystalline ceramic samples were exposed to different irradiation environments including low fluxes of high-energy (∼1-5 MeV) protons and alpha particles generated by an ion accelerator, high fluxes of low-energy (hundreds of keV) krypton particles generated by an ion implanter, and in-situ electron irradiations in a transmission electron microscope. These irradiation experiments were performed to simulate self-radiation effects in a waste form. Ion irradiation-induced microstructural modifications were examined using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Our preliminary results reveal different radiation tolerance in different crystalline phases under various radiation damage environments. However, their stability may be rate dependent which may limit the waste loading that can be achieved.

  11. Modal Survey Test of the SOTV 2X3 Meter Off-Axis Inflatable Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engberg, Robert C.; Lassiter, John O.; McGee, Jennie K.

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has had several projects involving inflatable space structures. Projects in solar thermal propulsion have had the most involvement, primarily inflatable concentrators. A flight project called Shooting Star Experiment initiated the first detailed design, analysis and testing effort involving an inflatable concentrator that supported a Fresnel lens. The lens was to concentrate the sun's rays to provide an extremely large heat transfer for an experimental solar propulsion engine. Since the conclusion of this experiment, research and development activities for solar propulsion at Marshall Space Flight Center have continued both in the solar propulsion engine technology as well as inflatable space structures. Experience gained in conducting modal survey tests of inflatable structures for the Shooting Star Experiment has been used by dynamic test engineers at Marshall Space Flight Center to conduct a modal survey test on a Solar Orbital Transfer Vehicle (SOTV) off-axis inflatable concentrator. This paper describes how both previously learned test methods and new test methods that address the unique test requirements for inflatable structures were used. Effects of the inherent nonlinear response of the inflatable concentrator on test methods and test results are noted as well. Nine analytical mode shapes were successfully correlated to test mode shapes. The paper concludes with several "lessons learned" applicable to future dynamics testing and shows how Marshall Space Flight Center has utilized traditional and new methods for modal survey testing of inflatable space structures.

  12. A FAR-INFRARED OBSERVATIONAL TEST OF THE DIRECTIONAL DEPENDENCE IN RADIATIVE GRAIN ALIGNMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaillancourt, John E.; Andersson, B.-G., E-mail: jvaillancourt@sofia.usra.edu, E-mail: bg@sofia.usra.edu [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    2015-10-10

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains with magnetic fields provides a key method for measuring the strength and morphology of the fields. In turn, this provides a means to study the role of magnetic fields from diffuse gas to dense star-forming regions. The physical mechanism for aligning the grains has been a long-term subject of study and debate. The theory of radiative torques, in which an anisotropic radiation field imparts sufficient torques to align the grains while simultaneously spinning them to high rotational velocities, has passed a number of observational tests. Here we use archival polarization data in dense regions of the Orion molecular cloud (OMC-1) at 100, 350, and 850 μm to test the prediction that the alignment efficiency is dependent upon the relative orientations of the magnetic field and radiation anisotropy. We find that the expected polarization signal, with a 180-degree period, exists at all wavelengths out to radii of 1.5 arcmin centered on the Becklin–Neugebauer Kleinmann-Low (BNKL) object in OMC-1. The probabilities that these signals would occur due to random noise are low (≲1%), and are lowest toward BNKL compared to the rest of the cloud. Additionally, the relative magnetic field to radiation anisotropy directions accord with theoretical predictions in that they agree to better than 15° at 100 μm and 4° at 350 μm.

  13. Testing and analysis of tube voltage and tube current in the radiation generator for mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hong Ryang; Hong, Dong Hee [Dept. of Health Care, Hanseo University, Seosan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Beom Hui [Dept. of Radiological Science, Seonam University, Namwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    Breast shooting performance management and quality control of the generator is applied to the amount of current IEC(International Electrotechnical Commission) 60601-2-45 tube voltage and tube current are based on standards that were proposed in the analysis of the test results were as follows. Tube voltage according to the value of the standard deviation by year of manufacture from 2001 to 2010 as a 42-3.15 showed the most significant, according to the year of manufacture by tube amperage value of the standard deviation to 6.38 in the pre-2000 showed the most significant , manufactured after 2011 the standard deviation of the devices, the PAE(Percent Average Error) was relatively low. This latest generation device was manufactured in the breast of the tube voltage and tube diagnosed shooting the correct amount of current to maintain the performance that can be seen. The results of this study as the basis for radiography diagnosed breast caused by using the device's performance and maintain quality control, so the current Food and Drug Administration 'about the safety of diagnostic radiation generator rule' specified in the test cycle during three years of self-inspection radiation on a radiation generating device ensure safety and performance of the device using a coherent X-ray(constancy) by two ultimately able to keep the radiation dose to the public to reduce the expected effect is expected.

  14. Actual questions of radiographic testing and radiation protection. Contributions; Aktuelle Fragen der Durchstrahlungspruefung und des Strahlenschutzes. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-08-01

    The proceedings of the 17th DGZfP seminar include nine contributions on the use of radiography for periodic non destructive testing purposes and issues of radiation protection for the testing personnel and the security of radioactive materials.

  15. Situation of young radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation biologists in German-speaking countries : Results from a web-based survey of the Young DEGRO working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, David; Baumann, Rene; Rieckmann, Thorsten; Fokas, Emmanouil; Gauer, Tobias; Niyazi, Maximilian

    2016-08-01

    The working group "Young DEGRO" (yDEGRO) was established in 2014 by the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). We aimed to assess the current situation of young radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation biologists. An online survey that included 52 questions or statements was designed to evaluate topics related to training, clinical duties and research opportunities. Using the electronic mailing list of the DEGRO and contact persons at university hospitals in Germany as well as at four hospitals in Switzerland and Austria, young professionals employed in the field of radiation oncology were invited to participate in the survey. A total of 260 responses were eligible for analysis. Of the respondents 69 % had a professional background in medicine, 23 % in medical physics and 9 % in radiation biology. Median age was 33 years. There was a strong interest in research among the participants; however a clear separation between research, teaching and routine clinical duties was rarely present for radiation oncologists and medical physicists. Likewise, allocated time for research and teaching during regular working hours was often not available. For radiation biologists, a lack of training in clinical and translational research was stated. This survey details the current state of education and research opportunities in young radiation oncologists, medical physicists and radiation biologists. These results will form the basis for the future working program of the yDEGRO.

  16. Radiation protection systems for the final focus test beam at SLAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokni, S H; Benson, E C; Burke, D L; Jenkins, T M; Liu, J C; Nelson, G; Nelson, W R; Smith, H E; Tenenbaum, P; Vylet, V; Walz, D R

    1996-11-01

    The Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) is a new beam line at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center designed to test new beam optics concepts, hardware, and techniques necessary to achieve and measure the small spot sizes required for future generations of high-energy e+e- linear colliders. The FFTB takes a 47 GeVc-1, 1 kW electron beam at the end of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center linear accelerator and transports it to the FFTB beam dump. A radiation protection system was designed and installed for the FFTB with the primary goal that the integrated dose equivalent outside the shielding resulting from beam loss would not exceed 10 mSv y-1. This system is comprised of shielding, a beam containment system and a personnel protection system. This paper presents various aspects of radiation safety at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center that were considered in the design of the FFTB radiation protection system. Beam tests were conducted in which the performance of various beam containment devices and the shielding effectiveness were evaluated. Preliminary results from these tests are presented.

  17. The assessment of radiation exposures in native American communities from nuclear weapons testing in Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frohmberg, E.; Goble, R.; Sanchez, V.; Quigley, D.

    2000-02-01

    Native Americans residing in a broad region downwind from the Nevada Test Site during the 1950s and 1960s received significant radiation exposures from nuclear weapons testing. Because of differences in diet, activities, and housing, their radiation exposures are only very imperfectly represented in the Department of Energy dose reconstructions. There are important missing pathways, including exposures to radioactive iodine from eating small game. The dose reconstruction model assumptions about cattle feeding practices across a year are unlikely to apply to the native communities as are other model assumptions about diet. Thus exposures from drinking milk and eating vegetables have not yet been properly estimated for these communities. Through consultations with members of the affected communities, these deficiencies could be corrected and the dose reconstruction extended to Native Americans. An illustration of the feasibility of extending the dose reconstruction is provided by a sample calculation to estimate radiation exposures to the thyroid from eating radio-iodine-contaminated rabbit thyroids after the Dedan test. The illustration is continued with a discussion of how the calculation results may be used to make estimates for other tests and other locations.

  18. The Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) Survey of Galactic HI: Final data release of the combined LDS and IAR surveys with improved stray-radiation corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, P M W; Hartmann, D; Arnal, E M; Bajaja, E; Morras, R; Poppel, W G L; Hartmann, Dap

    2005-01-01

    We present the final data release of observations of lambda 21-cm emission from Galactic neutral hydrogen over the entire sky, merging the Leiden/Dwingeloo Survey (LDS: Hartmann & Burton, 1997) of the sky north of delta = -30 deg with the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia Survey (IAR: Arnal et al., 2000, and Bajaja et al., 2005) of the sky south of delta = -25 deg. The angular resolution of the combined material is HPBW ~ 0.6 deg. The LSR velocity coverage spans the interval -450 km/s to +400 km/s, at a resolution of 1.3 km/s. The data were corrected for stray radiation at the Institute for Radioastronomy of the University of Bonn, refining the original correction applied to the LDS. The rms brightness-temperature noise of the merged database is 0.07 - 0.09 K. Residual errors in the profile wings due to defects in the correction for stray radiation are for most of the data below a level of 20 - 40 mK. It would be necessary to construct a telescope with a main beam efficiency of eta_{MB} > 99% to achi...

  19. Temperature performance of portable radiation survey instruments used for environmental monitoring and clean-up activities in Fukushima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saegusa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Kayo; Hasumi, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takenori; Uchita, Yoshiaki

    2017-08-01

    Following the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in March 2011, extensive radiation monitoring and environmental clean-up activities have been conducted throughout the Fukushima region. Outside air temperatures there reach 40 °C in summer and -20 °C in winter, which are beyond the quoted operational range of many radiation survey instruments. Herein, temperature performance of four types of portable Japanese radiation survey instruments widely used in Fukushima was experimentally investigated using a temperature-controlled chamber. They included two ionization chamber type instruments, Fuji NHA1 and Aloka ICS-323C, and two NaI(Tl) scintillation type ones, Fuji NHC7 and Aloka TCS-172B. Experimental results showed significantly diverse characteristics on the temperature dependences from one type of instrument to another. For example, NHA1 overestimated the ambient dose-equivalent rate by as much as 17% at -30 °C and 10% at 40 °C, whereas the TCS-172B readings underestimated the rate by 30% at -30 °C and 7% at 40 °C.

  20. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CellRad)": Hardware and biological system tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CellRad, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CellRad in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  1. Space experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space (CELLRAD)": Hardware and biological system tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Dilruba, Shahana; Adrian, Astrid; Feles, Sebastian; Schmitz, Claudia; Berger, Thomas; Przybyla, Bartos; Briganti, Luca; Franz, Markus; Segerer, Jürgen; Spitta, Luis F.; Henschenmacher, Bernd; Konda, Bikash; Diegeler, Sebastian; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Panitz, Corinna; Reitz, Günther

    2015-11-01

    One factor contributing to the high uncertainty in radiation risk assessment for long-term space missions is the insufficient knowledge about possible interactions of radiation with other spaceflight environmental factors. Such factors, e.g. microgravity, have to be considered as possibly additive or even synergistic factors in cancerogenesis. Regarding the effects of microgravity on signal transduction, it cannot be excluded that microgravity alters the cellular response to cosmic radiation, which comprises a complex network of signaling pathways. The purpose of the experiment "Cellular Responses to Radiation in Space" (CELLRAD, formerly CERASP) is to study the effects of combined exposure to microgravity, radiation and general space flight conditions on mammalian cells, in particular Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK) cells that are stably transfected with different plasmids allowing monitoring of proliferation and the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway by means of fluorescent proteins. The cells will be seeded on ground in multiwell plate units (MPUs), transported to the ISS, and irradiated by an artificial radiation source after an adaptation period at 0 × g and 1 × g. After different incubation periods, the cells will be fixed by pumping a formaldehyde solution into the MPUs. Ground control samples will be treated in the same way. For implementation of CELLRAD in the Biolab on the International Space Station (ISS), tests of the hardware and the biological systems were performed. The sequence of different steps in MPU fabrication (cutting, drilling, cleaning, growth surface coating, and sterilization) was optimized in order to reach full biocompatibility. Different coatings of the foil used as growth surface revealed that coating with 0.1 mg/ml poly-D-lysine supports cell attachment better than collagen type I. The tests of prototype hardware (Science Model) proved its full functionality for automated medium change, irradiation and fixation of cells. Exposure of

  2. Eurados trial performance test for personal dosemeters for external beta radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Bordy, J.M.; Ambrosi, P.

    2001-01-01

    On the initiative of the European Dosimetry Group (EURADOS) action group 'Harmonisation and Dosimetric Quality Assurance in Individual Monitoring for External Radiation' a trial performance test for whole-body and extremity personal dosemeters broadly representative of those in use in the EU...... was accomplished, This paper deals with the part of the performance test concerned with exposure to beta radiation. Fifteen dosimetric services participated with whole-body dosemeters intended to measure beta doses (H-p(0.07)) of which 13 used thermoluminescent (TL) detectors and two used photographic films. Eight...... services participated with extremity dosemeters which all used TL detectors. A description is given of the irradiation set-up, the characteristics of the irradiation fields, the calibration quantity applied and the performance criteria used for the evaluation of the results. The paper discusses in detail...

  3. The use of roentgen diagnostics in chiropractor activities. Project based survey according to new regulations regarding radiation protection and use of radiation; Bruk av roentgendiagnostikk i norske kiropraktorvirksomheter. Prosjektrettet tilsyn etter ny forskrift om straalevern og bruk av straaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaum, Aud; Widmark, Anders

    2005-12-15

    An audit has been performed in 17 chiropractic enterprises according to new radiation protection legislation. Before the audits a survey of the use of diagnostic imaging in Norwegian chiropractic enterprises was carried out. This report summarizes the results of the survey and the findings at the audits. (Author)

  4. Hadrontherapy from the Italian Radiation Oncologist point of view: face the reality. The Italian Society of Oncological Radiotherapy (AIRO) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvaso, Giulia; Vischioni, Barbara; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Ciardo, Delia; Fossati, Piero; Giandini, Tommaso; Morlino, Sara; Carrara, Mauro; Romanelli, Paola; Russi, Elvio; Valvo, Francesca; Valdagni, Riccardo; Orecchia, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    Hadrontherapy has been in constant progress in the past decades. Due to the increasing interest in this field and the spreading of the technique in Italy and worldwide, the Italian Society of Radiation Oncology surveyed (by an online survey) its members regarding their perception of hadrontherapy. The survey outline addressed different items all related to hadrontherapy, such as: demographics (3 items), personal knowledge (5 items), actual use in clinical practice (5 items), and future perspectives and development (5 items). The survey was filled in by 224 radiation oncologists (RO). Among them, 74.6 % were RO with more than 5 years of clinical practice, and only 10.4 % RO in training. Median age was 46 years (range 27-77). 32.24 % admitted average knowledge about heavy particles radiobiology rationale and 32.42 % about the ongoing particle therapy clinical trials. Radioresistant tumors are perceived as-principal indications for carbon ions in 39.3 % of responders, and pediatric malignancies for protons in 37 %. Re-irradiation is highly recommended for 52.2 %. Strikingly, 38.8 % of participating ROs reported that, in the daily clinical practice, approximately less than 1 out of 10 patients asks to be referred for hadrontherapy. On the other side, 35.7 % claimed need for at least 3 up to 5 particle therapy centers in Italy. Overall, the results of the present survey highlight the interest of the Italian RO community for particle therapy among the other radiotherapy technique. Analysis of our results might picture the clinical attitude of the RO community towards hadrontherapy in Italy, and help in promoting targeted initiatives to spread clinical results and knowledge about technical innovations in this field.

  5. Comparing simulations and test data of a radiation damaged CCD for the Euclid mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skottfelt, Jesper; Hall, David; Gow, Jason; Murray, Neil; Holland, Andrew; Prod'homme, Thibaut

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage effects from the harsh radiative environment outside the Earth's atmosphere can be a cause for concern for most space missions. With the science goals becoming ever more demanding, the requirements on the precision of the instruments on board these missions also increases, and it is therefore important to investigate how the radiation induced damage affects the Charge-Coupled Devices (CCDs) that most of these instruments rely on. The primary goal of the Euclid mission is to study the nature of dark matter and dark energy using weak lensing and baryonic acoustic oscillation techniques. The weak lensing technique depends on very precise shape measurements of distant galaxies obtained by a large CCD array. It is anticipated that over the 6 year nominal lifetime of mission, the CCDs will be degraded to an extent that these measurements will not be possible unless the radiation damage effects are corrected. We have therefore created a Monte Carlo model that simulates the physical processes taking place when transferring signal through a radiation damaged CCD. The software is based on Shockley-Read-Hall theory, and is made to mimic the physical properties in the CCD as close as possible. The code runs on a single electrode level and takes charge cloud size and density, three dimensional trap position, and multi-level clocking into account. A key element of the model is that it takes device specific simulations of electron density as a direct input, thereby avoiding to make any analytical assumptions about the size and density of the charge cloud. This paper illustrates how test data and simulated data can be compared in order to further our understanding of the positions and properties of the individual radiation-induced traps.

  6. Radiation hardness test of the Philips Digital Photon Counter with proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Frach, T.; Kononov, S. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The Philips Digital Photon Counter (DPC) is a silicon photomultiplier combining Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) and dedicated readout electronics in the same chip. The DPC is a promising photon sensor for future RICH detectors. A known issue of G-APD is its sensitivity to radiation damage. Two DPC sensors were tested using 800 MeV/c protons. An increase of dark counting rate with proton fluence up to 4 ·1011cm-2 has been measured.

  7. Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Graphics Processing Board (GPB) Radiation Test Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, George A.; Steele, Glen F.

    2013-01-01

    Large round trip communications latency for deep space missions will require more onboard computational capabilities to enable the space vehicle to undertake many tasks that have traditionally been ground-based, mission control responsibilities. As a result, visual display graphics will be required to provide simpler vehicle situational awareness through graphical representations, as well as provide capabilities never before done in a space mission, such as augmented reality for in-flight maintenance or Telepresence activities. These capabilities will require graphics processors and associated support electronic components for high computational graphics processing. In an effort to understand the performance of commercial graphics card electronics operating in the expected radiation environment, a preliminary test was performed on five commercial offthe- shelf (COTS) graphics cards. This paper discusses the preliminary evaluation test results of five COTS graphics processing cards tested to the International Space Station (ISS) low earth orbit radiation environment. Three of the five graphics cards were tested to a total dose of 6000 rads (Si). The test articles, test configuration, preliminary results, and recommendations are discussed.

  8. Radiation Resistance testing of commercial components for the new SPS Beam Position Measurement System

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Bogey, T; Gonzalez, J L; Savioz, J J

    2013-01-01

    A new Front-End (FE) electronics is under development for the SPS Multi Orbit POsition System (MOPOS). To cover the large dynamic range of beam intensities (70 dB) to be measured in the SPS, the beam position monitor signals are processed using logarithmic amplifiers. They are then digitized locally and transmitted via optical fibers over long distances (up to 1 km) to VME acquisition boards located in surface buildings. The FE board is designed to be located in the SPS tunnel, where it must withstand radiation doses of up to 100 Gy per year. Analogue components, such as Logarithmic Amplifiers (LA), ADC-Drivers (ADC-D) and Voltage Regulators (VR), have been tested at PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute) for radiation hardness, while several families of bidirectional SFP, both single-fiber and double-fiber, have been tested at both PSI and CNRAD. This paper gives a description of the overall system architecture and presents the results of the radiation hardness tests in detail.

  9. Survey of radiofrequency radiation levels around GSM base stations and evaluation of measurement uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulević Branislav D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a summary of broadband measurement values of radiofrequency radiation around GSM base stations in the vicinity of residential areas in Belgrade and 12 other cities in Serbia. It will be useful for determining non-ionizing radiation exposure levels of the general public in the future. The purpose of this paper is also an appropriate representation of basic information on the evaluation of measurement uncertainty.

  10. Who was concerned about radiation, food safety, and natural disasters after the great East Japan earthquake and Fukushima catastrophe? A nationwide cross-sectional survey in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sugimoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disaster-related concerns by sub-populations have not been clarified after the great East Japan earthquake and the Fukushima nuclear power plant incidents. This paper assesses who was concerned about radiation, food safety, and natural disasters among the general population in order to buffer such concerns effectively. METHODS: The hypothesis that women, parents, and family caregivers were most concerned about radiation, food safety, and natural disaster was tested using a varying-intercept multivariable logistic regression with 5809 responses from a nationwide cross-sectional survey random-sampled in March 2012. RESULTS: Many people were at least occasionally concerned about radiation (53.5%, food safety (47.3%, and about natural disaster (69.5%. Women were more concerned than men about radiation (OR = 1.67; 95% CI = 1.35-2.06, food safety (1.70; 1.38-2.10, and natural disasters (1.74; 1.39-2.19. Parents and family care needs were not significant. Married couples were more concerned about radiation (1.53; 1.33-1.77, food safety (1.38; 1.20-1.59, and natural disasters (1.30; 1.12-1.52. Age, child-cohabitation, college-completion, retirement status, homemaker status, and the house-damage certificate of the last disaster were also associated with at least one concern. Participants from the Kanto region were more concerned about radiation (2.08; 1.58-2.74 and food safety (1.30; 1.07-1.59, which demonstrate similar positive associations to participants from Tohoku where a disaster relief act was invoked (3.36; 2.25-5.01 about radiation, 1.49; 1.08-2.06 about food safety. CONCLUSIONS: Sectioning the populations by gender and other demographics will clarify prospective targets for interventions, allow for a better understanding of post-disaster concerns, and help communicate relevant information effectively.

  11. Facilitating genome navigation : survey sequencing and dense radiation-hybrid gene mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hitte, C; Madeoy, J; Kirkness, EF; Priat, C; Lorentzen, TD; Senger, F; Thomas, D; Derrien, T; Ramirez, C; Scott, C; Evanno, G; Pullar, B; Cadieu, E; Oza, [No Value; Lourgant, K; Jaffe, DB; Tacher, S; Dreano, S; Berkova, N; Andre, C; Deloukas, P; Fraser, C; Lindblad-Toh, K; Ostrander, EA; Galibert, F

    2005-01-01

    Accurate and comprehensive sequence coverage for large genomes has been restricted to only a few species of specific interest. Lower sequence coverage (survey sequencing) of related species can yield a wealth of information about gene content and putative regulatory elements. But survey sequences la

  12. Ionizing radiation test results for an automotive microcontroller on board the Schiaparelli Mars lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapani Nikkanen, Timo; Hieta, Maria; Schmidt, Walter; Genzer, Maria; Haukka, Harri; Harri, Ari-Matti

    2016-04-01

    The Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI) has delivered a pressure and a humidity instrument for the ESA ExoMars 2016 Schiaparelli lander mission. Schiaparelli is scheduled to launch towards Mars with the Trace Gas Orbiter on 14th of March 2016. The DREAMS-P (pressure) and DREAMS-H (Humidity) instruments are operated utilizing a novel FMI instrument controller design based on a commercial automotive microcontroller (MCU). A custom qualification program was implemented to qualify the MCU for the relevant launch, cruise and surface operations environment of a Mars lander. Resilience to ionizing radiation is one of the most critical requirements for a digital component operated in space or at planetary bodies. Thus, the expected Total Ionizing Dose accumulated by the MCU was determined and a sample of these components was exposed to a Co-60 gamma radiation source. Part of the samples was powered during the radiation exposure to include the effect of electrical biasing. All of the samples were verified to withstand the expected total ionizing dose with margin. The irradiated test samples were then radiated until failure to determine their ultimate TID.

  13. Design and Testing of an Active Heat Rejection Radiator with Digital Turn-Down Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunada, Eric; Birur, Gajanana C.; Ganapathi, Gani B.; Miller, Jennifer; Berisford, Daniel; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    NASA's proposed lunar lander, Altair, will be exposed to vastly different external environment temperatures. The challenges to the active thermal control system (ATCS) are compounded by unfavorable transients in the internal waste heat dissipation profile: the lowest heat load occurs in the coldest environment while peak loads coincide with the warmest environment. The current baseline for this fluid is a 50/50 inhibited propylene glycol/water mixture with a freeze temperature around -35 C. While the overall size of the radiator's heat rejection area is dictated by the worst case hot scenario, a turn-down feature is necessary to tolerate the worst case cold scenario. A radiator with digital turn-down capability is being designed as a robust means to maintain cabin environment and equipment temperatures while minimizing mass and power consumption. It utilizes active valving to isolate and render ineffective any number of parallel flow tubes which span across the ATCS radiator. Several options were assessed in a trade-study to accommodate flow tube isolation and how to deal with the stagnant fluid that would otherwise remain in the tube. Bread-board environmental tests were conducted for options to drain the fluid from a turned-down leg as well an option to allow a leg to freeze/thaw. Each drain option involved a positive displacement gear pump with different methods of providing a pressure head to feed it. Test results showed that a start-up heater used to generate vapor at the tube inlet held the most promise for tube evacuation. Based on these test results and conclusions drawn from the trade-study, a full-scale radiator design is being worked for the Altair mission profile.

  14. Radiation hardness tests of piezoelectric actuators with fast neutrons at liquid helium temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouaidy, M.; Martinet, G.; Hammoudi, N.; Chatelet, F.; Olivier, A.; Blivet, S.; Galet, F. [CNRS-IN2P3-IPN Orsay, Orsay (France)

    2007-07-01

    Piezoelectric actuators, which are integrated into the cold tuning system and used to compensate the small mechanical deformations of the cavity wall induced by Lorentz forces due to the high electromagnetic surface field, may be located in the radiation environment during particle accelerator operation. In order to provide for a reliable operation of the accelerator, the performance and life time of piezoelectric actuators ({approx}24.000 units for ILC) should not show any significant degradation for long periods (i.e. machine life duration: {approx}20 years), even when subjected to intense radiation (i.e. gamma rays and fast neutrons). An experimental program, aimed at investigating the effect of fast neutrons radiation on the characteristics of piezoelectric actuators at liquid helium temperature (i.e. T{approx}4.2 K), was proposed for the working package WPNo.8 devoted to tuners development in the frame of CARE project. A neutrons irradiation facility, already installed at the CERI cyclotron located at Orleans (France), was upgraded and adapted for actuators irradiations tests purpose. A deuterons beam (maximum energy and beam current: 25 MeV and 35{mu}A) collides with a thin (thickness: 3 mm) beryllium target producing a high neutrons flux with low gamma dose ({approx}20%): a neutrons fluence of more than 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2} is achieved in {approx}20 hours of exposure. A dedicated cryostat was developed at IPN Orsay and used previously for radiation hardness test of calibrated cryogenic thermometers and pressure transducers used in LHC superconducting magnets. This cryostat could be operated either with liquid helium or liquid argon. This irradiation facility was upgraded for allowing fast turn-over of experiments and a dedicated experimental set-up was designed, fabricated, installed at CERI and successfully operated for radiation hardness tests of several piezoelectric actuators at T{approx}4.2 K. This new apparatus allows on-line automatic measurements

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine in radiation oncology. Survey of patients' attitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lettner, Sabrina [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Kessel, Kerstin A.; Combs, Stephanie E. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Neuherberg (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are gaining in importance, but objective data are mostly missing. However, in previous trials, methods such as acupuncture showed significant advantages compared to standard therapies. Thus, the aim was to evaluate most frequently used methods, their significance and the general acceptance amongst cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT). A questionnaire of 18 questions based on the categorical classification released by the National Centre for Complementary and Integrative Health was developed. From April to September 2015, all patients undergoing RT at the Department of Radiation Oncology, Technical University of Munich, completed the survey. Changes in attitude towards CAM were evaluated using the questionnaire after RT during the first follow-up visit (n = 31). Of 634 patients, 333 answered the questionnaire (52.5%). Of all participants, 26.4% used CAM parallel to RT. Before RT, a total of 39.3% had already used complementary medicine. The most frequently applied methods during therapy were vitamins/minerals, food supplements, physiotherapy/manual medicine, and homeopathy. The majority (71.5%) did not use any complementary treatment, mostly stating that CAM was not offered to them (73.5%). The most common reasons for use were to improve the immune system (48%), to reduce side effects (43.8%), and to not miss an opportunity (37.8%). Treatment integrated into the individual therapy concept, e.g. regular acupuncture, would be used by 63.7% of RT patients. In comparison to other studies, usage of CAM parallel to RT in our department is considered to be low. Acceptance amongst patients is present, as treatment integrated into the individual oncology therapy would be used by about two-third of patients. (orig.) [German] Komplementaer- und alternativmedizinische Behandlungen (CAM) nehmen in vielen medizinischen Bereichen trotz oftmals fehlender objektiver Daten zu. In Therapiestudien zeigen Verfahren wie Akupunktur

  16. Research on the Equivalence Between Double Differential-mode Current Injection and Radiation Test Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xiaodong; WEI Guanghui; FAN Lisi; LU Xinfu; YANG Zhe

    2013-01-01

    There are the application scope limits for single differential-mode current injection test method,so in order to carry out injection susceptibility test for two-pieces equipment interconnected with both ends of a cable simultaneously,a double differential-mode current injection test method (DDMCI) is proposed.The method adopted the equivalence source wave theorem and Baum-Liu-Tesche (BLT)equation as its theory foundation.The equivalent corresponding relation between injection voltage and radiation electric field intensity is derived,and the phase relation between the two injection voltage sources is confirrned.The results indicate that the amplitude and phase of the equivalent injection voltage source is closely related to the S parameter of directional coupling device,the transmission line length,and the source vector in BLT equation,but has nothing to do with the reflection coefficient between the two equipment pieces.Therefore,by choosing the right amplitude and phase of the double injection voltage sources,the DDMCI test is equivalent to the radiation test for two interconnected equipment of a system.

  17. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  18. A Comparison of Web-Based and Paper-Based Survey Methods: Testing Assumptions of Survey Mode and Response Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlaw, Corey; Brown-Welty, Sharon

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys have become more prevalent in areas such as evaluation, research, and marketing research to name a few. The proliferation of these online surveys raises the question, how do response rates compare with traditional surveys and at what cost? This research explored response rates and costs for Web-based surveys, paper surveys, and…

  19. Median and quantile tests under complex survey design using SAS and R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Caudill, Samuel P; Li, Ruosha; Caldwell, Kathleen L

    2014-11-01

    Techniques for conducting hypothesis testing on the median and other quantiles of two or more subgroups under complex survey design are limited. In this paper, we introduce programs in both SAS and R to perform such a test. A detailed illustration of the computations, macro variable definitions, input and output for the SAS and R programs are also included in the text. Urinary iodine data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) are used as examples for comparing medians between females and males as well as comparing the 75th percentiles among three salt consumption groups.

  20. A Far-Infrared Observational Test of the Directional Dependence in Radiative Grain Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillancourt, John E

    2015-01-01

    The alignment of interstellar dust grains with magnetic fields provides a key method for measuring the strength and morphology of the fields. In turn, this provides a means to study the role of magnetic fields from diffuse gas to dense star-forming regions. The physical mechanism for aligning the grains has been a long-term subject of study and debate. The theory of radiative torques, in which an anisotropic radiation field imparts sufficient torques to align the grains while simultaneously spinning them to high rotational velocities, has passed a number of observational tests. Here we use archival polarization data in dense regions of the Orion molecular cloud (OMC-1) at 100, 350, and $850\\,\\mu$m to test the prediction that the alignment efficiency is dependent upon the relative orientations of the magnetic field and radiation anisotropy. We find that the expected polarization signal, with a 180-degree period, exists at all wavelengths out to radii of 1.5 arcminutes centered on the BNKL object in OMC-1. The ...

  1. Japanese structure survey of radiation oncology in 2005 based on institutional stratification of patterns of care study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teshima, Teruki; Numasaki, Hodaka; Shibuya, Hitoshi; Nishio, Masamichi; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Ito, Hisao; Sekiguchi, Kenji; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Koizumi, Masahiko; Tago, Masao; Nagata, Yasushi; Masaki, Hidekazu; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Yamada, Shogo

    2008-09-01

    To evaluate the structure of radiation oncology in Japan in terms of equipment, personnel, patient load, and geographic distribution to identify and improve any deficiencies. A questionnaire-based national structure survey was conducted between March 2006 and February 2007 by the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology. These data were analyzed in terms of the institutional stratification of the Patterns of Care Study. The total numbers of new cancer patients and total cancer patients (new and repeat) treated with radiotherapy in 2005 were estimated at approximately 162,000 and 198,000, respectively. In actual use were 765 linear accelerators, 11 telecobalt machines, 48 GammaKnife machines, 64 60Co remote-controlled after-loading systems, and 119 192Ir remote-controlled after-loading systems. The linear accelerator systems used dual-energy function in 498 systems (65%), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy in 462 (60%), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy in 170 (22%). There were 426 Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology-certified radiation oncologists, 774 full-time equivalent radiation oncologists, 117 medical physicists, and 1,635 radiation therapists. Geographically, a significant variation was found in the use of radiotherapy, from 0.9 to 2.1 patients/1,000 population. The annual patient load/FTE radiation oncologist was 247, exceeding the Blue Book guidelines level. Patterns of Care Study stratification can clearly discriminate the maturity of structures according to their academic nature and caseload. The Japanese structure has clearly improved during the past 15 years in terms of equipment and its use, although the shortage of manpower and variations in maturity disclosed by this Patterns of Care Study stratification remain problematic. These constitute the targets for nationwide improvement in quality assurance and quality control.

  2. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. II. Stray-Radiation Correction and Second Data Release

    CERN Document Server

    Kalberla, P M W; Pisano, D J; Calabretta, M R; Ford, H Alyson; Lockman, Felix J; Staveley-Smith, L; Kerp, J; Winkel, B; Murphy, T; Newton-McGee, K

    2010-01-01

    The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen (HI) emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release was published by McClure-Griffiths et al. (2009). We remove instrumental effects that affect the GASS and present the second data release. We calculate the stray-radiation by convolving the all-sky response of the Parkes antenna with the brightness temperature distribution from the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) all sky 21-cm line survey, with major contributions from the 30-m dish of the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR) in the southern sky. Remaining instrumental baselines are corrected using the LAB data for a first guess of emission-free baseline regions. Radio frequency interference is removed by median filtering. After applying these corrections to the GASS we find an excellent agreement with the Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) survey. The GASS is the highest spatial resolution, most sensitive, and is currently the m...

