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Sample records for survey participants completed

  1. ASHA Completes National Schools Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Johnson, Cassandra

    1996-01-01

    A national survey of speech-language pathologists working in school-based settings examined such topic areas as caseload characteristics, service delivery models, bilingual/bicultural services, support personnel, shortages of speech-language pathologists, and demographic information. (DB)

  2. Challenges in Cultivating EOSDIS User Survey Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquist, C. L.; Sofinowski, E. J.; Walter, S.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2004 NASA has surveyed users of its Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) to determine user satisfaction with its services. The surveys have been conducted by CFI Group under contract with the Federal Consulting Group, Executive Agent in government for the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). The purpose of these annual surveys is to help EOSDIS and the data centers assess current status and improve future services. The survey questions include demographic and experiential questions in addition to the ACSI and EOSDIS specific rating questions. In addition to customer satisfaction, analysis of each year's results has provided insight into the survey process. Although specific questions have been added, modified, or deleted to reflect changes to the EOSDIS system and processes, the model rating questions have remained the same to ensure consistency for evaluating cross year trends. Working with the CFI Group, we have refined the invitation and questions to increase clarity and address the different ways diverse groups of users access services at EOSDIS data centers. We present challenges in preparing a single set of questions that go to users with backgrounds in many Earth science disciplines. These users may have contacted any of the 12 EOSDIS data centers for information or may have accessed data or data products from many kinds of aircraft and satellite instruments. We discuss lessons learned in preparing the invitation and survey questions and the steps taken to make the survey easier to complete and to encourage increased participation.

  3. Survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health survey participation: results of a statewide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Timothy J; Jenkins, Sarah M; Anderson, Kari J; Davern, Michael E

    2008-12-01

    To determine the survey-related experiential and attitudinal correlates of future health-related survey participation. From July 21, 2005, through October 25, 2005, we conducted a mixed-mode mail and telephone survey of 1636 noninstitutionalized Minnesota residents aged 18 years or older. The overall response rate was 49%. We examined the unadjusted effect of each independent variable on the likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys using univariate logistic regression and discerned the relative contribution of the different variables with multivariate logistic regression analysis. Respondents were asked to complete an average of 4.5 different surveys in the year before the current survey; approximately a quarter of the respondents perceived these surveys to be burdensome. The likelihood of future participation in health-related surveys was negatively related to good health status, a busy schedule, and perceptions that the surveys were too long. Respondents were more than twice as likely to indicate that they would participate in a future health-related survey if they knew the organization doing the survey. For health-related surveys, investigators should remain mindful of people's busy schedules and keep their surveys as short as possible. Further research is needed to clarify whether the decision to participate in a survey hinges more on knowing the organization paying to have a survey performed (the sponsor) or the survey vendor collecting the data.

  4. Can survey participation alter household saving behaviour?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crossley, Thomas; de Bresser, Jochem; Delaney, L.; Winter, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    We document an effect of survey participation on household saving. Indentification comes from random assignment to modules within a population-representative internet panel. The saving measure is based on linked administrative wealth data. Households that responded to a detailed questionnaire on nee

  5. Clinical trial participants' experiences of completing questionnaires: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Christine; Karner, Julia J; Rappenecker, Julia; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-03-24

    To improve clinical study developments for elderly populations, we aim to understand how they transfer their experiences into validated, standardised self-completed study measurement instruments. We analysed how women (mean 78±8 years of age) participating in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) cognised study instruments used to evaluate outcomes of the intervention. The interview study was nested in an RCT on chronic neck pain using common measurement instruments situated in an elderly community in Berlin, Germany, which comprised of units for independent and assisted-living options. The sample (n=20 women) was selected from the RCT sample (n=117, 95% women, mean age 76 (SD±8) years). Interview participants were selected using a purposive sampling list based on the RCT outcomes. We asked participants about their experiences completing the RCT questionnaires. Interviews were analysed thematically, then compared with the questionnaires. Interviewees had difficulties in translating complex experiences into a single value on a scale and understanding the relationship of the questionnaires to study aims. Interviewees considered important for the trial that their actual experiences were understood by trial organisers. This information was not transferrable by means of the questionnaires. To rectify these difficulties, interviewees used strategies such as adding notes, adding response categories or skipping an item. Elderly interview participants understood the importance of completing questionnaires for trial success. This led to strategies of completing the questionnaires that resulted in 'missing' or ambiguous data. To improve data collection in elderly populations, educational materials addressing the differential logics should be developed and tested. Pilot testing validated instruments using cognitive interviews may be particularly important in such populations. Finally, when the target of an intervention is a subjective experience, it seems important to create a

  6. The COMPLETE Survey of Outflows in Perseus

    CERN Document Server

    Arce, Hector G; Goodman, Alyssa A; Pineda, Jaime E; Halle, Michael W; 10.1088/0004-637X/715/2/1170

    2010-01-01

    We present a study on the impact of molecular outflows in the Perseus molecular cloud complex using the COMPLETE survey large-scale 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) maps. We used three-dimensional isosurface models generated in RA-DEC-Velocity space to visualize the maps. This rendering of the molecular line data allowed for a rapid and efficient way to search for molecular outflows over a large (~ 16 sq. deg.) area. Our outflow-searching technique detected previously known molecular outflows as well as new candidate outflows. Most of these new outflow-related high-velocity features lie in regions that have been poorly studied before. These new outflow candidates more than double the amount of outflow mass, momentum, and kinetic energy in the Perseus cloud complex. Our results indicate that outflows have significant impact on the environment immediately surrounding localized regions of active star formation, but lack the energy needed to feed the observed turbulence in the entire Perseus complex. This implies that oth...

  7. MMT hypervelocity star survey. III. The complete survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Warren R.; Geller, Margaret J.; Kenyon, Scott J., E-mail: wbrown@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: mgeller@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: skenyon@cfa.harvard.edu [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We describe our completed spectroscopic survey for unbound hypervelocity stars (HVSs) ejected from the Milky Way. Three new discoveries bring the total number of unbound late B-type stars to 21. We place new constraints on the nature of the stars and on their distances using moderate resolution MMT spectroscopy. Half of the stars are fast rotators; they are certain 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} main sequence stars at 50-120 kpc distances. Correcting for stellar lifetime, our survey implies that unbound 2.5-4 M {sub ☉} stars are ejected from the Milky Way at a rate of 1.5 × 10{sup –6} yr{sup –1}. These unbound HVSs are likely ejected continuously over the past 200 Myr and do not share a common flight time. The anisotropic spatial distribution of HVSs on the sky remains puzzling. Southern hemisphere surveys like SkyMapper will soon allow us to map the all-sky distribution of HVSs. Future proper motion measurements with Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia will provide strong constraints on origin. Existing observations are all consistent with HVS ejections from encounters with the massive black hole in the Galactic center.

  8. Nonlinear optical crystals a complete survey

    CERN Document Server

    Nikogosyan, David N

    2005-01-01

    Nonlinear optical crystals are widely used in modern optical science and technology for frequency conversion of laser light, i.e. to generate laser radiation at any specific wavelength in visible, UV or IR spectral regions. This unrivalled reference book contains the most complete and up-to-date information on properties of nonlinear optical crystals. It includes: * Database of 63 common and novel nonlinear optical crystals * Periodically-poled and self-frequency-doubling materials * Full description of linear and nonlinear optical properties * Significant amount of crystallophysical, thermophysical, spectroscopic, electro-optic and magneto-optic information * 7 mini-reviews on novel applications, such as deep-UV light generation, terahertz-wave generation, ultrashort laser pulse compression, photonic band-gap crystals, x3 nonlinearity, etc. * More than 1500 different references with full titles It is a vital source of information for scientists and engineers dealing with modern applications of nonlinear opti...

  9. A survey of degree completion programs in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portillo, Karen M; Rogo, Ellen J; Calley, Kristin H; Cellucci, Leigh W

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to identify specific information related to U.S. dental hygiene baccalaureate degree completion programs. Learning experiences, assessment methods, and baccalaureate institutional partnerships were assessed. Of the sixty dental hygiene programs that offer a degree completion program, the forty-two that met the inclusion criteria (including having operated for at least three years) were invited to participate in a thirty-eight item online survey. A 62 percent (n=26) response rate was obtained. Learning experiences in responding programs included core dental hygiene courses, general education courses, and elective dental hygiene courses. Emphasis areas offered by various programs were in the specialty areas of education, public or community health, and research. Respondents reported that their graduates were employed in multiple settings (65 percent; n=17), with 19 percent (n=5) reporting employment in the combined grouping of private practice, education, and public health. Institutional partnerships included articulation agreements (88 percent; n=21), community college baccalaureate (8 percent; n=2), and university extension (4 percent; n=1) models. The findings of this study provide a baseline for assessing the educational composition and design of U.S. dental hygiene degree completion programs. However, results of this study showed inconsistencies among learning experiences that might raise concerns when considering students' level of preparation for graduate education and future leadership roles in the profession.

  10. Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Debora C; Brillant, Martha G S; Clovis, Joanne B; McNally, Mary E; Filiaggi, Mark J; Kotzer, Robert D; Lawrence, Herenia P

    2012-01-01

    Assessing the oral health of an ageing population: methods, challenges and predictors of survey participation Objectives To examine predictors of participation and to describe the methodological considerations of conducting a two-stage population-based oral health survey. Methods An observational, cross-sectional survey (telephone interview and clinical oral examination) of community-dwelling adults aged 45–64 and ≥65 living in Nova Scotia, Canada was conducted. Results The survey response rate was 21% for the interview and 13.5% for the examination. A total of 1141 participants completed one or both components of the survey. Both age groups had higher levels of education than the target population; the age 45–64 sample also had a higher proportion of females and lower levels of employment than the target population. Completers (participants who completed interview and examination) were compared with partial completers (who completed only the interview), and stepwise logistic regression was performed to examine predictors of completion. Identified predictors were as follows: not working, post-secondary education and frequent dental visits. Conclusion Recruitment, communications and logistics present challenges in conducting a province-wide survey. Identification of employment, education and dental visit frequency as predictors of survey participation provide insight into possible non-response bias and suggest potential for underestimation of oral disease prevalence in this and similar surveys. This potential must be considered in analysis and in future recruitment strategies. PMID:21916953

  11. Living with Smartphones: Does Completion Device Affect Survey Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Amber D.; Miller, Angie L.

    2015-01-01

    With the growing reliance on tablets and smartphones for internet access, understanding the effects of completion device on online survey responses becomes increasing important. This study uses data from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project, a multi-institution online alumni survey designed to obtain knowledge of arts education, to explore…

  12. Living with Smartphones: Does Completion Device Affect Survey Responses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Amber D.; Miller, Angie L.

    2015-01-01

    With the growing reliance on tablets and smartphones for internet access, understanding the effects of completion device on online survey responses becomes increasing important. This study uses data from the Strategic National Arts Alumni Project, a multi-institution online alumni survey designed to obtain knowledge of arts education, to explore…

  13. Black Women in Nursing Education Completion Programs: Issues Affecting Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Lolita Chappel; Cervero, Ronald M.; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 10 black women enrolled in or graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs identified intrapersonal and cultural factors encouraging their participation. Hindrances were classified as the experience of being the "other" and the culture of racism. Findings show that individual and institutional racism is a barrier in registered…

  14. Black Women in Nursing Education Completion Programs: Issues Affecting Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Lolita Chappel; Cervero, Ronald M.; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 10 black women enrolled in or graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs identified intrapersonal and cultural factors encouraging their participation. Hindrances were classified as the experience of being the "other" and the culture of racism. Findings show that individual and institutional racism is a barrier in registered…

  15. Recruitment of mental health survey participants using Internet advertising: content, characteristics and cost effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batterham, Philip J

    2014-06-01

    Postal and telephone survey research is threatened by declining response rates and high cost. Online recruitment is becoming more popular, although there is little empirical evidence about its cost-effectiveness or the representativeness of online samples. There is also limited research on optimal strategies for developing advertising content for online recruitment. The present study aimed to assess these aspects of online recruitment. Two mental health surveys used advertisements within a social network website (Facebook) to recruit adult Australian participants. The initial survey used advertisements linking directly to an external survey website, and recruited 1283 participants at $9.82 per completed survey. A subsequent survey used advertisements linking to a Facebook page that featured links to the external survey, recruiting 610 participants at $1.51 per completion. Both surveys were more cost-effective than similar postal surveys conducted previously, which averaged $19.10 per completion. Online and postal surveys both had somewhat unrepresentative samples. However, online surveys tended to be more successful in recruiting hard-to-reach populations. Advertising using "problem" terminology was more effective than "positive" terminology, while there was no significant effect of altruistic versus self-gain terminology. Online recruitment is efficient, flexible and cost-effective, suggesting that online recruitment has considerable potential for specific research designs.

  16. Do incentives exert undue influence on survey participation? Experimental evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Eleanor; Couper, Mick P

    2008-09-01

    MONETARY INCENTIVES ARE INCREASINGLY used to help motivate survey participation. Research Ethics Committees have begun to ask whether, and under what conditions, the use of monetary incentives to induce participation might be coercive. The article reports research from an online vignette-based study bearing on this question, concluding that at present the evidence suggests that larger incentives do not induce research participants to accept higher risks than they would be unwilling to accept with smaller ones.

  17. General Practitioners’ Participation in a Large, Multicountry Combined General Practitioner-Patient Survey: Recruitment Procedures and Participation Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P. Groenewegen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The participation of general practitioners (GPs is essential in research on the performance of primary care. This paper describes the implementation of a large, multicountry study in primary care that combines a survey among GPs and a linked survey among patients that visited their practice (the QUALICOPC study. The aim is to describe the recruitment procedure and explore differences between countries in the participation rate of the GPs. Methods. Descriptive analyses were used to document recruitment procedures and to assess hypotheses potentially explaining variation in participation rates between countries. Results. The survey was implemented in 31 European countries. GPs were mainly selected through random sampling. The actual implementation of the study differed between countries. The median participation rate was 30%. Both material (such as the payment system of GPs in a country and immaterial influences (such as estimated survey pressure are related to differences between countries. Conclusion. This study shows that the participation of GPs may indeed be influenced by the context of the country. The implementation of complex data collection is difficult to realize in a completely uniform way. Procedures have to be tuned to the context of the country.

  18. Cash incentives improve participation rate in a face-to-face survey: an intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke; Lei, Han; Li, Ge; Huang, Wei; Mu, Lihong

    2015-02-01

    Our study examined the effect of a ChinaYuan (CNY) 10 cash incentive on the participation rate in a face-to-face health survey among the general Chinese population. Subjects older than 15 years of age and had been living in the two selected districts for more than 6 months were selected using multistage random sampling. Participants from only one district received a cash incentive (CNY 10) for completing the survey. The participation rates in the nonincentive and incentive groups were 39.9% and 61.2%, respectively, P rate (54.4%); no significant difference was found between men (39.4%) and women (40.5%), P = 0.59. In the incentive group, the highest participation rate was observed in the ≥75 years (78.1%) age group. The cost for a completed interview was CNY 34.5 in the incentive group and CNY 35.8 in the nonincentive group. Cash incentives might increase participation rates in face-to-face surveys in China. The absolute cost was higher for the incentive group, whereas cost for a completed interview was actually the lowest. Furthermore, participation rate did not differ between men and women, but elders were more likely to participate in health surveys. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Participation willingness in web surveys: exploring effect of sponsoring corporation's and survey provider's reputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiaming; Wen, Chao; Pavur, Robert

    2012-04-01

    Prior research involving response rates in Web-based surveys has not adequately addressed the effect of the reputation of a sponsoring corporation that contracts with a survey provider. This study investigates the effect of two factors, namely, the reputation of a survey's provider and the reputation of a survey's sponsoring corporation, on the willingness of potential respondents to participate in a Web survey. Results of an experimental design with these two factors reveal that the sponsoring corporation's and the survey provider's strong reputations can induce potential respondents to participate in a Web survey. A sponsoring corporation's reputation has a greater effect on the participation willingness of potential respondents of a Web survey than the reputation of the survey provider. A sponsoring corporation with a weak reputation who contracts with a survey provider having a strong reputation results in increased participation willingness from potential respondents if the identity of the sponsoring corporation is disguised in a survey. This study identifies the most effective strategy to increase participation willingness for a Web-based survey by considering both the reputations of the sponsoring corporation and survey provider and whether to reveal their identities.

  20. [Utilization of CAP Survey, Based on Questionnaire Results from Survey Participants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Akiko; Ohno, Hiroie

    2015-08-01

    The survey provided by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) is chosen as one of the proficiency testing programs in Japan, and, recently, the numbers of participating facilities have increased. CAP provides 754 programs, and more than 1,000 tests were provided in 2014. Materials are translated as the "CAP global inter-laboratory comparison program" under the instruction of the Japanese Society of Laboratory Medicine (JSLM) selected from CAP surveys in Japan, and 68 programs and 261 items are provided. The total number of participating facilities was 174. CAP itself and the other services CAP provides are not well-known, while recognition of "the CAP survey as the proficiency test" has increased. The question "What is CAP and the CAP survey" was analyzed as a result of the questionnaire surveys conducted in 2014, and the advantage of the CAP survey and how to utilize it were considered. A questionnaire survey was conducted about the CAP survey for Japanese participants in 2014. Fifty-three questions were asked about their satisfaction level, intended use, and improvement. Eighty replies were analyzed. As a result, most CAP survey participants are satisfied. They intend to mainly use the CAP survey for their quality control. Furthermore, they can continuously monitor their systems throughout all testing phases as the survey has numbers of shipments a year and several specimens per each mailing. This helps in laboratory performance improvement. The Evaluation and Participant Summary (PSR) also effectively improves the laboratories' performance. CAP-accredited laboratories are required to participate in all survey programs concerning the test menu which they provide. Therefore, they have become accustomed to reviewing the evaluation and performing self-evaluation with a high usage rate of the Evaluation and PSR of the CAP survey. The questionnaire proved that performing the CAP survey properly enhanced the laboratories' quality control, and this meets the

  1. Adults' Participation in Informal Learning Activities: Key Findings from the Adult Education Participation Survey in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Horng-Ji; Wu, Ming-Lieh; Li, Ai-Tzu

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the informal learning experiences expressed by Taiwanese adults (aged from 16 to 97) and examined their involvement related to selected socio-demographic characteristics. Data of the 2008 Adult Education Participation Survey in Taiwan and Fujian Area were used to look at different variables of adults' demographic…

  2. Survey of upper extremity injuries among martial arts participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesselhorst, Matthew M; Rayan, Ghazi M; Pasque, Charles B; Peyton Holder, R

    2013-01-01

    To survey participants at various experience levels of different martial arts (MA) about upper extremity injuries sustained during training and fighting. A 21-s question survey was designed and utilised. The survey was divided into four groups (Demographics, Injury Description, Injury Mechanism, and Miscellaneous information) to gain knowledge about upper extremity injuries sustained during martial arts participation. Chi-square testing was utilised to assess for significant associations. Males comprised 81% of respondents. Involvement in multiple forms of MA was the most prevalent (38%). The hand/wrist was the most common area injured (53%), followed by the shoulder/upper arm (27%) and the forearm/elbow (19%). Joint sprains/muscle strains were the most frequent injuries reported overall (47%), followed by abrasions/bruises (26%). Dislocations of the upper extremity were reported by 47% of participants while fractures occurred in 39%. Surgeries were required for 30% of participants. Females were less likely to require surgery and more likely to have shoulder and elbow injuries. Males were more likely to have hand injuries. Participants of Karate and Tae Kwon Do were more likely to have injuries to their hands, while participants of multiple forms were more likely to sustain injuries to their shoulders/upper arms and more likely to develop chronic upper extremity symptoms. With advanced level of training the likelihood of developing chronic upper extremity symptoms increases, and multiple surgeries were required. Hand protection was associated with a lower risk of hand injuries. Martial arts can be associated with substantial upper extremity injuries that may require surgery and extended time away from participation. Injuries may result in chronic upper extremity symptoms. Hand protection is important for reducing injuries to the hand and wrist.

  3. "Do I really want to do this?" Longitudinal cohort study participants' perspectives on postal survey design: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbison Peter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Randomised controlled trials have investigated aspects of postal survey design yet cannot elaborate on reasons behind participants' decision making and survey behaviour. This paper reports participants' perspectives of the design of, and participation in, a longitudinal postal cohort survey. It describes strengths and weaknesses in study design from the perspectives of study participants and aims to contribute to the: 1 design of future cohort surveys and questionnaires generally and, 2 design of cohort surveys for people with musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs specifically. Methods In-depth interviews explored the design of postal surveys previously completed by participants. Interviews used open ended questioning with a topic guide for prompts if areas of interest were not covered spontaneously. Thematic data analysis was undertaken based on the framework method. A second researcher verified all coding. Results Data from fourteen interviews were analysed within three main themes; participation, survey design and survey content. One of the main findings was the importance of clear communication aimed at the correct audience both when inviting potential participants to take part and within the survey itself. Providing enough information about the study, having a topic of interest and an explanation of likely benefits of the study were important when inviting people to participate. The neutrality of the survey and origination from a reputable source were both important; as was an explanation about why information was being collected within the survey itself. Study findings included participants' impressions when invited to take part, why they participated, the acceptability of follow-up of non-responders and why participants completed the follow-up postal survey. Also discussed were participants' first impression of the survey, its length, presentation and participants' views about specific questions within the survey

  4. Prospective evaluation of direct approach with a tablet device as a strategy to enhance survey study participant response rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parker Melissa J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Investigators conduct survey studies for a variety of reasons. Poor participant response rates are common, however, and may limit the generalizability and utility of results. The objective of this study was to determine whether direct approach with a tablet device enhances survey study participant response rate and to assess participants’ experiences with this mode of survey administration. Findings An interventional study nested within a single center survey study was conducted at McMaster Children’s Hospital. The primary outcome was the ability to achieve of a survey study response rate of 70% or greater. Eligible participants received 3 email invitations (Week 0, 2, 4 to complete a web-based (Survey Monkey survey. The study protocol included plans for a two-week follow-up phase (Phase 2 where non-responders were approached by a research assistant and invited to complete an iPad-based version of the survey. The Phase 1 response rate was 48.7% (56/115. Phase 2 effectively recruited reluctant responders, increasing the overall response rate to 72.2% (83/115. On a 7-point Likert scale, reluctant responders highly rated their enjoyment (mean 6.0, sd 0.83 [95% CI: 5.7-6.3] and ease of use (mean 6.7, sd 0.47 [95% CI: 6.5-6.9] completing the survey using the iPad. Reasons endorsed for Phase 2 participation included: direct approach (81%, immediate survey access (62%, and the novelty of completing a tablet-based survey (54%. Most reluctant responders (89% indicated that a tablet-based survey is their preferred method of survey completion. Conclusions Use of a tablet-based version of the survey was effective in recruiting reluctant responders and this group reported positive experiences with this mode of survey administration.

  5. A telephone survey of factors affecting willingness to participate in health research surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, D C; Kelsall, H L; Slegers, C; Forbes, A B; Loff, B; Zion, D; Fritschi, L

    2015-10-05

    In recent years, reduced participation has been encountered across all epidemiological study designs, both in terms of non-response as well as refusal. A low response rate may reduce the statistical power but, more importantly, results may not be generalizable to the wider community. In a telephone survey of 1413 randomly selected members of the Australian general population and of 690 participants sourced from previous studies, we examined factors affecting people's stated willingness to participate in health research. The majority of participants (61 %) expressed willingness to participate in health research in general but the percentage increased when provided with more specific information about the research. People were more willing if they have personal experience of the disease under study, and if the study was funded by government or charity rather than pharmaceutical companies. Participants from previous studies, older people and women were the groups most willing to participate. Younger men preferred online surveys, older people a written questionnaire, and few participants in any age and sex groups preferred a telephone questionnaire. Despite a trend toward reduced participation rates, most participants expressed their willingness to participate in health research. However, when seeking participants, researchers should be concrete and specific about the nature of the research they want to carry out. The preferred method of recommended contact varies with the demographic characteristics.

  6. Differences in participation rates and lessons learned about recruitment of participants--the European Health Examination Survey Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Ahonen, Sanna; Jentoft, Susie; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Heldal, Johan

    2015-03-01

    In the 1980s, participation rates in health interview and health examination surveys were around 80% while now they are around 50-60%. There is also evidence that non-participation is selective. Low participation rates and selective non-participation may cause bias to our survey results based on participants alone. We aim to increase knowledge on cultural differences in acceptance and feasibility of different recruitment methods. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot Project, conducted in 2009-2012, included pilot surveys in 12 countries among people aged 25-64 years. Information about recruitment methods and participation rates in these surveys was collected. Participation rates ranged from 16% to 57% for men and from 31% to 74% for women, where in most surveys women had higher participation rates than men. A variety of recruitment and promotion methods were used to obtain as high participation rates as possible. Combinations of phone calls, invitation letter and home visits were used to recruit invitees. Obtaining valid phone numbers for survey invitees was difficult in several countries. Incentives, websites and promotion in local media were used to promote the surveys. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot surveys showed that obtaining a participation rate above 50% for a representative population sample is possible but it requires hard work and a well-planned recruitment strategy. Recruitment methods used in one country may not be possible to use in another country due to cultural norms and national regulations. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  7. The predictive validity of the survey of readiness for alcoholics anonymous participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingree, Jeffrey B; Simpson, Alpha; Thompson, Martie; McCrady, Barbara; Tonigan, J Scott

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive validity of the Survey of Readiness for Alcoholics Anonymous Participation (SYRAAP), which is a 15-item, self-administered instrument. Bivariate and multivariate analyses examined whether responses to the SYRAAP within 1 week of entering substance-use treatment (T1) were associated with posttreatment Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) participation at 3-month (T2) and 6-month (T3) follow-up assessments. The T1 assessment was completed by 268 respondents; the T2 and T3 assessments were completed by 232 (86%) and 217 (81%) respondents, respectively. Results revealed that responses to the SYRAAP at T1 predicted AA participation at T2 and T3. The findings indicate the SYRAAP is a valid measure for assessing readiness for participating in AA. Future research in relation to the SYRAAP and limitations of the current study are discussed.

  8. Increasing homework completion and accuracy rates with parental participation for young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina GILIC

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder often experience difficulty completing homework assignments independently more than students without disabilities. This study examined the use of a daily report card while adding a parent teacher component on the homework completion and accuracy rates of two second grade boys diagnosed with Autism. Parental participation for graphing and reviewing the student data involved the home environment. Researchers found that the use of the daily report card for homework completion and accuracy increased student success with the added parent teacher communication component. The parent teacher intervention increased both students’ homework completion by 65% and 38% respectively and accuracy rates by 123% and 30% respectively compared, to baseline sessions. Data showed that the addition of a parent teacher graphing component can be effective with a daily report card to increase parental involvement, while also helping increase homework completion and accuracy rates in students with Autism.

  9. Prison-based rehabilitation: Predictors of offender treatment participation and treatment completion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, A.; Kunst, M.; Dirkzwager, A.J.E.; Nieuwbeerta, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine to what extent risk factors and treatment readiness were related to engagement (i.e., participation and completion) in prison-based rehabilitation programs. The sample consisted of the total 6-month inflow of male detainees in the Netherlands who were

  10. Participation in and adherence to physical exercise after completion of primary cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampshoff, C.S.; van Mechelen, W.; Schep, G.; Nijziel, M.R.; Witlox, L.; Bosman, L.; Chinapaw, M.J.M.; Brug, J.; Buffart, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify demographic, clinical, psychosocial, physical and environmental factors that are associated with participation in and adherence to a combined resistance and endurance exercise program among cancer survivors, shortly after completion of primary

  11. ParticipACTION: Baseline assessment of the 'new ParticipACTION': A quantitative survey of Canadian organizational awareness and capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauman Adrian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ParticipACTION is a Canadian physical activity (PA communications and social marketing organization that was relaunched in 2007 after a six-year hiatus. This study assesses the baseline awareness and capacity of Canadian organizations that promote physical activity, to adopt, implement and promote ParticipACTION's physical activity campaign. The three objectives were: (1 to determine organizational awareness of both the 'original' and 'new' ParticipACTION; (2 to report baseline levels of three organizational capacity domains (i.e., to adopt, implement and externally promote physical activity initiatives; and, (3 to explore potential differences in those domains based on organizational size, sector and primary mandate. Methods Organizations at local, provincial/territorial, and national levels were sent an invitation via email prior to the official launch of ParticipACTION to complete an on-line survey. The survey assessed their organization's capacity to adopt, implement and externally promote a new physical activity campaign within their organizational mandates. Descriptive statistics were employed to address the first two study objectives. A series of one-way analysis of variance were conducted to examine the third objective. Results The response rate was 29.7% (268/902. The majority of responding organizations had over 40 employees and had operated for over 10 years. Education was the most common primary mandate, followed by sport and recreation. Organizations were evenly distributed between government and not-for-profits. Approximately 96% of respondents had heard of the 'original' ParticipACTION while 54.6% had heard of the 'new' ParticipACTION (Objective 1. Findings indicate good organizational capacity in Canada to promote physical activity (Objective 2 based on reported means of approximately 4.0 (on 5-point scales for capacity to adopt, implement, and externally promote new physical activity campaigns. Capacity to

  12. Transient analysis mode participation for modal survey target mode selection using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Alan R.; Ibrahim, Omar M.; Sullivan, Timothy L.; Goodnight, Thomas W.

    1994-01-01

    Many methods have been developed to aid analysts in identifying component modes which contribute significantly to component responses. These modes, typically targeted for dynamic model correlation via a modal survey, are known as target modes. Most methods used to identify target modes are based on component global dynamic behavior. It is sometimes unclear if these methods identify all modes contributing to responses important to the analyst. These responses are usually those in areas of hardware design concerns. One method used to check the completeness of target mode sets and identify modes contributing significantly to important component responses is mode participation. With this method, the participation of component modes in dynamic responses is quantified. Those modes which have high participation are likely modal survey target modes. Mode participation is most beneficial when it is used with responses from analyses simulating actual flight events. For spacecraft, these responses are generated via a structural dynamic coupled loads analysis. Using MSC/NASTRAN DMAP, a method has been developed for calculating mode participation based on transient coupled loads analysis results. The algorithm has been implemented to be compatible with an existing coupled loads methodology and has been used successfully to develop a set of modal survey target modes.

  13. A Survey of Query Auto Completion in Information Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cai, F.; de Rijke, M.

    2016-01-01

    In information retrieval, query auto completion (QAC), also known as type-ahead [Xiao et al., 2013, Cai et al., 2014b] and auto-complete suggestion [Jain and Mishne, 2010], refers to the following functionality: given a prefix consisting of a number of characters entered into a search box, the user i

  14. Voluntary survey completion among team members: implications of noncompliance and missing data for multilevel research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Robert R; Cole, Michael S; Bernerth, Jeremy B; Rizzuto, Tracey E

    2013-05-01

    We explored whether voluntary survey completion by team members (in aggregate) is predictable from team members' collective evaluations of team-emergent states. In doing so, we reanalyze less-than-complete survey data on 110 teams from a published field study, using so-called traditional and modern missing data techniques to probe the sensitivity of these team-level relationships to data missingness. The multivariate findings revealed that a greater within-team participation rate was indeed related to a higher team-level (mean) score on team mental efficacy (across all four missing-data techniques) and less dispersion among team member judgments about internal cohesion (when the 2 modern methods were used). In addition, results show that a commonly used approach of retaining only those teams with high participation rates produces inflated standardized effect size (i.e., R²) estimates and decreased statistical power. Suggestions include research design considerations and a comprehensive methodology to account for team member data missingness.

  15. Which long-term care residents should be asked to complete a customer satisfaction survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Water, Margaret S; Kutner, Michael; Parmelee, Patricia A; Johnson, Theodore

    2003-01-01

    impairment, mild-to-moderate impairment, and moderate-to-severe impairment, respectively. The rate of decline in reliability, however, was small for each unit of increase in MDS-COGS. Although the staff's opinions about residents' ability to complete a CSS were significantly associated with an objective MDS-COGS assessment, staff nonetheless failed on several occasions to let cognitively intact residents complete their own surveys. Although higher MDS-COGS scores were significantly related to lower reliability, there were no natural cut-points in the data to suggest a participate/do not participate line and the trend line between MDS-COGS level, and percent of questions answered reliably was not very strong. These results suggest that LTC residents with mild to moderate dementia might be capable of reliably answering certain types of customer satisfaction surveys.

  16. A Survey of Coral Reefs in South China Sea Completed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ An investigation of coral reefs in South China Sea has recently completed by CAS scientists at South China Sea Institute of Oceanography (SCSIO) in Guangzhou. The compilation and analysis of the obtained data is now under way.

  17. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Nightjar Survey Network Survey Field Procedures and Completed Data Sheets

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Raw data and survey instructions from the Nightjar Survey Network's nighjar survey on Okefenokee NWR. Nightjar Surveys are standardized population counts conducted...

  18. Can incentives undermine intrinsic motivation to participate in epidemiologic surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenemark, Marika; Vernby, Asa; Norberg, Annika Lindahl

    2010-04-01

    Response rates to surveys are decreasing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of lottery tickets as incentives in an epidemiologic control group. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to parents in the municipality of Stockholm, Sweden, who were to be used as a control group in a study addressing stress in parents of children with cancer. A stratified random sample of 450 parents were randomized into three incentive groups: (a) no incentive; (b) a promised incentive of one lottery ticket to be received upon reply; (c) a promised incentive of one lottery ticket to be received upon reply and an additional lottery ticket upon reply within 1 week. The overall response rate across the three groups was 65.3%. The response rate was highest in the no incentive group (69.3%) and lowest in the one plus one lottery ticket group (62.0%). In a survival analysis, the difference between the two response curves was significant by the log-rank test (P = 0.04), with the no incentive group having a shorter time to response than the incentive group. Our findings suggest that the use of lottery tickets as incentives to increase participation in a mail questionnaire among parents may be less valuable or even harmful. Incentives may undermine motivation in studies in which the intrinsic motivation of the respondents is already high.

  19. Retaining young people in a longitudinal sexual health survey: a trial of strategies to maintain participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nixon Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an increasing trend towards lower participation in questionnaire surveys. This reduces representativeness, increases costs and introduces particular challenges to longitudinal surveys, as researchers have to use complex statistical techniques which attempt to address attrition. This paper describes a trial of incentives to retain longitudinal survey cohorts from ages 16 to 20, to question them on the sensitive topic of sexual health. Methods A longitudinal survey was conducted with 8,430 eligible pupils from two sequential year groups from 25 Scottish schools. Wave 1 (14 years and Wave 2 (16 years were conducted largely within schools. For Wave 3 (18 years, when everyone had left school, the sample was split into 4 groups that were balanced across predictors of survey participation: 1 no incentive; 2 chance of winning one of twenty-five vouchers worth £20; 3 chance of winning one £500 voucher; 4 a definite reward of a £10 voucher sent on receipt of their completed questionnaire. Outcomes were participation at Wave 3 and two years later at Wave 4. Analysis used logistic regression and adjusted for clustering at school level. Results The only condition that had a significant and beneficial impact for pupils was to offer a definite reward for participation (Group 4. Forty-one percent of Group 4 participated in Wave 3 versus 27% or less for Groups 1 to 3. At Wave 4, 35% of Group 4 took part versus 25% or less for the other groups. Similarly, 22% of Group 4 participated in all four Waves of the longitudinal study, whereas for the other three groups it was 16% or less that participated in full. Conclusions The best strategy for retaining all groups of pupils and one that improved retention at both age 18 and age 20 was to offer a definite reward for participation. This is expensive, however, given the many benefits of retaining a longitudinal sample, we recommend inclusion of this as a research cost for cohort and other

  20. Understanding Why Students Participate in Multiple Surveys: Who are the Hard-Core Responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at survey response across multiple surveys to understand who the hard-core survey responders and non-responders are. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use the number of surveys…

  1. 75 FR 78225 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Minority-Owned Business Participation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... Minority Business Development Agency Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Minority-Owned Business Participation, Opportunities and Barriers to Global Commerce AGENCY: Minority Business... global commerce. The survey will provide valuable information on the markets minority businesses...

  2. Participant recruitment to FiCTION, a primary dental care trial - survey of facilitators and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, A; Clarkson, J; Maguire, A; Speed, C; Innes, N

    2014-11-01

    To identify reasons behind a lower than expected participant recruitment rate within the FiCTION trial, a multi-centre paediatric primary dental care randomised controlled trial (RCT). An online survey, based on a previously published tool, consisting of both quantitative and qualitative responses, completed by staff in dental practices recruiting to FiCTION. Ratings from quantitative responses were aggregated to give overall scores for factors related to participant recruitment. Qualitative responses were independently grouped into themes. Thirty-nine anonymous responses were received. Main facilitators related to the support received from the central research team and importance of the research question. The main barriers related to low child eligibility rates and the integration of trial processes within routine workloads. These findings have directed strategies for enhancing participant recruitment at existing practices and informed recruitment of further practices. The results help provide a profile of the features required of practices to successfully screen and recruit participants. Future trials in this setting should consider the level of interest in the research question within practices, and ensure trial processes are as streamlined as possible. Research teams should actively support practices with participant recruitment and maintain enthusiasm among the entire practice team.

  3. Participation in a mail survey: role of repeated mailings and characteristics of nonrespondents among recent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larroque, B; Kaminski, M; Bouvier-Colle, M H; Hollebecque, V

    1999-04-01

    This study analysed the characteristics of respondent and nonrespondent mothers at each stage of a survey procedure, from a initial questionnaire to a reminder letter and two repeated mailings. Of 938 mothers of liveborn children who, while maternity inpatients, received a questionnaire and information about a mail survey to follow 2 months later, 828 completed and returned the initial questionnaire, 708 agreed to participate in the mail survey and were sent the mail questionnaire, and 612 finally completed and returned the questionnaire at 2 months. There were differences between respondents and non-respondents for socio-demographic factors at each stage of the process. The final response rate to the mail questionnaire was higher among mothers who were younger, were breast feeding, and had more education, an occupation and fewer children. The characteristics of late respondents were intermediate between those of early to middle respondents and nonrespondents for age, educational level, breast feeding and occupation. Maternal and infant health varied only slightly according to response status. Repeated mailings increased response and diminished selection. A mail questionnaire after contact in a maternity ward is a cost-effective means of gathering data about a large sample of recent mothers and their children.

  4. Participation in sports after hip and knee arthroplasty: review of literature and survey of surgeon preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrory, B J; Stuart, M J; Sim, F H

    1995-04-01

    To summarize previously published findings and to present the opinions of a group of reconstructive orthopedic surgeons from a single institution on participation in sports after hip or knee arthroplasty. We reviewed the literature pertaining to participation in sports after hip or knee arthroplasty and surveyed a group of orthopedic surgeons about their recommendations for resumption of various sports activities by patients who had undergone total hip or knee arthroplasty. A computerized literature search was performed, and salient issues about participation in sports after joint replacement procedures were synthesized. At the Mayo Clinic, 28 orthopedic surgeons (13 consultants and 15 fellows or residents) completed a single-page questionnaire that requested a recommendation ("yes," "no," or "depends") about patients resuming participation in 28 common sports after recovery from total hip or knee arthroplasty. Staff surgeon responses were compared with responses from fellows and residents by using the Mann-Whitney U test. Sports in which 75% of surgeons would not allow participation were identified as "not recommended," whereas sports in which 75% of surgeons would allow participation were labeled as "recommended." Fellows and residents were less likely than staff surgeons to allow return to cross-country skiing after total knee arthroplasty. Otherwise, responses from consultant surgeons and from fellows and residents did not differ significantly. Recommended sports included sailing, swimming laps, scuba diving, cycling, golfing, and bowling after hip and knee replacement procedures and also cross-country skiing after knee arthroplasty. Sports not recommended after hip or knee arthroplasty were running, waterskiing, football, baseball, basketball, hockey, handball, karate, soccer, and racquetball. After hip or knee arthroplasty, participation in no-impact or low-impact sports can be encouraged, but participation in high-impact sports should be prohibited.

  5. Survey of motivation to participate in a birth cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Midori; Fujita, Misuzu; Mori, Chisato; Hata, Akira

    2016-09-01

    For a longitudinal prospective cohort study to be successful, participants' motivation to provide information must be maintained. Therefore, this study aimed to identify items that effectively promote participants' motivation. Questionnaires were mailed to 4541 mothers and expectant mothers in Chiba Prefecture, Japan who participated in a nationwide birth cohort. A total of 2387 (52.6%) responses were received. The following items were identified as primary motivating factors among our cohort: "benefits to the participants' children", "monetary compensation" and "contribution to a better future environment". More than 30% of the respondents expressed a lack of understanding regarding the study purpose and requirements for participation. About 14% were concerned about the leakage of personal information, and 13% felt burdened by having to make a long-term commitment to the study. Cluster analysis identified four groups, two of which, one with extremely low levels of motivation and the other motivated by only money or goods, lacked an understanding of the study and tended to be concerned about the associated risks and burdens. Participants in these groups were considered to be at a high risk of dropout. Therefore, implementing measures to provide participants with a better understanding of cohort studies could lead to more successful results.

  6. Communicating serum chemical concentrations to study participants: follow up survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis Germaine M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A considerable literature now supports the importance of effective communication with study participants, including how best to develop communication plans focusing on the uncertainty of health risks associated with particular environmental exposures. Strategies for communicating individual concentrations of environmental chemicals in human biological samples in the absence of clearly established safe or hazardous levels have been discussed from a conceptual basis and to a lesser extent from an empirical basis. We designed and evaluated an empirically based communication strategy for women of reproductive age who previously participated in a prospective study focusing on persistent environmental chemicals and reproductive outcomes. Methods A cohort of women followed from preconception through pregnancy or up to 12 menstrual cycles without pregnancy was given their individual serum concentrations for lead, dichloro-2,2-bisp-chlorophenyl ethylene, and select polychlorinated biphenyl congeners. Two versions of standardized letters were prepared depending upon women's exposure status, which was characterized as low or high. Letters included an introduction, individual concentrations, population reference values and guidance for minimizing future exposures. Participants were actively monitored for any questions or concerns following receipt of letters. Results Ninety-eight women were sent letters informing them of their individual concentrations to select study chemicals. None of the 89 (91% participating women irrespective of exposure status contacted the research team with questions or concerns about communicated exposures despite an invitation to do so. Conclusions Our findings suggest that study participants can be informed about their individual serum concentrations without generating unnecessary concern.

  7. Can smartphones measure momentary quality of life and participation? A proof of concept using experience sampling surveys with university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, Jacki; Wishink, Anna; Springfield, Liz; Gustafsson, Louise; Ireland, David; Silburn, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Understanding quality of life and participation is a key aspect of occupational therapy research. The use of smartphones to deliver experience-sampling surveys may provide an accessible way to monitor these outcomes. This study used smartphone-based experience sampling methods (ESM) to investigate factors influencing momentary quality of life (mQOL) of university students. A convenience sample of students at an Australian university participated. Using a custom smartphone application, ESM surveys were sent six to eight times, every second day, over a week. Participants indicated their mQOL, occupational participation, occupational enjoyment, social context and location via surveys and provided demographic and health information in a single self-report questionnaire. The relationship between mQOL and variables was analysed at the survey level using logistic regression. Forty students completed 391 surveys. Higher mQOL was significantly related to participation in productive occupations (z = 3.48; P = 0.001), moderate (z = 4.00; P sample, analysing at the individual level, and using ESM in conjunction with other methodologies is recommended. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  8. Complete denture impression techniques practiced by private dental practitioners: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakatkar, Vinay R

    2013-09-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  9. Language as a determinant of participation rates in Finnish health examination surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Koponen, Päivikki; Borodulin, Katja; Männistö, Satu; Peltonen, Markku; Vartiainen, Erkki

    2017-08-01

    A high participation rate is considered as a prerequisite for representative survey results, especially when it is known that non-participation is selective. In many countries migration is increasing and the proportion of people speaking other language(s) than the official language(s) of the country is also increasing. How does this affect survey participation rates? Data from four cross-sectional health examination surveys (the FINRISK Study) were used to evaluate the effect of the registered mother tongue to participation in the survey. Finland has two official languages (Finnish and Swedish). Between 1997 and 2012, the proportion of the population with some other language as their registered mother tongue has increased significantly. Participation rates in the health surveys have been highest among the Finnish language group (68% in men in 1997 and 76% in women in 1997), while lowest among the foreign language group (43% in men in 1997 and 57% in women in 1997). In 2012, the participation rates had declined in all language groups: for men, 58%, 62% and 41% for Finnish, Swedish and foreign groups respectively, and for women 68%, 75% and 56%. The participation rate for the foreign language group was significantly lower than for the Finnish and Swedish groups. In future surveys it will be important to include actions to promote participation, e.g. providing survey material in several languages. These actions will increase costs but will be essential to ensure high participation rates and reliable results for the total population.

  10. A Survey of Teen Museum Education Participants and Their Parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Jenny; Bobick, Bryna

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we discuss a museum program for teens located in an urban environment. The participants were high school students from public, private, religious and home schools. The program allowed learning to occur in an informal setting and united teens from one city through a common interest in visual art. Also, it was an opportunity for the…

  11. Participating on Equal Terms? The Gender Dimensions of Direct Participation in Organisational Change: Findings from the EPOC Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Annette; Webster, Juliet

    The gender dimensions of direct participation in organizational change were examined in a survey of general managers at 32,582 workplaces in the following European countries: Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Responses were received from 5,786 managers (response rate,…

  12. Geothermal-well completions: a survey and technical evaluation of existing equipment and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, J.E.; Snyder, R.E.

    1982-07-01

    The geothermal environment and associated well completion problems are reviewed. Existing well completion equipment is surveyed and limitations are identified. A technical evaluation of selected completion equipment is presented. The technical evaluation concentrates on well cementing equipment and identifies potential failure mechanisms which limit the effectiveness of these tools. Equipment employed in sand control, perforating, and corrosion control are identified as potential subjects for future technical evaluation.

  13. Choir of believers? Longitudinal evidence on public service motivation and survey participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; De Lorent Gad, Mette; Kjeldsen, Anne Mette

    The most widely used method to study individuals’ public service motivation is surveys. The validity and inferential power of such studies may, however, be harmed by survey participation bias, if highly public service motivated individuals are overrepresented among respondents. This paper examines...... the methodological critique of survey participation bias raised against the public service motivation literature and examines whether public service motivation increases the propensity to respond to surveys. By tracking more than 3,000 public service providers’ participation in a three-wave panel survey, our...... analysis shows that public service motivation does have a positive effect on survey participation. This suggests that future studies should pay attention to the characteristics of respondents/non-respondents and consider weighting the sample....

  14. Sample selection, recruitment and participation rates in health examination surveys in Europe--experience from seven national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jennifer S; Giampaoli, Simona; Goesswald, Antje; Kamtsiuris, Panagiotis; Mann, Charlotte; Männistö, Satu; Morgan, Karen; Shelton, Nicola J; Verschuren, W M Monique; Tolonen, Hanna

    2015-10-05

    Health examination surveys (HESs), carried out in Europe since the 1950's, provide valuable information about the general population's health for health monitoring, policy making, and research. Survey participation rates, important for representativeness, have been falling. International comparisons are hampered by differing exclusion criteria and definitions for non-response. Information was collected about seven national HESs in Europe conducted in 2007-2012. These surveys can be classified into household and individual-based surveys, depending on the sampling frames used. Participation rates of randomly selected adult samples were calculated for four survey modules using standardised definitions and compared by sex, age-group, geographical areas within countries, and over time, where possible. All surveys covered residents not just citizens; three countries excluded those in institutions. In two surveys, physical examinations and blood sample collection were conducted at the participants' home; the others occurred at examination clinics. Recruitment processes varied considerably between surveys. Monetary incentives were used in four surveys. Initial participation rates aged 35-64 were 45% in the Netherlands (phase II), 54% in Germany (new and previous participants combined), 55% in Italy, and 65% in Finland. In Ireland, England and Scotland, household participation rates were 66%, 66% and 63% respectively. Participation rates were generally higher in women and increased with age. Almost all participants attending an examination centre agreed to all modules but surveys conducted in the participants' home had falling responses to each stage. Participation rates in most primate cities were substantially lower than the national average. Age-standardized response rates to blood pressure measurement among those aged 35-64 in Finland, Germany and England fell by 0.7-1.5 percentage points p.a. between 1998-2002 and 2010-2012. Longer trends in some countries show a more

  15. Forest Landowner Education Interests and Delivery Preferences: A Retrospective Look at Survey Results and Actual Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobrist, Kevin W.; Rozance, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    This article presents survey data on education interests and delivery preferences of small forest landowners in Washington and compares it to actual program participation over 6 years. The survey was conducted in late 2007 to guide development and implementation of a Extension forestry program. The survey found broad interest across many topics…

  16. Forest Landowner Education Interests and Delivery Preferences: A Retrospective Look at Survey Results and Actual Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobrist, Kevin W.; Rozance, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    This article presents survey data on education interests and delivery preferences of small forest landowners in Washington and compares it to actual program participation over 6 years. The survey was conducted in late 2007 to guide development and implementation of a Extension forestry program. The survey found broad interest across many topics…

  17. Increasing health examination survey participation rates by SMS reminders and flexible examination times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Aistrich, Anna; Borodulin, Katja

    2014-11-01

    Declining participation rates are an increasing problem in population surveys. Different kinds of methods have been used to ensure participation rates as high as possible. Monetary incentives and reminders have been found to be effective ways to increase participation rates, but these are rather expensive to implement in large population surveys. There is a need for cheaper ways to motivate survey invitees to participate. The Kuusamo Health Examination Survey was conducted in May-June 2011. A random sample of 250 people was selected for the survey. Mobile phone numbers, when available, were obtained for people within the sample. For a random sample of 50% of survey invitees with a mobile phone number, a short message service (SMS) reminder was sent prior to their appointment. All survey participants were asked to fill in a feedback questionnaire. Participation rate was 58% for men and 74% for women. Mobile phone numbers were available for 66% of the sample. Among those receiving an SMS reminder about their appointment, participation rates were up to 25 percentage points higher than among the group not receiving a reminder. In the feedback questionnaire, 9% of the survey participants reported that they would not have participated without the SMS reminder they received. Participants preferred morning hours and Monday-Tuesday as time and day options for the examinations. SMS reminder about the appointment time was an effective way to increase participation rate, especially among the youngest age groups also, providing flexible office hours for the examination clinic may increase participation rate. © 2014 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  18. Comparison of Completion Rates for SF-36 Compared With SF-12 Quality of Life Surveys at a Tertiary Urban Wound Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Paul J; Kumar, Anagha; Elmarsafi, Tammer; Lehrenbaum, Hannah; Anghel, Ersilia; Steinberg, John S; Evans, Karen K; Attinger, Christopher E

    Patient-reported outcome measures derived from quality of life instruments are an important tool in monitoring disease progression and treatment response. Although a number of validated instruments are available, the Short Form-36 (SF-36) quality of life survey is the most widely used. It is imperative that the patients answer all the questions in this instrument for appropriate analysis and interpretation. It has been hypothesized that fewer questions (i.e., the Short Form-12 [SF-12]), will result in greater survey completion rates. The present study was a randomized prospective study comparing the completion rates for the SF-36 and SF-12 quality of life surveys. Patients presenting with a chronic wound were asked to complete the SF-36 or SF-12 survey. After an a priori power analysis was performed, the completion rates, patterns of skipped questions, and demographic information were analyzed using t tests for continuous variables or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables and both multivariate linear regression and logistic regression. A total of 59 subjects (30 completed the SF-12 and 29 completed the SF-36) participated in the present study. The SF-12 group had an 80% (24 of 30) completion rate compared with a 55% (16 of 29) completion rate for the SF-36 group (p < .05). However, the length of the survey did not affect the completion rate nor was a statistically detectable pattern of skipped questions found. College graduates were more likely to complete both surveys compared with high school graduates (p < .07). Although it is unclear why, our study results indicate that the SF-12 yields a higher total survey completion rate. However, completion appears independent of the shorter survey length. Copyright © 2017 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Measuring children's self-reported sport participation, risk perception and injury history: development and validation of a survey instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siesmaa, Emma J; Blitvich, Jennifer D; White, Peta E; Finch, Caroline F

    2011-01-01

    Despite the health benefits associated with children's sport participation, the occurrence of injury in this context is common. The extent to which sport injuries impact children's ongoing involvement in sport is largely unknown. Surveys have been shown to be useful for collecting children's injury and sport participation data; however, there are currently no published instruments which investigate the impact of injury on children's sport participation. This study describes the processes undertaken to assess the validity of two survey instruments for collecting self-reported information about child cricket and netball related participation, injury history and injury risk perceptions, as well as the reliability of the cricket-specific version. Face and content validity were assessed through expert feedback from primary and secondary level teachers and from representatives of peak sporting bodies for cricket and netball. Test-retest reliability was measured using a sample of 59 child cricketers who completed the survey on two occasions, 3-4 weeks apart. Based on expert feedback relating to face and content validity, modification and/or deletion of some survey items was undertaken. Survey items with low test-retest reliability (κ≤0.40) were modified or deleted, items with moderate reliability (κ=0.41-0.60) were modified slightly and items with higher reliability (κ≥0.61) were retained, with some undergoing minor modifications. This is the first survey of its kind which has been successfully administered to cricketers aged 10-16 years to collect information about injury risk perceptions and intentions for continued sport participation. Implications for its generalisation to other child sport participants are discussed.