  3. Radiated EMC& EMI Management During Design Qualification and Test Phases on LEO Satellites Constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeaux, H.; Terral, M.; Gutierrez-Galvan, R.; Baud, C.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the proposed paper is to present the global radiated EMC/EMI approach applied by Thales Alenia Space in the frame of a telecommunication Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites constellation program. The paper will present this approach in term of analyses, of specific characterisation and of sub-system and satellite tests since first design reviews up-to satellite qualification tests on Prototype Flight Model (PFM) and to production tests on reduced FMs. The global aim is : 1 - to reduce risk and cost (units EMC delta qualification, EMC tests at satellite level for the 81 Space Vehicles (SV) through appropriated EMC analyses (in term of methodologies and contours) provided in the frame of design reviews.2 - to early anticipate potential critical case to reduce the impact in term of engineering/qualification/test extra cost and of schedule.3 - to secure/assure the payload and SV design/layout.4 - to define and optimize the EMC/EMI test campaigns to be performed on Prototype Flight Model (PFM) for complete qualification and on some FMs for industrial qualification/validation.The last part of the paper is dedicated to system Bite Error Rate (BER) functional test performed on PFM SV to demonstrate the final compatibility between the three on-board payloads and to the Internal EMC tests performed on PFM and some FMs to demonstrate the SV panel RF shielding efficiency before and after environmental tests and the Thales Alenia Space (TAS) and Orbital AKT (OATK) workmanships reproducibility.

  4. Design and Test of a Deployable Radiation Cover for the REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carte, David B.; Inamdar, Niraj K.; Jones, Michael P.; Masterson, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    The REgolith X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) instrument contains a one-time deployable radiation cover that is opened using a shape memory alloy actuator (a "Frangibolt") from TiNi Aerospace and two torsion springs. The door will be held closed by the bolt for several years in cold storage during travel to the target asteroid, Bennu, and it is imperative to gain confidence that the door will open at predicted operational temperatures. This paper briefly covers the main design features of the radiation cover and measures taken to mitigate risks to cover deployment. As the chosen FD04 model Frangibolt actuator has minimal flight heritage, the main focus of this paper is the testing, results and conclusions with the FD04 while discussing key lessons learned with respect to the use of the FD04 actuator in this application.

  5. Radiative Heating in MSL Entry: Comparison of Flight Heating Discrepancy to Ground Test and Predictive Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; White, Todd R.; Mahzari, Milad; Bose, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    During the recent entry of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), the heat shield was equipped with thermocouple stacks to measure in-depth heating of the thermal protection system (TPS). When only convective heating was considered, the derived heat flux from gauges in the stagnation region was found to be underpredicted by as much as 17 W/sq cm, which is significant compared to the peak heating of 32 W/sq cm. In order to quantify the contribution of radiative heating phenomena to the discrepancy, ground tests and predictive simulations that replicated the MSL entry trajectory were performed. An analysis is carried through to assess the quality of the radiation model and the impact to stagnation line heating. The impact is shown to be significant, but does not fully explain the heating discrepancy.

  6. Electrochromic Radiator Coupon Level Testing and Full Scale Thermal Math Modeling for Use on Altair Lunar Lander

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Erika T.; Bower, Chad E.; Sheth, Rubik; Stephan, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    In order to control system and component temperatures, many spacecraft thermal control systems use a radiator coupled with a pumped fluid loop to reject waste heat from the vehicle. Since heat loads and radiation environments can vary considerably according to mission phase, the thermal control system must be able to vary the heat rejection. The ability to "turn down" the heat rejected from the thermal control system is critically important when designing the system. Electrochromic technology as a radiator coating is being investigated to vary the amount of heat rejected by a radiator. Coupon level tests were performed to test the feasibility of this technology. Furthermore, thermal math models were developed to better understand the turndown ratios required by full scale radiator architectures to handle the various operation scenarios encountered during a mission profile for the Altair Lunar Lander. This paper summarizes results from coupon level tests as well as the thermal math models developed to investigate how electrochromics can be used to increase turn down ratios for a radiator. Data from the various design concepts of radiators and their architectures are outlined. Recommendations are made on which electrochromic radiator concept should be carried further for future thermal vacuum testing.

  7. Establishing survey validity and reliability for American Indians through "think aloud" and test-retest methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauge, Cindy Horst; Jacobs-Knight, Jacque; Jensen, Jamie L; Burgess, Katherine M; Puumala, Susan E; Wilton, Georgiana; Hanson, Jessica D

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a mixed-methods approach to determine the validity and reliability of measurements used within an alcohol-exposed pregnancy prevention program for American Indian women. To develop validity, content experts provided input into the survey measures, and a "think aloud" methodology was conducted with 23 American Indian women. After revising the measurements based on this input, a test-retest was conducted with 79 American Indian women who were randomized to complete either the original measurements or the new, modified measurements. The test-retest revealed that some of the questions performed better for the modified version, whereas others appeared to be more reliable for the original version. The mixed-methods approach was a useful methodology for gathering feedback on survey measurements from American Indian participants and in indicating specific survey questions that needed to be modified for this population.

  8. A survey of radiation dose to patients and operators during radiofrequency ablation using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidatul, A; Azlan, CA; Megat Amin, MSA; Abdullah, BJJ; Ng, KH

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy is able to give real time images to a physician undertaking minimally invasive procedures such as biopsies, percutaneous drainage, and radio frequency ablation (RFA). Both operators executing the procedure and patients too, are thus at risk of radiation exposure during a CT fluoroscopy. This study focuses on the radiation exposure present during a series of radio frequency ablation (RFA) procedures, and used Gafchromic film (Type XR-QA; International Specialty Products, USA) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100H; Bicron, USA) to measure the radiation received by patients undergoing treatment, and also operators subject to scatter radiation. The voltage was held constant at 120 kVp and the current 70mA, with 5mm thickness. The duration of irradiation was between 150-638 seconds. Ultimately, from a sample of 30 liver that have undergone RFA, the study revealed that the operator received the highest dose at the hands, which was followed by the eyes and thyroid, while secondary staff dosage was moderately uniform across all parts of the body that were measured. PMID:21611060

  9. A survey of radiation dose to patients and operators during radiofrequency ablation using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidatul, A; Azlan, Ca; Megat Amin, Msa; Abdullah, Bjj; Ng, Kh

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy is able to give real time images to a physician undertaking minimally invasive procedures such as biopsies, percutaneous drainage, and radio frequency ablation (RFA). Both operators executing the procedure and patients too, are thus at risk of radiation exposure during a CT fluoroscopy.This study focuses on the radiation exposure present during a series of radio frequency ablation (RFA) procedures, and used Gafchromic film (Type XR-QA; International Specialty Products, USA) and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100H; Bicron, USA) to measure the radiation received by patients undergoing treatment, and also operators subject to scatter radiation.The voltage was held constant at 120 kVp and the current 70mA, with 5mm thickness. The duration of irradiation was between 150-638 seconds.Ultimately, from a sample of 30 liver that have undergone RFA, the study revealed that the operator received the highest dose at the hands, which was followed by the eyes and thyroid, while secondary staff dosage was moderately uniform across all parts of the body that were measured.

  10. RPR test for serological survey of rabbit syphilis in companion rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kumiko; Tagawa, Masayo; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2003-07-01

    Since the RPR (rapid plasma regain) test was found to be useful for the diagnosis of rabbit syphilis, serological survey by this test has been carried out in Japanese companion rabbits. A hundred virgin household rabbits kept alone and without signs and history of syphilis were examined by RPR test from April 2001 to March 2002, in Tokyo, Japan. The test was positive in 35 cases and negative in 65 cases. RPR negative rabbits should be selected for breeding to prevent the spread of rabbit syphilis in companion rabbits in Japan.

  11. Summary, the 20th quality control survey for radioisotopes in vitro tests in Japan, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    For advancement of radioisotope in vitro tests such as radioimmunoassay and immunoradiometric assay, the Subcommittee for Radioisotope in vitro Test in Medical and Pharmaceutical Committee of Japan Radioisotope Association has conducted the yearly quality control survey for the test facilities in Japan since 1978. This is the summary of the 20th survey in 1998 where non-radioisotope tests like enzyme-immunoassay were involved as well. The survey was done for 143 facilities: 20 national and public university hospitals, 18 private university hospitals, 8 national hospitals, 13 public hospitals, 21 private hospitals, 41 hygienic laboratories and 22 manufacturers of reagents. Facilities examined intra- and between day-reproducibility, freeze-thaw effect and time change of the measured values on the same samples. Assays were for: growth hormone (h), somatomedin C, follicle stimulating h, luteinizing h, prolactin, thyroid stimulating h, triiodothyronines, thyroxines, thyroxine binding protein, calcitonin, insulin, C-peptide, glucagons, gastrin, testosterones, estradiol, progesterone, gonadotropin, 17{alpha}-hydroxyprogesterone, aldosterone, cortisol, dehydroepiandorosterone sulfate, renin, IgE, digoxin, {alpha}-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide antigen, CA (125, 19-9 and 15-3), prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate specific antigen, {beta}2-microglobulin, ferritin, and neuron specific enolase. There was no great difference between this and last survey results although tendency of improvement was recognized. There were problems to be solved from the standpoint of clinical practice. (K.H.)

  12. Can Sanitary Surveys Replace Water Quality Testing? Evidence from Kisii, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misati, Aaron Gichaba; Ogendi, George; Peletz, Rachel; Khush, Ranjiv; Kumpel, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Information about the quality of rural drinking water sources can be used to manage their safety and mitigate risks to health. Sanitary surveys, which are observational checklists to assess hazards present at water sources, are simpler to conduct than microbial tests. We assessed whether sanitary survey results were associated with measured indicator bacteria levels in rural drinking water sources in Kisii Central, Kenya. Overall, thermotolerant coliform (TTC) levels were high: all of the samples from the 20 tested dug wells, almost all (95%) of the samples from the 25 tested springs, and 61% of the samples from the 16 tested rainwater harvesting systems were contaminated with TTC. There were no significant associations between TTC levels and overall sanitary survey scores or their individual components. Contamination by TTC was associated with source type (dug wells and springs were more contaminated than rainwater systems). While sanitary surveys cannot be substituted for microbial water quality results in this context, they could be used to identify potential hazards and contribute to a comprehensive risk management approach. PMID:28178226

  13. A national survey of the availability of intensity-modulated radiation therapy and stereotactic radiosurgery in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlDuhaiby Eman Z

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The timely and appropriate adoption of new radiation therapy (RT technologies is a challenge both in terms of providing of optimal patient care and managing health care resources. Relatively little is known regarding the rate at which new RT technologies are adopted in different jurisdictions, and the barriers to implementation of these technologies. Methods Surveys were sent to all radiation oncology department heads in Canada regarding the availability of RT equipment from 2006 to 2010. Data were collected concerning the availability and use of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, and the obstacles to implementation of these technologies. Results IMRT was available in 37% of responding centers in 2006, increasing to 87% in 2010. In 2010, 72% of centers reported that IMRT was available for all patients who might benefit, and 37% indicated that they used IMRT for "virtually all" head and neck patients. SRS availability increased from 26% in 2006 to 42.5% in 2010. Eighty-two percent of centers reported that patients had access to SRS either directly or by referral. The main barriers for IMRT implementation included the need to train or hire treatment planning staff, whereas barriers to SRS implementation mostly included the need to purchase and/or upgrade existing planning software and equipment. Conclusions The survey showed a growing adoption of IMRT and SRS in Canada, although the latter was available in less than half of responding centers. Barriers to implementation differed for IMRT compared to SRS. Enhancing human resources is an important consideration in the implementation of new RT technologies, due to the multidisciplinary nature of the planning and treatment process.

  14. Cosmic Ray Test of Mini-drift Thick Gas Electron Multiplier Chamber for Transition Radiation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, S; Buck, B; Li, C; Ljubicic, T; Majka, R; Shao, M; Smirnov, N; Visser, G; Xu, Z; Zhou, Y

    2014-01-01

    A thick gas electron multiplier (THGEM) chamber with an effective readout area of 10$\\times$10 cm$^{2}$ and a 11.3 mm ionization gap has been tested along with two regular gas electron multiplier (GEM) chambers in a cosmic ray test system. The thick ionization gap makes the THGEM chamber a mini-drift chamber. This kind mini-drift THGEM chamber is proposed as part of a transition radiation detector (TRD) for identifying electrons at an Electron Ion Collider (EIC) experiment. Through this cosmic ray test, an efficiency larger than 94$\\%$ and a spatial resolution $\\sim$220 $\\mu$m are achieved for the THGEM chamber at -3.65 kV. Thanks to its outstanding spatial resolution and thick ionization gap, the THGEM chamber shows excellent track reconstruction capability. The gain uniformity and stability of the THGEM chamber are also presented.

  15. Radiation Tests on the Complete System of the Instrumentation of the LHC Cryogenics at the CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Gousiou, E; Casas Cubillos, J; de la Gama Serrano, J

    2009-01-01

    There are more than 6000 electronic cards for the instrumentation of the LHC cryogenics, housed in crates and distributed around the 27 km tunnel. Cards and crates will be exposed to a complex radiation field during the 10 years of LHC operation. Rad-tol COTS and rad-hard ASIC have been selected and individually qualified during the design phase of the cards. The test setup and the acquired data presented in this paper target the qualitative assessment of the compliance with the LHC radiation environment of an assembled system. It is carried out at the CNGS test facility which provides exposure to LHC-like radiation field.

  16. Beam test of a one-dimensional position sensitive chamber on synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Liu; Hui-Rong, Qi; Bao-An, Zhuang; Jian, Zhang; Rong-Guang, Liu; Qi-Ming, Zhu; Qun, Ouyang; Yuan-Bo, Chen; Xiao-Shan, Jiang; Ya-Jie, Wang; Peng, Liu; Guang-Cai, Chang

    2013-01-01

    One-dimensional single-wire chamber was developed to provide high position resolution for powder diffraction experiments with synchrotron radiation. A diffraction test using the sample of SiO2 has been accomplished at 1W2B laboratory of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Source. The data of beam test were analyzed and some diffraction angles were obtained. The experimental results were in good agreement with standard data from ICDD powder diffraction file. The precision of diffraction angles was 1% to 4.7%. Most of relative errors between measured values of diffraction angles and existing data were less than 1%. As for the detector, the best position resolution in the test was 138 um (sigma value) with an X-ray tube. Finally, discussions of the results were given. The major factor that affected the precision of measurement was deviation from the flat structure of detector. The effect was analyzed and it came to a conclusion that it would be the optimal measurement scheme when the distance between the powder sample...

  17. Accuracy tests of radiation schemes used in hot Jupiter Global Circulation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Amundsen, David Skålid; Tremblin, Pascal; Manners, James; Hayek, Wolfgang; Mayne, N J; Acreman, David M

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of radiation transport in global circulation models (GCMs) is crucial to correctly describe Earth and exoplanet atmospheric dynamics processes. The two-stream approximation and correlated-$k$ method are currently state-of-the-art approximations applied in both Earth and hot Jupiter GCM radiation schemes to facilitate rapid calculation of fluxes and heating rates. Their accuracy have been tested extensively for Earth-like conditions, but verification of the methods' applicability to hot Jupiter-like conditions is lacking in the literature. We are adapting the UK Met Office GCM, the Unified Model (UM), for the study of hot Jupiters, and present in this work the adaptation of the Edwards-Slingo radiation scheme based on the two-stream approximation and the correlated-$k$ method. We discuss the calculation of absorption coefficients from high temperature line lists and highlight the large uncertainty in the pressure-broadened line widths. We compare fluxes and heating rates obtained with our adapted...

  18. Accelerated aging tests of radiation damaged lasers and photodiodes for the CMS tracker optical links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    1999-01-01

    The combined effects of radiation damage and accelerated ageing in COTS lasers and p-i-n photodiodes are presented. Large numbers of these devices are employed in future High Energy Physics experiments and it is vital that these devices are confirmed to be sufficiently robust in terms of both radiation resistance and reliability. Forty 1310 nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers (20 irradiated) and 30 InGaAs p- i-n photodiodes (19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80 degrees C with periodic measurements made of laser threshold and efficiency, in addition to p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout- related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment. (13 refs).

  19. Estimates of cosmic radiation dose received by aircrew of DCTA’s flight test special group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Antonio Federico

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft crews are subjected to radiation doses of cosmic origin in the regular exercise of their functions. The present paper gives an estimate of typical doses received by crews of the Flight Test Special Group of DCTA (GEEV from July 2007 to November 2009. The dose estimates were performed using the CARI-6 and PCAIRE codes and were compared with each other and with values obtained by other authors in other regions of the globe, being analyzed from the standpoint of estimating radiobiological risk.

  20. Planned High-brightness Channeling Radiation Experiment at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomberg, Ben [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, Daniel [NICADD, DeKalb; Panuganti, Harsha [NICADD, DeKalb; Piot, Philippe [Fermilab; Brau, Charles [Vanderbilt U.; Choi, Bo [Vanderbilt U.; Gabella, William [Vanderbilt U.; Ivanov, Borislav [Vanderbilt U.; Mendenhall, Marcus [Vanderbilt U.; Lynn, Christopher [Swarthmore Coll.; Sen, Tanaji [Fermilab; Wagner, Wolfgang [Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf

    2014-07-01

    In this contribution we describe the technical details and experimental setup of our study aimed at producing high-brightness channeling radiation (CR) at Fermilab’s new user facility the Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). In the ASTA photoinjector area electrons are accelerated up to 40-MeV and focused to a sub-micron spot on a ~40 micron thick carbon diamond, the electrons channel through the crystal and emit CR up to 80-KeV. Our study utilizes ASTA’s long pulse train capabilities and ability to preserve ultra-low emittance, to produce the desired high average brightness.

  1. Fisheye Photogrammetry: Tests and Methodologies for the Survey of Narrow Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, L.; Polari, C.; Fassi, F.

    2017-02-01

    The research illustrated in this article aimed at identifying a good standard methodology to survey very narrow spaces during 3D investigation of Cultural Heritage. It is an important topic in today's era of BIM modelling applied to Cultural Heritage. Spaces like staircases, corridors and passages are very common in the architectural or archaeological fields, and obtaining a 3D-oriented survey of those areas can be a very complex task when completeness of the model and high precision are requested. Photogrammetry appears to be the most promising solution in terms of versatility and manoeuvrability also considering the quality of the required data. Fisheye lenses were studied and tested in depth because of their significant advantage in the field of view if compared with rectilinear lenses. This advantage alone can be crucial to reduce the total amount of photos and, as a consequence, to obtain manageable data, to simplify the survey phase and to significantly reduce the elaboration time. In order to overcome the main issue that arise when using fisheye lenses, which is the lack of rules that can be employed to design the survey, a general mathematical formulation to precisely estimate the GSD (Ground Sampling Distance) for every optical projection is presented here. A complete survey of a real complex case study was performed in order to test and stress the proposed methodology, and to handle a fisheye-based survey from beginning to end: the photogrammetric survey of the Minguzzi Staircase. It is a complex service spiral-staircase located in the Duomo di Milano with a total height of 25 meters and characterized by a narrow walkable space about 70 centimetres wide.

  2. Accuracy tests of radiation schemes used in hot Jupiter global circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, David S.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Tremblin, Pascal; Manners, James; Hayek, Wolfgang; Mayne, Nathan J.; Acreman, David M.

    2014-04-01

    The treatment of radiation transport in global circulation models (GCMs) is crucial for correctly describing Earth and exoplanet atmospheric dynamics processes. The two-stream approximation and correlated-k method are currently state-of-the-art approximations applied in both Earth and hot Jupiter GCM radiation schemes to facilitate the rapid calculation of fluxes and heating rates. Their accuracy have been tested extensively for Earth-like conditions, but verification of the methods' applicability to hot Jupiter-like conditions is lacking in the literature. We are adapting the UK Met Office GCM, the Unified Model (UM), for the study of hot Jupiters, and present in this work the adaptation of the Edwards-Slingo radiation scheme based on the two-stream approximation and the correlated-k method. We discuss the calculation of absorption coefficients from high-temperature line lists and highlight the large uncertainty in the pressure-broadened line widths. We compare fluxes and heating rates obtained with our adapted scheme to more accurate discrete ordinate (DO) line-by-line (LbL) calculations ignoring scattering effects. We find that, in most cases, errors stay below 10% for both heating rates and fluxes using ~10 k-coefficients in each band and a diffusivity factor D = 1.66. The two-stream approximation and the correlated-k method both contribute non-negligibly to the total error. We also find that using band-averaged absorption coefficients, which have previously been used in radiative-hydrodynamical simulations of a hot Jupiter, may yield errors of ~100%, and should thus be used with caution.

  3. PET-guided delineation of radiation therapy treatment volumes: a survey of image segmentation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); El Naqa, Issam [Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Historically, anatomical CT and MR images were used to delineate the gross tumour volumes (GTVs) for radiotherapy treatment planning. The capabilities offered by modern radiation therapy units and the widespread availability of combined PET/CT scanners stimulated the development of biological PET imaging-guided radiation therapy treatment planning with the aim to produce highly conformal radiation dose distribution to the tumour. One of the most difficult issues facing PET-based treatment planning is the accurate delineation of target regions from typical blurred and noisy functional images. The major problems encountered are image segmentation and imperfect system response function. Image segmentation is defined as the process of classifying the voxels of an image into a set of distinct classes. The difficulty in PET image segmentation is compounded by the low spatial resolution and high noise characteristics of PET images. Despite the difficulties and known limitations, several image segmentation approaches have been proposed and used in the clinical setting including thresholding, edge detection, region growing, clustering, stochastic models, deformable models, classifiers and several other approaches. A detailed description of the various approaches proposed in the literature is reviewed. Moreover, we also briefly discuss some important considerations and limitations of the widely used techniques to guide practitioners in the field of radiation oncology. The strategies followed for validation and comparative assessment of various PET segmentation approaches are described. Future opportunities and the current challenges facing the adoption of PET-guided delineation of target volumes and its role in basic and clinical research are also addressed. (orig.)

  4. Psychodiagnostic test usage: a survey of the society for personality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, C; Sherry, D; Keller, J W

    1985-04-01

    The present survey investigated psychodiagnostic test usage and practices of the Society for Personality Assessment. A brief questionnaire was forwarded to 400 SPA members and 206 responded for a 51.5% rate of return. Projective techniques found popular in previous surveys of Division 12 were the major assessment instruments utilized by SPA members. Exner's comprehensive system was the preferred mode of Rorschach analysis, followed by the Klopfer and Beck systems. The Wechsler Scales and the MMPI were frequently included in conducting a psychological battery. Personality assessment was mainly utilized for diagnostic purposes and as an indicator for type of therapy.

  5. A Brief Historical Survey of Rocket Testing Induced Acoustic Environments at NASA SSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    A survey was conducted of all the various rocket test programs that have been performed since the establishment of NASA Stennis Space Center. The relevant information from each of these programs were compiled and used to quantify the theoretical noise source levels using the NASA approved methodology for computing "acoustic loads generated by a propulsion system" (NASA SP ]8072). This methodology, which is outlined in Reference 1, has been verified as a reliable means of determining the noise source characteristics of rocket engines. This information is being provided to establish reference environments for new government/business residents to ascertain whether or not their activities will generate acoustic environments that are more "encroaching" in the NASA Fee Area. In this report, the designation of sound power level refers to the acoustic power of the rocket engine at the engine itself. This is in contrast to the sound pressure level associated with the propagation of the acoustic energy in the surrounding air. The first part of the survey documents the "at source" sound power levels and their dominant frequency bands for the range of engines tested at Stennis. The second part of the survey discusses how the acoustic energy levels will propagate non ]uniformly from the test stands. To demonstrate this, representative acoustic sound pressure mappings in the NASA Stennis Fee Area were computed for typical engine tests on the B ]1 and E ]1 test stands.

  6. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: a Survey of Perspectives on Carrier Testing and Communication Within the Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brenna; Hassed, Susan; Chaloner, Jae Lindsay; Aston, Christopher E; Guy, Carrie

    2016-06-01

    Carrier testing is widely available for multiple genetic conditions, and several professional organizations have created practice guidelines regarding appropriate clinical application and the testing of minors. Previous research has focused on carrier screening, predictive testing, and testing for X-linked conditions. However, family perspectives on carrier testing for X-linked lethal diseases have yet to be described. In this study, we explored communication within the family about carrier testing and the perspectives of mothers of sons with an X-linked lethal disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Twenty-five mothers of sons with DMD participated in an anonymous online survey. Survey questions included multiple choice, Likert scale, and open ended, short answer questions. Analysis of the multiple choice and Likert scale questions revealed that most mothers preferred a gradual style of communication with their daughters regarding risk status. In addition, most participants reported having consulted with a genetic counselor and found it helpful. Comparisons between groups, analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, found no differences in preferred style due to mother's carrier status or having a daughter. Thematic analysis was conducted on responses to open ended questions. Themes identified included the impact of family implications, age and maturity, and a desire for autonomy regarding the decision to discuss and undergo carrier testing with at-risk daughters, particularly timing of these discussions. Implications for genetic counseling practice are discussed.

  7. Men's values-based factors on prostate cancer risk genetic testing: A telephone survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuelin

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While a definitive genetic test for Hereditary Prostate Cancer (HPC is not yet available, future HPC risk testing may become available. Past survey data have shown high interest in HPC testing, but without an in-depth analysis of its underlying rationale to those considering it. Methods Telephone computer-assisted interviews of 400 men were conducted in a large metropolitan East-coast city, with subsequent development of psychometric scales and their correlation with intention to receive testing. Results Approximately 82% of men interviewed expressed that they "probably" or "definitely" would get genetic testing for prostate cancer risk if offered now. Factor analysis revealed four distinct, meaningful factors for intention to receive genetic testing for prostate cancer risk. These factors reflected attitudes toward testing and were labeled "motivation to get testing," "consequences and actions after knowing the test result," "psychological distress," and "beliefs of favorable outcomes if tested" (α = 0.89, 0.73, 0.73, and 0.60, respectively. These factors accounted for 70% of the total variability. The domains of motivation (directly, consequences (inversely, distress (inversely, and positive expectations (directly all correlated with intention to receive genetic testing (p Conclusions Men have strong attitudes favoring genetic testing for prostate cancer risk. The factors most associated with testing intention include those noted in past cancer genetics studies, and also highlights the relevance in considering one's motivation and perception of positive outcomes in genetic decision-making.

  8. Characterization of a medical X-ray machine for testing the response of electronic dosimeters in pulsed radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Margarete C.; Da Silva, Teógenes A.

    2014-11-01

    Electronic personal dosimeters (EPD) based on solid state detectors have been used for personnel monitoring for radiation protection purpose; their use has been extended to practices with pulsed radiation beams although their performance is not well known. Deficiencies in the EPD response in pulsed radiation fields have been reported; they were not detected before since type tests and calibrations of EPDs were established in terms of continuous X and gamma reference radiations. An ISO working group was formed to elaborate a standard for test conditions and performance requirements of EPDs in pulsed beams; the PTB/Germany implemented a special X-ray facility for generating the reference pulsed radiation beams. In this work, an 800 Plus VMI medical X-ray machine of the Dosimeter Calibration Laboratory of CDTN/CNEN was characterized to verify its feasibility to perform EPD tests. Characterization of the x-ray beam was done in terms of practical peak voltage, half-value layer, mean energy and air kerma rate. Reference dosimeters used for air kerma measurements were verified as far their metrological coherence and a procedure for testing EDPs was established. Electronic personal dosimeters (EPD) have been used for personnel monitoring. EPD use has been extended to pulsed radiation beams. Deficiencies in the EPD response in pulsed beams have been reported. The feasibility of using a medical X-ray machine to perform EPD tests was studied. Reference dosimeters were verified and EPD testing procedure was established.

  9. Niche evolution and adaptive radiation: Testing the order of trait divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerly, D.D.; Schwilk, D.W.; Webb, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of an adaptive radiation, the evolution of niche parameters is of particular interest for understanding modes of speciation and the consequences for coexistence of related species within communities. We pose a general question: In the course of an evolutionary radiation, do traits related to within-community niche differences (?? niche) evolve before or after differentiation of macrohabitat affinity or climatic tolerances (?? niche)? Here we introduce a new test to address this question, based on a modification of the method of independent contrasts. The divergence order test (DOT) is based on the average age of the nodes on a tree, weighted by the absolute magnitude of the contrast at each node for a particular trait. The comparison of these weighted averages reveals whether large divergences for one trait have occurred earlier or later in the course of diversification, relative to a second trait; significance is determined by bootstrapping from maximum-likelihood ancestral state reconstructions. The method is applied to the evolution of Ceanothus, a woody plant group in California, in which co-occurring species exhibit significant differences in a key leaf trait (specific leaf area) associated with contrasting physiological and life history strategies. Co-occurring species differ more for this trait than expected under a null model of community assembly. This ?? niche difference evolved early in the divergence of two major subclades within Ceanothus, whereas climatic distributions (?? niche traits) diversified later within each of the subclades. However, rapid evolution of climate parameters makes inferences of early divergence events highly uncertain, and differentiation of the ?? niche might have taken place throughout the evolution of the group, without leaving a clear phylogenetic signal. Similar patterns observed in several plant and animal groups suggest that early divergence of ?? niche traits might be a common feature of niche evolution in

  10. Application and development of ion-source technology for radiation-effects testing of electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvas, T.; Javanainen, A.; Kettunen, H.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.; Virtanen, A.

    2017-09-01

    Studies of heavy-ion induced single event effect (SEE) on space electronics are necessary to verify the operation of the components in the harsh radiation environment. These studies are conducted by using high-energy heavy-ion beams to simulate the radiation effects in space. The ion beams are accelerated as so-called ion cocktails, containing several ion beam species with similar mass-to-charge ratio, covering a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) values also present in space. The use of cocktails enables fast switching between beam species during testing. Production of these high-energy ion cocktails poses challenging requirements to the ion sources because in most laboratories reaching the necessary beam energies requires very high charge state ions. There are two main technologies producing these beams: The electron beam ion source EBIS and the electron cyclotron resonance ion source ECRIS. The EBIS is most suitable for pulsed accelerators, while ECRIS is most suitable for use with cyclotrons, which are the most common accelerators used in these applications. At the Accelerator Laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä (JYFL), radiation effects testing is currently performed using a K130 cyclotron and a 14 GHz ECRIS at a beam energy of 9.3 MeV/u. A new 18 GHz ECRIS, pushing the limits of the normal conducting ECR technology is under development at JYFL. The performances of existing 18 GHz ion sources have been compared, and based on this analysis, a 16.2 MeV/u beam cocktail with 1999 MeV 126Xe44+ being the most challenging component to has been chosen for development at JYFL. The properties of the suggested beam cocktail are introduced and discussed.

  11. Radiated radiofrequency immunity testing of automated external defibrillators - modifications of applicable standards are needed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassen Howard I

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We studied the worst-case radiated radiofrequency (RF susceptibility of automated external defibrillators (AEDs based on the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC requirements of a current standard for cardiac defibrillators, IEC 60601-2-4. Square wave modulation was used to mimic cardiac physiological frequencies of 1 - 3 Hz. Deviations from the IEC standard were a lower frequency limit of 30 MHz to explore frequencies where the patient-connected leads could resonate. Also testing up to 20 V/m was performed. We tested AEDs with ventricular fibrillation (V-Fib and normal sinus rhythm signals on the patient leads to enable testing for false negatives (inappropriate "no shock advised" by the AED. Methods We performed radiated exposures in a 10 meter anechoic chamber using two broadband antennas to generate E fields in the 30 - 2500 MHz frequency range at 1% frequency steps. An AED patient simulator was housed in a shielded box and delivered normal and fibrillation waveforms to the AED's patient leads. We developed a technique to screen ECG waveforms stored in each AED for electromagnetic interference at all frequencies without waiting for the long cycle times between analyses (normally 20 to over 200 s. Results Five of the seven AEDs tested were susceptible to RF interference, primarily at frequencies below 80 MHz. Some induced errors could cause AEDs to malfunction and effectively inhibit operator prompts to deliver a shock to a patient experiencing lethal fibrillation. Failures occurred in some AEDs exposed to E fields between 3 V/m and 20 V/m, in the 38 - 50 MHz range. These occurred when the patient simulator was delivering a V-Fib waveform to the AED. Also, we found it is not possible to test modern battery-only-operated AEDs for EMI using a patient simulator if the IEC 60601-2-4 defibrillator standard's simulated patient load is used. Conclusions AEDs experienced potentially life-threatening false-negative failures from

  12. Development of a synchrotron radiation beam monitor for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpelli, Andrea [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear integrable optics applied to beam dynamics may mitigate multi-particle instabilities, but proof of principle experiments have never been carried out. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron and proton storage ring currently being built at Fermilab, which addresses tests of nonlinear lattice elements in a real machine in addition to experiments on optical stochastic cooling and on the single-electron wave function. These experiments require an outstanding control over the lattice parameters, achievable with fast and precise beam monitoring systems. This work describes the steps for designing and building a beam monitor for IOTA based on synchrotron radiation, able to measure intensity, position and transverse cross-section beam.

  13. On Dimensions of OTA Setups for Massive MIMO Base Stations Radiated Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyösti, Pekka; Fan, Wei; Pedersen, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    The development of base stations (BS) with large aperture antenna arrays, enabled partially by the utilization of cmWave and mmWave frequency bands, will require radiated testing in fading conditions. In this paper, the objective is to investigate the suitable measurement distances and physical...... (DoA) estimation algorithm as well as multi-user MIMO sum-rate capacity are investigated to determine the range of the test setup. It was found that the link budget doesn’t support for the measurement distances claimed by the Fraunhofer distance. Most of the utilized metrics, especially the sum rate...... capacity, indicate that smaller setup sizes can still yield reasonable measurement accuracy. Simulations were performed at 2.6, 3.5, and 28 GHz frequencies....

  14. The design, build and test of a digital analyzer for mixed radiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, M. J.; Aspinall, M. D.; Georgopoulos, K. [Department of Engineering, Lancaster University, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Cave, F. D.; Jarrah, Z. [Hybrid Instruments Ltd., Priory Close, St. Mary' s Gate, Lancaster, Lancashire LA1 4WA (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The design, build and test of a digital analyzer for mixed radiation fields is described. This instrument has been developed to provide portable, real-time discrimination of hard mixed fields comprising both neutrons and {gamma} rays with energies typically above 0.5 MeV. The instrument in its standard form comprises a sensor head and a system unit, and affords the flexibility to provide processed data in the form of the traditional scatter-plot representation separating neutron and {gamma}-ray components, or the full, sampled pulse data itself. The instrument has been tested with an americium-beryllium source in three different shielding arrangements to replicate the case in which there are only neutrons, only {gamma} rays and where both neutrons and {gamma}-rays are present. The instrument is observed to return consistent results. (authors)

  15. Diffusion of Molecular Diagnostic Lung Cancer Tests: A Survey of German Oncologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Alexander Steffen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at examining the diffusion of diagnostic lung cancer tests in Germany. It was motivated by the high potential of detecting and targeting oncogenic drivers. Recognizing that the diffusion of diagnostic tests is a conditio sine qua non for the success of personalized lung cancer therapies, this study analyzed the diffusion of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK tests in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative research strategies were combined in a mixed-method design. A literature review and subsequent Key Opinion Leader interviews identified a set of qualitative factors driving the diffusion process, which were then translated into an online survey. The survey was conducted among a sample of 961 oncologists (11.34% response rate. The responses were analyzed in a multiple linear regression which identified six statistically significant factors driving the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: reimbursement, attitude towards R&D, information self-assessment, perceived attitudes of colleagues, age and test-pathway strategies. Besides the important role of adequate reimbursement and relevant guidelines, the results of this study suggest that an increasing usage of test-pathway strategies, especially in an office-based setting, can increase the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests in the future.

  16. Diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: a survey of german oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Julius Alexander

    2014-03-21

    This study was aimed at examining the diffusion of diagnostic lung cancer tests in Germany. It was motivated by the high potential of detecting and targeting oncogenic drivers. Recognizing that the diffusion of diagnostic tests is a conditio sine qua non for the success of personalized lung cancer therapies, this study analyzed the diffusion of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) tests in Germany. Qualitative and quantitative research strategies were combined in a mixed-method design. A literature review and subsequent Key Opinion Leader interviews identified a set of qualitative factors driving the diffusion process, which were then translated into an online survey. The survey was conducted among a sample of 961 oncologists (11.34% response rate). The responses were analyzed in a multiple linear regression which identified six statistically significant factors driving the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests: reimbursement, attitude towards R&D, information self-assessment, perceived attitudes of colleagues, age and test-pathway strategies. Besides the important role of adequate reimbursement and relevant guidelines, the results of this study suggest that an increasing usage of test-pathway strategies, especially in an office-based setting, can increase the diffusion of molecular diagnostic lung cancer tests in the future.

  17. HIV testing during the Canadian immigration medical examination: a national survey of designated medical practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Jennifer M; Li, Alan; Owino, Maureen; English, Ken; Mascarenhas, Lyndon; Tan, Darrell H S

    2014-01-01

    HIV testing is mandatory for individuals wishing to immigrate to Canada. Since the Designated Medical Practitioners (DMPs) who perform these tests may have varying experience in HIV and time constraints in their clinical practices, there may be variability in the quality of pre- and posttest counseling provided. We surveyed DMPs regarding HIV testing, counseling, and immigration inadmissibility. A 16-item survey was mailed to all DMPs across Canada (N = 203). The survey inquired about DMP characteristics, knowledge of HIV, attitudes and practices regarding inadmissibility and counseling, and interest in continuing medical education. There were a total of 83 respondents (41%). Participants frequently rated their knowledge of HIV diagnostics, cultural competency, and HIV/AIDS service organizations as "fair" (40%, 43%, and 44%, respectively). About 25%, 46%, and 11% of the respondents agreed/strongly agreed with the statements "HIV infected individuals pose a danger to public health and safety," "HIV-positive immigrants cause excessive demand on the healthcare system," and "HIV seropositivity is a reasonable ground for denial into Canada," respectively. Language was cited as a barrier to counseling, which focused on transmission risks (46% discussed this as "always" or "often") more than coping and social support (37%). There was a high level of interest (47%) in continuing medical education in this area. There are areas for improvement regarding DMPs' knowledge, attitudes, and practices about HIV infection, counseling, and immigration criteria. Continuing medical education and support for DMPs to facilitate practice changes could benefit newcomers who test positive through the immigration process.

  18. Multi-agency radiation survey and site investigation manual (MARSIM). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The MARSSIM provides information on planning, conducting, evaluating, and documenting building surface and surface soil final status radiological surveys for demonstrating compliance with dose or risk-based regulations or standards. The MARSSIM is a multi-agency consensus document that was developed collaboratively by four Federal agencies having authority and control over radioactive materials: Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The MARSSIM`s objective is to describe a consistent approach for planning, performing, and assessing building surface and surface soil final status surveys to meet established dose or risk-based release criteria, while at the same time encouraging an effective use of resources.

  19. A robust hypothesis test for the sensitive detection of constant speed radiation moving sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumazert, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.dumazert@cea.fr [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Coulon, Romain; Kondrasovs, Vladimir; Boudergui, Karim; Moline, Yoann; Sannié, Guillaume; Gameiro, Jordan; Normand, Stéphane [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Méchin, Laurence [CNRS, UCBN, Groupe de Recherche en Informatique, Image, Automatique et Instrumentation de Caen, 14050 Caen (France)

    2015-09-21

    Radiation Portal Monitors are deployed in linear networks to detect radiological material in motion. As a complement to single and multichannel detection algorithms, inefficient under too low signal-to-noise ratios, temporal correlation algorithms have been introduced. Test hypothesis methods based on empirically estimated mean and variance of the signals delivered by the different channels have shown significant gain in terms of a tradeoff between detection sensitivity and false alarm probability. This paper discloses the concept of a new hypothesis test for temporal correlation detection methods, taking advantage of the Poisson nature of the registered counting signals, and establishes a benchmark between this test and its empirical counterpart. The simulation study validates that in the four relevant configurations of a pedestrian source carrier under respectively high and low count rate radioactive backgrounds, and a vehicle source carrier under the same respectively high and low count rate radioactive backgrounds, the newly introduced hypothesis test ensures a significantly improved compromise between sensitivity and false alarm. It also guarantees that the optimal coverage factor for this compromise remains stable regardless of signal-to-noise ratio variations between 2 and 0.8, therefore allowing the final user to parametrize the test with the sole prior knowledge of background amplitude.

  20. International Test Program for Synergistic Atomic Oxygen and Vacuum Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure of Spacecraft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2001-01-01

    The components and materials of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can degrade in thermal and optical performance through interaction with atomic oxygen and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, which are predominant in low Earth orbit. Because of the importance of low Earth orbit durability and performance to manufacturers and users, an international test program for assessing the durability of spacecraft materials and components was initiated. Initial tests at the NASA Glenn Research Center consisted of exposure of samples representing a variety of thermal control paints, multilayer insulation materials, and Sun sensors that have been used in space. Materials donated from various international sources were tested alongside materials whose performance is well known, such as Teflon FEP, Kapton H, or Z-93-P white paint. The optical, thermal, or mass loss data generated during the tests were then provided to the participating material suppliers. Data were not published unless the participant donating the material consented to publication. The test program is intended to give spacecraft builders and users a better understanding of degradation processes and effects so that they can improve their predictions of spacecraft performance.

  1. A scintillation testing technology at a viewpoint of optical test. At a memory of winning of the Radiation Prize (Prize of Encouragement)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Tatsuyuki [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-04-01

    In a 'summer school' held at Matsushima, a series of developmental results had been introduced on a wavelength shift type beta-ray detector and others recently progressed by author at a viewpoint of 'new reconsideration on scintillation testing, one of the oldest radiation testing technology for an optical testing'. As a chance to write this theme again was obtained at present, here were introduced on trial and errors, backgrounds on ideas, pains for trial production and so forth at a process of putting together them for actual technologies and products under combining a series of ideas with their needs. Here were newly introduced on developmental backgrounds, points for practicability, and so forth on optical radiation testing technology which had been developed by authors. By upgrading of radiation resistance on the optical fibers themselves, developments for not only radiation testing but also instrumentation in storage vessel specific to nuclear instrumentation are considered in future. And, some findings on new elements and techniques, such as application of radiation to refractive index change due to much minute exotherm, application of Cherenkov phenomenon in glass, fiber grating and interference test assembles a minute diffraction lattice into a core, and so forth are found recently, which will be expected for their future developments. (G.K.)

  2. Prenotification, Incentives, and Survey Modality: An Experimental Test of Methods to Increase Survey Response Rates of School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Robin Tepper; Jacob, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teacher and principal surveys are among the most common data collection techniques employed in education research. Yet there is remarkably little research on survey methods in education, or about the most cost-effective way to raise response rates among teachers and principals. In an effort to explore various methods for increasing survey response…

  3. Prenotification, Incentives, and Survey Modality: An Experimental Test of Methods to Increase Survey Response Rates of School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Robin Tepper; Jacob, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Teacher and principal surveys are among the most common data collection techniques employed in education research. Yet there is remarkably little research on survey methods in education, or about the most cost-effective way to raise response rates among teachers and principals. In an effort to explore various methods for increasing survey response…

  4. A preliminary area survey of neutron radiation levels associated with the NASA variable energy cyclotron horizontal neutron delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. K.; Leonard, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    The 25 MeV deuteron beam from the NASA variable energy cyclotron incident on a thick beryllium target will deliver a tissue neutron dose rate of 2.14 rad micron A-min at a source to skin distance of 125 cm. A neutron survey of the existing hallways with various shielding configurations made during operating of the horizontal neutron delivery system indicates that minimal amounts of additional neutron shielding material are required to provide a low level radiation environment within a self-contained neutron therapy control station. Measurements also indicate that the primary neutron distribution delivered by a planned vertical delivery system will be minimally perturbed by neutrons backscattered from the floor.

  5. National Survey of Radiation Dose and Image Quality in Adult CT Head Scans in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Jung Lin

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the influence of different variables on radiation dose and image quality based on a national database.Taiwan's Ministry of Health and Welfare requested all radiology departments to complete a questionnaire for each of their CT scanners. Information gathered included all scanning parameters for CT head scans. For the present analysis, CT machines were divided into three subgroups: single slice CT (Group A; multi-detector CT (MDCT with 2-64 slices (Group B; and MDCT with more than 64 slices (Group C. Correlations between computed tomography dose index (CTDI and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR with cumulated tube rotation number (CTW(n and cumulated tube rotation time (CTW(s, and sub group analyses of CTDI and SNR across the three groups were performed.CTDI values demonstrated a weak correlation (r = 0.33 with CTW(n in Group A. SNR values demonstrated a weak negative correlation (r = -0.46 with CTW(n in Group C. MDCT with higher slice numbers used more tube potential resulting in higher effective doses. There were both significantly lower CTDI and SNR values in helical mode than in axial mode in Group B, but not Group C.CTW(n and CTW(s did not influence radiation output. Helical mode is more often used in MDCT and results in both lower CTDI and SNR compared to axial mode in MDCT with less than 64 slices.

  6. Test models for estimating radiation balance in different scales for Jaboticabal, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valquíria de Alencar Beserra

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The net radiation (Rn in agroecosystems is the amount of energy that is available in the environment to heating processes of living organisms, air and soil; perspiration of animals and plants; photosynthesis and water evaporation. The Rn defines the type of climate and weather conditions prevailing in a region affecting the availability and thermal water, the fundamental understanding of genotype-environment, which ultimately determine the productivity of the agricultural system. Rn usually is used in models of weather and climate studies. The sustainability and economic viability of zootechnical activity is dependent on the positive interaction between animal and environment. Environmental factors such as water, shading, thermal exchanges sensible heat (conduction, convection and radiation skin and latent heat losses (evaporation and transpiration, conditioned by Rn, must be managed to provide the best results. The present study was conducted to develop and test models for accurate and precise radiation balance on the scales daily, monthly and seasonal ten-day for Jaboticabal - SP, due to the importance of estimates of net radiation for agricultural activities. We used daily meteorological data from weather station located in Jaboticabal, SP (coordinates: 21 ° 14'05 "South, 48 ° 17'09" West, 615m altitude at Universidade Estadual Paulista "Júlio Mesquita Filho" - FCAV/UNESP in a situation of default grass "Bahiagrass" during the period 20/08/2005 to 20/01/2012. The data used were the maximum temperature (Tmax, minimum (Tmin and mean (TMED; maximum relative humidity (URMáx, minimum (URMín and average (URMéd precipitation (mm, average velocity (m/s, Qo, solar radiation (MJ m-2, sunshine (hour meter (MJ m², soil temperature at two depths (Tsoil2CM, Tsoil5CM and class A pan evaporation (TCA (mm. The measures taken by the balance radiometer were taken as a reference to test other models. The models tested were those reported by NORMAN et al

  7. Critical appraisal of speech in noise tests: a systematic review and survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhani Sharma

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Speech in noise tests that measure the perception of speech in presence of noise are now an important part of audiologic tests battery and hearing research as well. There are various tests available to estimate the perception of speech in presence of noise, for example, connected sentence test, hearing in noise test, words in noise, quick speech-in-noise test, bamford-kowal-bench speech-in-noise test, and listening in spatialized noise-sentences. All these tests are different in terms of target age, measure, procedure, speech material, noise, normative, etc. Because of the variety of tests available to estimate speech-in-noise abilities, audiologists often select tests based on their availability, ease to administer the test, time required in running the test, age of the patient, hearing status, type of hearing disorder and type of amplification device if using. A critical appraisal of these speech-in-noise tests is required for the evidence based selection and to be used in audiology clinics. In this article speech-in-noise tests were critically appraised for their conceptual model, measurement model, normatives, reliability, validity, responsiveness, item/instrument bias, respondent burden and administrative burden. Selection of a standard speech-in-noise test based on this critical appraisal will also allow an easy comparison of speech-in-noise ability of any hearing impaired individual or group across audiology clinics and research centers. This article also describes the survey which was done to grade the speech in noise tests on the various appraisal characteristics.

  8. Mechanical waves conceptual survey: Its modification and conversion to a standard multiple-choice test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2016-06-01

    In this article we present several modifications of the mechanical waves conceptual survey, the most important test to date that has been designed to evaluate university students' understanding of four main topics in mechanical waves: propagation, superposition, reflection, and standing waves. The most significant changes are (i) modification of several test questions that had some problems in their original design, (ii) standardization of the number of options for each question to five, (iii) conversion of the two-tier questions to multiple-choice questions, and (iv) modification of some questions to make them independent of others. To obtain a final version of the test, we administered both the original and modified versions several times to students at a large private university in Mexico. These students were completing a course that covers the topics tested by the survey. The final modified version of the test was administered to 234 students. In this study we present the modifications for each question, and discuss the reasons behind them. We also analyze the results obtained by the final modified version and offer a comparison between the original and modified versions. In the Supplemental Material we present the final modified version of the test. It can be used by teachers and researchers to assess students' understanding of, and learning about, mechanical waves.

  9. Access to gynecological services and Papanicolau tests in HIV-infected Italian women: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murri, R; Franceschi, S; Ravizza, M; Fiore, S; Bini, T; Mussini, C; Fasolo, M; Liuzzi, G; Ippolito, G; D'Arminio Monforte, A

    2006-05-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the access to Papanicolau (Pap) tests of HIV-infected women in Italy. A cross-sectional survey on a cohort of HIV-infected women seen at 27 HIV clinics was performed. At each clinic a female physician involved in the care of HIV-infected women was asked questions on clinic and patients' characteristics and on access to Pap tests. The outcome of the study was to find the percentage of women who had not had a Pap test before coming to the HIV clinic and the percentage having had a Pap test in 2001. In the survey, 7,600 HIV-infected women were represented. Women who came to the clinic without having ever had a Pap test were 62+/-22%, while women who had had a Pap test in 2001 were 43+/-36%. Women who reported never having had a Pap test before coming to the HIV clinic were more often from the south than the north of Italy (17.9+/-49% from the north, 18+/-53% from the center and 9.3+/-83.9% from the south; p<0.001). This a difference disappeared when comparing the women who had had a Pap test in 2001 (28+/-39.6% from the north, 31.6+/-44.2% from the center and 25.6+/-45.7% from the south; p=0.88). Despite the published guidelines in Italy, only 38% of women had ever had a Pap test before coming to the HIV clinic and only 43% had had a Pap test in 2001. Strategies aimed to improve these proportions should be rapidly implemented at all levels of care organization.

  10. Radiation test results on COTS components needed for the large hadron collider at CERN; Resultats de tests aux radiations de composants COTS necessaires pour le large hadron collider au CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rausch, R.; Tavlet, M. [CERN Conseil Europeen pour la recherche nucleaire, Lab. europeen pour la physique des particules, Geneve (Switzerland)

    1999-07-01

    Calculations have shown that the level of absorbed radiation dose inside the tunnel of the future LHC will be between 1 and 10 Gy pro year. This level of radiation allows the use of industry standard commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices. For some COTS to be used at the LHC, on-line testing have started in a typical proton-accelerator radiation-field; mainly gammas and neutrons, plus some high-energy particles. After irradiations at about 100 Gy and a few 1.10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2} (eq. 1 MeV-Si), fatal faults and important upset rates appear.

  11. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: Probing the Epoch of Radiation Domination using Large Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Gregory B; Parkinson, David; Brough, Sarah; Colless, Matthew; Contreras, Carlos; Couch, Warrick; Croton, Darren J; Croom, Scott; Davis, Tamara; Drinkwater, Michael J; Forster, Karl; Gilbank, David; Gladders, Mike; Glazebrook, Karl; Jelliffe, Ben; Jurek, Russell J; Li, I-hui; Madore, Barry; Martin, D Christopher; Pimbblet, Kevin; Pracy, Michael; Sharp, Rob; Wisnioski, Emily; Woods, David; Wyder, Ted K; Yee, H K C

    2012-01-01

    We place the most robust constraint to date on the scale of the turnover in the cosmological matter power spectrum using data from the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. We find this feature to lie at a scale of k_0=0.0160^{+0.0041}_{-0.0035}$ [h/Mpc] (68% confidence) for an effective redshift of 0.62 and obtain from this the first-ever turnover-derived distance and cosmology constraints: a measure of the cosmic distance-redshift relation in units of the horizon scale at the redshift of radiation-matter equality (r_H) of D_V(z=0.62)/r_H=18.3 (+6.3/-3.3) and, assuming a prior on the number of extra relativistic degrees of freedom N_eff=3, constraints on the cosmological matter density parameter Omega_Mh^2=0.136 (+0.026/-0.052) and on the redshift of matter-radiation equality z_eq=3274 (+631/-1260). All results are in excellent agreement with the predictions of standard LCDM models. Our constraints on the logarithmic slope of the power spectrum on scales larger than the turnover is bounded in the lower limit with valu...

  12. National Medical Care System May Impede Fostering of True Specialization of Radiation Oncologists: Study Based on Structure Survey in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numasaki, Hodaka [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Nishio, Masamichi [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Hokkaido Cancer Center, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Ikeda, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Sakai Municipal Hospital, Sakai, Osaka (Japan); Sekiguchi, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s International Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kamikonya, Norihiko [Department of Radiology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, Hyogo (Japan); Koizumi, Masahiko [Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Tago, Masao [Department of Radiology, Teikyo University School of Medicine University Hospital, Mizonokuchi, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Ando, Yutaka [Department of Medical Informatics, Heavy Ion Medical Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Terahara, Atsuro [Department of Radiology, Toho University Omori Medical Center, Tokyo (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Mitsumori, Michihide [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Graduate School of Medicine Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nishimura, Tetsuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, Shizuoka (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Hokkaido (Japan); Teshima, Teruki, E-mail: teshima@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the actual work environment of radiation oncologists (ROs) in Japan in terms of working pattern, patient load, and quality of cancer care based on the relative time spent on patient care. Methods and Materials: In 2008, the Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology produced a questionnaire for a national structure survey of radiation oncology in 2007. Data for full-time ROs were crosschecked with data for part-time ROs by using their identification data. Data of 954 ROs were analyzed. The relative practice index for patients was calculated as the relative value of care time per patient on the basis of Japanese Blue Book guidelines (200 patients per RO). Results: The working patterns of RO varied widely among facility categories. ROs working mainly at university hospitals treated 189.2 patients per year on average, with those working in university hospitals and their affiliated facilities treating 249.1 and those working in university hospitals only treating 144.0 patients per year on average. The corresponding data were 256.6 for cancer centers and 176.6 for other facilities. Geographically, the mean annual number of patients per RO per quarter was significantly associated with population size, varying from 143.1 to 203.4 (p < 0.0001). There were also significant differences in the average practice index for patients by ROs working mainly in university hospitals between those in main and affiliated facilities (1.07 vs 0.71: p < 0.0001). Conclusions: ROs working in university hospitals and their affiliated facilities treated more patients than the other ROs. In terms of patient care time only, the quality of cancer care in affiliated facilities might be worse than that in university hospitals. Under the current national medical system, working patterns of ROs of academic facilities in Japan appear to be problematic for fostering true specialization of radiation oncologists.

  13. Preliminary assays for lemongrass essential oil ecotoxicological test in D. similis and C. silvestrii submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimiliani, Giovana T.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose R., E-mail: gtgimiliani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Culturas Celulares

    2011-07-01

    Pharmaceutical products are of great interest in ecotoxicological studies due to being found some of these products in the superficial waters and sediments, water and sewage treatment effluents. It was verified an increase of insect repellent chemical products in the aquatic environment because of the increase of diseases transmitted by mosquitoes like dengue. As these compounds show toxicity, the use of essential oils natural products with repellent properties is increasing and the literature about the impact in the aquatic environment is scarce. The hydric frame would suffer natural radiation and radiations from energy generation nuclear plants impacts fall out of tests and nuclear accidents. There is no universal definition of environmental protection and there are few studies on radiation effects in the aquatic environment. In this study was determined the lemon grass essential oil toxicity level as well as the lethal dose of ionizing radiation, LD{sub 50}, in aquatic organisms. Cytotoxicity test was performed by in vitro neutral red uptake method in NCTC clone L929 cell line. In the LD{sub 50} test aquatic organisms were submitted to gamma radiation. The essential oil of lemongrass Cymbopogon flexuosus showed cytotoxicity index IC{sub 50} about 50{mu}g.mL{sup -1}. The LD{sub 50} for Daphnia similis was 242 Gy and Ceriodaphnia silvestrii about 525 Gy. Studies will be continued with acute and chronic ecotoxicological tests of lemongrass essential oil in natural organisms and in organisms submitted to gamma radiation, utilizing the results obtained in this work. (author)

  14. Scintillator correlation and Columbia River radiation survey, March--April 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConiga, M.W.; Rising, F.L.

    1959-09-15

    The purpose of the work documented herein was to correlate a new sensitive scintillator for the measurement of gamma dose rates from the reactor effluent isotopic spectrum in the Columbia River. Previous scintillation devices lacked the desired sensitivity for estimating these dose rates. A portable scintillation device was calibrated against ionization chambers over essentially full range of dose rates from the reactor effluent spectrum in the Columbia River. A river survey was then made, combining scintillator readings with pulse pencil and portable instrument readings from 1--1/2 miles above the reactors to about 57 miles downstream. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN SW

    2010-12-02

    Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground

  16. Hypothesis tests for the detection of constant speed radiation moving sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumazert, Jonathan; Coulon, Romain; Kondrasovs, Vladimir; Boudergui, Karim; Sannie, Guillaume; Gameiro, Jordan; Normand, Stephane [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Architectures Electroniques, 99 Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Mechin, Laurence [CNRS, UCBN, Groupe de Recherche en Informatique, Image, Automatique et Instrumentation de Caen, 4050 Caen, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors are deployed in linear network to detect radiological material in motion. As a complement to single and multichannel detection algorithms, inefficient under too low signal to noise ratios, temporal correlation algorithms have been introduced. Test hypothesis methods based on empirically estimated mean and variance of the signals delivered by the different channels have shown significant gain in terms of a tradeoff between detection sensitivity and false alarm probability. This paper discloses the concept of a new hypothesis test for temporal correlation detection methods, taking advantage of the Poisson nature of the registered counting signals, and establishes a benchmark between this test and its empirical counterpart. The simulation study validates that in the four relevant configurations of a pedestrian source carrier under respectively high and low count rate radioactive background, and a vehicle source carrier under the same respectively high and low count rate radioactive background, the newly introduced hypothesis test ensures a significantly improved compromise between sensitivity and false alarm, while guaranteeing the stability of its optimization parameter regardless of signal to noise ratio variations between 2 to 0.8. (authors)

  17. How do people respond to self-test results? A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Vries Nanne K

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-tests, tests on medical conditions that can be performed by consumers without consulting a doctor first, are frequently used. Nevertheless, there are concerns about the safety of self-testing, as it may delay diagnosis and appropriate treatment in the case of inappropriate use of the test, or false-negative results. It is unclear whether self-tests stimulate appropriate follow-up behaviour. Our aim was to examine the frequency of self-test use, consumers' response to self-test results in terms of their confidence in the result, reassurance by the test result, and follow-up behaviour. Methods A two step cross-sectional survey was designed. A random sample of 6700 Internet users in an existing Internet panel received an online questionnaire on the use of self-tests. Self-tests were defined as tests on body materials, initiated by consumers with the aim to diagnose a disease or risk factor. A second questionnaire on consumers' response to self-test results was sent to the respondents that were identified as a self-tester in the first questionnaire (n = 703. Results 18.1% (799/4416 of the respondents had ever performed a self-test, the most frequently used tests being those for diabetes (5.3%, kidney disease (4.9%, cholesterol (4.5%, urinary tract infection (1.9% and HIV/AIDS and Chlamydia (both 1.6%. A total of 78.1% of the testers with a normal test result and 81.4% of those with an abnormal result reported confidence in this result. Almost all (95.6% of the testers with a normal result felt reassured. After a normal result, 78.1% did not take any further action and 5.8% consulted a doctor. The corresponding figures after an abnormal test result were 9.3% and 72.2%, respectively. Conclusions Respondents who had performed a self-test seemed to base their follow-up behaviour on the result of the test. They had confidence in the test result, and were often reassured by a normal result. After an abnormal result, most self

  18. Radiation Hardness tests with neutron flux on different Silicon photomultiplier devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, P. W.; Cervi, T.; Menegolli, A.; Oddone, M.; Prata, M.; Prata, M. C.; Rossella, M.

    2017-07-01

    Radiation hardness is an important requirement for solid state readout devices operating in high radiation environments common in particle physics experiments. The MEG II experiment, at PSI, Switzerland, investigates the forbidden decay μ+ → e+ γ. Exploiting the most intense muon beam of the world. A significant flux of non-thermal neutrons (kinetic energy Ek>= 0.5 MeV) is present in the experimental hall produced along the beam-line and in the hall itself. We present the effects of neutron fluxes comparable to the MEG II expected doses on several Silicon Photomultiplier (SiPMs). The tested models are: AdvanSiD ASD-NUV3S-P50 (used in MEG II experiment), AdvanSiD ASD-NUV3S-P40, AdvanSiD ASD-RGB3S-P40, Hamamatsu and Excelitas C30742-33-050-X. The neutron source is the thermal Sub-critical Multiplication complex (SM1) moderated with water, located at the University of Pavia (Italy). We report the change of SiPMs most important electric parameters: dark current, dark pulse frequency, gain, direct bias resistance, as a function of the integrated neutron fluency.

  19. Beam test results of CMS RPCs at high eta region under high-radiation environment

    CERN Document Server

    Park, S; Bahk, S Y; Hong, B; Hong, S J; Kang, D H; Kang, T I; Kim, T J; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y U; Koo, D G; Lee, H W; Lee, K S; Lee, S J; Lim, J K; Moon, D H; Nam, S K; Oh, J K; Park, W J; Rhee, J T; Ryu, M S; Shim, H H; Sim, K S

    2004-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward resistivity plate chambers (RPCs) at the high eta region must be operated in presence of a radiation-induced rate as high as 1 kHz/cm**2. It is still unknown if the RPCs coated with linseed oil can be operated under such a high- radiation environment over the lifetime of CMS. Non-oiled RPCs may be one of the options since phenolic or melamine-coated bakelite is chemically stabler than linseed oil. We have constructed oiled and non-oiled RPCs at the high eta region of CMS using phenolic bakelite and tested them in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. While both RPCs show the same characteristics in the efficiency and the strip multiplicity, the non-oiled RPC generates an intrinsic noise rate of 50 Hz/cm**2, compared to only 5 Hz/cm**2 for the oiled RPC, both at 10.0kV which is about 100 V above the 95% knee of the efficiency curve.

  20. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: Evidence for radiative heating in Serpens MWC 297 and its influence on local star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rumble, D; Gutermuth, R A; Kirk, H; Buckle, J; Beaulieu, S F; Berry, D S; Broekhoven-Fiene, H; Currie, M J; Fich, M; Jenness, T; Johnstone, D; Mottram, J C; Nutter, D; Pattle, K; Pineda, J E; Quinn, C; Salji, C; Tisi, S; Walker-Smith, S; Di Francesco, J; Hogerheijde, M R; Ward-Thompson, D; Allen, L E; Cieza, L A; Dunham, M M; Harvey, P M; Stapelfeldt, K R; Bastien, P; Butner, H; Chen, M; Chrysostomou, A; Coude, S; Davis, C J; Drabek-Maunder, E; Duarte-Cabral, A; Fiege, J; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J; Gregson, J; Holland, W; Joncas, G; Kirk, J M; Knee, L B G; Mairs, S; Marsh, K; Matthews, B C; Moriarty-Schieven, G; Rawlings, J; Richer, J; Robertson, D; Rosolowsky, E; Sadavoy, S; Thomas, H; Tothill, N; Viti, S; White, G J; Wilson, C D; Wouterloot, J; Yates, J; Zhu, M

    2014-01-01

    We present SCUBA-2 450\\mu m and 850\\mu m observations of the Serpens MWC 297 region, part of the JCMT Gould Belt Survey of nearby star-forming regions. Simulations suggest that radiative feedback influences the star-formation process and we investigate observational evidence for this by constructing temperature maps. Maps are derived from the ratio of SCUBA-2 fluxes and a two component model of the JCMT beam for a fixed dust opacity spectral index of beta = 1.8. Within 40 of the B1.5Ve Herbig star MWC 297, the submillimetre fluxes are contaminated by free-free emission with a spectral index of 1.03\\pm0.02, consistent with an ultra-compact HII region and polar winds/jets. Contamination accounts for 73\\pm5 per cent and 82\\pm4 per cent of peak flux at 450\\mu m and 850\\mu m respectively. The residual thermal disk of the star is almost undetectable at these wavelengths. Young Stellar Objects are confirmed where SCUBA-2 850\\mu m clumps identified by the fellwalker algorithm coincide with Spitzer Gould Belt Survey d...

  1. Developing energy and momentum conceptual survey (EMCS) with four-tier diagnostic test items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afif, Nur Faadhilah; Nugraha, Muhammad Gina; Samsudin, Achmad

    2017-05-01

    Students' conceptions of work and energy are important to support the learning process in the classroom. For that reason, a diagnostic test instrument is needed to diagnose students' conception of work and energy. As a result, the researcher decided to develop Energy and Momentum Conceptual Survey (EMCS) instrument test into four-tier test diagnostic items. The purpose of this research is organized as the first step of four-tier test-formatted EMCS development as one of diagnostic test instruments on work and Energy. The research method used the 4D model (Defining, Designing, Developing and Disseminating). The instrument developed has been tested to 39 students in one of Senior High Schools. The resulting research showed that four-tier test-formatted EMCS is able to diagnose students' conception level of work and energy concept. It can be concluded that the development of four-tier test-formatted EMCS is one of potential diagnostic test instruments that able to obtain the category of students who understand concepts, misconceptions and do not understand about Work and Energy concept at all.

  2. Characterization and acceptance testing of fully depleted thick CCDs for the large synoptic survey telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Ivan V.; Haupt, Justine; O'Connor, Paul; Smith, Thomas; Takacs, Peter; Neal, Homer; Chiang, Jim

    2016-07-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) camera will be made as a mosaic assembled of 189 large format Charge Coupled Devices (CCD). They are n-channel, 100 micron thick devices operated in the over depleted regime. There are 16 segments, 1 million pixels each, that are read out through separate amplifiers. The image quality and readout speed expected from LSST camera translates into strict acceptance requirements for individual sensors. Prototype sensors and preproduction CCDs were delivered by vendors and they have been used for developing test procedures and protocols. Building upon this experience, two test stands were designed and commissioned at Brookhaven National Laboratory for production electro-optical testing. In this article, the sensor acceptance criteria are outlined and discussed, the test stand design and used equipment are presented and the results from commissioning sensor runs are shown.

  3. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  4. Radiation hardness tests of double-sided 3D strip sensors with passing-through columns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco, E-mail: gianfranco.dallabetta@unitn.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 9, I-38123 Trento (Italy); INFN TIFPA, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Betancourt, Christopher [Institute of Physics, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Boscardin, Maurizio; Giacomini, Gabriele [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Jakobs, Karl; Kühn, Susanne [Institute of Physics, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lecini, Besnik [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 9, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Mendicino, Roberto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 9, I-38123 Trento (Italy); INFN TIFPA, Via Sommarive 14, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Mori, Riccardo; Parzefall, Ulrich [Institute of Physics, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Povoli, Marco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università degli Studi di Trento, Via Sommarive 9, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Thomas, Maira [Institute of Physics, University of Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Zorzi, Nicola [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Centro per i Materiali e i Microsistemi (FBK-CMM), Via Sommarive 18, I-38123 Trento (Italy)

    2014-11-21

    This paper deals with a radiation hardness study performed on double-sided 3D strip sensors with passing-through columns. Selected results from the characterization of the irradiated sensors with a beta source and a laser setup are reported and compared to pre-irradiation results and to TCAD simulations. The sensor performance in terms of signal efficiency is found to be in good agreement with that of other 3D sensors irradiated at the same fluences and tested under similar experimental conditions. - Highlights: • We report results from 3D silicon strip detectors irradiated up to HL-LHC fluences. • I–V curves, noise, charge collection measurements and laser scans are shown. • In all sensors, signals are distinguished from the noise already at low voltage. • Signal efficiency is in agreement with values expected from the electrode geometry. • Efficiency and spatial uniformity would benefit from higher operation voltages.

  5. Ageing Tests of Radiation Damaged Lasers and Photodiodes for the CMS Tracker Optical Links

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    1999-01-01

    The effects of thermally accelerated ageing in irradiated and unirradiated 1310nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers and InGaAs p-i-n photodiodes are presented. 40 lasers ( 20 irradiated) and 30 photodiodes ( 19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80¡C. Periodic measurements were made of laser threshold and efficiency, and p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the CMS Tracker despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment.

  6. Ageing tests of radiation damaged lasers and photodiodes for the CMS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, K; Batten, J; Cervelli, G; Grabit, R; Jensen, F; Troska, Jan K; Vasey, F

    2000-01-01

    The effects of thermally accelerated ageing in irradiated and unirradiated 1310 nm InGaAsP edge-emitting lasers and InGaAs p-i-n photodiodes are presented. 40 lasers (20 irradiated) and 30 photodiodes (19 irradiated) were aged for 4000 hours at 80 degrees C. Periodic measurements were made of laser threshold and efficiency, and p-i-n leakage current and photocurrent. There were no sudden failures and there was very little wearout related degradation in either unirradiated or irradiated sample groups. The results suggest that the tested devices have a sufficiently long lifetime to operate for at least 10 years inside the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment despite being exposed to a harsh radiation environment. (19 refs).