  20. Aqueous Computing:A Survey with an Invitation to Participate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tom Head; Xia Chen; Masayuki Yamamura; Susannah Gal

    2002-01-01

    The concept of aqueous computing is presented here, first in full generality,and afterward, using an implementation in a specific enzymatic technology. Aqueous computingarose in the context of biomolecular (DNA) computing, but the concept is independent ofthe specifics of its biochemical origin. Alternate technologies for realizing aqueous computingare being considered for future implementation. A solution of an instance of the Booleansatisfiability problem, (SAT), is reported here that provides a new example of an aqueouscomputation that has been carried out successfully. This small instance of the SAT problemis sufficiently complex to allow our current enzymatic technology to be illustrated in detail.The reader is invited to participate in the rich interdisciplinary activity required by wet labcomputing. A project is suggested to the reader for determining the three-colorings of a graph.The basic operations required for this project are exhibited in the solution of the SAT examplereported here.

  1. Drug use among complete responders, partial responders and non-responders in a longitudinal survey of nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wastesson, Jonas W; Rasmussen, Lotte; Oksuzyan, Anna;

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: In observational studies, non-response can limit representativity and introduce bias. We aimed to investigate the longitudinal changes in the number of used drugs among complete responders, partial responders, and non-responders in a whole birth cohort of Danish nonagenarians participating...... in a longitudinal survey. METHODS: We obtained prescription data on all individuals born in 1905 and living in Denmark when the Danish 1905 cohort study was initiated in 1998 (n = 3600) using the Danish National Prescription Registry. Drug use was assessed for complete responders, non-responders at baseline......, and partial responders (i.e., dropouts) in the 4-month period preceding each wave of the study (1998, 2000, 2003, and 2005), that is, as the cohort aged from 92-93 to 99-100 years. RESULTS: Complete responders, non-responders, and partial responders used a similar number of drugs at baseline, on average 4...

  2. Training practitioners in preparing systematic reviews: a cross-sectional survey of participants in the Australasian Cochrane Centre training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silagy Chris

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although systematic reviews of health care interventions are an invaluable tool for health care providers and researchers, many potential authors never publish reviews. This study attempts to determine why some people with interest in performing systematic reviews do not subsequently publish a review; and what steps could possibly increase review completion. Methods Cross-sectional survey by email and facsimile of the 179 participants in Australasian Cochrane Centre training events between 1998 and 2000. Results Ninety-two participants responded to the survey (51 percent. Response rate of deliverable surveys was 82 percent (92/112. The remainder of the participants had invalid or no contact information on file. More than 75 percent of respondents felt that the current workshops met their needs for training. The most critical barriers to completion of a Cochrane review were: lack of time (80 percent, lack of financial support (36 percent, methodological problems (23 percent and problems with group dynamics (10 percent. Conclusions Strategies to protect reviewer time and increase the efficiency of the review process may increase the numbers of trained reviewers completing a systematic review.

  3. Barriers to participation in a patient satisfaction survey: who are we missing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Gayet-Ageron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A common weakness of patient satisfaction surveys is a suboptimal participation rate. Some patients may be unable to participate, because of language barriers, physical limitations, or mental problems. As the role of these barriers is poorly understood, we aimed to identify patient characteristics that are associated with non-participation in a patient satisfaction survey. METHODOLOGY: At the University Hospitals of Geneva, Switzerland, a patient satisfaction survey is regularly conducted among all adult patients hospitalized for >24 hours on a one-month period in the departments of internal medicine, geriatrics, surgery, neurosciences, psychiatry, and gynaecology-obstetrics. In order to assess the factors associated with non-participation to the patient satisfaction survey, a case-control study was conducted among patients selected for the 2005 survey. Cases (non respondents, n = 195 and controls (respondents, n = 205 were randomly selected from the satisfaction survey, and information about potential barriers to participation was abstracted in a blinded fashion from the patients' medical and nursing charts. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Non-participation in the satisfaction survey was independently associated with the presence of a language barrier (odds ratio [OR] 4.53, 95% confidence interval [CI95%]: 2.14-9.59, substance abuse (OR 3.75, CI95%: 1.97-7.14, cognitive limitations (OR 3.72, CI95%: 1.64-8.42, a psychiatric diagnosis (OR 1.99, CI95%: 1.23-3.23 and a sight deficiency (OR 2.07, CI95%: 0.98-4.36. The odds ratio for non-participation increased gradually with the number of predictors. CONCLUSIONS: Five barriers to non-participation in a mail survey were identified. Gathering patient feedback through mailed surveys may lead to an under-representation of some patient subgroups.

  4. What is a non-user? An analysis of Danish surveys on cultural habits and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balling, Gitte; Kann-Christensen, Nanna

    2013-01-01

    The article analyses surveys of cultural participation and discusses how they convey certain concepts of users and culture. The article aims to develop a more nuanced and contemporary picture of cultural participation and notions of the non-user. The article shows a shift in how the user is const......The article analyses surveys of cultural participation and discusses how they convey certain concepts of users and culture. The article aims to develop a more nuanced and contemporary picture of cultural participation and notions of the non-user. The article shows a shift in how the user...

  5. Rates, Delays, and Completeness of General Practitioners’ Responses to a Postal Versus Web-Based Survey: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisonneuve, Hubert; Cerutti, Bernard; Fournier, Jean Pascal; Senn, Nicolas; Haller, Dagmar M

    2017-01-01

    Background Web-based surveys have become a new and popular method for collecting data, but only a few studies have directly compared postal and Web-based surveys among physicians, and none to our knowledge among general practitioners (GPs). Objective Our aim is to compare two modes of survey delivery (postal and Web-based) in terms of participation rates, response times, and completeness of questionnaires in a study assessing GPs’ preventive practices. Methods This randomized study was conducted in Western Switzerland (Geneva and Vaud) and in France (Alsace and Pays de la Loire) in 2015. A random selection of community-based GPs (1000 GPs in Switzerland and 2400 GPs in France) were randomly allocated to receive a questionnaire about preventive care activities either by post (n=700 in Switzerland, n=400 in France) or by email (n=300 in Switzerland, n=2000 in France). Reminder messages were sent once in the postal group and twice in the Web-based group. Any GPs practicing only complementary and alternative medicine were excluded from the study. Results Among the 3400 contacted GPs, 764 (22.47%, 95% CI 21.07%-23.87%) returned the questionnaire. Compared to the postal group, the participation rate in the Web-based group was more than four times lower (246/2300, 10.70% vs 518/1100, 47.09%, Pparticipation in surveys while reducing costs. PMID:28330830

  6. Participant recruitment in sensitive surveys: a comparative trial of 'opt in' versus 'opt out' approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, Katherine J; Shlomo, Natalie; Addington-Hall, Julia

    2013-01-01

    ... by returning a reply slip is frequently adopted. However, in observational research the risk to participants is lower than in clinical research and so some surveys have used an 'opt-out' system...

  7. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Julie-Anne; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Huttner, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers’ motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90%) filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53%) were male. Thirty-five respondents (34%) were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97%) and 61/103 (59%) reported additional “humanitarian reasons” and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72%) recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90%) a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial’s context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the intense

  8. Children's Experiences of Completing a Computer-Based Violence Survey: Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellonen, Noora; Poso, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the ethics of research on children when studying sensitive issues such as violence. The empirical analysis is based on the accounts given by children (11 377) who completed a computer-based questionnaire about their experiences of violence ("The Finnish Child Victim Survey 2008")…

  9. Children's Experiences of Completing a Computer-Based Violence Survey: Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellonen, Noora; Poso, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the ethics of research on children when studying sensitive issues such as violence. The empirical analysis is based on the accounts given by children (11 377) who completed a computer-based questionnaire about their experiences of violence ("The Finnish Child Victim Survey 2008")…

  10. Using online social media for recruitment of human immunodeficiency virus-positive participants: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Patrick; Bare, Michael G; Johnson, Mallory O; Saberi, Parya

    2014-05-01

    There are many challenges in recruiting and engaging participants when conducting research, especially with HIV-positive individuals. Some of these challenges include geographical barriers, insufficient time and financial resources, and perceived HIV-related stigma. This paper describes the methodology of a recruitment approach that capitalized on existing online social media venues and other Internet resources in an attempt to overcome some of these barriers to research recruitment and retention. From May through August 2013, a campaign approach using a combination of online social media, non-financial incentives, and Web-based survey software was implemented to advertise, recruit, and retain participants, and collect data for a survey study with a limited budget. Approximately US $5,000 was spent with a research staff designated at 20% of full-time effort, yielding 2034 survey clicks, 1404 of which met the inclusion criteria and initiated the survey, for an average cost of US $3.56 per survey initiation. A total of 1221 individuals completed the survey, yielding 86.97% retention. These data indicate that online recruitment is a feasible and efficient tool that can be further enhanced by sophisticated online data collection software and the addition of non-financial incentives.

  11. Using Online Social Media for Recruitment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Positive Participants: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Patrick; Bare, Michael G; Johnson, Mallory O

    2014-01-01

    Background There are many challenges in recruiting and engaging participants when conducting research, especially with HIV-positive individuals. Some of these challenges include geographical barriers, insufficient time and financial resources, and perceived HIV-related stigma. Objective This paper describes the methodology of a recruitment approach that capitalized on existing online social media venues and other Internet resources in an attempt to overcome some of these barriers to research recruitment and retention. Methods From May through August 2013, a campaign approach using a combination of online social media, non-financial incentives, and Web-based survey software was implemented to advertise, recruit, and retain participants, and collect data for a survey study with a limited budget. Results Approximately US $5,000 was spent with a research staff designated at 20% of full-time effort, yielding 2034 survey clicks, 1404 of which met the inclusion criteria and initiated the survey, for an average cost of US $3.56 per survey initiation. A total of 1221 individuals completed the survey, yielding 86.97% retention. Conclusions These data indicate that online recruitment is a feasible and efficient tool that can be further enhanced by sophisticated online data collection software and the addition of non-financial incentives. PMID:24784982

  12. The Milky Way in Molecular Clouds A New Complete CO Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Dame, T M; Thaddeus, P; Hartmann, Dap

    2000-01-01

    New large-scale CO surveys of the first and second Galactic quadrants and the nearby molecular cloud complexes in Orion and Taurus, obtained with the CfA 1.2 m telescope, have been combined with 31 other surveys obtained over the past two decades with that instrument and a similar telescope on Cerro Tololo in Chile, to produce a new composite CO survey of the entire Milky Way. The survey consists of 488,000 spectra that Nyquist or beamwidth (1/8-deg) sample the entire Galactic plane over a strip 4-10 deg wide in latitude, and beamwidth or 1/4-deg sample nearly all large local clouds at higher latitudes. A map of molecular column density predicted from complete and unbiased far-infrared and 21 cm surveys of the Galaxy was used both to determine the completeness of the present survey and to extrapolate it to the entire sky at |b| 5 deg), X shows little systematic variation with latitude from a mean value of 1.8 +/- 0.3 x 10^20 cm-2 K-1 km-1 s. Given the large sky area and large quantity of CO data analyzed, we...

  13. Why Don't Our Students Respond? Understanding Declining Participation in Survey Research among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschepikow, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Declining response rates among college students threaten the effectiveness of survey research at institutions of higher education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the conditions that promote participation in survey research among this population. The researcher identified three themes through this study. First, participants…

  14. Why Don't Our Students Respond? Understanding Declining Participation in Survey Research among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschepikow, William K.

    2012-01-01

    Declining response rates among college students threaten the effectiveness of survey research at institutions of higher education. The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the conditions that promote participation in survey research among this population. The researcher identified three themes through this study. First, participants…

  15. Relationship between participants' level of education and engagement in their completion of the Understanding Dementia Massive Open Online Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Lynette R; Bell, Erica; King, Carolyn; O'Mara, Ciaran; McInerney, Fran; Robinson, Andrew; Vickers, James

    2015-03-26

    The completion rates for Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) generally are low (5-10%) and have been reported to favour participants with higher (typically tertiary-level) education. Despite these factors, the flexible learning offered by a MOOC has the potential to provide an accessible educational environment for a broad spectrum of participants. In this regard, the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre has developed a MOOC on dementia that is evidence-based and intended to address this emerging major global public health issue by providing educational resources to a broad range of caregivers, people with dementia, and health care professionals. The Understanding Dementia MOOC was designed specifically to appeal to, and support, adult learners with a limited educational background. The nine-week course was presented in three units. Participants passed a quiz at the end of each unit to continue through the course. A series of discussion boards facilitated peer-to-peer interactions. A separate "Ask an Expert" discussion board also was established for each unit where participants posted questions and faculty with expertise in the area responded. Almost 10,000 people from 65 countries registered; 4,409 registrants engaged in the discussion boards, and 3,624 (38%) completed the course. Participants' level of education ranged from postgraduate study to a primary (elementary) school education. Participants without a university education (vocational certificate and below) were as likely as those with a university education to complete the course (χ(2) = 2.35, df = 6, p = 0.88) and to engage in the online discussions (F[6, 3799] = 0.85, p = 0.54). Further, participants who completed the MOOC engaged in significantly more discussion board posts than participants who did not complete the course (t = 39.60, df = 4407, p MOOCs can be successfully developed and delivered to students from diverse educational backgrounds. The high

  16. Primitive running: a survey analysis of runners' interest, participation, and implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothschild, Carey E

    2012-08-01

    Running is a sport that has continued to see growth in numbers over the years. Recently, there has been a movement promoting running barefoot and in light, "minimalist" shoes. Advocates of barefoot running believe that a more primitive style of running may result in fewer running-related injuries and even possibly improve performance. To identify the current interest level and participation in barefoot or minimalist shod running, an electronic survey was developed and dispersed to 6,082 runners. The survey instrument examined demographics, motivating factors, used resources, perceived barriers, and expectations in runners who add barefoot or in minimalist shod running to their training. Seven hundred eighty-five (13%) runners completed the survey. Six hundred and thirty (75.7%) indicated they were at least somewhat interested in running barefoot or in minimalist shoes. One hundred seventy-two (21.9%) runners had previously tried barefoot running, whereas 239 (30.4%) had previously tried minimalist shoes. The primary motivating factor for those running barefoot or in minimalist shoes (n = 283) was to prevent future injury (n = 97, 34.3%). Advice from friends (n = 68, 24.5%) or books (n = 68, 24.5%) was the most commonly used resource in transitioning to barefoot or minimalist shod running. Fear of possible injury (n = 424, 54%) was the most prevalent perceived barrier in transitioning to barefoot or minimalist shod running. An overwhelming 671 (85.5%) indicated that they were at least somewhat likely to continue with or to add barefoot or minimalist shod running if provided sufficient instruction. Runners who are men, of younger age, and who consider themselves elite runners are somewhat more likely to be interested in barefoot or minimalist shod running.

  17. Prepaid monetary incentives—Predictors of taking the money and completing the survey: Results from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Seema; Kennedy, Ryan David; Thompson, Mary E.; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Prepaid monetary incentives are used to address declining response rates in random-digit-dial surveys. There is concern among researchers that some respondents will accept the prepayment but not complete the survey. There is little research to understand check cashing and survey completing behaviors among respondents who receive pre-payment. Data from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Study—a longitudinal survey of smokers in Canada, the US, the UK, and Australia, were used to examine the impact of prepayment (in the form of checks, approximately $10USD) on sample profile. Approximately 14% of respondents cashed their check, but did not complete the survey, while about 14% did not cash their checks, but completed the survey. Younger adults (Canada, US), those of minority status (US), and those who had been in the survey for only two waves or less (Canada, US) were more likely to cash their checks and not complete the survey. PMID:26778862

  18. Prepaid monetary incentives-Predictors of taking the money and completing the survey: Results from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Four Country Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutti, Seema; Kennedy, Ryan David; Thompson, Mary E; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2014-05-01

    Prepaid monetary incentives are used to address declining response rates in random-digit-dial surveys. There is concern among researchers that some respondents will accept the prepayment but not complete the survey. There is little research to understand check cashing and survey completing behaviors among respondents who receive pre-payment. Data from the International Tobacco Control Four Country Study-a longitudinal survey of smokers in Canada, the US, the UK, and Australia, were used to examine the impact of prepayment (in the form of checks, approximately $10USD) on sample profile. Approximately 14% of respondents cashed their check, but did not complete the survey, while about 14% did not cash their checks, but completed the survey. Younger adults (Canada, US), those of minority status (US), and those who had been in the survey for only two waves or less (Canada, US) were more likely to cash their checks and not complete the survey.

  19. Participation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-08-02

    Aug 2, 2011 ... there is still little theorising about those on the other side of the policy equation. ... The concept of participation designates human beings – their priorities, knowledge .... Thus, a person's mode of participation in the enterprise.

  20. Adolescent and Young Adult Patient Engagement and Participation in Survey-Based Research: A Report From the "Resilience in Adolescents and Young Adults With Cancer" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Abby R; Bona, Kira; Wharton, Claire M; Bradford, Miranda; Shaffer, Michele L; Wolfe, Joanne; Baker, Kevin Scott

    2016-04-01

    Conducting patient-reported outcomes research with adolescents and young adults (AYAs) is difficult due to low participation rates and high attrition. Forty-seven AYAs with newly diagnosed cancer at two large hospitals were prospectively surveyed at the time of diagnosis and 3-6 and 12-18 months later. A subset participated in 1:1 semistructured interviews. Attrition prompted early study closure at one site. The majority of patients preferred paper-pencil to online surveys. Interview participants were more likely to complete surveys (e.g., 93% vs. 58% completion of 3-6 month surveys, P = 0.02). Engaging patients through qualitative methodologies and using patient-preferred instruments may optimize future research success.

  1. Network meta-analysis of the outcome 'participant complete clearance' in nonimmunosuppressed participants of eight interventions for actinic keratosis: a follow-up on a Cochrane review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A K; Paquet, M

    2013-08-01

    The conclusions of pairwise meta-analyses of interventions for actinic keratosis (AK) are limited due to the lack of direct comparison between some interventions. Consequently, we performed a network meta-analysis for eight treatments [5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-photodynamic therapy (PDT), cryotherapy, diclofenac 3% in 2·5% hyaluronic acid (DCF/HA), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 0·5% or 5·0%, imiquimod (IMI) 5%, ingenol mebutate (IMB) 0·015-0·05%, methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL)-PDT and placebo/vehicle (including placebo-PDT)] to determine their relative efficacies. As part of a prior Cochrane systematic review, different databases and grey literature were searched for randomized controlled trials up to April 2012. The inclusion criteria were parallel-group studies with nonimmunosuppressed participants: (i) reporting 'participant complete clearance' and (ii) comparing at least two of the interventions. Thirty-two publications met the criteria and they included the following number of individual or pooled studies (n) and total number of participants (N) for the different interventions: 5-FU 0·5% (n = 4, N = 169), 5-FU 5·0% (n = 2, N = 44), ALA-PDT (n = 6, N = 739), cryotherapy (n = 2, N = 174), DCF/HA (n = 5, N = 299), IMI (n = 14, N = 1411), IMB (n = 3, N = 560), MAL-PDT (n = 7, N = 557) and placebo (n = 32, N = 2520). Network analyses using a random-effects Bayesian model were carried out with the software ADDIS v1.16.1. The interventions were ranked as follows based on calculated probabilities and odd ratios: 5-FU > ALA-PDT ≈ IMI ≈ IMB ≈ MAL-PDT > cryotherapy > DCF/HA > placebo. This efficacy ranking was obtained based on the current available data on 'participant complete clearance' from randomized controlled trials and the analysis model used. However, several other factors should also be considered when prescribing a treatment for AK.

  2. Halpha3: an Halpha imaging survey of HI selected galaxies from ALFALFA. V: The Coma Supercluster survey completion

    CERN Document Server

    Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Viscardi, Elisa; Fossati, Matteo; Savorgnan, Giulia; Fumagalli, Michele; Gutierrez, Leonel; Toledo, Hector Hernandez; Boselli, Alessandro; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2015-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen represents the major observable baryonic constituent of galaxies that fuels the formation of stars through the transformation in molecular hydrogen. The emission of the hydrogen recombination line Halpha is the most direct tracer of the process that transforms gas (fuel) into stars. We continue to present Halpha3 (acronym for Halpha-alpha-alpha), an extensive Halpha+[NII] narrow-band imaging campaign of galaxies selected from the HI Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey (ALFALFA), using the instrumentation available at the San Pedro Martir observatory (Mexico). In only four years since 2011 we were able to complete in 48 nights the Halpha imaging observations of 724 galaxies in the region of the Coma supercluster 10^h < R.A. <16^h; 24^o < Dec. <28^o and 3900Survey (ALFALFA) and constitute a 97% complete sample. They provide for the first time a complete census of the massive star formation propertie...

  3. Public Participation in Classical Ballet: A Special Analysis of the Ballet Data Collected in the 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Carol

    The 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) produced a national audience profile for classical ballet and explored factors that predispose participation in this art form. This monograph analyzed data from these surveys in terms of: (1) audience size and composition for live ballet performances; (2) television's role in…

  4. Revisiting the Completeness and the Luminosity Function in High-Redshift Low-Luminosity Quasar Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Niida, Mana; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kenta; Kobayashi, Masakazu A R; Toba, Yoshiki; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have derived quasar luminosity functions (QLFs) at various redshifts. However, the faint side of the QLF at high redshifts is still too uncertain. An accurate estimate of the survey completeness is essential to derive an accurate QLF for use in studying the luminosity-dependent density evolution of the quasar population. Here we investigate how the luminosity dependence of quasar spectra (the Baldwin effect) and the attenuation model for the inter-galactic medium (IGM) affect the completeness estimates. For this purpose, we revisit the completeness of quasar surveys specifically at $z\\sim4-5$, using the COSMOS images observed with Subaru/Suprime-Cam. As the result, we find that the completeness estimates are sensitive to the luminosity dependence of the quasar spectrum and difference in the IGM attenuation models. At $z\\sim4$, the number density of quasars when we adopt the latest IGM model and take the luminosity dependence of spectra into account are $(3.49\\pm1.62)\\times10^{-7}$ Mpc$^{-3}$ ma...

  5. Complete Hard X-Ray Surveys, AGN Luminosity Functions and the X-Ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tueller, Jack

    2011-01-01

    AGN are believed to make up most of the Cosmic X-Ray Background (CXB) above a few keV, but this background cannot be fully resolved at energies less than 10 keV due to absorption. The Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL missions are performing the first complete hard x-ray surveys with minimal bias due to absorption. The most recent results for both missions will be presented. Although the fraction of the CXB resolved by these surveys is small, it is possible to derive unbiased number counts and luminosity functions for AGN in the local universe. The survey energy range from 15-150 keV contains the important reflection and cutoff spectral features dominate the shape of the AGN contribution to the CXB. Average spectral characteristics of survey detected AGN will be presented and compared with model distributions. The numbers of hard x-ray blazars detected in these surveys are finally sufficient to estimate this important component's contribution the cosmic background. Constraints on CXB models and their significance will be discussed.

  6. Understanding of Statistical Terms Routinely Used in Presentations: A Survey among Residents who participate at a Summer School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmina-Ioana BONDOR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to investigate the understanding of statistical terms commonly used in lectures presented at summer schools for residents and young specialists. Material and Method: A survey was distributed to all the participants at the “Diabetic neuropathy from theory to practice” Summer School, 2014. The program was addressed to residents or young specialists in diabetes, neurology, surgery, and orthopedic from Romania. The survey consists of 6 multiple-choice questions and the first four questions evaluate the understanding of statistical terms. Results: There were 51 (42.5% participants who completed the questionnaires. From 204 total questions 81 (39.7% had correct answers. At the question 1, where relative risk was evaluated, only 3 (5.9% respondents answered correctly while at the question 2 (number need to treat about 78.4% (40 of answers were correct. At the question 3 (sensitivity, 22 (43.1% respondents answer correct while at the question 4 (Receiver Operating Characteristic curves only 16 (31.4% respondents provided a correct answer. The overall mean score of correct answers was 1.56±0.91. Conclusion: Our study showed that young specialists who participated to the survey were not familiarized with simple statistical terms commonly used in presentations.

  7. Completion and return of fall diaries varies with participants' level of education, first language, and baseline fall risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Laura; Kendrick, Denise; Morris, Richard; Dinan, Susie; Masud, Tahir; Skelton, Dawn; Iliffe, Steve

    2012-02-01

    Consensus guidelines recommend the use of prospective fall diaries in studies of fall rates. We sought to determine the characteristics associated with return and successful completion of a falls diary and whether characteristics such as gender, education level, native language, income, and falls risk influenced self-reported fall rates. Two hundred and seventy people aged 65 years and older participating in a randomized controlled trial evaluating two exercise programmes. Fall diaries were collected for 6 months, then evaluated for correct completion and falls reported. An increasing risk of falls was associated with a reducing odds of returning diaries (odds ratio for a one unit increase in Falls Risk Assessment Tool score 0.71, 95% confidence interval 0.53-0.96). Native English speakers were more likely to complete more than half the diaries correctly (odds ratio 2.63, 95% confidence interval 1.20-5.75). Problems arise in the correct completion of falls diaries among those for whom English is not their first language. Diaries may underreport the rate of falls as those at higher risk were less likely to return diaries but more likely to report falls. Careful consideration should be given to the analysis of falls diaries as missing data are unlikely to be missing completely at random. We recommend additional training in the use of falls diaries for these groups or the utilization of simpler instruments.

  8. And the survey said.... evaluating rationale for participation in gun buybacks as a tool to encourage higher yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Rebecca E; Green, Jonathan; Damle, Rachelle N; Aidlen, Jeremy; Nazarey, Pradeep; Manno, Mariann; Borer, Esther; Hirsh, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Gun buyback programs represent one arm of a multipronged approach to raise awareness and education about gun safety. The city of Worcester, MA has conducted an annual gun buyback at the Police Department Headquarters since 2002. We analyzed survey responses from a voluntary, 18-question, face-to-face structured interview from December 2009 to June 2015 using descriptive statistics to determine participant demographics and motivations for participation. A total of 943 guns were collected, and 273 individuals completed surveys. The majority of participants were white males older than 55years (42.4%). Participants represented 61 zip codes across Worcester County, with 68% having prior gun safety training and 61% with weapons remaining in the home (27% of which children could potentially access). The top reasons for turning in guns were "no longer needed" (48%) and "fear of children accessing the gun" (14%). About 1 in 3 respondents knew someone injured/killed by gun violence. Almost all (96%) respondents claimed the program raised community awareness of firearm risk. The Worcester Goods for Guns Buyback has collected more than 900 guns between 2009 and 2015. The buyback removes unwanted guns from homes and raises community awareness about firearm safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Non-Participation Survey: Understanding Why High School Students Choose Not to Eat School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to develop and validate a survey that will enable school nutrition (SN) directors and managers to identify and address issues affecting the non-participation of high school students in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The research was conducted in two phases. Qualitative data…

  10. Assessment of the contribution of morbidity and mortality conferences to quality and safety improvement: a survey of participants' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoanet, André; Vidal-Trecan, Gwenaëlle; Prate, Frédéric; Quaranta, Jean-François; Sellier, Elodie; Guyomard, Alizé; Seigneurin, Arnaud; François, Patrice

    2016-05-11

    Evidence for the effectiveness of the morbidity and mortality conferences in improving patient safety is lacking. The aim of this survey was to assess the opinion of participants concerning the benefits and the functioning of morbidity and mortality conferences, according to their organizational characteristics. We conducted a survey of professionals involved in a morbidity and mortality conference using a self-administered questionnaire in three French teaching hospitals in 2012. The questionnaire focused on the functioning of morbidity and mortality conferences, the perceived benefits, the motivations of participants, and how morbidity and mortality conferences could be improved. The perception of participants was analysed according to the characteristics of morbidity and mortality conferences. A total of 698 participants in 54 morbidity and mortality conferences completed the questionnaire. Most of them (91 %) were satisfied with how the morbidity and mortality conference they attended was conducted. The improvements in healthcare quality and patient safety were the main benefits perceived by participants. Effectiveness in improving safety was mainly perceived when cases were thoroughly analysed (adjusted odds ratio [a0R] =2.31 [1.14-4.66]). The existence of a written charter (p = 0.05), the use of a standardized case presentation (p = 0.049), and prior dissemination of the meeting agenda (p = 0.02) were also associated with the perception of morbidity and mortality conference effectiveness. The development and achievement of improvement initiatives were associated with morbidity and mortality conferences perceived as being more effective (p < 0.01). Participants suggested improving the attendance of medical and paramedical professionals to enhance the effectiveness of morbidity and mortality conferences. Morbidity and mortality conferences were positively perceived. These results suggest that a structured framework and thoroughly analyzing

  11. The QSO evolution derived from the HBQS and other complete QSO surveys

    CERN Document Server

    La Franca, F; Franca, Fabio La; Cristiani, Stefano

    1997-01-01

    An ESO Key programme dedicated to an Homogeneous Bright QSO Survey (HBQS) has been completed. 327 QSOs (Mb<-23, 0.3survey, corresponding to a surface density of 0.013+/-.006 deg^{-2}. If the Edinburgh QSO Survey is included, an overdensity of a factor 2.7 is observed, corresponding to a density of 0.016+/-0.005 deg^{-2}. In order to derive the QSO optical luminosity function (LF) we used Monte Carlo simulations that take into account of the selection criteria, photometric errors and QSO spectral slope distribution. The LF can be represented with a Pure Luminosity Evolution (L(z)\\propto(1+z)^k) of a two power law both for q_0=0.5 and q_0=0.1. For q_0=0.5 k=3.26, slower than the previous Boyle's (1992) estimations of k=3.45. A flatter slope beta=-3.72 of the bright part of the LF is also required. The observed overdensity of bright QSOs ...

  12. The QSO evolution derived from the HBQS and other complete QSO surveys

    CERN Document Server

    La Franca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    An ESO Key programme dedicated to an Homogeneous Bright QSO Survey (HBQS) has been completed. 327 QSOs (Mb<-23, 0.3survey, corresponding to a surface density of 0.013+/-.006 deg^{-2}. If the Edinburgh QSO Survey is included, an overdensity of a factor 2.7 is observed, corresponding to a density of 0.016+/-0.005 deg^{-2}. In order to derive the QSO optical luminosity function (LF) we used Monte Carlo simulations that take into account of the selection criteria, photometric errors and QSO spectral slope distribution. The LF can be represented with a Pure Luminosity Evolution (L(z)\\propto(1+z)^k) of a two power law both for q_0=0.5 and q_0=0.1. For q_0=0.5 k=3.26, slower than the previous Boyle's (1992) estimations of k=3.45. A flatter slope beta=-3.72 of the bright part of the LF is also required. The observed overdensity of bright QSOs ...

  13. [Participation and representation of the immigrant population in the Spanish National Health Survey 2011-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Rábago, Yolanda; La Parra, Daniel; Martín, Unai; Malmusi, Davide

    2014-01-01

    Population health surveys have been the main data source for analysis of immigrants' health status in Spain. The aim of this study was to analyze the representation of this population in the Spanish National Health Survey (SNHS) 2011-2012. We analyzed methodological publications and data from the SNHS 2011-2012 and the population registry. Differences in the participation rate between the national and foreign populations and the causes for these differences were analyzed, as well as the representation of 11 countries of birth in the survey with respect to the general population, with and without weighting. Households with any foreign person had a lower participation rate, either due to a higher error in the sampling frame or to a higher non-response rate. In each country of birth, the sample was smaller than would be expected according to the population registry, especially among the Chinese population. When we applied the sample weights to the 11 countries of birth, the estimated population volume was closer to the estimated volume of the population registry for all the countries considered, although globally both the underrepresentation and the intranational bias remained. The lower participation of the immigrant population and differences in participation depending on the country of origin suggest the existence of a potential bias in the SNHS, which should be taken into account in studies analyzing the health of this population. The lower participation rate should be studied in greater depth in order to take appropriate measures to increase the representativeness of health surveys. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Using social media to improve continuing medical education: a survey of course participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Amy T; Sandhu, Nicole P; Wittich, Christopher M; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Beckman, Thomas J

    2012-12-01

    To determine continuing medical education (CME) course participants' use of social media (SM) and their attitudes about the value of SM for enhancing CME education and to examine associations between participants' characteristics and attitudes toward SM. We conducted a cross-sectional survey and validation study of 539 participants at a Mayo Clinic Internal Medicine CME course in November 2011. The Social Media Use and Perception Instrument (SMUPI) consisted of 10 items (5-point Likert scales) and categorical response options. The main outcome measures were psychometric characteristics of the SMUPI scale, course participants' use of SM, and their attitudes regarding the importance of SM for enhancing CME. Of 539 CME course participants, 327 (61%) responded to the SMUPI survey. Most respondents (291 [89%]) reported using SM, with the most common types being YouTube (189 of the 327 participants [58%]) and Facebook (163 of 327 [50%]). Factor analysis revealed a 2-dimensional assessment of course participants' attitudes. Internal consistency reliability (Cronbach α) was excellent for factor 1 (0.94), factor 2 (0.89), and overall (0.94). The CME course participants' favorable attitudes toward SM were associated with younger age (20-29 years, mean score 3.13; 30-39 years, 3.40; 40-49 years, 3.39; 50-59 years, 3.18; 60-69 years, 2.93; and ≥70 years, 2.92; P=.02), using SM frequently (never, mean score 2.49; less than once monthly, 2.75; once monthly, 3.21; weekly, 3.31; and daily, 3.81; PEducation and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Predictors of refusal to participate: a longitudinal health survey of the elderly in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Helen

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The loss of participants in longitudinal studies due to non-contact, refusal or death can introduce bias into the results of such studies. The study described here examines reasons for refusal over three waves of a survey of persons aged ≥ 70 years. Methods In a longitudinal study involving three waves, participants were compared to those who refused to participate but allowed an informant to be interviewed and to those who refused any participation. Results At Wave 1 both groups of Wave 2 non-participants had reported lower occupational status and fewer years of education, had achieved lower verbal IQ scores and cognitive performance scores and experienced some distress from the interview. Those with an informant interview only were in poorer physical health than those who participated and those who refused. Depression and anxiety symptoms were not associated with non-participation. Multivariate analyses found that verbal IQ and cognitive impairment predicted refusal. Results were very similar for refusers at both Waves 2 and 3. Conclusions Longitudinal studies of the elderly may over estimate cognitive performance because of the greater refusal rate of those with poorer performance. However, there is no evidence of bias with respect to anxiety or depression.

  16. The Influence of Religious Affiliation on Participant Responsiveness to the Complete Health Improvement Program (CHIP) Lifestyle Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, L M; Morton, D P; Ward, E J; Rankin, P M; Ferret, R B; Gobble, J; Diehl, H A

    2016-10-01

    Seventh-day Adventist (SDA) and non-SDA (21.3 and 78.7 %, respectively) individuals (n = 7172) participating in the Complete Health Improvement Program, a 30-day diet and lifestyle intervention, in North America (241 programs, 2006-2012) were assessed for changes in selected chronic disease risk factors: body mass index (BMI), blood pressure (BP), pulse, lipid profile and fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Reductions were greater among the non-SDA for BMI, pulse and blood lipids. Furthermore, the majority of non-SDA in the highest risk classifications for BP, lipids and FPG, but only some lipids among SDA, were able to show improvement by 20 % or more.

  17. Effect of survey instrument on participation in a follow-up study: a randomization study of a mailed questionnaire versus a computer-assisted telephone interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocheleau Carissa M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many epidemiological and public health surveys report increasing difficulty obtaining high participation rates. We conducted a pilot follow-up study to determine whether a mailed or telephone survey would better facilitate data collection in a subset of respondents to an earlier telephone survey conducted as part of the National Birth Defects Prevention Study. Methods We randomly assigned 392 eligible mothers to receive a self-administered, mailed questionnaire (MQ or a computer-assisted telephone interview (CATI using similar recruitment protocols. If mothers gave permission to contact the fathers, fathers were recruited to complete the same instrument (MQ or CATI as mothers. Results Mothers contacted for the MQ, within all demographic strata examined, were more likely to participate than those contacted for the CATI (86.6% vs. 70.6%. The median response time for mothers completing the MQ was 17 days, compared to 29 days for mothers completing the CATI. Mothers completing the MQ also required fewer reminder calls or letters to finish participation versus those assigned to the CATI (median 3 versus 6, though they were less likely to give permission to contact the father (75.0% vs. 85.8%. Fathers contacted for the MQ, however, had higher participation compared to fathers contacted for the CATI (85.2% vs. 54.5%. Fathers recruited to the MQ also had a shorter response time (median 17 days and required fewer reminder calls and letters (median 3 reminders than those completing the CATI (medians 28 days and 6 reminders. Conclusions We concluded that offering a MQ substantially improved participation rates and reduced recruitment effort compared to a CATI in this study. While a CATI has the advantage of being able to clarify answers to complex questions or eligibility requirements, our experience suggests that a MQ might be a good survey option for some studies.

  18. Complete Results from a Spectral-Line Survey of Sgr B2(N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfen, DeWayne T.; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    A confusion-limited spectral line survey of the Galactic center molecular cloud Sgr B2(N) at 3, 2, and 1 mm (68 - 116, 130 - 172, and 210 - 280 GHz) using the Kitt Peak 12 m and the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory was recently completed. About 15,000 spectral lines were observed in the survey range. The data have been analyzed using two techniques. First, the rotational temperature diagram methods was used for each individual species. Second, an LTE code was used to model and ultimately fit the data to a set of parameters for each species, using a least squares approach. Seventy-four molecules are identified in the data, along with 81 isotopologue species. In addition, 26 excited vibrational states of the identified molecules were detected, as well as H and He recombination lines. Source and Galactic absorption lines are seen in several abundant species, as well as multiple maser lines of methanol and possibly SO_2.

  19. Microfinance Participation and Domestic Violence in Bangladesh: Results From a Nationally Representative Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Nadine Shaanta; Akincigil, Ayse; Zippay, Allison

    2016-05-01

    This article examines domestic violence among women who participate in microfinance in Bangladesh. Secondary analysis of survey data from nationally representative Bangladesh Demographic and Health Survey was used to investigate the association between microfinance participation and domestic violence of 4,163 ever-married women between the ages of 18 and 49 years. Outcome measure is experience of domestic violence as measured by a modified Conflict Tactics Scale (CTS) and predictor variables include microfinance, binary indicator of relatively better economic status, autonomy, decision-making power, and demographic variables. The likelihood of experiencing domestic violence was not found to vary with microfinance participation. However, the interaction effect of microfinance and better economic status was found to be significantly associated with domestic violence (9% increased probability). Experience of domestic violence was negatively associated with older age, higher education of the husband, and autonomy. In Bangladesh, microfinance participation may be associated with a higher probability of experiencing domestic violence for women with relatively better economic status, but not for the poorest of the poor.

  20. Modeling participation duration, with application to the North American Breeding Bird Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, William; Sauer, John

    2014-01-01

    We consider “participation histories,” binary sequences consisting of alternating finite sequences of 1s and 0s, ending with an infinite sequence of 0s. Our work is motivated by a study of observer tenure in the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS). In our analysis, j indexes an observer’s years of service and Xj is an indicator of participation in the survey; 0s interspersed among 1s correspond to years when observers did not participate, but subsequently returned to service. Of interest is the observer’s duration D = max {j: Xj = 1}. Because observed records X = (X1, X2,..., Xn)1 are of finite length, all that we can directly infer about duration is that D ⩾ max {j ⩽n: Xj = 1}; model-based analysis is required for inference about D. We propose models in which lengths of 0s and 1s sequences have distributions determined by the index j at which they begin; 0s sequences are infinite with positive probability, an estimable parameter. We found that BBS observers’ lengths of service vary greatly, with 25.3% participating for only a single year, 49.5% serving for 4 or fewer years, and an average duration of 8.7 years, producing an average of 7.7 counts.

  1. A Survey Study on Customer Experience in Banking Cash Management Products and, Participation Banking Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cüneyt DİRİCAN

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Banking as a safe bridge of risk management balances relation between deposit and loan. In the growing trend of interest-free banking Turkey practice, Participation Banking is working to fix the expectations of customers with reasonable solutions. For corporate customers with comprehensive cash management expectations, producing appropriate and fast solutions are important for a positive and sustainable customer experience. Cash Management covers collection of trade receivables and short -term debt payments. In this study, in the light of the financial ratios of participation banking within the banking industry, a participation bank customers' experiences and expectations in cash management products and services were evaluated with the survey methodology and its importance were also examined.

  2. Cervical and breast cancer screening participation for women with chronic conditions in France: results from a national health survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Panayotis; Dray-Spira, Rosemary; Menvielle, Gwenn

    2016-03-31

    Comorbidity at the time of diagnosis is an independent prognostic factor for survival among women suffering from cervical or breast cancer. Although cancer screening practices have proven their efficacy for mortality reduction, little is known about adherence to screening recommendations for women suffering from chronic conditions. We investigated the association between eleven chronic conditions and adherence to cervical and breast cancer screening recommendations in France. Using data from a cross-sectional national health survey conducted in 2008, we analyzed screening participation taking into account self-reported: inflammatory systemic disease, cancer, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, depression, diabetes, dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, osteoarthritis and thyroid disorders. We first computed age-standardized screening rates among women who reported each condition. We then estimated the effect of having reported each condition on adherence to screening recommendations in logistic regression models, with adjustment for sociodemographic characteristics, socioeconomic position, health behaviours, healthcare access and healthcare use. Finally, we investigated the association between chronic conditions and opportunistic versus organized breast cancer screening using multinomial logistic regression. The analyses were conducted among 4226 women for cervical cancer screening and 2056 women for breast cancer screening. Most conditions studied were not associated with screening participation. Adherence to cervical cancer screening recommendations was higher for cancer survivors (OR = 1.73 [0.98-3.05]) and lower for obese women (OR = 0.73 [0.57-0.93]), when accounting for our complete range of screening determinants. Women reporting chronic respiratory disease or diabetes participated less in cervical cancer screening, except when adjusting for socioeconomic characteristics. Adherence to breast cancer screening recommendations was lower for

  3. A survey of referee participation, training and injury in elite gaelic games referees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gissane Conor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Referees in Gaelic games are exposed to injury risk in match-play and training. Little is currently know about the degree of exposure or the prevalence of injury in this group. The aim of this study was to determine the time commitment to refereeing and training in elite-level Gaelic referees and to establish, for the first time, point and period (past 12 months prevalence of Gaelic games injury in these officials. Methods A retrospective survey was posted to the complete list of 111 male referees who officiated in elite-level competition in Gaelic football and hurling at the end of the 2005 competition season. Data were summarised using percentages with 95% Confidence Intervals. Results The response rate was 80% (n = 89. Mean age was 42 ± 6 years, ranging from 28–55 years. Forty eight percent were football referees, 25% were hurling referees and 27% refereed both football and hurling. Most referees (69% officiated at 3–4 games weekly (range 1–6 and most (62% trained 2–3 times per week (range 1–7. Fourteen percent (n = 12 were currently injured (95% CI 9–21%. Annual injury prevalence was 58% (95% CI 46 to 70% for football, 50% (95% CI 33 to 67% for hurling and 42% (95% CI 27 to 58% for dual referee groups. Sixty percent of injuries were sustained while refereeing match play. The majority (83%, n = 40 were to the lower limb and the predominant (56%, n = 27 injury mechanism was running or sprinting. The most prevalent injuries were hamstring strain (n = 12, 25% of injuries and calf strain (n = 9, 19% of injuries. Injury causing time off from refereeing was reported by 31% of all referees (95% CI 24 to 40%, n = 28, for a median duration of 3 weeks. Conclusion Participation in official duties and training is high in elite Gaelic games referees, despite the amateur status of the sports. Gaelic games injury is common in the referee cohort, with lower limb injury predominating. These injuries have implications for both

  4. A survey of referee participation, training and injury in elite gaelic games referees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Catherine; Sherry, James; Gissane, Conor

    2009-06-22

    Referees in Gaelic games are exposed to injury risk in match-play and training. Little is currently know about the degree of exposure or the prevalence of injury in this group. The aim of this study was to determine the time commitment to refereeing and training in elite-level Gaelic referees and to establish, for the first time, point and period (past 12 months) prevalence of Gaelic games injury in these officials. A retrospective survey was posted to the complete list of 111 male referees who officiated in elite-level competition in Gaelic football and hurling at the end of the 2005 competition season. Data were summarised using percentages with 95% Confidence Intervals. The response rate was 80% (n = 89). Mean age was 42 +/- 6 years, ranging from 28-55 years. Forty eight percent were football referees, 25% were hurling referees and 27% refereed both football and hurling. Most referees (69%) officiated at 3-4 games weekly (range 1-6) and most (62%) trained 2-3 times per week (range 1-7). Fourteen percent (n = 12) were currently injured (95% CI 9-21%). Annual injury prevalence was 58% (95% CI 46 to 70%) for football, 50% (95% CI 33 to 67%) for hurling and 42% (95% CI 27 to 58%) for dual referee groups. Sixty percent of injuries were sustained while refereeing match play. The majority (83%, n = 40) were to the lower limb and the predominant (56%, n = 27) injury mechanism was running or sprinting. The most prevalent injuries were hamstring strain (n = 12, 25% of injuries) and calf strain (n = 9, 19% of injuries). Injury causing time off from refereeing was reported by 31% of all referees (95% CI 24 to 40%, n = 28), for a median duration of 3 weeks. Participation in official duties and training is high in elite Gaelic games referees, despite the amateur status of the sports. Gaelic games injury is common in the referee cohort, with lower limb injury predominating. These injuries have implications for both the referee and for organisation of the games.

  5. A survey of referee participation, training and injury in elite Gaelic games referees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Blake, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Referees in Gaelic games are exposed to injury risk in match-play and training. Little is currently know about the degree of exposure or the prevalence of injury in this group. The aim of this study was to determine the time commitment to refereeing and training in elite-level Gaelic referees and to establish, for the first time, point and period (past 12 months) prevalence of Gaelic games injury in these officials. METHODS: A retrospective survey was posted to the complete list of 111 male referees who officiated in elite-level competition in Gaelic football and hurling at the end of the 2005 competition season. Data were summarised using percentages with 95% Confidence Intervals. RESULTS: The response rate was 80% (n = 89). Mean age was 42 +\\/- 6 years, ranging from 28-55 years. Forty eight percent were football referees, 25% were hurling referees and 27% refereed both football and hurling. Most referees (69%) officiated at 3-4 games weekly (range 1-6) and most (62%) trained 2-3 times per week (range 1-7). Fourteen percent (n = 12) were currently injured (95% CI 9-21%). Annual injury prevalence was 58% (95% CI 46 to 70%) for football, 50% (95% CI 33 to 67%) for hurling and 42% (95% CI 27 to 58%) for dual referee groups. Sixty percent of injuries were sustained while refereeing match play. The majority (83%, n = 40) were to the lower limb and the predominant (56%, n = 27) injury mechanism was running or sprinting. The most prevalent injuries were hamstring strain (n = 12, 25% of injuries) and calf strain (n = 9, 19% of injuries). Injury causing time off from refereeing was reported by 31% of all referees (95% CI 24 to 40%, n = 28), for a median duration of 3 weeks. CONCLUSION: Participation in official duties and training is high in elite Gaelic games referees, despite the amateur status of the sports. Gaelic games injury is common in the referee cohort, with lower limb injury predominating. These injuries have implications for both the referee and

  6. [Attitude survey of medical staff on the participation of community pharmacists in palliative home care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Namika; Fujita-Hamabe, Wakako; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2009-11-01

    The treatment of cancer pain requires an individually-targeted multidimensional team approach. Further, the basic act for the Anti-Cancer Measures describes that medical staff including pharmacists should participate in the palliative care. Thus it is obvious that community pharmacists should also participate in palliative home care. In addition, a misunderstanding about opioids remains strong in Japan, which could be one of the barriers to palliative home care. In our previous report, we clarified for local residents the importance of educational activity using opioids as a new role for community pharmacists, and it was recognized of great significance by these pharmacists. In this study, we conducted a questionnaire survey among medical doctors, nurses, care managers and home helpers about the need and meaning of the educational activity performed by pharmacists in palliative home care. 86.4% of respondents felt pharmacists' participation in home care was required. Furthermore, most respondents thought that misunderstanding remained about opioids in palliative home care, and believed that pharmacists could play an important role in educational activity about opioids as experts in medicine. This study clarified that other medical team members need the participation of community pharmacists in palliative home care. Therefore, it seems important for these pharmacists to be proactive in participating in such care in the future.

  7. General practitioners’ participation in a large, multicountry combined general practitioner-patient survey: recruitment procedures and participation rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Greß, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Theparticipation of general practitioners (GPs) is essential in research on the performance of primary care.This paper describes the implementation of a large,multicountry study in primary care that combines a survey among GPs and a linked survey among patients that visited their practic

  8. Orphanhood and Completion of Compulsory School Education among Young People in South Africa: Findings from a National Representative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Operario, Don; Cluver, Lucie; Rees, Helen; MacPhail, Catherine; Pettifor, Audrey

    2008-01-01

    We examined the association of orphanhood and completion of compulsory school education among young people in South Africa. In South Africa, school attendance is compulsory through grade 9, which should be completed before age 16. However, family and social factors such as orphanhood and poverty can hinder educational attainment. Participants were…

  9. A preliminary retrospective survey of injuries occurring in dogs participating in canine agility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, M; Hall, C; Trentacosta, N; Percival, M

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the risks of injury to dogs participating in the relatively new sport of canine agility. The purpose of this study was to identify the factors that put the participating dog at risk as well as determine the anatomical sites that were most commonly injured. A retrospective survey using a paper and web-based data collection instrument was used to evaluate dogs participating in the sport of canine agility. Of the 1627 dogs included in the study, 33% were injured, and of those 58% were injured in competition. Most injuries occurred on dry outdoor surfaces. Border Collies were the most commonly injured, and injuries were in excess of what would be expected from their exposure. For all dogs, soft tissue injuries were most common. The shoulders and backs of dogs were most commonly injured. Dogs were most commonly injured by contact with an obstacle. The A-frame, dogwalk and bar jump obstacles were responsible for nearly two-thirds of injuries that resulted from contact with the obstacle. Border Collies are at higher risk for injury than would be expected from their exposure. The A-frame, dogwalk and bar jump obstacles put the shoulders and backs of dogs at risk. For the first time, this study gives us insight into injuries occurring in dogs participating in canine agility. This will help direct prospective studies that evaluate the safety of individual obstacles, direct rule changes and enable practitioners to understand the risks of the sport.

  10. 45 CFR 2522.230 - Under what circumstances may an AmeriCorps participant be released from completing a term of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., or for cause. (a) Release for compelling personal circumstances. (1) An AmeriCorps program may...) Disability, serious illness, or death of a participant's family member if this makes completing a term... the nonrenewal or premature closing of a project or program, that make completing a term...

  11. Selection patterns of dietary foods in edentulous participants rehabilitated with maxillary complete dentures opposed by mandibular implant-supported prostheses: a multicenter longitudinal assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Sharareh; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E; Faine, Mary P; Mancl, Lloyd A; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2013-10-01

    Documentation of long-term changes in food intake is lacking for those treated with a maxillary complete denture opposed by a mandibular, screw-retained, implant-supported fixed prosthesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the selection patterns of dietary foods over 5 years for edentulous participants treated in a multicenter prospective clinical trial that compared cast alloy versus laser-welded titanium frameworks of an implant-supported prostheses opposed by maxillary complete dentures to rehabilitate edentulous participants. The study assessed data from a multicenter prospective clinical trial that followed edentulous participants from an initial baseline of wearing existing complete dentures to implant placement, restoration with a mandibular implant-supported prosthesis opposed by a maxillary complete denture, to follow-up assessment of these treatments over 5 years. The 32 participants in the cohort were treated at 5 of 9 participating centers. The data collected included 2 dietary forms, a standardized 4-day food diary form, and a dietary habits questionnaire. Each participant completed forms before entering into treatment (control) and at the 1- and 5-year follow-up assessment after being treated with a maxillary complete denture opposing a mandibular complete-arch fixed implant-supported prosthesis. Descriptive statistics were calculated for each measure at each assessment point. Regression analysis and the Sign test were used to calculate change in the participants' nutritional status (α=.05). Among the findings, it was noted that difficulty in masticating hard, raw, and fibrous foods decreased and intake of vegetable portions increased significantly from 2.5 to 3.3 servings. Participant comfort in eating in public places and their enjoyment of eating were significantly improved from 50% of participants being uncomfortable with their prior complete denture treatment to only 4% after 5 years. Within the limitations of this study, it was

  12. Barriers and facilitators to participation in workplace health promotion (WHP) activities: results from a cross-sectional survey of public-sector employees in Tasmania, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Michelle; Blizzard, Leigh; Sanderson, Kristy; Teale, Brook; Jose, Kim; Venn, Alison

    2017-01-19

    Issue addressed: Workplaces are promising settings for health promotion, yet employee participation in workplace health promotion (WHP) activities is often low or variable. This study explored facilitating factors and barriers associated with participation in WHP activities that formed part of a comprehensive WHP initiative run within the Tasmanian State Service (TSS) between 2009 and 2013.Methods: TSS employee (n=3228) completed surveys in 2013. Data included sociodemographic characteristics, employee-perceived availability of WHP activities, employee-reported participation in WHP activities, and facilitators and barriers to participation. Ordinal log-link regression was used in cross-sectional analyses.Results: Significant associations were found for all facilitating factors and participation. Respondents who felt their organisation placed a high priority on WHP, who believed that management supported participation or that the activities could improve their health were more likely to participate. Time- and health-related barriers were associated with participation in fewer activities. All associations were independent of age, sex, work schedule and employee-perceived availability of programs. Part-time and shift-work patterns, and location of activities were additionally identified barriers.Conclusion: Facilitating factors relating to implementation, peer and environmental support, were associated with participation in more types of activities, time- and health-related barriers were associated with less participation.So what?: Large and diverse organisations should ensure WHP efforts have manager support and adopt flexible approaches to maximise employee engagement.

  13. The development and initial evaluation of the survey of readiness for alcoholics anonymous participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingree, J B; Simpson, Alpha; Thompson, Martie; McCrady, Barbara; Tonigan, J Scott; Lautenschlager, Gary

    2006-12-01

    This article presents 5 studies related to the development and initial evaluation of the Survey of Readiness for Alcoholics Anonymous Participation (SYRAAP). The SYRAAP is a brief, multidimensional, self-administered instrument that assesses beliefs associated with Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) participation. Study 1 generated 239 candidate items for potential inclusion in the instrument. Study 2 assessed the content validity of these items according to 3 criteria and identified a subset of 60 with the highest values on the criteria for further consideration. Study 3 produced a shorter version of the SYRAAP and evaluated its structure, internal reliability, and validity. Study 4 reevaluated the structure and internal reliability of the SYRAAP and yielded findings that were generally consistent with those from Study 3. Study 5 established stability reliability for the instrument. The collective findings indicated the SYRAAP can reliably and validly assess individual-level beliefs associated with AA participation. The potential use of the SYRAAP for researchers and clinicians, along with limitations of the work presented here, are discussed. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved

  14. Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Adam D.; Diamond-Stanic, Aleks; Gallagher, John S.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lucatello, Sara; Lundgren, Britt; Tremonti, Christina A.; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-III Collaboration, SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Committee on the Participation of Women in the SDSS (CPWS) was formed by the SDSS to evaluate the gender climate within the collaboration. The CPWS seeks to foster gender balance in our collaboration by fielding concerns from our members and by recommending best practices for establishing the SDSS leadership team. An important aspect of the mission of the CPWS is to regularly assess gender diversity and inclusiveness within the SDSS. Against the backdrop of the transition from SDSS-III to SDSS-IV, the CPWS has been collecting data relevant to gender issues through interviews and surveys. In April, 2014, the CPWS surveyed 251 SDSS-IV members (~50% of active membership) regarding gender and leadership. Broad findings from this survey include that the male-to-female ratio in SDSS-IV is about 3:1 and that the male-to-female ratio among those that identify themselves as being in an SDSS-IV leadership role is also close to 3:1. About 35% of those surveyed self-identify as an SDSS-IV "leader," though we recognize the possibility that active stakeholders might be more likely to respond to a demographics survey. About 80% of those that self-identify as leaders consider their leadership role within SDSS-IV to be officially acknowledged, regardless of gender. The fraction of women in SDSS leadership roles appears to be a weak function of current job position in that 6 of 32 (19%) senior faculty that are SDSS leaders are women, compared to 4 of 13 (31%) postdocs. Similarly, the fraction of SDSS leaders who are women is highest (32%) amongst those leaders who received their PhDs 6-10 years ago, while the fraction of female leaders amongst other age demographics is somewhat lower (20%). Although these are small sample sizes, this hints at a trend where women are most likely to fill SDSS leadership roles at certain stages of their lives and careers. The CPWS intends to use this initial survey data to establish a baseline for tracking SDSS-IV demographics, and thus hopes to

  15. School Non-Completers: Profiles and Initial Destinations. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 54

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, David D.; McMillan, Julie

    2008-01-01

    This study examines non-completion of Year 12 at school for a nationally representative sample of young people who were 15 years old and still attending school in 2003. The study explores relationships between non-completion and selected socio-demographic and school-related factors, and changes in rates of school non-completion from the early…

  16. A Method for Recruiting Participants from Isolated Islands of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) for Survey Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Sheena; Koopman-Boyden, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    Representing isolated small island communities through social survey research continues to be challenging. We examine a locally developed method to reach and recruit older people (65+ years) for a survey on well-being in the small island developing state of Maldives. The use of messengers to recruit participants is examined in the context of these…

  17. Understanding the Impact of Lottery Incentives on Web Survey Participation and Response Quality: A Leverage-Salience Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chan; Lonn, Steven; Teasley, Stephanie D.

    2017-01-01

    Cumulative evidence is mixed regarding the effect of lottery incentives on survey participation; little is known about why this strategy sometimes works and other times fails. We examined two factors that can influence the effectiveness of lottery incentives as suggested by leverage-salience theory: emphasis of survey attributes in invitations and…

  18. A Study of Student Completion Strategies in a Likert-Type Course Evaluation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Nick

    2017-01-01

    This article investigates the motivations and strategies employed by respondents to a Likert-style course evaluation at a UK university. These attitude surveys, generating large amounts of quantitative data, are commonly used in quality assurance procedures across UK higher education institutions. Similar student survey results are now scrutinised…

  19. An overview of the completed Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS)

    CERN Document Server

    Hildebrandt, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    The Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) represents the most powerful weak lensing survey carried out to date. The CFHTLenS (Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey) team was formed in 2008 to analyse the data from the CFHTLS focussing on a rigorous treatment of systematic effects in shape measurements and photometric redshifts. Here we review the technical challenges that we faced in analysing these data and their solutions which set the current standard for weak lensing analyses. We also present some science highlights that were made possible by this effort including cosmic shear tomography, tests for modified gravity models, and the mapping of dark matter structures over unprecedentedly large scales. An outlook is given on current and future surveys that are analysed with the tools prepared for CFHTLenS. CFHTLenS represents the first and only weak lensing data set that has been made publicly available so far. We encourage other surveys to follow this example.

  20. Attitudes and usage of denture adhesives by complete denture wearers: a survey in Greece and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyzois, G.L.; Baat, C. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether there are differences in usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives among patients in two countries. BACKGROUND: There are no multi-country surveys concerning usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives from complete denture wearers. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  1. Attitudes and usage of denture adhesives by complete denture wearers: a survey in Greece and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyzois, G.L.; Baat, C. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether there are differences in usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives among patients in two countries. BACKGROUND: There are no multi-country surveys concerning usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives from complete denture wearers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Th

  2. Using public participation to sample trace metals in lake surface sediments: the OPAL Metals Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S D; Rose, N L; Goldsmith, B; Bearcock, J M; Scheib, C; Yang, H

    2017-05-01

    Members of the public in England were invited in 2010 to take part in a national metals survey, by collecting samples of littoral sediment from a standing water body for geochemical analysis. To our knowledge, this is the first national sediment metals survey using public participation and reveals a snapshot of the extent of metals contamination in ponds and lakes across England. Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb concentrations exceeding sediment quality guidelines for the health of aquatic biota are ubiquitous in ponds and lakes, not just in areas with a legacy of industrial activity. To validate the public sampling approach, a calibration exercise was conducted at ten water bodies selected to represent a range of lakes found across England. Sediment concentrations of Hg, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb were measured in samples of soil, stream and littoral and deep water sediment to assess inputs. Significant differences between littoral sediment metal concentrations occur due to local variability, but also organic content, especially in upland, peat soil catchments. Variability of metal concentrations between littoral samples is shown to be low in small (metal contamination in standing waters. However, the heterogeneity of geology, soils and history/extent of metal contamination in the English landscape, combined with the random nature of sample collection, shows that systematic sampling for evaluating the full extent of metal contamination in lakes is still required.

  3. Person-fit statistics, response sets and survey participation in a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Jörg M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Person-fit methodology is a promising technique for identifying subjects whose test scores have questionable validity. Less is known however about this technique’s ability to predict survey participation longitudinally. This study presents theory-derived expectations related to social desirability, the tendency for extreme responding and traitedness for specific deviating answer patterns and an expected consistence of person-fit scores across 27 personality scales. Data from 5,114 subjects (Amelang, 1997 were reanalysed with a polytomous-Rasch model to estimate scale scores and von Davier and Molenaar’s (2003 person-fit statistics. The person-fit statistics of the 27 scales were examined together with the 27 person parameter scores in one common factor analysis. The person-fit scores served as indicators of the latent factor ‘scalability’ while the person-parameter scores were considered to index the bias introduced by social desirability. The sign of factor loadings showed consistency and validity of the tendency for social desirability and extreme responding. Moreover, the personfit- based subject classification derived from the baseline data was able to predict subjects’ participation at a 8,5-year follow-up. However, the nature of those associations was contrary to our predictions. The discussion addresses explanations and practical implications, but also the limitations pertaining to the identification and interpretation of person-fit scores.

  4. Consumer participation in nurse education: a national survey of Australian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Byrne, Louise; Wynaden, Dianne; Martin, Graham; Harris, Scott

    2015-04-01

    Consumers of mental health services have an important role to play in the higher education of nursing students, by facilitating understanding of the experience of mental illness and instilling a culture of consumer participation. Yet the level of consumer participation in mental health nursing programmes in Australia is not known. The aim of the present study was to scope the level and nature of involvement of consumers in mental health nursing higher education in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken involving an internet survey of nurse academics who coordinate mental health nursing programmes in universities across Australia, representing 32 universities. Seventy-eight percent of preregistration and 75% of post-registration programmes report involving consumers. Programmes most commonly had one consumer (25%) and up to five. Face-to-face teaching, curriculum development, and membership-to-programme committees were the most regular types of involvement. The content was generally codeveloped by consumers and nurse academics (67.5%). The frequency of consumer involvement in the education of nursing students in Australia is surprisingly high. However, involvement is noticeably variable across types of activity (e.g. curriculum development, assessment), and tends to be minimal and ad hoc. Future research is required into the drivers of increased consumer involvement.

  5. Community survey results for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge : Completion report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a summary of results for the survey of residents of communities adjacent to Rappahannock River Valley NWR conducted from the spring through the...

  6. Visitor and community survey results for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge : Completion report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides a summary of results for the community and visitor surveys conducted at Prime Hook NWR from the fall of 2004 through fall of 2005. The purpose...

  7. Completing the census of young stars near the Sun with the FunnelWeb spectroscopic survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Warrick; Murphy, Simon; Tinney, Christopher G.; Ireland, Michael; Bessell, Michael S.

    2016-06-01

    From late 2016, the Australian FunnelWeb survey will obtain medium-resolution (R~2000) spectra covering the full optical range for 2 million of the brightest stars (ITESS) and radial velocity exoplanet studies. In this poster contribution we introduce the FunnelWeb survey, its science goals and input catalogue, as well as provide an update on the status of the fibre positioner and spectrograph commissioning at Siding Spring.

  8. The Building the Bridge survey for z=3 Ly-alpha emitting galaxies II: Completion of the survey

    CERN Document Server

    Grove, L F; Ledoux, C; Limousin, M; Møller, P; Nilsson, K; Thomsen, B

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged). We aim at bridging the gap between absorption selected and emission selected galaxies at z~3 by probing the faint end of the luminosity function of star-forming galaxies at z~3. We have performed narrow-band imaging in three fields with intervening QSO absorbers (a damped Ly$\\alpha$ absorber and two Lyman-limit systems) using the VLT. We target Ly-alpha at redshifts 2.85, 3.15 and 3.20. We find a consistent surface density of about 10 Ly-alpha-emitters per square arcmin per unit redshift in all three fields down to our detection limit of about 3x10^41 ergs s^-1. The luminosity function is consistent with what has been found by other surveys at similar redshifts. About 85% of the sources are fainter than the canonical limit of R=25.5 for most Lyman-break galaxy surveys. In none of the three fields do we detect the emission counterparts of the QSO absorbers. In particular we do not detect the counterpart of the z=2.85 damped Ly-alpha absorber towards Q2138-4427. Narrow-band surveys for Ly-alpha emit...

  9. Year 12 Completion and Youth Transitions. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Chris

    2011-01-01

    On average, young people who complete Year 12 tend to have more successful transitions from education to work than those who do not. Hence everyone has seen numerous governments introduce policies that promote Year 12 completion. However, in recent years there has been a realisation that it does not make much sense to promote Year 12 retention for…

  10. An investigation of complete denture teaching in the UK: part 1. A survey of undergraduate teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, M; Faigenblum, M; Eder, A; Louca, C

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first in a series of two that investigate the undergraduate teaching of complete dentures in the UK. A questionnaire was sent by email to 13 UK dental schools enquiring about the number of hours spent in the lecture theatre, laboratory and clinic. The schools were also asked to give their views about the preparedness of the new graduates for dealing with complete dentures in general practice. There was great disparity between schools in the overall number of lectures delivered. Two schools claimed 28 hours and the remainder varied between 6-15 hours. Four schools devoted more time to laboratory work whereas three schools spent more time in the clinic. One school reported no dedicated clinical time for complete dentures. There appears to be a regional variation with northern UK dental schools spending more time on the teaching of complete dentures. The quota for complete dentures varied from three in most schools to eight in one school and none in another. Comments from the dental schools varied from a reported lack of suitable complete denture cases, to concerns with insufficient curricular time devoted to the subject and a subsequent lack of clinical competence on graduation. Some schools have integrated complete denture teaching into the general prosthodontic course as it is considered inappropriate to teach different aspects of prosthetics in isolation. Competence in complete dentures falls short of what is expected. With a single exception all the schools seem to have low expectations for their undergraduate students to be practically trained and experienced in the production of complete dentures. Despite the advent of implants and the introduction of clinical dental technicians, there is and will continue to be a need for the competent treatment of the edentulous population by general practitioners.

  11. A COMPLETE ATLAS OF H I ABSORPTION TOWARD H II REGIONS IN THE SOUTHERN GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY (SGPS I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, C.; Dickey, J. M.; Dawson, J. R. [School of Physical Sciences, Private Bag 37, University of Tasmania, Hobart 7001 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    We present a complete catalog of H I emission and absorption spectrum pairs, toward H II regions, detectable within the boundaries of the Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS I), a total of 252 regions. The catalog is presented in graphical, numerical, and summary formats. We demonstrate an application of this new data set through an investigation of the locus of the Near 3 kpc Arm.

  12. Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area 2003 visitor use survey: Completion report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponds, Phadrea; Gillette, Shana C.; Koontz, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    This report represents the analysis of research conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The purpose is to provide socio-economic and recreational use information that can be used in the development of a Resource Management Plan (RMP) for the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area (CCNCA). The results reported here deal primarily with recreation-based activities in four areas: Kokopelli Loops, Rabbit Valley, Loma Boat Launch, and Devil’s Canyon.

  13. The SONYC survey: Towards a complete census of brown dwarfs in star forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Muzic, K; Geers, V C; Jayawardhana, R; Tamura, M; Dawson, P; Ray, T P

    2013-01-01

    SONYC, short for "Substellar Objects in Nearby Young Clusters", is a survey program to provide a census of the substellar population in nearby star forming regions. We have conducted deep optical and near-infrared photometry in five young regions (NGC1333, rho Ophiuchi, Chamaeleon-I, Upper Sco, and Lupus-3), combined with proper motions, and followed by extensive spectroscopic campaigns with Subaru and VLT, in which we have obtained more than 700 spectra of candidate low-mass objects. We have identified and characterized more than 60 new substellar objects, among them a handful of objects with masses close to, or below the Deuterium burning limit. Through SONYC and surveys by other groups, the substellar IMF is now well characterized down to ~ 5 - 10 MJup, and we find that the ratio of the number of stars with respect to brown dwarfs lies between 2 and 6. A comprehensive survey of NGC 1333 reveals that, down to ~5MJup, free-floating objects with planetary masses are 20-50 times less numerous than stars, i.e. ...

  14. The Herschel Open Time Key Project; DUst Around NEarby Stars: Results from the Complete Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchi, William C.; Eiroa, C.; Consortium, DUNES

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel DUst Around Nearby Stars (DUNES) survey (Eiroa et al. 2010) was designed to address several fundamental questions regarding debris disks around nearby solar type stars, in order to put the Solar System into context. Our goals were to: (1) determine the fraction of stars with faint, Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt (EKB)-like disks, (2) explore collisional and dynamical evolution of EKB analogues, (3) observe dust properties and size distribution, and (4) determine the incidence of EKB-like disks vs. presence of planets. The final sample of stars directly observed by DUNES included 133 stars, including 27 F-type, 52 G-type and 54 K-type stars within 20 pc of the Sun. The integration time was set in order to make a 5-sigma detection of the expected photospheric emission at 100 and 160 microns, using the PACS instrument. In addition, 106 stars observed by DEBRIS survey (Mathews et al. 2010) satisfying the photospheric detection condition are shared targets, specifically 83 FGK stars - 51 F, 24 G and 8 K (the rest are A and M stars). We report the main conclusions from the survey including the frequency of detection of debris disks as a function of fractional luminosity of the dust, Ld/L*, and correlations of Ld/L* with metallicity, bolometric luminosity, effective temperature, and stellar age.

  15. Year 12 Completion and Youth Transitions: Research Overview. Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth. Research Report 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    On average, young people who complete Year 12 tend to have more successful transitions from education to work than those who do not. However, in recent years there has been a realisation that it does not make much sense to promote Year 12 retention for its own sake. Year 12 traditionally has been more suited to those of an academic bent, and it is…

  16. Exploring survey participation, data combination, and research validity in a substance use study: an application of hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Rebecca; Chapman, Phillip L; Edwards, Ruth W

    2010-01-01

    A sound decision regarding combination of datasets is critical for research validity. Data were collected between 1996 and 2000 via a 99-item survey of substance use behaviors. Two groups of 7th-12th grade students in predominately White communities are compared: 166,578 students from 193 communities with high survey participation and 41,259 students from 65 communities with lower participation. Hierarchical logistic models are used to explore whether the two datasets may be combined for further study of community-level substance use effects. "Scenario analysis" is introduced. Results suggest the datasets may reasonably be combined. Limitations and further research are discussed.

  17. Knowledge attainment, perceptions, and professionalism in participants completing the didactic phase of an Army reserve critical care nursing residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, C A; Gotschall, W

    2000-04-01

    Combat hospitals in today's Army demand nurses with critical care nursing "8A" additional skills identifiers. The intensity of future wars and operations other than war, together with highly technological weapons, forecast a large number of casualties evacuated rapidly from combat with wounds that require skillful and intensive nursing care. Many of the critical care nurses providing future care are positioned in the reserve components and require creative approaches to education and training concentrated into one weekend per month. An Army Reserve critical care nursing residency program was designed in one midwestern combat support hospital. The didactic course, phase I, was evaluated for effectiveness in achieving outcomes of increased knowledge attainment, enhanced perceptions of critical care nursing, and higher degrees of professionalism. Twenty-seven registered nurses completed the course, and 30 nurses from the same hospital served as controls. A repeated-measures analysis examined outcomes before intervention (time 1), at course completion (time 2), and at a 6-month follow-up (time 3). The course was effective at increasing scores on knowledge attainment and perceptions of critical care nursing; however; professionalism scores were initially high and remained so throughout the study. This research extends information about critical care nursing education and evaluates a training mechanism for meeting the unique requirements and time constraints of nurses in the reserve components who need to provide a high level of skill to soldiers in combat.

  18. No Effects of Artificial Surveillance Cues or Social Proofs on Survey Participation Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rasmus Tue

    This paper tests whether the efficacy of survey invitations and survey reminders can be increased by using artificial surveillance cues and social proofs. Several experimental treatments on a group of 1,000 respondents yield no significant effects.......This paper tests whether the efficacy of survey invitations and survey reminders can be increased by using artificial surveillance cues and social proofs. Several experimental treatments on a group of 1,000 respondents yield no significant effects....

  19. What deters nurses from participating in web-based graduate nursing programs?: A cross-sectional survey research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Suzanne H

    2016-01-01

    A graduate degree is required of nursing faculty in America. Because of the nursing faculty shortage, web-based graduate nursing programs are being offered to encourage nurses to return to school. The identification of deterrents to participating in these programs is an important step in increasing enrollment. To identify deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs. Descriptive survey research. Louisiana Two hundred and eighty-one registered nurse members of the Louisiana Nurses' Association. The 54-item four-point Likert-type interval scale Deterrents to Participation in Web-Based Graduate Nursing Programs Survey Instrument was used. Data were collected over 8weeks using SurveyMonkey.com to administer the web survey tool to all members of the Louisiana State Nurses' Association. A factor analysis revealed a three-factor solution that explained 55.436% of the total variance in deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs. The factors were labeled "concerns about quality, cost, and time," "concerns about access to resources: technological and personal," and "concerns about electronic mediated communication." Multiple regression analysis revealed an overall model of three predictors of deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs: no computer literacy, annual household income between 20,000 and 50,000 dollars, and having the current educational status of graduating from a diploma RN program. This model accounted for 21% of the variance in the deterrents to participation scores. Since these three significant predictors of deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs were identified, web-based nursing graduate program administrators might consider an outreach to RN diploma graduates in an effort to make them aware of available technology support programs to foster participation. Scholarships for lower income nursing students are recommended, and programs to support computer

  20. Student experiences of participating in five collaborative blended learning courses in Africa and Asia: a survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Salla; Yan, Weirong; Meragia, Elnta; Mahomed, Hassan; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Skinner, Donald; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2016-01-01

    Background As blended learning (BL; a combination of face-to-face and e-learning methods) becomes more commonplace, it is important to assess whether students find it useful for their studies. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH (African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research; Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health) were unique capacity-building projects, focusing on developing BL in Africa and Asia on issues related to global health. Objective We aimed to evaluate the student experience of participating in any of five ARCADE BL courses implemented collaboratively at institutions from Africa, Asia, and Europe. Design A post-course student survey with 118 students was conducted. The data were collected using email or through an e-learning platform. Data were analysed with SAS, using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. We focused on the associations between various demographic and experience variables and student-reported overall perceptions of the courses. Results In total, 82 students responded to the survey. In bivariate logistic regression, the course a student took [p=0.0067, odds ratio (OR)=0.192; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.058–0.633], male gender of student (p=0.0474, OR=0.255; 95% CI: 0.066–0.985), not experiencing technical problems (pstudent needs (p=0.0036, OR=0.165; 95% CI: 0.049–0.555) were found to be associated with a more positive perception of BL, as measured by student rating of the overall helpfulness of the e-learning component to their studies. In contrast, perceiving the assessment as adequate was associated with a worse perception of overall usefulness. In a multiple regression, the course, experiencing no technical problems, and perceiving the discussion as adequate remained significantly associated with a more positively rated perception of the usefulness of the online component of the blended courses. Discussion The results suggest that lack of technical

  1. Survey nonresponse among ethnic minorities in a national health survey - a mixed-method study of participation, barriers, and potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlmark, Nanna; Algren, Maria Holst; Holmberg, Teresa;

    2015-01-01

    and incentives to participation. Design. This was a mixed-method study. Logistic regression was used to analyze nonresponse using data from DNHS (N = 177,639 and chi-square tests in item nonresponse analyses. We explored barriers and incentives regarding participation through focus groups and cognitive...

  2. CO in the galactic center: A complete survey of carbon monoxide emission in the inner 4 KPC of the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitrancarreno, Mauricio Ernesto

    The first well-sampled, large scale survey of CO-12 (J = 1 yields 0) emission from the inner 4 kpc of the Galaxy is presented and used to study the distribution of molecular clouds and the kinematics of the molecular gas in the inner Galaxy. The survey samples a 4 deg wide strip along the Galactic equator from 1 = -12 deg to 1 = 13 deg. The over 8000 spectra obtained with the Columbia University Southern millimeter telescope (La Serena, Chile) have a velocity resolution of 1.3 km/s, a rms sensitivity better than 0.12 K, and are spaced by approximately one beamwidth (8.8 minutes). This is the first survey to encompass the complete latitude and velocity spans of the CO emission from the inner Galaxy. The survey is presented as a collection of 1-V, b-V, and 1-b maps. Features with the largest CO luminosities and velocity widths in the inner Galaxy, outside the nuclear regions, were fully mapped and analyzed. Molecular clouds in the surveyed area were identified and cataloged. The inclination and thickness of the molecular layer in the inner Galaxy were measured and their relevance to current models of the regions discussed. A lower limit for the surface density at the center was found and a CO rotation curve was calculated and compared to available H I rotation curves.

  3. Participants' preference for type of leaflet used to feed back the results of a randomised trial: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brealey, Stephen; Andronis, Lazaros; Dennis, Laura; Atwell, Christine; Bryan, Stirling; Coulton, Simon; Cox, Helen; Cross, Ben; Fylan, Fiona; Garratt, Andrew; Gilbert, Fiona; Gillan, Maureen; Hendry, Maggie; Hood, Kerenza; Houston, Helen; King, David; Morton, Veronica; Robling, Michael; Russell, Ian; Wilkinson, Clare

    2010-12-01

    Hundreds of thousands of volunteers take part in medical research, but many will never hear from researchers about what the study revealed. There is a growing demand for the results of randomised trials to be fed back to research participants both for ethical research practice and for ensuring their co-operation in a trial. This study aims to determine participants' preferences for type of leaflet (short versus long) used to summarise the findings of a randomised trial; and to test whether certain characteristics explained participants' preferences. 553 participants in a randomised trial about General Practitioners' access to Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients presenting with suspected internal derangement of the knee were asked in the final follow-up questionnaire whether they would like to be fed back the results of the trial. Participants who agreed to this were included in a postal questionnaire survey asking about their preference, if any, between a short and a long leaflet and what it was about the leaflet that they preferred. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test whether certain demographics of responding participants along with treatment group explained whether a participant had a preference for type of leaflet or no preference. Of the participants who returned the final follow-up questionnaire, 416 (88%) agreed to receive the results of the trial. Subsequently 132 (32%) participants responded to the survey. Most participants preferred the longer leaflet (55%) and the main reasons for this were the use of technical information (94%) and diagrams (89%). There was weak evidence to suggest that gender might explain whether participants have a preference for type of leaflet or not (P = 0.084). Trial participants want to receive feed back about the results and appear to prefer a longer leaflet. Males and females might require information to be communicated to them differently and should be the focus of further research. The trial is registered

  4. Urban Lifestyle and Social Participation of Aged Citizens of Ahwaz City: A Regional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolrahim Asadollahi

    2013-07-01

    have led social scientists to think about deterrents of social participation (SP and other declining factors. At the moment, severe decrease in SP amongst the increasing population of elderly is assumed to be happening because of injustice and social inequality. Iran and our research community in particular - Khuzestan province and Ahwaz city- is a multi-ethnic society, where the resources of community and society should be distributed in a justified and equal manner. Every study in its policies should attend to this issue and special groups specifically in cases involving CE and SWB. Elderly, women, ethnic groups, and enhancing their well-being and the situation of social problems are areas that require further attention. This study looks forward to understanding the reasons for such neglected interest in these areas and hope to share a new vision for policy making at micro level for aged citizens of Ahwaz city. An attempt is made to investigate the role of variables such as social participation and background characteristics in urban lifestyle of the aged in the hope of ensuring a better health and an acceptable end-life condition for them.     Materials & Methods   Research population in this survey includes the elderly of Ahwaz, who were 60 years old and above. During 1997 to 2007, Ahwaz showed a higher ratio of aged citizens among all cities of Khuzestan province (3.1% in total aged population of the province. All data were based on KSCC and ISCC annual reports in 2007 (KSCC, 2007. The study has evaluated the factors of SP. Theories of participation, social capital and trust, and inequality were reviewed. Consequently, six factors were considered. Regarding the last census in 2007, total population of Ahwaz city was 969,843 inhabitants, of whom 51594 were aged 60 and above (male: 26,294 and female: 25,345. Unfortunately, in the national and provincial reports on population and census, there is no independent data for ethnicity. Research sample was obtained

  5. CoCoRaHS (The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network): Analysis of Participant Survey Data to Uncover Learning through Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, M. A.; Zimmerman, T.; Doesken, N. J.; Reges, H. W.; Newman, N.; Turner, J.; Schwalbe, Z.

    2010-12-01

    CoCoRaHS (The Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow network) is based out of Fort Collins Colorado and is an extremely successful citizen science project with over 15,000 volunteers collecting valuable precipitation data. Forecasters and scientists use data from this dense network to illuminate and illustrate the high small-scale variability of precipitation across the nation. This presentation will discuss the results of a survey of CoCoRaHS participants as related to 1) citizen scientists’ motivation and learning; 2) the challenges of identifying how people learn science in citizen science projects; and 3) a potential research-based framework for how people learn through engaging in the data collection within in a citizen science project. A comprehensive survey of 14,500 CoCoRaHS observers was recently conducted to uncover participant perceptions of numerous aspects of the CoCoRaHS program, including its goal of increasing climate literacy. The survey yielded a response rate of over 50%, and included measures of motivation, engagement and learning. In relationship to motivation and learning, the survey revealed that most (57.1%) observers would make precipitation observations regardless of being a CoCoRaHS volunteer, therefore their motivation is related to their inherent level of interest in weather. Others are motivated by their desire to learn more about weather and climate, they want to contribute to a scientific project, they think its fun, and/or it provides a sense of community. Because so many respondents already had knowledge and interest in weather and climate, identifying how and what people learn through participating was a challenge. However, the narrow project focus of collecting and reporting of local precipitation assisted in identifying aspects of learning. For instance, most (46.4%) observers said they increased their knowledge about the local variability in precipitation even though they had been collecting precipitation data for many

  6. New active galactic nuclei detected in ROSAT All Sky Survey galaxies - The complete dataset

    CERN Document Server

    Kollatschny, W; Pietsch, W; Bischoff, K; Zetzl, M

    2008-01-01

    The ROSAT ALL Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (RASS-BSC) has been correlated with the Catalogue of Principal Galaxies (PGC) to identify new extragalactic counterparts. 550 reliable optical counterparts have been detected. We took optical spectra of 176 X-ray candidates and companions at ESO, Calar Alto observatory and McDonald observatory. We discuss the redshift-, linewidth-, as well as optical and X-ray luminosity distribution of our ROSAT selected sample. 139 galaxies of our 166 X-ray counterparts have been identified as AGN with 93 being Seyfert 1 galaxies (61%). Eighteen of them (20%) are Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies. 34 X-ray candidates (21%) are LINERs and only eight candidates (5%) are Seyfert 2. The ratio of the number of Seyfert 1 galaxies to Seyfert 2 galaxies is about 11/1. Optical surveys result in ratios of 1/1.4. The high fraction of detected Seyfert 1 galaxies is explained by the sensitivity of the ROSAT to soft X-rays which are heavily absorbed in type 2 AGN. Two X-ray candidates are HII...

  7. [Survey of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus control measures in hospitals participating in the VINCat program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena-Galindo, Nieves; Hornero-Lopez, Anna; Freixas-Sala, Núria; Bella-Cueto, Feliu; Pérez-Jové, Josefa; Limon-Cáceres, Enric; Gudiol-Munté, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    VINCat is a nosocomial infection surveillance program in hospitals in Catalonia. The aim of the study was to determine the surveillance and control measures of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in these centres. An e-mail survey was carried out from January to March 2013 with questions related to the characteristics of the hospitals and their control measures for MRSA. A response was received from 53 hospitals (>500 beds: 7; 200-500 beds: 14;<200 beds: 32; had ICU: 29). Computer alert of readmissions was available in 63%. There was active surveillance of patients admitted from another hospital (46.2%) or a long-term-care centre (55.8%), both being significantly more common measures in hospitals with a rate of MRSA≤22% (global median). Compliance with hand hygiene was observed in 77.4% of the centres, and was greater than 50% in 69.7% of them. All hospitals had contact precautions, although 62.3% did not have exclusive frequently used clinical material in bedrooms. The room cleaning was performed more frequently in 54.7% of hospitals, and 67.9% of them had programs for the appropriate use of antibiotics. This study provides information on the implementation of measures to prevent MRSA in hospitals participating in the VINCat program. Most of the centres have an MRSA protocol, however compliance with it should be improved, especially in areas such as active detection on admission in patients at risk, hand hygiene adherence, cleaning frequency and optimising the use of antibiotics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence for Long-Term Impact of Pasos Adelante: Using a Community-Wide Survey to Evaluate Chronic Disease Risk Modification in Prior Program Participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Fernandez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Effective community-level chronic disease prevention is critical to population health within developed and developing nations. Pasos Adelante is a preventive intervention that aims to reduce chronic disease risk with evidence of effectiveness in US-Mexico residing, Mexican origin, participants. This intervention and related ones also implemented with community health workers have been shown to improve clinical, behavioral and quality of life indicators; though most evidence is from shorter-term evaluations and/or lack comparison groups. The current study examines the impact of this program using secondary data collected in the community 3–6 years after all participants completed the program. A proportional household survey (N = 708 was used that included 48 respondents who indicated they had participated in Pasos. Using propensity score matching to account for differences in program participants versus other community residents (the program targeted those with diabetes and associated risk factors, 148 natural controls were identified for 37 matched Pasos participants. Testing a range of behavioral and clinical indicators of chronic disease risk, logistic regression models accounting for selection bias showed two significant findings; Pasos participants were more physically active and drank less whole milk. These findings add to the evidence of the effectiveness of Pasos Adalente and related interventions in reducing chronic disease risk in Mexican-origin populations, and illustrate the use of innovative techniques for using secondary, community-level data to complement prior evaluation research.

  9. Nature and completeness of galaxies detected in the Two Micron All Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, D H; Weinberg, M D; Katz, N; Intosh, Daniel H. Mc; Bell, Eric F.; Weinberg, Martin D.; Katz, Neal

    2005-01-01

    We cross correlate the well-defined and very complete spectroscopic Main Galaxy Sample (MGS) of 156,000 bright (r16 reflects the sharp surface-brightness limit of the extended source detection algorithm in 2MASS. As a result, the r>16 galaxies found in the XSC are over-representative in red early types and under-representative in blue latetypes. At r>16 the XSC suffers an additional selection effect from the 2-3" spatial resolution limit of 2MASS. Therefore, 2MASS continues to detect 90% of of the MGS at 16completeness. Using data from SDSS-DR2, this sample contains 19,156 galaxies with a median redshift of 0.052. (abridged)

  10. A Complete Survey of the Central Molecular Zone in NH3

    CERN Document Server

    Nagayama, Takumi; Handa, Toshihiro; Iahak, Hayati Bebe Hajra; Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Miyaji, Takeshi; Koyama, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    We present a map of the major part of the central molecular zone (CMZ) of simultaneous observations in the NH3 (J,K) = (1,1) and (2,2) lines using the Kagoshima 6-m telescope. The mapped area is -1.000 80 K contain 75% and 25% of the total NH3 flux, respectively. These temperatures indicate that the dense molecular gas in the CMZ is dominated by gas that is warmer than the majority of the dust present there. A comparison with the CO survey by Sawada et al. (2001) shows that the NH3 emitting region is surrounded by a high pressure region on the l-v plane. Although NH3 emission traces dense gas, it is not extended into a high pressure region. Therefore, the high pressure region is less dense and has to be hotter. This indicates that the molecular cloud complex in the Galactic center region has a ``core'' of dense and warm clouds which are traced by the NH3 emission, and an ``envelope'' of less dense and hotter gas clouds. Besides heating by ambipolar diffusion, the hot plasma gas emitting the X-ray emission ma...

  11. Civic participation and self-rated health: a cross-national multi-level analysis using the world value survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saerom; Kim, Chang-yup; You, Myung Soon

    2015-01-01

    Civic participation, that which directly influences important decisions in our personal lives, is considered necessary for developing a society. We hypothesized that civic participation might be related to self-rated health status. We constructed a multi-level analysis using data from the World Value Survey (44 countries, n=50 859). People who participated in voting and voluntary social activities tended to report better subjective health than those who did not vote or participate in social activities, after controlling for socio-demographic factors at the individual level. A negative association with unconventional political activity and subjective health was found, but this effect disappeared in a subset analysis of only the 18 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. Moreover, social participation and unconventional political participation had a statistically significant contextual association with subjective health status, but this relationship was not consistent throughout the analysis. In the analysis of the 44 countries, social participation was of borderline significance, while in the subset analysis of the OECD countries unconventional political participation was a stronger determinant of subjective health. The democratic index was a significant factor in determining self-rated health in both analyses, while public health expenditure was a significant factor in only the subset analysis. Despite the uncertainty of its mechanism, civic participation might be a significant determinant of the health status of a country.

  12. 76 FR 24457 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Income and Program Participation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... the income and general economic and financial situation of the U.S. population, which the SIPP has... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Income and Program...'' over the life of the panel. The survey is molded around a central ``core'' of labor force and...

  13. 76 FR 79650 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Income and Program Participation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... the income and general economic and financial situation of the U.S. population, which the SIPP has.... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Survey of Income and Program... of the panel. The survey is molded around a central ``core'' of labor force and income questions...

  14. Using Epidemiological Survey Data to Examine Factors Influencing Participation in Parent-Training Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska, Alina; Dyah Ramadewi, Mikha; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based parent-training programmes aim to reduce child behaviour problems; however, the effects of these programmes are often limited by poor participation rates. This study proposes a model of parent, child and family factors related to parental participation in parenting interventions. A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to…

  15. Participants' preference for type of leaflet used to feed back the results of a randomised trial: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston Helen

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hundreds of thousands of volunteers take part in medical research, but many will never hear from researchers about what the study revealed. There is a growing demand for the results of randomised trials to be fed back to research participants both for ethical research practice and for ensuring their co-operation in a trial. This study aims to determine participants' preferences for type of leaflet (short versus long used to summarise the findings of a randomised trial; and to test whether certain characteristics explained participants' preferences. Methods 553 participants in a randomised trial about General Practitioners' access to Magnetic Resonance Imaging for patients presenting with suspected internal derangement of the knee were asked in the final follow-up questionnaire whether they would like to be fed back the results of the trial. Participants who agreed to this were included in a postal questionnaire survey asking about their preference, if any, between a short and a long leaflet and what it was about the leaflet that they preferred. Multinomial logistic regression was used to test whether certain demographics of responding participants along with treatment group explained whether a participant had a preference for type of leaflet or no preference. Results Of the participants who returned the final follow-up questionnaire, 416 (88% agreed to receive the results of the trial. Subsequently 132 (32% participants responded to the survey. Most participants preferred the longer leaflet (55% and the main reasons for this were the use of technical information (94% and diagrams (89%. There was weak evidence to suggest that gender might explain whether participants have a preference for type of leaflet or not (P = 0.084. Conclusions Trial participants want to receive feed back about the results and appear to prefer a longer leaflet. Males and females might require information to be communicated to them differently and should

  16. Survey of Participants in the Gulf of Mexico Grouper-Tilefish Individual Fishing Quota Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data includes qualitative responses regarding participant satisfaction with the IFQ, changes in fishing operations due to IFQ, hiring crew, and availability of...

  17. Eight month post program completion; change in risk factors for chronic disease amongst participants in a four-month pedometer-based workplace health program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freak-Poli, Rosanne; Wolfe, Rory; Brand, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    measured waist circumference at twelve-months indicated that the significant improvements observed immediately after the health program could not be sustained. Approximately half of those not meeting guidelines for physical activity, waist circumference and blood pressure at baseline, were meeting......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether participation in a four-month, pedometer-based, physical activity, workplace health program is associated with long-term sustained improvements in risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, eight-months after the completion of the program. DESIGN...... guidelines at twelve-months. CONCLUSIONS: Participation in this four-month, pedometer-based, physical activity, workplace health program was associated with sustained improvements chronic disease risk factors at twelve-months. These results indicate that such programs can have a long-term benefit and thus...

  18. FACEBOOK ADVERTISEMENTS FOR SURVEY PARTICIPANT RECRUITMENT: CONSIDERATIONS FROM A MULTI-NATIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Thomson; Naoya Ito

    2014-01-01

    Facebook’s global reach suggests good potential for recruiting research participants and collecting objective behavioral data for cross-cultural research. Previous literature suggests the usefulness of Facebook advertisements to recruit participants in single-country studies. However, Facebook advert use in multi-country studies has not yet been reported. Nor are there any reports about soliciting Facebook user data (via Facebook applications) using Facebook advertisements. This paper contrib...

  19. FACEBOOK ADVERTISEMENTS FOR SURVEY PARTICIPANT RECRUITMENT: CONSIDERATIONS FROM A MULTI-NATIONAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Thomson; Naoya Ito

    2014-01-01

    Facebook’s global reach suggests good potential for recruiting research participants and collecting objective behavioral data for cross-cultural research. Previous literature suggests the usefulness of Facebook advertisements to recruit participants in single-country studies. However, Facebook advert use in multi-country studies has not yet been reported. Nor are there any reports about soliciting Facebook user data (via Facebook applications) using Facebook advertisements. This paper contrib...

  20. A Descriptive Survey of Weight Control Participants at a U.S. Army Community Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    exercise can be gradually increased. When regular physical exercise is performed by an obese or overweight individual...consistent in the future. The seventh possible contributing factor to weight loss is a service member’s participation in physical activities , i.e., exercise ...plan? SOURCE 13. Did you participate in physical exercise activities after duty hours, i.e., aerobic exercises as prescribed by a physical

  1. A Survey Study of Effective Factors on Social Participation of Citizens, A Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Rezadoost

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Social participation is considered as one of the essential elements to reach development. Socialparticipation means individuals' mental and emotional attachment to the group condition for the accessinggroups' commitment to the work. This study is exploratory in nature and data has been collected byquestionnaires from 385 through sampling method.To explain the effective factors on social participation, the theories of weber, Durkhiem, homens,parsons, maccleland, siemel and bernschtain were used and finally parsons theoretical of model was appliedfor this study.The result of the research showed that, the effective factors on social participation are; education, maritalstatus, social status, occupation, membership of social organization, public services contentment andParticipating in elections. The result of multi – variant analysis showed that the independent variables whichare significant in this study are about 52 percent at the variances in the dependent variables could beexplained, and taking participate in election has more effect than the other variables. Thus income and socialstatus have less effect on social participation.

  2. A Study of Student Participation and Nonparticipation in Prelecture Electronic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Vincent C. H.; Chow, Danny S. L.

    2013-01-01

    Student nonparticipation in electronic surveys represents a challenge to educators as it may impact significantly on the implementation or evaluation of the associated teaching activities. We here study the student evaluation of a pedagogical project consisting of prelecture online polling followed by linked revision lectures. This investigation…

  3. Health behaviors and their correlates among participants in the Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muellerova, Hana; Landis, Sarah H.; Aisanov, Zaurbek; Davis, Kourtney J.; Ichinose, Masakazu; Mannino, David M.; Maskell, Joe; Menezes, Ana M.; van der Molen, Thys; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Tabberer, Maggie; Han, MeiLan K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: We used data from the Continuing to Confront COPD International Patient Survey to test the hypothesis that patients with COPD who report less engagement with their disease management are also more likely to report greater impact of the disease. METHODS: This was a population-bas

  4. Split views among parents regarding children's right to decide about participation in research: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartling, U; Helgesson, G; Hansson, M G; Ludvigsson, J

    2009-07-01

    Based on extensive questionnaire data, this paper focuses on parents' views about children's right to decide about participation in research. The data originates from 4000 families participating in a longitudinal prospective screening as 1997. Although current regulations and recommendations underline that children should have influence over their participation, many parents in this study disagree. Most (66%) were positive providing information to the child about relevant aspects of the study. However, responding parents were split about whether or not children should at some point be allowed decisional authority when participating in research: 41.6% of the parents reported being against or unsure. Those who responded positively believed that children should be allowed to decide about blood-sampling procedures (70%), but to a less extent about participation (48.5%), analyses of samples (19.7%) and biological bank storage (15.4%). That as many as possible should remain in the study, and that children do not have the competence to understand the consequences for research was strongly stressed by respondents who do not think children should have a right to decide. When asked what interests they consider most important in paediatric research, child autonomy and decision-making was ranked lowest. We discuss the implications of these findings.