  7. A radiation damage test for double-sided silicon strip detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Iwata, Y; Ikeda, M; Kitabayashi, H; Ohmoto, T; Kondo, T; Unno, Y; Terada, S; Kohriki, T; Takashima, R

    2002-01-01

    In order to investigate the p-side strip isolation, position sensitivity and charge collection of type-inverted double-sided silicon microstrip detectors, signal amplitude and charge sharing of adjacent strips were measured by using a laser test stand, following the irradiation with a flux of 3.8x10 sup 1 sup 3 /cm sup 2 of 12 GeV protons. The irradiated detectors indicated high bulk resistivity, which results in maintaining a position sensitivity of the ohmic contact side even below the full depletion voltage. This fact suggests a possibility of operation of a double-sided detector whose full depletion voltage becomes higher than its breakdown limit because of a radiation damage.

  8. Positive attitudes to pediatric HIV testing: findings from a nationally representative survey from Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Buzdugan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early HIV testing and diagnosis are paramount for increasing treatment initiation among children, necessary for their survival and improved health. However, uptake of pediatric HIV testing is low in high-prevalence areas. We present data on attitudes towards pediatric testing from a nationally representative survey in Zimbabwe. METHODS: All 18-24 year olds and a proportion of 25-49 year olds living in randomly selected enumeration areas from all ten Zimbabwe provinces were invited to self-complete an anonymous questionnaire on a personal digital assistant, and 16,719 people agreed to participate (75% of eligibles. RESULTS: Most people think children can benefit from HIV testing (91%, 81% of people who looked after children know how to access testing for their children and 92% would feel happier if their children were tested. Notably, 42% fear that, if tested, children may be discriminated against by some community members and 28% fear their children are HIV positive. People who fear discrimination against children who have tested for HIV are more likely than their counterparts to perceive their community as stigmatizing against HIV positive people (43% vs. 29%. They are also less likely to report positive attitudes to HIV themselves (49% vs. 74%. Only 28% think it is possible for children HIV-infected at birth to live into adolescence without treatment. Approximately 70% of people (irrespective of whether they are themselves parents think HIV-infected children in their communities can access testing and treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric HIV testing is the essential gateway to prevention and care services. Our data indicate positive attitudes to testing children, suggesting a conducive environment for increasing uptake of pediatric testing in Zimbabwe. However, there is a need to better understand the barriers to pediatric testing, such as stigma and discrimination, and address the gaps in knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS in children.

  9. Accelerated radiation damage test facility using a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wady, P.T., E-mail: paul.wady@manchester.ac.uk [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Draude, A.; Shubeita, S.M.; Smith, A.D.; Mason, N. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); Pimblott, S.M. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jimenez-Melero, E. [Dalton Cumbrian Facility, University of Manchester, Westlakes Science & Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria CA24 3HA (United Kingdom); School of Materials, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a new irradiation facility that allows to perform accelerated damage tests of nuclear reactor materials at temperatures up to 400 °C using the intense proton (<100 μA) and heavy ion (≈10 μA) beams produced by a 5 MV tandem ion accelerator. The dedicated beam line for radiation damage studies comprises: (1) beam diagnosis and focusing optical components, (2) a scanning and slit system that allows uniform irradiation of a sample area of 0.5–6 cm{sup 2}, and (3) a sample stage designed to be able to monitor in-situ the sample temperature, current deposited on the sample, and the gamma spectrum of potential radio-active nuclides produced during the sample irradiation. The beam line capabilities have been tested by irradiating a 20Cr–25Ni–Nb stabilised stainless steel with a 3 MeV proton beam to a dose level of 3 dpa. The irradiation temperature was 356 °C, with a maximum range in temperature values of ±6 °C within the first 24 h of continuous irradiation. The sample stage is connected to ground through an electrometer to measure accurately the charge deposited on the sample. The charge can be integrated in hardware during irradiation, and this methodology removes uncertainties due to fluctuations in beam current. The measured gamma spectrum allowed the identification of the main radioactive nuclides produced during the proton bombardment from the lifetimes and gamma emissions. This dedicated radiation damage beam line is hosted by the Dalton Cumbrian Facility of the University of Manchester.

  10. Results of radiation test of the cathode front-end board for CMS endcap muon chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedon, R.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Gu, J.; Hauser, J.; Holbrook, B.; Kim, C. L.; Ling, T. Y.; von der Mey, M.; Murray, P.; Rush, C. J.; Santiard, J. C.; Tripathi, M.

    2001-10-01

    After a brief overview of the CMS EMU electronics system, results on radiation induced single event effects, total ionization dose and displacement effects will be reported. These results are obtained by irradiating the components on electronics boards with 63 MeV protons and 1 MeV neutrons. During the proton irradiation, the electronics board was fully under power, all components on the board were active and the data were read out in the same way as designed for CMS. No deterioration of analog performance for each of the three CMOS ASICs on the tested board was observed, up to a dose of 10 krad. Each of the tested FPGAs survived beyond the dose of 30 krad. No single event latch-up was detected for the CMOS ASICs up to a proton fluence of 2×10 12 cm-2. Single Event Upsets (SEU) in FPGAs were detected and their cross-sections measured. SEU mitigation with triple module redundancy and voting was implemented and tested.

  11. Results of radiation test of the cathode front-end board for CMS endcap muon chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Breedon, R; Durkin, L S; Gilmore, J; Gu, J; Hauser, J; Holbrook, B; Kim, C L; Ling, T; Mey, M; Murray, P; Rush, C J; Santiard, Jean-Claude; Tripathi, M

    2001-01-01

    After a brief overview of the CMS EMU electronics system, results on radiation induced single event effects, total ionization dose and displacement effects will be reported. These results are obtained by irradiating the components on electronics boards with 63 MeV protons and 1 MeV neutrons. During the proton irradiation, the electronics board was fully under power, all components on the board were active and the data were read out in the same way as designed for CMS. No deterioration of analog performance for each of the three CMOS ASICs on the tested board was observed, up to a dose of 10 krad. Each of the tested FPGAs survived beyond the dose of 30 krad. No single event latch-up was detected for the CMOS ASICs up to a proton fluence of 2x10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2. Single Event Upsets (SEU) in FPGAs were detected and their cross-sections measured. SEU mitigation with triple module redundancy and voting was implemented and tested.

  12. Human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing. An international literary survey; Inhimillisten ja organisatoristen tekijoeiden yhteys NDT- tarkastusten luotettavuuteen. Katsaus kansainvaeliseen kirjallisuuteen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, J.; Norros, L.

    1996-04-01

    The aim of the study is to chart human and organisational factors influencing the reliability of non-destructive testing (NDT). The emphasis will be in ultrasonic testing (UT) and in the planning and execution of in-service inspections during nuclear power plant maintenance outages. Being a literary survey this study is mainly based on the foreign and domestic research available on the topic. In consequence, the results presented in this report reflect the ideas of international research community. In addition to this, Finnish nuclear power plant operators (Imatran Voima Oy and Teollisuuden Voima Oy), independent inspection organisations and the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety have provided us with valuable information on NDT theory and practice. Especially, a kind of `big picture` of non-destructive testing has been pursued in the study. (6 figs., 2 tabs.).

  13. Radiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) Test Case Implementation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaver, Mark W.

    2010-09-27

    Final report for the project. This project was designed to demonstrate the use of the Radiation Detection Scenario Analysis Toolbox (RADSAT) radiation detection transport modeling package (developed in a previous NA-22 project) for specific radiation detection scenarios important to proliferation detection.

  14. A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert G. Ellingson

    2004-09-28

    One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

  15. Optimal Moments for the Analysis of Peculiar Velocity Surveys II: Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, H A; Melott, A L; Chambers, S W; Feldman, Hume A.; Watkins, Richard; Melott, Adrian L.; Chambers, Scott W.

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of peculiar velocity surveys face several challenges, including low signal--to--noise in individual velocity measurements and the presence of small--scale, nonlinear flows. This is the second in a series of papers in which we describe a new method of overcoming these problems by using data compression as a filter with which to separate large--scale, linear flows from small--scale noise that can bias results. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our method using realistic catalogs of galaxy velocities drawn from N--body simulations. Our tests show that a likelihood analysis of simulated catalogs that uses all of the information contained in the peculiar velocities results in a bias in the estimation of the power spectrum shape parameter $\\Gamma$ and amplitude $\\beta$, and that our method of analysis effectively removes this bias. We expect that this new method will cause peculiar velocity surveys to re--emerge as a useful tool to determine cosmological parameters.

  16. Expanding HIV testing efforts in concentrated epidemic settings: a population-based survey from rural Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Pharris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To improve HIV prevention and care programs, it is important to understand the uptake of HIV testing and to identify population segments in need of increased HIV testing. This is particularly crucial in countries with concentrated HIV epidemics, where HIV prevalence continues to rise in the general population. This study analyzes determinants of HIV testing in a rural Vietnamese population in order to identify potential access barriers and areas for promoting HIV testing services. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional survey of 1874 randomly sampled adults was linked to pregnancy, migration and economic cohort data from a demographic surveillance site (DSS. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to determine which factors were associated with having tested for HIV. RESULTS: The age-adjusted prevalence of ever-testing for HIV was 7.6%; however 79% of those who reported feeling at-risk of contracting HIV had never tested. In multivariate analysis, younger age (aOR 1.85, 95% CI 1.14-3.01, higher economic status (aOR 3.4, 95% CI 2.21-5.22, and semi-urban residence (aOR 2.37, 95% CI 1.53-3.66 were associated with having been tested for HIV. HIV testing rates did not differ between women of reproductive age who had recently been pregnant and those who had not. CONCLUSIONS: We found low testing uptake (6% among pregnant women despite an existing prevention of mother-to-child HIV testing policy, and lower-than-expected testing among persons who felt that they were at-risk of HIV. Poverty and residence in a more geographically remote location were associated with less HIV testing. In addition to current HIV testing strategies focusing on high-risk groups, we recommend targeting HIV testing in concentrated HIV epidemic settings to focus on a scaled-up provision of antenatal testing. Additional recommendations include removing financial and geographic access barriers to client-initiated testing, and encouraging provider

  17. Patterns of Cancer Genetic Testing: A Randomized Survey of Oregon Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summer L. Cox

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Appropriate use of genetic tests for population-based cancer screening, diagnosis of inherited cancers, and guidance of cancer treatment can improve health outcomes. We investigated clinicians’ use and knowledge of eight breast, ovarian, and colorectal cancer genetic tests. Methods. We conducted a randomized survey of 2,191 Oregon providers, asking about their experience with fecal DNA, OncoVue, BRCA, MMR, CYP2D6, tumor gene expression profiling, UGT1A1, and KRAS. Results. Clinicians reported low confidence in their knowledge of medical genetics; most confident were OB-GYNs and specialists. Clinicians were more likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA and MMR than the other tests, and OB-GYNs were twice as likely to have ordered/recommended BRCA testing than primary care providers. Less than 10% of providers ordered/recommended OncoVue, fecal DNA, CYP2D6, or UGT1A1; less than 30% ordered/recommended tumor gene expression profiles or KRAS. The most common reason for not ordering/recommending these tests was lack of familiarity. Conclusions. Use of appropriate, evidence-based testing can help reduce incidence and mortality of certain cancers, but these tests need to be better integrated into clinical practice. Continued evaluation of emerging technologies, dissemination of findings, and an increase in provider confidence and knowledge are necessary to achieve this end.

  18. Integration and verification testing of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Travis; Bond, Tim; Chiang, James; Gilmore, Kirk; Digel, Seth; Dubois, Richard; Glanzman, Tom; Johnson, Tony; Lopez, Margaux; Newbry, Scott P.; Nordby, Martin E.; Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Reil, Kevin A.; Roodman, Aaron J.

    2016-08-01

    We present an overview of the Integration and Verification Testing activities of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) Camera at the SLAC National Accelerator Lab (SLAC). The LSST Camera, the sole instrument for LSST and under construction now, is comprised of a 3.2 Giga-pixel imager and a three element corrector with a 3.5 degree diameter field of view. LSST Camera Integration and Test will be taking place over the next four years, with final delivery to the LSST observatory anticipated in early 2020. We outline the planning for Integration and Test, describe some of the key verification hardware systems being developed, and identify some of the more complicated assembly/integration activities. Specific details of integration and verification hardware systems will be discussed, highlighting some of the technical challenges anticipated.

  19. Men's responses to HPV test results: development of a theory-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Ellen M; Buhi, Eric R; Baldwin, Julie; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Vadaparampil, Susan; Abrahamsen, Martha; Vamos, Cheryl A; Kolar, Stephanie; Chandler, Rasheeta; Anstey, Erica Hesch; Giuliano, Anna

    2009-01-01

    To develop and perform psychometric testing on an instrument designed to assess cognitive/emotional responses among men receiving HPV testing. Men enrolled in an HPV natural history study (N = 139) completed a computer-assisted survey instrument based on Leventhal's parallel processing/common-sense model. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Mplus. Reliability analyses resulted in Cronbach alpha of 0.72 (knowledge), 0.86 (perceived threat), 0.83 (self-efficacy), and 0.55 (response efficacy). A revised measurement model exhibited evidence of construct validity, as indicated by acceptable model fit statistics. To our knowledge, this is the only validated instrument assessing men's reactions to an HPV test result.

  20. Development of a methodology for selecting office building upgrading solutions based on a test survey in European buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittchen, K.B.; Brandt, E. [Danish Building and Urban Research, Horsholm (Denmark)

    2001-07-01

    The potential for using the TOBUS methodology to select office building upgrading solutions have been investigated during field tests in 15 European office buildings in 5 European countries. The 15 office buildings represent a variety of building traditions, architectural designs, construction periods and energy and indoor performance. The buildings were audited following the TOBUS methodology developed within the project. The results of the test surveys were primarily used to improve the TOBUS methodology and secondly to suggest general upgrading solutions and energy retrofit measures for the surveyed buildings. This paper describes the development of the TOBUS methodology based on the 15 test surveys. (author)

  1. Management of small-cell lung cancer with radiotherapy—a pan-Canadian survey of radiation oncologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, J.; Wright, J.R.; Gabos, Z.; Swaminath, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of small-cell lung cancer (sclc) with radiotherapy (rt) varies, with many treatment regimens having been described in the literature. We created a survey to assess patterns of practice and clinical decision-making in the management of sclc by Canadian radiation oncologists (ros). Methods A 35-item survey was sent by e-mail to Canadian ros. The questions investigated the role of rt, the dose and timing of rt, target delineation, and use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (pci) in limited-stage (ls) and extensive-stage (es) sclc. Results Responses were received from 52 eligible ros. For ls-sclc, staging (98%) and simulation or dosimetric (96%) computed tomography imaging were key determinants of rt suitability. The most common dose and fractionation schedule was 40–45 Gy in 15 once-daily fractions (40%), with elective nodal irradiation performed by 31% of ros. Preferred management of clinical T1/2aN0 sclc favoured primary chemoradiotherapy (64%). For es-sclc, consolidative thoracic rt was frequently offered (88%), with a preferred dose and fractionation schedule of 30 Gy in 10 once-daily fractions (70%). Extrathoracic consolidative rt would not be offered by 23 ros (44%). Prophylactic cranial irradiation was generally offered in ls-sclc (100%) and es-sclc (98%) after response to initial treatment. Performance status, baseline cognition, and pre-pci brain imaging were important patient factors assessed before an offer of pci. Conclusions Canadian ros show practice variation in sclc management. Future clinical trials and national treatment guidelines might reduce variability in the treatment of early-stage disease, optimization of dose and targeting in ls-sclc, and definition of suitability for pci or consolidative rt. PMID:27330347

  2. Factors affecting voluntary HIV counselling and testing among men in Ethiopia: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leta Tesfaye H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT is one of the key strategies in the HIV/AIDS prevention and control programmes in Ethiopia. However, utilization of this service among adults is very low. The aim of the present study was to investigate factors associated with VCT utilization among adult men since men are less likely than women to be offered and accept routine HIV testing. Methods The study utilized data from the Ethiopian Demographic Health Survey (EDHS 2005, which is a cross-sectional survey conducted on a nationally representative sample. Using cluster sampling, 6,778 men aged 15–59 years were selected from all the eleven administrative regions in Ethiopia. Logistic regression was used to analyze potential factors associated with VCT utilization. Results Overall, 21.9% of urban men and 2.6% of rural men had ever tested for HIV through VCT and most of them had learned their HIV test result. Having no stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS was found to be strongly and positively associated with VCT utilization in both urban and rural strata. In rural areas HIV test rates were higher among younger men (aged ≤44 years and those of higher socio-economic position (SEP. Among urban men, risky sexual behaviour was positively associated with VCT utilization whereas being Muslim was found to be inversely associated with utilization of VCT. Area of residence as well as SEP strongly affected men’s level of stigmatizing attitudes toward people living with HIV/AIDS. Conclusions VCT utilization among men in Ethiopia was low and affected by HIV/AIDS-related stigma and residence. In order to increase VCT acceptability, HIV/AIDS prevention and control programs in the country should focus on reducing HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Targeting rural men with low SEP should be given first priority when designing, expanding, and implementing VCT services in the country.

  3. The 11th quality control survey for radioisotopes in vitro tests in Japan, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-01

    This report presents the results of the 11th quality control nationwide survey. Of 730 facilities performing radioisotopes in vitro tests in November 1989, 422 facilities (60.5%) participated in the present survey. The following 23 items were examined: adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), albumin, carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA 125), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), calcitonin, cortisol, estradiol, ferritin, free thyroxine (FT{sub 4}), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), gastrine, cholylglycine, glucagon, insulin, anti-DNA antibody, luteinizing hormone (LH), neuron specific enolase (NSE), parathyroid hormone (PTH), squamous cell carcinoma associated antigen (SCC), thyroxine (T{sub 4}), thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), and antithyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody. 'Within kit variation' between facilities showed large coefficient of variation for ACTH, CA125, CEA, estradiol, ferritin, FSH, glucagon, anti-DNA antibody, LH, PTH, and TSH receptor antibody. Both 'within kit variation' and 'between kit variation' showed small coefficient of variation for cortisol, free T{sub 4}, NSE, SCC, T{sub 4}, and TBG. The present survey was characterized by using immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) and non-isotope techniques, as well as radioimmunoassay. Kits for IRMA greatly varied from facility to facility. (N.K.).

  4. Development and psychometric evaluation of an information literacy self-efficacy survey and an information literacy knowledge test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Rodger; Tepe, Chabha

    2015-03-01

    To develop and psychometrically evaluate an information literacy (IL) self-efficacy survey and an IL knowledge test. In this test-retest reliability study, a 25-item IL self-efficacy survey and a 50-item IL knowledge test were developed and administered to a convenience sample of 53 chiropractic students. Item analyses were performed on all questions. The IL self-efficacy survey demonstrated good reliability (test-retest correlation = 0.81) and good/very good internal consistency (mean κ = .56 and Cronbach's α = .92). A total of 25 questions with the best item analysis characteristics were chosen from the 50-item IL knowledge test, resulting in a 25-item IL knowledge test that demonstrated good reliability (test-retest correlation = 0.87), very good internal consistency (mean κ = .69, KR20 = 0.85), and good item discrimination (mean point-biserial = 0.48). This study resulted in the development of three instruments: a 25-item IL self-efficacy survey, a 50-item IL knowledge test, and a 25-item IL knowledge test. The information literacy self-efficacy survey and the 25-item version of the information literacy knowledge test have shown preliminary evidence of adequate reliability and validity to justify continuing study with these instruments.

  5. An in situ survey of Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, Tonopah Test Range, Central Nevada. Date of survey: September--November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    A ground-based in situ radiological survey was conducted downwind of the Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3 nuclear safety test sites at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada from September through November 1993. The purpose of the study was to corroborate the americium-241 ({sup 241}Am) soil concentrations that were derived from the aerial radiological survey of the Clean Slate areas, which was conducted from August through October 1993. The presence of {sup 241}Am was detected at 140 of the 190 locations, with unrecoverable or lost data accounting for fifteen (15) of the sampling points. Good agreement was obtained between the aerial and in situ results.

  6. A survey of the optical hazards associated with hospital light sources with reference to the Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, A; Fedele, F; Freeman, P [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Khazova, M [Health Protection Agency, Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 ORQ (United Kingdom); Sarkany, R, E-mail: andrew.coleman@gstt.nhs.u [St John' s Institute of Dermatology, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2010-09-15

    Workplace exposure to coherent and incoherent optical radiation from artificial sources is regulated under the Artificial Optical Radiation Directive (AORD) 2006/25/EC, now implemented in the UK under the Control of Artificial Optical Radiation at Work Regulations (AOR) 2010. These regulations set out exposure limit values. Implementing the AOR (2010 Health and Safety Statutory Instrument No 1140 www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2010/1140/pdf/uksi{sub 2}0101140{sub e}n.pdf) requirements in a hospital environment is a potentially complex problem because of the wide variety of sources used for illumination, diagnosis and therapy. A survey of sources of incoherent optical radiation in a large hospital is reported here. The survey covers examples of office lighting, operating theatre lighting, examination lamps, and sources for ultraviolet phototherapy and visible phototherapies, including photodynamic therapy and neonatal blue-light therapy. The results of the survey are used to inform consideration of the strategy that a hospital might reasonably adopt both to demonstrate compliance with the AOR (2010) and to direct implementation effort.

  7. A user interface for the Kansas Geological Survey slug test model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esling, Steven P; Keller, John E

    2009-01-01

    The Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) developed a semianalytical solution for slug tests that incorporates the effects of partial penetration, anisotropy, and the presence of variable conductivity well skins. The solution can simulate either confined or unconfined conditions. The original model, written in FORTRAN, has a text-based interface with rigid input requirements and limited output options. We re-created the main routine for the KGS model as a Visual Basic macro that runs in most versions of Microsoft Excel and built a simple-to-use Excel spreadsheet interface that automatically displays the graphical results of the test. A comparison of the output from the original FORTRAN code to that of the new Excel spreadsheet version for three cases produced identical results.

  8. The administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip test: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Orit; Goodall, Sara K

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if the administration and interpretation of the rapid exchange grip (REG) test vary among hand therapists nationally. The REG is used to determine sincerity of effort of grip strength. There are inconsistencies in the literature regarding the administration and interpretation of the REG, as various studies use different testing protocols and diverse interpretation criteria for what constitutes a sincere effort. As a result, we expected to find a lack of standardization in the administration and interpretation of the REG in clinical practice. We conducted a random nationwide survey of 200 hand therapists. The questionnaire items regarding the administration of the REG included patient position, test instructions, handle settings, handling of the dynamometer, hand switch rate, number of repetitions, and techniques used to record the score. The items for the interpretation of the REG involved questions regarding comparative tests. We found that the REG test lacks standardized administration protocols and interpretation criteria among therapists nationwide. The lack of standardization is likely to affect the reliability and validity of the REG and to hinder the therapist's ability to accurately report its outcomes. The implications of lack of standardization in assessment techniques to the profession are discussed.

  9. External radiation surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report describes how external radiation was measured, how surveys were performed, and the results of these measurements and surveys. External radiation exposure rates were measured at locations on and off the Hanford Site using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). External radiation and contamination surveys were also performed with portable radiation survey instruments at locations on and around the Hanford Site.

  10. Proton and neutron test facilities at 1 GeV synchrocyclotron of PNPI for radiation resistance testing of avionic and space electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov Evgeniy M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A description of the proton (IS SC-1000, IS OP-1000 and neutron (IS NP/GNEIS test facilities at the 1 GeV synchrocyclotron SC-1000 of the PNPI used for radiation resistance testing of electronic components and systems intended for avionic and space research is presented. A unique conjunction of proton beams with variable energy 100–1000 MeV and atmospheric like neutron beam with broad energy range (1–1000 MeV spectrum enables to perform complex testing of the semiconductor electronic devices within a single testing cycle.

  11. Cuff leak test and laryngeal survey for predicting post-extubation stridor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anit B Patel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Evidence for the predictive value of the cuff leak test (CLT for post-extubation stridor (PES is conflicting. We evaluated the association and accuracy of CLT alone or combined with other laryngeal parameters with PES. Methods: Fifty-one mechanically ventilated adult patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit were tested prior to extubation using; CLT, laryngeal ultrasound and indirect laryngoscopy. Biometric, laryngeal and endotracheal tube (ETT parameters were recorded. Results: PES incidence was 4%. CLT demonstrated ′no leak′ in 20% of patients. Laryngeal oedema was present in 10% of the patients on indirect laryngoscopy, and 71% of the patients had a Grades 1-3 indirect laryngoscopic view. Mean air column width on laryngeal ultrasound was 0.66 ± 0.15 cm (cuff deflated, mean ratio of ETT to laryngeal diameter was 0.48 ± 0.07, and the calculated CLT and laryngeal survey composite was 0.86 ± 1.25 (range 0-5. CLT and the CLT and Laryngeal survey composite measure were not associated with or predict PES. Age, sex, peri-extubation steroid use, intubation duration and body mass index were not associated with PES. Conclusion: Even including ultrasonographic and indirect laryngoscopic examination of the airway, no single aspect of the CLT or combination with laryngeal parameters accurately predicts PES.

  12. Developing and testing a new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership: the clinical leadership survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Allison; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Wong, Carol; Finegan, Joan

    2011-05-01

    To test the psychometric properties of a newly developed measure of staff nurse clinical leadership derived from Kouzes and Posner's model of transformational leadership. While nurses have been recognized for their essential role in keeping patients safe, there has been little empirical research that has examined clinical leadership at the staff nurse level.   A non-experimental survey design was used to test the psychometric properties of the clinical leadership survey (CLS). Four hundred and eighty registered nurses (RNs) providing direct patient care in Ontario acute care hospitals returned useable questionnaires.   Confirmatory factor analysis provided preliminary evidence for the construct validity for the new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership. Structural empowerment fully mediated the relationship between nursing leadership and staff nurse clinical leadership. The results provide encouraging evidence for the construct validity of the CLS. Nursing administrators must create empowering work environments to ensure staff nurses have access to work structures which enable them to enact clinical leadership behaviours while providing direct patient care. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Summary. The 19th quality control survey for radioisotope in vitro tests in Japan, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shishiba, Yoshimasa; Shimizu, Taeko [Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ichihara, Kiyoshi; Kousaka, Tadako; Kobayashi, Hisae; Tsushima, Toshio; Hoshino, Minoru; Mori, Mikio

    1998-11-01

    This summary concerns results of the survey in the title performed by the Subcommittee for Radioisotope in vitro Test in the Medical and Pharmaceutical Committee, Japan Radioisotope Association. The survey was conducted in 161 facilities in Japan including public and private hospitals, health institutes and reagent manufacturers. Samples were sent to the facilities and subjected to examinations of intra- and inter-day reproducibility, freeze-thawing effects and periodical changes of the measured values. Methods employed were RIA, IRMA, EIA, ELISA, LPIA, PAMIA, FIA, FPIA, NIA, LAT, CLIA and ECLIA. Results were analyzed by variation coefficients in the kit and between the kits. Samples were for: growth hormone, somatomedin C, follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone, prolactin, thyroid stimulating hormone, triiodothyronine, thyroxine, thyroxine binding globulin, calcitonin, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, gastrin, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, {beta}human chorionic gonadotropin, 17{alpha}-hydroxyprogesterone, aldosterone, cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, renin, immunogloblin E, digoxin, {alpha}-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen, tissue polypeptide antigen, CA125, CA19-9, CA15-3, prostatic acid phosphatase, prostate specific antigen, {beta}{sub 2}-microgloblin and ferritin. Results were found rather unsatistactory for some products in the clinical practice, necessary for improvement of detection for some tests and needed for some kits for solving the problems of difference between kits and of matrix effect. (K.H)

  14. Decliners of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling: Characteristics of participants who refused HIV testing in a population survey in Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pascalina; Chanda-Kapata; William; Ngosa; Albertina; Ngomah; Moraes; Nicole; Maddox; Nathan; Kapata

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of HIV infection, to highlight HIV-testing refusal rates among participants in a population-based tuberculosis survey and to assess the implication for programme implementation.Methods: This cross-sectional study on the characteristics of participants who refused HIV testing was conducted in a national survey in Zambia. All eligible participants were aged above 15 years and included in the analysis.Results: Out of the 44 791 tuberculosis survey participants, 14 164(31.6%) refused to participate in HIV testing. The unemployed, rural dwellers, married, and those aged 15-24 years were associated with higher refusal rates.Conclusions: Strategies to improve HIV testing acceptance are necessary. Qualitative research is recommended to understand the reasons for testing refusals so that remedial interventions can be implemented.

  15. CERN Radiation Protection (RP) calibration facilities

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082069; Macián-Juan, Rafael

    Radiation protection calibration facilities are essential to ensure the correct operation of radiation protection instrumentation. Calibrations are performed in specific radiation fields according to the type of instrument to be calibrated: neutrons, photons, X-rays, beta and alpha particles. Some of the instruments are also tested in mixed radiation fields as often encountered close to high-energy particle accelerators. Moreover, calibration facilities are of great importance to evaluate the performance of prototype detectors; testing and measuring the response of a prototype detector to well-known and -characterized radiation fields contributes to improving and optimizing its design and capabilities. The CERN Radiation Protection group is in charge of performing the regular calibrations of all CERN radiation protection devices; these include operational and passive dosimeters, neutron and photon survey-meters, and fixed radiation detectors to monitor the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), inside CERN accelera...

  16. 40 CFR Table E-2 to Subpart E of... - Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Permitted Tolerance for Conducting Radiative Tests E Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods and Class I and Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 or PM10â2.5 Pt. 53, Subpt. E, Table E-2 Table E-2 to Subpart E of Part 53—Spectral Energy Distribution and Permitted Tolerance...

  17. Measurements and radiation tests on scintillating fibres for the LHCb SciFi project

    CERN Document Server

    Joram, Christian; Shatalov, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    This note describes a number of measurements and a radiation test performed on the baseline fibre of the LHCb SciFi upgrade project. These include measurements of the optical attenuation length - globally and wavelength resolved -, measurements of the photoelectric yield, and finally the assessment of the impact of proton irradiation on these quantities. The fibres were irradiated at the CERN PS with 24 GeV/c protons up to a fluence of 7•10$^{13}$ p/cm$^2$ equivalent to an ionizing dose of about 22 kGy. Measurements on the fibres, in particular in view of possible recovery effects, are still ongoing and the report is expected to be updated in the coming months. This report is meant as backup document for the LHCb internal SciFi review in February 2013. It had to be produced in a short available time. Missing information will be added and style as well as formatting will be improved in the forthcoming version.

  18. Beam test of novel n-in-p strip sensors for high radiation environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, T., E-mail: kubota@hep.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kishida, T.; Jinnouchi, O. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Ikegami, Y.; Unno, Y.; Terada, S.; Mitsui, S. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tamii, A.; Aoi, T. [Research Center of Nuclear Physics (RCNP), 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hanagaki, K. [Department of Physics, Osaka University, Machikaneyama-cho, Toyonaka-shi, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Hara, K. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kimura, N. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University (Japan); Takashima, R. [Department of Education, Kyoto University of Education, 1 Fukakusa-Fujimori-cho, Fushimi-ku, Kyoto 612-8522 (Japan); Takubo, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Study, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tojo, J. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Nagai, K. [Institute of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Nakano, I. [Department of Physics, Okayama University, 3-1-1 Tshushima-naka, Kita-ku, Okayama-shi, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yorita, K. [Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University (Japan)

    2013-12-11

    Highly radiation tolerant n-in-p strip sensors have been developed for the high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). This paper reports the results of measurements with 392 MeV kinetic energy proton beam at RCNP in December 2011. The data was taken with a new DAQ system consisting of an universal read-out board ‘SEABAS’ and beam tracking telescopes whose spacial resolution is better than 5μm. The aim of this beam test is to evaluate the new 1 cm×1 cm n-in-p miniature sensors before and after 10{sup 15} n{sub eq} cm{sup −2} irradiation. The median charge of un-irradiated sensor is 6.2 fC at full depletion voltage, while the median charge after 10{sup 15} n{sub eq} cm{sup −2} irradiation of the sensor is 4.2 fC. The novel Punch-Through-Protection (PTP) has been implemented in these sensors. The length of active region of the sensor around PTP is observed to be decreased by 12μm in the irradiated sensors at 10{sup 15} n{sub eq} cm{sup −2}.

  19. Micronucleus test for radiation biodosimetry in mass casualty events: Evaluation of visual and automated scoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolognesi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.bolognesi@istge.i [Environmental Carcinogenesis Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Balia, Cristina; Roggieri, Paola [Environmental Carcinogenesis Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Cardinale, Francesco [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Bruzzi, Paolo [Clinical Epidemiology Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Sorcinelli, Francesca [Environmental Carcinogenesis Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Laboratory of Genetics, Histology and Molecular Biology Section, Army Medical and Veterinary, Research Center, Via Santo Stefano Rotondo 4, 00184 Roma (Italy); Lista, Florigio [Laboratory of Genetics, Histology and Molecular Biology Section, Army Medical and Veterinary, Research Center, Via Santo Stefano Rotondo 4, 00184 Roma (Italy); D' Amelio, Raffaele [Sapienza, Universita di Roma II Facolta di Medicina e Chirurgia and Ministero della Difesa, Direzione Generale Sanita Militare (Italy); Righi, Enzo [Frascati National Laboratories, National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Via Enrico Fermi 40, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    2011-02-15

    In the case of a large-scale nuclear or radiological incidents a reliable estimate of dose is an essential tool for providing timely assessment of radiation exposure and for making life-saving medical decisions. Cytogenetics is considered as the 'gold standard' for biodosimetry. The dicentric analysis (DA) represents the most specific cytogenetic bioassay. The micronucleus test (MN) applied in interphase in peripheral lymphocytes is an alternative and simpler approach. A dose-effect calibration curve for the MN frequency in peripheral lymphocytes from 27 adult donors was established after in vitro irradiation at a dose range 0.15-8 Gy of {sup 137}Cs gamma rays (dose rate 6 Gy min{sup -1}). Dose prediction by visual scoring in a dose-blinded study (0.15-4.0 Gy) revealed a high level of accuracy (R = 0.89). The scoring of MN is time consuming and requires adequate skills and expertise. Automated image analysis is a feasible approach allowing to reduce the time and to increase the accuracy of the dose estimation decreasing the variability due to subjective evaluation. A good correlation (R = 0.705) between visual and automated scoring with visual correction was observed over the dose range 0-2 Gy. Almost perfect discrimination power for exposure to 1-2 Gy, and a satisfactory power for 0.6 Gy were detected. This threshold level can be considered sufficient for identification of sub lethally exposed individuals by automated CBMN assay.