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: anisotropic galaxy clustering in Fourier space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee-Jong; Saito, Shun; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Schneider, Donald P.; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the anisotropic clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12 sample, which consists of 1198 006 galaxies in the redshift range 0.2 measure redshift-space distortions simultaneously with the Alcock-Paczynski effect and the baryon acoustic oscillation scale. We include the power-spectrum monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole in our analysis and compare our measurements with a perturbation-theory-based model, while properly accounting for the survey window function. To evaluate the reliability of our analysis pipeline, we participate in a mock challenge, which results in systematic uncertainties significantly smaller than the statistical uncertainties. While the high-redshift constraint on fσ8 at zeff = 0.61 indicates a small (∼1.4σ) deviation from the prediction of the Planck ΛCDM (Λ cold dark matter) model, the low-redshift constraint is in good agreement with Planck ΛCDM. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  6. MegaMorph - multi-wavelength measurement of galaxy structure: complete S\\'ersic profile information from modern surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Häußler, Boris; Vika, Marina; Rojas, Alex L; Barden, Marco; Kelvin, Lee S; Alpaslan, Mehmet; Robotham, Aaron S G; Driver, Simon P; Baldry, I K; Brough, Sarah; Hopkins, Andrew M; Liske, Jochen; Nichol, Robert C; Popescu, Cristina C; Tuffs, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a new method for fitting galaxy profiles which makes use of the full multi-wavelength data provided by modern large optical-near-infrared imaging surveys. We present a new version of GALAPAGOS, which utilises a recently-developed multi-wavelength version of GALFIT, and enables the automated measurement of wavelength dependent S\\'ersic profile parameters for very large samples of galaxies. Our new technique is extensively tested to assess the reliability of both pieces of software, GALFIT and GALAPAGOS on both real ugrizY JHK imaging data from the GAMA survey and simulated data made to the same specifications. We find that fitting galaxy light profiles with multi-wavelength data increases the stability and accuracy of the measured parameters, and hence produces more complete and meaningful multi-wavelength photometry than has been available previously. The improvement is particularly significant for magnitudes in low S/N bands and for structural parameters like half-light radius r...

  7. The Munich Near-Infrared Cluster Survey -- IV. Biases in the Completeness of Near-Infrared Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Snigula, J; Bender, R; Botzler, C S; Feulner, G; Hopp, U

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of completeness simulations for the detection of point sources as well as redshifted elliptical and spiral galaxies in the K'-band images of the Munich Near-Infrared Cluster Survey (MUNICS). The main focus of this work is to quantify the selection effects introduced by threshold-based object detection algorithms used in deep imaging surveys. Therefore, we simulate objects obeying the well-known scaling relations between effective radius and central surface brightness, both for de Vaucouleurs and exponential profiles. The results of these simulations, while presented for the MUNICS project, are applicable in a much wider context to deep optical and near-infrared selected samples. We investigate the detection probability as well as the reliability for recovering the true total magnitude with Kron-like (adaptive) aperture photometry. The results are compared to the predictions of the visibility theory of Disney and Phillipps in terms of the detection rate and the lost-light fraction. Addit...

  8. Telecommunications and Black Americans: A Survey of Ownership, Participation and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molden, Vaughncille

    A broad, panoramic study was conducted on the activities and the extent of participation of Black people in various telecommunications fields in the United States. The ways in which media technology can be and has been used as a means for educating Black people were examined. Briefly, the ideological perspective of Black education was discussed…

  9. Does digital competence and occupational setting influence MOOC participation? Evidence from a cross-course survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaño-Muñoz, Jonatan; Kreijns, Karel; Kalz, Marco; Punie, Yves

    2016-01-01

    While MOOCs are recognized nowadays as a potential format for professional development and lifelong learning, little research has been conducted on the factors that influence MOOC participation of professionals and unemployed in MOOCs. Based on a framework developed earlier, we conducted a study, wh

  10. Does Digital Competence and Occupational Setting Influence MOOC Participation? Evidence from a Cross-Course Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaño-Muñoz, Jonatan; Kreijns, Karel; Kalz, Marco; Punie, Yves

    2017-01-01

    While MOOCs are recognized nowadays as a potential format for professional development and lifelong learning, little research has been conducted on the factors that influence MOOC participation of professionals and unemployed in MOOCs. Based on a framework developed earlier, we conducted a study, which focused on the influence of background…

  11. Toward Complete Statistics of Massive Binary Stars: Penultimate Results from the Cygnus OB2 Radial Velocity Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Kobulnicky, Henry A; Lundquist, Michael J; Burke, Jamison; Chapman, James; Keller, Erica; Lester, Kathryn; Rolen, Emily K; Topel, Eric; Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Smullen, Rachel A; Alvarez, Carlos A Vargas; Runnoe, Jessie C; Dale, Daniel A; Brotherton, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    We analyze orbital solutions for 48 massive multiple-star systems in the Cygnus OB2 Association, 23 of which are newly presented here, to find that the observed distribution of orbital periods is approximately uniform in log P for P 45 d, even after correction for completeness, indicating either a lower binary fraction or a shift toward low-mass companions. A high degree of similarity (91% likelihood) between the Cyg OB2 period distribution and that of other surveys suggests that the binary properties at P<25 d are determined by local physics of disk/clump fragmentation and are relatively insensitive to environmental and evolutionary factors. Fully 30% of the unbiased parent sample is a binary with period P < 45 d. Completeness corrections imply a binary fraction near 55% for P < 5000 d. The observed distribution of mass ratios 0.2

  12. Toward Complete Statistics of Massive Binary Stars: Penultimate Results from the Cygnus OB2 Radial Velocity Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Kiminki, Daniel C.; Lundquist, Michael J.; Burke, Jamison; Chapman, James; Keller, Erica; Lester, Kathryn; Rolen, Emily K.; Topel, Eric; Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Smullen, Rachel A.; Vargas Álvarez, Carlos A.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Dale, Daniel A.; Brotherton, Michael M.

    2014-08-01

    We analyze orbital solutions for 48 massive multiple-star systems in the Cygnus OB2 association, 23 of which are newly presented here, to find that the observed distribution of orbital periods is approximately uniform in log P for P power law provides a statistically compelling prescription, but if features are ignored, a power law with exponent β ~= -0.22 provides a crude approximation over P = 1.4-2000 days, as does a piece-wise linear function with a break near 45 days. The cumulative period distribution flattens at P > 45 days, even after correction for completeness, indicating either a lower binary fraction or a shift toward low-mass companions. A high degree of similarity (91% likelihood) between the Cyg OB2 period distribution and that of other surveys suggests that the binary properties at P period P < 45 days. Completeness corrections imply a binary fraction near 55% for P < 5000 days. The observed distribution of mass ratios 0.2 < q < 1 is consistent with uniform, while the observed distribution of eccentricities 0.1 < e < 0.6 is consistent with uniform plus an excess of e ~= 0 systems. We identify six stars, all supergiants, that exhibit aperiodic velocity variations of ~30 km s-1 attributed to atmospheric fluctuations.

  13. Intel Teach to the Future[R] U.S. Classic Program and U.S. Expansion Program Participant Teacher End of Training Survey. Summary Report. CCT Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupert, Naomi; Martin, Wendy; Kanaya, Tomoe

    2004-01-01

    This report compares findings from the End of Training surveys administered to Participant Teachers (PTs) who took part in the Classic version of Intel Teach to the Future and who took part in the Expansion version of Intel Teach to the Future. Classic survey data were collected between March 2001 and July 2003. PT Expansion survey data were…

  14. Comparison of survey methods to profile participants in emerging adventure recreation activities undertaken in wilderness

    OpenAIRE

    Burgin, Shelley; Hardiman, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    Growth in ‘adventure recreation’, typically practised in protected areas, is occurring. Canyoning (cf. canyoneering), is one such activity. In the Greater Blue Mountain World Heritage Area (GBMWHA), Australia, management was concerned that canyoning was causing environmental damage. However, there is a dearth of data, even on participation, because of the ‘composite’ nature of the activity, its recent emergence, and because adventure recreation is typically restricted to wilderness areas whic...

  15. Selected effects of the Conservation Reserve Program on program participants: A report to survey respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandever, Mark W.; Allen, Arthur W.; Sexton, Natalie R.

    2002-01-01

    The Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) established under the 1985 Food Security Act was initially designed to provide the agricultural community economic assistance while protecting highly erodible cropland. Many of the environmental benefits to soil, water, and wildlife resources have been documented (Dunn and others, 1993; Ryan and others, 1998; Flather and others, 1999; Heard and others, 2000). However, the personal and social effects of the program on CRP participants (or contractees) had not been formally documented. Information had been limited to anecdotal comments from individual participants, such as: “since establishment of the CRP the streams have surface water in them” or “the CRP grasses capture drifting snow, making winter feeding of cattle easier.” The Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) wanted to have a better picture of the strengths and weaknesses of the program, according to those most affected by it. In addition, policy makers wanted to get input from program participants on the growing emphasis of the program on long-term management and wildlife habitat requirements.

  16. Medical practitioners in outpatient care: who is interested in participating in EBM courses? Results of a representative postal survey in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thorsten; Stroebel, Angelika; Raspe, Heiner

    2005-10-01

    We surveyed the attitudes of medical practitioners towards evidence-based medicine (EBM) and characterized those with an interest in participating in EBM courses. A random sample of 900 outpatient care doctors stratified by level and field of specialization was surveyed by means of a postal questionnaire. Importance of knowledge on information management, a positive attitude towards EBM and not yet doing critical appraisal were significant predictors of interest in participating in EBM courses. Low participation rates of outpatient care doctors in EBM courses are not due to attitudinal or general motivational problems. Although possible predictors of interest in participation could be specified, further factors contributing to actual participation need to be identified.

  17. Social marketing strategies for reaching older people with disabilities: findings from a survey of centers for independent living participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moone, Rajean Paul; Lightfoot, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Centers for independent living (CILs) provide critical supports, services, and advocacy for assisting people with disabilities in living independently. As there is a rapidly increasing population of older people with disabilities, many CILs are now considering how to actively engage older adults in their organizations. This study utilized a survey of older people with disabilities to help identify social marketing techniques that community organizations like CILs can use to effectively reach older people with disabilities. Utilizing the components of the social marketing mix in designing outreach efforts, including a critical examination of product, place, price, participants, and partnering, CILs and other community agencies can better reach older adults with disabilities.

  18. Uav Surveying for a Complete Mapping and Documentation of Archaeological Findings. The Early Neolithic Site of Portonovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, E. S.; Conati Barbaro, C.; Pierdicca, R.; Bozzi, C. A.; Tassetti, A. N.

    2016-06-01

    The huge potential of 3D digital acquisition techniques for the documentation of archaeological sites, as well as the related findings, is almost well established. In spite of the variety of available techniques, a sole documentation pipeline cannot be defined a priori because of the diversity of archaeological settings. Stratigraphic archaeological excavations, for example, require a systematic, quick and low cost 3D single-surface documentation because the nature of stratigraphic archaeology compels providing documentary evidence of any excavation phase. Only within a destructive process each single excavation cannot be identified, documented and interpreted and this implies the necessity of a re- examination of the work on field. In this context, this paper describes the methodology, carried out during the last years, to 3D document the Early Neolithic site of Portonovo (Ancona, Italy) and, in particular, its latest step consisting in a photogrammetric aerial survey by means of UAV platform. It completes the previous research delivered in the same site by means of terrestrial laser scanning and close range techniques and sets out different options for further reflection in terms of site coverage, resolution and campaign cost. With the support of a topographic network and a unique reference system, the full documentation of the site is managed in order to detail each excavation phase; besides, the final output proves how the 3D digital methodology can be completely integrated with reasonable costs during the excavation and used to interpret the archaeological context. Further contribution of this work is the comparison between several acquisition techniques (i.e. terrestrial and aerial), which could be useful as decision support system for different archaeological scenarios. The main objectives of the comparison are: i) the evaluation of 3D mapping accuracy from different data sources, ii) the definition of a standard pipeline for different archaeological needs

  19. Effects of invitation to participate in health surveys on the incidence of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaaby, Tea; Jørgensen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effects of health checks on reducing cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality in the general population have been questioned. There are few randomized studies with long-term follow-up. We used a cohort randomly selected from a general population as a randomized trial to study...... the effect of repeated general health checks on the 30-year incidence of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), stroke and all-cause mortality. METHODS: The study included all persons (n = 17 845) aged 30, 40, 50 and 60 years living in 11 municipalities in Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark. An age- and gender......-stratified random sample (n = 4789) was invited to up to three health checks, from 1982 to 1994 (intervention group). The remaining 12 994 persons were defined as the control group. Complete follow-up on mortality, emigration and fatal and non-fatal IHD and stroke until 31 December 2012 was obtained by linkage...

  20. Characterizing researchers by strategies used for retaining minority participants: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James; Quinn, Sandra C; Fryer, Craig S; Garza, Mary A; Kim, Kevin H; Thomas, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    Limited attention has been given to the optimal strategies for retaining racial and ethnic minorities within studies and during the follow-up period. High attrition limits the interpretation of results and reduces the ability to translate findings into successful interventions. This study examined the retention strategies used by researchers when retaining minorities in research studies. From May to August 2010, we conducted an online survey with researchers (principal investigators, research staff, and IRB members) and examined their use of seven commonly used retention strategies. The number and type of retention strategies used, how these strategies differ by researcher type, and other characteristics (e.g., funding) were explored. We identified three clusters of researchers: comprehensive retention strategy researchers - utilized the greatest number of retention strategies; moderate retention strategy researchers - utilized an average number of retention strategies; and limited retention strategy researchers - utilized the least number of retention strategies. The comprehensive and moderate retention strategy researchers were more likely than the limited retention strategy researchers to conduct health outcomes research, work with a community advisory board, hire minority staff, use steps at a higher rate to overcome retention barriers, develop new partnerships with the minority community, modify study materials for the minority population, and allow staff to work flexible schedules. This study is a novel effort to characterize researchers, without implying a value judgment, according to their use of specific retention strategies. It provides critical information for conducting future research to determine the effectiveness of using a combination of retention strategies.

  1. Gemini/GMOS Transmission Spectral Survey: Complete Optical Transmission Spectrum of the Hot Jupiter WASP-4b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huitson, C. M.; Désert, J.-M.; Bean, J. L.; Fortney, J. J.; Stevenson, K. B.; Bergmann, M.

    2017-09-01

    We present the complete optical transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-4b from 440 to 940 nm at R ˜ 400-1500 obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrometers (GMOS); this is the first result from a comparative exoplanetology survey program of close-in gas giants conducted with GMOS. WASP-4b has an equilibrium temperature of 1700 K and is favorable to study in transmission due to its large scale height (370 km). We derive the transmission spectrum of WASP-4b using four transits observed with the MOS technique. We demonstrate repeatable results across multiple epochs with GMOS, and derive a combined transmission spectrum at a precision about twice above photon noise, which is roughly equal to one atmospheric scale height. The transmission spectrum is well fitted with a uniform opacity as a function of wavelength. The uniform opacity and absence of a Rayleigh slope from molecular hydrogen suggest that the atmosphere is dominated by clouds with condensate grain sizes of ˜1 μm. This result is consistent with previous observations of hot Jupiters since clouds have been seen in planets with similar equilibrium temperatures to WASP-4b. We describe a custom pipeline that we have written to reduce GMOS time-series data of exoplanet transits, and present a thorough analysis of the dominant noise sources in GMOS, which primarily consist of wavelength- and time-dependent displacements of the spectra on the detector, mainly due to a lack of atmospheric dispersion correction.

  2. Men with disabilities - A cross sectional survey of health promotion, social inclusion and participation at community Men's Sheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie; Parsons, Richard; Vaz, Sharmila; Buchanan, Angus

    2016-01-01

    The intersections between chronicity, disability and social inequality are well understood. Novel ways to counter the social determinants of health and disability are needed. Men's Sheds are a community space where men can participate in a range of shared activities and potentially experience a health and social benefits. This cross-sectional survey was conducted to inform future research by determining who attended Men's Sheds and the range of health, social, community, and educational activities undertaken there. This paper explores the membership of people with disabilities (PWD) at Men's Sheds and the factors that predict their membership. An online survey link was sent to all known Men's Sheds internationally in 2012. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential (univariate and multivariate) statistics. 32.2% of international sheds and 29% of Australian sheds specifically targeted the inclusion of PWD. 80% of these sheds have significantly more members with disabilities than sheds who do no target PWD. Factors associated with greater membership of PWD included the provision of transport, social outings and promoting occupational skills. PWD are being encouraged to join and are joining Men's Sheds. This is significant as the value of participation and inclusion toward better health and wellbeing is well known. Men's Sheds offer a community space where the social determinants of chronicity and disability can potentially be countered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Century Survey Galactic Halo Project III: A Complete 4300 deg^2 Survey of Blue Horizontal Branch Stars in the Metal-Weak Thick Disk and Inner Halo

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Warren R; Wilhelm, Ronald; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Geller, Margaret J; Kenyon, Scott J; Kurtz, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    We present a complete spectroscopic survey of 2414 2MASS-selected blue horizontal branch (BHB) candidates selected over 4300 deg^2 of the sky. We identify 655 BHB stars in this non-kinematically selected sample. We calculate the luminosity function of field BHB stars and find evidence for very few hot BHB stars in the field. The BHB stars located at a distance from the Galactic plane |Z|<4 kpc trace what is clearly a metal-weak thick disk population, with a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]= -1.7, a rotation velocity gradient of dv_{rot}/d|Z|= -28+-3.4 km/s in the region |Z|<6 kpc, and a density scale height of h_Z= 1.26+-0.1 kpc. The BHB stars located at 5<|Z|<9 kpc are a predominantly inner-halo population, with a mean metallicity of [Fe/H]= -2.0 and a mean Galactic rotation of -4+-31 km/s. We infer the density of halo and thick disk BHB stars is 104+-37 kpc^-3 near the Sun, and the relative normalization of halo to thick-disk BHB stars is 4+-1% near the Sun.

  4. Gambling Participation and Problem Gambling Severity in a Stratified Random Survey: Findings from the Second Social and Economic Impact Study of Gambling in Tasmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Darren R; Dowling, Nicki A; Jackson, Alun C; Thomas, Shane A

    2015-12-01

    Demographic characteristics associated with gambling participation and problem gambling severity were investigated in a stratified random survey in Tasmania, Australia. Computer-assisted telephone interviews were conducted in March 2011 resulting in a representative sample of 4,303 Tasmanian residents aged 18 years or older. Overall, 64.8% of Tasmanian adults reported participating in some form of gambling in the previous 12 months. The most common forms of gambling were lotteries (46.5%), keno (24.3%), instant scratch tickets (24.3%), and electronic gaming machines (20.5%). Gambling severity rates were estimated at non-gambling (34.8%), non-problem gambling (57.4%), low risk gambling (5.3%), moderate risk (1.8%), and problem gambling (.7%). Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole significantly higher annual participation rates were reported by couples with no children, those in full time paid employment, and people who did not complete secondary school. Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole significantly higher gambling frequencies were reported by males, people aged 65 or older, and people who were on pensions or were unable to work. Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole significantly higher gambling expenditure was reported by males. The highest average expenditure was for horse and greyhound racing ($AUD 1,556), double the next highest gambling activity electronic gaming machines ($AUD 767). Compared to Tasmanian gamblers as a whole problem gamblers were significantly younger, in paid employment, reported lower incomes, and were born in Australia. Although gambling participation rates appear to be falling, problem gambling severity rates remain stable. These changes appear to reflect a maturing gambling market and the need for population specific harm minimisation strategies.

  5. The Use of Recovery Strategies Among Participants of the Bupa Great North Run: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Sarah; Smith, Tina; Alexanders, Jenny; Shaw, Thomas; Smith, Lois; Nevill, Alan; Anderson, Anna

    2016-09-26

    To investigate half marathon runners' frequency of use of recovery strategies, perceptions regarding the most beneficial recovery strategy and reasons for using recovery strategies. Cross-sectional survey. 186 participants of the 13.1 mile BUPA Great North Run 2013. A questionnaire was developed which required participants to indicate how frequently they used twelve different recovery strategies, identify which recovery strategy they believed to be most beneficial and rank six reasons for using recovery strategies in order of importance. Data was analysed using a Friedman non-parametric ANOVA and additional non-parametric tests. All participants used recovery strategies. Stretching was the most commonly used recovery strategy (p strategies such as kinesio tape (80%), hydrotherapy (78%) or ice baths (71%). A significant difference was observed between reasons for using recovery strategy (χ(2) (5) = 292.29, p important reasons for using recovery strategies, minor sex and age differences in the responses were identified. Recovery strategy usage appears to be widespread among half marathon runners; however disparities exist between the frequency of use and perceived effectiveness of different recovery strategies. Further research in this area is needed to facilitate the development of recovery strategy guidelines which are both evidence-based and practically relevant.

  6. Mental health clinicians' attitudes about consumer and consumer consultant participation in Australia: A cross-sectional survey design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Terence V; Clark, Eileen; Baird, John; Lu, Sai

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess mental health clinicians' attitudes about mental health consumer participation in inpatient psychiatric units. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a non-probability sample of 47 clinicians in the psychiatric units of a large Australian hospital. The results showed that gender, length of time as a clinician, and how long the staff worked in the units influenced their attitudes about consumer involvement. Females were more likely than males to support consumer participation in management and consumer consultants. Less experienced staff showed greater support than more experienced staff for mental health consumer involvement in treatment-related matters and consumer consultants in units. New staff members were more likely to register agreement-to-uncertainty regarding consumer involvement in treatment-related issues, whereas established staff members were more likely to record uncertainty about this issue. The findings showed that although reports and policies promoted participation, some clinicians were reluctant to accept consumer and consultant involvement.

  7. A systematic survey on reporting and methods for handling missing participant data for continuous outcomes in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Flórez, Ivan D; Colunga Lozano, Luis E; Aloweni, Fazila Abu Bakar; Kennedy, Sean Alexander; Li, Aihua; Craigie, Samantha; Zhang, Shiyuan; Agarwal, Arnav; Lopes, Luciane C; Devji, Tahira; Wiercioch, Wojtek; Riva, John J; Wang, Mengxiao; Jin, Xuejing; Fei, Yutong; Alexander, Paul; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Zhang, Yuan; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Kahale, Lara A; Akl, Elie A; Schünemann, Holger J; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-08-01

    To assess analytic approaches randomized controlled trial (RCT) authors use to address missing participant data (MPD) for patient-important continuous outcomes. We conducted a systematic survey of RCTs published in 2014 in the core clinical journals that reported at least one patient-important outcome analyzed as a continuous variable. Among 200 studies, 187 (93.5%) trials explicitly reported whether MPD occurred. In the 163 (81.5%) trials that reported the occurrence of MPD, the median and interquartile ranges of the percentage of participants with MPD were 11.4% (2.5%-22.6%).Among the 147 trials in which authors made clear their analytical approach to MPD, the approaches chosen included available data only (109, 67%); mixed-effect models (10, 6.1%); multiple imputation (9, 4.5%); and last observation carried forward (9, 4.5). Of the 163 studies reporting MPD, 16 (9.8%) conducted sensitivity analyses examining the impact of the MPD and (18, 11.1%) discussed the risk of bias associated with MPD. RCTs reporting continuous outcomes typically have over 10% of participant data missing. Most RCTs failed to use optimal analytic methods, and very few conducted sensitivity analyses addressing the possible impact of MPD or commented on how MPD might influence risk of bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CHANDRA OBSERVATIONS OF 3C RADIO SOURCES WITH z < 0.3. II. COMPLETING THE SNAPSHOT SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Tremblay, G. R. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Harris, D. E.; O' Dea, C. P. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kharb, P.; Axon, D. [Department of Physics, Rochester Institute of Technology, Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Balmaverde, B.; Capetti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Baum, S. A. [Carlson Center for Imaging Science 76-3144, 84 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623 (United States); Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, F. D.; Sparks, W. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martine Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gilli, R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Giovannini, G. [INAF-Istituto di Radioastronomia di Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Grandi, P.; Torresi, E. [INAF-IASF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e fisica Cosmica di Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Risaliti, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    We report on the second round of Chandra observations of the 3C snapshot survey developed to observe the complete sample of 3C radio sources with z < 0.3 for 8 ks each. In the first paper, we illustrated the basic data reduction and analysis procedures performed for the 30 sources of the 3C sample observed during Chandra Cycle 9, while here we present the data for the remaining 27 sources observed during Cycle 12. We measured the X-ray intensity of the nuclei and of any radio hot spots and jet features with associated X-ray emission. X-ray fluxes in three energy bands, i.e., soft, medium, and hard, for all the sources analyzed are also reported. For the stronger nuclei, we also applied the standard spectral analysis, which provides the best-fit values of the X-ray spectral index and absorbing column density. In addition, a detailed analysis of bright X-ray nuclei that could be affected by pile-up has been performed. X-ray emission was detected for all the nuclei of the radio sources in our sample except for 3C 319. Among the current sample, there are two compact steep spectrum radio sources, two broad-line radio galaxies, and one wide angle tail radio galaxy, 3C 89, hosted in a cluster of galaxies clearly visible in our Chandra snapshot observation. In addition, we also detected soft X-ray emission arising from the galaxy cluster surrounding 3C 196.1. Finally, X-ray emission from hot spots has been found in three FR II radio sources and, in the case of 3C 459, we also report the detection of X-ray emission associated with the eastern radio lobe as well as X-ray emission cospatial with radio jets in 3C 29 and 3C 402.

  9. Decliners of provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling: Characteristics of participants who refused HIV testing in a population survey in Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pascalina; Chanda-Kapata; William; Ngosa; Albertina; Ngomah; Moraes; Nicole; Maddox; Nathan; Kapata

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of HIV infection, to highlight HIV-testing refusal rates among participants in a population-based tuberculosis survey and to assess the implication for programme implementation.Methods: This cross-sectional study on the characteristics of participants who refused HIV testing was conducted in a national survey in Zambia. All eligible participants were aged above 15 years and included in the analysis.Results: Out of the 44 791 tuberculosis survey participants, 14 164(31.6%) refused to participate in HIV testing. The unemployed, rural dwellers, married, and those aged 15-24 years were associated with higher refusal rates.Conclusions: Strategies to improve HIV testing acceptance are necessary. Qualitative research is recommended to understand the reasons for testing refusals so that remedial interventions can be implemented.

  10. Sports Team Participation: A Risk Behavior Comparison of Montana High School Students Based on Sports Team Participation. 2011 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montana Office of Public Instruction, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) is administered by the Montana Office of Public Instruction every two years to students in grades 7 through 12. The purpose of the survey is to help monitor the prevalence of behaviors that not only influence youth health, but also put youth at risk for the most significant health and social problems…

  11. When "no" might not quite mean "no"; the importance of informed and meaningful non-consent: results from a survey of individuals refusing participation in a health-related research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMurdo Marion ET

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low participation rates can lead to sampling bias, delays in completion and increased costs. Strategies to improve participation rates should address reasons for non-participation. However, most empirical research has focused on participants' motives rather than the reasons why non-participants refuse to take part. In this study we investigated the reasons why older people choose not to participate in a research project. Methods Follow-up study of people living in Tayside, Scotland who had opted-out of a cross-sectional survey on activities in retirement. Eight hundred and eighty seven people aged 65–84 years were invited to take part in a home-based cross-sectional survey. Of these, 471 refused to take part. Permission was obtained to follow-up 417 of the refusers. Demographic characteristics of people who refused to take part and the reasons they gave for not taking part were collected. Results 54% of those invited to take part in the original cross-sectional survey refused to do so. However, 61% of these individuals went on to participate in the follow-up study and provided reasons for their original refusal. For the vast majority of people initial non-participation did not reflect an objection to participating in research in principle but frequently stemmed from barriers or misunderstandings about the nature or process of the project itself. Only 28% indicated that they were "not interested in research". The meaningfulness of expressions of non-consent may therefore be called into question. Hierarchical log-linear modelling showed that refusal was independently influenced by age, gender and social class. However, this response pattern was different for the follow-up study in which reasons for non-participation in the first survey were sought. This difference in pattern and response rates supports the likely importance of recruitment issues that are research and context specific. Conclusion An expression of non

  12. Parental participation in religious services and parent and child well-being: findings from the National Survey of America's Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Ming

    2014-10-01

    Using data from the 1999 and 2002 National Survey of America's Families, a large-scale nationally representative sample, this study finds that parental religious attendance is positively associated with parent self-rated health, parent mental well-being, positive parenting attitudes, child health, and child school engagement. Although the strength of these associations varies to some extent according to socio-demographic factors, the interactive patterns are not consistently predictable. Moreover, parental health and well-being and positive attitudes toward parenting appear to be important pathways linking parental religious attendance to child well-being. These findings suggest that opportunities for participation in local religious services offered by faith-based organizations may be fruitful avenues through which the government and society can help American families enhance parent and child well-being.

  13. Survey Probability and Factors affecting Farmers Participation in Future and Option Markets Case Study: Cotton product in Gonbad kavos city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. sakhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Farmers are facing with a variety of natural and unnatural risks in agricultural activities, and thus their income is unstable. A wide range of risks such as risks of production, price risk, financial and human risks, influence the income of agricultural products. One of the major risks that farmers faced is the risk of price volatility of agricultural products. Cotton is one of the agricultural products with high real price volatility. Numerous tools for marketing and risk management for agricultural products in the face of price risks are available. Futures and options contracts may be the most important available tools (to reduce price volatility in agricultural products. The purpose of the current study was to look at the possibility of farmers participations in the future and option markets that presented as a means to reduce the cotton prices volatility. The dependent variable for this purpose had four categories and these included: participate in both the market, participation in the future market, participation in the option market and participation in both future and option markets. Materials and Methods: data gathered with interview and completing 200 questionnaires of cotton growers using simple random sampling. Multinomial Logit Regression Model was used for data analysis. Results and Discussion: To measure content validity of the preliminary study the validity of confirmatory factor analysis were used. For calculating reliability, the pre-test done with 30 questionnaires and reliability, coefficient Cronbach alpha was 0.79. The independence of dependent variables categories was confirmed by Hausman test results. The Likelihood ratio and Wald showed these categories are not combinable. Results indicated into period 2014 -2015 and the sample under study, 35% of cotton growers unwilling to participate in future and option markets. Farmers willingness to participate in future and option market was 19% and %21

  14. Grandparenting and mothers' labour force participation: A comparative analysis using the Generations and Gender Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnstein Aassve

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND It is well known that the provision of public childcare plays an important role for women labour force participation and its availability varies tremendously across countries. In many countries, informal childcare is also important and typically provided by the grandparents, but its role on mothers' employment is not yet well understood. Understanding the relationship between labour supply decisions and grandparental childcare is complex. While the provision of grandparental childcare is clearly a function of the social and institutional context of a country, it also depends on family preferences, which are typically unobserved in surveys. OBJECTIVE We analyze the role of informal childcare provided by grandparents on mothers' labour force participation keeping unobserved preferences into account. METHODS Bivariate probit models with instrumental variables are estimated on data from seven countries (Bulgaria, France, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Russia and The Netherlands drawn from the Generations and Gender Survey. RESULTS We find that only in some countries mothers' employment is positively and significantly associated with grandparents providing childcare. In other countries, once we control for unobserved preferences, we do not find this effect. CONCLUSIONS The role of grandparents is an important element to reconcile work and family for women in some countries. Our results show the importance of considering family preferences and country differences when studying the relationship between grandparental childcare and mothers' labour supply. COMMENTS Our results are consistent with previous research on this topic. However, differently from previous studies, we conduct separate analyses by country and show that the effect of grandparental childcare varies considerably. The fact that we also include in the analyses Bulgaria, Hungary, Russia and Georgia is an important novelty as there are no studies on this issue

  15. Low Rice Intake Is Associated with Proteinuria in Participants of Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se Jin; Lee, So Young; Sung, Su Ah; Chin, Ho Jun; Lee, Sung Woo

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors of proteinuria in the Asian population. On the basis of the association between rice intake patterns and chronic diseases, we hypothesized that rice intake patterns are associated with proteinuria in the Asian population. Data, including data regarding rice intake frequency and dipstick urinalysis results, from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 1998, 2001, 2005, and 2007 were analyzed. The study involved 19,824 participants who were older than 20 years of age. Low rice intake was defined as consumption of rice ≤ 1 time/day. Proteinuria was defined as dipstick urinalysis protein ≥ 1 positive. Among the 19,824 participants, the prevalence of low rice intake and proteinuria were 17.3% and 2.9%, respectively. The low rice intake group showed a higher rate of proteinuria than the non-low rice intake group did (3.8% vs. 2.7%, P proteinuria was 1.54 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25-1.89; P proteinuria in the Asian population, which might have been affected by the associations of low rice intake with high blood pressure and diabetes. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm the results of this study.

  16. Reporting, handling and assessing the risk of bias associated with missing participant data in systematic reviews: a methodological survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Carrasco-Labra, Alonso; Brignardello-Petersen, Romina; Neumann, Ignacio; Johnston, Bradley C; Sun, Xin; Briel, Matthias; Busse, Jason W; Ebrahim, Shanil; Granados, Carlos E; Iorio, Alfonso; Irfan, Affan; Martínez García, Laura; Mustafa, Reem A; Ramírez-Morera, Anggie; Selva, Anna; Solà, Ivan; Sanabria, Andrea Juliana; Tikkinen, Kari A O; Vandvik, Per O; Vernooij, Robin W M; Zazueta, Oscar E; Zhou, Qi; Guyatt, Gordon H; Alonso-Coello, Pablo

    2015-09-30

    To describe how systematic reviewers are reporting missing data for dichotomous outcomes, handling them in the analysis and assessing the risk of associated bias. We searched MEDLINE and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews of randomised trials published in 2010, and reporting a meta-analysis of a dichotomous outcome. We randomly selected 98 Cochrane and 104 non-Cochrane systematic reviews. Teams of 2 reviewers selected eligible studies and abstracted data independently and in duplicate using standardised, piloted forms with accompanying instructions. We conducted regression analyses to explore factors associated with using complete case analysis and with judging the risk of bias associated with missing participant data. Of Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews, 47% and 7% (previews) and assuming no participants with missing data had the event (4%). The use of complete case analysis was associated only with Cochrane reviews (relative to non-Cochrane: OR=7.25; 95% CI 1.58 to 33.3, p=0.01). 65% of reviews assessed risk of bias associated with missing data; this was associated with Cochrane reviews (relative to non-Cochrane: OR=6.63; 95% CI 2.50 to 17.57, p=0.0001), and the use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology (OR=5.02; 95% CI 1.02 to 24.75, p=0.047). Though Cochrane reviews are somewhat less problematic, most Cochrane and non-Cochrane systematic reviews fail to adequately report and handle missing data, potentially resulting in misleading judgements regarding risk of bias. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Associations Between Resilience, Community Belonging, and Social Participation Among Community-Dwelling Older Adults: Results From the Eastern Townships Population Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, Mélanie; Roy, Mathieu; Michallet, Bernard; St-Hilaire, France; Maltais, Danielle; Généreux, Mélissa

    2017-04-26

    To examine the associations between resilience, community belonging, and social participation, and the moderating effect of resilience on the association between community belonging and social participation among community-dwelling older adults. Cross-sectional; secondary analyses of the Eastern Townships Population Health Survey. Community. A sample (N=4541) of women (n=2485) and men (n=2056) aged ≥60 years was randomly selected according to area. Most participants had resilience were collected by phone interviewer-administered questionnaire. A social participation scale measured frequency of participation in 8 community activities. A 4-point Likert scale ranging from "very strong" to "very weak" estimated sense of belonging to the local community. Social participation and sense of belonging questions came from Statistics Canada surveys. Resilience was assessed with the 10-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, capturing the ability to cope with adversity. Controlling for age, education, and psychological distress, greater resilience and community belonging were associated with greater social participation among women (R(2)=.13; Presilience, especially in men. Greater community belonging further enhanced social participation, especially among women (P=.03) and men (Presilience (moderator effect). Resilience moderates the association between community belonging and social participation among community-dwelling older women and, especially, men. Interventions targeting social participation should consider the potential impact of resilience on improving community belonging. Future studies should investigate why resilience moderates associations between community belonging and social participation, and how to enhance resilience among older adults. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of diffuse background emission and source crowding on photometric completeness in Spitzer Space Telescope IRAC surveys: The GLIMPSE Catalogs and Archives

    CERN Document Server

    Kobulnicky, Chip; Alexander, Michael; Meade, Marilyn; Whitney, Barbara; Churchwell, Ed

    2013-01-01

    We characterize the completeness of point source lists from Spitzer Space Telescope surveys in the four Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) bandpasses, emphasizing the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) programs (GLIMPSE I, II, 3D, 360; Deep GLIMPSE) and their resulting point source Catalogs and Archives. The analysis separately addresses effects of incompleteness resulting from high diffuse background emission and incompleteness resulting from point source confusion (i.e., crowding). An artificial star addition and extraction analysis demonstrates that completeness is strongly dependent on local background brightness and structure, with high-surface-brightness regions suffering up to five magnitudes of reduced sensitivity to point sources. This effect is most pronounced at the IRAC 5.8 and 8.0 microns bands where UV-excited PAH emission produces bright, complex structures (photodissociation regions; PDRs). With regard to diffuse background effects, we provide the completeness as a fu...

  19. COMPARING H{alpha} AND H I SURVEYS AS MEANS TO A COMPLETE LOCAL GALAXY CATALOG IN THE ADVANCED LIGO/VIRGO ERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metzger, Brian D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08542 (United States); Kaplan, David L. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Berger, Edo, E-mail: bmetzger@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: kaplan@uwm.edu, E-mail: eberger@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-02-20

    Identifying the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources detected by upcoming networks of advanced ground-based interferometers will be challenging, due in part to the large number of unrelated astrophysical transients within the {approx}10-100 deg{sup 2} sky localizations. A potential way to greatly reduce the number of such false positives is to limit detailed follow-up to only those candidates near galaxies within the GW sensitivity range of {approx}200 Mpc for binary neutron star mergers. Such a strategy is currently hindered by the fact that galaxy catalogs are grossly incomplete within this volume. Here, we compare two methods for completing the local galaxy catalog: (1) a narrowband H{alpha} imaging survey and (2) an H I emission line radio survey. Using H{alpha} fluxes, stellar masses (M {sub *}), and star formation rates (SFRs) from galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), combined with H I data from the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey and the Herschel Reference Survey, we estimate that an H{alpha} survey with a luminosity sensitivity of L {sub H{alpha}} = 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1} at 200 Mpc could achieve a completeness of f {sup H{alpha}} {sub SFR} Almost-Equal-To 75% with respect to total SFR, but only f{sub M* Star-Operator }{sup H{alpha}} approx. 33% with respect to M {sub *} (due to lack of sensitivity to early-type galaxies). These numbers are significantly lower than those achieved by an idealized spectroscopic survey due to the loss of H{alpha} flux resulting from resolving out nearby galaxies and the inability to correct for the underlying stellar continuum. An H I survey with sensitivity similar to the proposed WALLABY survey on ASKAP could achieve f{sub SFR}{sup H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 80% and f{sub M Star-Operator }{sup H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 50%, somewhat higher than that of the H{alpha} survey. Finally, both H{alpha} and H I surveys should achieve {approx}> 50% completeness with respect to the host galaxies of

  20. Implementation of the forced answering option within online surveys: Do higher item response rates come at the expense of participation and answer quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Décieux Jean Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Online surveys have become a popular method for data gathering for many reasons, including low costs and the ability to collect data rapidly. However, online data collection is often conducted without adequate attention to implementation details. One example is the frequent use of the forced answering option, which forces the respondent to answer each question in order to proceed through the questionnaire. The avoidance of missing data is often the idea behind the use of the forced answering option. However, we suggest that the costs of a reactance effect in terms of quality reduction and unit nonresponse may be high because respondents typically have plausible reasons for not answering questions. The objective of the study reported in this paper was to test the influence of forced answering on dropout rates and data quality. The results show that requiring participants answer every question increases dropout rates and decreases quality of answers. Our findings suggest that the desire for a complete data set has to be balanced against the consequences of reduced data quality.

  1. CO in the Galactic center: A complete survey of carbon monoxide emission in the inner 4 kpc of the Galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bitran, C.; Ernesto, M.

    1987-01-01

    The first well-sampled, large scale survey of {sup 12}CO (J = 1 {yields} 0) emission from the inner 4 kpc of the Galaxy is presented and used to study the distribution of molecular clouds and the kinematics of the molecular gas in the inner Galaxy. The survey samples a 4{degree} wide strip along the Galactic equator from 1 = {minus}12{degree} to 1 = 13{degree}. The over 8000 spectra obtained with the Columbia University Southern millimeter telescope have a velocity resolution of 1.3 km s{sup {minus}1}, a rms sensitivity better than 0.12 K, and are spaced by approximately one beamwidth. The survey is presented as collection of 1-V, b-V, and 1-b maps. Several new CO features were observed, and the molecular counterparts of the classic H I structures appear with unprecedented clarity owing to the dense sampling, high sensitivity, and extended latitude coverage of this survey. Features with the largest CO luminosities and velocity widths in the inner Galaxy, outside the nuclear region, were fully mapped and analyzed. The author argues that these features are peculiar molecular clouds located in the vicinity of the Galactic center, and that their large internal kinetic energies (of the order of 10{sup 54} ergs) may have originated in a Seyfert-like event at the Galactic nucleus about one million years ago. Molecular clouds in the surveyed area were identified and catalogued. The inclination and thickness of the molecular layer in the inner Galaxy were measured and their relevance to current models of the region discussed. A lower limit for the surface density at the center was found, and a CO rotation curve was calculated and compared to available H I rotation curves.

  2. Issues concerning Migrant Workers’ Participation in the New Rural Cooperative Medical System and Countermeasures——Based on the Survey in Wenjiang District and Jintang County, Chengdu City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    We conduct questionnaire survey of migrant workers in Wenjiang District and Jintang County of Chengdu City,respectively,using the method of key-point investigation and the sampling survey. We describe the status quo of the sample migrant workers’ participation in the New Rural Cooperative Medical System,analyze the issues concerning migrant workers’ participation in the New Rural Cooperative Medical System,and put forward the countermeasures and recommendations as follows: using many types of medical insurance; establishing universal reimbursement points in strange land and premium-paying system for migrant workers; making the proportion of reimbursement open and transparent; establishing and improving medicare security system for migrant workers.

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: combining correlated Gaussian posterior distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ariel G; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The cosmological information contained in anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements can often be compressed into a small number of parameters whose posterior distribution is well described by a Gaussian. We present a general methodology to combine these estimates into a single set of consensus constraints that encode the total information of the individual measurements, taking into account the full covariance between the different methods. We illustrate this technique by applying it to combine the results obtained from different clustering analyses, including measurements of the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) and redshift-space distortions (RSD), based on a set of mock catalogues of the final SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our results show that the region of the parameter space allowed by the consensus constraints is smaller than that of the individual methods, highlighting the importance of performing multiple analyses on galaxy surveys even when the measurements a...

  4. The IRAM M 33 CO(2-1) survey. A complete census of molecular gas out to 7 kpc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Druard, C.; Braine, J.; Schuster, K. F.; Schneider, N.; Gratier, P.; Bontemps, S.; Boquien, M.; Combes, F.; Corbelli, E.; Henkel, C.; Herpin, F.; Kramer, C.; van der Tak, F.; van der Werf, P.

    2014-01-01

    To study the interstellar medium and the interplay between the atomic and molecular components in a low-metallicity environment, we present a complete high angular and spectral resolution map and position-position-velocity data cube of the 12CO(J = 2-1) emission from the Local Group galaxy Messier 3

  5. Comparing H-alpha and HI Surveys as Means to a Complete Local Galaxy Catalog in the Advanced LIGO/Virgo Era

    CERN Document Server

    Metzger, Brian D; Berger, Edo

    2012-01-01

    Identifying the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) sources detected by upcoming networks of advanced ground-based interferometers will be challenging due in part to the large number of unrelated astrophysical transients within the ~10-100 square degree sky localizations. A potential way to greatly reduce the number of such false positives is to limit detailed follow-up to only those candidates near galaxies within the GW sensitivity range of ~200 Mpc for binary neutron star mergers. Such a strategy is currently hindered by the fact that galaxy catalogs are grossly incomplete within this volume. Here we compare two methods for completing the local galaxy catalog: (1) a narrow-band H-alpha imaging survey; and (2) an HI emission line radio survey. Using H-alpha fluxes, stellar masses (M_star), and star formation rates (SFR) from galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), combined with HI data from the GALEX Arecibo SDSS Survey and the Herschel Reference Survey, we estimate that a H-alp...

  6. Computer-Based Training at a Military Medical Center: Understanding Decreased Participation in Training among Staff and Ways to Improve Completion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavender, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Military health care facilities make extensive use of computer-based training (CBT) for both clinical and non-clinical staff. Despite evidence identifying various factors that may impact CBT, the problem is unclear as to what factors specifically influence employee participation in computer-based training. The purpose of this mixed method case…

  7. Attitudes to School and Intentions for Educational Participation: An Analysis of Data from the Longitudinal Survey of Young People in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Gaynor; Croll, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The paper investigates the attitudes of young people in England towards schooling and education and the relationship of these attitudes to intentions for educational participation and to various background characteristics of the young people. It provides an example of secondary data analysis through using the Longitudinal Survey of Young People in…

  8. An examination of participants who develop an eating disorder despite completing an eating disorder prevention program: implications for improving the yield of prevention efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Audra C; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Numerous trials provide support for the Body Project, an eating disorder prevention program wherein young women with body image concerns critique the thin ideal. Despite medium to large effects, some participants subsequently develop an eating disorder, suggesting that intervention or recruitment procedures could be improved. This study investigated baseline and acute intervention predictors of DSM-5 eating disorder development during a 3-year follow-up among Body Project participants. Combined data from two trials compare participants who experienced eating disorder onset during follow-up (n = 20) to those who did not (n = 216). Participants who did versus did not develop an eating disorder started the intervention with higher eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.08), negative affect (η (2) = 0.06), thin-ideal internalization (η (2) = 0.02), and body dissatisfaction (η (2) = 0.02); the same baseline predictors of eating disorder onset emerged in controls. Attenuated pre-post reductions in eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.01) predicted eating disorder onset but not after controlling for baseline levels. Given that Body Project and control participants who later developed an eating disorder started with initial elevations in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms, it might be useful to develop a more intensive variant of this program for those exhibiting greater risk at baseline and to deliver the prevention program earlier to prevent initial escalation of risk. The fact that nonresponders also showed greater negative affect and eating disorder symptoms suggests that it might be useful to add activities to improve affect and increase dissonance about disordered eating.

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: combining correlated Gaussian posterior distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    The cosmological information contained in anisotropic galaxy clustering measurements can often be compressed into a small number of parameters whose posterior distribution is well described by a Gaussian. We present a general methodology to combine these estimates into a single set of consensus constraints that encode the total information of the individual measurements, taking into account the full covariance between the different methods. We illustrate this technique by applying it to combine the results obtained from different clustering analyses, including measurements of the signature of baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift-space distortions, based on a set of mock catalogues of the final SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Our results show that the region of the parameter space allowed by the consensus constraints is smaller than that of the individual methods, highlighting the importance of performing multiple analyses on galaxy surveys even when the measurements are highly correlated. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The methodology presented here is used in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  10. Representativeness of participants in a cross-sectional health survey by time of day and day of week of data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindell, Jennifer; Aresu, Maria; Bécares, Laia; Tolonen, Hanna

    2012-06-01

    General population health examination surveys (HESs) provide a reliable source of information to monitor the health of populations. A number of countries across Europe are currently planning their first HES, or the first after a significant gap, and some of these intend offering appointments only during office hours and/or weekdays, raising concerns about representativeness of survey participants. It is important to ascertain whether personal characteristics of participants vary by time of day and day of week of data collection, in order to determine the association between time and day of interview and physical examination on the results of data collected in HES. Multivariable regression models were applied to national HES in England to examine socio-demographic and health variations in three combined day-time periods of interview and physical examination: weekday daytime; weekday evening; and weekend. The characteristics of participants interviewed or visited by a nurse varied by both time of day and day of the week for age, ethnicity, marital status, income, socio-economic group, economic activity and deprivation. People seen during weekday working hours had higher rates of poor self-reported health, limiting longstanding illness and obesity, and higher alcohol consumption, BMI and systolic blood pressure; adjustment for socio-demographic characteristics eliminated or substantially reduced these differences. People responsible for planning surveys should be aware of participant preference for the timing of data collection and ensure flexibility and choice in times and days offered to optimise participation rates and representativeness.

  11. The current status of education and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs in Japan: a survey by the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoya, Noriyuki; Karasawa, Kumiko; Sumida, Iori; Arimura, Hidetaka; Yamada, Syogo

    2015-07-01

    To standardize educational programs and clinical training for medical physics students, the Japanese Board for Medical Physicist Qualification (JBMP) began to accredit master's, doctorate, and residency programs for medical physicists in 2012. At present, 16 universities accredited by the JBMP offer 22 courses. In this study, we aimed to survey the current status of educational programs and career paths of students after completion of the medical physicist program in Japan. A questionnaire was sent in August 2014 to 32 universities offering medical physicist programs. The questionnaire was created and organized by the educational course certification committee of the JBMP and comprised two sections: the first collected information about the university attended, and the second collected information about characteristics and career paths of students after completion of medical physicist programs from 2008 to 2014. Thirty universities (16 accredited and 14 non-accredited) completed the survey (response rate 94 %). A total of 209, 40, and 3 students graduated from the master's, doctorate, and residency programs, respectively. Undergraduates entered the medical physicist program constantly, indicating an interest in medical physics among undergraduates. A large percentage of the students held a bachelor's degree in radiological technology (master's program 94 %; doctorate program 70 %); graduates obtained a national radiological technologist license. Regarding career paths, although the number of the graduates who work as medical physicist remains low, 7 % with a master's degree and 50 % with a doctorate degree worked as medical physicists. Our results could be helpful for improving the medical physicist program in Japan.

  12. A Complete Survey of the Transient Radio Sky and Implications for Gamma-Ray Bursts, Supernovae, and other Relativistic Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, A; Poznanski, D; Levinson, A; Waxman, E; Frail, D A; Soderberg, A M; Nakar, E; Li, W; Filippenko, A V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; Poznanski, Dovi; Levinson, Amir; Waxman, Eli; Frail, Dale A.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Nakar, Ehud; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2006-01-01

    We had previously reported on a survey for radio transients, used to set an upper limit on the number of orphan gamma-ray burst (GRB) radio afterglows, and thus a lower limit on the typical GRB beaming factor. Here we report radio and optical follow-up observations of these possible transients, achieving the first full characterization of the transient radio sky. We find that only two source are likely to be real radio transients, an optically obscured radio supernova (SN) in the nearby galaxy NGC 4216, and a source not associated with a bright host galaxy, which is too radio luminous to be a GRB afterglow. We speculate that this may be a flare from a peculiar active galactic nucleus, or a burst from an unusual Galactic compact object. We place an upper limit of 65 radio transients above 6 mJy over the entire sky at the 95% confidence level. The implications are as follows. First, we derive a limit on the typical beaming of GRBs; we find f_b^{-1} >~ 60, ~5 times higher than our earlier results. Second, we imp...

  13. The IRAM M33 CO(2-1) Survey - A complete census of the molecular gas out to 7 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Druard, C; Schuster, K F; Schneider, N; Gratier, P; Bontemps, S; Boquien, M; Combes, F; Corbelli, E; Henkel, C; Herpin, F; Kramer, C; van der Tak, F; van der Werf, P

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the ISM and the interplay between the atomic and molecular components in a low-metallicity environment, we present a complete high angular and spectral resolution map and data cube of the 12CO(2-1) emission from the Local Group galaxy M33. Its metallicity is roughly half-solar, such that we can compare its ISM with that of the Milky Way with the main changes being the metallicity and the gas mass fraction. The data have a 12" angular resolution (50pc) with a spectral resolution of 2.6 km/s and a mean noise level of 20 mK per channel in antenna temperature. A radial cut along the major axis was also observed in the 12CO(1-0) line. The CO data cube and integrated intensity map are optimal when using HI data to define the baseline window and the velocities over which the CO emission is integrated. Great care was taken when building these maps, testing different windowing and baseline options and investigating the effect of error beam pickup. The total CO(2-1) luminosity is 2.8e7 K km/s pc2, fol...

  14. Timeliness and completeness of measles vaccination among children in rural areas of Guangxi, China: A stratified three-stage cluster survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xianyan; Geater, Alan; McNeil, Edward; Zhou, Hongxia; Deng, Qiuyun; Dong, Aihu

    2017-07-01

    Large-scale outbreaks of measles occurred in 2013 and 2014 in rural Guangxi, a region in Southwest China with high coverage for measles-containing vaccine (MCV). This study aimed to estimate the timely vaccination coverage, the timely-and-complete vaccination coverage, and the median delay period for MCV among children aged 18-54 months in rural Guangxi. Based on quartiles of measles incidence during 2011-2013, a stratified three-stage cluster survey was conducted from June through August 2015. Using weighted estimation and finite population correction, vaccination coverage and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Weighted Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to estimate the median delay periods for the first (MCV1) and second (MCV2) doses of the vaccine. A total of 1216 children were surveyed. The timely vaccination coverage rate was 58.4% (95% CI, 54.9%-62.0%) for MCV1, and 76.9% (95% CI, 73.6%-80.0%) for MCV2. The timely-and-complete vaccination coverage rate was 47.4% (95% CI, 44.0%-51.0%). The median delay period was 32 (95% CI, 27-38) days for MCV1, and 159 (95% CI, 118-195) days for MCV2. The timeliness and completeness of measles vaccination was low, and the median delay period was long among children in rural Guangxi. Incorporating the timeliness and completeness into official routine vaccination coverage statistics may help appraise the coverage of vaccination in China. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. CONSTRAINING THE EXOZODIACAL LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS: COMPLETE RESULTS FROM THE KECK NULLER MID-INFRARED SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mennesson, B.; Serabyn, E.; Colavita, M. M.; Bryden, G.; Doré, O.; Traub, W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Millan-Gabet, R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Absil, O. [Département d' Astrophysique, Géophysique et Océanographie, Université de Liège, 17 Allée du Six Août, 4000 Liège (Belgium); Wyatt, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Danchi, W.; Kuchner, M.; Stapelfeldt, K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Defrère, D.; Hinz, P. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ragland, S. [Keck Observatory, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Scott, N. [Center for High Angular Resolution Astronomy, Georgia State University, Mount Wilson, CA 91023 (United States); Woillez, J., E-mail: Bertrand.Mennesson@jpl.nasa.gov [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    Forty-seven nearby main-sequence stars were surveyed with the Keck Interferometer mid-infrared Nulling instrument (KIN) between 2008 and 2011, searching for faint resolved emission from exozodiacal dust. Observations of a subset of the sample have already been reported, focusing essentially on stars with no previously known dust. Here we extend this previous analysis to the whole KIN sample, including 22 more stars with known near- and/or far-infrared excesses. In addition to an analysis similar to that of the first paper of this series, which was restricted to the 8-9 μm spectral region, we present measurements obtained in all 10 spectral channels covering the 8-13 μm instrumental bandwidth. Based on the 8-9 μm data alone, which provide the highest signal-to-noise measurements, only one star shows a large excess imputable to dust emission (η Crv), while four more show a significant (>3σ) excess: β Leo, β UMa, ζ Lep, and γ Oph. Overall, excesses detected by KIN are more frequent around A-type stars than later spectral types. A statistical analysis of the measurements further indicates that stars with known far-infrared (λ ≥ 70 μm) excesses have higher exozodiacal emission levels than stars with no previous indication of a cold outer disk. This statistical trend is observed regardless of spectral type and points to a dynamical connection between the inner (zodi-like) and outer (Kuiper-Belt-like) dust populations. The measured levels for such stars are clustering close to the KIN detection limit of a few hundred zodis and are indeed consistent with those expected from a population of dust that migrated in from the outer belt by Poynting-Robertson drag. Conversely, no significant mid-infrared excess is found around sources with previously reported near-infrared resolved excesses, which typically have levels of the order of 1% over the photospheric flux. If dust emission is really at play in these near-infrared detections, the absence of a strong mid

  16. Barrier Factors to the Completion of Diabetes Education in Korean Diabetic Adult Patients: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys 2007-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Tae; Lee, Kiheon; Jung, Se Young; Oh, Seung-Min; Jeong, Su-Min; Choi, Yoon-Jung

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes is a disease with high social burdens and is expected to increase gradually. A long-term management is essential for the treatment of diabetes, requiring patient self-cares. Diabetes education is important for such self-cares, but it does not sufficiently take place. In addition, little studies have been conducted on the barriers to the completion of diabetes education. This study, thus, aimed to analyze the factors related to the completion of diabetes education and investigate its barriers. Of 50,405 respondents to the fourth and fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a total of 3,820 were selected for the analysis, excluding those aged 29 or younger and those with missing values. The completion of diabetes education was set as a dependent variable and an analysis was made on the factors that affect the dependent variable. A multivariable logistic regression was employed for the analysis. Lower educational level was associated with less diabetes education, and the degree of diabetes education was lower in the group with male, the group that didn't have a family history or was not aware of a family history, the group that was not currently aware of diabetes and the group without a spouse. There was no difference in the completion of diabetes education by underlying diseases, family income level, age, residing area, economic activity status, insurance coverage, smoking, and drinking. Diabetes education is of importance for the treatment and management of diabetes. Currently, however, diabetes education is not sufficiently carried out in Korea. The completion rate of diabetes education was low in male, patients without or not knowing a family history, patients who were not currently aware of their diabetes, patients without a spouse, and patients with low educational level. Therefore, encouraging these patients to take the education will be a more effective approach to increase the completion rate of diabetes education.

  17. Real-life Perception and Practice Patterns of NAFLD/NASH in Romania: Results of a Survey Completed by 102 Board-certified Gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Speranta; Ester, Carmen; Lita, Mihaela; Ratziu, Vlad; Gheorghe, Liana

    2016-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has an increasing incidence worldwide, reflecting the epidemics of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Data on knowledge, attitude and management by the Romanian gastroenterologists with regard to NAFLD are lacking. We assessed current diagnostic and treatment patterns of the management of NAFLD among 102 Romanian board certified gastroenterologists using a survey developed to collect information regarding participants' clinical practice, diagnostic tools and usage of medication in patients with NAFLD. 71.6% of the surveyed gastroenterologists (SG) had more than 5 years of gastroenterology practice, were university affiliated and 37.3% had predominant activity in hepatology (>60%). In Romania, 60.8% of the SG would diagnose NAFLD only if all other causes of liver disease were absent. All practitioners use a noninvasive tool for staging NAFLD, 45.1% use both serum markers and transient elastography. Liver biopsy is performed by 61.8% of the SG in the presence of a discordant result in two noninvasive methods of fibrosis evaluation. The most frequently prescribed drugs are: silymarin (88.2%), vitamin E (78.4%) and ursodeoxycholic acid (77.4%). The results of this survey suggest that clinical practice patterns among Romanian gastroenterologists for the diagnosis (mainly liver biopsy) and management of NAFLD frequently diverge from published practice guidelines. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis is probably underdiagnosed, especially in patients with normal transaminase levels and is also overtreated with drugs that are not recommended in the guidelines.

  18. Survey of K-3rd-Grade Teachers' Knowledge of Ear Infections and Willingness to Participate in Prevention Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauer, Jeffrey L.; Johnson, Carole E.; Caudle, Abby T.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Ear infections are prevalent in kindergarten through 3rd-grade (K-3rd) children and can affect their performance at school. Chewing gum, when administered by parents and teachers, can help prevent ear infections in children. This pilot study surveyed K-3rd-grade teachers in the Santa Barbara School Districts to assess their knowledge…

  19. Gender Differences in Elders’ Participation in the National Can-cer Screening Program: Evidence from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2010–12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang-Hyun KIM

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer-screening programs are effective in reducing cancer prevalence and mortality; however, cancer remains the leading cause of death in elderly people in Korea. The aim of this study was to identify the factors associated with elders’ participation in the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP and differences in screening rates by gender.Methods: Original data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition and Examination Survey were analyzed by logistic regression analysis. The sample consisted of 5,505 elderly individuals over age 60. Selected demographic variables, cancer screening participation, physical and psychological health status, and lifestyle were examined.Results: The NCSP participation rates decreased in both men and women as age increased. Private medical insurance (OR 95% CI: 1.04–1.78, one or more chronic disease (OR 95% CI: 1.07–1.71, and current smoker (OR 95% CI: 0.52–0.94 had the strongest associations with cancer screening participation among men after multivariate adjustment. In contrast, cancer screening participation among women was significantly associated only with living place (OR 95% CI: 1.06–2.203 after multivariate adjustment.Conclusions: Effective health promoting interventions for elders require individualized programs that address gender-related factors associated with elders’ participation in cancer screening programs.

  20. Young people, the Internet and political participation : findings of a web survey in Italy, Spain and The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calenda, D.; Meijer, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Do young people participate in politics? Some claim that young people are not as much involved in politics as their parents were, others argue that young people are interested in politics but in a different way than previous generations. The Internet is said to play an important role in 'new politic

  1. How to survey classical swine fever in wild boar (Sus scrofa) after the completion of oral vaccination? Chasing away the ghost of infection at different spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saubusse, Thibault; Masson, Jean-Daniel; Le Dimma, Mireille; Abrial, David; Marcé, Clara; Martin-Schaller, Regine; Dupire, Anne; Le Potier, Marie-Frédérique; Rossi, Sophie

    2016-01-25

    Oral mass vaccination (OMV) is considered as an efficient strategy for controlling classical swine fever (CSF) in wild boar. After the completion of vaccination, the presence of antibodies in 6-12 month-old hunted wild boars was expected to reflect a recent CSF circulation. Nevertheless, antibodies could also correspond to the long-lasting of maternal antibodies. This paper relates an experience of surveillance which lasted 4 years after the completion of OMV in a formerly vaccinated area, in north-eastern France (2010-2014). First, we conducted a retrospective analysis of the serological data collected in 6-12 month-old hunted wild boars from 2010 up to 2013, using a spatial Bayesian model accounting for hunting data autocorrelation and heterogeneity. At the level of the whole area, seroprevalence in juvenile boars decreased from 28% in 2010-2011 down to 1% in 2012-2013, but remained locally high (above 5%). The model revealed the existence of one particular seroprevalence hot-spot where a longitudinal survey of marked animals was conducted in 2013-2014, for deciphering the origin of antibodies. Eleven out of 107 captured piglets were seropositive when 3-4 months-old, but their antibody titres progressively decreased until 6-7 months of age. These results suggest piglets were carrying maternal antibodies, few of them carrying maternal antibodies lasting until the hunting season. Our study shows that OMV may generate confusion in the CSF surveillance several years after the completion of vaccination. We recommend using quantitative serological tools, hunting data modelling and capture approaches for better interpreting serological results after vaccination completion. Surveillance perspectives are further discussed.

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    CERN Document Server

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Percival, Will J; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles l > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, we constra...

  3. More evidence for trends in the intergenerational transmission of divorce: a completed cohort approach using data from the general social survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfinger, Nicholas H

    2011-05-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that the children of divorce are disproportionately likely to end their own marriages. In previous work, I showed that the transmission of divorce between generations weakened substantially for General Social Survey (GSS) respondents interviewed between 1973 and 1996 (Wolfinger 1999); Li and Wu (2006, 2008) contended that my finding is a methodological artifact of the GSS's lack of marriage duration data. This article presents a completed-cohort approach to studying divorce using the GSS. The results confirm a decline in the probability of divorce transmission that cannot be explained by the right-censoring bias alleged by Li and Wu. This finding contributes to an ongoing debate about trends in the negative consequences of parental divorce, as well as demonstrating a useful approach to right-censored phenomena when event history data are not available.

  4. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Anisotropic galaxy clustering in Fourier-space

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Florian; Saito, Shun; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Sánchez, Ariel G; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Schneider, Donald P; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the anisotropic clustering of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12 (DR12) sample, which consists of $1\\,198\\,006$ galaxies in the redshift range $0.2 < z < 0.75$ and a sky coverage of $10\\,252\\,$deg$^2$. We analyse this dataset in Fourier space, using the power spectrum multipoles to measure Redshift-Space Distortions (RSD) simultaneously with the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale. We include the power spectrum monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole in our analysis and compare our measurements with a perturbation theory based model, while properly accounting for the survey window function. To evaluate the reliability of our analysis pipeline we participate in a mock challenge, which resulted in systematic uncertainties significantly smaller than the statistical uncertainties. While the high-redshift constraint on $f\\sigma_8$ at $z_{\\rm eff}=0.61$ indicates a small ($\\sim 1.4\\sigma$) deviation from the prediction of th...

  5. Identification of a core-periphery structure among participants of a business climate survey. An investigation based on the ZEW survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenburg, U.; Lux, T.

    2011-12-01

    Processes of social opinion formation might be dominated by a set of closely connected agents who constitute the cohesive `core' of a network and have a higher influence on the overall outcome of the process than those agents in the more sparsely connected `periphery'. Here we explore whether such a perspective could shed light on the dynamics of a well known economic sentiment index. To this end, we hypothesize that the respondents of the survey under investigation form a core-periphery network, and we identify those agents that define the core (in a discrete setting) or the proximity of each agent to the core (in a continuous setting). As it turns out, there is significant correlation between the so identified cores of different survey questions. Both the discrete and the continuous cores allow an almost perfect replication of the original series with a reduced data set of core members or weighted entries according to core proximity. Using a monthly time series on industrial production in Germany, we also compared experts' predictions with the real economic development. The core members identified in the discrete setting showed significantly better prediction capabilities than those agents assigned to the periphery of the network.

  6. The SDSS-IV in 2015: Report of the Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Lucatello, Sara; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Cherinka, Brian; Cunha, Katia M. L.; Gillespie, Bruce Andrew; Hagen, Alex; Jones, Amy; Kinemuchi, Karen; Lundgren, Britt; Myers, Adam D.; Roman, Alexandre; Zasowski, Gail; SDSS-IV Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Given that many astronomers now participate in large international scientific collaborations, it is important to examine whether these structures foster a healthy scientific climate that is inclusive and diverse. The Committee on the Participation of Women in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (CPWS) was formed to evaluate the climate and demographics within the SDSS collaboration and to make recommendations for how best to establish the scientific and technical leadership team for SDSS-IV. Building on the work described in Lundgren et al. (2015), the CPWS conducted a demographic survey in Spring 2015 that included questions about career and leadership status, racial / ethnic identity, gender identity, identification with the LGBT community, disability, partnership status, and level of parental education. For example, 71% of survey respondents identify as male and 81% do not identify as a racial or ethnic minority at their current institution. This reflects the under-representation of women and men from minority groups (e.g., people of color in the United States) and women from majority groups (e.g., white women in the United States) in the field of astronomy. We have focused our analysis on the representation of scientists from these groups among the SDSS-IV leadership and the full collaboration. Our goal is to use these quantitative data to track the demographics of SDSS-IV membership and leadership over time as we work to assess and improve the climate of SDSS-IV.

  7. Minimum Cost Estimation of a Baseline Survey for a Molecular Epidemiology Cohort Study: Collecting Participants in a Model Region in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Norie; Iwasaki, Motoki; Ohashi, Kayo; Tsugane, Shoichiro

    2016-01-01

    Background Some recent molecular epidemiology studies of the effects of genetic and environmental factors on human health have required the enrollment of more than 100 000 participants and the involvement of regional study offices across the country. Although regional study office investigators play a critical role in these studies, including the acquisition of funds, this role is rarely discussed. Methods We first differentiated the functions of the regional and central study offices. We then investigated the minimum number of items required and approximate cost of a molecular epidemiology study enrolling 7400 participants from a model region with a population of 100 000 for a 4-year baseline survey using a standard protocol developed based on the protocol of Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study for the Next Generation. Results The functions of the regional study office were identified, and individual expenses were itemized. The total cost of the 4-year baseline survey was 153 million yen, excluding consumption tax. Accounting difficulties in conducting the survey were clarified. Conclusions We investigated a standardized example of the tasks and total actual costs of a regional study office. Our approach is easy to utilize and will help improve the management of regional study offices in future molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:27001116

  8. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in Fourier space

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Saito, Shun; Wang, Dandan; Ross, Ashley J; Beutler, Florian; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Percival, Will J; Brownstein, Joel R; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Weinberg, David H; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2016-01-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) analysis using the monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole of the redshift-space galaxy power spectrum measured from the pre-reconstructed combined galaxy sample of the completed Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release (DR)12 covering the redshift range of $0.20

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in Fourier space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting; Saito, Shun; Wang, Dandan; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Percival, Will J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Weinberg, David H.; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2017-04-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) analysis using the monopole, quadrupole and hexadecapole of the redshift-space galaxy power spectrum measured from the pre-reconstructed combined galaxy sample of the completed Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release12 covering the redshift range of 0.20 < z < 0.75. By allowing for overlap between neighbouring redshift slices, we successfully obtained the isotropic and anisotropic BAO distance measurements within nine redshift slices to a precision of 1.5-3.4 per cent for DV/rd, 1.8-4.2 per cent for DA/rd and 3.7-7.5 per cent for H rd, depending on effective redshifts. We provide our BAO measurement of DA/rd and H rd with the full covariance matrix, which can be used for cosmological implications. Our measurements are consistent with those presented in Alam et al., in which the BAO distances are measured at three effective redshifts. We constrain dark energy parameters using our measurements and find an improvement of the Figure-of-Merit of dark energy in general due to the temporal BAO information resolved. This paper is a part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS.

  10. Factors associated with untreated diabetes: analysis of data from 20,496 participants in the Japanese National Health and Nutrition Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Goto

    Full Text Available We aimed to examine factors associated with untreated diabetes in a nationally representative sample of the Japanese population.We pooled data from the Japanese National Health and Nutrition Survey from 2005 to 2009 (n = 20,496. Individuals aged 20 years and older were included in the analysis. We classified participants as having diabetes if they had HbA1c levels ≥6.5% (≥48 mmol/mol. People with diabetes who self-reported that they were not currently receiving diabetic treatment were considered to be untreated. We conducted a multinomial logistic regression analysis to determine factors associated with untreated diabetes relative to non-diabetic individuals.Of 20,496 participants who were included in the analysis, untreated diabetes was present in 748 (3.6%. Among participants with untreated diabetes, 48.3% were previously diagnosed with diabetes, and 46.5% had HbA1c levels ≥7.0% (≥53 mmol/mol. Participants with untreated diabetes were significantly more likely than non-diabetic participants to be male, older, and currently smoking, have lower HDL cholesterol levels and higher BMI, non-HDL cholesterol levels, and systolic blood pressure.A substantial proportion of people in Japan with untreated diabetes have poor glycemic control. Targeting relevant factors for untreated diabetes in screening programs may be effective to enhance the treatment and control of diabetes.

  11. Toxic ignorance and right-to-know in biomonitoring results communication: a survey of scientists and study participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Rebecca

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure assessment has shifted from pollutant monitoring in air, soil, and water toward personal exposure measurements and biomonitoring. This trend along with the paucity of health effect data for many of the pollutants studied raise ethical and scientific challenges for reporting results to study participants. Methods We interviewed 26 individuals involved in biomonitoring studies, including academic scientists, scientists from environmental advocacy organizations, IRB officials, and study participants; observed meetings where stakeholders discussed these issues; and reviewed the relevant literature to assess emerging ethical, scientific, and policy debates about personal exposure assessment and biomonitoring, including public demand for information on the human health effects of chemical body burdens. Results We identify three frameworks for report-back in personal exposure studies: clinical ethics; community-based participatory research; and citizen science 'data judo.' The first approach emphasizes reporting results only when the health significance of exposures is known, while the latter two represent new communication strategies where study participants play a role in interpreting, disseminating, and leveraging results to promote community health. We identify five critical areas to consider in planning future biomonitoring studies. Conclusion Public deliberation about communication in personal exposure assessment research suggests that new forms of community-based research ethics and participatory scientific practice are emerging.

  12. A survey of senior medical students’ attitudes and awareness toward teaching and participation in a formal clinical teaching elective: a Canadian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Hughes, J. D.; Azzi, Elise; Rose, Gregory Walter; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Khamisa, Karima

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: To prepare for careers in medicine, medical trainees must develop clinical teaching skills. It is unclear if Canadian medical students need or want to develop such skills. We sought to assess Canadian students’ perceptions of clinical teaching, and their desire to pursue clinical teaching skills development via a clinical teaching elective (CTE) in their final year of medical school. Methods: We designed a descriptive cross-sectional study of Canadian senior medical students, using an online survey to gauge teaching experience, career goals, perceived areas of confidence, and interest in a CTE. Results: Students at 13 of 17 Canadian medical schools were invited to participate in the survey (4154 students). We collected 321 responses (7.8%). Most (75%) respondents expressed confidence in giving presentations, but fewer were confident providing bedside teaching (47%), teaching sensitive issues (42%), and presenting at journal clubs (42%). A total of 240 respondents (75%) expressed interest in participating in a CTE. The majority (61%) favored a two week elective, and preferred topics included bedside teaching (85%), teaching physical examination skills (71%), moderation of small group learning (63%), and mentorship in medicine (60%). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates that a large number of Canadian medical students are interested in teaching in a clinical setting, but lack confidence in skills specific to clinical teaching. Our respondents signaled interest in participating in an elective in clinical teaching, particularly if it is offered in a two-week format. PMID:28178914

  13. Exploring implications of Medicaid participation and wait times for colorectal screening on early detection efforts in Connecticut--a secret-shopper survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vatsal B; Nahar, Richa; Murray, Betty; Salner, Andrew L

    2013-04-01

    Routine colorectal screening, decreases in incidence, and advances in treatment have lowered colorectal cancer mortality rates over the past three decades. Nevertheless, it remains the second most common cause of cancer death amongst men and women combined in U.S. Most cases of colon cancer are diagnosed at a late stage leading to poor survival outcomes for patients. After extensive research of publically available data, it would appear that the state of Connecticut does not have available state-wide data on patient wait times for routine colonoscopy screening. Furthermore, there are no publicly available, or Connecticut-specific, reports on Medicaid participation rates for colorectal screening amongst gastroenterologists (GI) in Connecticut. In 2012, the American Cancer Society report on Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates confirmed barriers to health-care access and disparities in health outcomes and survival rates for colon cancer patients based on race, ethnicity, and low socioeconomic status. Given this information, one could conjecture that low Medicaid participation rates among GIs could potentially have a more severe impact on health-care access and outcomes for underserved populations. At present, funding and human resources are being employed across the state of Connecticut to address bottlenecks in colorectal cancer screening. More specifically, patient navigation and outreach programs are emerging and expanding to address the gaps in services for hard-to-reach populations and the medically underserved. Low Medicaid participation rates and increased wait times for colonoscopy screening may impair the efficacy of colorectal cancer patient navigation and outreach efforts and potentially funding for future interventions. In this study, we report the results of our secret-shopper telephone survey comprising of 93 group and independent gastroenterologist (GI) practices in different counties of Connecticut. Reviewing online resources and yellow pages

  14. Youth Motivations for Program Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenifer K. McGuire

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Through their participation in youth programs, young people have access to opportunities to learn and build important skills. A total of 214 youth between the ages of 10-19 (mean 15.5 years completed an online survey about characteristics of youth programs they participated in, didn’t participate in, and had participated in but quit. We found that youth participated in activities that provided a benefit to meet personal goals or develop skills. However, our findings suggest that youth may leave activities, or never join them, based on different sets of motivations than the reasons they stay in activities. There was variability across demographic groups: Males reported more problems with past activities, sexual minority youth were more likely to endorse social problems with past and never joined activities, and ethnic minorities reported less support for personal goals and connection to adults in current activities and more logistic barriers for activities never joined.

  15. Participation bias in postal surveys among older adults: the role played by self-reported health, physical functional decline and frailty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Philipe de Souto

    2012-01-01

    Postal survey is a simple and efficient way to collect information in large study samples. The purpose of this study was to find out differences between older adults who responded to a postal survey on health outcomes and those who did not, and to examine the importance of frailty, physical functional decline and poor self-reported health in determining non-response. We mailed out a questionnaire on general health twice at a year's interval to 1000 individuals ≥60 years, and members of the medical insurance scheme of the French national education system. At Year1, 535 persons responded to the questionnaire (65% women, 70.9 ± 8.4 years). A year later (Year2), we obtained 384 responses (63.3% women, 70.5 ± 7.8 years). Compared to respondents, non-respondents at Year2 were more frequently categorized as frail, reported more often to be in bad health, and had more physical functional declines. Frailty, physical functional decline and poor self-reported health increased the likelihood of not responding to Year2 questionnaire, with poor self-reported health weakening the association of physical functional decline and non-response. Respondents of this postal survey are fitter and healthier than non-respondents. This participation bias precludes the generalization of postal surveys results.

  16. Public appraisal of government efforts and participation intent in medico-ethical policymaking in Japan: a large scale national survey concerning brain death and organ transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public satisfaction with policy process influences the legitimacy and acceptance of policies, and conditions the future political process, especially when contending ethical value judgments are involved. On the other hand, public involvement is required if effective policy is to be developed and accepted. Methods Using the data from a large-scale national opinion survey, this study evaluates public appraisal of past government efforts to legalize organ transplant from brain-dead bodies in Japan, and examines the public's intent to participate in future policy. Results A relatively large percentage of people became aware of the issue when government actions were initiated, and many increasingly formed their own opinions on the policy in question. However, a significant number (43.3% remained unaware of any legislative efforts, and only 26.3% of those who were aware provided positive appraisals of the policymaking process. Furthermore, a majority of respondents (61.8% indicated unwillingness to participate in future policy discussions of bioethical issues. Multivariate analysis revealed the following factors are associated with positive appraisals of policy development: greater age; earlier opinion formation; and familiarity with donor cards. Factors associated with likelihood of future participation in policy discussion include younger age, earlier attention to the issue, and knowledge of past government efforts. Those unwilling to participate cited as their reasons that experts are more knowledgeable and that the issues are too complex. Conclusions Results of an opinion survey in Japan were presented, and a set of factors statistically associated with them were discussed. Further efforts to improve policy making process on bioethical issues are desirable.

  17. Association of personality, neighbourhood, and civic participation with the level of perceived social support: the HUNT study, a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grav, Siv; Romild, Ulla; Hellzèn, Ove; Stordal, Eystein

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the association of personality, neighbourhood, and civic participation with the level of perceived social support if needed. The sample consists of a total of 35,797 men (16,035) and women (19,762) drawn from the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study 3 (HUNT3), aged 20-89, with a fully completed short version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) including a complete response to questions regarding perceived social support. A multinomial logistic regression model was used to investigate the association between the three-category outcomes (high, medium, and low) of perceived social support. The Chi-square test detected a significant (p personality, sense of community, civic participation, self-rated health, living arrangement, age groups, gender, and perceived social support, except between perceived social support and loss of social network, in which no significance was found. The crude and adjusted multinomial logistic regression models show a relation between medium and low scores on perceived social support, personality, and sources of social support. Interactions were observed between gender and self-rated health. There is an association between the level of perceived social support and personality, sense of community in the neighbourhood, and civic participation. Even if the interaction between men and self-reported health decreases the odds for low and medium social support, health professionals should be aware of men with poor health and their lack of social support.

  18. Assessing the Perceived Value of Research Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWormer, Lisa A.; Jordan, Erica F.; Blalock, Lisa Durrance

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate psychology majors are encouraged to engage in research to improve understanding of research methods and increase research skills. This study examines the potential of volunteering as a research participant to increase student perceptions of knowledge and interest in research. Undergraduate students completed a survey regarding the…

  19. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe.

  20. Mortality disparities among groups participating in an East Africa surveying expedition: the Herbert Henry Austin expedition of 1900-1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imperato, Pascal James; Imperato, Gavin H; Imperato, Austin C

    2013-10-01

    In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, a number of European expeditions traveled to the region of Lake Rudolf, now largely in northern Kenya. Although diverse in intent, many of these were undertaken in the interests of furthering colonial territorial claims. In 1900-1901, Major Herbert Henry Austin led a British expedition down to the lake from Khartoum in the north. Of the 62 African, Arab, and European members of this expedition, only 18 (29 %) arrived at its final destination at Lake Baringo in Kenya. Because of a confluence of adverse climatic, social, and political conditions, the expedition ran short of food supplies when it arrived at the northern end of the lake in April 1901. For the next 4 months, the members of the expedition struggled down the west side of the lake and beyond. The greatest mortality (91 %) occurred among the 32 African transport drivers who were the most marginally nourished at the outset of the trip. The lowest mortality among the Africans on the expedition (15 %) occurred among the members of the Tenth Sudanese Rifles Battalion, who had an excellent nutritional status at the start of the expedition. Major Austin himself suffered from severe scurvy with retinal hemorrhages which left him partially blind in his right eye. An analysis of the mortality rates among the groups that participated in this expedition was undertaken. This revealed that poor nutritional status at the start of the trip was predictive of death from starvation.

  1. [A case management programme for women with breast cancer: results of a written survey of participating medical and non-medical networking-partners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büscher, C; Thorenz, A; Grochocka, A; Koch, U; Watzke, B

    2011-12-01

    Breast cancer patients are as a rule in need of a multiple sequential in-patient, day-patient and out-patient permanent treatment. The required care demands a trans-sectoral networking of all multi-professional persons involved in diagnostics, therapies, rehabilitation and aftercare. A method to develop the integration of treatment processes, as well as thereby resulting in increased effectiveness and efficiency, can constitute the concept of case management. A prerequisite for an effective implementation of case management and thus the starting point of the present survey is a well-functioning network encompassing optimal cooperation. Within the framework of the evaluation of the case management-based integrated care model "mammaNetz" for women with mamma carcinoma as a whole and against the background of the potential for innovation and improvement of case management on the one hand as well as the existence of only few empirical data otherwise, the present survey of members of a trans-sectoral network of the service centre was accomplished. Medical and non-medical networking partners of the service centre (N=168) were questioned by regular mail about different aspects of the cooperation. Identical items in both surveys were compared. The return rate for the medical networking partners is about 59% (n=35), whereby only medical network partners in private practice participated in the survey. For the non-medical networking partners about 60% (n=66) participated. Medical networking partners assess the cooperation with the service centre in reference to the exchange of information slightly more positively (66%) than the non-medical networking partners (59%). Medical networking partners are in significantly more frequent contact with the service centre and see in the cooperation significantly more advantages for their own office/facility (each with p=0.001) than non-medical networking partners. Overall the results suggest that medical as well as non-medical networking

  2. Multiple imputation of completely missing repeated measures data within person from a complex sample: application to accelerometer data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Benmei; Yu, Mandi; Graubard, Barry I; Troiano, Richard P; Schenker, Nathaniel

    2016-12-10

    The Physical Activity Monitor component was introduced into the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to collect objective information on physical activity including both movement intensity counts and ambulatory steps. Because of an error in the accelerometer device initialization process, the steps data were missing for all participants in several primary sampling units, typically a single county or group of contiguous counties, who had intensity count data from their accelerometers. To avoid potential bias and loss in efficiency in estimation and inference involving the steps data, we considered methods to accurately impute the missing values for steps collected in the 2003-2004 NHANES. The objective was to come up with an efficient imputation method that minimized model-based assumptions. We adopted a multiple imputation approach based on additive regression, bootstrapping and predictive mean matching methods. This method fits alternative conditional expectation (ace) models, which use an automated procedure to estimate optimal transformations for both the predictor and response variables. This paper describes the approaches used in this imputation and evaluates the methods by comparing the distributions of the original and the imputed data. A simulation study using the observed data is also conducted as part of the model diagnostics. Finally, some real data analyses are performed to compare the before and after imputation results. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  4. The search for complex molecules in the ISM: a complete 3 mm line survey of Sgr B2-N and -M

    CERN Document Server

    Belloche, A; Hieret, C; Menten, K M; Müller, H S P; Schilke, P

    2008-01-01

    Famous for the extraordinary richness of its molecular content, the Sgr B2 molecular cloud complex is the prime target in the long-standing search for ever more complex species. We have completed a molecular line survey of the hot dense cores Sgr B2(N) and Sgr B2(M) in the 3 mm wavelength range with the IRAM 30 m telescope. We performed the analysis of this huge data set by modeling the whole spectrum at once in the LTE approximation. Ongoing analyses yield an average line density of about 100 features/GHz above 3 sigma for Sgr B2(N), emitted and/or absorbed by a total of 51 molecular species. We find lines from 60 rare isotopologues and from 41 vibrationally excited states in addition to the main species, vibrational ground state lines. For Sgr B2(M), we find about 25 features/GHz above 3 sigma, from 41 molecular species plus 50 isotopologues and 20 vibrationally excited states. Thanks to the constant updates to the Cologne Database for Molecular Spectroscopy, we are working our way through the assignment of...

  5. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-05-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power-spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new fast-Fourier-transform-based estimators, we measure the power-spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular-diameter distance, the Hubble parameter and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full-shape clustering measurements in combination with cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernova data. Assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1 Mpc^{-1}}, at a confidence level of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy-clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  6. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a ΛCDM cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}, at a confidence level (CL) of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  7. Family History, Diabetes, and Other Demographic and Risk Factors Among Participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Duquette, MS, CGC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Family history of diabetes has been recognized as an important risk factor of the disease. Family medical history represents valuable genomic information because it characterizes the combined interactions between environmental, behavioral, and genetic factors. This study examined the strength and effect of having a family history of diabetes on the prevalence of self-reported, previously diagnosed diabetes among adult participants of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2002. Methods The study population included data from 10,283 participants aged 20 years and older. Gender, age, race/ethnicity, poverty income ratio, education level, body mass index, and family history of diabetes were examined in relation to diabetes status. Diabetes prevalence estimates and odds ratios of diabetes were calculated based on family history and other factors. Results The prevalence of diabetes among individuals who have a first-degree relative with diabetes (14.3% was significantly higher than that of individuals without a family history (3.2%, corresponding to a crude odds ratio of five. Both prevalence and odds ratio estimates significantly increased with the number of relatives affected with diabetes. Family history was also associated with several demographic and risk factors. Conclusion Family history of diabetes was shown to be a significant predictor of diabetes prevalence in the adult U.S. population. We advocate the inclusion of family history assessment in public health prevention and screening programs as an inexpensive and valuable source of genomic information and measure of diabetes risk.

  8. Effects of rapid aging and lower participation rate among younger adults on the short-term trend of physical activity in the National Health and Nutrition Survey, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Nobuo; Yoshizawa, Takeshi; Okuda, Nagako

    2017-01-06

    The National Health and Nutrition Survey, Japan, has annually monitored two indicators of physical activity in adults. They are contrasting in the association with age; the prevalence of exercise habit is lower and step counts are higher among younger participants. The present study aimed to examine the effects of rapid aging of the Japanese population and the lower participation rate among younger adults on the short-term trend of two indicators of physical activity using tabulated data. The prevalence of exercise habit and step counts by age groups (≥20 years) from 2003 to 2010 were estimated using tabulated data from the National Health and Nutrition Survey by calculating sex-specific means weighted by age-specific Japanese population data for each year (population-weighted estimates) and for a fixed year (2005; age-standardized estimates). Linear regression analyses were used to test the statistical significance of their trends. Statistically significant increasing trends in the prevalence of exercise habit were observed for the crude means (P = 0.029), the population-weighted estimates (P = 0.007) and the age-standardized estimates (P = 0.016) only in men. Statistically significant decreasing trends in the step counts were observed for the crude means (P = 0.006 in men and P = 0.033 in women) and the population-weighted estimates (P = 0.008 in men and P = 0.049 in women) both in men and women, but for the age-standardized estimates (P = 0.039) only in men. The effects of rapid aging of the Japanese population and the lower participation rate among younger adults on the short-term trend are not small, and age-standardization is necessary to observe even the short-term trend of physical activity data. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2017; ••: ••-••. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  9. The "medicine in Australia: balancing employment and life (MABEL)" longitudinal survey--protocol and baseline data for a prospective cohort study of Australian doctors' workforce participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Catherine M; Scott, Anthony; Jeon, Sung-Hee; Humphreys, John; Kalb, Guyonne; Witt, Julia; Leahy, Anne

    2010-02-25

    While there is considerable research on medical workforce supply trends, there is little research examining the determinants of labour supply decisions for the medical workforce. The "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL)" study investigates workforce participation patterns and their determinants using a longitudinal survey of Australian doctors. It aims to generate evidence to support developing effective policy responses to workforce issues such as shortages and maldistribution. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline cohort, including an analysis of response rates and response bias. MABEL is a prospective cohort study. All Australian doctors undertaking clinical work in 2008 (n = 54,750) were invited to participate, and annual waves of data collections will be undertaken until at least 2011. Data are collected by paper or optional online version of a questionnaire, with content tailored to four sub-groups of clinicians: general practitioners, specialists, specialists in training, and hospital non-specialists. In the baseline wave, data were collected on: job satisfaction, attitudes to work and intentions to quit or change hours worked; a discrete choice experiment examining preferences and trade-offs for different types of jobs; work setting; workload; finances; geographic location; demographics; and family circumstances. The baseline cohort includes 10,498 Australian doctors, representing an overall response rate of 19.36%. This includes 3,906 general practitioners, 4,596 specialists, 1,072 specialists in training, and 924 hospital non-specialists. Respondents were more likely to be younger, female, and to come from non-metropolitan areas, the latter partly reflecting the effect of a financial incentive on response for doctors in remote and rural areas. Specialists and specialists in training were more likely to respond, whilst hospital non-specialists were less likely to respond. The distribution of hours worked was similar

  10. The "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL" longitudinal survey - Protocol and baseline data for a prospective cohort study of Australian doctors' workforce participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witt Julia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While there is considerable research on medical workforce supply trends, there is little research examining the determinants of labour supply decisions for the medical workforce. The "Medicine in Australia: Balancing Employment and Life (MABEL" study investigates workforce participation patterns and their determinants using a longitudinal survey of Australian doctors. It aims to generate evidence to support developing effective policy responses to workforce issues such as shortages and maldistribution. This paper describes the study protocol and baseline cohort, including an analysis of response rates and response bias. Methods/Design MABEL is a prospective cohort study. All Australian doctors undertaking clinical work in 2008 (n = 54,750 were invited to participate, and annual waves of data collections will be undertaken until at least 2011. Data are collected by paper or optional online version of a questionnaire, with content tailored to four sub-groups of clinicians: general practitioners, specialists, specialists in training, and hospital non-specialists. In the baseline wave, data were collected on: job satisfaction, attitudes to work and intentions to quit or change hours worked; a discrete choice experiment examining preferences and trade-offs for different types of jobs; work setting; workload; finances; geographic location; demographics; and family circumstances. Discussion The baseline cohort includes 10,498 Australian doctors, representing an overall response rate of 19.36%. This includes 3,906 general practitioners, 4,596 specialists, 1,072 specialists in training, and 924 hospital non-specialists. Respondents were more likely to be younger, female, and to come from non-metropolitan areas, the latter partly reflecting the effect of a financial incentive on response for doctors in remote and rural areas. Specialists and specialists in training were more likely to respond, whilst hospital non-specialists were less

  11. A Model-calibration Approach to Using Complete Auxiliary Information from Stratified Sampling Survey Data%利用分层抽样数据中完全辅助信息的模型校正方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍长春; 张润楚

    2006-01-01

    In stratified survey sampling, sometimes we have complete auxiliary information. One of the fundamental questions is how to effectively use the complete auxiliary information at the estimation stage. In this paper, we extend the model-calibration method to obtain estimators of the finite population mean by using complete auxiliary information from stratified sampling survey data. We show that the resulting estimators effectively use auxiliary information at the estimation stage and possess a number of attractive features such as asymptotically design-unbiased irrespective of the working model and approximately model-unbiased under the model. When a linear working-model is used, the resulting estimators reduce to the usual calibration estimator(or GREG).

  12. The Student Human Papillomavirus Survey: Nurse-Led Instrument Development and Psychometric Testing to Increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Series Completion in Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tami; Dalmida, Safyia; Higgins, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    The Student Human Papillomavirus Survey (SHPVS) was developed to examine students' perceived benefits or barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. Survey development included (a) 2-phase integrative literature reviews; (b) draft of survey items based on the literature; (c) critique of survey items by young adults, nursing and psychology faculty, and health care providers; and (d) pilot testing. The psychometric properties of the SHPVS were evaluated using classical item analysis and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) among a sample of 527 university students' ages 18-24 years. The estimated Cronbach's alpha for the SHPVS is .74. The SHPVS is a measure of young adults HPV perceived vulnerability, perceived severity, perceived barriers, and perceived benefits of HPV vaccination.

  13. Explaining union participation: The effects of union commitment and demographic factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Bolton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the relationship between trade union commitment and union participation among blue-collar workers in South Africa. Survey questionnaires were completed by 93 participants (response rate = 62 %. Findings are consistent with previous research and showed that after controlling for demographic factors, 43% of the variance in participation can be explained by union commitment. In this study, Black participants displayed significantly higher levels of commitment and participation than their Coloured counterparts did.

  14. A systematic survey of the methods literature on the reporting quality and optimal methods of handling participants with missing outcome data for continuous outcomes in randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuqing; Alyass, Akram; Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Sadeghirad, Behnam; Flórez, Iván D; Pichika, Sathish Chandra; Kennedy, Sean Alexander; Abdulkarimova, Ulviya; Zhang, Yuan; Iljon, Tzvia; Morgano, Gian Paolo; Colunga Lozano, Luis E; Aloweni, Fazila Abu Bakar; Lopes, Luciane C; Yepes-Nuñez, Juan José; Fei, Yutong; Wang, Li; Kahale, Lara A; Meyre, David; Akl, Elie A; Thabane, Lehana; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2017-08-01

    To conduct (1) a systematic survey of the reporting quality of simulation studies dealing with how to handle missing participant data (MPD) in randomized control trials and (2) summarize the findings of these studies. We included simulation studies comparing statistical methods dealing with continuous MPD in randomized controlled trials addressing bias, precision, coverage, accuracy, power, type-I error, and overall ranking. For the reporting of simulation studies, we adapted previously developed criteria for reporting quality and applied them to eligible studies. Of 16,446 identified citations, the 60 eligible generally had important limitations in reporting, particularly in reporting simulation procedures. Of the 60 studies, 47 addressed ignorable and 32 addressed nonignorable data. For ignorable missing data, mixed model was most frequently the best on overall ranking (9 times best, 34.6% of times tested) and bias (10, 55.6%). Multiple imputation was also performed well. For nonignorable data, mixed model was most frequently the best on overall ranking (7, 46.7%) and bias (8, 57.1%). Mixed model performance varied on other criteria. Last observation carried forward (LOCF) was very seldom the best performing, and for nonignorable MPD frequently the worst. Simulation studies addressing methods to deal with MPD suffered from serious limitations. The mixed model approach was superior to other methods in terms of overall performance and bias. LOCF performed worst. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Is Self-Reported Physical Activity Participation Associated with Lower Health Services Utilization among Older Adults? Cross-Sectional Evidence from the Canadian Community Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koren L. Fisher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine relationships between leisure time physical activity (LTPA and health services utilization (H in a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling older adults. Methods. Cross-sectional data from 56,652 Canadian Community Health Survey respondents aged ≥ 50 years (48% M; 52% F; mean age 63.5 ± 10.2 years were stratified into three age groups and analysed using multivariate generalized linear modeling techniques. Participants were classified according to PA level based on self-reported daily energy expenditure. Nonleisure PA (NLPA was categorized into four levels ranging from mostly sitting to mostly lifting objects. Results. Active 50–65-year-old individuals were 27% less likely to report any GP consultations ORadj=0.73; P<0.001 and had 8% fewer GP consultations annually (IRRadj=0.92; P<0.01 than their inactive peers. Active persons aged 65–79 years were 18% less likely than inactive respondents to have been hospitalized overnight in the previous year (ORadj=0.82, P<0.05. Higher levels of NLPA were significantly associated with lower levels of HSU, across all age groups. Conclusion. Nonleisure PA appeared to be a stronger predictor of all types of HSU, particularly in the two oldest age groups. Considering strategies that focus on reducing time spent in sedentary activities may have a positive impact on reducing the demand for health services.

  16. Emission-Line Galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution and Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) Grism Survey. II: The Complete Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Pirzkal, Nor; Ly, Chun; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E; Grogin, Norman A; Dahlen, Tomas; Meurer, Gerhardt R; Walsh, Jeremy R; Hathi, Nimish P; Cohen, Seth H; Bellini, Andrea; Holwerda, Benne W; Straughn, Amber N; Mechtley, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on HST. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations to support the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data we are able to identify star forming galaxies within the redshift volume 0 1e9} M_sun decreases by an order of magnitude at z<0.5 relative to the number at 0.5

  17. Stigmatizing attitudes and low levels of knowledge but high willingness to participate in HIV management: A community-based survey of pharmacies in Pune, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Amita

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The World Health Organization (WHO recommends that the role of pharmacists in low-income settings be expanded to address the increasing complexity of HIV antiretroviral (ARV and co-infection drug regimens. However, in many such settings including in India, many pharmacists and pharmacy workers are often neither well trained nor aware of the intricacies of HIV treatment. The aims of our study were; to determine the availability of ARVs, provision of ARVs, knowledge about ARVs, attitudes towards HIV-infected persons and self-perceived need for training among community-based pharmacies in an urban area of India. Methods We performed a survey of randomly selected, community-based pharmacies located in Pune, India, in 2004-2005 to determine the availability of ARVs at these pharmacies, how they were providing ARVs and their self-perceived need for training. We also assessed knowledge, attitudes and perceptions on HIV and ARVs and factors associated with stocking ARVs. Results Of 207 pharmacies included in the survey, 200 (96.6% were single, private establishments. Seventy-three (35.3% pharmacies stocked ARVs and 38 (18.4% ordered ARVs upon request. The reported median number of ARV pills that patients bought at one time was 30, a two week supply of ARVs (range: 3-240 pills. Six (2.9% pharmacy respondents reported selling non-allopathic medicines (i.e. Ayurvedic, homeopathy for HIV. Ninety (44.2% pharmacy respondents knew that ARVs cannot cure HIV, with those stocking ARVs being more likely to respond correctly (60.3% vs. 34.8%, p = 0.001. Respondents of pharmacies which stocked ARVs were also more likely to believe it was a professional obligation to provide medications to HIV-infected persons (91.8% vs. 78.8%, p = 0.007 but they were also more likely to believe that HIV-infected persons are unable to adhere to their medicines (79.5% vs. 40.9%, p Conclusion There is a high willingness to participate in HIV management among

  18. The Forgotten Schools. Current Status of Special Schools for Pupils with Social, Emotional and Behavioural Difficulties in Germany: A Complete National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Marc

    2007-01-01

    The article reports on a survey of special schools for children with social, emotional, and behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in Germany. The schools were asked by standardised mail questionnaire about their organisational structures. The rate of return was 77% and a total of 397 schools were included in the interpretation of data. The questionnaire…

  19. Technological Implementation of Renewable Energy in Rural-Isolated Areas and Small-Medium Islands in Indonesia: Problem Mapping And Preliminary Surveys of Total People Participation in a Local Wind Pump Water Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taufik, Ahmad

    2007-10-01

    This article discusses a formulation of problem mapping and preliminary surveys of total people participation in a local wind pump (LWP) water supply in term of technological implementation of renewable energy (RE) in rural-isolated areas and small-medium islands in Indonesia. The formulation was constructed in order to enhance and to promote the local product of RE across Indonesia. It was also addressed to accommodate local potencies, barriers and opportunities into a priority map. Moreover, it was designed into five aspects such as (1) local technology of the RE: a case of pilot project of the LWP; (2) environmental-cultural aspects related to global issues of energy-renewable energy; (3) potencies and barriers corresponding to local, national, regional and international contents; (4) education and training and (5) gender participation. To focus the formulation, serial preliminary surveys were conducted in five major areas, namely: (1) survey on support and barrier factors of the aspects; (2) strategic planning model, a concept A-B-G which stands for Academician-Business people-Government; (3) survey on background based knowledge on energy conservation; (4) survey on gender participation in energy conservation and (5) survey on local stakeholder involvement. Throughout the surveys, it has been notified that the concept needs to be developed to any level of its component since its elements were identified in tolerance values such as high potency value of the LWP development (95%); a strong potency of rural area application (88%); a medium background of energy, energy conservation (EC) identified in a range of 56%-72%, sufficient support from local stakeholders and gender participation.