  20. Assessment of Radiated Fan Noise Prediction Capabilities Using Static Engine Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nark, Douglas M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes further assessment of the CDUCT-LaRC code via comparison with static engine test data. In an effort to improve confidence in the use of CDUCT-LaRC for liner optimization studies addressing realistic three-dimensional geometries, inlet radiated fan noise predictions were performed at 54% and 87% engine speed settings. Predictions were then compared with far-field measurements to assess the approach and implementation. The particular configurations were chosen to exercise the three-dimensional capability of CDUCT-LaRC and it s applicability to realistic configurations and conditions. At the 54% engine speed setting, the predictions capture the general directivity and acoustic treatment effects quite well. Comparisons of the predicted and measured directivity at the 87% power setting were more problematic. This was likely due in part to the difficulties in source specification and possibly the nonlinear nature of buzz-saw tones at this engine operating condition. Overall, the approach captured the basic trends and provided a conservative estimate of liner effects from which relative performance metrics could be inferred.

  1. Structural and ultrastructural study of rat testes influenced by electromagnetic radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almášiová, Viera; Holovská, Katarína; Cigánková, Viera; Račeková, Enikö; Fabianová, Kamila; Martončíková, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the influence of whole-body electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on testicular parenchyma of Wistar rats. Sexually mature rats were subjected to pulsed electromagnetic field at frequency of 2.45 GHz and mean power density 2.8 mW/cm(2) by 3-h daily applications for 3 wk. Tissue samples were obtained 3 h after the last irradiation and processed by histological techniques for light and transmission electron microscopy. Testes showed apparent degenerative changes of seminiferous epithelium. The seminiferous tubules were mostly irregular in shape, and seminiferous epithelium contained a number of empty spaces of different size. Subsequently, groups of sloughed epithelial cells were often found inside the lumina of tubules. Except for relatively unchanged Sertoli cells, some locations of basal compartment of seminiferous epithelium contained shriveled Sertoli cells with dark cytoplasm. These areas showed degenerative features including necrotizing and shriveled spermatogonia surrounded by empty irregular spaces, and undulating basement membrane. The intertubular spaces were enlarged but interstitial Leydig cells did not show any marked morphological changes. Evidence demonstrates the adverse effects of EMR on testicular parenchyma in rats.

  2. Radiation detection field test at the Federal Express (FedEx) air cargo facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Amy; Weirup, Dave; Hall, Howard; Dougan, Arden; Trombino, Dave; Mattesich, Gary; Hull, Ethan L.; Bahowick, Sally; Loshak, Alex; Gruidl, Jeremiah

    2004-07-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility; quantify and identify "nuisance" alarms; evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment. LLNL emplaced a primary screening detector that provided the initial detection of radiation anomalies in near real-time. Once detected, a secondary test location provided capability to perform higher-resolution analysis of the parcels or containers that triggered the primary detector. Two triggered radiation events were observed during the course of this project. Both of the radiation events were determined to be legitimate shipments of radioactive material. The overall effect of this project on FedEx operations and personnel was deemed to be minimal.

  3. Nevada Test Site Area 25, Radiological Survey and Cleanup Project, 1974-1983 (a revised final report). Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, M.G.

    1984-12-01

    This report describes the radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for beta plus gamma and alpha radioactive contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 9 references, 23 figures.

  4. Radiation testing campaign results for understanding the suitability of FPGAs in detector electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citterio, M., E-mail: mauro.citterio@mi.infn.it [INFN Milan, Milan (Italy); Camplani, A. [INFN Milan, Milan (Italy); Cannon, M. [Brigham Young University, Provo (United States); Chen, H.; Chen, K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Deng, B.; Liu, C. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas (United States); Meroni, C. [INFN Milan, Milan (Italy); Kierstead, J.; Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Wirthlin, M. [Brigham Young University, Provo (United States); Ye, J. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas (United States)

    2016-07-11

    SRAM based Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) have been rarely used in High Energy Physics (HEP) due to their sensitivity to radiation. The last generation of commercial FPGAs based on 28 nm feature size and on Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technologies are more tolerant to radiation to the level that their use in front-end electronics is now feasible. FPGAs provide re-programmability, high-speed computation and fast data transmission through the embedded serial transceivers. They could replace custom application specific integrated circuits in front end electronics in locations with moderate radiation field. The use of a FPGA in HEP experiments is only limited by our ability to mitigate single event effects induced by the high energy hadrons present in the radiation field. - Highlights: • Radiation campaign on Xilinx Kintex 7 FPGAs. • Use of FPGAs in high energy physics. • Evaluation of configuration RAM and block RAM parameters after irradiation.

  5. Testing and Improving Theories of Radiative Transfer for Determining the Mineralogy of Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, E.; Ehlmann, B. L.; Mustard, J. F.; Hiroi, T.; Poulet, F.

    2012-12-01

    Two radiative transfer theories, the Hapke and Shkuratov models, have been used to estimate the mineralogic composition of laboratory mixtures of anhydrous mafic minerals from reflected near-infrared light, accurately modeling abundances to within 10%. For this project, we tested the efficacy of the Hapke model for determining the composition of mixtures (weight fraction, particle diameter) containing hydrous minerals, including phyllosilicates. Modal mineral abundances for some binary mixtures were modeled to +/-10% of actual values, but other mixtures showed higher inaccuracies (up to 25%). Consequently, a sensitivity analysis of selected input and model parameters was performed. We first examined the shape of the model's error function (RMS error between modeled and measured spectra) over a large range of endmember weight fractions and particle diameters and found that there was a single global minimum for each mixture (rather than local minima). The minimum was sensitive to modeled particle diameter but comparatively insensitive to modeled endmember weight fraction. Derivation of the endmembers' k optical constant spectra using the Hapke model showed differences with the Shkuratov-derived optical constants originally used. Model runs with different sets of optical constants suggest that slight differences in the optical constants used significantly affect the accuracy of model predictions. Even for mixtures where abundance was modeled correctly, particle diameter agreed inconsistently with sieved particle sizes and varied greatly for individual mix within suite. Particle diameter was highly sensitive to the optical constants, possibly indicating that changes in modeled path length (proportional to particle diameter) compensate for changes in the k optical constant. Alternatively, it may not be appropriate to model path length and particle diameter with the same proportionality for all materials. Across mixtures, RMS error increased in proportion to the fraction

  6. The Alcock Paczy'nski test with Baryon Acoustic Oscillations: systematic effects for future surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepori, Francesca; Di Dio, Enea; Viel, Matteo; Baccigalupi, Carlo; Durrer, Ruth

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the Alcock Paczy'nski (AP) test applied to the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) feature in the galaxy correlation function. By using a general formalism that includes relativistic effects, we quantify the importance of the linear redshift space distortions and gravitational lensing corrections to the galaxy number density fluctuation. We show that redshift space distortions significantly affect the shape of the correlation function, both in radial and transverse directions, causing different values of galaxy bias to induce offsets up to 1% in the AP test. On the other hand, we find that the lensing correction around the BAO scale modifies the amplitude but not the shape of the correlation function and therefore does not introduce any systematic effect. Furthermore, we investigate in details how the AP test is sensitive to redshift binning: a window function in transverse direction suppresses correlations and shifts the peak position toward smaller angular scales. We determine the correction that should be applied in order to account for this effect, when performing the test with data from three future planned galaxy redshift surveys: Euclid, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA).

  7. Testing longwave radiation parameterizations under clear and overcast skies at Storglaciären, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sedlar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy balance based glacier melt models require accurate estimates of incoming longwave radiation but direct measurements are often not available. Multi-year near-surface meteorological data from Storglaciären, Northern Sweden, were used to evaluate commonly used longwave radiation parameterizations in a glacier environment under clear-sky and all-sky conditions. Parameterizations depending solely on air temperature performed worse than those which include water vapor pressure. All models tended to overestimate incoming longwave radiation during periods of low longwave radiation, while incoming longwave was underestimated when radiation was high. Under all-sky conditions root mean square error (RMSE and mean bias error (MBE were 17 to 20 W m−2 and −5 to 1 W m−2, respectively. Two attempts were made to circumvent the need of cloud cover data. First cloud fraction was parameterized as a function of the ratio, τ, of measured incoming shortwave radiation and calculated top of atmosphere radiation. Second, τ was related directly to the cloud factor (i.e. the increase in sky emissivity due to clouds. Despite large scatter between τ and both cloud fraction and the cloud factor, resulting calculations of hourly incoming longwave radiation for both approaches were only slightly more variable with RMSE roughly 3 W m−2 larger compared to using cloud observations as input. This is promising for longwave radiation modeling in areas where shortwave radiation data are available but cloud observations are not.

  8. Validation testing of ANSI/IEEE n42.49 standard requirements for personal emergency radiation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibida, L; Minniti, R; O'Brien, M

    2010-04-01

    Various radiation detectors including electronic personal emergency radiation detectors (PERDs), radiochromic film cards and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to validate a subset of the radiological test requirements listed in the American National Standards Institute/The Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (ANSI/IEEE) N42.49 standard. The subset of tests included the following: comparing the readout of the detectors with the value given at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); testing of the alarm settings (when applicable) in air-kerma (or exposure) and air-kerma rate (or exposure rate) mode; and investigating the effect of testing the detectors mounted on a phantom and free in air. The purpose of this work was not to test the performance of the sample of detectors used. Instead, the detectors were used to validate the requirements of the written standard being developed. For this purpose, the performance and response of these instruments were recorded when placed in (137)Cs, and x-ray beams at different air-kerma rates and test conditions. The measurements described in this report were performed at the NIST x-ray and gamma-ray radiation calibration facilities. The data in this report provide a benchmark in support of the development of the ANSI/IEEE N42.49 standard.

  9. Standards for Radiation Effects Testing: Ensuring Scientific Rigor in the Face of Budget Realities and Modern Device Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, J M.

    2015-01-01

    An overview is presented of the space radiation environment and its effects on electrical, electronic, and electromechanical parts. Relevant test standards and guidelines are listed. Test standards and guidelines are necessary to ensure best practices, minimize and bound systematic and random errors, and to ensure comparable results from different testers and vendors. Test standards are by their nature static but exist in a dynamic environment of advancing technology and radiation effects research. New technologies, failure mechanisms, and advancement in our understanding of known failure mechanisms drive the revision or development of test standards. Changes to standards must be weighed against their impact on cost and existing part qualifications. There must be consensus on new best practices. The complexity of some new technologies exceeds the scope of existing test standards and may require development of a guideline specific to the technology. Examples are given to illuminate the value and limitations of key radiation test standards as well as the challenges in keeping these standards up to date.

  10. Survey of active and inactive mines for possible use as in situ test facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-09-01

    A survey of active and inactive mines which might be useful for radioactive waste storage in situ test experiments was conducted. It was performed for Union Carbide Corporation, Nuclear Division, Office of Waste Isolation. The report covers available information gathered from literature, U.S. Bureau of Mines, the Mining Enforcement and Safety Agency, and a limited number of personal contacts with constructors or operators of facilities. This survey is preliminary in nature and the objective is to develop potential candidate facilities for in situ experiments which warrant further investigation. Included are descriptions of 244 facilities, with all the data about each one which was available within the time restraint of the study. These facility descriptions are additionally indexed by depth of mine, nature of the country rock, mineral mined, and type of entry. A total of 14 inactive mines and 34 active mines has been selected as those most worthy of further investigation for possible service as nuclear waste isolation test facilities. This investigation, being preliminary and having been performed in a very short time period, must be qualified, and the description of the qualification is presented in the body of this report. Qualifications deal primarily with the hazard of having omitted facilities and having incomplete data in some instances. Results indicate sedimentary rock mines of minerals of evaporite origin as a first ranking of preference for in situ testing, followed by other sedimentary rocks and then by mines producing minerals from any type rock where the mine is above the local water table. These are general rules and of course there can be exceptions to them.

  11. Family physicians understanding about Mantoux test: A survey from a high endemic TB country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Niloufer

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis is a global health emergency and is a big challenge to diagnose and manage it. Family physicians being first contact health persons should be well competent to diagnose and manage the patients with tuberculosis. Aims This study was aimed to assess the level of understanding about Mantoux Test amongst Family Physicians in Karachi, Pakistan and to determine the difference of level of understanding by gender and number of tuberculosis patients seen in a month. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted among 200 Family Physicians working in Karachi; the largest city and economic hub of Pakistan. Family Physicians who attended Continuous Medical Education sessions were approached after taking consent. Pre-tested, self administered questionnaire was filled consisting of: basic demographic characteristics, questions regarding knowledge about Mantoux Test, its application and interpretation. Data of 159 questionnaires was analyzed for percentages, as rest were incomplete. Chi square test was used to calculate the difference of understanding levels between various groups. Results Almost two thirds of respondents were males and above 35 years of age. Majority of Family Physicians were private practitioners and seeing more than five tuberculosis patients per month. Overall, a big gap was identified about the knowledge of Mantoux Test among study participants. Only 18.8% of Family Physicians secured Excellent (≥ 80% correct responses. This poor level of understanding was almost equally distributed in all comparative groups (Male = 20.8% versus Female = 15.9%; p - 0.69 and (Seen Conclusion Our study revealed an overall major deficit in understanding and interpretation of Mantoux Test amongst Family Physicians which needs to be addressed. Continues Medical Education sessions for Family Physicians should be organized in regular basis for upgrading their knowledge in this regards.

  12. Observation and Characterization of Coherent Optical Radiation and Microbunching Instability in the SLAC Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathersby, S.; Dunning, M.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Xiang, D.; /SLAC

    2011-06-02

    The NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC is currently configured for a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) experiment using an 120 MeV beam. During commissioning, unexpected coherent optical undulator radiation (CUR) and coherent optical transition radiation (COTR) was observed when beam is accelerated off-crest and compressed after the chicanes. The CUR and COTR is likely due to a microbunching instability where the initial small ripples in cathode drive laser is compressed and amplified. In this paper we present the observation and characterization of the CUR, COTR and microbunching instability at NLCTA.

  13. Development and psychometric evaluation of an information literacy self-efficacy survey and an information literacy knowledge test*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Rodger; Tepe, Chabha

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop and psychometrically evaluate an information literacy (IL) self-efficacy survey and an IL knowledge test. Methods In this test–retest reliability study, a 25-item IL self-efficacy survey and a 50-item IL knowledge test were developed and administered to a convenience sample of 53 chiropractic students. Item analyses were performed on all questions. Results The IL self-efficacy survey demonstrated good reliability (test–retest correlation = 0.81) and good/very good internal consistency (mean κ = .56 and Cronbach's α = .92). A total of 25 questions with the best item analysis characteristics were chosen from the 50-item IL knowledge test, resulting in a 25-item IL knowledge test that demonstrated good reliability (test–retest correlation = 0.87), very good internal consistency (mean κ = .69, KR20 = 0.85), and good item discrimination (mean point-biserial = 0.48). Conclusions This study resulted in the development of three instruments: a 25-item IL self-efficacy survey, a 50-item IL knowledge test, and a 25-item IL knowledge test. The information literacy self-efficacy survey and the 25-item version of the information literacy knowledge test have shown preliminary evidence of adequate reliability and validity to justify continuing study with these instruments. PMID:25517736

  14. Reliability, precision, and measurement in the context of data from ability tests, surveys, and assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, W P Jr [LivingCapitalMetrics.com 5252 Annunciation St, New Orleans, Louisiana 70115 (United States); Elbaum, B [University of Miami, Florida (United States); Coulter, A, E-mail: william@livingcapitalmetrics.co, E-mail: elbaum@miami.ed, E-mail: acoulter@lsuhsc.ed [Louisiana State University, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Reliability coefficients indicate the proportion of total variance attributable to differences among measures separated along a quantitative continuum by a testing, survey, or assessment instrument. Reliability is usually considered to be influenced by both the internal consistency of a data set and the number of items, though textbooks and research papers rarely evaluate the extent to which these factors independently affect the data in question. Probabilistic formulations of the requirements for unidimensional measurement separate consistency from error by modelling individual response processes instead of group-level variation. The utility of this separation is illustrated via analyses of small sets of simulated data, and of subsets of data from a 78-item survey of over 2,500 parents of children with disabilities. Measurement reliability ultimately concerns the structural invariance specified in models requiring sufficient statistics, parameter separation, unidimensionality, and other qualities that historically have made quantification simple, practical, and convenient for end users. The paper concludes with suggestions for a research program aimed at focusing measurement research more on the calibration and wide dissemination of tools applicable to individuals, and less on the statistical study of inter-variable relations in large data sets.

  15. A survey of techniques to reduce and manage external beam radiation-induced xerostomia in British oncology and radiotherapy departments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknelly, Andrew [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (United Kingdom); Day, Jane [Faculty of Health, Wellbeing and Science, University Campus Suffolk, Waterfront Building, Neptune Quay, Ipswich (United Kingdom)], E-mail: j.day@ucs.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    ? - A feasibility study for locally advanced head and neck cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical Oncology 2006;18(6):497-504, Braam P, Terhaard C, Roesnink J, Cornelis P, Raaijmakers C. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy significantly reduces xerostomia compared with conventional radiotherapy. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics 2006, Wendt TG, Abbasi-Senger N, Salz H, Pinquart I, Koscelny S, Przetak S, et al. 3D-conformal-intensity modulated radiotherapy with compensators for head and neck cancer: clinical results of normal tissue sparing. Radiation Oncology 2006;1:18. Available from: (http://www.ro-journal.com/content/1/1/18) [accessed on 21.11.06].]. This, in turn, offers increased normal tissue sparing than conventional radiotherapy [Ng M, Porceddu S, Milner A, Corry J, Hornby C, Hope G, et al. Parotid-sparing radiotherapy: does it really reduce xerostomia? Clinical Oncology 2005;17(8):610-7.]. The survey indicated that all three techniques, however, are still in use in oncology and radiotherapy departments, and several departments stated that financial considerations were hindering their move toward providing IMRT.

  16. SOLIDIFICATION TESTING FOR A HIGH ACTIVITY WASTESTREAM FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE USING GROUT AND GAMMA RADIATION SHEILDING MATERIALS - 10017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, H.

    2009-11-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating grouts that include gamma radiation shielding materials to solidify surrogates of liquid aqueous radioactive wastes from across the DOE Complex. The Savannah River Site (SRS) identified a High Activity Waste (HAW) that will be treated and solidified at the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for surrogate grout testing. The HAW, which is produced at the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), is an acidic aqueous wastestream generated by the alkaline treatment process and the aqueous purification process. The HAW surrogate was solidified using Portland cement with and without the inclusion of different gamma radiation shielding materials to determine the shielding material that is the most effective to attenuate gamma radiation for this application.

  17. Foodstuff Survey Around a Major Nuclear Facility with Test of Satellite Image Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fledderman, P.D.

    1999-07-16

    'A foodstuff survey was performed around the Savannah River Site, Aiken SC. It included a census of buildings and fields within 5 km of the boundary and determination of the locations and amounts of crops grown within 80 km of SRS center. Recent information for this region was collected on the amounts of meat, poultry, milk, and eggs produced, of deer hunted, and of sports fish caught. The locations and areas devoted to growing each crop were determined in two ways: by the usual process of assuming uniform crop distribution in each county on the basis of agricultural statistics reported by state agencies, and by analysis of two LANDSAT TM images obtained in May and September. For use with environmental radionuclide transfer and radiation dose calculation codes, locations within 80 km were defined for 64 sections by 16 sectors centered on the Site and by 16-km distance intervals from 16 km to 80 km. Most locally-raised foodstuff was distributed regionally and not retained locally for consumption. For four food crops, the amounts per section based on county agricultural statistics prorated by area were compared with the amounts per section based on satellite image analysis. The median ratios of the former to the latter were 0.6 - 0.7, suggesting that the two approaches are comparable but that satellite image analysis gave consistently higher amounts. Use of satellite image analysis is recommended on the basis of these findings to obtain site-specific, as compared to area-averaged, information on crop locations in conjunction with radionuclide pathway modelling. Some improvements in technique are suggested for satellite image application to characterize additional crops.'

  18. DOES MIGRATION DISRUPT FERTILITY? A TEST USING THE MALAYSIAN FAMILY LIFE SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher King Manner,

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The disruption hypothesis suggests that migration interrupts fertility during the period of the move. This may be due to the psychological and physiological consequences of the stressful situation associated with the movement itself or the fairly common separate living arrangements of spouses during the early stages of the migration process. In this study, we examine the disruption hypothesis using the Malaysian Family Life Survey life history data. We used ordinary least squares and censored regression models to test the effect of marital separation on fertility surrounding the time of migration. While migrants do appear to experience more temporary separations than non-migrants, our analysis failed to indicate any disruptive effect associated with migration.

  19. Radiation tests of ATLAS full-sized n-in-n prototype detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allport, P.P.; Booth, P.S.L.; Green, C.; Greenall, A.; Hanlon, M.; Jackson, J.N.; Jones, T.J.; Garcia, S.M.I.; Orme, E.; Richardson, J.D.; Smith, N.A.; Turner, P.R.; Wormald, M.P. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 EBX (United Kingdom); Apsimon, R.J.; Bizzell, J.; Tyndel, M. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot EBX (United Kingdom); Becker, C.; Thuene, R.; Wunstorf, R.; Wuestenfeld, J. [Experimentelle Physik, Universitaet Dortmund EBX (Germany); Bonino, R.; Perrin, E.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kowalewski, R.; Macina, D.; Vuaridel, B. [Section de Physique, Universite de Geneve EBX (Switzerland); Boulter, B.; Riedler, P.; Roe, S. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics (CERN) Geneva (Switzerland); Carter, A.A.; Newman-Coburn, D. [Department of Physics, Queen Mary and Westfield College, London (United Kingdom); Carter, J.R.; Goodrick, M.J.; Hill, J.C.; Munday, D.J.; Robinson, D.; Wyllie, K.H. [Cavendish Laboratory, The University of Cambridge EBX (United Kingdom); O' Shea, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Glasgow EBX (United Kingdom)

    1998-11-21

    ATLAS Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC/94-43 has adopted n-side read out All rights reserved.)s. (Copyrbaseline technology for the silicon microstrips due to the anticipated radiation tolerance of such a design ATLAS Inner Detector Technical Design Report, CERN/LHCC/97-17. This results from the reasonable efficiencies anticipated for charge collection, even when the detectors are run well below the final depletion voltage.Full-sized prototypes 64x63.6 mm{sup 2} detectors have been produced with a range of manufacturers to a common specification and shown to work well in test-beam with ATLAS electronics. A selection of detectors was also scanned in the CERN PS beam for runs of two weeks giving an integrated dose over the full surface of 2x10{sup 14} p/cm{sup 2}. This dose corresponds to the highest charged hadron fluence expected in 10 yr of operation in ATLAS.Results are presented on these detectors both from parametric measurements and from studies using analogue LHC speed electronics. The detectors are shown to remain fully operational after these doses and to yield high signal/noise for read-out of 12 cm strip length. The performance partially depleted is also shown to match expectations and operation at down to half the final depletion voltage gives adequate efficiencies. Uncertainties in the anticipated dose and damage effects argue strongly for this additional robustness in detectors which must operate with very limited access in the hostile environment of the LHC for 10 yr. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. The 14th quality control survey for radioisotope in vitro tests in Japan, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    This report presents the results of the 14th quality control nationwide survey. Of 490 facilities performing RI in vitro tests as of December 1992, 261 (53.3%) participated in the present 1992 survey. Free testosterone and renin were added to the following conventional 37 test items: adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), growth hormone (GH), somatomedin C, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T[sub 3]), free T[sub 3], thyroxine (T[sub 4]), free T[sub 4], T[sub 3] uptake, thyroglobulin, T[sub 3] binding globulin (TBG), parathyroid hormone (PTH), calcitonin, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, gastrin, testosterone, estradiol, progesterone, 17[alpha]-hydroxyprogesterone, aldosterone, cortisol, immunoglobulin E (IgE), digoxin, [alpha]-fetoprotein, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), tissue polypeptide antigen (TPA), CA125, CA19-9, CA15-3, prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP), [beta][sub 2]-microglobulin, and ferritin. Measurement data for each kit were analyzed by a mean value of measurements, standard deviation, and coefficient of variation (CV). Both 'within kit variation' between facilities and 'between kit variation' showed a CV of 20% or less for GH, somatomedin C, TSH, T[sub 3], T[sub 4], T[sub 3] uptake, TBG, cortisol, IgE, CA125, PAP, and [beta][sub 2]-microglobulin, revealing satisfactory results. There was a great 'within kit variation' between facilities in ACTH, free T[sub 4], and calcitonin; and there was a great 'between kit variation' in ACTH, LH, free T[sub 4], thyroglobulin, PTH, calcitonin, and [alpha]-fetoprotein. (N.K.).

  1. Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test results in European countries: an ESCMID cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcini, Céline; Tebano, Gianpiero; Mutters, Nico T; Tacconelli, Evelina; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jarlier, Vincent

    2017-02-01

    Selective reporting of antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) results is one possible laboratory-based antibiotic stewardship intervention. The primary aim of this study was to identify where and how selective reporting of AST results is implemented in Europe both in inpatient and in outpatient settings. An ESCMID cross-sectional, self-administered, internet-based survey was conducted among all EUCIC (European Committee on Infection Control) or EUCAST (European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing) national representatives in Europe and Israel. Of 38 countries, 36 chose to participate in the survey. Selective reporting of AST results was implemented in 11/36 countries (31%), was partially implemented in 4/36 (11%) and was limited to local initiatives or was not adopted in 21/36 (58%). It was endorsed as standard of care by health authorities in only three countries. The organisation of selective reporting was everywhere discretionally managed by each laboratory, with a pronounced intra- and inter-country variability. The most frequent application was in uncomplicated community-acquired infections, particularly urinary tract and skin and soft-tissue infections. The list of reported antibiotics ranged from a few first-line options, to longer reports where only last-resort antibiotics were hidden. Several barriers to implementation were reported, mainly lack of guidelines, poor system support, insufficient resources, and lack of professionals' capability. In conclusion, selective reporting of AST results is poorly implemented in Europe and is applied with a huge heterogeneity of practices. Development of an international framework, based on existing initiatives and identified barriers, could favour its dissemination as one important element of antibiotic stewardship programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  2. A Critical Experimental Test of Synchrotron Radiation Theory with 3rd Generation Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Geloni, Gianluca; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-01-01

    A recent "beam splitting" experiment at LCLS apparently demonstrated that after a microbunched electron beam is kicked on a large angle compared to the divergence of the FEL radiation, the microbunching wave front is readjusted along the new direction of motion of the kicked beam. Therefore, coherent radiation from an undulator placed after the kicker is emitted along the kicked direction without suppression. This strong emission of coherent undulator radiation in the kicked direction cannot be explained in the framework of conventional synchrotron radiation theory. In a previous paper we explained this puzzle. We demonstrated that, in accelerator physics, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of results from particle dynamics treated according to the absolute time convention and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell equations treated according to the standard (Einstein) synchronization convention. Here lies the misconception which led to the strong qualitative disagre...

  3. Radiation testing campaign results for understanding the suitability of FPGAs in detector electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citterio, M.; Camplani, A.; Cannon, M.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Deng, B.; Liu, C.; Meroni, C.; Kierstead, J.; Takai, H.; Wirthlin, M.; Ye, J.

    2016-07-01

    SRAM based Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) have been rarely used in High Energy Physics (HEP) due to their sensitivity to radiation. The last generation of commercial FPGAs based on 28 nm feature size and on Silicon On Insulator (SOI) technologies are more tolerant to radiation to the level that their use in front-end electronics is now feasible. FPGAs provide re-programmability, high-speed computation and fast data transmission through the embedded serial transceivers. They could replace custom application specific integrated circuits in front end electronics in locations with moderate radiation field. The use of a FPGA in HEP experiments is only limited by our ability to mitigate single event effects induced by the high energy hadrons present in the radiation field.

  4. Modeling, Testing and Deploying a Multifunctional Radiation Shielding / Hydrogen Storage Unit Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project addresses two vital problems for long-term space travel activities: radiation shielding and hydrogen storage for power and propulsion. While both...

  5. Oxidative effects of extremely low frequency magnetic field and radio frequency radiation on testes tissues of diabetic and healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzay, D; Ozer, C; Sirav, B; Canseven, A G; Seyhan, N

    2017-01-01

    With the development of technology, people are increasingly under the exposure of electromagnetic fields. Individuals with chronic diseases such as diabetes are now long-term exposed to Radio Frequency-RF radiation and extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MFs). The purpose of this present study is to investigate oxidative effects and antioxidant parameters of ELF MFs and RF radiation on testis tissue in diabetic and healthy rats. Wistar male rats were divided into 10 groups. Intraperitoneal single dose STZ (65 mg/kg) dissolved in citrate buffer (0.1M (pH 4.5)) was injected to diabetes groups. ELF MFs and RF radiation were used as an electromagnetic exposure for 20 min/day, 5 days/week for one month. Testis tissue oxidant malondialdehyde (MDA), and antioxidants glutathione (GSH), and total nitric oxide (NOx) levels were determined. The results of ANOVA and Mann-Whitney tests were compared; p radiation resulted in an increase in testicular tissue MDA and NOX levels (p radiation practices increased the oxidative stress in testis tissue while causing a decrease in antioxidant level which was more distinctive in diabetic rats (Tab. 1, Fig. 3, Ref. 30).

  6. Manufacture and Test of the Prototype 5 T Superconducting Undulator for the LHC Synchrotron Radiation Profile Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    MacCaferri, R; Tommasini, D; Venturini-Delsolaro, W

    2006-01-01

    A superconducting undulator wound with Nb-Ti based conductor, will be used in the LHC as a key part of the synchrotron radiation profile monitor system. Two undulators are needed, one per each circulating beam, providing 5 T in a 60 mm bore over two periods of 280 mm each. A full scale prototype has been designed and successfully tested in the end of 2004. In this paper, the electromagnetic and the mechanical design of the undulator are summarized. The fabrication of the prototype is described and the successful cold test results, both power test and magnetic flux density measurements, are reported.

  7. Will Genetic Testing for Complex Diseases Increase Motivation to Quit Smoking? Anticipated Reactions in a Survey of Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Saskia C.; Wardle, Jane

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve understanding of smokers' potential reactions to genetic testing for smoking-related diseases. One thousand twenty-four respondents completed a postal survey; 186 were smokers. Questions addressed anticipated psychological and behavioral reactions to genetic test results using hypothetical scenarios. Of…

  8. Will Genetic Testing for Complex Diseases Increase Motivation to Quit Smoking? Anticipated Reactions in a Survey of Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Saskia C.; Wardle, Jane

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve understanding of smokers' potential reactions to genetic testing for smoking-related diseases. One thousand twenty-four respondents completed a postal survey; 186 were smokers. Questions addressed anticipated psychological and behavioral reactions to genetic test results using hypothetical scenarios. Of…

  9. On-Line Radiation Test Facility for Industrial Equipment needed for the Large Hadron Collider at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Rausch, R

    1999-01-01

    The future Large Hadron Collider to be built at CERN will use superconducting magnets cooled down to 1.2 K. To preserve the superconductivity, the energy deposition dose levels in equipment located outside the cryostat, in the LHC tunnel, are calculated to be of the order of 1 to 10 Gy per year. At such dose levels, no major radiation-damage problems are to be expected, and the possibility of installing Commercial Of The Shelf (COTS) electronic equipment in the LHC tunnel along the accelerator is considered. To this purpose, industrial electronic equipment and circuits have to be qualified and tested against radiation to insure their long term stability and reliability. An on-line radiation test facility has been setup at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and a program of on-line tests for electronic equipment is ongoing. Equipment tested includes Industrial Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) from several manufacturers, standard VME modules, Fieldbuses like Profibus, WorldFIP and CAN, various electro...

  10. Radiation Engineering for Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the natural space radiation environment, an introduction to radiation effect types, an overview of EEE parts selection, scrubbing, and radiation mitigation, and an introduction to radiation testing.

  11. Radiation Engineering for Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    This tutorial provides an overview of the natural space radiation environment, an introduction to radiation effect types, an overview of EEE parts selection, scrubbing, and radiation mitigation, and an introduction to radiation testing.

  12. Surveying Indian gay men for coping skills and HIV testing patterns using the internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Jethwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surveying vulnerable and incarcerated populations is often challenging. Newer methods to reach and collect sensitive information in a safe, secure, and valid manner can go a long way in addressing this unmet need. Homosexual men in India live with inadequate social support, marginalization, and lack legal recognition. These make them less reachable by public health agencies, and make them more likely to continue with high-risk behaviors, and contract human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Aims: To understand coping skills and HIV testing patterns of homosexual men versus heterosexual men. Materials and Methods: An internet based study using a secure web platform and an anonymised questionnaire. The brief COPE Inventory was used to assess coping styles. Results: A total of 124 respondents were studied. Homosexual men used negative coping skills such as behavioral disengagement and tested for HIV significantly more often than heterosexual men. Heterosexual respondents used positive coping skills more often. The most commonly used coping skill by heterosexual men was instrumental coping and by homosexual men was acceptance. Discussion: Overall, homosexual men used negative coping mechanisms, like behavioral disengagement more often. The Indian family structure and social support is probably responsible for heterosexual men′s over-reliance on instrumental coping, while resulting in disengagement in homosexuals. Conclusion: The lack of legal and social recognition of homosexuality has negatively impacted lives of gay men in India. This is strongly linked to harmful psychological and public health implications for HIV prevention and mental health for homosexual men.

  13. Laboratory Diagnosis of Syphilis: A Survey to Examine the Range of Tests Used in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond SW. Tsang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis has undergone major changes in the past decade with the introduction of immunoassays and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigens as screening tools for syphilis infection. To address this change in laboratory practice, a national syphilis laboratory working group was established with members from the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial public health laboratories across the country as well as sexually transmitted infection researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists. This working group aims to examine how the use of newer immunoassays will affect syphilis diagnosis, surveillance and disease management. To provide a baseline for this work, an e-mail survey was conducted in the fall of 2009 to determine current laboratory practices for syphilis diagnosis in Canada. The most commonly used tests were rapid plasma reagin, enzyme immunoassay, T pallidum passive particle agglutination, venereal disease research laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, line immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction with 92%, 36%, 32%, 20%, 12%, 12% and 12% of the responding laboratories reporting using these tests, respectively. The ultimate goal of this working group will be to update laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of syphilis, and to identify syphilis surveillance and research priorities in Canada.

  14. Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis: A survey to examine the range of tests used in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Raymond Sw; Radons, Sandra Michelle; Morshed, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Laboratory diagnosis of syphilis has undergone major changes in the past decade with the introduction of immunoassays and recombinant Treponema pallidum antigens as screening tools for syphilis infection. To address this change in laboratory practice, a national syphilis laboratory working group was established with members from the Public Health Agency of Canada, provincial public health laboratories across the country as well as sexually transmitted infection researchers, clinicians and epidemiologists. This working group aims to examine how the use of newer immunoassays will affect syphilis diagnosis, surveillance and disease management. To provide a baseline for this work, an e-mail survey was conducted in the fall of 2009 to determine current laboratory practices for syphilis diagnosis in Canada. The most commonly used tests were rapid plasma reagin, enzyme immunoassay, T pallidum passive particle agglutination, venereal disease research laboratory, fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption, line immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction with 92%, 36%, 32%, 20%, 12%, 12% and 12% of the responding laboratories reporting using these tests, respectively. The ultimate goal of this working group will be to update laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis of syphilis, and to identify syphilis surveillance and research priorities in Canada.

  15. St. John’s Bayou Cultural Resources Survey and Testing in Scott, Mississippi and New Madrid Counties, Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Objectives 22 Natural Environment and Site Locations 22 Landforms 23 Biotic Communities 24 Soil Associations 24 Site Significance and Lithic Analysis 25 Nature...survey records accumulated over many decades and should be tested by intensive on-the-ground pedestrian survey. SITE SIGNIFICANUE AND LITHIC ANALYSIS While... lithic analysis has been an important part of the overall research effort in the Lower Valley for the past decade, there are still many basic

  16. Current patterns of care for patients with extensive stage small cell lung cancer: Survey of US radiation oncologists on their recommendations regarding thoracic consolidation radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitin, Timur; Jain, Aditya; Degnin, Catherine; Chen, Yiyi; Henderson, Mark; Thomas, Charles R

    2016-10-01

    Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend thoracic consolidation radiation therapy (TCRT) for patients with Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer (ES-SCLC) with response to systemic chemotherapy, based on two randomized clinical trials, which varied in patient selection and radiation therapy doses administered. The current pattern of practice among US radiation oncologists is unknown. We have surveyed practicing US radiation oncologist via a short online questionnaire. Respondents' characteristics and their self-rated knowledge base were analyzed for association with their treatment recommendations. We received 473 responses from practicing US radiation oncologists. Over half of respondents were practicing for over 10 years after completing residency training and 70% treated more than 10 lung cancer patients per year. 96% of respondents recommend TCRT for patients with ES-SCLC after systemic chemotherapy. Patient selection and radiation therapy doses vary greatly. High self-rated knowledge of individual clinical trials is associated with lower TCRT recommended doses. Patients treated at academic centers are less likely to receive TCRT than patients treated in private clinics (p=0.0101). Our analysis revealed that among the respondents, there was a very high adherence to current NCCN guidelines, which recommend TCRT for ES-SCLC patients with clinical response to systemic chemotherapy. The great variability in patient selection and radiation therapy doses is concerning and calls for future clinical trials to standardize treatment approaches and improve treatment outcomes among patients with ES-SCLC. Until such data exists and in light of poor long-term survival of patients with ES-SCLC, the shorter and less toxic regimen of 30Gy in 10 fractions should be used as the standard of care and the more aggressive regimens studied on clinical protocols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Testing General Relativity with Growth rate measurement from Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Shadab; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Schneider, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    The measured redshift ($z$) of an astronomical object is a combination of Hubble recession, gravitational redshift and peculiar velocity. In particular, the line of sight distance to a galaxy inferred from redshift is affected by the peculiar velocity component of galaxy redshift, which can also be observed as an anisotropy in the correlation function. This anisotropy allows us to measure the linear growth rate of matter ($f\\sigma_8$). In this paper, we measure the linear growth rate of matter ($f\\sigma_8$) at $z=0.57$ using the CMASS sample from Data Release 11 of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III) Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). The galaxy sample consists of 690,826 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the redshift range 0.43 to 0.7 covering 8498 deg$^2$. Here we report the first measurement of $f\\sigma_8$ and cosmology using Convolution Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (CLPT) with Gaussian streaming model (GSRSD). We arrive at a constraint of $f\\sigma_8=0.462\\pm0.041$ (9\\% accuracy) at effec...

  18. Dependence of radiation belt simulations to assumed radial diffusion rates tested for two empirical models of radial transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdov, Alexander; Shprits, Yuri; Aseev, Nikita; Kellerman, Adam; Reeves, Geoffrey

    2017-04-01

    Radial diffusion is one of the dominant physical mechanisms that drives acceleration and loss of the radiation belt electrons, which makes it very important for nowcasting and forecasting space weather models. We investigate the sensitivity of the two parameterizations of the radial diffusion of Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014] on long-term radiation belt modeling using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB). Following Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2014], we first perform 1-D radial diffusion simulations. Comparison of the simulation results with observations shows that the difference between simulations with either radial diffusion parameterization is small. To take into account effects of local acceleration and loss, we perform 3-D simulations, including pitch-angle, energy and mixed diffusion. We found that the results of 3-D simulations are even less sensitive to the choice of parameterization of radial diffusion rates than the results of 1-D simulations at various energies (from 0.59 to 1.80 MeV). This result demonstrates that the inclusion of local acceleration and pitch-angle diffusion can provide a negative feedback effect, such that the result is largely indistinguishable simulations conducted with different radial diffusion parameterizations. We also perform a number of sensitivity tests by multiplying radial diffusion rates by constant factors and show that such an approach leads to unrealistic predictions of radiation belt dynamics. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999ja900344. Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. Jonathan Rae, and D. K. Milling (2014), Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res. [Space Phys.], 119(3), 1587-1605, doi:10.1002/2013JA019204.

  19. Linking Errors between Two Populations and Tests: A Case Study in International Surveys in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Hastedt

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This simulation study was prompted by the current increased interest in linking national studies to international large-scale assessments (ILSAs such as IEA's TIMSS, IEA's PIRLS, and OECD's PISA. Linkage in this scenario is achieved by including items from the international assessments in the national assessments on the premise that the average achievement scores from the latter can be linked to the international metric. In addition to raising issues associated with different testing conditions, administrative procedures, and the like, this approach also poses psychometric challenges. This paper endeavors to shed some light on the effects that can be expected, the linkage errors in particular, by countries using this practice. The ILSA selected for this simulation study was IEA TIMSS 2011, and the three countries used as the national assessment cases were Botswana, Honduras, and Tunisia, all of which participated in TIMSS 2011. The items selected as items common to the simulated national tests and the international test came from the Grade 4 TIMSS 2011 mathematics items that IEA released into the public domain after completion of this assessment. The findings of the current study show that linkage errors seemed to achieve acceptable levels if 30 or more items were used for the linkage, although the errors were still significantly higher compared to the TIMSS' cutoffs. Comparison of the estimated country averages based on the simulated national surveys and the averages based on the international TIMSS assessment revealed only one instance across the three countries of the estimates approaching parity. Also, the percentages of students in these countries who actually reached the defined benchmarks on the TIMSS achievement scale differed significantly from the results based on TIMSS and the results for the simulated national assessments. As a conclusion, we advise against using groups of released items from international assessments in national

  20. Flight Crew Survey Responses from the Interval Management (IM) Avionics Phase 2 Flight Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxley, Brian T.; Swieringa, Kurt A.; Wilson, Sara R.; Roper, Roy D.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Goess, Paul A.; Shay, Richard F.

    2017-01-01

    The Interval Management (IM) Avionics Phase 2 flight test used three aircraft over a nineteen day period to operationally evaluate a prototype IM avionics. Quantitative data were collected on aircraft state data and IM spacing algorithm performance, and qualitative data were collected through end-of-scenario and end-of-day flight crew surveys. The majority of the IM operations met the performance goals established for spacing accuracy at the Achieve-by Point and the Planned Termination Point, however there were operations that did not meet goals for a variety of reasons. While the positive spacing accuracy results demonstrate the prototype IM avionics can contribute to the overall air traffic goal, critical issues were also identified that need to be addressed to enhance IM performance. The first category was those issues that impacted the conduct and results of the flight test, but are not part of the IM concept or procedures. These included the design of arrival and approach procedures was not ideal to support speed as the primary control mechanism, the ground-side of the Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration (ATD-1) integrated concept of operations was not part of the flight test, and the high workload to manually enter the information required to conduct an IM operation. The second category was issues associated with the IM spacing algorithm or flight crew procedures. These issues include the high frequency of IM speed changes and reversals (accelerations), a mismatch between the deceleration rate used by the spacing algorithm and the actual aircraft performance, and some spacing error calculations were sensitive to normal operational variations in aircraft airspeed or altitude which triggered additional IM speed changes. Once the issues in these two categories are addressed, the future IM avionics should have considerable promise supporting the goals of improving system throughput and aircraft efficiency.

  1. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: Retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gossman, Michael S., E-mail: MGossman@TSRCC.com [Regulation Directive Medical Physics, Russell, KY (United States); Wilkinson, Jeffrey D. [Medtronic, Inc., Mounds View, MN (United States); Mallick, Avishek [Department of Mathematics, Marshall University, Huntington, WV (United States)

    2014-01-01

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient's sex; patient's age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient's medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards.

  2. Treatment approach, delivery, and follow-up evaluation for cardiac rhythm disease management patients receiving radiation therapy: retrospective physician surveys including chart reviews at numerous centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossman, Michael S; Wilkinson, Jeffrey D; Mallick, Avishek

    2014-01-01

    In a 2-part study, we first examined the results of 71 surveyed physicians who provided responses on how they address the management of patients who maintained either a pacemaker or a defibrillator during radiation treatment. Second, a case review study is presented involving 112 medical records reviewed at 18 institutions to determine whether there was a change in the radiation prescription for the treatment of the target cancer, the method of radiation delivery, or the method of radiation image acquisition. Statistics are provided to illustrate the level of administrative policy; the level of communication between radiation oncologists and heart specialists; American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) staging and classification; National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines; tumor site; patient׳s sex; patient׳s age; device type; manufacturer; live monitoring; and the reported decisions for planning, delivery, and imaging. This survey revealed that 37% of patient treatments were considered for some sort of change in this regard, whereas 59% of patients were treated without regard to these alternatives when available. Only 3% of all patients were identified with an observable change in the functionality of the device or patient status in comparison with 96% of patients with normal behavior and operating devices. Documented changes in the patient׳s medical record included 1 device exhibiting failure at 0.3-Gy dose, 1 device exhibiting increased sensor rate during dose delivery, 1 patient having an irregular heartbeat leading to device reprogramming, and 1 patient complained of twinging in the chest wall that resulted in a respiratory arrest. Although policies and procedures should directly involve the qualified medical physicist for technical supervision, their sufficient involvement was typically not requested by most respondents. No treatment options were denied to any patient based on AJCC staging, classification, or NCCN practice standards.

  3. System tests of radiation hard optical links for the ATLAS semiconductor tracker

    CERN Document Server

    Charlton, D G; Homer, R James; Jovanovic, P; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Mahout, G; Shaylor, H R; Wilson, J A; Rudge, A; Fopma, J; Mandic, I; Nickerson, R B; Shield, P; Wastie, R L; Weidberg, A R; Eek, L O; Go, A; Lund-Jensen, B; Pearce, M; Söderqvist, J; Morrissey, M; White, D J

    2000-01-01

    A prototype optical data and timing, trigger and control transmission system based on LEDs and PIN-diodes has been constructed. The system would be suitable in terms of radiation hardness and radiation length for use in the ATLAS semiconductor tracker. Bit error rate measurements were performed for the data links and for the links distributing the timing, trigger and control data from the counting room to the front-end modules. The effects of cross-talk between the emitters and receivers were investigated. The advantages of using vertical cavity surface emitting lasers instead of LEDs are discussed. (5 refs).

  4. Radiation Testing of Consumer High-Speed LSI Chips for the Next Space VLBI Mission, VSOP-2

    CERN Document Server

    Wajima, Kiyoaki; Murata, Yasuhiro; Hirabayashi, Hisashi

    2007-01-01

    We performed two types of radiation testing on high-speed LSI chips to test their suitability for use in wideband observations by the Japanese next space VLBI mission, VSOP-2. In the total ionization dose experiment we monitored autocorrelation spectra which were taken with irradiated LSI chips and the source current at intervals up to 1,000 hours from the ionization dose, but we could not see any change of these features for the chips irradiated with dose rates expected in the VSOP-2 mission. In the single event effect experiment, we monitored the cross correlation phase and power spectra between the data from radiated and non-radiated devices, and the source current during the irradiation of heavy-ions. We observed a few tens of single event upsets as discrete delay jumps for each LSI. We estimated the occurrence rate of single events in space as between once a few days to once a month. No single event latch-up was seen in any of the LSIs. These results show that the tested LSIs have sufficient tolerance to...

  5. Test result communication in primary care: a survey of current practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Lilford, Richard; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-11-01

    The number of blood tests ordered in primary care continues to increase and the timely and appropriate communication of results remains essential. However, the testing and result communication process includes a number of participants in a variety of settings and is both complicated to manage and vulnerable to human error. In the UK, guidelines for the process are absent and research in this area is surprisingly scarce; so before we can begin to address potential areas of weakness there is a need to more precisely understand the strengths and weaknesses of current systems used by general practices and testing facilities. We conducted a telephone survey of practices across England to determine the methods of managing the testing and result communication process. In order to gain insight into the perspectives from staff at a large hospital laboratory we conducted paired interviews with senior managers, which we used to inform a service blueprint demonstrating the interaction between practices and laboratories and identifying potential sources of delay and failure. Staff at 80% of practices reported that the default method for communicating normal results required patients to telephone the practice and 40% of practices required that patients also call for abnormal results. Over 80% had no fail-safe system for ensuring that results had been returned to the practice from laboratories; practices would otherwise only be aware that results were missing or delayed when patients requested results. Persistent sources of missing results were identified by laboratory staff and included sample handling, misidentification of samples and the inefficient system for collating and resending misdirected results. The success of the current system relies on patients both to retrieve results and in so doing alert staff to missing and delayed results. Practices appear slow to adopt available technological solutions despite their potential for reducing the impact of recurring errors in the

  6. Power spectrum, correlation function, and tests for luminosity bias in the CfA redshift survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Changbom; Vogeley, Michael S.; Geller, Margaret J.; Huchra, John P.

    1994-01-01

    We describe and apply a method for directly computing the power spectrum for the galaxy distribution in the extension of the Center for Astrophysics Redshift Survey. Tests show that our technique accurately reproduces the true power spectrum for k greater than 0.03 h Mpc(exp -1). The dense sampling and large spatial coverage of this survey allow accurate measurement of the redshift-space power spectrum on scales from 5 to approximately 200 h(exp -1) Mpc. The power spectrum has slope n approximately equal -2.1 on small scales (lambda less than or equal 25 h(exp -1) Mpc) and n approximately -1.1 on scales 30 less than lambda less than 120 h(exp -1) Mpc. On larger scales the power spectrum flattens somewhat, but we do not detect a turnover. Comparison with N-body simulations of cosmological models shows that an unbiased, open universe CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.2) and a nonzero cosmological constant (CDM) model (OMEGA h = 0.24, lambda(sub zero) = 0.6, b = 1.3) match the CfA power spectrum over the wavelength range we explore. The standard biased CDM model (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.5) fails (99% significance level) because it has insufficient power on scales lambda greater than 30 h(exp -1) Mpc. Biased CDM with a normalization that matches the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy (OMEGA h = 0.5, b = 1.4, sigma(sub 8) (mass) = 1) has too much power on small scales to match the observed galaxy power spectrum. This model with b = 1 matches both Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) and the small-scale power spect rum but has insufficient power on scales lambda approximately 100 h(exp -1) Mpc. We derive a formula for the effect of small-scale peculiar velocities on the power spectrum and combine this formula with the linear-regime amplification described by Kaiser to compute an estimate of the real-space power spectrum. Two tests reveal luminosity bias in the galaxy distribution: First, the amplitude of the pwer spectrum is approximately 40% larger for the brightest

  7. The coherent Cerenkov radiated power from a group of field-aligned test particles in a magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    An expression is derived that describes the coherent Cerenkov radiated power from a group of test particles in a plasma medium moving parallel to a magnetic field. In this analysis, each particle has an arbitrary position and velocity along a field line and, as a consequence, both the spatial and temporal coherence of the radiation are considered. As an example, it is demonstrated that a monoenergetic electron beam consisting of small pulses can generate wave powers well above incoherent levels if the pulse spacing is comparable to an integer number of emission wavelengths. It is also shown that, if the beam particles have a velocity spread, Delta-V, the wave powers will decrease in time due to the reduced temporal coherence of the particle radiators, where this coherence scales as 1/Delta-V. This latter effect applies to any charged particle beam propagating in a magnetoplasma, because even an initially monoenergetic beam becomes thermalized by electrostatic wave-particle interactions reducing the radiated power.

  8. How Radiation Oncologists Evaluate and Incorporate Life Expectancy Estimates Into the Treatment of Palliative Cancer Patients: A Survey-Based Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tseng, Yolanda D., E-mail: ydtseng@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Krishnan, Monica S. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sullivan, Adam J. [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Jones, Joshua A. [Harvard Palliative Medicine Fellowship Program, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chow, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: We surveyed how radiation oncologists think about and incorporate a palliative cancer patient’s life expectancy (LE) into their treatment recommendations. Methods and Materials: A 41-item survey was e-mailed to 113 radiation oncology attending physicians and residents at radiation oncology centers within the Boston area. Physicians estimated how frequently they assessed the LE of their palliative cancer patients and rated the importance of 18 factors in formulating LE estimates. For 3 common palliative case scenarios, physicians estimated LE and reported whether they had an LE threshold below which they would modify their treatment recommendation. LE estimates were considered accurate when within the 95% confidence interval of median survival estimates from an established prognostic model. Results: Among 92 respondents (81%), the majority were male (62%), from an academic practice (75%), and an attending physician (70%). Physicians reported assessing LE in 91% of their evaluations and most frequently rated performance status (92%), overall metastatic burden (90%), presence of central nervous system metastases (75%), and primary cancer site (73%) as “very important” in assessing LE. Across the 3 cases, most (88%-97%) had LE thresholds that would alter treatment recommendations. Overall, physicians’ LE estimates were 22% accurate with 67% over the range predicted by the prognostic model. Conclusions: Physicians often incorporate LE estimates into palliative cancer care and identify important prognostic factors. Most have LE thresholds that guide their treatment recommendations. However, physicians overestimated patient survival times in most cases. Future studies focused on improving LE assessment are needed.

  9. Current problems of radiographic testing and radiation protection. Contributions; Aktuelle Fragen der Durchstrahlungspruefung und des Strahlenschutzes. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-06-01

    These seminar proceedings contain eight contributions in the form of summaries, some with PowerPoint slides, on the following topics: 1. Selected applications of radiographic testing in lightweight construction (T. Wenzel et al.); 2. X-ray computer tomography in lightweight construction (H.-J. Ullrich); 3. Testing of castings at Volkswagen using atline computer tomography (F. Hansen et al.), 4: Use of X-ray computer tomography for inspection of fibre-reinforced structures in the aerospace sector (T. Ullmann et al.); 5. New standards in digital radiography and for the phaseout of film radiography - from welding techniques to fibre composites (U. Ewert); 6. The current model approvals for nondestructive testing - what do the regulations require of the radiation protection supervisor and the radiation protection officer? (A. Lange); 7. Pulsed x-ray radiation - what measurement devices come into consideration? - current status and developments (F. Busch); 8. The revised EURATOM basic radiation protection standards - What changes await industrial radiography? [German] Diese Seminar-CD enthaelt acht Beitraege in Form von Kurzfassungen, zum Teil auch mit PowerPoint-Folien, zu folgenden Themen: 1. Ausgewaehlte Anwendungen der Durchstrahlungspruefung im Leichtbau (T. Wenzel et al.); 2. Roentgen-Computer-Tomographie im Leichtbau (H.-J. Ullrich); 3. Pruefung der Gussproduktion bei Volkswagen mit Hilfe der atline Computertomographie (F. Hansen et al.), 4: Einsatz der Roentgen-Computertomographie zur Untersuchung von Faserverbundstrukturen in der Luft- und Raumfahrt (T. Ullmann et al.); 5. Neue Standards zur Digitalen Radiographie und zum Filmersatz - von der Schweisstechnik bis zu Faserkompositen (U. Ewert); 6. Die aktuellen Muster-Genehmigungen in der ZfP - Was verlangen die Auflagen vom SSV und SSB? (A. Lange); 7. Gepulste Roentgenstrahlung - Welche Messgeraete waeren einsetzbar?. - Stand und Entwicklung (F. Busch); 8. Die neue EURATOM-Strahlenschutzgrundnorm - Welche

  10. Using the FLUKA Monte Carlo Code to Simulate the Interactions of Ionizing Radiation with Matter to Assist and Aid Our Understanding of Ground Based Accelerator Testing, Space Hardware Design, and Secondary Space Radiation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Designing hardware to operate in the space radiation environment is a very difficult and costly activity. Ground based particle accelerators can be used to test for exposure to the radiation environment, one species at a time, however, the actual space environment cannot be duplicated because of the range of energies and isotropic nature of space radiation. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code is an integrated physics package based at CERN that has been under development for the last 40+ years and includes the most up-to-date fundamental physics theory and particle physics data. This work presents an overview of FLUKA and how it has been used in conjunction with ground based radiation testing for NASA and improve our understanding of secondary particle environments resulting from the interaction of space radiation with matter.

  11. Optimizing bone surveys performed for suspected non-accidental trauma with attention to maximizing diagnostic yield while minimizing radiation exposure: utility of pelvic and lateral radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Priyanka; Stein-Wexler, Rebecca; Seibert, Anthony; Wootton-Gorges, Sandra L. [University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Coulter, Kevin [University of California Davis Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Sacramento, CA (United States); Li, Chin-Shang [University of California Davis Medical Center, Division of Biostatistics, Department of Public Health Sciences, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Skeletal surveys for non-accidental trauma (NAT) include lateral spinal and pelvic views, which have a significant radiation dose. To determine whether pelvic and lateral spinal radiographs should routinely be performed during initial bone surveys for suspected NAT. The radiology database was queried for the period May 2005 to May 2011 using CPT codes for skeletal surveys for suspected NAT. Studies performed for skeletal dysplasia and follow-up surveys were excluded. Initial skeletal surveys were reviewed to identify fractures present, including those identified only on lateral spinal and/or pelvic radiographs. Clinical information and MR imaging was reviewed for the single patient with vertebral compression deformities. Of the 530 children, 223 (42.1%) had rib and extremity fractures suspicious for NAT. No fractures were identified solely on pelvic radiographs. Only one child (<0.2%) had vertebral compression deformities identified on a lateral spinal radiograph. This infant had rib and extremity fractures and was clinically paraplegic. MR imaging confirmed the vertebral body fractures. Since no fractures were identified solely on pelvic radiographs and on lateral spinal radiographs in children without evidence of NAT, nor in nearly all with evidence of NAT, inclusion of these views in the initial evaluation of children for suspected NAT may not be warranted. (orig.)

  12. The VIMOS VLT Deep Survey: Testing the gravitational instability paradigm at z ~ 1

    CERN Document Server

    Marinoni, C; Cappi, A; Lefèvre, O; Mazure, A; Meneux, B; Pollo, A; Iovino, A; McCracken, H J; Scaramella, R; dela Torre, S; Virey, J M; Bottini, D; Garilli, B; Le Brun, V; MacCagni, D; Picat, J P; Scodeggio, M; Tresse, L; Vettolani, G; Zanichelli, A; Adami, C; Arnouts, S; Bardelli, S; Bolzonella, M; Charlot, S; Ciliegi, P; Contini, T; Foucaud, S; Franzetti, P; Gavignaud, I; Ilbert, O; Lamareille, F; Marano, B; Mathez, G; Merighi, R; Paltani, S; Pelle, R; Pozzetti, L; Radovich, M; Vergani, D; Zamorani, G; Zucca, E; Abbas, U; Bondi, M; Bongiorno, A; Brinchmann, J; Buzzi, A; Cucciati, O; de Ravel, L; Gregorini, L; Mellier, Y; Merluzzi, P; Pérez-Montero, E; Taxil, P; Temporin, S; Walcher, C J

    2008-01-01

    We have reconstructed the three-dimensional density fluctuation maps to z ~ 1.5 using the distribution of galaxies observed in the VVDS-Deep survey. We use this overdensity field to measure the evolution of the probability distribution function and its lower-order moments over the redshift interval 0.7tested on realistic mock samples. We find that the variance and skewness of the galaxy distribution evolve over this redshift interval in a way that is remarkably consistent with predictions of first- and second-order perturbation theory. This finding confirms the standard gravitational instability paradigm over nearly 9 Gyrs of cosmic time and demonstrates the importance of accounting for the non-linear component of galaxy biasing to consistently reproduce the higher-order moments of the galaxy distribution and their evolution.

  13. A Polar Rover for Large-scale Scientific Surveys: Design, Implementation and Field Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing He

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of polar regions is of great importance to scientific research. Unfortunately, due to the harsh environment, most of the regions on the Antarctic continent are still unreachable for humankind. Therefore, in 2011, the Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE launched a project to design a rover to conduct large-scale scientific surveys on the Antarctic. The main challenges for the rover are twofold: one is the mobility, i.e., how to make a rover that could survive the harsh environment and safely move on the uneven, icy and snowy terrain; the other is the autonomy, in that the robot should be able to move at a relatively high speed with little or no human intervention so that it can explore a large region in a limit time interval under the communication constraints. In this paper, the corresponding techniques, especially the polar rover’s design and autonomous navigation algorithms, are introduced in detail. Subsequently, an experimental report of the fields tests on the Antarctic is given to show some preliminary evaluation of the rover. Finally, experiences and existing challenging problems are summarized.

  14. Serological survey on canine coronavirus antibodies in giant pandas by virus neutralization test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAOJun; XIAXian-zhu; YANGSong-tao; LIDe-sheng; HUGui-xue; GAOYu-wei; SUNHe-ting; ZHAOZhong-pen; XlEZhi-jing; YANFang; HEWen-qi; HUANGGen

    2004-01-01

    In order to survey the infectious situation of canine coronavirus (CCV) in giant panda population, a virus neutralization test detecting specific antibodies against CCV in giant panda's sera was established by using two-fold dilutions of serum and 100 TCID50 of the virus. The 62 sera samples of giant pandas, which were gathered from zoos and reserve region of Sichuan Province, China were detected. The neutralization antibody titer of 1:4 was recognized as the positive criterion, 8 sera samples were detected to be positive, and the positive rate was 12.9%. The titers of neutralizing antibody ranged from 1:8 to 1:32. It was the first comprehensive investigation on neutralization antibodies against CCV in giant panda population in China. The results of study showed that the infection of CCV in giant panda population was universal, which has posed a threat to the health of giant panda. Therefore, it is incumbent on us to study safe and effective vaccines to protect giant panda against CCV infection.

  15. A Polar Rover for Large-Scale Scientific Surveys: Design, Implementation and Field Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing He

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exploration of polar regions is of great importance to scientific research. Unfortunately, due to the harsh environment, most of the regions on the Antarctic continent are still unreachable for humankind. Therefore, in 2011, the Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE launched a project to design a rover to conduct large-scale scientific surveys on the Antarctic. The main challenges for the rover are twofold: one is the mobility, i.e., how to make a rover that could survive the harsh environment and safely move on the uneven, icy and snowy terrain; the other is the autonomy, in that the robot should be able to move at a relatively high speed with little or no human intervention so that it can explore a large region in a limit time interval under the communication constraints. In this paper, the corresponding techniques, especially the polar rover's design and autonomous navigation algorithms, are introduced in detail. Subsequently, an experimental report of the fields tests on the Antarctic is given to show some preliminary evaluation of the rover. Finally, experiences and existing challenging problems are summarized.

  16. An X-ray Imaging Survey of Quasar Jets -- Testing the Inverse Compton Model

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, H L; Schwartz, D A; Murphy, D W; Lovell, J E J; Worrall, D M; Birkinshaw, M; Perlman, E S; Godfrey, L; Jauncey, D L

    2011-01-01

    We present results from continued Chandra X-ray imaging and spectroscopy of a flux-limited sample of flat spectrum radio-emitting quasars with jet-like extended structure. X-rays are detected from 24 of the 39 jets observed so far. We compute the distribution of alpha_rx, the spectral index between the X-ray and radio bands, showing that it is broad, extending at least from 0.8 to 1.2. While there is a general trend that the radio brightest jets are detected most often, it is clear that predicting the X-ray flux from the radio knot flux densities is risky so a shallow X-ray survey is the most effective means for finding jets that are X-ray bright. We test the model in which the X-rays result from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by relativistic electrons in the jet moving with high bulk Lorentz factor nearly along the line of sight. Depending on how the jet magnetic fields vary with z, the observed X-ray to radio flux ratios do not follow the redshift dependence exp...

  17. Testing the lognormality of the galaxy and weak lensing convergence distributions from Dark Energy Survey maps

    CERN Document Server

    Clerkin, L; Manera, M; Lahav, O; Abdalla, F; Amara, A; Bacon, D; Chang, C; Gaztañaga, E; Hawken, A; Jain, B; Joachimi, B; Vikram, V; Abbott, T; Allam, S; Armstrong, R; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernstein, G M; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Burk, D L; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Dietrich, J P; Eifler, T F; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kent, S; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lima, M; Melchior, P; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Sanchez, E; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Santos, M Soares; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Walker, A R

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (kappa_WL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the Counts in Cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data over 139 deg^2. We test whether the underlying density contrast is well described by a lognormal distribution for the galaxies, the convergence and their joint PDF. We confirm that the galaxy density contrast distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Poisson noise at angular scales from 10-40 arcmin (corresponding to physical scales of 3-10 Mpc). We note that as kappa_WL is a weighted sum of the mass fluctuations along the line of sight, its PDF is expected to be only approximately lognormal. We find that the kappa_WL d...

  18. Tolerancing, alignment and test of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) optical assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeau, Brian; Balonek, Gregory; MacDonald, Robert; Chrisp, Michael; Chesbrough, Christian; Andre, James; Clark, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will carry four visible waveband seven-element refractive f/1.4 lenses, each with a 34 degree diagonal field of view. This paper describes the tolerancing, assembly and alignment methods developed during the build of the TESS Risk Reduction Unit optical system. Lens assembly tolerances were derived from a sensitivity analysis using an image quality metric customized for mission performance. The optomechanical design consists of a two-stage lens housing that provides access for active alignment of each lens using a Trioptics OptiCentric measurement system. Thermal stresses and alignment shifts are mitigated by mounting the optics with cast RTV silicone spacers into individually aligned bezels, and custom fixtures were developed to aid in RTV bonding with reduced alignment error. The lens assembly was tested interferometrically over the field of view at room temperature and results were used to successfully predict lens performance and compensator adjustments and detector shim thickness for the -75C operational temperature and pressure.

  19. Survey of Occupational Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Patch Test among Clothing Employees in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Xin; Gao, Bing-Ai; Cheng, Hai-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Occupational population-based epidemiological data relating to occupational contact allergies in the Chinese clothing industry are limited. To investigate the prevalence of occupational allergic contact dermatitis (OACD) and to identify the causative allergens among clothing employees in China, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 529 clothing employees at 12 clothing factories in Beijing. All employees were subjected to an interview using self-administered questionnaire and skin examination, and those who were diagnosed with occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) were patch tested. In the present survey, we found that the overall 1-year prevalence of OACD among the clothing employees was 8.5%. The 1-year prevalence of OACD among workers (10.8%) was significantly higher than that among managers (3.2%). The lesions were primarily on the hands and wrists in workers, but the face and neck in managers. The major allergens were nickel sulfate and cobalt dichloride in workers and colophony and p-tert-butylphenol formaldehyde resin in managers. In conclusion, workers are at a higher risk of OACD compared with managers in the Chinese clothing industry. In addition to hand dermatitis in workers, airborne contact dermatitis on the face and neck should be also addressed in managers.

  20. Genus Topology of Structure in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: Model Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Hambrick, D. Clay; Vogeley, Michael S.; Kim, Juhan; Park, Changbom; Choi, Yun-Young; Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2008-03-01

    We measure the three-dimensional topology of large-scale structure in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This allows the genus statistic to be measured with unprecedented statistical accuracy. The sample size is now sufficiently large to allow the topology to be an important tool for testing galaxy formation models. For comparison, we make mock SDSS samples using several state-of-the-art N-body simulations: the Millennium run of Springel et al. (10 billion particles), the Kim & Park CDM models (1.1 billion particles), and the Cen & Ostriker hydrodynamic code models (8.6 billion cell hydro mesh). Each of these simulations uses a different method for modeling galaxy formation. The SDSS data show a genus curve that is broadly characteristic of that produced by Gaussian random-phase initial conditions. Thus, the data strongly support the standard model of inflation where Gaussian random-phase initial conditions are produced by random quantum fluctuations in the early universe. But on top of this general shape there are measurable differences produced by nonlinear gravitational effects and biasing connected with galaxy formation. The N-body simulations have been tuned to reproduce the power spectrum and multiplicity function but not topology, so topology is an acid test for these models. The data show a "meatball" shift (only partly due to the Sloan Great Wall of galaxies) that differs at the 2.5 σ level from the results of the Millenium run and the Kim & Park dark halo models, even including the effects of cosmic variance.

  1. 131I-tositumomab myeloablative radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: radiation dose to the testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hattori, Naoya; Gopal, Ajay K.; Shields, Andrew T.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Gooley, Ted; Pagel, John M.; Press, Oliver W.; Rajendran, Joseph G.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate radiation doses to the testes delivered by a radiolabeled anti-CD20 antibody and its effects on male sex hormone levels. Materials and methods: Testicular uptake and retention of 131I-tositumomab were measured, and testicular absorbed doses were calculated for 67 male patients (54+/-11 years of age) with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who had undergone myeloablative radioimmunotherapy (RIT) using 131I-tositumomab. Time-activity curves for the major organs, testes, and whole body were generated from planar imaging studies. In a subset of patients, male sex hormones were measured before and 1 year after the therapy. Results: The absorbed dose to the testes showed considerable variability (range=4.4-70.2 Gy). Pretherapy levels of total testosterone were below the lower limit of the reference range, and post-therapy evaluation demonstrated further reduction [4.6+/-1.8 nmol/l (pre-RIT) vs. 3.8+/-2.9 nmol/l (post-RIT), P<0.05]. Patients receiving higher radiation doses to the testes (>=25 Gy) showed a greater reduction [4.7+/-1.6 nmol/l (pre-RIT) vs. 3.3+/-2.7 nmol/l (post-RIT), P<0.05] compared with patients receiving lower doses (<25 Gy), who showed no significant change in total testosterone levels. Conclusion: The testicular radiation absorbed dose varied highly among individual patients. Finally, patients receiving higher doses to the testes were more likely to show post-RIT suppression of testosterone levels.

  2. Thermal Assessment of Landsat-7 ETM+ Radiative Cooler in Instrument and Spacecraft Thermal Vacuum Tests and in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    1999-01-01

    During the radiative cooler cool-down phase of the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument thermal vacuum test #3, the coldest temperature that the Cold Focal Plane Array (CFPA) achieved was 89.5 K. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.5 K in 80 hours. In the spacecraft and instrument integrated thermal vacuum test, the cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 86.9 K in 80 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 0.08 K/hr when the cool-down was terminated. The cool-down was faster, and a colder CFPA temperature was obtained. In flight, the cooler cool- down was even faster, and colder. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.7 K in 33 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 1 K/hr when cool- down was terminated at 89.7 K. The factors that affected the ETM+ cooler cool-down are the radiation heat sink temperature for the cold stage and intermediate stage, parasitic radiation heat load to the cooler, parasitic conduction heat load to the cooler, and cooler outgas time preceding cooler cool-down.