  20. Gaining Insights Into the Waterpipe Tobacco Industry: Participant Observation and a Cross-Sectional Survey of Products at a Trade Exhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Mohammed; Nakkash, Rima T; Hawkins, Ben; Akl, Elie A

    2016-05-01

    The rise in waterpipe tobacco smoking has been accompanied by the emergence of a diverse range of products, such as "herbal" waterpipe tobacco substitutes and electronic waterpipes. The aims of this study were to assess the extent to which emerging waterpipe products are being developed by waterpipe tobacco companies themselves, to understand the key characteristics of the main market players, and to examine the connections between producers of different product categories. In 2014, one researcher attended an international waterpipe trade exhibition in Germany, conducting a survey of products at exhibition stands, and gathering qualitative data on exhibitors and products using participant observation. Cross-tabulations and chi-square tests identified the association between waterpipe tobacco, waterpipe tobacco substitutes, and electronic waterpipe products. We thematically analyzed field notes into information about exhibitors and products. Of 97 exhibitors, 55 displayed waterpipe-related products. Of these, nearly half (45%) displayed electronic waterpipe products, 38% displayed waterpipe tobacco and 23% displayed waterpipe tobacco substitutes. There was an inverse association between the display of waterpipe tobacco and electronic waterpipe products, and a positive association between the display of waterpipe tobacco and waterpipe tobacco substitutes. We found that Japan Tobacco Inc, Philip Morris, and British American Tobacco were partnered or affiliated with exhibitors displaying waterpipe-related products. Electronic waterpipe products were the main feature of this exhibition. Waterpipe tobacco substitutes are likely to be produced by the waterpipe tobacco industry whereas electronic waterpipes are not. There is a developing interest in waterpipe-related products by transnational tobacco corporations. Further industry surveillance is warranted. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and

  1. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Observational systematics and baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Ashley J; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Seo, Hee-Jong; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J; Percival, Will J; Burden, Angela; Sanchez, Ariel G; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Reid, Beth; Brownstein, Joel R; Dawson, Kyle S; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio A; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Schneider, Donald P; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; White, Martin; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We present baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements determined from the clustering of 1.2 million massive galaxies with redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.75 distributed over 9300 square degrees, as quantified by their redshift-space correlation function. In order to facilitate these measurements, we define, describe, and motivate the selection function for galaxies in the final data release (DR12) of the SDSS III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). This includes the observational footprint, masks for image quality and Galactic extinction, and weights to account for density relationships intrinsic to the imaging and spectroscopic portions of the survey. We simulate the observed systematic trends in mock galaxy samples and demonstrate that they impart no bias on baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements and have a minor impact on the recovered statistical uncertainty. We measure transverse and radial BAO distance measurements in 0.2 < z < 0.5, 0.5 < z < 0.75, and (overla...

  2. Which Early Care and Education Centers Participate in Head Start or Public Pre-Kindergarten? National Survey of Early Care & Education. Technical Report. OPRE Report 2015-92a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Administration for Children & Families, 2015

    2015-01-01

    This report draws on newly available data from the National Survey of Early Care and Education (NSECE) to describe early care and education (ECE) centers that participate in two prominent publicly-funded ECE initiatives: Head Start and publicly-funded pre-kindergarten. Although a great deal is known about Head Start programs, and there are sources…

  3. Intel Teach to the Future[R] U.S. Classic Program Cumulative Participant Teacher End-of-Training Survey Data through 04-2003. Summary Report. CCT Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupert, Naomi; Martin, Wendy; Kanaya, Tomoe

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes responses of Participant Teachers to selected questions in a program application form and a survey administered at the conclusion of every Intel Teach to the Future "Classic" training in the United States between July 2000 to December 2003. The data reported here demonstrate that teachers' responses to this training have…

  4. Outdoor recreation participation trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Ken Cordell; Barbara L. McDonald; R. Jeff Teasley; John C. Bergstrom; Jack Martin; Jim Bason; Vernon R. Leeworthy

    1999-01-01

    As part of the national assessment of outdoor recreation trends, the authors have taken a look at participation patterns and levels of participation across activities and across segments of our society. The primary source of data is the National Survey on Recreation and the Environment (NSRE). The NSRE is the latest in the continuing series of National Recreation...

  5. Complete prewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid-fluid and fluid-substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  6. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    CERN Document Server

    Alam, Shadab; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A; Bolton, Adam S; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J; Dawson, Kyle S; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M; Reid, Beth A; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Ashley J; Ross, Nicholas P; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Sánchez, Ariel G; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Satpathy, Siddharth; Scóccola, Claudia G; Schlegel, David J; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A; Swanson, Molly E C; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg^2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc^3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51, and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DM*H from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by f{\\sigma}8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one m...

  7. Students' Autobiographical Memory of Participation in Multiple Sport Education Seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, Oleg A.; Hastie, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the recollections of the Sport Education experiences of a cohort of students (15 boys and 19 girls) who had participated in seasons of basketball, soccer and badminton across grades six through eight (average age at data collection = 15.6 years). Using autobiographic memory theory techniques, the students completed surveys and…

  8. Music Ensemble Participation: Personality Traits and Music Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrance, Tracy A.; Bugos, Jennifer A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationship between personality type and ensemble choice and (2) to examine the differences in personality across age and music experience in young adults. Participants (N = 137; 68 instrumentalists, 69 vocalists) completed a demographic survey and the Big Five Personality Inventory.…

  9. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe.

  10. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales s ≳ 20 h-1 Mpc. We combined the information from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation-of-state parameter to wDE = -0.996 ± 0.042 when to be assumed time independent, the curvature of the Universe to Ωk = -0.0007 ± 0.0030 and the sum of the neutrino masses to ∑mν < 0.25 eV at 95 per cent confidence levels. We explore the constraints on the growth rate of cosmic structures assuming f(z) = Ωm(z)γ and obtain γ = 0.609 ± 0.079, in good agreement with the predictions of general relativity of γ = 0.55. We compress the information of our clustering measurements into constraints on the parameter combinations DV(z)/rd, FAP(z) and fσ8(z) at zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61 with their respective covariance matrices and find good agreement with the predictions for these parameters obtained from the best-fitting ΛCDM model to the CMB data from the Planck satellite. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others by Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  11. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmic flows and cosmic web from luminous red galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Hernández Monteagudo, Carlos; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-06-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given Λ cold dark matter cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift-dependent non-linear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalized perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the argo code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions. Our tests relying on accurate N-body-based mock galaxy catalogues show unbiased real space power spectra of the non-linear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the non-linear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual light-cone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10 per cent of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, for example, baryon acoustic oscillation reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich, integrated Sachs-Wolfe measurements or environmental studies.

  12. Preconceptional ancestry-based carrier couple screening for cystic fibrosis and haemoglobinopathies: what determines the intention to participate or not and actual participation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman, Phillis; Plass, Anne Marie Catharina; Henneman, Lidewij; Bezemer, Pieter Dirk; Cornel, Martina Cornelia; ten Kate, Leo Pieter

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores determinants of the intention to participate or not and of actual participation in preconceptional ancestry-based carrier couple screening for cystic fibrosis (CF) and haemoglobinopathies (HbPs). In total, 9453 individuals from a multi-ethnic population were invited. Invitees who had a partner and who were planning a pregnancy were the target population (33–36%). Test participation was conditional on survey participation. Those who refrained from test participation were asked to participate in the survey only. The questionnaire was based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour, which explains behaviour through intention. It was completed by 418 survey participants: 171 who intended to participate in the testing, and 247 who refrained from test participation. Both test intenders and offer decliners generally had a positive attitude towards test participation, and perceived high behavioural control. This applied to Western and non-Western survey participants equally. Offer decliners, however, perceived less control in terms of the time and effort needed for participation. Still, 68% of them intended to participate in the future if the screening would be offered routinely. Test intenders more often would draw reproductive consequences from test results, perceived a higher risk of being a carrier, more benefits and less adverse psychological outcomes. Feelings of stigmatisation were not an important issue, but 14% thought that there would be discrimination against carriers: among them more were non-Western survey participants. Preconceptional ancestry-based CF and HbPs carrier screening was evaluated as positive and desirable among Western and non-Western survey participants. The effort and time needed for participation were important reasons for declining participation, which might be overcome by improving access to the screening. PMID:19223934

  13. Matrix Completions and Chordal Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kenneth John HARRISON

    2003-01-01

    In a matrix-completion problem the aim is to specifiy the missing entries of a matrix inorder to produce a matrix with particular properties. In this paper we survey results concerning matrix-completion problems where we look for completions of various types for partial matrices supported ona given pattern. We see that thc existence of completions of the required type often depends on thechordal properties of graphs associated with the pattern.

  14. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological analysis of the DR12 galaxy sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Shadab; Ata, Metin; Bailey, Stephen; Beutler, Florian; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blazek, Jonathan A.; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Ho, Shirley; Kinemuchi, Karen; Kirkby, David; Kitaura, Francisco; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Maraston, Claudia; McBride, Cameron K.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Percival, Will J.; Petitjean, Patrick; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrian M.; Reid, Beth A.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Rubiño-Martín, Jose Alberto; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scóccola, Claudia G.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Sheldon, Erin S.; Simmons, Audrey; Slosar, Anže; Strauss, Michael A.; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Magaña, Mariana Vargas; Vazquez, Jose Alberto; Verde, Licia; Wake, David A.; Wang, Yuting; Weinberg, David H.; White, Martin; Wood-Vasey, W. Michael; Yèche, Christophe; Zehavi, Idit; Zhai, Zhongxu; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-09-01

    We present cosmological results from the final galaxy clustering data set of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey, part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III. Our combined galaxy sample comprises 1.2 million massive galaxies over an effective area of 9329 deg2 and volume of 18.7 Gpc3, divided into three partially overlapping redshift slices centred at effective redshifts 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We measure the angular diameter distance DM and Hubble parameter H from the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) method, in combination with a cosmic microwave background prior on the sound horizon scale, after applying reconstruction to reduce non-linear effects on the BAO feature. Using the anisotropic clustering of the pre-reconstruction density field, we measure the product DMH from the Alcock-Paczynski (AP) effect and the growth of structure, quantified by fσ8(z), from redshift-space distortions (RSD). We combine individual measurements presented in seven companion papers into a set of consensus values and likelihoods, obtaining constraints that are tighter and more robust than those from any one method; in particular, the AP measurement from sub-BAO scales sharpens constraints from post-reconstruction BAOs by breaking degeneracy between DM and H. Combined with Planck 2016 cosmic microwave background measurements, our distance scale measurements simultaneously imply curvature ΩK = 0.0003 ± 0.0026 and a dark energy equation-of-state parameter w = -1.01 ± 0.06, in strong affirmation of the spatially flat cold dark matter (CDM) model with a cosmological constant (ΛCDM). Our RSD measurements of fσ8, at 6 per cent precision, are similarly consistent with this model. When combined with supernova Ia data, we find H0 = 67.3 ± 1.0 km s-1 Mpc-1 even for our most general dark energy model, in tension with some direct measurements. Adding extra relativistic species as a degree of freedom loosens the constraint only slightly, to H0 = 67.8 ± 1.2 km s-1 Mpc-1. Assuming flat

  15. Completing $h$

    CERN Document Server

    Dienes, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, the science community was introduced to the $h$-index, a proposed statistical measure of the collective impact of the publications of any individual researcher. It is of course undeniable that any method of reducing a complex data set to a single number will necessarily have certain limitations and introduce certain biases. However, in this paper we point out that the definition of the $h$-index actually suffers from something far deeper: a hidden mathematical incompleteness intrinsic to its definition. In particular, we point out that one critical step within the definition of $h$ has been missed until now, resulting in an index which only achieves its stated objectives under certain rather limited circumstances. For example, this incompleteness explains why the $h$-index ultimately has more utility in certain scientific subfields than others. In this paper, we expose the origin of this incompleteness and then also propose a method of completing the definition of $h$ in a way which remai...

  16. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ata, Metin; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E; Ferraro, Simone; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Perciva, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G; Schlege, David; Schneider, Donald P; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 $h^{-1}$ Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the \\textsc{argo} code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate $N$-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to $k\\sim0.2\\, h$ Mpc$^{-1}$, and vanishing quadrupoles down to $\\sim20\\,h^{-1}$ Mpc. We also demonstrate tha...

  17. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: tomographic BAO analysis of DR12 combined sample in configuration space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Brownstein, Joel R.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Zhu, Fangzhou

    2017-08-01

    We perform a tomographic baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs) analysis using the two-point galaxy correlation function measured from the combined sample of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12), which covers the redshift range of 0.2 clustering, we obtain a measurement of DA(z)/rd and H(z)rd at nine effective redshifts with the full covariance matrix calibrated using MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues. Using the reconstructed galaxy catalogues, we obtain the precision of 1.3-2.2 per cent for DA(z)/rd and 2.1-6.0 per cent for H(z)rd. To quantify the gain from the tomographic information, we compare the constraints on the cosmological parameters using our nine-bin BAO measurements, the consensus three-bin BAO and redshift space distortion measurements at three effective redshifts in Alam et al., and the non-tomographic (one-bin) BAO measurement at a single effective redshift. Comparing the nine-bin with one-bin constraint result, it can improve the dark energy Figure of Merit by a factor of 1.24 for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization for equation-of-state parameter wDE. The errors of w0 and wa from nine-bin constraints are slightly improved when compared to the three-bin constraint result.

  18. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: angular clustering tomography and its cosmological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Crocce, Martin; Scoccimarro, Roman; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Samushia, Lado; Tinker, Jeremy; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, ω(θ), in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard Λ cold dark matter model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from wDE = -1, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity (GR) using the growth-index γ parametrization. These results are, in general, comparable to the most precise present-day constraints on cosmological parameters, and show very good agreement with the standard model. In particular, combining CMB, ω(θ) and SNIa, we find a value of wDE consistent with -1 to a precision better than 5 per cent when it is assumed to be constant in time, and better than 6 per cent when we also allow for a spatially curved Universe.

  19. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in Fourier-space

    CERN Document Server

    Beutler, Florian; Ross, Ashley J; McDonald, Patrick; Saito, Shun; Bolton, Adam S; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A; Ross, Nicholas P; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G; Schneider, Donald P; Slosar, Anže; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) signal of the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data release (DR12). Our analysis is performed in Fourier-space, using the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole. The dataset includes $1\\,198\\,006$ galaxies over the redshift range $0.2 < z < 0.75$. We divide this dataset into three (overlapping) redshift bins with the effective redshifts $\\zeff = 0.38$, $0.51$ and $0.61$. We demonstrate the reliability of our analysis pipeline using N-body simulations as well as $\\sim 1000$ MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues, which mimic the BOSS-DR12 target selection. We apply density field reconstruction to enhance the BAO signal-to-noise ratio. By including the power spectrum quadrupole we can separate the line-of-sight and angular modes, which allows us to constrain the angular diameter distance $D_A(z)$ and the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ separately. We obtain two independent $1.6\\%$ and $1.5\\%$ constraints on $D_A(z)$ and $2.9\\%$ and $2.3\\%$ constraints...

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: theoretical systematics and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the galaxy correlation function

    CERN Document Server

    Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J; O'Connell, Ross; Ross, Ashley J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Percival, Will J; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A; Rossi, Graziano; Seo, Hee-Jong; Brownstein, Joel R; Olmstead, Matthew; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the potential sources of theoretical systematics in the anisotropic Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) distance scale measurements from the clustering of galaxies in configuration space using the final Data Release (DR12) of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). We perform a detailed study of the impact on BAO measurements from choices in the methodology such as fiducial cosmology, clustering estimators, random catalogues, fitting templates, and covariance matrices. The theoretical systematic uncertainties in BAO parameters are found to be 0.002 in in the isotropic dilation $\\alpha$ and 0.003 in in the quadrupolar dilation $\\epsilon$. We also present BAO-only distance scale constraints from the anisotropic analysis of the correlation function. Our constraints on the angular diameter distance $D_A(z)$ and the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ including both statistical and theoretical systematic uncertainties are 1.5% and 2.8% at $z_{\\rm eff}=0.38$, 1.4% and 2.4% at $z_{\\rm eff}=0.51$, and 1....

  1. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: observational systematics and baryon acoustic oscillations in the correlation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Seo, Hee-Jong; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Percival, Will J.; Burden, Angela; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Reid, Beth; Brownstein, Joel R.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio A.; Saito, Shun; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Schneider, Donald P.; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; White, Martin; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-01-01

    We present baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale measurements determined from the clustering of 1.2 million massive galaxies with redshifts 0.2 image quality and Galactic extinction, and weights to account for density relationships intrinsic to the imaging and spectroscopic portions of the survey. We simulate the observed systematic trends in mock galaxy samples and demonstrate that they impart no bias on BAO scale measurements and have a minor impact on the recovered statistical uncertainty. We measure transverse and radial BAO distance measurements in 0.2 < z < 0.5, 0.5 < z < 0.75, and (overlapping) 0.4 < z < 0.6 redshift bins. In each redshift bin, we obtain a precision that is 2.7 per cent or better on the radial distance and 1.6 per cent or better on the transverse distance. The combination of the redshift bins represents 1.8 per cent precision on the radial distance and 1.1 per cent precision on the transverse distance. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ariel G; Crocce, Martin; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; DallaVecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, galaxy bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales $s \\gtrsim 20\\,h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc}$. We combined the galaxy clustering information from BOSS with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter to $w_{\\rm DE}=-0.996\\pm0.042$ when assumed time-independent, the curvature of the Universe to $\\Omega_{k}=-0.0007\\pm 0.0030$ and the sum of the neutrino masses to $\\sum m_{\

  3. The Clustering of Galaxies in the Completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmic Flows and Cosmic Web from Luminous Red Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata, Metin; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Angulo, Raul E.; Ferraro, Simone; Gil-Marín, Hector; McDonald, Patrick; Monteagudo, Carlos Hernández; Müller, Volker; Yepes, Gustavo; Autefage, Mathieu; Baumgarten, Falk; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Burden, Angela; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Guo, Hong; Ho, Shirley; McBride, Cameron; Neyrinck, Mark; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schlegel, David; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana

    2017-01-01

    We present a Bayesian phase-space reconstruction of the cosmic large-scale matter density and velocity fields from the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillations Spectroscopic Survey Data Release 12 (BOSS DR12) CMASS galaxy clustering catalogue. We rely on a given ΛCDM cosmology, a mesh resolution in the range of 6-10 h-1 Mpc, and a lognormal-Poisson model with a redshift dependent nonlinear bias. The bias parameters are derived from the data and a general renormalised perturbation theory approach. We use combined Gibbs and Hamiltonian sampling, implemented in the ARGO code, to iteratively reconstruct the dark matter density field and the coherent peculiar velocities of individual galaxies, correcting hereby for coherent redshift space distortions (RSD). Our tests relying on accurate N-body based mock galaxy catalogues, show unbiased real space power spectra of the nonlinear density field up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1, and vanishing quadrupoles down to r ˜ 20 h-1 Mpc. We also demonstrate that the nonlinear cosmic web can be obtained from the tidal field tensor based on the Gaussian component of the reconstructed density field. We find that the reconstructed velocities have a statistical correlation coefficient compared to the true velocities of each individual lightcone mock galaxy of r ˜ 0.68 including about 10% of satellite galaxies with virial motions (about r = 0.75 without satellites). The power spectra of the velocity divergence agree well with theoretical predictions up to k ˜ 0.2 h Mpc-1. This work will be especially useful to improve, e.g. BAO reconstructions, kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (kSZ), integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) measurements, or environmental studies.

  4. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: baryon acoustic oscillations in the Fourier space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beutler, Florian; Seo, Hee-Jong; Ross, Ashley J.; McDonald, Patrick; Saito, Shun; Bolton, Adam S.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Hand, Nick; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Modi, Chirag; Nichol, Robert C.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Schneider, Donald P.; Slosar, Anže; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Vazquez, Jose A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signal of the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) data release (DR12). Our analysis is performed in the Fourier space, using the power spectrum monopole and quadrupole. The data set includes 1198 006 galaxies over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.75. We divide this data set into three (overlapping) redshift bins with the effective redshifts zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61. We demonstrate the reliability of our analysis pipeline using N-body simulations as well as ˜1000 MultiDark-Patchy mock catalogues that mimic the BOSS-DR12 target selection. We apply density field reconstruction to enhance the BAO signal-to-noise ratio. By including the power spectrum quadrupole we can separate the line of sight and angular modes, which allows us to constrain the angular diameter distance DA(z) and the Hubble parameter H(z) separately. We obtain two independent 1.6 and 1.5 per cent constraints on DA(z) and 2.9 and 2.3 per cent constraints on H(z) for the low (zeff = 0.38) and high (zeff = 0.61) redshift bin, respectively. We obtain two independent 1 and 0.9 per cent constraints on the angular averaged distance DV(z), when ignoring the Alcock-Paczynski effect. The detection significance of the BAO signal is of the order of 8σ (post-reconstruction) for each of the three redshift bins. Our results are in good agreement with the Planck prediction within Λ cold dark matter. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  5. A SURVEY ON THE REASONS FOR NOT BEGINNING OR COMPLETING THE IMMUNIZATION SCHEDULE OF THE EXPANDED PROGRAMME ON IMMUNIZATION IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Nasseri

    1986-12-01

    Full Text Available Not beginning or completing the vaccination schedule as recommended in the Expanded Programme on Immunization is one of the major reasons for low immunization coverage. It should be studied in detail for remedial action, if the objectives of the EPI in Iran are to be achieved as stated. Generally, lack of knowledge, lack of motivation and obstacles ore the basic categorical reasons for low coverage. Studies done shows however, that lack of motivation does not seem to play an important role in Iran. Whereas, unawareness of the need for immunization and previous attack of target diseases, mainly measles, is the major components of lack of knowledge. Among obstacles, illness of the child, including afflictions to low fever, uncomplicated diarrhea, and so on, are the most frequently stated reasons for postponement of immunization. Presently, both cases are handled improperly. Diagnosis of measles is not an easy task and there are no contradictions for injecting such a child with live, attenuated measles vaccine. Moreover, fever and mild diarrhea not cause any harmful side effects. Thus the Ministry of Health and Medical Education has officially recommended insisting on immunizing such children. It is only with following such recommendations and actual expansion of the immunization delivery centers, that immunization coverage can be elevated to reach the stated objectives of EPI in Iran.

  6. Complete Makeover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released July 23, 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. We finish our look at Mars's dynamic atmosphere with an image of the surface that has been completely modified by the wind. Even the small ridges that remain have been ground down to a cliff-face with a 'tail' of eroded material. The crosshatching shows that the wind regime has remained mainly E/W to ENE/WSW. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 8.9, Longitude 221 East (139 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State

  7. Ambivalent participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes-Green, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Participation in young peoples' sexual cultures in Maputo, Mozambique led to reflections about the field dynamics of power, participation, desire, and discomfort. Structural inequalities of race, gender, and educational status resulted in informants seeing me as a morally righteous person to whom...... they could not give open accounts about sexual practice. Attempting to overcome these barriers, I participated in excessive nightlife activities, and as a consequence they began viewing me as a more accepting and reliable person. Although breaking down these barriers provided invaluable insight......' continued participation. I show how negotiating the risks of participation may simultaneously satisfy the desire for knowledge and curb erotic desires....

  8. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation....

  9. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: towards a computationally efficient analysis without informative priors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gongbo; Ross, Ashley J.; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose A.; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J.; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Satpathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.

    2017-07-01

    We develop a new computationally efficient methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors (those coming from extra probes) in the estimation of cosmological parameters. Using our new methodology, we extract the dark energy model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurements. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of {R, la, Ωbh2, ns, log(As), Ωk, H(z), DA(z), f(z)σ8(z)}, which give an efficient summary of the Planck data and two-point statistics from the BOSS galaxy sample. The CMB shift parameters are R=√{Ω _m H_0^2} r(z_*) and la = πr(z*)/rs(z*), where z* is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and r(z*) and rs(z*) denote our comoving distance to the z* and sound horizon at z*, respectively; Ωb is the baryon fraction at z = 0. This approximate methodology guarantees that we will not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is unable to constrain, i.e. Ωbh2 and ns. The main advantage is that the computational time required for extracting these parameters is decreased by a factor of 60 with respect to exact full-likelihood analyses. The results obtained show no tension with the flat Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological paradigm. By comparing with the full-likelihood exact analysis with fixed dark energy models, on one hand we demonstrate that the double-probe method provides robust cosmological parameter constraints that can be conveniently used to study dark energy models, and on the other hand we provide a reliable set of measurements assuming dark energy models to be used, for example, in distance estimations. We extend our study to measure the sum of the neutrino mass using different methodologies, including double-probe analysis (introduced in this study), full-likelihood analysis and single-probe analysis

  10. Attitudes of Patients in Developing Countries Toward Participating in Clinical Trials: A Survey of Saudi Patients Attending Primary Health Care Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lateefa O. Al-Dakhil

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Clinical trials are experimental projects that include patients as subjects. A number of benefits are directly associated with clinical trials. Healthcare processes and outcomes can be improved with the help of clinical trials. This study aimed to assess the attitudes and beliefs of patients about their contribution to and enrolment in clinical trials. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used for data collection and analysis. A questionnaire was developed with six categories to derive effective outcomes. Results: Of the 2000 participants approached to take part in the study, 1081 agreed. The majority of the study population was female, well educated, and unaware of clinical trials. Only 324 subjects (30.0% had previously agreed to participate in a clinical trial. The majority (87.1% were motivated to participate in clinical trials due to religious aspects. However, fear of any risk was the principal reason (79.8% that reduced their motivation to participate. Conclusions: The results of this study revealed that patients in Saudi Arabia have a low awareness and are less willing to participate in clinical trials. Different motivational factors and awareness programs can be used to increase patient participation in the future.

  11. Unfolding Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saad-Sulonen, Joanna; Halskov, Kim; Eriksson, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding......, urban planning, participatory arts, business, science and technology studies) to bring a plurality of perspectives and expertise related to participation.......The aim of the Unfolding Participation workshop is to outline an agenda for the next 10 years of participatory design (PD) and participatory human computer interaction (HCI) research. We will do that through a double strategy: 1) by critically interrogating the concept of participation (unfolding...... the concept itself), while at the same time, 2) reflecting on the way that participation unfolds across different participatory configurations. We invite researchers and practitioners from PD and HCI and fields in which information technology mediated participation is embedded (e.g. in political studies...

  12. COMPLETE ISSUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Littera Aperta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available LITTERA APERTA (Vol. 2 - 2014. Abstract: In its open and interdisciplinary scope, volume 2 of Littera Aperta. Journal of Literary and Cultural Studies continues the path opened in volume 1. It includes papers which belong to a wide range of periods, genres, nationalities and methodological approaches. Two complementary papers look into the figure of ghosts in the Classical writers Aristophanes and Lucretius: “The ghosts in Aristophanes’ Frogs” by Soraya Planchas Gallarte (Universidad Complutense de Madrid; and “Templa Serena against Acherusia Templa: A Materialistic Explanation of Ghosts in Lucretius” by Ángel J. Traver Vera (Junta de Extremadura. Juan de Dios Torralbo Caballero (Universidad de Córdoba analyzes the narrative techniques of the novel History of the Nun (1688 by the English writer Aphra Behn. In the field of contemporary world literature in English, Miryam Librán Moreno (Universidad de Extremadura traces the far-reaching influence of Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus on the story of Túrin Turambar by J.R.R. Tolkien; and the researcher Damlègue Lare, from the University of Lomé (Togo, surveys Efo Kodjo Mawugbe’s procedures to debunk African patriarchal patterns of thought in his feminist play In the Chest of a Woman (2008. As a cultural complement to these research pieces, Gabriel Laguna Mariscal (Universidad de Córdoba interviews the Spanish philosopher Javier Gomá Lanzón about the philosophy of the interviewee himself, the role of the philosopher in the modern society and the relevance of Humanities in the education of citizenry. Gabriel Laguna also publishes a review about a book that Javier Gomá coauthors together with Carlos García Gual and Fernando Savater: Muchas felicidades. Tres visiones y más de la idea de felicidad. // LITTERA APERTA (Vol. 2 - 2014. Resumen: El volumen 2 de Littera Aperta. Journal of Literary and Cultural Studies continúa la línea interdisciplinar y abierta del volumen 1, al incluir

  13. Impacts of Social Network on Therapeutic Community Participation: A Follow-up Survey of Data Gathered after Ya'an Earthquake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, natural disasters and the accompanying health risks have become more frequent, and rehabilitation work has become an important part of government performance. On one hand, social networks play an important role in participants' therapeutic community participation and physical & mental recovery. On the other hand, therapeutic communities with widespread participation can also contribute to community recovery after disaster.This paper described a field study in an earthquake-stricken area of Ya'an. A set of 3-stage follow-up data was obtained concerning with the villagers' participation in therapeutic community, social network status, demographic background, and other factors. The Hierarchical linear Model (HLM method was used to investigate the determinants of social network on therapeutic community participation.First, social networks have significantly impacts on the annual changes of therapeutic community participation. Second, there were obvious differences in education between groups mobilized by the self-organization and local government. However, they all exerted the mobilization force through the acquaintance networks. Third, local cadre networks of villagers could negatively influence the activities of self-organized therapeutic community, while with positively influence in government-organized therapeutic activities.This paper suggests that relevant government departments need to focus more on the reconstruction and cultivation of villagers' social network and social capital in the process of post-disaster recovery. These findings contribute to better understandings of how social networks influence therapeutic community participation, and what role local government can play in post-disaster recovery and public health improvement after natural disasters.

  14. Conceptualizing Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka; Bruun Jensen, Bjarne

    Although participation is not a new issue, it would be fair to say that consequential participation, which implies young people engaging in meaningful dialogue with adults and institutions and influencing decision-making processes in matters that concern them, is still in its infancy. This document...... and society. It then describes different forms, modes or qualities of participation and proposes a specific model of facilitating participatory work with young people - the IVAC approach (Investigation-Vision-Action-Change). The concept of action, types of actions aimed at initiating change and corresponding...... aims to set the scene for discussing young people's participation in different domains that have an impact on their lives. It outlines the meaning and different interpretations of the concept of "participation" before reviewing why participation is an important issue in relation to young people...

  15. Occupational Therapy in the Context of Head Start: A Preliminary Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowyer, Patricia; Moore, Cary C.; Thom, Carly

    2016-01-01

    This preliminary, descriptive study yields information on the utilization of occupational therapy services within Head Start programs. Participants completed an Internet-based survey of 25 questions pertaining to the understanding, scope, and utilization of occupational therapy services. Surveys were completed by 35 respondents nationwide. A total…

  16. Use of food labels, awareness of nutritional programmes and participation in the special supplemental program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC): results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2005-2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcicki, Janet M; Heyman, Melvin B

    2013-07-01

    Use of nutritional labels in choosing food is associated with healthier eating habits including lower fat intake. Current public health efforts are focusing on the revamping of nutritional labels to make them easier to read and use for the consumer. The study aims to assess the frequency of use of nutritional labels and awareness of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) nutritional programmes by low-income women including those participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) as surveyed in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006. Many low-income women do not regularly use the nutrition facts panel information on the food label and less than half had heard of the USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans (38.9%). In multivariate logistic regression, we found that WIC participation was associated with reduced use of the nutrition facts panel in choosing food products [odds ratio (OR) 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.22-0.91], the health claims information (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.32-0.28) and the information on carbohydrates when deciding to buy a product (OR 0.44, 95% CI 0.20-0.97) in comparison with WIC eligible non-participants. Any intervention to improve use of nutritional labels and knowledge of the USDA's nutritional programmes needs to target low-income women, including WIC participants. Future studies should evaluate possible reasons for the low use of nutrition labels among WIC participants in comparison with eligible non-participants.

  17. Door to Door Survey and Community Participation to Implement a New County Mosquito Control Program in Wayne County, North Carolina, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Kelley

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Community involvement in mosquito management programs provides more sustainable and effective organization and service. A door to door survey in Wayne County, NC carried out by student volunteers, resulted in 60 household responses. Residents had not previously experienced outreach from the county (88%, and 95% of them thought the student door to door survey was an effective form of outreach. One third of the residents thought mosquitoes were severe where they lived, but only 9% thought they had any containers in their yard that might breed mosquitoes. Only 15% of the residents were concerned about mosquito borne diseases. These responses provide evidence that outreach and education on mosquito control and diseases were necessary steps for future mosquito control community planning.

  18. Evaluation of Early Childhood Coaching Implementation in Nebraska. Technical Report Vol. 1: Key Findings from Participant Follow Up Survey. CYFS Working Paper 2014-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Knoche, Lisa; Marvin, Christine; Bainter, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The Nebraska Early Childhood Coach (ECC) training was a 3 day (8 hours) professional development event sponsored by the Nebraska Department of Education, Office of Child Development in 2009-2010. Sixty-five early childhood teachers and related service providers participated for the purpose of learning the basic principles and behaviors associated…

  19. Changing nursing student attitudes to consumer participation in mental health services: a survey study of traditional and lived experience-led education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Louise; Platania-Phung, Chris; Happell, Brenda; Harris, Scott; Sci, Dip Health; Hlth Nurs, M Ment; Bradshaw, Julie

    2014-09-01

    Mental health policy emphasises the importance of consumer participation in mental health services. To align education with policy and orient future healthcare services to active consumer involvement, the potential of academics with a lived experience of mental illness to impact on student attitudes towards consumer participation needs to be examined. A cohort comparative study was undertaken comparing attitudinal change between undergraduate nursing students undertaking two different mental health courses, one nurse-led (n  =  61) and one lived experience-led. Attitudes were measured through the Mental Health Consumer Participation Questionnaire. Within-cohort change was assessed via dependent sample t-tests, and degree of change was observed in each cohort, by comparing effect sizes. For the nurse-led course, attitudes on consumer involvement t (60)  =  -1.79, p consumer as staff t (60)  =  -4.12, p consumer capacity t (109)  =  -3.63, p consumer as staff, t (109)  =  -5.63, p consumer participation. Lived experience-led education was more beneficial in changing attitudes to consumer capacity and both types of education had similar positive effects on attitudes to consumers as staff.

  20. Belief in AIDS Origin Conspiracy Theory and Willingness to Participate in Biomedical Research Studies: Findings in Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics in Seven Cities Across Two Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Stefanie L.; Katz, Ralph V.; Wang, Min Qi; Lee, Ryan; Green, B. Lee; Kressin, Nancy R.; Claudio, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether a belief in the AIDS origin conspiracy theory is related to likelihood or fear of participation in research studies. Methods The Tuskegee Legacy Project Questionnaire was administered via random-digit-dialed telephone interview to black, white, and Hispanic participants in 4 cities in 1999 and 2000 (n = 1,133) and in 3 cities in 2003 (n = 1,162). Results In 1999, 27.8% of blacks, 23.6% of Hispanics, and 8% of whites (P ≤ .001) reported that it was “very or somewhat likely” that AIDS is “the result of a government plan to intentionally kill a certain group of people by genocide.” In 2003, 34.1% of blacks, 21.9% of Hispanics, and 8.4% of whites (P ≤ .001) reported the same. Conclusions Whereas blacks and Hispanics were more than 3 times more likely than whites to believe in this AIDS origin conspiracy theory, holding this belief was not associated with a decreased likelihood of participation in, or increased fear of participation in, biomedical research. PMID:21388939

  1. Injuries from Participation in Sports, Exercise, and Recreational Activities Among Active Duty Service Members - Analysis of the April 2008 Status of Forces Survey of Active Duty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    recall bias). Survey respondents may have also been more likely to report injuries that were more severe in nature even if occurring almost a year...approved life jacket Kayaking , canoeing, fishing, tubing, and swimming in open water 84, 85 Injury Prevention Report No. 12-HF-0DPT-08 58 b...be implemented prior to IRB approval. If you have questions regarding this IRB action or questions of a more general nature concerning human

  2. Suboptimal Control of Lipid Levels: Results from 29 Countries Participating in the Centralized Pan-Regional Surveys on the Undertreatment of Hypercholesterolaemia (CEPHEUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Chern-En; Ferrières, Jean; Gotcheva, Nina N; Raal, Frederick J; Shehab, Abdulla; Sung, Jidong; Henriksson, Karin M; Hermans, Michel P

    2016-05-02

    Five multicentre, cross-sectional Centralized Pan-Regional Surveys on the Undertreatment of Hypercholesterolaemia (CEPHEUS) were conducted in 29 countries across Asia, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Africa. The surveys assessed the current use and efficacy of lipid-lowering drugs (LLDs) worldwide and identified possible patient and physician characteristics associated with failure to attain low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals. The aim of this analysis was to consolidate the global results from these surveys. The surveys involved patients aged ≥18 years who had been prescribed LLDs for at least 3 months without dose changes for at least 6 weeks. A single visit was scheduled for data collection, including fasting plasma lipid and glucose levels. Cardiovascular risk profile and LDL-C goal attainment were assessed according to the 2004 updated US National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines. In total, 35 121 patients (mean age: 60.4 years) were included, and 90.3% had been prescribed statin monotherapy. Overall, only 49.4% of patients reached their recommended LDL-C level. LDL-C goals were attained in 54.8% (5084/9273) and 22.8% (3287/14 429) of patients were at high and very high cardiovascular risk, respectively. Factors associated with an increased likelihood of LDL-C goal attainment were lower baseline cardiovascular risk; presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or history of cardiovascular disease; and treatment with simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin (vs. all other LLDs). LDL-C goal attainment in patients taking LLDs is suboptimal worldwide, particularly in patients at high and very high cardiovascular risk.

  3. Authoring Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papazu, Irina

    2016-01-01

    . By turning to material participation, a concept inspired by Noortje Marres and Jennifer Gabrys, the efforts put into Samsø’s energy transformation by the islanders are given specificity. While much literature on public participation foregrounds public meetings and other spaces for deliberation and debate...

  4. Language Identity among Iranian English Language Learners: A Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Saeed; Khatib, Mohammad; Baleghizadeh, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    The present study is a nationwide survey of language identity among English language learners in Iran. The participants who completed the survey in this research included 1851 English language learners from different parts of the country who belonged to different genders, age groups and English language proficiency levels. The main instrument was…

  5. Language Identity among Iranian English Language Learners: A Nationwide Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Saeed; Khatib, Mohammad; Baleghizadeh, Sasan

    2014-01-01

    The present study is a nationwide survey of language identity among English language learners in Iran. The participants who completed the survey in this research included 1851 English language learners from different parts of the country who belonged to different genders, age groups and English language proficiency levels. The main instrument was…

  6. Positive impact of Tai Chi Chuan participation on biopsychosocial quality of life compared to exercise and sedentary controls: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Alex; J P Francis, Andrew

    2013-05-24

    Tai Chi Chuan (TCC) is a traditional Chinese medicine practice and martial art with biopsychosocial aspects. This study aimed to examine the impact of participation in TCC on multiple domains of Quality of Life (QoL) and to assess the involvement of the psychological factors of self-efficacy, Locus of Control (LoC) and Hope in these effects. A total of 68 participants from the general community (13 males and 55 females) aged between 18 and 68 (M=43.55 years) and not currently suffering from a mental or physical illness took part in the study. It was found that TCC participants, as a group, scored significantly better than those in sedentary (book club) and active (gym exercise) control conditions on Psychological and Physical QoL, and that the Physical QoL benefits of TCC continue to accrue with years of practice. The three psychological factors were shown to variously mediate (self-efficacy) and moderate (internal LoC and Hope) this latter relationship. Whilst the results bear limitations (in particular small sample sizes), it is hoped that these findings will encourage further research into TCC, and consideration of TCC as part of the range of treatment options available in community-based mental and physical health management.

  7. Costs and benefits of reaching parents for survey participation through school communication systems: testing the potential of a straightforward convenience sample

    OpenAIRE

    Vercruyssen, Anina

    2014-01-01

    Drawing a random sample for surveys from official registers is an expensive and time-consuming procedure in Belgium as in other countries. In order to obtain a sample for a study on work-family life balance amongst working mothers in Flanders (the Dutch-speaking part of Belgium), I opted for a promising, economical procedure by first selecting children in schools and day-care facilities. Given the compulsory nature of schooling in Belgium and the widespread use of day-care facilities, this of...

  8. Socio-economic Survey of Commercial Fishing Crew in the Northeast

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's Social Sciences Branch (SSB) completed a survey of crew, including hired captains, participating in commercial fisheries in...

  9. Geodetic Control Points, GPS survey was completed to create a GPS network containing 50 azimuth stations throughout the county intended to meet WisDOT First Order geometric accuracy standard (10ppm)., Published in 1996, 1:600 (1in=50ft) scale, Wood County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Geodetic Control Points dataset current as of 1996. GPS survey was completed to create a GPS network containing 50 azimuth stations throughout the county intended to...

  10. Complete 2mm Spectral Line Survey (130-170 GHz) of Sgr B2N, Sgr B2OH, IRC +10 216, Orion (KL), Orion-S, W51M, and W3(IRS5)

    CERN Document Server

    Remijan, Anthony J; Markwick-Kemper, A J; Turner, B E

    2008-01-01

    We report a complete 2mm spectral line survey (130-170 GHz) taken with the NRAO 12m Telescope between 1993 and 1995 toward the following sources: Sgr B2N, Sgr B2OH, IRC +10 216, Orion (KL), Orion-S, W51M, and W3(IRS5). Until very recently, this project was entirely the work of B. E. Turner. He wrote the original proposal, given below without changes or updates, and did all of the observing. B.E. Turner has fallen seriously ill and can no longer continue to work on the analysis of these data. The notes that follow the proposal give further information about the project and important information for users of these data. The data are distributed using the Spectral Line Search Engine (SLiSE) developed by A. J. Remijan and M. J. Remijan. SLiSE is a data display tool that will contain all the fully reduced and calibrated archived data taken as part of this 2mm survey. SLiSE is fast, easy to use, and contains the necessary functionality to display the data taken from spectral line searches. For example, SLiSE contai...

  11. The Impact of Repeated Lying on Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Chesney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effects on results of participants completing a survey more than once, a phenomenon known as farming. Using data from a real social science study as a baseline, three strategies that participants might use to farm are studied by Monte Carlo simulation. Findings show that farming influences survey results and can cause both statistical hypotheses testing Type I (false positive and Type II (false negative errors in unpredictable ways.

  12. Preventing Unplanned Pregnancy and Completing College: An Evaluation of Online Lessons. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonishak, Jill; Connolly, Chelsey

    2014-01-01

    The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy published free online lessons that help students take action to prevent unplanned pregnancy and complete their education. From the fall of 2012 to the spring of 2014, approximately 2,800 students took the online lessons and participated in pre- and post-lesson evaluation surveys at four…

  13. Factors associated with self-reported HBV vaccination among HIV-negative MSM participating in an online sexual health survey: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E Matthews

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A substantial proportion of men who have sex with men (MSM in the United States remain unvaccinated against hepatitis B. We sought to understand which factors are associated with vaccination among HIV-negative MSM. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Data were from a 2010 web-based survey of adult MSM. We calculated the prevalence of self-reported hepatitis B vaccination among 1,052 HIV-negative or HIV-untested men who knew their hepatitis B vaccination status, and used multivariate logistic regression to determine associated factors. 679 (64.5% MSM reported being vaccinated. Younger men were more likely to report being vaccinated than older men, and there was a significant interaction between age and history of hepatitis B testing. Men with at least some college education were at least 2.1 times as likely to be vaccinated as men with a high school education or less (95% CI = 1.4-3.1. Provider recommendation for vaccination (aOR = 4.2, 95% CI = 2.4-7.4 was also significantly associated with receipt of vaccination. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Providers should assess sexual histories of male patients and offer those patients with male sex partners testing for hepatitis infection and vaccinate susceptible patients. There may be particular opportunities for screening and vaccination among older and more socioeconomically disadvantaged MSM.

  14. Claiming Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabian, Louise; Samson, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    with participation are currently strong influential factors in Danish planning. The article explores the use of participatory DIY urban design in two cases: the relocation of beer drinkers in Enghave Square and the Carlsberg City development in Copenhagen, Denmark. Carlsberg City is the most thorough Danish example...

  15. Community-Academic Partnership Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Spurgeon, Emily

    2016-10-01

    Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) improve the research process, outcomes, and yield benefits for the community and researchers. This exploratory study examined factors important in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community stakeholders, previously contacted to participate in a CAP (n = 18), completed the 15-item Decision to Participate Questionnaire (DPQ). The DPQ assessed reasons for participating or declining participation in the ASD CAP. CAP participants rated networking with other providers, fit of collaboration with agency philosophy, and opportunity for future training/consultations as factors more important in their decision to participate in the ASD CAP than nonparticipants. Nonparticipants reported the number of requests to participate in research as more important in their decision to decline participation than participants. Findings reveal important factors in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs that may provide guidance on increasing community engagement in CAPs and help close the science-to-service gap.

  16. Sports participation of Dutch lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bragaru, Mihail; Meulenbelt, Hendrik; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H.B.; Dekker, Rienk

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To analyze sports participation of Dutch lower limb amputees and factors influencing sports participation. Study design: A cross-sectional survey was performed. Dutch lower limb amputees (N = 2039) were invited to participate in a postal survey addressing personal and amputation character

  17. Employee Participation in Europe: In search of the participative workplace

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poutsma, E.; Hendrickx, J.; Huygen, F.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents an overview of participation schemes in European companies, It is based on a secondary analysis of data from the 1996 EPOC mail survey among managers of profit sector establishments in 10 EU countries. The article describes the diverse extent and nature of participative workpla

  18. Overall survival and local recurrence of 406 completely resected stage IIIa-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients: questionnaire survey of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group to plan for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Y; Kato, H; Koike, T; Tsuchiya, R; Fujisawa, T; Shimizu, N; Watanabe, Y; Mitsudomi, T; Yoshimura, M

    2001-10-01

    the group of completely resected stage IIIA-N2 non-small cell lung cancer patients (NSCLC) is considered to be heterogeneous in various aspects including survival and the recurrent pattern. In the present study, we attempted to clarify the factors which separate these patients into high and low risk groups based on the survival and local recurrence. a questionnaire survey on the survival and local recurrence of non-small cell lung cancer patients with pathological stage IIIA-N2 disease who underwent a complete resection from January 1992 to December 1993 was performed by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group as of July 1999. The information on the survival of 406 patients and that of local recurrence in 332 of them was available. the 5-year survival of the 406 patients was 31.0%. In a univariate analysis, the age, clinical and pathological T status, number of N2 stations, pathological N1 disease, operative modality and postoperative radiotherapy were all found to be important prognostic factors. Clinical N2 disease marginally influenced the survival (P=0.07). In a multivariate analysis of these variables including clinical N2 disease, the survival was significantly worse in the case of multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=1.741), the presence of pathological N1 disease (1.403), pathological T2 or 3 disease (1.399) and an age older than 65 (1.327). The rate of freedom from any local recurrence at the bronchial stump, or in the hilar, mediastinal or supraclavicular lymph nodes at 5 years was 64%. In a univariate analysis of the freedom from local recurrence, the clinical N status, pathological T status, pathological N1 disease and number of N2 stations were all found to be important prognostic factors. A multivariate analysis revealed the freedom from local recurrence to be adversely influenced by multiple N2 stations (hazard ratio=2.05), and the presence of either clinical N1 or 2 (1.733) disease. The 5-year survival and the rate of freedom from local recurrence at 5

  19. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ), which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and EQ-5D-5L. Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81-0.96), as was test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83-0.92). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ- 5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in a range of further conditions, and additional properties, such as responsiveness, will also be assessed in the next phase of the instrument's development.

  20. Public Opinion Regarding Financial Incentives to Engage in Advance Care Planning and Complete Advance Directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Catherine L; Chen, Lucy; Olorunnisola, Michael; Delman, Aaron; Nguyen, Christina A; Cooney, Elizabeth; Gabler, Nicole B; Halpern, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently instituted physician reimbursements for advance care planning (ACP) discussions with patients. To measure public support for similar programs. Cross-sectional online and in-person surveys. English-speaking adults recruited at public parks in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from July to August 2013 and online through survey sampling international Web-based recruitment platform in July 2015. Participants indicated support for 6 programs designed to increase advance directive (AD) completion or ACP discussion using 5-point Likert scales. Participants also indicated how much money (US$0-US$1000) was appropriate to incentivize such behaviors, compared to smoking cessation or colonoscopy screening. We recruited 883 participants: 503 online and 380 in-person. The status quo of no systematic approach to motivate AD completion was supported by 67.0% of participants (63.9%-70.1%). The most popular programs were paying patients to complete ADs (58.0%; 54.5%-61.2%) and requiring patients to complete ADs or declination forms for health insurance (54.1%; 50.8%-57.4%). Participants more commonly supported paying patients to complete ADs than paying physicians whose patients complete ADs (22.6%; 19.8%-25.4%) or paying physicians who document ACP discussions (19.1%; 16.5%-21.7%; both P < .001). Participants supported smaller payments for AD completion and ACP than for obtaining screening colonoscopies or stopping smoking. Americans view payments for AD completion or ACP more skeptically than for other health behaviors and prefer that such payments go to patients rather than physicians. The current CMS policy of reimbursing physicians for ACP conversations with patients was the least preferred of the programs evaluated.

  1. European Patterns of Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas Fehmerling; Ejrnæs, Anders

    2015-01-01

    of dissatisfaction with the government and feelings of being member of a discriminated group affect the level of extra-parliamentary participation, and second, how different welfare regimes condition the extend to which these groups chose to act. In a comparative multilevel design, using data from the European...... Social Survey (ESS) Round 4 (2008), the article finds that satisfaction/dissatisfaction with the government is an important predictor alongside the institutional macro-level variable. The article combines a critical tradition, which suggests that political participation is motivated by a feeling...... of dissatisfaction with an institutional perspective in which certain institutional conditions are seen as enablers for citizens to actively participate in political life. Our results show that the overall level of extra-parliamentary activity in the Scandinavian countries is higher than in the other European...

  2. Political participation of registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenhouten, Christine L; Malakar, Crystalmichelle L; Kubsch, Sylvia; Block, Derryl E; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan

    2011-08-01

    Level of political participation and factors contributing to participation were measured among Midwest RNs (n = 468) via an online survey (Cronbach's α = .95). Respondents reported engaging in primarily "low cost" activities (e.g., voting, discussing politics, and contacting elected officials), with fewer reporting speaking at public gatherings, participating in demonstrations, and membership in nursing organizations. Psychological engagement was most predictive (p nursing organizations need to model and cultivate greater psychological engagement among students and nurses.