  3. Thermal Assessment of Landsat-7 ETM+ Radiative Cooler in Instrument and Spacecraft Thermal Vacuum Tests and in Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    1999-01-01

    During the radiative cooler cool-down phase of the Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) instrument thermal vacuum test #3, the coldest temperature that the Cold Focal Plane Array (CFPA) achieved was 89.5 K. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.5 K in 80 hours. In the spacecraft and instrument integrated thermal vacuum test, the cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 86.9 K in 80 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 0.08 K/hr when the cool-down was terminated. The cool-down was faster, and a colder CFPA temperature was obtained. In flight, the cooler cool- down was even faster, and colder. The cold stage/CFPA temperature decreased from 315 K to 89.7 K in 33 hours, and was still decreasing at a rate of 1 K/hr when cool- down was terminated at 89.7 K. The factors that affected the ETM+ cooler cool-down are the radiation heat sink temperature for the cold stage and intermediate stage, parasitic radiation heat load to the cooler, parasitic conduction heat load to the cooler, and cooler outgas time preceding cooler cool-down.

  4. Survey of ELF-VLF plasma waves in outer radiation belt observed by Cluster STAFF-SA experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Various types of plasma waves have profound effects on acceleration and scattering of radiation belt particles. For the purposes of radiation belt modeling it is necessary to know statistical distributions of plasma wave parameters. This paper analyzes four years of plasma wave observations in the Earth's outer radiation belt obtained by the STAFF-SA experiment on board Cluster spacecraft. Statistical distributions of spectral density of different plasma waves observed in ELF-VLF range (chorus, plasmaspheric hiss, magnetosonic waves are presented as a function of magnetospheric coordinates and geomagnetic activity indices. Comparison with other spacecraft studies supports some earlier conclusions about the distribution of chorus and hiss waves and helps to remove the long-term controversy regarding the distribution of equatorial magnetosonic waves. This study represents a step towards the development of multi-spacecraft database of plasma wave activity in radiation belts.

  5. Comparison of cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and mobile phone GSM 900 radiation in the Allium cepa test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesnya, Dmitry S; Romanovsky, Anton V

    2013-01-20

    The goal of this study was to compare the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of plutonium-239 alpha particles and GSM 900 modulated mobile phone (model Sony Ericsson K550i) radiation in the Allium cepa test. Three groups of bulbs were exposed to mobile phone radiation during 0 (sham), 3 and 9h. A positive control group was treated during 20min with plutonium-239 alpha-radiation. Mitotic abnormalities, chromosome aberrations, micronuclei and mitotic index were analyzed. Exposure to alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 and exposure to modulated radiation from mobile phone during 3 and 9h significantly increased the mitotic index. GSM 900 mobile phone radiation as well as alpha-radiation from plutonium-239 induced both clastogenic and aneugenic effects. However, the aneugenic activity of mobile phone radiation was more pronounced. After 9h of exposure to mobile phone radiation, polyploid cells, three-groups metaphases, amitoses and some unspecified abnormalities were detected, which were not registered in the other experimental groups. Importantly, GSM 900 mobile phone radiation increased the mitotic index, the frequency of mitotic and chromosome abnormalities, and the micronucleus frequency in a time-dependent manner. Due to its sensitivity, the A. cepa test can be recommended as a useful cytogenetic assay to assess cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Validity and reliability testing of two instruments to measure breast cancer patients' concerns and information needs relating to radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristjanson Linda J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult to determine the most effective approach to patient education or tailor education interventions for patients in radiotherapy without tools that assess patients' specific radiation therapy information needs and concerns. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop psychometrically sound tools to adequately determine the concerns and information needs of cancer patients during radiation therapy. Patients and Methods Two tools were developed to (1 determine patients concerns about radiation therapy (RT Concerns Scale and (2 ascertain patient's information needs at different time point during their radiation therapy (RT Information Needs Scale. Tools were based on previous research by the authors, published literature on breast cancer and radiation therapy and information behaviour research. Thirty-one breast cancer patients completed the questionnaire on one occasion and thirty participants completed the questionnaire on a second occasion to facilitate test-retest reliability. One participant's responses were removed from the analysis. Results were analysed for content validity, internal consistency and stability over time. Results Both tools demonstrated high internal consistency and adequate stability over time. The nine items in the RT Concerns Scale were retained because they met all pre-set psychometric criteria. Two items were deleted from the RT Information Needs Scale because they did not meet content validity criteria and did not achieve pre-specified criteria for internal consistency. This tool now contains 22 items. Conclusion This paper provides preliminary data suggesting that the two tools presented are reliable and valid and would be suitable for use in trials or in the clinical setting.

  7. Bilogical effects of ionizing radiation: epidemiological surveys and laboratory animal experiments. Implications for risk evaluation and decision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1981-04-01

    General background is given for an understanding of the potential health effects in populations exposed to low-level ionizing radiations. The discussion is within the framework of the scientific deliberations and controversies that arose during preparation of the current report of the committee on the biological effects of ionizing radiation of the National Academy of Science - National Research Council (1980 Beir-III Report). (ACR)

  8. Low Interrater Reliability in Grading of Rectal Bleeding Using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Toxicity Scales: A Survey of Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huynh-Le, Minh-Phuong [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Zhang, Zhe [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T.; DeWeese, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Song, Daniel Y., E-mail: dsong2@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To measure concordance among genitourinary radiation oncologists in using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria (NCI CTC) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) grading scales to grade rectal bleeding. Methods and Materials: From June 2013 to January 2014, a Web-based survey was sent to 250 American and Canadian academic radiation oncologists who treat prostate cancer. Participants were provided 4 case vignettes in which patients received radiation therapy and developed rectal bleeding and were asked for management plans and to rate the bleeding according to NCI CTC v.4 and RTOG late toxicity grading (scales provided). In 2 cases, participants were also asked whether they would send the patient for colonoscopy. A multilevel, random intercept modeling approach was used to assess sources of variation (case, respondent) in toxicity grading to calculate the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Agreement on a dichotomous grading scale (low grades 1-2 vs high grades 3-4) was also assessed, using the κ statistic for multiple respondents. Results: Seventy-two radiation oncologists (28%) completed the survey. Forty-seven (65%) reported having either written or been principal investigator on a study using these scales. Agreement between respondents was moderate (ICC 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47-0.58) when using NCI CTC and fair using the RTOG scale (ICC 0.28, 95% CI 0.20-0.40). Respondents who chose an invasive management were more likely to select a higher toxicity grade (P<.0001). Using the dichotomous scale, we observed moderate agreement (κ = 0.42, 95% CI 0.40-0.44) with the NCI CTC scale, but only slight agreement with the RTOG scale (κ = 0.19, 95% CI 0.17-0.21). Conclusion: Low interrater reliability was observed among radiation oncologists grading rectal bleeding using 2 common scales. Clearer definitions of late rectal bleeding toxicity should be constructed to reduce this variability and avoid ambiguity in both

  9. Testing a combined radiation protection modality: chemical protector and local shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkova, M; Baldzhijska, M

    1989-01-01

    The impact of combined radiation protection upon damage to critical organs-spleen, small intestine, and bone marrow was studied in adult rat males 3 days after whole-body exposure to 9.5 Gy gamma-ray dose. Adeturone, the chemical radioprotector used, was administered intraperitoneally at 1/17 of its LD50 dose. Local shielding of the abdomino-lumbal region was accomplished using a lead ring providing on average 28-30% attenuation of radiation exposure. This degree of physical abdomino-lumbal protection combined with adeturone (50 mg/kg) pretreatment resulted in mutual enhancement of the components' action, expansion of the chemical agent's therapeutic range, providing a combination with improved overall antiradiation properties.

  10. Photonuclear and Radiation Effects Testing with a Refurbished 20 MeV Medical Electron Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Timothy; Beezhold, Wendland; De Veaux, Linda C; Harmon, Frank; Petrisko, Jill E; Spaulding, Randy

    2005-01-01

    An S-band 20 MeV electron linear accelerator formerly used for medical applications has been recommissioned to provide a wide range of photonuclear activation studies as well as various radiation effects on biological and microelectronic systems. Four radiation effect applications involving the electron/photon beams are described. Photonuclear activation of a stable isotope of oxygen provides an active means of characterizing polymer degradation. Biological irradiations of microorganisms including bacteria were used to study total dose and dose rate effects on survivability and the adaptation of these organisms to repeated exposures. Microelectronic devices including bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and diodes were irradiated to study photocurrent from these devices as a function of peak dose rate with comparisons to computer modeling results. In addition, the 20 MeV linac may easily be converted to a medium energy neutron source which has been used to study neutron damage effects on transistors.

  11. Moving on From Representativeness: Testing the Utility of the Global Drug Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Monica J; Ferris, Jason A; Zahnow, Renee; Palamar, Joseph J; Maier, Larissa J; Winstock, Adam R

    2017-01-01

    A decline in response rates in traditional household surveys, combined with increased internet coverage and decreased research budgets, has resulted in increased attractiveness of web survey research designs based on purposive and voluntary opt-in sampling strategies. In the study of hidden or stigmatised behaviours, such as cannabis use, web survey methods are increasingly common. However, opt-in web surveys are often heavily criticised due to their lack of sampling frame and unknown representativeness. In this article, we outline the current state of the debate about the relevance of pursuing representativeness, the state of probability sampling methods, and the utility of non-probability, web survey methods especially for accessing hidden or minority populations. Our article has two aims: (1) to present a comprehensive description of the methodology we use at Global Drug Survey (GDS), an annual cross-sectional web survey and (2) to compare the age and sex distributions of cannabis users who voluntarily completed (a) a household survey or (b) a large web-based purposive survey (GDS), across three countries: Australia, the United States, and Switzerland. We find that within each set of country comparisons, the demographic distributions among recent cannabis users are broadly similar, demonstrating that the age and sex distributions of those who volunteer to be surveyed are not vastly different between these non-probability and probability methods. We conclude that opt-in web surveys of hard-to-reach populations are an efficient way of gaining in-depth understanding of stigmatised behaviours and are appropriate, as long as they are not used to estimate drug use prevalence of the general population. PMID:28924351

  12. Experiments testing the abatement of radiation damage in D-xylose isomerase crystals with cryogenic helium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, B Leif; Harp, Joel M; Kirschbaum, Kristin; Schall, Constance A; DeWitt, Ken; Howard, Andrew; Pinkerton, A Alan; Bunick, Gerard J

    2002-11-01

    Helium is a more efficient cryogen than nitrogen, and for macromolecular data collection at high-flux beamlines will deliver lower temperatures. An open-flow helium cryostat developed at the University of Toledo (the Pinkerton Device) has been used for macromolecular data collection. This device differs from standard commercial He cryostats by having a much narrower aperture providing a high velocity stream of He around the crystal that maximizes convective and conductive heat exchange between the crystal and the cryogen. This paper details a series of experiments conducted at the IMCA-CAT 17ID beamline using one crystal for each experimental condition to examine whether helium at 16 K provided better radiation-damage abatement compared with nitrogen at 100 K. These studies used matched high-quality crystals (0.94 A diffraction resolution) of D-xylose isomerase derived from the commercial material Gensweet SGI. Comparisons show that helium indeed abates the indicators of radiation damage, in this case resulting in longer crystal diffractive lifetimes. The overall trend suggests that crystals maintain order and that high-resolution data are less affected by increased radiation load when crystals are cooled with He rather than N(2). This is probably the result of a lower effective temperature at the crystal with concomitant reduction in free-radical diffusion. Other features, such as an apparent phase transition in macromolecular crystals at lower temperatures, require investigation to broaden the utility of He use.

  13. Research on a laser ultrasound method for testing the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kuanshuang; Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Liyin

    2017-02-01

    Laser ultrasonics has been investigated for inspecting the quality of a nuclear radiation protection structure. A possibility is proposed to improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of a laser ultrasonic inspection system. Then, a nuclear radiation protection structure composed of an AISI 1045 steel sheet connected with a lead alloy sheet by using an epoxy resin adhesive was manufactured with simulated defects. A non-contact laser ultrasonic inspection system, where the measured signals were filtered using a wavelet threshold de-noising method, was established to conduct a series of experiments. The proposed signal processing method can significantly improve the SNR of measured laser ultrasound signals on a rough solid surface. Compared with the SNR of original ultrasonic signals measured in transmission and reflection, the SNR of processed transmitted and reflected signals is improved by 13.8 and 16.6 dB, respectively. Moreover, laser ultrasonic C-scans based on the transmission and pulse-echo method can detect the simulated de-bonding defects, and the relative deviation between the measured sizes and design values is below 9%. Therefore, the laser ultrasonic method combined with effective signal processing can achieve the quantitative characterization of de-bonding defects in nuclear radiation protection structures.

  14. Lineage diversity and size disparity in Musteloidea: testing patterns of adaptive radiation using molecular and fossil-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Chris J; Slater, Graham J; Mehta, Rita S

    2017-05-04

    Adaptive radiation is hypothesized to be a primary mechanism that drives the remarkable species diversity and morphological disparity across the Tree of Life. Tests for adaptive radiation in extant taxa are traditionally estimated from calibrated molecular phylogenies with little input from extinct taxa. With 85 putative species in 33 genera and over 400 described extinct species, the carnivoran superfamily Musteloidea is a prime candidate to investigate patterns of adaptive radiation using both extant- and fossil-based macroevolutionary methods. The species diversity and equally impressive ecological and phenotypic diversity found across Musteloidea is often attributed to 2 adaptive radiations coinciding with 2 major climate events, the Eocene-Oligocene transition and the Mid-Miocene Climate Transition. Here, we compiled a novel time-scaled phylogeny for 88% of extant musteloids and used it as a framework for testing the predictions of adaptive radiation hypotheses with respect to rates of lineage diversification and phenotypic evolution. Contrary to expectations, we found no evidence for rapid bursts of lineage diversification at the origin of Musteloidea, and further analyses of lineage diversification rates using molecular and fossil-based methods did not find associations between rates of lineage diversification and the Eocene-Oligocene transition or Mid-Miocene Climate Transition as previously hypothesized. Rather, we found support for decoupled diversification dynamics driven by increased clade carrying capacity in the branches leading to a subclade of elongate mustelids. Supporting decoupled diversification dynamics between the subclade of elongate mustelids and the ancestral musteloid regime is our finding of increased rates of body length evolution, but not body mass evolution, within the decoupled mustelid subclade. The lack of correspondence in rates of body mass and length evolution suggest that phenotypic evolutionary rates under a single

  15. Results of the 2012-2013 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) job search and career planning survey of graduating residents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattes, Malcolm D; Kharofa, Jordan; Zeidan, Youssef H; Tung, Kaity; Gondi, Vinai; Golden, Daniel W

    2014-01-01

    To determine the timeline used by postgraduate year (PGY)-5 radiation oncology residents during the job application process and the factors most important to them when deciding on a first job. In 2012 and 2013, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide electronic survey of PGY-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 2 months of their training. Descriptive statistics are reported. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed. Surveys were completed by 180 of 314 residents contacted. The median time to start networking for the purpose of employment was January PGY-4; to start contacting practices, complete and upload a curriculum vitae to a job search website, and use the American Society of Radiation Oncology Career Center was June PGY-4; to obtain letters of recommendation was July PGY-5; to start interviewing was August PGY-5; to finish interviewing was December PGY-5; and to accept a contract was January PGY-5. Those applying for a community position began interviewing at an earlier average time than did those applying for an academic position (P=.04). The most important factors to residents when they evaluated job offers included (in order from most to least important) a collegial environment, geographic location, emphasis on best patient care, quality of support staff and facility, and multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Factors that were rated significantly different between subgroups based on the type of position applied for included adequate mentoring, dedicated research time, access to clinical trials, amount of time it takes to become a partner, geographic location, size of group, starting salary, and amount of vacation and days off. The residents' perspective on the job application process over 2 years is documented to provide a resource for current and future residents and employers to use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Results of the 2012-2013 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Job Search and Career Planning Survey of Graduating Residents in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattes, Malcolm D., E-mail: mdm9007@nyp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Zeidan, Youssef H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Tung, Kaity [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Gondi, Vinai [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To determine the timeline used by postgraduate year (PGY)-5 radiation oncology residents during the job application process and the factors most important to them when deciding on a first job. Methods and Materials: In 2012 and 2013, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide electronic survey of PGY-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 2 months of their training. Descriptive statistics are reported. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed. Results: Surveys were completed by 180 of 314 residents contacted. The median time to start networking for the purpose of employment was January PGY-4; to start contacting practices, complete and upload a curriculum vitae to a job search website, and use the American Society of Radiation Oncology Career Center was June PGY-4; to obtain letters of recommendation was July PGY-5; to start interviewing was August PGY-5; to finish interviewing was December PGY-5; and to accept a contract was January PGY-5. Those applying for a community position began interviewing at an earlier average time than did those applying for an academic position (P=.04). The most important factors to residents when they evaluated job offers included (in order from most to least important) a collegial environment, geographic location, emphasis on best patient care, quality of support staff and facility, and multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Factors that were rated significantly different between subgroups based on the type of position applied for included adequate mentoring, dedicated research time, access to clinical trials, amount of time it takes to become a partner, geographic location, size of group, starting salary, and amount of vacation and days off. Conclusions: The residents' perspective on the job application process over 2 years is documented to provide a resource for current and future residents and employers to use.

  17. The Leiden/Argentine/Bonn (LAB) Survey of Galactic HI: Final data release of the combined LDS and IAR surveys with improved stray-radiation corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaberla, P.M.W.; Burton, W.B.; Hartmann, L.; Arnal, E.M.; Bajaja, E.; Morras, R.; Pöppel, W.G.L.

    2005-01-01

    We present the final data release of observations of λ21-cm emission from Galactic neutral hydrogen over the entire sky, merging the Leiden/Dwingeloo Survey (LDS: Hartmann & Burton 1997, Atlas of Galactic Neutral Hydrogen) of the sky north of δ = −30◦ with the Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía

  18. Test of a Web and Paper Employee Satisfaction Survey: Comparison of Respondents and Non-Respondents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina B. Gesell

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if administering an employee satisfaction survey using the Internet affected the rates or quality of employees’ participation. 644 hospital employees were randomly assigned to complete a satisfaction survey using either a Web survey or a traditional paper measure. Response rates were relatively high across both modes. No evidence for a very large difference in response rates was detected. A plurality of respondents showed no preference for survey mode while the remainder tended to express a preference for the mode they had been randomly assigned to complete in this study. Respondents did not differ from non-respondents by sex, race, or education. Other response differences (such as age and employment status are likely to be a function of the survey topic. Overall, Web and mail respondents did not differ in the level of employee satisfaction reported, the primary outcome being measured.

  19. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Paul F; Semelka, Michael W; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-03-01

    Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training.

  20. 某铀矿区退役后环境辐射水平调查%Environmental Radiation Level Survey of a Remediated Uranium Mining Area in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵其文; 王国全

    2015-01-01

    The environmental radiation level of a uranium mining area ,once remediated ,was surveyed .It is showed that 226 Ra content in soil samples from some locations exceeds the limit requirement ,and measures are needed to be taken to have the area further remediated .%对某铀矿区退役后辐射环境进行了调查监测。监测结果表明,某铀矿退役场所部分点位土样中核素226 Ra含量超出限值要求,急需采取措施进行治理。

  1. Validity testing and neuropsychology practice in the VA healthcare system: results from recent practitioner survey (.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J Christopher; Roper, Brad L; Arentsen, Timothy J

    2016-05-01

    A survey of neuropsychologists in the Veterans Health Administration examined symptom/performance validity test (SPVT) practices and estimated base rates for patient response bias. Invitations were emailed to 387 psychologists employed within the Veterans Affairs (VA), identified as likely practicing neuropsychologists, resulting in 172 respondents (44.4% response rate). Practice areas varied, with 72% at least partially practicing in general neuropsychology clinics and 43% conducting VA disability exams. Mean estimated failure rates were 23.0% for clinical outpatient, 12.9% for inpatient, and 39.4% for disability exams. Failure rates were the highest for mTBI and PTSD referrals. Failure rates were positively correlated with the number of cases seen and frequency and number of SPVT use. Respondents disagreed regarding whether one (45%) or two (47%) failures are required to establish patient response bias, with those administering more measures employing the more stringent criterion. Frequency of the use of specific SPVTs is reported. Base rate estimates for SPVT failure in VA disability exams are comparable to those in other medicolegal settings. However, failure in routine clinical exams is much higher in the VA than in other settings, possibly reflecting the hybrid nature of the VA's role in both healthcare and disability determination. Generally speaking, VA neuropsychologists use SPVTs frequently and eschew pejorative terms to describe their failure. Practitioners who require only one SPVT failure to establish response bias may overclassify patients. Those who use few or no SPVTs may fail to identify response bias. Additional clinical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  2. Testing the lognormality of the galaxy and weak lensing convergence distributions from Dark Energy Survey maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerkin, L.; Kirk, D.; Manera, M.; Lahav, O.; Abdalla, F.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Chang, C.; Gaztañaga, E.; Hawken, A.; Jain, B.; Joachimi, B.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-08-30

    It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (kappa_WL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the Counts in Cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data over 139 deg^2. We test whether the underlying density contrast is well described by a lognormal distribution for the galaxies, the convergence and their joint PDF. We confirm that the galaxy density contrast distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Poisson noise at angular scales from 10-40 arcmin (corresponding to physical scales of 3-10 Mpc). We note that as kappa_WL is a weighted sum of the mass fluctuations along the line of sight, its PDF is expected to be only approximately lognormal. We find that the kappa_WL distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Gaussian shape noise at scales between 10 and 20 arcmin, with a best-fit chi^2/DOF of 1.11 compared to 1.84 for a Gaussian model, corresponding to p-values 0.35 and 0.07 respectively, at a scale of 10 arcmin. Above 20 arcmin a simple Gaussian model is sufficient. The joint PDF is also reasonably fitted by a bivariate lognormal. As a consistency check we compare the variances derived from the lognormal modelling with those directly measured via CiC. Our methods are validated against maps from the MICE Grand Challenge N-body simulation.

  3. Perceived and Performed eHealth Literacy: Survey and Simulated Performance Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neter, Efrat; Brainin, Esther

    2017-01-17

    Electronic health (eHealth) literacy of consumers is essential in order to improve information and communication technology (ICT) use for health purposes by ordinary citizens. However, performed eHealth literacy is seldom studied. Therefore, the present study assessed perceived and performed eHealth literacy using the recent conceptualization of health literacy skills. The aim of this paper was to examine the association between perceived and performed eHealth literacies. In total, 82 Israeli adults participated in the study, all 50 years and older, with a mean age of 67 (SD 11). Of the participants, 60% (49/82) were women and 72% (59/82) had a post-secondary education. The participants were first surveyed and then tested in a computer simulation of health-related Internet tasks. Performed, perceived (eHealth Literacy Scale, eHEALS), and evaluated eHealth literacy were assessed, and performed eHealth literacy was also recorded and re-evaluated later. Performance was scored for successful completion of tasks, and was also assessed by two researchers for motivation, confidence, and amount of help provided. The skills of accessing, understanding, appraising, applying, and generating new information had decreasing successful completion rates. Generating new information was least correlated with other skills. Perceived and performed eHealth literacies were moderately correlated (r=.34, P=.01) while facets of performance (ie, digital literacy and eHealth literacy) were highly correlated (r=.82, Pliteracy were significantly different: low performers were older and had used the Internet for less time, required more assistance, and were less confident in their conduct than high performers. The moderate association between perceived and performed eHealth literacy indicates that the latter should be assessed separately. In as much, the assessment of performed eHealth literacy in clinical settings should entail the structuring of tasks as well as shortening and automatizing

  4. Testing the validity and acceptability of the diagnostic criteria for Hoarding Disorder: a DSM-5 survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, D; Fernández de la Cruz, L; Nakao, T; Pertusa, A

    2011-12-01

    The DSM-5 Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum Sub-Workgroup is recommending the creation of a new diagnostic category named Hoarding Disorder (HD). The validity and acceptability of the proposed diagnostic criteria have yet to be formally tested. Obsessive-compulsive disorder/hoarding experts and random members of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) were shown eight brief clinical vignettes (four cases meeting criteria for HD, three with hoarding behaviour secondary to other mental disorders, and one with subclinical hoarding behaviour) and asked to decide the most appropriate diagnosis in each case. Participants were also asked about the perceived acceptability of the criteria and whether they supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual. Altogether, 211 experts and 48 APA members completed the survey (30% and 10% response rates, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of the HD diagnosis and the individual criteria were high (80-90%) across various types of professionals, irrespective of their experience with hoarding cases. About 90% of participants in both samples thought the criteria would be very/somewhat acceptable for professionals and sufferers. Most experts (70%) supported the inclusion of HD in the main manual, whereas only 50% of the APA members did. The proposed criteria for HD have high sensitivity and specificity. The criteria are also deemed acceptable for professionals and sufferers alike. Training of professionals and the development and validation of semi-structured diagnostic instruments should improve diagnostic accuracy even further. A field trial is now needed to confirm these encouraging findings with real patients in real clinical settings.

  5. Testing the lognormality of the galaxy and weak lensing convergence distributions from Dark Energy Survey maps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clerkin, L.; et al.

    2016-05-06

    It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (kappa_WL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the Counts in Cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data over 139 deg^2. We test whether the underlying density contrast is well described by a lognormal distribution for the galaxies, the convergence and their joint PDF. We confirm that the galaxy density contrast distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Poisson noise at angular scales from 10-40 arcmin (corresponding to physical scales of 3-10 Mpc). We note that as kappa_WL is a weighted sum of the mass fluctuations along the line of sight, its PDF is expected to be only approximately lognormal. We find that the kappa_WL distribution is well modeled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Gaussian shape noise at scales between 10 and 20 arcmin, with a best-fit chi^2/DOF of 1.11 compared to 1.84 for a Gaussian model, corresponding to p-values 0.35 and 0.07 respectively, at a scale of 10 arcmin. Above 20 arcmin a simple Gaussian model is sufficient. The joint PDF is also reasonably fitted by a bivariate lognormal. As a consistency check we compare the variances derived from the lognormal modelling with those directly measured via CiC. Our methods are validated against maps from the MICE Grand Challenge N-body simulation.

  6. Testing the lognormality of the galaxy and weak lensing convergence distributions from Dark Energy Survey maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerkin, L.; Kirk, D.; Manera, M.; Lahav, O.; Abdalla, F.; Amara, A.; Bacon, D.; Chang, C.; Gaztañaga, E.; Hawken, A.; Jain, B.; Joachimi, B.; Vikram, V.; Abbott, T.; Allam, S.; Armstrong, R.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernstein, G. M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Burke, D. L.; Rosell, A. Carnero; Carrasco Kind, M.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Eifler, T. F.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kent, S.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Walker, A. R.

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that the probability distribution function (PDF) of galaxy density contrast is approximately lognormal; whether the PDF of mass fluctuations derived from weak lensing convergence (κWL) is lognormal is less well established. We derive PDFs of the galaxy and projected matter density distributions via the counts-in-cells (CiC) method. We use maps of galaxies and weak lensing convergence produced from the Dark Energy Survey Science Verification data over 139 deg2. We test whether the underlying density contrast is well described by a lognormal distribution for the galaxies, the convergence and their joint PDF. We confirm that the galaxy density contrast distribution is well modelled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Poisson noise at angular scales from 10 to 40 arcmin (corresponding to physical scales of 3-10 Mpc). We note that as κWL is a weighted sum of the mass fluctuations along the line of sight, its PDF is expected to be only approximately lognormal. We find that the κWL distribution is well modelled by a lognormal PDF convolved with Gaussian shape noise at scales between 10 and 20 arcmin, with a best-fitting χ2/dof of 1.11 compared to 1.84 for a Gaussian model, corresponding to p-values 0.35 and 0.07, respectively, at a scale of 10 arcmin. Above 20 arcmin a simple Gaussian model is sufficient. The joint PDF is also reasonably fitted by a bivariate lognormal. As a consistency check, we compare the variances derived from the lognormal modelling with those directly measured via CiC. Our methods are validated against maps from the MICE Grand Challenge N-body simulation.

  7. Using large spectroscopic surveys to test the double degenerate model for Type Ia supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedt, E.; Steeghs, D.; Marsh, T. R.; Gentile Fusillo, N. P.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Green, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Hermes, J. J.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Parsons, S. G.; Bours, M. C. P.; Longa-Peña, P.; Rebassa-Mansergas, A.

    2017-07-01

    An observational constraint on the contribution of double degenerates to Type Ia supernovae requires multiple radial velocity measurements of ideally thousands of white dwarfs. This is because only a small fraction of the double degenerate population is massive enough, with orbital periods short enough, to be considered viable Type Ia progenitors. We show how the radial velocity information available from public surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey can be used to pre-select targets for variability, leading to a 10-fold reduction in observing time required compared to an unranked or random survey. We carry out Monte Carlo simulations to quantify the detection probability of various types of binaries in the survey and show that this method, even in the most pessimistic case, doubles the survey size of the largest survey to date (the SPY Survey) in less than 15 per cent of the required observing time. Our initial follow-up observations corroborate the method, yielding 15 binaries so far (eight known and seven new), as well as orbital periods for four of the new binaries.

  8. Residual radionuclide concentrations and estimated radiation doses at the former French nuclear weapons test sites in Algeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danesi, P.R. [Arsenal, Objekt 3/30, A-1030 Vienna (Austria)], E-mail: piero@danesi.at; Moreno, J. [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Technishe Universitaet Muenchen, Walther-Meissner Str. 3., D-85748 Garching (Germany); Makarewicz, M.; Louvat, D. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2008-11-15

    In order to assess the level of residual radioactivity and evaluate the radiological conditions at the former French nuclear testing sites of Reggane and Taourirt Tan Afella in the south of Algeria, the International Atomic Energy Agency, at the request of the government of Algeria, conducted a field mission to the sites in 1999. At these locations, France conducted a number of nuclear tests in the early 1960s. At the ground zero locality of the ''Gerboise Blanche'' atmospheric test (Reggane) and in the vicinity of a tunnel where radioactive lava was ejected during a poorly contained explosion (Taourirt Tan Afella), non-negligible levels of radioactive material could still be measured. Using the information collected and using realistic potential exposure scenarios, radiation doses to potential occupants and visitors to the sites were estimated.

  9. Genotoxicity assessment of low-level doses of gamma radiation with the SOS chromotest and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, A Ya; Sinitsyna, O I; Frolova, T S; Vasyunina, E A; Dementyev, D V

    2016-07-01

    This is the first study to present data on the genotoxicity of low γ-irradiation doses for E. coli and S. typhimurium cells obtained using the SOS chromotest and the Ames test. The most pronounced effect was recorded in the first 24 h of γ-irradiation. After 72 h in the Ames test and after 96 h in the SOS chromotest, a significant effect of γ-irradiation on bacterial cells was detected. The absence of genotoxicity at the later stages can be explained by the adaptation of bacterial cells to the conditions of exposure. The findings allow the bacterial test system to be used for studying the effects of low doses at the early stages of exposure to radiation.

  10. Radiation Testing of the Configurable Fault Tolerant Processor (CFTP) for Space-Based Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    for testing. Table 11. Test Agenda G. SHIPPING INFORMATION: Test equipment should be sent to: DR PAUL MARSHALL CARE OF MR CARLOS CASTANEDA ...Facility POC: Carlos Castaneda Email: Castaneda @Crocker.UCDavis.Edu 67 APPENDIX B: LAN IP ADDRESS ASSIGNMENTS Table 12. IP Assignment Log

  11. Heavy-Ion Radiation Impact on a 4Mb FRAM under Different Test Conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, V.; Tsiligiannis, G.; Zadeh, A.; Javanainen, A.; Virtanen, A.; Puchner, H.; Saigne, F.; Wrobel, F.; Dilillo, L.

    2015-01-01

    The impact of heavy-ions on commercial Ferroelectric Memories (FRAMs) is analyzed. The influence of different test modes (static and dynamic) on this memory is investigated. Static test results show that the memory is prone to temporary effects occurring in the peripheral circuitry. Dynamic tests results show a high sensitivity of this memory to heavy-ions.

  12. Development and Testing of A Radiation Model for Interpreting ARM Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiang FU

    2004-11-01

    A research program devoted to improving the understanding of atmospheric radiation processes has been supported by DOE ARM Grant DE-FG03-00ER62931. This research effort was carried out at the University of Washington from March 16, 2000 to October 31, 2002 with Prof. Qiang Fu as the principal investigator. In this report, the major accomplishments from the research effort are first described in section one. The journal publications that acknowledge DOE ARM Grant DE-FG03-00ER62931 are listed in section two. In Section 3, the presentations in the ARM Science Meetings are listed from 2000 to 2002.

  13. Radiation tests of ITER diagnostic system materials in the BOR-60 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revyakin, Yu. L.; Kosenkov, V. M.; Bender, S. E.; Belyakov, V. A.

    1996-10-01

    An in-pile experiment was conducted up to a fluence of 9.9 × 10 25 m 2 ( E ≫ 0.1 MeV) which investigated the following electrophysical characteristics of a cable with mineral insulation and nickel conductor: insulation resistance, radiation-induced current and EMF. Irradiation was also performed in the BOR-60 reactor up to a fluence 10 23 m -2 on six crystal types for the monochromator: mica, LiF, multilayered mirrors Fe/C, W/Si, Cr/C and Mo/Si. Change of the reflectivity, width and shape of diffraction reflections were investigated.

  14. Dose-rate and total-dose radiation testing of the Texas Instruments TMS320C30 32-bit floating point digital signal processor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siy, P.F.; Carter, J.T.; D' Addario, L.R.; Loeber, D.A.

    1991-08-01

    The MITRE Corporation has performed in-flux radiation testing of the Texas Instruments TMS320C30 32-bit floating point digital signal processor in both total dose and dose rate radiation environments. This test effort has provided data relating to the applicability of the TMS320C30 in systems with total dose and/or dose rate survivability requirements. In order to accomplish these tests, the MITRE Corporation developed custom hardware and software for in-flux radiation testing. This paper summarizes the effort by providing an overview of the TMS320C30, MITRE's test methodology, test facilities, statistical analysis, and full coverage of the test results. (Author)

  15. Bread-Board Testing of the Radiation Hard Electron Monitor (RADEM) being developed for the ESA JUICE Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrigakshi, Alankrita; Hajdas, Wojtek; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw; Xiao, Hualin; Goncalves, Patricia; Pinto, Marco; Pinto, Costa; Marques, Arlindo; Meier, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The RADEM instrument will serve as the radiation monitor for the JUICE spacecraft. It will characterize the highly dynamic radiation environment of the Jovian system by measuring the energy spectra of energetic electrons and protons up to 40 MeV and 250 MeV, respectively. It will also determine the directionality of 0.3-10 MeV electrons. Further goals include the detection of heavy ions, and the determination of the corresponding LET spectra and dose rates. Here, the tests of the Electron and Proton Telescopes, and the Directionality Detector of the RADEM Bread-Board model are described. The objective of these tests is to validate RADEM design and physical concept applied therein. The tests were performed at various irradiation facilities at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) where energy ranges relevant for space applications can be covered (electrons: ≤100 MeV and protons: ≤230 MeV). The measured values are also compared with GEANT4 Monte-Carlo Simulation results.

  16. An overview of the radiation environment at the LHC in light of R2E irradiation test activities

    CERN Document Server

    Roeed, K; Spiezia, G; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this report is to present a brief overview of the radiation environment that can be expected in areas where electronics is installed in the LHC. This covers particle energy spectra in addition to nominal integrated values of the High Energy Hadron (HEH) fluence, relevant for Single Event Effects (SEEs), Total Ionizing Dose (TID), and the 1 MeV neutron equivalent, relevant for displacement damage. The risk of thermal neutrons is considered by introducing the risk factor Rth. This report is presented as part of the R2E project and should create a foundation from which appropriate irradiation test criteria can be evaluated and determined.

  17. Study of radiation damage and substrate resistivity effects from beam test of silicon microstrip detectors using LHC readout electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Angarano, Matteo Maria; Brunetti, Maria Teresa; Civinini, Carlo; Coughlan, John A; De Palma, Mauro; Drouhin, Frédéric; French, Marcus; Fürtjes, A; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Checcucci, Bruno; Creanza, Donato; Fano, Livio; Fiore, Luigi; Giorgi, Marco; Lariccia, Paolo; Maggi, Giorgio; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Messina, Giulia; My, Salvatore; Papi, Andrea; Radicci, Valeria; Santinelli, Roberto; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Servoli, Leonello; Silvestris, Lucia; Brunetti, Maria Teresa; Tempesta, Paolo; De Palma, Mauro

    2002-01-01

    We present the beam test results of single-sided silicon microstrip detectors, with different substrate resistivities. The effects of radiation damage are studied for a detector irradiated to a fluence of 2.4 multiplied by 10**1**4 n/cm**2. The detectors are read out with the APV6 chip, which is compatible with the 40 MHz LHC clock. The performance of different detectors and readout modes are studied in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and efficiency.

  18. An experimental test of the 'transmission-line model' of electromagnetic radiation from triggered lightning return strokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, J. C.; Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.; Leteinturier, C.; Eybert-Berard, A.

    1988-01-01

    Peak currents, two-dimensional average propagation speeds, and electric field waveforms for a number of subsequent return strikes in rocket-triggered lightning flashes were measured in order to test the 'transmission-line model' of return-stroke radiation of Uman and McLain (1970). Reasonable agreement is found between the propagation speeds measured with the streak camera and those deduced from the transmission-line model. A modification of the model is proposed in which two wave fronts travel upward and downward away from a junction point a short distance above the ground.

  19. Testing a Cue-list to Aid Attitude Recall in Surveys: A Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaart, van der W.

    2009-01-01

    Survey questionnaires commonly include retrospective questions on attitudes as a substitute for concurrently obtained assessments. Empirical studies have shown that these retrospectively obtained attitudes often deviate seriously from the attitudes for which they are substitutes: the attitude that r

  20. Toward generally accepted forensic assessment practices among clinical neuropsychologists: a survey of professional practice and common test use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDuke, Casey; Barr, William; Brodale, Donald L; Rabin, Laura A

    2017-07-04

    This study investigated professional practice and common test use among clinical neuropsychologists engaging in forensic assessment.  Doctorate-level psychologists active in the practice of neuropsychology and on the INS and NAN membership listings (n = 502) were surveyed about their demographics, professional practice, and common test use. Participants who reported engaging in forensic practice (n = 255) were further surveyed about their forensic practice. Forensic participants were more likely to be male and Caucasian, and reported higher ages, more years of professional experience, and a higher prevalence of board certification. While characteristics of their professional and forensic practice varied, forensic participants reported spending most of their professional time conducting neuropsychological assessments with adult clients in a private or group practice setting, focusing on civil referrals and civil legal questions involving older adult issues, developmental issues, head injury, and psychiatric issues. Common test use across neuropsychological assessment domains is presented for board-certified forensic participants (n = 77). An examination of these results reveals that the current pattern of test use is similar to the results of a more general survey of neuropsychological test use.  The findings provide insight into the practice of forensic neuropsychological assessment, and further establish the admissibility of neuropsychological evidence in the United States legal system. Results will be useful for clinical neuropsychologists, field leaders, and legal professionals hoping to gain insight into the role of clinical neuropsychology in civil and criminal legal decision-making.

  1. Radiation-induced electrical degradation experiments in the Japan materials testing reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnum, Eugene H.; Shikama, Tatsuo; Narui, Minoru; Sagawa, Tsutomu; Scarborough, Kent

    1996-02-01

    An experiment to measure radiation-induced electrical degradation (RIED) in a sapphire sample and in three MgO-insulated cables was conducted at the JMTR light water reactor. The materials were irradiated at about 260°C to a fluence of 3 × 1024 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV) with an applied DC electric field between 100 kV/m and 500 kV/m. Even though the results for the sapphire sample are somewhat ambiguous because of an unexplained offset current of about 0.6 μA substantial degradation was not observed in the sapphire: instead, radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) seemed to decrease slightly during the experiment. Substantial increase in leakage current, that increased with applied electric field, occurred in the MgO-insulated cables. This increased conductivity disappeared when the reactor was shut down and sample temperature returned to ambient. However, the physical degradation apparently remained in the material while the reactor was off because restarting the irradiation brought the conductivity back to its previous, degraded, reactor-on value. This effect is different from the RIED effect reported by Hodgson but is similar to previous results reported by Shikama et al. Considerable data were taken to determine the sample temperature and leakage currents during the irradiation.

  2. Advanced Ultrasonic Testing Systems - A State-of-the-Art Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-09-01

    by Erikson et al. (Ref. 18), Kennedy and Woodmansee (Ref. 19), and Rose and Meyer (Refs. 20 & 21). The work of Erikson et al. (Ref. 18) is an...primary emphasis of Berger’s survey, however, was the Sokolov tube. Erikson et al. (Ref. 18) surveyed a number of ultrasonic imaging methods used in...Ref. 60), Erik - Coherent Illumination son el al. (Ref. IS). Hildebrand (Ref. 6 1), and Intlekofer et al. (Ref. 62) presented intro- a. Recording

  3. X-Ray Emitting GHz-Peaked Spectrum Galaxies: Testing a Dynamical-Radiative Model with Broad-Band Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostorero, L.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Moderski, R.; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Diaferio, A.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Kowalska, I.; /Warsaw U. Observ.; Cheung, C.C.; /NASA, Goddard /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Kataoka, J.; /Waseda U., RISE; Begelman, M.C.; /JILA, Boulder; Wagner, S.J.; /Heidelberg Observ.

    2010-06-07

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the GPS spectral energy distribution (SED) with the source expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broad-band SEDs of a sample of eleven X-ray emitting GPS galaxies with Compact-Symmetric-Object (CSO) morphology, and show that: (i) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism; (ii) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N{sub H}) and radio (N{sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  4. Testing LSST Dither Strategies for Survey Uniformity and Large-scale Structure Systematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Humna; Gawiser, Eric; Kurczynski, Peter; Jones, R. Lynne; Zhan, Hu; Padilla, Nelson D.; Muñoz Arancibia, Alejandra M.; Orsi, Alvaro; Cora, Sofía A.; Yoachim, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will survey the southern sky from 2022-2032 with unprecedented detail. Since the observing strategy can lead to artifacts in the data, we investigate the effects of telescope-pointing offsets (called dithers) on the r-band coadded 5σ depth yielded after the 10-year survey. We analyze this survey depth for several geometric patterns of dithers (e.g., random, hexagonal lattice, spiral) with amplitudes as large as the radius of the LSST field of view, implemented on different timescales (per season, per night, per visit). Our results illustrate that per night and per visit dither assignments are more effective than per season assignments. Also, we find that some dither geometries (e.g., hexagonal lattice) are particularly sensitive to the timescale on which the dithers are implemented, while others like random dithers perform well on all timescales. We then model the propagation of depth variations to artificial fluctuations in galaxy counts, which are a systematic for LSS studies. We calculate the bias in galaxy counts caused by the observing strategy accounting for photometric calibration uncertainties, dust extinction, and magnitude cuts; uncertainties in this bias limit our ability to account for structure induced by the observing strategy. We find that after 10 years of the LSST survey, the best dither strategies lead to uncertainties in this bias that are smaller than the minimum statistical floor for a galaxy catalog as deep as r floor for r < 25.7 after the first year of survey.

  5. The importance of survey content: testing for the context dependency of the New Ecological Paradigm Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, Elizabeth F; Lew, Daniel K; Wallmo, Kristy

    2015-05-01

    Using a regression-based analysis of a survey of U.S. households, we demonstrate that both environmental concern, as measured by the New Ecological Paradigm (NEP) Scale, and facets of environmental concern, as measured by three NEP factors, are influenced by survey context. Survey respondents were presented with detailed information about two to four threatened and endangered marine species in the United States, including the Endangered Species Act listing status of the species and threats to the survival of the species. All else being equal, measures of environmental concern are influenced by both which species were included in the survey and by the concern expressed about these species. As such, measures of environmental concern are found to be context dependent since they are correlated with the species included in each survey. We also demonstrate that NEP-based measures of environmental concern are affected by socio-demographic variables, opinions about government spending, and environmental knowledge. Given the wide, multi-disciplinary use of the NEP Scale, it is important for researchers to recognize that NEP-based measures of environmental concern may be sensitive to information included in surveys. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Surveys at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth S. Haines; Bethany L. Burton; Donald S. Sweetkind; Theodore H. Asch

    2009-03-30

    In April 2007, the USGS collected direct-current (DC) electrical resistivity data and shear- (S) and compressional- (P) wave seismic data to provide new detail of previously mapped, overlapping fault splays at two administrative areas in the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In NTS Area 7, we collected two-dimensional DC resistivity data along a transect crossing the Yucca Fault parallel to, and between, two transects along which resistivity data were collected in a previous study in 2006. In addition, we collected three-dimensional DC resistivity data in a grid that overlies part of the 2007 transect. The DC resistivity data show that the fault has a footwall that is more conductive than the hanging wall and an along-strike progression of the fault in a location where overlapping splays are present. Co-located with the northernmost of the two 2006 DC resistivity transects, we acquired S- and P-wave seismic data for both reflection and refraction processing. The S-wave data are corrupted by large amounts of converted (P-wave) energy likely due to the abundance of fractured caliche in the shallow subsurface. The P-wave data show minimal reflected energy, but they show clear refracted first arrivals. We have inverted these first arrival times to determine P-wave seismic velocity models. The seismic model for the transect in Area 7 shows low velocities extending to the base of the model at the location of the Yucca Fault, as well as low velocities at the eastern end of the transect, in the vicinity of the adjacent crater. These new surveys provide further detail about the geometry of the Yucca Fault in this location where it shows two overlapping splays. We collected P- and S-wave seismic data along a transect in the southern part of NTS Area 2, corresponding with the location of a 2006 DC resistivity transect that targeted a set of small faults identified with field mapping. Again, the S-wave data are difficult to interpret. The P-wave data show clear first arrivals that we

  7. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Surveys at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, April 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Seth S.; Burton, Bethany L.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Asch, Theodore H.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2007, the USGS collected direct-current (DC) electrical resistivity data and shear- (S) and compressional- (P) wave seismic data to provide new detail of previously mapped, overlapping fault splays at two administrative areas in the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In NTS Area 7, we collected two-dimensional DC resistivity data along a transect crossing the Yucca Fault parallel to, and between, two transects along which resistivity data were collected in a previous study in 2006. In addition, we collected three-dimensional DC resistivity data in a grid that overlies part of the 2007 transect. The DC resistivity data show that the fault has a footwall that is more conductive than the hanging wall and an along-strike progression of the fault in a location where overlapping splays are present. Co-located with the northernmost of the two 2006 DC resistivity transects, we acquired S- and P-wave seismic data for both reflection and refraction processing. The S-wave data are corrupted by large amounts of converted (P-wave) energy likely due to the abundance of fractured caliche in the shallow subsurface. The P-wave data show minimal reflected energy, but they show clear refracted first arrivals. We have inverted these first arrival times to determine P-wave seismic velocity models. The seismic model for the transect in Area 7 shows low velocities extending to the base of the model at the location of the Yucca Fault, as well as low velocities at the eastern end of the transect, in the vicinity of the adjacent crater. These new surveys provide further detail about the geometry of the Yucca Fault in this location where it shows two overlapping splays. We collected P- and S-wave seismic data along a transect in the southern part of NTS Area 2, corresponding with the location of a 2006 DC resistivity transect that targeted a set of small faults identified with field mapping. Again, the S-wave data are difficult to interpret. The P-wave data show clear first arrivals that we

  8. Screening, testing, and reporting for drug and alcohol use on labor and delivery: a survey of Maryland birthing hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Catherine; Lanham, Amy; Welsh, Christopher; Ramanadhan, Shaalini; Terplan, Mishka

    2014-01-01

    Recent amendments to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act tie the receipt of federal block grants to mandatory reporting of substance-exposed newborns. To determine rates of screening, testing, and reporting of drug and alcohol use at the time of delivery, we administered a telephone survey of nursing managers and perinatal social workers at Maryland birthing hospitals. Of the 34 hospitals, 31 responded (response rate 91%). Although 97% of hospitals reported universal screening, only 6% used a validated instrument. Testing was reported by 94% with 45% reporting universal maternal testing and 7% universal newborn testing. Only 32% reported obtaining maternal consent prior to testing. There is significant heterogeneity in screening and testing for substance use in birthing hospitals. Given federal reporting mandates, state-level practices need to be standardized.

  9. Unshielded and Shielded Facility Nondestructive Inspection (NDI) Radiation Protection Survey for F.S. Gabreski ANGB, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    that NDI personnel get electronic personal dosimeters that allow them to set alarm rates as well as see their cumulative radiation dose in real time...chamber (PIC) or electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) available 1. Proper central storage location for PIC/EPDs and control 2...PIC) or electronic personal dosimeter (EPD) Available 1. Proper central storage location for PIC/EPDs and control

  10. The Lemna minor growth inhibition test as basis to evaluate radiation or radionuclide-induced effects on freshwater plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horemans, N.; Van Hees, M.; Van Hoeck, A.; Vandenhove, H. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    The setting of radiation protection criteria for wildlife is based on tiered Environmental Risk Assessments (ERA) methods. At various points in such a tiered ERA robust and transparent benchmark values are needed to indicate the levels of exposure that are considered safe to the environment. Although not ideal these benchmark values are today mainly based on laboratory-based experiments in which the toxic effects of radiation or radionuclides to one selected species exposed under standardised growth conditions is studied. As such an eco-toxicity test has been developed for the floating macrophyte Lemna minor that can be used to test the effect of different chemicals in freshwater. Here the use of this test to estimate effects of radiation or radionuclides and its relevance to the environment will be discussed. First single dose response curves are shown that were set up according to the guidelines for gamma, uranium and as a reference also cadmium. According to the guidelines growth inhibition can be calculated on different endpoints like frond number and frond area. The choice of this endpoint seems to be of major importance as dependent on the stressor significant shifts in the EC50 values, the concentration giving 50% effect, were observed. For gamma radiation a recovery experiment was set up in irradiated plants were allowed to grow again for 7 days in control conditions. It was shown that plant growth rate did not catch up with that of the non-irradiated group. On the contrary, plant cultures that showed a growth inhibition above 40% immediately after irradiation completely collapsed during the recovery period indicating no recovery from the gamma induced damage and resulting in a 3-fold lower EC50 value after 7 days recovery. The relevance of these data to the environment will be further discussed. Finally the influence of different cations on the uranium speciation and toxicity are studied. These experiments are the first steps to set up a biotic ligand

  11. Precise calibration of LIGO test mass actuators using photon radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Goetz, E; Erickson, S; Savage, R L; González, G; Kawabe, K; Landry, M; Marka, S; O'Reilly, B; Riles, K; Sigg, D; Willems, P

    2009-01-01

    Precise calibration of kilometer-scale interferometric gravitational wave detectors is crucial for source localization and waveform reconstruction. A technique that uses the radiation pressure of a power-modulated auxiliary laser to induce calibrated displacements of one of the ~10 kg arm cavity mirrors, a so-called photon calibrator, has been demonstrated previously and has recently been implemented on the LIGO detectors. In this article, we discuss the inherent precision and accuracy of the LIGO photon calibrators and several improvements that have been developed to reduce the estimated voice coil actuator calibration uncertainties to less than 2 percent (1-sigma). These improvements include accounting for rotation-induced apparent length variations caused by interferometer and photon calibrator beam centering offsets, absolute laser power measurement using temperature-controlled InGaAs photodetectors mounted on integrating spheres and calibrated by NIST, minimizing errors induced by localized elastic defor...

  12. Radiation-induced electrical degradation experiments in the Japan materials testing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farnum, E.; Scharborough, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shikama, Tatsuo [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the extent of degradation during neutron irradiation of electrical and optical properties of candidate dielectric materials. The goals are to identify promising dielectrics for ITER and other fusion machines for diagnostic applications and establish the basis for optimization of candidate materials. An experiment to measure radiation-induced electrical degradation (REID) in sapphire and MgO-insulated cables was conducted at the JMTR light water reactor. The materials were irradiated at about 260 {degree}C to a fluence of 3{times}10{sup 24} n/m{sup 2} (E>1 MeV) with an applied DC electric field between 100 kV/m and 500 kV/m.

  13. Perceived and Performed eHealth Literacy: Survey and Simulated Performance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Electronic health (eHealth) literacy of consumers is essential in order to improve information and communication technology (ICT) use for health purposes by ordinary citizens. However, performed eHealth literacy is seldom studied. Therefore, the present study assessed perceived and performed eHealth literacy using the recent conceptualization of health literacy skills. Objective The aim of this paper was to examine the association between perceived and performed eHealth literacies. Methods In total, 82 Israeli adults participated in the study, all 50 years and older, with a mean age of 67 (SD 11). Of the participants, 60% (49/82) were women and 72% (59/82) had a post-secondary education. The participants were first surveyed and then tested in a computer simulation of health-related Internet tasks. Performed, perceived (eHealth Literacy Scale, eHEALS), and evaluated eHealth literacy were assessed, and performed eHealth literacy was also recorded and re-evaluated later. Performance was scored for successful completion of tasks, and was also assessed by two researchers for motivation, confidence, and amount of help provided. Results The skills of accessing, understanding, appraising, applying, and generating new information had decreasing successful completion rates. Generating new information was least correlated with other skills. Perceived and performed eHealth literacies were moderately correlated (r=.34, P=.01) while facets of performance (ie, digital literacy and eHealth literacy) were highly correlated (r=.82, P<.001). Participants low and high in performed eHealth literacy were significantly different: low performers were older and had used the Internet for less time, required more assistance, and were less confident in their conduct than high performers. Conclusions The moderate association between perceived and performed eHealth literacy indicates that the latter should be assessed separately. In as much, the assessment of performed e

  14. Radiation effects on rat testes. VIII. Kinetic properties of hydrolases following partial body gamma irradiation of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, G S; Bawa, S R

    1975-05-01

    Kinetic properties such as Michaelis constant (Km), maximum velocity (Vmax), temperature coefficient (Q10) and energy of activation (Ea) for hydrolysis of adenosine-5'-phosphate at pH 9.5 and sodium pyrophosphate at pH 8.35 by normal and radiated testes supernatants have been described. Kinetic parameters are related to respective phosphohydrolases (phosphatases). (1) Km values for 5'nucleotidase and inorganic pyrophosphatase of normal testis were determined as 1.25 X 10(-3)M and 0.81 X 10(-3)M respectively; (II) Vmax correspond to 318 mug P/15 min and 430 mug P/15 min for 100 mg tissue respectively; (III) Q10 for 5 nucleotidase is 1.7 and for inorganic pyrophosphatase is 4.2 at a temperature 10-30degreesC; (IV) Ea for hydrolysis of AMP and sodium pyrophosphate were calculated by Arrhenius plots as 17000 and 9000 cal/mol. (V) Km values for irradiated enzymes are similar to the control values suggesting that the binding capacities of these enzymes with their substrates remain unaffected after radiation; (VI) Vmax for radiated enzymes correspond to a value of 500 mug P/100 mg tissue/15 min for 5'nucleotidase and 118 mug P/100 mug tissue/15 min for inorganic pyrophosphatase; (VII) 110 for 5'nucleotidase is 2.2 and inorganic pyrophosphatase 1.16 at 10-30degreesC; (VIII) Ea for irradiated 5'nucleotidase is comparable to those of normal rats whereas for inorganic pyrophosphatase Ea is moderately declined. The observed changes have been related to the different types of metabolic activity in germinal and nongerminal cells of testes.

  15. Testing LSST Dither Strategies for Survey Uniformity and Large-Scale Structure Systematics

    CERN Document Server

    Awan, Humna; Kurczynski, Peter; Jones, R Lynne; Zhan, Hu; Padilla, Nelson D; Arancibia, Alejandra M Muñoz; Orsi, Alvaro; Yoachim, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will survey the southern sky from 2022-2032 with unprecedented detail. Given that survey observational strategy can lead to artifacts in the observed data, we investigate the effects of telescope-pointing offsets (called dithers) on the $r$-band coadded 5$\\sigma$ depth yielded after the 10-year survey. We analyze this survey depth for several geometric patterns of dithers (e.g., random, hexagonal lattice, spiral) with amplitude as large as the radius of the LSST field-of-view, implemented on different timescales (per season, per night, per visit). Our results illustrate that per night and per visit dither assignments are more effective than per season. Also, we find that some dither geometries (e.g. hexagonal lattice) are particularly sensitive to the timescale on which the dithers are implemented, while others like random dithers perform well on all timescales. We then model the propagation of depth variations to artificial fluctuations in galaxy counts, which are a...

  16. Development of a test device to characterize thermal protective performance of fabrics against hot steam and thermal radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yun; Li, Jun

    2016-12-01

    Steam burns severely threaten the life of firefighters in the course of their fire-ground activities. The aim of this paper was to characterize thermal protective performance of flame-retardant fabrics exposed to hot steam and low-level thermal radiation. An improved testing apparatus based on ASTM F2731-11 was developed in order to simulate the routine fire-ground conditions by controlling steam pressure, flow rate and temperature of steam box. The thermal protective performance of single-layer and multi-layer fabric system with/without an air gap was studied based on the calibrated tester. It was indicated that the new testing apparatus effectively evaluated thermal properties of fabric in hot steam and thermal radiation. Hot steam significantly exacerbated the skin burn injuries while the condensed water on the skin’s surface contributed to cool down the skin tissues during the cooling. Also, the absorbed thermal energy during the exposure and the cooling was mainly determined by the fabric’s configuration, the air gap size, the exposure time and the existence of hot steam. The research provides a effective method to characterize the thermal protection of fabric in complex conditions, which will help in optimization of thermal protection performance of clothing and reduction of steam burn.

  17. Developing and testing a student-focussed teaching evaluation survey for university instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginns, Paul; Barrie, Simon

    2009-06-01

    This paper describes a process for developing a student-focussed survey to gather teaching- and learning-related feedback from university students and examines the psychometric properties of a short survey for confidential feedback to lecturers in higher education regarding teaching. Analyses were performed at the level of individual respondents and on teacher-average responses. Principal component and exploratory factor analyses at both levels indicated a single underlying lecturing effectiveness factor. Scale scores had high internal consistency. The items and subsequent scale were also consistent in terms of interrater reliability, i.e., the average consistency of ratings of an individual lecturer. Finally, at both levels of analysis, strong correlations between responses to each item and an overall rating provided support for the concurrent validity of the items. These analyses provide initial evidence of the suitability of the survey for gathering confidential student feedback on lecturing effectiveness.

  18. Construction and testing of advanced ceramic fabric radiator components to 1000 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, Z.I.; Bates, J.M.; Webb, B.J.

    1990-01-01

    For a number of years, the authors have been studying the application of advanced ceramic fabric materials to spacecraft heat rejection systems. Their studies indicated that significant mass and launch volume savings could be realized through such application, but concrete evidence to support this contention was lacking. Last year they presented preliminary test data that supported their claims (Antoniak and Webb 1989). Recent pressure, heat transfer, and wicking tests and analyses confirm the earlier results.

  19. Follow-up nationwide survey on predictive genetic testing for late-onset hereditary neurological diseases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Keiko; Sekijima, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Kunihiro; Tamai, Mariko; Kosho, Tomoki; Sakurai, Akihiro; Wakui, Keiko; Ikeda, Shu-ichi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2013-08-01

    A follow-up nationwide survey on predictive genetic testing for late-onset neurological diseases in Japan was conducted. A questionnaire was sent to 89 institutional members of the Japan's National Liaison Council for Clinical Sections of Medical Genetics, and was returned by 60 (67.4%). A total of 301 clients with an interest in predictive testing were accumulated from April 2006 to March 2011. The greatest interest was shown for spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD, n=110), followed by myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, n=69), Huntington's disease (HD, n=52) and familial amyloid polyneuropathy (FAP, n=35). The ratios of clients who actually underwent predictive testing were: SCD, 21.8%; DM1, 39.1%; HD, 26.9%; and FAP, 74.3%, indicating that predictive testing was conducted very cautiously for untreatable neurological diseases in Japan. Clinical geneticists were predominantly involved in genetic counseling, whereas the participation of non-medical doctor (non-MD) staff, including nurses, clinical psychologists and genetic counselors, was not common. Lack of non-MD counseling staff was one of the most serious issues in conducting predictive testing, which has not been improved since the previous survey performed in 2006. Institutional arrangements, such as revision of medical insurance system regarding genetic testing and counseling, might be necessary to resolve this issue.

  20. Psychosocial determinants of HIV testing across stages of change in Spanish population: a cross-sectional national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster-RuizdeApodaca, Maria Jose; Laguia, Ana; Molero, Fernando; Toledo, Javier; Arrillaga, Arantxa; Jaen, Angeles

    2017-03-07

    The goal of this research is to study the psychosocial determinants of HIV-testing as a function of the decision or change stage concerning this health behavior. The determinants considered in the major ongoing health models and the stages contemplated in the Precaution Adoption Process Model are analysed. A cross-sectional survey was administered to 1,554 people over 16 years of age living in Spain by a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI). The sample design was randomised, with quotas of sex and age. The survey measured various psychosocial determinants of health behaviors considered in the main cognitive theories, the interviewees' stage of change concerning HIV-testing (lack of awareness, decision not to act, decision to act, action, maintenance, and abandonment), and the signal for the action of getting tested or the perceived barriers to being tested. Approximately two thirds of the population had not ever had the HIV test. The predominant stage was lack of awareness. The most frequently perceived barriers to testing were related to the health system and to the stigma. We also found that the psychosocial determinants studied differed depending on the respondents' stage of change. Perception of risk, perceived self-efficacy, proximity to people who had been tested, perceived benefits of knowing the diagnosis, and a positive instrumental and emotional attitude were positively associated with the decision and maintenance of testing behavior. However, unrealistic underestimation of the risk of HIV infection, stereotypes about the infection, and the perceived severity of HIV were associated with the decision not to be tested. There are various sociocognitive and motivational profiles depending on people's decision stage concerning HIV-testing. Knowing this profile may allow us to design interventions to influence the psychosocial determinants that characterise each stage of change.

  1. Real-time and on-site γ-ray radiation response testing system for semiconductor devices and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Yifei, E-mail: Y.Mu@student.liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Zhao, Ce Zhou, E-mail: cezhou.zhao@xjtlu.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Qi, Yanfei, E-mail: yanfei.qi01@xjtlu.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Lam, Sang, E-mail: s.lam@xjtlu.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhao, Chun, E-mail: garyzhao@ust.hk [Nano and Advanced Materials Institute, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Lu, Qifeng, E-mail: qifeng@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Cai, Yutao, E-mail: yutao.cai@xjtlu.edu.cn [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Mitrovic, Ivona Z., E-mail: ivona@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Taylor, Stephen, E-mail: s.taylor@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); Chalker, Paul R., E-mail: pchalker@liverpool.ac.uk [Center for Materials and Structures, School of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-01

    The construction of a turnkey real-time and on-site radiation response testing system for semiconductor devices is reported. Components of an on-site radiation response probe station, which contains a 1.11 GBq Cs{sup 137} gamma (γ)-ray source, and equipment of a real-time measurement system are described in detail for the construction of the whole system. The real-time measurement system includes a conventional capacitance–voltage (C–V) and stress module, a pulse C–V and stress module, a conventional current–voltage (I–V) and stress module, a pulse I–V and stress module, a DC on-the-fly (OTF) module and a pulse OTF module. Electrical characteristics of MOS capacitors or MOSFET devices are measured by each module integrated in the probe station under continuous γ-ray exposure and the measurement results are presented. The dose rates of different gate dielectrics are calculated by a novel calculation model based on the Cs{sup 137} γ-ray source placed in the probe station. For the sake of operators’ safety, an equivalent dose rate of 70 nSv/h at a given operation distance is indicated by a dose attenuation model in the experimental environment. HfO{sub 2} thin films formed by atomic layer deposition are employed to investigate the radiation response of the high-κ material by using the conventional C–V and pulse C–V modules. The irradiation exposure of the sample is carried out with a dose rate of 0.175 rad/s and ±1 V bias in the radiation response testing system. Analysis of flat-band voltage shifts (ΔV{sub FB}) of the MOS capacitors suggests that the on-site and real-time/pulse measurements detect more serious degradation of the HfO{sub 2} thin films compared with the off-site irradiation and conventional measurement techniques.

  2. Assessment of ambient dose equivalent rate performance of an automatic survey meter as an instrument to quantify the presence of radiation in soils

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, E M; Okuno, E

    2002-01-01

    Those who work in radiation protection are faced with various quantities that were created to account for the effects of ionizing radiation in the human body. As far as the experimental point of view is concerned, each available equipment is planned to measure a distinct quantity, for a specific radiation protection application, and it is not always clear which one it is. This paper shows a series of tests, planned and applied to a portable gamma ray spectrometer, in order to assure that the monitoring low dose levels of radiation with it is reliable. The equipment is fully automated and does not allow modifications of the conversion factors from counts to ambient dose equivalent. It is therefore necessary to assure that the values provided by the equipment are correct and refer to the actual situation one expects to find in practice. The system is based on an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, mounted with its electronics in a portable case, suitable for field measurements. It measures ambient dose equivalent r...

  3. Testing the Canon: Student Responses to Texts by Medieval Women in English Literature Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ann R.

    While there has been a great deal of debate about enlarging the canon, less attention has been paid to how students respond to "new" literary figures such as Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich, or to how instructors should incorporate them into an already cramped literature survey course. Instructors must consider some questions that…

  4. Archaeological Survey and Testing of Areas along Main Ditch and Ditch 9, Pemiscot County, Missouri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-15

    These include nine Clovis and Clovis -like points from the Bootheel (Cha:narn .975:93). No intact sites have yet beer - tifiec from this perioc, aria...and J. H. House .982 A Cultura . soeurces OvervLew o± the Ozark-St. 7rancs Nationa7 Forelsts Arkansas. Arkansas Archeological Survey, Fayetteville

  5. Testing Type II Radiative Seesaw Model: from Dark Matter Detection to LHC Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Liao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass $M_{s_1}$ that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h/2$, (2) the Higgs region with $M_{s_1}\\sim M_h$, and (3) the coannihilation region with $M_{s_2}\\sim M_{s_1}$. Here $s_{1,2}$ are two scalar singlets with the lighter $s_1$ being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and tri-lepton signatures at 13 (14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the tri-lepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the $5\\sigma$ significance with an integrated lumin...

  6. Production and testing of a synthetic diamond film radiation dosimeter for radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Fidanzio, A; Venanzi, C; Pinzari, F; Piermattei, A

    2002-01-01

    A detector, constituted by a polycrystalline chemical vapor deposited diamond film, has been made for on-line radiotherapy beam analysis in terms of dose distributions in water equivalent material. Preliminary results are reported which evidence that the leakage current can be a limiting parameter for an efficient collection of the charge carriers produced by the ionizing radiation. A signal to noise ratio near to 100 has been obtained. A priming effect similar to that found in natural diamond devices has also been evidenced, and a stable detector response was obtained after an accumulated dose of 5 Gy. The linearity has been achieved between the detector reading and the dose. The detector sensitivity resulted was equal to 77 nC/Gy per mm sup 3 of detector sensitive volume. A power law with exponent DELTA less than one has been found between detector reading and dose rate. However, when the dose rate dependence was corrected, the percentage depth doses, along an X-ray beam central axis, was in agreement with ...

  7. Testing the type II radiative seesaw model: From dark matter detection to LHC signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shu-Yuan; Han, Zhi-Long; Liao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    We analyze the testability of the type II radiative seesaw in which neutrino mass and dark matter (DM) are related at one-loop level. Under the constraints from DM relic density, direct and indirect detection, and invisible Higgs decays, we find three possible regions of DM mass Ms1that can survive the present and even the future experiments: (1) the Higgs resonance region with Ms 1˜Mh/2 , (2) the Higgs region with Ms1˜Mh, and (3) the coannihilation region with Ms 2˜Ms 1. Here s1 ,2 are two scalar singlets with the lighter s1 being the DM candidate. Based on DM properties and direct collider constraints, we choose three benchmark points to illustrate the testability of this model at the LHC. We perform a detailed simulation of the four-lepton and trilepton signatures at 13(14) TeV LHC. While both signatures are found to be promising at all benchmark points, the trilepton one is even better: it is possible to reach the 5 σ significance with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb-1.

  8. Development of an Automated System to Test and Select CCDs for the Dark Energy Survey Camera (DECam)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Donna; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The Dark Energy Survey (DES) is a next generation sky survey aimed directly at understanding why the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. The survey will use the Dark Energy Camera (DECam), a 3 square degree, 500 Megapixel mosaic camera mounted at the prime focus of the Blanco 4-meter telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, to observe 5000 square-degrees of sky through 5 filters (g, r, i, z, Y). DECam will be comprised of 74 CCDs: 62 2k x 4k CCDs for imaging and 12 2k x 2k CCDs for guiding and focus. The goal of the DES is to provide a factor of 3-5 improvement in the Dark Energy Task Force Figure of Merit using four complementary methods: weak gravitational lensing, galaxy cluster counts, baryon acoustic oscillations, and Type IA supernovae. This goal sets stringent technical requirements for the CCDs. Testing a large number of CCDs to determine which best meet the DES requirements would be a very time-consuming manual task. We have developed