  3. Survey on Secondary And Primary School Students to Participate in the Sunshine Sports%中小学生参与阳光体育运动现状调查研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻坚; 黄敏; 郑磊

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: By Using the method of literature, questionnaire survey method, conducted a survey of primary and secondary school students to participate in the sun sports status quo. The results showed that : the level of prima ry and secondary students' awareness of the sun sports basically in simple to understand. Primary and secondary school students to participate more optimistic about the overall situation of the sun sport, but the pupils individual consciousness, the initiative needs to be improved. Academic pressure, lack of sports activities, sports venues, and the lack of facilities and equipment, factors affecting primary and secondary school students take the initia- tive to participate in the Sunshine Sports. Health First is to establish and actively promote the implementation of the Sunshine Sports; increase funding for sports facilities; great importance to the school Family combination of social sports, to promote students' active, conscious participation sunshine sports is recommended.%采用文献资料、问卷调查等研究方法,对中小学生参与阳光体育运动的现状进行了调查。结果显示:中小学生对于阳光体育运动的认知情况较为浅显,参与阳光体育运动的总体情况较为乐观,但其个人自觉、主动性还有待提高。升学压力大、体育活动时间缺乏、体育场地、器材设备不足等是影响中小学生主动参加阳光体育运动的主要因素。建议在中小学生中树立健康第一的思想,以积极推动阳光体育运动的实施;加大体育场地设施的资金投入;重视学校一家庭一社会体育相结合,促进学生主动、自觉参与阳光体育运动。

  4. Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Interest and Participation in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, Amy R; Blanchard, May Hsieh; Carson, Sandra A; Peterson, Herbert B; Flynn, Erica B; Ogburn, Tony

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate obstetrics and gynecology resident interest and participation in global health experiences and elucidate factors associated with resident expectation for involvement. A voluntary, anonymous survey was administered to U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents before the 2015 Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology in-training examination. The 23-item survey gathered demographic data and queried resident interest and participation in global health. Factors associated with resident expectation for participation in global health were analyzed by Pearson χ tests. Of the 5,005 eligible examinees administered the survey, 4,929 completed at least a portion of the survey for a response rate of 98.5%. Global health was rated as "somewhat important" or "very important" by 96.3% (3,761/3,904) of residents. "Educational opportunity" (69.2%) and "humanitarian effort" (17.7%) were cited as the two most important aspects of a global health experience. Residents with prior global health experience rated the importance of global health more highly and had an increased expectation for future participation. Global health electives were arranged by residency programs for 18.0% (747/4,155) of respondents, by residents themselves as an elective for 44.0% (1,828/4,155), and as a noncredit experience during vacation time for 36.4% (1,514/4,155) of respondents. Female gender, nonpartnered status, no children, prior global health experience, and intention to incorporate global health in future practice were associated with expectations for a global health experience. Most obstetrics and gynecology residents rate a global health experience as somewhat or very important, and participation before or during residency increases the perceived importance of global health and the likelihood of expectation for future participation. A majority of residents report arranging their own elective or using vacation time to participate, suggesting that residency programs have

  5. Factors Associated with PMTCT Cascade Completion in Four African Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Dionne-Odom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many countries are working to reduce or eliminate mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV. Prevention efforts have been conceptualized as steps in a cascade but cascade completion rates during and after pregnancy are low. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was performed across 26 communities in Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, South Africa, and Zambia. Women who reported a pregnancy within two years were enrolled. Participant responses were used to construct the PMTCT cascade with all of the following steps required for completion: at least one antenatal visit, HIV testing performed, HIV testing result received, initiation of maternal prophylaxis, and initiation of infant prophylaxis. Factors associated with cascade completion were identified using multivariable logistic regression modeling. Results. Of 976 HIV-infected women, only 355 (36.4% completed the PMTCT cascade. Although most women (69.2% did not know their partner’s HIV status; awareness of partner HIV status was associated with cascade completion (aOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.01–2.0. Completion was also associated with receiving an HIV diagnosis prior to pregnancy compared with HIV diagnosis during or after pregnancy (aOR 14.1, 95% CI 5.2–38.6. Conclusions. Pregnant women with HIV infection in Africa who were aware of their partner’s HIV status and who were diagnosed with HIV before pregnancy were more likely to complete the PMTCT cascade.

  6. Voice Disorder Management Competencies: A Survey of School-Based Speech-Language Pathologists in Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Amy F.; DeVeney, Shari L.; Friehe, Mary J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this survey was to determine the self-perceived competence levels in voice disorders of practicing school-based speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and identify correlated variables. Method: Participants were 153 master's level, school-based SLPs with a Nebraska teaching certificate and/or licensure who completed a survey,…

  7. A national survey on radiation dose in CT in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molen, A.J. van der; Schilham, A.; Stoop, P.; Prokop, M.; Geleijns, J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess radiation exposure due to CT in the Netherlands. Methods Twenty-one hospitals participated in a dose survey for the 21 most frequently used CT protocols. Hospitals completed a Web survey with detailed parameters for one patient per protocol, including the dose length product (

  8. A Survey of Current and Projected Ethical Dilemmas of Rehabilitation Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Michael T.; Cartwright, Brenda Y.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study surveyed current and projected ethical dilemmas of rehabilitation counselors. Method: As a mixed-methods approach, the study used both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Results: Of the 211 participants who completed the survey, 116 (55.0%) reported an ethical dilemma. Based on the descriptions, common themes involved roles…

  9. Cultural participation in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevenson, David; Kann-Rasmussen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    Europe has a ‘problem’; it is becoming a ‘less cultural continent’ as fewer Europeans are ‘engaging in cultural activities’. This conclusion has been reached due to the findings of the latest cross national cultural participation survey. This paper questions the existence of this ‘problem......’ and instead suggests that there is a shared problematisation across Europe sustained by common discursive archaeology that employs various discursive strands in relation to a dominant institutional discourse. The argument is that the ‘problem’ of ‘non-participation’ legitimates a ‘solution’ that predates its...

  10. Large Pelagics Intercept Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Large Pelagics Intercept Survey (LPIS) is a dockside survey of private and charterboat captains who have just completed fishing trips directed at large pelagic...

  11. Global Land Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Global Land Survey (GLS) datasets are a collection of orthorectified, cloud-minimized Landsat-type satellite images, providing near complete coverage of the...

  12. Patient Perceptions of Participating in the RSNA Image Share Project: a Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiremath, Atheeth; Awan, Omer; Mendelson, David; Siegel, Eliot L

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to gauge patient perceptions of the RSNA Image Share Project (ISP), a pilot program that provides patients access to their imaging studies online via secure Personal Health Record (PHR) accounts. Two separate Institutional Review Board exempted surveys were distributed to patients depending on whether they decided to enroll or opt out of enrollment in the ISP. For patients that enrolled, a survey gauged baseline computer usage, perceptions of online access to images through the ISP, effect of patient access to images on patient-physician relationships, and interest in alternative use of images. The other survey documented the age and reasons for declining participation for those that opted out of enrolling in the ISP. Out of 564 patients, 470 enrolled in the ISP (83 % participation rate) and 456 of these 470 individuals completed the survey for a survey participation rate of 97 %. Patients who enrolled overwhelmingly perceived access to online images as beneficial and felt it bolstered their patient-physician relationship. Out of 564 patients, 94 declined enrollment in the ISP and all 94 individuals completed the survey for a survey participation rate of 100 %. Patients who declined to participate in the ISP cited unreliable access to Internet and existing availability of non-web-based intra-network images to their physicians. Patients who participated in the ISP found having a measure of control over their images to be beneficial and felt that patient-physician relationships could be negatively affected by challenges related to image accessibility.

  13. Participação em dias nacionais de vacinação contra poliomielite: resultados de inquérito de cobertura vacinal em crianças nas 27 capitais brasileiras Participation in national polio immunization days: results of a vaccine coverage survey among children in 27 Brazilian cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Rocha Mello

    2010-06-01

    Immunization Days (NIDs are held twice a year to maintain the elimination of poliomyelitis and to provide routine immunization for children younger than five years of age. Few studies have examined factors associated with participation in National Immunization Days among Brazilian children, or the contribution of immunization days to the coverage of recommended vaccines. METHODS: We conducted a household cluster survey in 26 state capitals and the Federal District among children aged 19 to 35 months. Vaccination histories, including dates of vaccination, participation in the most recent NID or reasons for non-participation were obtained. Survey estimates were compared with official estimates based on doses administered. RESULTS: Among the 17,749 children surveyed, 16,213 (91% participated in the most recent NID. Children who received vaccination in the private sector had the lowest participation (84% in NIDs. In 13 capitals, official coverage estimates were higher than those from the survey. The main reasons given for non-participation the most recent NID included parent's decision not to participate, doctor's advice, child's illness, and factors associated with the organization of the NID. Overall, 15% of the children surveyed had received at least one immunization in addition to oral polio vaccine in the most recent NID, including yellow fever, hepatitis B, measles-mumps-rubella (MMR and combined diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis-Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines. CONCLUSIONS: In Brazilian capitals, National Immunization Days continue to enjoy high levels of acceptance by the population and offer opportunities to complete recommended immunization schedules. Reasons for non-participation suggest the need for different communication strategies to reach parents who do not bring their children for vaccination on NIDs.

  14. Trainee resident participation in health research in a resource-constrained setting in south-eastern Nigeria: perspectives, issues and challenges. A cross-sectional survey of three residency training centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eze Boniface

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The participation of trainers and trainees in health research is critical to advance medical science. Overcoming barriers and enhancing incentives are essential to sustain a research culture and extend the frontiers of medical education. In this study, we investigated the roles of individual and system factors influencing trainee resident participation in health research in Enugu, south-eastern Nigeria. Methods This cross-sectional survey of trainee residents was conducted across three residency training centres in Enugu, Nigeria, between February and March, 2010. The number and speciality distribution of trainee residents were determined from personnel records at each centre. A 19-item questionnaire was used to record demographic characteristics, research training/experience, and attitudes toward and perceived barriers to health research. Data were analysed to yield frequencies, percentages and proportions. Values of p  Results The response rate was 93.2%. The respondents (n = 136 comprised 109 males and 27 females. Their mean ± standard deviation age was 35.8 ± 5.6 years (range: 25–53 years. Participation in research was significantly associated with previous research training [odds ratio (OR: 2.90; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.35–6.25, p = 0.003, β = 22.57], previous research participation (OR: 2.21; 95% CI: 0.94–5.29, p = 0.047, β = 22.53 and research publication (OR: 2.63; 95% CI: 1.00–7.06, p = 0.03, β = 22.57. Attitude towards research was significantly influenced by perceived usefulness of research in patient care (OR: 7.10; 95% CI: 3.33–15.13, p = 0.001, job promotion (OR: 8.97; 95% CI: 4.12–19.53, p = 0.001 and better understanding of disease (OR: 21.37; 95% CI: 8.71–54.44, p = 0.001. Time constraints (OR: 0.06; 95% CI = 0.025–0.14, p = 0.001, funding (OR: 0.028; 95% CI: 0.008–0.10, p = 0.001 and mentorship (OR: 0.086; 95% CI

  15. Stress Associated with Transportation: A Survey of Persons with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crudden, Adele; Cmar, Jennifer L.; McDonnall, Michele C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study evaluated transportation-related stress and factors predicting stress among persons with visual impairments. Methods: Participants with visual impairments completed electronic surveys rating their stress levels experienced when completing various walking and public transportation tasks. They also indicated activities they…

  16. Motivation of fitness center participants toward resistance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathrins, Bess P; Turbow, David J

    2010-09-01

    There is a need to better understand the behavior and sense of motivation of fitness center participants. The purpose of this study was to assess whether or not demographic characteristics and health self-determinism (intrinsic or extrinsic motivation) of fitness center participants were predictive of their levels of resistance training. A cross-sectional design was used; participants were recruited via the Internet to complete an online survey. There were 185 participants (age = 39.1 +/- 11.3 years) in the study. The majority of respondents reported having carried out levels of resistance training that met national health organization recommendations. Regression analysis of the data revealed that health self-determinism predicted quantity of resistance training reported (p = 0.014), whereas demographics did not. Being intrinsically motivated to health self-determinism predicted meeting national resistance training recommendations compared to participants extrinsically motivated (p = 0.007). For those who work with fitness center participants, our findings are useful by identifying participants as a predominantly intrinsically motivated group of people that performs adequate quantities of resistance training; the methodology employed in this study can be used to identify participants in need of increased levels of resistance training and heightened sense of motivation to do so.

  17. Fifth National Survey of Older Americans Act Survey of Participants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — AoA's Performance Outcomes Measures project (POMP) helps States and Area Agencies on Aging assess their own program performance, while assisting AoA to meet the...

  18. Third National Survey of Older Americans Act Survey of Participants

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — AoA's Performance Outcomes Measures project (POMP) helps States and Area Agencies on Aging assess their own program performance, while assisting AoA to meet the...

  19. Quality of life and its association with work, the Internet, participation in groups and physical activity among the elderly from the EpiFloripa survey, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Larissa Pruner; Schneider, Ione Jayce Ceola; d'Orsi, Eleonora

    2016-12-22

    The study aimed to investigate the association between changes in social relations and physical activity on the quality of life of the elderly in the city of Florianópolis, Santa Catarina state, Brazil. Data on 1,197 elderly from two waves of the population and household survey, EpiFloripa Idoso, were analyzed. Multiple linear regression was performed to estimate association of social change variables and lifestyle on quality of life score (QoL; measured by CASP-16 Brazil, score can range from 0, which represents no QoL to 48, total satisfaction in all domains of CASP). The average QoL score in the sample was 37.6 (95%CI: 37.2; 38.1). The social relations that were associated with positive QoL score were to start to work, to continue to use the Internet, to start participating in religious or lifestyle groups, to remain and to become physically active, and for those who were physically active, but became inactive in the second wave. To remain living with family had a negative effect on QoL score for the elderly. Some changes in social relations had a positive effect on QoL, and results reaffirmed the importance of physical activity to healthy aging, since to pursue it in some of the waves was better than to remain inactive.

  20. Determinants of successful completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown AT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Angel T Brown,1 Jason Hitchcock,2 Christopher Schumann,2 J Michael Wells,1,3,4 Mark T Dransfield,1,3,4 Surya P Bhatt1,3 1Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, 2Department of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation, 3UAB Lung Health Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 4Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Birmingham, AL, USA Background: Despite known benefits, a significant proportion of patients with COPD do not complete pulmonary rehabilitation (PR. Little is known regarding which factors promote successful completion of PR. Methods: We analyzed data from a prospectively maintained database of subjects with COPD who attended a PR program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, from 1996 to 2013. Subjects were categorized as either completers or non-completers, based on successful completion of at least 8 weeks of PR. Demographics and comorbidities were recorded. Short Form 36 Health Survey, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire were administered to all participants at baseline and on completion of PR to assess participants’ perception of their health status, severity of depression, and dyspnea with performance of activities of daily living. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify predictors of successful completion of PR. Results: Four hundred and forty subjects were included, of whom 229 completed PR. Forty-one percent were female, and 17% were African American. Compared with non-completers, completers had greater Short Form 36 Health Survey pain score, lower forced expiratory volume in the first second, and lower Beck Depression Inventory score, and included a lower percentage of current smokers. On multivariate analysis, cigarette smoking at enrollment was associated with lower likelihood of completion of PR (adjusted odds ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.16–0.90; P=0.02.Conclusion: Cigarette smoking was the sole independent predictor of PR

  1. Evaluating tablet computers as a survey tool in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Steve M; Logan, Henrietta L; Guo, Yi; Marks, John G; Shepperd, James A

    2015-01-01

    Although tablet computers offer advantages in data collection over traditional paper-and-pencil methods, little research has examined whether the 2 formats yield similar responses, especially with underserved populations. We compared the 2 survey formats and tested whether participants' responses to common health questionnaires or perceptions of usability differed by survey format. We also tested whether we could replicate established paper-and-pencil findings via tablet computer. We recruited a sample of low-income community members living in the rural southern United States. Participants were 170 residents (black = 49%; white = 36%; other races and missing data = 15%) drawn from 2 counties meeting Florida's state statutory definition of rural with 100 persons or fewer per square mile. We randomly assigned participants to complete scales (Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Inventory and Regulatory Focus Questionnaire) along with survey format usability ratings via paper-and-pencil or tablet computer. All participants rated a series of previously validated posters using a tablet computer. Finally, participants completed comparisons of the survey formats and reported survey format preferences. Participants preferred using the tablet computer and showed no significant differences between formats in mean responses, scale reliabilities, or in participants' usability ratings. Overall, participants reported similar scales responses and usability ratings between formats. However, participants reported both preferring and enjoying responding via tablet computer more. Collectively, these findings are among the first data to show that tablet computers represent a suitable substitute among an underrepresented rural sample for paper-and-pencil methodology in survey research. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. In the eye of the storm. Planned EEG amendments reduce the half-life of the market survey of complete PV power generation systems; Im Auge des Wirbelsturms. Die EEG-Reformplaene lassen die Halbwertszeit der Marktuebersicht Komplettsysteme rapide schrumpfen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias B.

    2012-04-15

    The impending amendments of the German Renewables Act (EEG) have put the photovoltaic industry in a state of fright. Accurate market surveys are hardly possible, although at least a return on investments will still be possible even after 2012.

  3. Geology, Bedrock, Bedrock geologic map of the NPS Blue Ridge Parkway corridor. Majority of central and southern segments completed with entire project completed by October 2008., Published in 2004, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, NC DENR / Div. of Land Resources / Geological Survey Section.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geology, Bedrock dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2004. It is described as...

  4. Geology, Bedrock, Surficial and geologic hazard map of the NPS Blue Ridge Parkway corridor. Majority of central and southern segments completed with entire project completed by October 2008., Published in 2004, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, NC DENR / Div. of Land Resources / Geological Survey Section.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Geology, Bedrock dataset, published at 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Field Survey/GPS information as of 2004. It is described as...

  5. A practitioner survey of opinions toward regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epelman, Ingrid; Murray, Peter E; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Kuttler, Sergio; Namerow, Kenneth N

    2009-09-01

    The success of regenerative endodontic procedures requires practitioner acceptance, but little or no evidence is available. The purpose of this survey was to collect the opinions of attendee's of the 2008 Endodontic Board of Diplomates 2008 Summer Conference on the issue of regenerative endodontic procedures (REPs). After Nova Southeastern University institutional review board approval, 100 copies of a survey were circulated, and 56 completed surveys were returned anonymously. The survey found that 96% of participants thought that more regenerative therapies should be incorporated into treatments. Although only 14% of participants had used umbilical cord or stem cell banking for themselves or a relative, 63% thought that stem cell banking would be useful to regenerate dental tissues. Most (89%) of the participants would be willing to save teeth and dental tissues for stem cell banking. These results suggest that endodontic practitioners are supportive and optimistic about the future use of REPs.

  6. Completing the Complete ECC Formulae with Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Chmielewski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This work implements and evaluates the recent complete addition formulae for the prime order elliptic curves of Renes, Costello and Batina on an FPGA platform. We implement three different versions:(1 an unprotected architecture; (2 an architecture protected through coordinate randomization; and (3 an architecture with both coordinate randomization and scalar splitting in place. The evaluation is done through timing analysis and test vector leakage assessment (TVLA. The results show that applying an increasing level of countermeasures leads to an increasing resistance against side-channel attacks. This is the first work looking into side-channel security issues of hardware implementations of the complete formulae.

  7. Participation in Adult Education: Attitudes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeren, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we control the intention theory of Fishbein and Ajzen (1980) for the participation in an adult education course. Based on the Flemish Eurostat Adult Education Survey, we reveal that participants in adult education have a more positive attitude towards learning and that within the group of non-participants, those who formulate an…

  8. Receptivity and preferences of pancreatic cancer family members for participating in lifestyle programs to reduce cancer risk

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Lisa A.; Sinicrope, Pamela S.; Brockman, Tabetha A.; Patten, Christi A.; Decker, Paul A; Ehlers, Shawna L.; Nadeau, Ashley; Rabe, Kari G.; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Gloria M Petersen

    2013-01-01

    Background Cancer is a shared family experience that might provide an opportunity for lifestyle change among at-risk family members. The purpose of this study was to assess receptivity and preferences for cancer risk reduction programs among at-risk family members with two or more relatives affected with pancreas cancer. Methods We surveyed 401 at-risk family members in an existing pancreatic cancer family registry. Participants completed a mailed survey which examined demographic, medical, a...

  9. A survey of patients' attitudes to clinical research.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, A

    2011-04-01

    Every year hundreds of patients voluntarily participate in clinical trials across Ireland. However, little research has been done as to how patients find the experience. This survey was conducted in an attempt to ascertain clinical trial participants\\' views on their experience of participating in a clinical trial and to see and how clinical trial participation can be improved. One hundred and sixty-six clinical trial participants who had recently completed a global phase IV cardiovascular endpoint clinical trial were sent a 3-page questionnaire. Ninety-one (91%) respondents found the experience of participating in a clinical trial a good one with 85 (84.16%) respondents saying they would recommend participating in a clinical trial to a friend or relative and eighty-five (87.63%) respondents feeling they received better healthcare because they had participated in a clinical trial.

  10. Influence of family, religion, and social conformity on client participation in sexual reorientation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccio, Elaine M

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the likelihood of participating in sexual reorientation therapy (SRT) based on actual or expected family reactions to the disclosure of one's same-sex sexuality, religious fundamentalism, social conformity, and several demographic variables. A sample of 52 SRT participants and 211 SRT nonparticipants who had ever identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual completed a survey either online or in hardcopy format. Actual or expected negative family reactions, high religious fundamentalism, and identifying as spiritual significantly increased one's odds of participating in SRT. The findings are essential for preparing practitioners in any clinical practice setting to work with clients struggling with their sexuality.

  11. Completions of rationals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz J. Charatonik

    1994-05-01

    Full Text Available Spaces which are metrizable completions of the space Q of rationals are described. A characterization of metrizable spaces having the same family of metrizable completions as Q is deduced.

  12. Analytical Survey of College Students' Participation in Sports in the Context of Sunshine Sports Campaign%阳光体育背景下大学生参与体育运动调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏勇

    2012-01-01

    By use of questionnaires, literature review, a survey and analysis is made of the status quo of college students participation in sports, the findings of which show that: students have inadequate knowledge of the sunshine sports campaign; students' motive of sports goes adrift with their sports acts with a far from satisfactory rate of participation; the lack of suffi- cient sports grounds and facilities, all of which have negative effects upon the smooth implementation of the campaign. Sugges- tions : to step up the publicity campaign of the sunshine sports ; to raise students' awareness of keeping fit ; to integrate the sun- shine sports ideology with the sports courses; to introduce the inner and outer class all-in-one club model; to invest more on sports so as to satisfy the needs of the out-of-class sports communities and clubs.%运用问卷调查、文献资料等方法,对四川省高校大学生参与体育运动的现状进行调查分析,结果表明:大学生对阳光体育运动认识不深,体育动机与行为脱节和参与频率较低,学校缺乏足够的运动场地和器材,这些严重影响了阳光体育运动的开展.建议:增强阳光体育宣传力度,提高大学生健身意识;将阳光体育的健身理念融人体育课程,实施课内外一体化俱乐部制模式;加大体育经费投入,以满足课外体育社团、体育俱乐部的需要.

  13. The relationship between physical activity level and selected cardiovascular risk factors and mortality of males ≥ 50 years in Poland – The results of follow-up of participants of National Multicenter Health Survey WOBASZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Śmigielski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The role of leisure-time physical activity in reducing all-cause and cardiovascular mortality is well explored. The knowledge on occupational and commuting physical activity continues to be ambiguous and misleading. The aim of the study is to assess the influence of different kinds of physical activity on cardiovascular mortality risk in men. Material and Methods: Data analysis on physical activity level and other selected cardiovascular risk factors acquired from 3577 men in the age between 50–80 years who participated in the National Multicenter Health Survey WOBASZ (Wieloośrodkowe Ogólnopolskie Badanie Stanu Zdrowia, Poland (2003–2005 was linked with male mortality in 2004–2009. Data about causes of deaths were obtained from the Central Statistical Office and the Population Electronic Register. Results: Among males aged 50–59 years, the strongest risk factor was living in large settlements and provincial capitals as a place of residence and the most protective factor was occupational physical activity. In the age group 60–69 years and 70–80 years, the strongest protective effect was observed for leisure-time physical activity. In men aged between 70–80 years (unlike in the 50–59 years age group, the protective effect of large settlements and provincial capitals as a place of residence was noted. Conclusions: Occupational physical activity significantly reduced cardiovascular mortality in men aged 50–69 years, while for leisure-time activity the positive effect was observed in age group 60–69 years and 70–80 years. On the other hand, for the inhabitants of large settlements and provincial capitals, significantly higher risk of cardiovascular mortality in the age group 50–69 years and lower risk in the age group ≥ 70 years was noted, both in comparison with smaller places of residence.

  14. A Survey of Business Trends at BioOne Publishing Partners and its Implications for BioOne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Todd A.; Joseph, Heather; Waltham, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of BioOne participating publishers that was conducted during the fall of 2003. In that survey, BioOne collected data from 18 not-for-profit publishers on circulation levels, scholarly output in terms of pages and articles produced, revenues, and expenditures. From eight of the publishers, complete profit, loss, and…

  15. A Survey of Business Trends at BioOne Publishing Partners and its Implications for BioOne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Todd A.; Joseph, Heather; Waltham, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of BioOne participating publishers that was conducted during the fall of 2003. In that survey, BioOne collected data from 18 not-for-profit publishers on circulation levels, scholarly output in terms of pages and articles produced, revenues, and expenditures. From eight of the publishers, complete profit, loss, and…

  16. U. S. Intel[R] Teach to the Future Essentials Course: 2006 End of School Year Survey. Key Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Development Center, Inc, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This document presents highlights from the U.S. Intel Teach to the Future Essentials 2006 End of School Year Survey, which was administered via the web in April of 2006 to Master and Participant Teachers identified in the database as having completed the training between October 2004 and September 2005. This survey included the International…

  17. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley D

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available David Morley, Sarah Dummett, Laura Kelly, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, Crispin Jenkinson Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Purpose: There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ, which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Methods: Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and EQ-5D-5L. Results: Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81–0.96, as was test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83–0.92. Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ-5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Conclusion: Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in

  18. On completely irreducible operators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zejian; SUN Shanli

    2006-01-01

    Let T be a bounded linear operator on Hilbert space H,M an invariant subspace of T.If there exists another invariant subspace N of T such that H=M+N and M ∩ N=0,then M is said to be a completely reduced subspace of T.If T has a nontrivial completely reduced subspace,then T is said to be completely reducible;otherwise T is said to be completely irreducible.In the present paper we briefly sum up works on completely irreducible operators that have been done by the Functional Analysis Seminar of Jilin University in the past ten years and more.The paper contains four sections.In section 1 the background of completely irreducible operators is given in detail.Section 2 shows which operator in some well-known classes of operators,for example,weighted shifts,Toeplitz operators,etc.,is completely irreducible.In section 3 it is proved that every bounded linear operator on the Hilbert space can be approximated by the finite direct sum of completely irreducible operators.It is clear that a completely irreducible operator is a rather suitable analogue of Jordan blocks in L(H),the set of all bounded linear operators on Hilbert space H.In section 4 several questions concerning completely irreducible operators are discussed and it is shown that some properties of completely irreducible operators are different from properties of unicellular operators.

  19. Market research completed in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Intensive market research, completed in El Salvador for the contraceptive social marketing project of the Asociacion Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), was designed to obtain a better understanding of Salvadoran usage of and attitudes toward contraceptives in general and ADS products in particular. The research results are being used to develop a new marketing plan for the Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) program as it works to increase the program's effectiveness in reaching consumers. Points-of-purchase (retail outlets) were surveyed in November 1982 to study brand presence and vendor perceptions of consumer behavior in order to define the market in terms of products, prices, and distribution. Focus groups were conducted during November and December 1982 to probe consumer awareness and attitudes regarding methods, brands, and purchasing behavior. The results of the focus groups helped guide the development of a door-to-door consumer survey conducted from December 1982 through February 1983 to further define the market in terms of consumer size and characteristics. Personal interviews were conducted with the owner or manager of each of 247 pharmacies selected at random but in proportion to their distributional weight as to location. Aragon and Associates found that standard-dose orals and condoms were sold in 86% of the outlets surveyed and foaming tablets and low-dose pills in 37%. In terms of brand presence in outlets, the CSM products Perla (orals) and Condor (condom) both led their respective categories. In the foaming tablet category Suave had the lowest presence and Neo Sampoon the highest. The difference between reported and actual presence of contraceptives in the outlets was significant: 32% of the sellers of Perla, 18% of the sellers of Condor, and 26% of the sellers of Suave were out of stock at the time of the survey. The difference in average CSM product prices and the next lowest priced brands is very large. Dealers reported that their contraceptive

  20. A model of union participation: the impact of perceived union support, union instrumentality, and union loyalty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrick, Lois E; Shore, Lynn M; McClurg, Lucy Newton; Vandenberg, Robert J

    2007-05-01

    Perceived union support and union instrumentality have been shown to uniquely predict union loyalty. This study was the first to explicitly examine the relation between perceived union support and union instrumentality. Surveys were completed by 273 union members and 29 union stewards. A comparison of 2 models, 1 based on organizational support theory and 1 based on union participation theories, found that the model based on organizational support theory, in which union instrumentality was an antecedent to perceived union support and led to union loyalty and subsequently union participation, best fit the data. The model based on union participation theories, in which perceived union support was an antecedent of union instrumentality and led to union loyalty and subsequently union participation, was not supported. Union instrumentality was related to union commitment, but the relation was completely mediated by perceived union support.

  1. Nutrition risk factors among home delivered and congregate meal participants: need for enhancement of nutrition education and counseling among home delivered meal participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, S; Bai, Y; Piemonte, J

    2011-11-01

    The short-term impact of nutrition education and counseling intervention on nutrition risk factors among home delivered (HDM) and congregate (CGM) meal participants using Nutrition Survey Risk Screening was studied. A two-year intervention was conducted with 355 participants (n=259 CGM, n=96 HDM). Various nutrition behaviors that affect the nutrition risk score were compared. Congregate and home delivered meal locations in a northern county of New Jersey. CGM and HDM participants in a northern county of New Jersey age 60 and older. CGM participants received regular topical nutrition education and counseling in a classroom format with cooking demo, discussion, and handouts. The HDM participants only received the printed material (same handouts) and counseling by telephone. Demographics, medical condition, risk factors data were collected. All participants completed the 12 items checklist Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutritional behaviors assessed include number of meals eaten per day, servings of fruits and vegetables and nutrition risk score. A score of 6 or more points was defined as persons at high risk nutritionally. The impact of the intervention was evaluated using ANOVA/chi-square on Nutrition Survey Risk Screening. Nutrition education and counseling intervention improved nutrition risk scores; 5.76 to 5.32 (p=0.14) in CGM, 8.1 to 6.1 (peffective nutrition education and counseling.

  2. Vegetarian diet and mental disorders: results from a representative community survey

    OpenAIRE

    Michalak Johannes; Zhang Xiao; Jacobi Frank

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The present study investigated associations between vegetarian diet and mental disorders. Methods Participants were drawn from the representative sample of the German Health Interview and Examination Survey and its Mental Health Supplement (GHS-MHS). Completely vegetarian (N = 54) and predominantly vegetarian (N = 190) participants were compared with non-vegetarian participants (N = 3872) and with a non-vegetarian socio-demographically matched subsample (N = 242). Results ...

  3. China Executive Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENWEIXIAN

    2005-01-01

    Beiiing-based CTR Market Research recently completed a survey named China Business Executive Survey in the four Chinese dries of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. The survey identified 340,000 senior executives in the four cities and found that around 20,000 ofthem have annual income of over 200,000yuan (US$24,000).

  4. The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey. X. A Complete Spectroscopic Catalog of Dense Molecular Gas Observed toward 1.1 mm Dust Continuum Sources with 7.5 <= l <= 194 degrees

    CERN Document Server

    Shirley, Yancy L; Svoboda, Brian; Schlingman, Wayne M; Ginsburg, Adam; Rosolowsky, Erik; Gerner, Thomas; Mairs, Steven; Battersby, Cara; Stringfellow, Guy; Dunham, Miranda K; Glenn, Jason; Bally, John

    2013-01-01

    The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS) is a 1.1 mm continuum survey of dense clumps of dust throughout the Galaxy covering 170 square degrees. We present spectroscopic observations using the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope of the dense gas tracers, HCO+ and N2H+ 3-2, for all 6194 sources in the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey v1.0.1 catalog between 7.5 0.5 K) without HCO+ 3-2 emission does not occur in this catalog. We characterize the properties of the dense molecular gas emission toward the entire sample. HCO+ is very sub-thermally populated and the 3-2 transitions are optically thick toward most BGPS clumps. The median observed line width is 3.3 km/s consistent with supersonic turbulence within BGPS clumps. We find strong correlations between dense molecular gas integrated intensities and 1.1 mm peak flux and the gas kinetic temperature derived from previously published NH3 observations. These intensity correlations are driven by the sensitivity of the 3-2 transitions to excitation conditions rathe...

  5. Survey on job satisfaction of general practitioners who completed residency training in Zhongshan Hospital%复旦大学附属中山医院全科规范化培训毕业学员工作满意度调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健; 潘志刚; 赵琦

    2016-01-01

    Objective To survey job satisfaction of general practitioners ( GP ) who completed residency training program in Zhongshan Hospital , Fudan University .Methods One hundred and fifty two GPs who completed residency training program in Zhongshan Hospital and were currently working in community health service centers in Shanghai participated in the study .Job satisfaction was surveyed with Minnesota job satisfaction questionnaire and self-designed job satisfaction questionnaire .Results Total 152 questionnaires were distributed and 152 effective questionnaires were recovered with a response rate of 100%.The overall score of job satisfaction was 60.26 ±16.47, the mean score of internal satisfaction was 60.13 ±15.13 and the mean score of external satisfaction was 60.08 ±15.07.Linear regression analysis showed that there were no significant differences in overall , internal and external job satisfaction scores among participants with different gender , age, education level , job title, work duration and work location . Besides pay , participants valued the opportunities of upgrading working capability , job achievement , harmonious interpersonal relationships and good working environment .21.1%(32/152) of the participants were satisfied with their job and 26.3%(40/152) were not satisfied or even wanted to leave their job .The main reason for dissatisfaction was low income ( 100.0%); other reasons included lacking opportunity of upgrading clinical skills(72.5%,29/40)and poor working conditions (35.0%,14/40).Only 11.8%(18/152)of the participants thought that their work was recognized by their chief and peers .52.6%(80/152) thought that their abilities had not been fully developed and 7.2%(11/152) did not have any chance to display their abilities.61.8%(94/152) thought that they were over burdened .Only 9.3%(14/152) thought that medical work is respectable by the society .Conclusion The job satisfaction of GPs who completed residency training in Zhongshan Hospital seems

  6. Access, use and completion of a brief disaster mental health intervention among Hispanics, African-Americans and Whites affected by Hurricane Ike

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Matthew; Davidson, Tatiana M.; Andrews, Jeannette O.; Ruggiero, Kenneth J.

    2013-01-01

    African-Americans and Hispanics are disproportionally affected by disasters. We evaluated differences in the use and completion of a web-based mental health intervention, Disaster Recovery Web (DRW), by White, African-American and Hispanic adults in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. Approximately one year after the hurricane, a telephone survey was carried out with adults from Galveston and Chambers counties. A total of 1249 adults participated in the survey (80% White, 14% African-American and...

  7. Consumer food system participation: a community analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Mary K; Sobal, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence, patterns, and health associations of consumer participation in different stages of the food system using a survey of 663 adults in one U.S. county. Consumer food system participation by stage was 43% in food production, 47% in food processing, 65% in food distribution, 62% in food acquisition, 61% in food preparation, and 100% in food consumption. Consumers participated in an average of 3.7 of these 6 possible stages. Women and unmarried people participated in more stages. Food system participation was associated with few health problems, although people reporting some illnesses had higher food system participation.

  8. Wealth Accumulation across the Adult Life Course: Stability and Change in Sociodemographic Covariate Structures of Net Worth Data in the Survey of Income and Program Participation, 1984-1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land; Russell

    1996-12-01

    This paper reports microlevel Tobit regression analyses of sociodemographic covariates of the life course accumulation of total household net worth data in eight waves of five distinct panels-spanning over 6 years from late 1984 through early 1991-of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). It is found that the quadratic age-wealth relationship predicted by Modigliani's Life Cycle Hypothesis is evident in aggregate age-median wealth profiles as well as in the micro data for households with positive net worth. However, when adult status attainment variables are entered into the regression models either by themselves or in combination with marital/family status variables, the age of household head at which net worth begins to decline is far beyond the typical retirement age. In addition, the traditional criterion variables of sociological status attainment theory-educational attainment, occupational status, and earnings-are found to be positively associated with household net worth, although the net effect of occupational status generally is not statistically significant and the earnings effect is nonlinear. Further, consistent with status attainment theory, householder minority status (black, Hispanic) is negatively associated with the accumulation of net worth. It is found that both single male and single female householder status are negatively associated with the accumulation of household net worth (relative to married couple households) as is the size of the household (measured by the number of children under age 18 present). Separate logistic regression analyses show that households with zero and negative net worth are more likely than households with positive net worth to be black and have low earnings. Higher levels of educational and occupational status attainment reduce the probability of zero net worth but not the probability of negative net worth. Male- and female-headed households and households headed by Hispanics also are more likely to

  9. Mental Health Clinicians' Participation in Web-Based Training for an Evidence Supported Intervention: Signs of Encouragement and Trouble Ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, J Curtis; Hawley, Kristin M; Proctor, Enola K

    2016-07-01

    Comprehensive scalable clinician training is needed to increase the impact of evidence-supported psychotherapies. This study was designed to ascertain clinician participation in different low-cost training activities, what predicts their training participation, and how participation can be increased. The study enrolled 163 clinicians. Of these, 105 completed a follow-up survey and 20 completed a more in-depth qualitative interview. Some activities (web training) attracted greater participation than others (e.g., discussion boards, role playing). Key findings include the desirability of self-paced learning and the flexibility it afforded practicing clinicians. However, some found the lack of accountability insurmountable. Many desired in-person training as a way to introduce accountability and motivation. While low-cost, relevant, self-paced learning appeals to practicing clinicians, it may need to be combined with opportunities for in-person training and accountability mechanisms in order to encourage large numbers of clinicians to complete training.

  10. Latino College Completion: Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Completely random signed measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmund, Gunnar

    Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases.......Completely random signed measures are defined, characterized and related to Lévy random measures and Lévy bases....

  12. Latino College Completion: Kansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. BOSS DR12 combined galaxy sample: The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: On the measurement of growth rate using galaxy correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Satpathy, Siddharth; Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Bahcall, Neta A; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Kitaura, Francisco; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G; Seo, Hee-Jong; Thomas, Daniel; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita

    2016-01-01

    We present a measurement of the linear growth rate of structure, \\textit{f} from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III) Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Data Release 12 (DR12) using Convolution Lagrangian Perturbation Theory (CLPT) with Gaussian Streaming Redshift-Space Distortions (GSRSD) to model the two point statistics of BOSS galaxies in DR12. The BOSS-DR12 dataset includes 1,198,006 massive galaxies spread over the redshift range $0.2 < z < 0.75$. These galaxy samples are categorized in three redshift bins. Using CLPT-GSRSD in our analysis of the combined sample of the three redshift bins, we report measurements of $f \\sigma_8$ for the three redshift bins. We find $f \\sigma_8 = 0.430 \\pm 0.054$ at $z_{\\rm eff} = 0.38$, $f \\sigma_8 = 0.452 \\pm 0.057$ at $z_{\\rm eff} = 0.51$ and $f \\sigma_8 = 0.457 \\pm 0.052$ at $z_{\\rm eff} = 0.61$. Our results are consistent with the predictions of Planck $\\Lambda$CDM-GR. Our constraints on the growth rates of structure in the Universe at differ...

  15. Attitudes of Research Participants and the General Public Regarding Disclosure of Alzheimer Disease Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooblar, Jonathan; Roe, Catherine M.; Selsor, Natalie J.; Gabel, Matthew J.; Morris, John C.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Results of Alzheimer disease (AD) research assessments typically are not disclosed to participants. Recent research has suggested interest in disclosure, but, to our knowledge, few studies have accounted for awareness of potential benefits and limitations of disclosure. OBJECTIVE To determine the attitudes of cognitively normal research participants and members of the general public regarding disclosure of AD research results. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Participants in a longitudinal aging study (Alzheimer Disease Research Center [ADRC]) were given preintervention and postintervention surveys about disclosure attitudes. In a general public sample (The American Panel Survey), participants responded to a similar survey about disclosure attitudes. INTERVENTIONS Participants in the ADRC sample were randomly assigned to a group (n = 119) that read an education intervention about the usefulness of AD biomarkers or to a placebo group (n = 100) that read as its intervention general information about the ADRC. Participants in the general public sample read a brief vignette describing participation in a longitudinal AD study. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Interest in disclosure of AD research results. RESULTS Cognitively normal ADRC participants (n = 219) were 60.7% (n = 133) female, 83.6% (n = 183) of white race, and reported a mean of 15.91 years of education. Twenty-nine individuals refused participation. The American Panel Survey participants (n = 1418) indicated they did not have AD and were 50.5% (n = 716) female, 76.7% (n = 1087) of white race, and reported a mean of 13.85 years of education. Overall, 77.6% of eligible participants (1583 of 2041) completed the survey in July 2014. Interest in disclosure was high among the ADRC participants (55.1% [119 of 216] were “extremely interested”). Viewing the education intervention predicted lower interest in disclosure (odds ratio, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.15–3.53; P = .02). High subjective risk of AD, a family

  16. Leisure Sport Participation in Cyprus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicos Kartakoullis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study contributes to the limited existing research on the participation patterns of Cypriots in leisure and sports. Leisure and sport are viewed collectively while adapting the notion put forth by The Council of Europe (2007 defining leisure sports as sports activities aimed at the preservation and improvement of physical condition, health and fun. The purpose of this paper is to examine the leisure sport participation patterns of Cypriots, specifically: (1 participation patterns in leisure sports, (2 reasons for participating in leisure sports, (3 cost and participation in leisure sport, (4 leisure sport spectatorship, and (5 vacationing and leisure sport experiences. Data was commissioned and collected by the Centre for Leisure, Tourism and Sports (University of Nicosia for the Cyprus Sport Organisation. A telephone-survey of 1000 Cypriots, men and women, aged 15+, from coast-to-coast in Cyprus using stratified random sampling was employed. The sample was weighted by gender, age, district and region of residence. The results indicate that: (1 almost half of the Cypriot population participates in leisure sports, (2 participation in leisure sports decreases with age, (3 participation in leisure sports tends to be driven by health benefits, (4 most Cypriots participate in leisure sport at no cost, (5 television is the most common means reported for spectatorship, and (6 some Cypriots plan their vacations around leisure sport experiences. The results indicate the relevant importance of the leisure sport culture in Cyprus while also reflecting on age and cost related factors that may influence participation in leisure sports.

  17. Knowledge Translation from Research to Clinical Practice: Measuring Participation of Children with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yunwha; Law, Mary; DeMatteo, Carol; Stratford, Paul; Kim, Hwan

    2016-10-01

    This knowledge translation project was conducted to increase occupational therapy practitioners' awareness of the importance of measuring participation of children with disabilities. The Knowledge to Action process framework (KTA framework) guided knowledge translation via a web-based seminar (webinar) to practitioners working with children and educators teaching in occupational therapy programs in South Korea. Two hundred and seventy six views of the webinar were recorded within a month and 15 practitioners and 13 educators completed the online evaluation survey. The participants indicated that the webinar helped them understand the participation concept and its associated measures and raised awareness of practitioners' current use of measurement and intervention that do not focus on participation of children with disabilities. This project led practitioners and educators to realize the importance of measuring participation of children with disabilities and contributes to inform the importance of knowledge translation science to facilitate the evidence-based practice.

  18. Characterization of complete denture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srivastava, Rajeev; Choukse, Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Characterization is a procedure in which the character or collective qualities of a person are introduced in the complete denture, either by modification of teeth or denture bases, to make it appear...

  19. Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radke, Usha; Mundhe, Darshana

    2011-01-01

    .... The resorption occurs at a faster rate in mandibular arch as compared to the maxillary arch; but severely atrophic maxillae with large interridge distance often pose a clinical challenge during fabrication of a successful maxillary complete denture...

  20. Understanding the Relationship Between Incentive Design and Participation in U.S. Workplace Wellness Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batorsky, Benjamin; Taylor, Erin; Huang, Crystal; Liu, Hangsheng; Mattke, Soeren

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to understand how employer characteristics relate to the use of incentives to promote participation in wellness programs and to explore the relationship between incentive type and participation rates. A cross-sectional analysis of nationally representative survey data combined with an administrative business database was employed. Random sampling of U.S. companies within strata based on industry and number of employees was used to determine a final sample of 3000 companies. Of these, 19% returned completed surveys. The survey asked about employee participation rate, incentive type, and gender composition of employees. Incentive types included any incentives, high-value rewards, and rewards plus penalties. Logistic regressions of incentive type on employer characteristics were used to determine what types of employers are more likely to offer which type of incentives. A generalized linear model of participation rate was used to determine the relationship between incentive type and participation. Employers located in the Northeast were 5 to 10 times more likely to offer incentives. Employers with a large number of employees, particularly female employees, were up to 1.25 times more likely to use penalties. Penalty and high-value incentives were associated with participation rates of 68% and 52%, respectively. Industry or regional characteristics are likely determinants of incentive use for wellness programs. Penalties appear to be effective, but attention should be paid to what types of employees they affect.

  1. FY1998 survey on IEA international cooperation project on demonstration and survey of new load leveling methods (participation in the IEA/DSM task VI); 1998 nendo fuka heijunka shinshuho jissho chosa IEA kokusai kyoryoku jigyo 'IEA/DSM task 6 eno sanka ni tsuite' chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    It is intended to participate in the IEA international cooperation project related to DSA, exchange items of information, and promote demonstration and survey of new load leveling methods. The existing and newly proposed DSM mechanisms as the achievement of the previous tasks were put into order. The arena of information exchange and discussions was prepared through use of the Internet homepage for the IEA/DSM implementation agreement. Necessary official policies were also made available. Points of precautions when the mechanisms of other countries are used in Japan: the key to the success depends on social or cultural situations that work as the base; therefore, comparisons and analyses are necessary on such elements as customers as the object, energy projects and governments; compatibility of the situation and pattern of the demand side with the DSM technologies governs the reasonability thereof; the types of the mechanisms are narrowed down by size of the customer division, consumption pattern, electric power quality and safety, and needs on the flexibility; proliferation levels of the DSM technologies determine the appropriate mechanisms; and how the DSM is conceived against the final consumption is governed by the conception by both of the customers and the government. (NEDO)

  2. Genetic etiology and clinical consequences of complete and incomplete achromatopsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiadens, A.A.H.J.; Slingerland, N.W.; Roosing, S.; Schooneveld, M.J. van; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Moll-Ramirez, N.G. van; Born, L.I. van den; Hoyng, C.B.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Klaver, C.C.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the genetic causes of complete and incomplete achromatopsia (ACHM) and assess the association between disease-causing mutations, phenotype at diagnosis, and visual prognosis. DESIGN: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. PARTICIPANTS: Probands with complete ACHM (n

  3. Evaluating the Motivations, Knowledge, and Efficacy of Participants in Environmental Health Citizen Science Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhaus, Shana

    Environmental research is increasingly using citizen scientists in many aspects of projects, such as data collection and question design. To date, only a limited number of co-created citizen science projects where community members are involved in most or all steps of the scientific process have been completed, and few comparing community engagement methods and efficacy and learning outcomes across demo- and geographic data. This study compares two citizen science programs, evaluating what motivates citizen scientists to participate in environmental health research and whether participation affects scientific knowledge and environmental behavior and efficacy. Participants in the Gardenroots: A Citizen Science Garden Project completed sample collection training and submitted soil, water, vegetable, and dust samples for analysis and received their environmental monitoring results. In the Facilitating Community Action to Address Climate Change and Build Resiliency in Southern Metropolitan Tucson project, Spanish speaking community members of South Tucson underwent training in climate change and environmental quality and sample collection, and worked with families in the South Tucson community, collecting soil and water samples and providing environmental health education. For both projects, participants completed a pre- and post-survey with a variety of qualitative and quantitative questions. These survey instruments were used to evaluate differences in environmental self-efficacy and motivations. In addition, select Gardenroots participants were involved in focus groups and semi-structured interviews to understand and gauge changes in knowledge and to further explore changes in motivation and self-efficacy. The participants were primarily internally motivated and saw increases in both efficacy and knowledge as a result of participation in the program. This information is critical to moving citizen science efforts forward and determining whether such projects: 1) co

  4. Using Standardized Patients to Teach Complete Denture Procedures in Second Year of Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Gary M; Halket, Christine A; Ferguson, Gilda P; Perry, Jeffrey

    2017-03-01

    Second-year dental students are commonly instructed on the process of complete denture fabrication with a traditional didactic lecture and preclinical dental laboratory education model. The problem with this limited mode of instruction is that dental students often fail to understand the various chairside procedures required to fabricate a complete denture. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of standardized dental patients to enhance students' understanding of the procedures involved with each appointment in the complete denture process. The Midwestern University College of Dental Medicine-Arizona created an event using standardized patients in four simulated chairside dental appointments for complete denture instruction of second-year dental students. Each appointment simulated the various sequential chairside procedures required to fabricate complete dentures. Following the didactic and dental laboratory instruction and the standardized patient event, a survey was conducted requesting the students' response to six statements regarding their understanding of the denture fabrication process. Of the 110 students who participated in the instructional events, 107 responded to the survey (97% response rate). These students responded very favorably to the simulated appointments, with the majority agreeing or strongly agreeing that their best understanding of the complete denture process was obtained through the standardized patient experiences. The use of standardized patients in simulated denture fabrication appointments enhanced the educational experience of these students when added to the traditional didactic lecture and preclinical laboratory education format. The experience has since been incorporated into the school's second-year oral health science laboratory curriculum.

  5. The Pan-STARRS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.; Pan-STARRS Team

    2016-01-01

    The 4 year Pan-STARRS1 Science Mission has now completed and the final data processing and database ingest is underway. We expect to have the public release of the PS1 Survey data at approximately the time of the AAS Meeting. The full data set, including catalogs (150 Terabyte database), images (2 Petabytes), and metadata, will be available from the STScI MASTarchive. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys include: (1) The 3pi Steradian Survey, (2) The Medium Deep survey of 10 PS1 footprints (7 sq deg each) spaced around the sky; (3) A solar system survey of the ecliptic optimized for the discovery of Near Earth Objects, (4) a Stellar Transit Survey in the galactic bulge; and (5) a time domain Survey of M31. The characteristics of the Pan-STARRS1 Surveys will be presented, including image quality, depth, cadence, and coverage. Science results span most fields of astronomy from Near Earth Objects to cosmology. The 2nd mission, the Pan-STARRS NEO Survey, is currently underway on PS1 and it will be supplemented by PS2 observations as PS2 becomes fully operational. We will also report on the status of PS2 and the prospects for future wide field surveys in the Northern Hemisphere. The Pan-STARRS1 Surveys have been made possible through contributions of the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Hawaii; the Pan-STARRS Project Office; the Max-Planck Society and its participating institutes: the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg and the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Garching; The Johns Hopkins University; Durham University; the University of Edinburgh; Queen's University Belfast; the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network Incorporated; the National Central University of Taiwan; the Space Telescope Science Institute; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant No. NNX08AR22G issued through the Planetary Science Division of the NASA Science Mission Directorate; the National

  6. BUSN 460 Complete Class

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril1

    2017-01-01

    BUSN 460 Complete Class Click Link Below To Buy:   http://hwcampus.com/shop/busn-460-complete-class/     Week 1 DQ 1 Selling your team’s services to CanGo  Week 1 DQ 2 Mission, Vision & Values  Week 2 DQ 1 Planning a Technological Solution  Week 2 DQ 2 Cost Benefit Analysis  Week 3 DQ 1 Flow Charting Processes  Week 3 DQ 2 Implementing Technology  Week 4 DQ 1 Group vs Team  Week  4 DQ 2 Matrixed Employee Environments  Week 5 DQ 1 Pe...

  7. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: double-probe measurements from BOSS galaxy clustering \\& Planck data -- towards an analysis without informative priors

    CERN Document Server

    Pellejero-Ibanez, Marcos; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Cuesta, Antonio J; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo; Ross, Ashley J; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Prada, Francisco; Slosar, Anže; Vazquez, Jose A; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Ho, Shirley; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Percival, Will J; Rossi, Graziano; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Samushia, Lado; Sánchez, Ariel G; Satpathy, Siddharth; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Brownstein, Joel R; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new methodology called double-probe analysis with the aim of minimizing informative priors in the estimation of cosmological parameters. We extract the dark-energy-model-independent cosmological constraints from the joint data sets of Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) galaxy sample and Planck cosmic microwave background (CMB) measurement. We measure the mean values and covariance matrix of $\\{R$, $l_a$, $\\Omega_b h^2$, $n_s$, $log(A_s)$, $\\Omega_k$, $H(z)$, $D_A(z)$, $f(z)\\sigma_8(z)\\}$, which give an efficient summary of Planck data and 2-point statistics from BOSS galaxy sample, where $R=\\sqrt{\\Omega_m H_0^2}\\,r(z_*)$, and $l_a=\\pi r(z_*)/r_s(z_*)$, $z_*$ is the redshift at the last scattering surface, and $r(z_*)$ and $r_s(z_*)$ denote our comoving distance to $z_*$ and sound horizon at $z_*$ respectively. The advantage of this method is that we do not need to put informative priors on the cosmological parameters that galaxy clustering is not able to constrain well, i.e. $\\Omega_b...

  8. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  9. 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The 2007 Veterans Employability Research Survey (VERS) was conducted to determine the factors that impact veterans' employability resulting from participation in the...

  10. Complete French Teach Yourself

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Gaelle

    2010-01-01

    The best-selling complete course for a fun and effective way to learn French. This ISBN is for the paperback book. The corresponding audio support (ISBN: 9781444100068) is also available. The book and audio support can also be purchased as a pack (ISBN: 9781444100051).

  11. Complete-member Ethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsun-Yu Sharon Chuang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the vast array of ethnographic research methodology, complete-member ethnography (CME is one ethnographic inquiry whose methodological development is still in infantile in intercultural communication research. Specifically in this article, the author includes four major sections to understand and to advance CME. First, the author reviews the historical development of CME, and realizes epistemological intimacy as the core of CME and as how researchers’ complete-memberships may be established. Second, the author explains the concept and practice of epistemological intimacy in extant literature. Third, the author advances the concept of epistemological intimacy to identify and explain five contextual factors that influence a complete-member ethnographer’s complete-membership to his or her research community. The five factors include historicity of identity, institutional memory, situational (intersubjectivity, consensual membership, and symbolic codes. In order to elucidate that said factors are essentially interrelated, the author supplements the five factors with her conceptualizations of selfhood/identity. In the end, the author discusses three potential contributions of how CME can advance critical communication research, which pertain to (a praxis and reflexivity, (b challenging struggles and inequalities in power and privilege, and (c promote hopeful social justice from within.

  12. Global Hyperbolicity and Completeness

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Y; Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne; Cotsakis, Spiros

    2002-01-01

    We prove global hyperbolicity of spacetimes under generic regularity conditions on the metric. We then show that these spacetimes are timelike and null geodesically complete if the gradient of the lapse and the extrinsic curvature $K$ are integrable. This last condition is required only for the tracefree part of $K$ if the universe is expanding.

  13. Completeness of Lyapunov Abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the generation of complete abstractions of polynomial dynamical systems by timed automata. For the proposed abstraction, the state space is divided into cells by sublevel sets of functions. We identify a relation between these functions and their directional derivatives along...

  14. Completeness of Lyapunov Abstraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Wisniewski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we continue our study on discrete abstractions of dynamical systems. To this end, we use a family of partitioning functions to generate an abstraction. The intersection of sub-level sets of the partitioning functions defines cells, which are regarded as discrete objects. The union of cells makes up the state space of the dynamical systems. Our construction gives rise to a combinatorial object - a timed automaton. We examine sound and complete abstractions. An abstraction is said to be sound when the flow of the time automata covers the flow lines of the dynamical systems. If the dynamics of the dynamical system and the time automaton are equivalent, the abstraction is complete. The commonly accepted paradigm for partitioning functions is that they ought to be transversal to the studied vector field. We show that there is no complete partitioning with transversal functions, even for particular dynamical systems whose critical sets are isolated critical points. Therefore, we allow the directional derivative along the vector field to be non-positive in this work. This considerably complicates the abstraction technique. For understanding dynamical systems, it is vital to study stable and unstable manifolds and their intersections. These objects appear naturally in this work. Indeed, we show that for an abstraction to be complete, the set of critical points of an abstraction function shall contain either the stable or unstable manifold of the dynamical system.

  15. Completeness of Lyapunov Abstraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the generation of complete abstractions of polynomial dynamical systems by timed automata. For the proposed abstraction, the state space is divided into cells by sublevel sets of functions. We identify a relation between these functions and their directional derivatives along...

  16. Complete Rerouting Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Thomas K.; Kjærulff, Peter

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present a new protection method: Complete Rerouting. This is the most capacity e cient protection method for circuit switched networks and it is, to the best of our knowledge, the first time it has been described. We implement a column generation algorithm and test the performanc...

  17. Worker participation - the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwantes, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Worker participation relates to the involvement of workers in the management decision-making processes. In this article attention is focused on worker participation related to occupational safety and health in the Netherlands. Worker participation can refer either to direct or indirect participation

  18. Indonesian students' participation in an interprofessional learning workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernawati, Desak Ketut; Lee, Ya Ping; Hughes, Jeffery

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional learning activities, such as workshops allow students to learn from, with and about each other. This study assessed the impact on Indonesian health students' attitudes towards interprofessional education (IPE) from participating in a workshop on medication safety. The students attended a two-day IPE workshop on medication safety. Thirty-five (48.6%) students completed pre-/post-workshop surveys using a modified Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) survey. The post-workshop survey also had a series of open-ended questions. Students' responses to each RIPLS statement pre-/post-workshop were compared, whilst their responses to open-ended questions in post-workshop survey were thematically analysed. Students reported positive attitudinal changes on statements of shared learning and teamwork sub-scale (Wilcoxon p value importance of teamwork and communication skills. This study found that learning with other health students through an IPE workshop improved medical, nursing and pharmacy students' attitudes towards the importance of shared learning, teamwork and communication in healthcare service.

  19. 高校教师参与学校管理研究--基于增权理论视角%Survey on School Management Participancy of Higher School Teachers---Based on the Perspective of Empowerment Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雄; 吴靖晗

    2014-01-01

    Empowerment is the important precondition for the breakthrough of the higher school teachers participating school man-agement. Just taking the management participancy of the higher school teacher as a technical and political process instead of a po-litical one is the real reason why the management participancy of the higher school teachers can not make real progress in prac-tice. A view that the individual empowerment of the higher school teachers should precede the perfection of the participancy insti-tution and model is put forward after reviewing and analyzing of the studies on western empowerment theory and the management participancy of the higher school teachers.%增权是高校教师参与学校管理取得突破的重要前提,仅将高校教师参与学校管理作为一个经济和技术过程而不是政治过程,是当高校教师参与学校管理在实践中不能取得真正进步的原因。本文对西方增权理论以及高校教师参与学校管理研究成果进行了介绍和分析,提出高校教师个人增权先于完善参与学校管理制度和模式的观点。

  20. Eagle surveys near Valdez

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A shoreline survey of birds in Port Valdez, Sawmill Bay and Jack Bay was completed between September 14 and September 16, 1976, by Special Studies Team Mike Jacobson...

  1. Waterfowl breeding population survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Waterfowl breeding population surveys have been completed annually on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska since 1986. Methods for the 2011 Arctic Coastal Plain...

  2. Waterfowl breeding population survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Waterfowl breeding population surveys have been completed annually on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska since 1986. Methods for the 2010 Arctic Coastal Plain...

  3. Muskox survey, Nunivak Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial survey completed July 1958 is presented with results. Muskox were located and plotted on a map. Animals were also classified by Adult bull, calve, cows and...

  4. The complete cosmicomics

    CERN Document Server

    Calvino, Italo

    2014-01-01

    The definitive edition of Calvino’s cosmicomics, bringing together all of these enchanting stories—including some never before translated—in one volume for the first time. In Italo Calvino’s cosmicomics, primordial beings cavort on the nearby surface of the moon, play marbles with atoms, and bear ecstatic witness to Earth’s first dawn. Exploring natural phenomena and the origins of the universe, these beloved tales relate complex scientific concepts to our common sensory, emotional, human world. Now, The Complete Cosmicomics brings together all of the cosmicomic stories for the first time. Containing works previously published in Cosmicomics, t zero, and Numbers in the Dark, this single volume also includes seven previously uncollected stories, four of which have never been published in translation in the United States. This “complete and definitive collection” (Evening Standard) reconfirms the cosmicomics as a crowning literary achievement and makes them available to new generations of reader...

  5. Problems with Complete Dentures and Related Factors in Patients in Rajavithi Hospital from 2007 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piampring, Prapin

    2016-02-01

    Complete dentures are used to restore masticatory function, improve esthetics, enhance phonetic functionality, and facilitate social communication for edentulous patients. After long-term use, problems can arise because of changes in the patients' condition and because of denture attrition. To survey problems encountered while using complete dentures, and to evaluate related factors after 3-8 years of use. One hundred and fourteen participants aged between 56 and 97 years who wore complete dentures supplied by Rajavithi Hospital between 2007 and 2012 were included in the survey. Data were collected via telephone interviews. Details were recorded for baseline characteristics of patients, how and when they used their dentures, how they maintained them, their perception of the condition of their dentures, and the problems that they encountered while using them. Descriptive statistics were used to evaluate patient characteristics and Chi-square/Fisher's exact/Student t-tests were used to evaluate correlations between condition of dentures and patient factors. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Half of all participants had problems in using complete dentures, and the most frequent difficulty was denture looseness, which affected about one-third of all patients. Marital status, whether or not participants had children, and time of wearing dentures were significantly related to having problems (p = 0.007, 0.039, and 0.003, respectively). Many complete denture patients had problems with denture looseness and dentists should recall these patients in a timely manner to help them achieve a better quality of life.

  6. MKT 438 Complete Class

    OpenAIRE

    admin

    2015-01-01

      To purchase this material click below link   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/MKT-438/MKT-438-Complete-Class-Guide   For more classes visit www.assignmentcloud.com   MKT 438 Week 1 Individual Assignment Defining Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 2 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaign Overview Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Individual Assignment Functions of Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaig...

  7. Deployment Completion Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-24

    computer in its con- struction management effort. NMCE ONE enjoyed and fostered strong relations between the Seabees and the Fleet. * SUPLY: NMCB CNE’s...planning, & leadership present day to day on the projects was exhibited for the enbarka- tion. NMCB CNE maintained a strong Community Relations Program...DICMY LABR EX] EHM : 166 mandays(CAT 0115: 93, TRAINEE: 3, LOCAL: 70) 3. O OSITICH CF W= O : CAT 0115, TRAINEE, & LOAL 4. UIM’I OF PIOJIM: Completion

  8. CMS Is Finally Completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Yet another step in the completion of the Large Hadron Collider was taken yesterday morning, as the final element of the Compact Muon Solenoid was lowered nearly 100 meters bellow ground. After more than eight years of work at the world's most powerful particle accelerator, scientists hope that they will be able to start initial experiments with the LHC until the end of this year.

  9. LEAR construction completed

    CERN Multimedia

    1982-01-01

    In July 1982, LEAR construction was completed, the individual systems had been dry-tested. On 16 July, the first 50 MeV (309 MeV/c) protons from Linac 1 were injected and circulated. On 11 October, the first antiprotons from the AA, decelerated in the PS to 609 MeV/c, were injected. Also in 1982, acceleration, deceleration and stochastic cooling were successfully tested. See 9007366 for a more detailed description. See also 8201061, 8204131, 8309026.

  10. Interest of individuals from BRCA families to participate in research studies focused on male BRCA carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tuya; Vadaparampil, Susan; Kim, Jongphil; Xu, Yan; Friedman, Sue; Narod, Steven A; Metcalfe, Kelly

    2013-12-01

    Although men and women are equally likely to carry a mutation in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA) genes, the clinical significance of mutations in men remains incompletely defined. We sought evaluate interest of individuals from BRCA families to participate in a research study focused on men from BRCA families. Through an anonymous survey posted on the website of the BRCA patient advocacy organization, facing our risk of cancer empowered (FORCE), data was collected over a 21 month period (August 2010-June 2012) from members of BRCA families. The survey was completed by 405 individuals with known BRCA mutations, including 150 males and 232 females. The median age of survey respondents was 49 years (50 years for males and 48 years for females). Overall, 84% of survey respondents indicated prior BRCA mutation testing (95.2% females, 67.3% males). For the overall group of survey respondents, 84% (86% females, 84% males) indicated they would tell their male relatives about a research study focused on high risk men from BRCA families, and 53% (39% females, 74% males) thought that their male relatives would be interested in participating in such a study. Despite limited studies focused on men from BRCA mutation positive families, our survey suggests that both male and female family members are highly interested in focused on male BRCA mutation carriers. The importance of further studying this topic is underscored by emerging literature that suggest cancer surveillance and treatment decisions may improve outcomes in men with BRCA mutations.

  11. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tančić-Gajić Milina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS belongs to disorders of sex development, resulting from complete or partial resistance to the biological actions of androgens in persons who are genetically males (XY with normally developed testes and age-appropriate for males of serum testosterone concentration. Case Outline. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted at our Clinic further evaluation and treatment of testicular feminization syndrome, which was diagnosed at the age of 16 years. The patient had never menstruated. On physical examination, her external genitalia and breast development appeared as completely normal feminine structures but pubic and axillary hair was absent. Cytogenetic analysis showed a 46 XY karyotype. The values of sex hormones were as in adult males. The multisliced computed tomography (MSCT showed structures on both sides of the pelvic region, suggestive of testes. Bilateral orchiectomy was performed. Hormone replacement therapy was prescribed after gonadectomy. Vaginal dilatation was advised to avoid dyspareunia. Conclusion. The diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity is based on clinical findigs, hormonal analysis karyotype, visualization methods and genetic analysis. Bilateral gonadectomy is generally recommended in early adulthood to avoid the risk of testicular malignancy. Vaginal length may be short requiring dilatation in an effort to avoid dyspareunia. Vaginal surgery is rarely indicated for the creation of a functional vagina. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175067

  12. SCT Barrel Assembly Complete

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Batchelor

    As reported in the April 2005 issue of the ATLAS eNews, the first of the four Semiconductor Tracker (SCT) barrels, complete with modules and services, arrived safely at CERN in January of 2005. In the months since January, the other three completed barrels arrived as well, and integration of the four barrels into the entire barrel assembly commenced at CERN, in the SR1 building on the ATLAS experimental site, in July. Assembly was completed on schedule in September, with the addition of the innermost layer to the 4-barrel assembly. Work is now underway to seal the barrel thermal enclosure. This is necessary in order to enclose the silicon tracker in a nitrogen atmosphere and provide it with faraday-cage protection, and is a delicate and complicated task: 352 silicon module powertapes, 352 readout-fibre bundles, and over 400 Detector Control System sensors must be carefully sealed into the thermal enclosure bulkhead. The team is currently verifying the integrity of the low mass cooling system, which must be d...

  13. Hilbert, completeness and geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Venturi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to show how the mathematical content of Hilbert's Axiom of Completeness consists in an attempt to solve the more general problem of the relationship between intuition and formalization. Hilbert found the accordance between these two sides of mathematical knowledge at a logical level, clarifying the necessary and sufficient conditions for a good formalization of geometry. We will tackle the problem of what is, for Hilbert, the definition of geometry. The solution of this problem will bring out how Hilbert's conception of mathematics is not as innovative as his conception of the axiomatic method. The role that the demonstrative tools play in Hilbert's foundational reflections will also drive us to deal with the problem of the purity of methods, explicitly addressed by Hilbert. In this respect Hilbert's position is very innovative and deeply linked to his modern conception of the axiomatic method. In the end we will show that the role played by the Axiom of Completeness for geometry is the same as the Axiom of Induction for arithmetic and of Church-Turing thesis for computability theory. We end this paper arguing that set theory is the right context in which applying the axiomatic method to mathematics and we postpone to a sequel of this work the attempt to offer a solution similar to Hilbert's for the completeness of set theory.

  14. Sport participation in colorectal cancer survivors: an unexplored approach to promoting physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Erin L; Speed-Andrews, Amy E; Rhodes, Ryan E; Blanchard, Chris M; Culos-Reed, S Nicole; Friedenreich, Christine M; Courneya, Kerry S

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity improves health outcomes in colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors, but participation rates are low. One understudied strategy for increasing physical activity in CRC survivors may be sport participation. Here, we report the sport participation rate, sport preferences, and correlates of sport participation among CRC survivors. A provincial, population-based mailed survey of CRC survivors in Alberta, Canada was performed and included measures of sport participation, sport preferences, sport benefits and barriers, and medical and demographic variables. A total of 600 CRC survivors completed the survey (34 % response rate). Almost a quarter (23.0 %) of CRC survivors reported participating in a sport in the past month, with the most common sport being golf (58.7 %). In multivariate regression analysis, 33.0 % (p = 0.001) of the variance in sport participation was explained by being male (β = 0.12; p = 0.006), in better general health (β = 0.12; p = 0.006), and ≥ 5 years post-diagnosis (β = 0.09; p = 0.031). The most common barriers to sport participation were time, age/agility, and no interest/dislike of sports. The most common anticipated benefits of sport participation were improved physical fitness, meeting people, and improved health. Over half (57.2 %) of CRC survivors were possibly interested in learning about sport participation opportunities. Promotion of sport participation may be a potentially fruitful strategy for increasing physical activity in CRC survivors.

  15. 上海市住院患者参与不同健康照护内容意愿的调查研究%A Survey on the Willingness of Inpatients Participation in Different Health Care Content in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    巫雅萍; 吴清; 叶旭春

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解上海市住院患者对不同健康照护内容的参与意愿.方法采用便利抽样法,应用自行研制的«患者参与健康照护意愿调查问卷»对上海市8所二、三级综合性医院的内、外科430名住院患者进行横断面调查.结果患者参与健康照护的总体参与意愿较高,为(4.23±0.58)分.其中,参与信息互动的意愿最高,为(4.42±0.52)分;其次为参与决策和参与照护,分别为(4.20±0.75)分和(4.18±0.62)分;参与诉求的意愿最低,为(3.94±0.85)分.结论患者对健康照护的总体参与意愿较高,但参与意愿因内容而异,其中参与信息互动是患者参与的首要需求,并注重情感需求,应尊重患者的参与权利,关注患者的参与需求,优化信息互动的过程,加强人文关怀.%Objective To explore the willingness of inpatients participation in different health care content in Shanghai.Methods By convenience sampling,430 inpatients in 8 Class Ⅱ and Class Ⅲ comprehensive hospitals in Shanghai were selected and investigated by using a self-developed questionnaire of the willing-ness of inpatients participation in health care.Results Patients’general willingness to be engaged in healthcare was relatively high(4.23 ±0.58).Patients willingness to be engaged in different dimensions ranked from high to low by the scores:information interaction related participation(4.42±0.52),decision making related participation(4.20±0.75),caring related participation(4.18±0.62)and complaint related participation (3.94±0.85).Conclusion Patients’general willingness to be engaged in healthcare was rela-tively high,while the participation willingness varied from different contents.Information interaction relat-ed participation was proved to be the primary demand among four dimensions.Emotional information inter-action related participation drew more attention by patients.Therefore,patients ’right to

  16. Mobile-Only Web Survey Respondents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtig, P.J.; Toepoel, V.; amin, alerk

    2016-01-01

    Web surveys are no longer completed on just a desktop or laptop computer. Respondents increasingly use mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones to complete web surveys. In this article, we study how respondents in the American Life Panel complete surveys using varying devices. We show that ab

  17. Mobile-Only Web Survey Respondents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtig, P.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304824658; Toepoel, V.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304576034; amin, alerk

    2016-01-01

    Web surveys are no longer completed on just a desktop or laptop computer. Respondents increasingly use mobile devices, such as tablets and smartphones to complete web surveys. In this article, we study how respondents in the American Life Panel complete surveys using varying devices. We show that

  18. Parent Participation in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Rounds via Telemedicine: Feasibility and Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Phoebe H; Clark, Maureen; Cummings, Brian M; Noviski, Natan

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate feasibility and impact of telemedicine for remote parent participation in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) rounds when parents are unable to be present at their child's bedside. Parents of patients admitted to a 14-bed PICU were approached, and those unable to attend rounds were eligible subjects. Nurse and physician caregivers were also surveyed. Parents received an iPad (Apple Inc, Cupertino, California) with an application enabling audio-video connectivity with the care team. At a predetermined time for bedside rounds with the PICU team, parents entered a virtual meeting room to participate. Following each telemedicine encounter, participants (parent, physician, nurse) completed a brief survey rating satisfaction (0?=?not satisfied, 10?=?completely satisfied) and disruption (0?=?no disruption at all, 10?=?very disruptive). A total of 153 surveys were completed following 51 telemedicine encounters involving 13 patients. Parents of enrolled patients cited work demands (62%), care for other dependents (46%), and transportation difficulties (31%) as reasons for study participation. The median levels of satisfaction and disruption were 10 (range 5-10) and 0 (range 0-5), respectively. All parents reported that telemedicine encounters had a positive effect on their level of reassurance regarding their child's care and improved communication with the care team. This proof-of-concept study indicates that remote parent participation in PICU rounds is feasible, enhances parent-provider communication, and offers parents reassurance. Providers reported a high level of satisfaction with minimal disruption. Technological advancements to streamline teleconferencing workflow are needed to ensure program sustainability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. User participation in implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Benedicte; Rasmussen, Rasmus; Simonsen, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Systems development has been claimed to benefit from user participation, yet user participation in implementation activities may be more common and is a growing focus of participatory-design work. We investigate the effect of the extensive user participation in the implementation of a clinical...... system by empirically analyzing how management, participating staff, and non-participating staff view the implementation process with respect to areas that have previously been linked to user participation such as system quality, emergent interactions, and psychological buy-in. The participating staff...... experienced more uncertainty and frustration than management and non-participating staff, especially concerning how to run an implementation process and how to understand and utilize the configuration possibilities of the system. This suggests that user participation in implementation introduces a need...

  20. Predicting Substance Abuse Treatment Completion using a New Scale Based on the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemore, Sarah E.; Ajzen, Icek

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether a 9-item scale based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicted substance abuse treatment completion. Data were collected at a public, outpatient program among clients initiating treatment (N=200). Baseline surveys included measures of treatment-related attitudes, norms, perceived control, and intention; discharge status was collected from program records. As expected, TPB attitude and control components independently predicted intention (model R-squared=.56), and intention was positively associated with treatment completion even including clinical and demographic covariates (model R-squared=.24). TPB components were generally associated with the alternative readiness scales as expected, and the TPB remained predictive at higher levels of coercion. Meanwhile, none of the standard measures of readiness (e.g., the URICA and TREAT) or treatment coercion were positively associated with treatment participation. Results suggest promise for application of the TPB to treatment completion and support use of the intention component as a screener, though some refinements are suggested. PMID:23953167

  1. Predicting substance abuse treatment completion using a new scale based on the theory of planned behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemore, Sarah E; Ajzen, Icek

    2014-02-01

    We examined whether a 9-item scale based on the theory of planned behavior (TPB) predicted substance abuse treatment completion. Data were collected at a public, outpatient program among clients initiating treatment (N=200). Baseline surveys included measures of treatment-related attitudes, norms, perceived control, and intention; discharge status was collected from program records. As expected, TPB attitude and control components independently predicted intention (model R-squared=.56), and intention was positively associated with treatment completion even including clinical and demographic covariates (model R-squared=.24). TPB components were generally associated with the alternative readiness scales as expected, and the TPB remained predictive at higher levels of coercion. Meanwhile, none of the standard measures of readiness (e.g., the URICA and TREAT) or treatment coercion were positively associated with treatment participation. Results suggest promise for application of the TPB to treatment completion and support use of the intention component as a screener, though some refinements are suggested. © 2013.

  2. Connecting Participant Observation Positions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McCurdy, Patrick; Uldam, Julie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue for the importance of considering participant observation roles in relation to both insider/outsider and overt/covert roles. Through combining key academic debates on participant observation, which have separately considered insider/outsider and overt/covert participant...... observation, we develop a reflexive framework to assist researchers in (1) locating the type of participant observation research; (2) identifying implications of participant observation for both the research and the subjects under study; and (3) reflecting on how one’s role as participant observer shifts over...

  3. Tiger in Focus--A National Survey of ICT in Estonian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toots, Anu; Laanpere, Mart

    2004-01-01

    Estonia has not participated in international studies of ICT in education, nor have there been any similar studies at the national level up until the year 2000. The first survey of ICT in Estonian schools was conducted after completion of the national school computerization programme called Tiger Leap. This paper focuses on the targeted responses…

  4. Crisis Response in the Public Schools: A Survey of School Psychologists' Experiences and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Austin D.; Peacock, Gretchen Gimpel

    2007-01-01

    In this study, 228 school psychologists completed a survey regarding crisis intervention teams and plans. The majority of respondents indicated their schools had crisis plans (95.1%) and teams (83.6%). The most common team activities endorsed by participants involved providing direct assistance and services to students, staff, and the media. The…

  5. Exploring E-Learning Acceptance among University Students in Thailand: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Ruangrit, Nammon; Khlaisang, Jintavee; Thammetar, Thapanee; Sunphakitjumnong, Kobkul

    2014-01-01

    This study surveys the e-learning acceptance of university students in Thailand. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-one (1,981) participants completed the E-Learning Acceptance Measure (Teo, 2010) which measures three constructs that predict e-learning acceptance (tutor quality, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions). Data analysis…

  6. Targeting Family Risk Factors in the Context of Treating Youth Depression: A Survey of Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Gilbert R.; Buckholdt, Kelly E.; Olsen, James P.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; Davis, Genevieve L.; Gamble, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the practices and perceptions of psychologists related to targeting family risk factors when treating youth depression. Participants were practicing psychologists recruited through the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology (N = 279). Psychologists completed a brief anonymous survey about addressing…

  7. Survey of comparability and accuracy of complete blood count among third level hospitals in Beijing%北京市三级医院全血细胞计数结果可比性和准确性调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭明婷; 岳育红; 申子瑜; 王清涛; 陆红; 李臣宾; 谷小林; 陈文祥

    2007-01-01

    目的 对北京市三级医院间全血细胞计数结果的可比性和准确性进行调查,为开展临床检验结果的互认提供依据.方法 共调查41家实验室,以全血细胞计数(complete blood count,CBC)为试点项目,通过现场调查、仪器校准和结果比对等方式,发现存在的问题,制定相应的管理措施、纠正措施和评价方法.结果 在仪器校准和室内质量控制方面存在较多有待规范之处,表现为22家实验室(53.6%)无校准记录,甚至有4家实验室(9.8%)从未进行过校准,4家实验室(9.8%)使用质控物而非校准物进行了错误的校准;14家实验室(34.2%)开展室内质量控制项目的数量达不到要求.此外,有4家实验室(9.8%)使用非配套试剂.根据调查数据和检验结果生物变异的文献报道,将北京市血细胞计数结果的允许偏差暂定为:WBC≤15%,Hb≤5%,RBC≤5%,红细胞压积(HCT)≤5%,PLT≤15%.通过使用卫生部临床检验中心血细胞分析校准实验室提供的溯源至参考方法的定值新鲜血对血液分析仪进行校准,使13家医院的14个不合格项目纠正了11个.结论 通过现场调查、使用具有溯源性的定值新鲜血校准不同的检测系统、现场的结果比对、质量管理要求的提出以及监督措施的实施,可以明显提高医院间检验结果的可比性和准确性,为开展检验结果的互认提供了依据.

  8. Participant Assisted Data Collection Methods in the California Healthy Homes Indoor Air Quality Study of 2011-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, Nasim A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Jina [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Singer, Brett C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    From November 2011 to March 2013, air quality was measured over 6-day periods in 324 residences across California using a mail-out strategy. All interactions with study participants, from recruitment, to data collection, to communication of results, were conducted with remote communication methods including conventional mail, electronic mail, telephone and text messaging. Potential participants were reached primarily by sharing study information with community groups and organizations that directed interested individuals to complete an online screening survey. Pollutant concentrations were measured with sampling equipment that was mailed to participants' homes with deployment instructions. Residence and household characteristics and activity data were collected via two phone surveys and an activity log. A comparison of responses to survey questions completed online versus over the phone indicated that a substantial fraction of participants (roughly 20%) required a researcher's assistance to respond to basic questions about appliance characteristics. Using the printed instructions and telephone assistance from researchers, roughly 90% of participants successfully deployed and returned sampling materials accurately and on schedule. The mail-out strategy employed in this study was found to be a cost-effective means for collecting residential air quality data.

  9. Statistics a complete introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Statistics: A Complete Introduction is the most comprehensive yet easy-to-use introduction to using Statistics. Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. The book covers all the key areas of Statistics including graphs, data interpretation, spreadsheets, regression, correlation and probability. Everything you will need is here in this one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions.

  10. Complete thoracic ectopia cordis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonso, N; Venugopal, P S; Deshpande, R; Anderson, D

    2003-03-01

    Thoracic ectopia cordis is a rare congenital defect with very few reported survivors after surgical correction. We report a case of complete thoracic ectopia cordis with double outlet right ventricle. The diagnosis was established antenatally and a repair was undertaken soon after birth. The child remained stable and was extubated on the fifth post-operative day. Forty-eight hours later the child succumbed to an unexplained respiratory arrest. Also presented is a review of the different surgical strategies for this unusual condition.

  11. TestComplete cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Alpaev, Gennadiy

    2013-01-01

    A practical cookbook, with a perfect package of simple, medium, and advanced recipes targeted at basic programmers as well as expert software testers, who will learn to create, manage, and run automated tests. It is packed with problem-solving recipes that are supported by simple examples.If you are a software tester or a programmer who is involved with testing automation using TestComplete, this book is ideal for you! You will be introduced to the very basics of using the tool, as well as polish any previously gained knowledge in using the tool. If you are already aware of programming basics,

  12. Reasons for participating and not participating in a e-health workplace physical activity intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Bardus, Marco; Blake, Holly; Lloyd, Scott; Suzanne Suggs, L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the reasons for participating and not participating in an e-health workplace physical activity (PA) intervention. Design/methodology/approach – Semi-structured interviews and two focus groups were conducted with a purposive sample of employees who enrolled and participated in the intervention and with those who did not complete enrolment, hence did not participate in it. Data were examined using thematic analysis according to the...

  13. Participation and agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe.......The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe....

  14. Labor Force Participation Rate

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This thematic map presents the labor force participation rate of working-age people in the United States in 2010. The 2010 Labor Force Participation Rate shows the...

  15. Participating in Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z > Participating in Clinical Trials: About Clinical Trials In This Topic About Clinical Trials Risks and Benefits ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study ...

  16. Participation and agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe.......The article adresses the gap between the rhetoric and practice of participation in urban environmental planning in Europe....

  17. Photometric and Obscurational Completeness

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, R A

    2005-01-01

    We report a method that uses "completeness" to estimate the number of exrasolar planets discovered by an observing program with a direct-imaging instrument. We develop a completeness function for Earth-like planets on "habitable" orbits for an instrument with a central field obscuration, uniform sensitivity in an annular detection zone, and limiting sensitivity that is expressed as a "delta magnitude" with respect to the star, determined by systematic effects (given adequate exposure time). We demonstrate our method of estimation by applying it to our understanding of the coronagraphic version of the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF-C) mission as of October 2004. We establish an initial relationship between the size, quality, and stability of the instrument's optics and its ability to meet mission science requirements. We provide options for increasing the fidelity and versatility of the models on which our method is based, and we discuss how the method could be extended to model the TPF-C mission as a whole, t...

  18. Superluminality and UV Completion

    CERN Document Server

    Shore, G M

    2007-01-01

    The idea that the existence of a consistent UV completion satisfying the fundamental axioms of local quantum field theory or string theory may impose positivity constraints on the couplings of the leading irrelevant operators in a low-energy effective field theory is critically discussed. Violation of these constraints implies superluminal propagation, in the sense that the low-frequency limit of the phase velocity $v_{\\rm ph}(0)$ exceeds $c$. It is explained why causality is related not to $v_{\\rm ph}(0)$ but to the high-frequency limit $v_{\\rm ph}(\\infty)$ and how these are related by the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relation, depending on the sign of the imaginary part of the refractive index $\\Ima n(\\w)$ which is normally assumed positive. Superluminal propagation and its relation to UV completion is investigated in detail in three theories: QED in a background electromagnetic field, where the full dispersion relation for $n(\\w)$ is evaluated numerically for the first time and the role of the null energy con...

  19. Drama-based education to motivate participation in substance abuse prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Amura

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The substance abuse prevention goal of the theatre production "TUNNELS" was to provide community education on substance abuse to an audience in Durham, NC and surrounding communities. The education effort intended to increase awareness and understanding of the risk and protective factors associated with alcohol and other drug use, and to promote pro-active behaviors in substance abuse prevention within the adult community. It was hypothesized that community-based education via drama would change attitudes toward alcohol and substance abuse, and increase participation in family and community activities aimed at substance abuse prevention. Methods A focus group comprised of educators, substance abuse researchers and local substance abuse counselors developed "life stories" of users of alcohol and other drugs and a local playwright incorporated these and other experiences into a series of six vignettes. The production was publicized throughout the Durham area, and 700 adults attending the play signed a consent form and completed the pre-play survey. The participant pool was restricted to those adults who completed both the time-1 and time-2 surveys and resided within Durham and surrounding communities. Paired comparisons of mean responses were analyzed using a paired sample two-tailed t-test. A telephone survey three months after the play assessed attitudes toward substance abuse as a disease, and whether the respondents had increased their participation in prevention activities including discussions of the play with others. Results Viewing the play increased the knowledge base of participants regarding substance abuse as a disease, even though the audience demonstrated an appreciation of risk and protective factors prior to attending the performance. In the pre-play survey, participants indicated a strong opinion that parental involvement in teen life was important, and therefore this was not increased as a result of viewing

  20. Participation in adult learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desjardins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This entry presents an internationally comparative overview of adult learning patterns. Emphasis is placed on who is participating in adult learning and the observed unequal chances to participate. The entry covers three overarching questions that are central to participation research: a) What...

  1. Displacement Through Participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Citizen participation is often regarded as a means to increase local democracy. Seldom is participation viewed as a means to legitimate disruptive practices of states. However, participation can become a tool for the effective implementation of policy rather than a means to enhance justice, if no po

  2. Personality, Negativity, and Political Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Weinschenk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Scholars have recently started to integrate personality traits into models of political participation. In this paper, we present the results of a survey experiment (N = 724 designed to test whether negative political messages differentially impact people with different personality traits. We found evidence that individuals with high scores on agreeableness were less likely, and individuals with high scores on extraversion were more likely, to report intending to participate in politics than their counterparts after being exposed to negative political messages. Agreeableness and extraversion also interacted with negative messages to influence specific intentions to make a political donation, attend a meeting, rally, or event, and volunteer for a political campaign. We also found suggestive evidence that agreeableness interacted with negativity to influence turnout intentions. The results of this study have important implications for the study of political engagement, the ways in which people interact with political information, and the practice of democratic politics.

  3. Test of a Web and Paper Employee Satisfaction Survey: Comparison of Respondents and Non-Respondents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina B. Gesell

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined if administering an employee satisfaction survey using the Internet affected the rates or quality of employees’ participation. 644 hospital employees were randomly assigned to complete a satisfaction survey using either a Web survey or a traditional paper measure. Response rates were relatively high across both modes. No evidence for a very large difference in response rates was detected. A plurality of respondents showed no preference for survey mode while the remainder tended to express a preference for the mode they had been randomly assigned to complete in this study. Respondents did not differ from non-respondents by sex, race, or education. Other response differences (such as age and employment status are likely to be a function of the survey topic. Overall, Web and mail respondents did not differ in the level of employee satisfaction reported, the primary outcome being measured.

  4. Navy Professional Reading Program: Results of the 2007 Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    books were also the most common genre for four of the five groups. The single most common genre for Junior Enlisted was Science Fiction (11...Chicago, IL, SPSS, 2007. Uriell, Z. A., & Burress, L. (2007). Results of the 2005 Pregnancy and Parenthood Survey (NPRST-AB-07-5). Millington, TN...attributable to any single individual. PARTICIPATION: Completion of this questionnaire is entirely voluntary. Failure to respond to any of the questions

  5. Cancer Patients? Willingness to Routinely Complete the EQ-5D Instrument at Clinic Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Hiten; Qiu, Xin; Brown, M Catherine; Mahler, Mary; Hon, Henrique; Tiessen, Kyoko; Thai, Henry; Ho, Valerie; Gonos, Christina; Charow, Rebecca; Pat, Vivien; Irwin, Margaret; Herzog, Lindsay; Ho, Anthea; Xu, Wei; Howell, Doris; Seung, Soo Jin; Liu, Geoffrey; Mittmann, Nicole

    2016-09-13

    Health utility (HU) scores play an essential role in pharmacoeconomic analyses. Routine clinical administration of the EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) can allow for HU and health related quality of life (HRQOL) assessments in the real-world setting. The primary goals of this study were to evaluate whether patients were willing to complete the EQ-5D instrument on a routine basis and which clinical or demographic factors influence this willingness. 618 adult cancer survivors across multiple cancer disease sites at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre completed an acceptability survey after completing the EQ-5D instrument. The mean (SD) EQ-5D score was 0.81 (0.15). Among those surveyed, 88% reported that the EQ-5D was easy to complete. 91% took under 5 minutes and 88% were satisfied with its length. 85% were satisfied with the types of questions asked on the EQ-5D. Importantly, 92% reported that they would complete the EQ-5D, even if it were used solely for research purposes; 73% agreed with the notion of completing it regularly at their clinic visits. Patients with lower EQ-5D scores (p=0.0006), and non-Caucasians (p=0.0024; 60% willing) were less willing to complete the instrument on a regular basis. Curability of tumour, disease site, age, and gender did not influence willingness. The majority of cancer patients across disease sites are willing to complete the EQ-5D instrument regularly, even if it were solely for research purposes, but up to 39% declined participation in the first place.

  6. Who Sends the Email? Using Electronic Surveys in Violence Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Sutherland

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Students aged 16–24 years are at greatest risk for interpersonal violence and the resulting short and long-term health consequences. Electronic survey methodology is well suited for research related to interpersonal violence. Yet methodological questions remain about best practices in using electronic surveys. While researchers often indicate that potential participants receive multiple emails as reminders to complete the survey, little mention is made of the sender of the recruitment email. The purpose of this analysis is to describe the response rates from three violence-focused research studies when the recruitment emails are sent from a campus office, researcher or survey sampling firm. Methods: Three violence-focused studies were conducted about interpersonal violence among college students in the United States. Seven universities and a survey sampling firm were used to recruit potential participants to complete an electronic survey. The sender of the recruitment emails varied within and across the each of the studies depending on institutional review boards and university protocols.Results: An overall response rate of 30% was noted for the 3 studies. Universities in which researcher initiated recruitment emails were used had higher response rates compared to universities where campus officials sent the recruitment emails. Researchers found lower response rates to electronic surveys at Historically Black Colleges or Universities and that other methods were needed to improve response rates.Conclusion: The sender of recruitment emails for electronic surveys may be an important factor in response rates for violence-focused research. For researchers identification of best practices for survey methodology is needed to promote accurate disclosure and increase response rates. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:363–369.

  7. National wildlife refuge visitor survey results: 2010/2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carolos, Andrew W.; Miller, Holly M.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. The survey was conducted on 53 refuges across the National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System) to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. A total of 14,832 visitors agreed to participate in the survey between July 2010 and November 2011. In all, 10,233 visitors completed the survey for a 71% response rate. This report provides a summary of visitor and trip characteristics; visitor opinions about refuges and their offerings; and visitor opinions about alternative transportation and climate change, two Refuge System topics of interest. The Refuge System, established in 1903 and managed by the Service, is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 National Wildlife Refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. These combined results are based on surveying at 53 participating

  8. Mapping eParticipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Sanford, Clive Carlton

    2007-01-01

    The emerging research area of eParticipation can be characterized as the study of technology-facilitated citizen participation in (democratic) deliberation and decision-making. Using conventional literature study techniques, we identify 105 articles that are considered to be highly relevant to eParticipation......, and methods. We extend the analysis to define four central research challenges for the field: understanding technology and participation; the strategic challenge; the design challenge; and the evaluation challenge. This article thus contributes to a developing account of eParticipation, which will help future...

  9. Geodesically Complete Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Bars, Itzhak

    2011-01-01

    This talk is about solving cosmological equations analytically without approximations, and discovering new phenomena that could not be noticed with approximate solutions. We found all the solutions of the Friedmann equations for a specific model, including all the zero-size-bounce solutions that do not violate the null energy condition, as well as all the finite-size-bounce solutions, and then discovered model independent phenomena. Among them is the notion of geodesic completeness for the geometry of the universe. From this we learned a few new general lessons for cosmology. Among them is that anisotropy provides a model independent attractor mechanism to some specific initial values for cosmological fields, and that there is a period of antigravity in the history of the universe. The results are obtained only at the classical gravity level. Effects of quantum gravity or string theory are unknown, they are not even formulated, so there are new theoretical challenges.

  10. Algebraic totality, towards completeness

    CERN Document Server

    Tasson, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Finiteness spaces constitute a categorical model of Linear Logic (LL) whose objects can be seen as linearly topologised spaces, (a class of topological vector spaces introduced by Lefschetz in 1942) and morphisms as continuous linear maps. First, we recall definitions of finiteness spaces and describe their basic properties deduced from the general theory of linearly topologised spaces. Then we give an interpretation of LL based on linear algebra. Second, thanks to separation properties, we can introduce an algebraic notion of totality candidate in the framework of linearly topologised spaces: a totality candidate is a closed affine subspace which does not contain 0. We show that finiteness spaces with totality candidates constitute a model of classical LL. Finally, we give a barycentric simply typed lambda-calculus, with booleans ${\\mathcal{B}}$ and a conditional operator, which can be interpreted in this model. We prove completeness at type ${\\mathcal{B}}^n\\to{\\mathcal{B}}$ for every n by an algebraic metho...

  11. Global Management Education Graduate Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    Each year for the past 12 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. This Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating business schools. The survey allows students to express their…

  12. 2012 Global Management Education Graduate Survey. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Each year for the past 13 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. The Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating schools. The survey allows students to express their opinions about…

  13. Survey and Analysis of Female Students’ Extracurricular Sports Participation in Honghe University%红河学院非体育专业女大学生课外运动参与状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈洁

    2013-01-01

      本研究通过文献资料法、问卷调查法、访谈法等研究方法对红河学院非体育专业女大学生课外运动参与状况进行调查,发现红河学院非体育专业女大学生课外体育运动参与不积极,甚至有抵触现象。另外,非体育专业女大学生参与体育运动的时间少、频率低,多以室内运动和隔网对抗运动项目为主。而且,女大学生特有的生理和心理特征、学业负担,学校课外体育活动组织力度不足、覆盖面小等因素是影响她们参与课外运动的主要原因。%In this study, literature, questionnaires, interviews and other ways to investigate the status of Extracurricular sports participation of Honghe university non-sports institute girl students , the results show that: there is a negative attitude to training, or even against with sports among the Honghe university non-sports institute girl students .Other, non-sports institute girl students to participate in sports less time, frequency is low, its multi-sport indoor sports and every other network to the main confrontation. And the special of the physical and psychological characteristics of the girl students, academic burden, sports coverage smaller and other factors are the main reason affect the girl students for sport participation.

  14. Maximising response rates in household telephone surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Martha

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological and other studies that require participants to respond by completing a questionnaire face the growing threat of non-response. Response rates to household telephone surveys are diminishing because of changes in telecommunications, marketing and culture. Accordingly, updated information is required about the rate of telephone listing in directories and optimal strategies to maximise survey participation. Methods A total of 3426 households in Sydney, Australia were approached to participate in a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI regarding their domestic (recycled and/or drinking water usage. Only randomly selected households in the suburb and postcode of interest with a telephone number listed in the Electronic White Pages (EWP that matched Australian electoral records were approached. Results The CATI response rate for eligible households contacted by telephone was 39%. The rate of matching of electoral and EWP records, a measure of telephone directory coverage, was 55%. Conclusion The use of a combination of approaches, such as an advance letter, interviewer training, establishment of researcher credentials, increasing call attempts and targeted call times, remains a good strategy to maximise telephone response rates. However, by way of preparation for future technological changes, reduced telephone number listings and people's increasing resistance to unwanted phone calls, alternatives to telephone surveys, such as internet-based approaches, should be investigated.

  15. Maximising response rates in household telephone surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Joanne; Sinclair, Martha; Leder, Karin

    2008-11-03

    Epidemiological and other studies that require participants to respond by completing a questionnaire face the growing threat of non-response. Response rates to household telephone surveys are diminishing because of changes in telecommunications, marketing and culture. Accordingly, updated information is required about the rate of telephone listing in directories and optimal strategies to maximise survey participation. A total of 3426 households in Sydney, Australia were approached to participate in a computer assisted telephone interview (CATI) regarding their domestic (recycled and/or drinking) water usage. Only randomly selected households in the suburb and postcode of interest with a telephone number listed in the Electronic White Pages (EWP) that matched Australian electoral records were approached. The CATI response rate for eligible households contacted by telephone was 39%. The rate of matching of electoral and EWP records, a measure of telephone directory coverage, was 55%. The use of a combination of approaches, such as an advance letter, interviewer training, establishment of researcher credentials, increasing call attempts and targeted call times, remains a good strategy to maximise telephone response rates. However, by way of preparation for future technological changes, reduced telephone number listings and people's increasing resistance to unwanted phone calls, alternatives to telephone surveys, such as internet-based approaches, should be investigated.

  16. The Use of Social Media to Recruit Participants With Rare Conditions: Lynch Syndrome as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton-Chase, Allison M; Parker, Wendy M; Hennig, Kelsey; Sisson, Faith; Bruzzone, Linda L

    2017-01-23

    Social media is increasingly being used as a means of recruiting participants, particularly for investigators whose areas of interest involve rare conditions or hard-to-reach populations. However, much of the literature to date has focused on paid advertisement recruitment. We used Lynch syndrome (LS), a rare hereditary cancer syndrome, as a model to demonstrate the successful partnership between researchers and a Web-based patient education and advocacy organization to facilitate participant recruitment. Recruitment was undertaken in partnership with Lynch Syndrome International (LSI), an advocacy organization with a strong social media presence. After LSI published our study information, participants followed up via email or phone call. Following prescreening and consent, interested and eligible participants were then sent a secure survey link. Within 36 hours of a single Facebook post by the site administrators for LSI, over 150 individuals responded via phone or email. Sixty-five individuals were sent the survey link and 57 individuals completed the survey (88% response rate). Of note, these 57 individuals were geographically diverse within the Unites States, representing LS patients from 26 different states. This approach has several advantages, including recruitment through a trusted source outside of a clinical setting, higher response rates, and cost-effectiveness with a small research team in a relatively short amount of time. Overall, social media recruitment with a trusted online partner can be highly effective in hard-to-reach clinical populations, such as patients with LS. However, this approach requires additional effort for eligibility screening.

  17. The effect of mode and context on survey results: Analysis of data from the Health Survey for England 2006 and the Boost Survey for London

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roth Marilyn A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related data at local level could be provided by supplementing national health surveys with local boosts. Self-completion surveys are less costly than interviews, enabling larger samples to be achieved for a given cost. However, even when the same questions are asked with the same wording, responses to survey questions may vary by mode of data collection. These measurement differences need to be investigated further. Methods The Health Survey for England in London ('Core' and a London Boost survey ('Boost' used identical sampling strategies but different modes of data collection. Some data were collected by face-to-face interview in the Core and by self-completion in the Boost; other data were collected by self-completion questionnaire in both, but the context differed. Results were compared by mode of data collection using two approaches. The first examined differences in results that remained after adjusting the samples for differences in response. The second compared results after using propensity score matching to reduce any differences in sample composition. Results There were no significant differences between the two samples for prevalence of some variables including long-term illness, limiting long-term illness, current rates of smoking, whether participants drank alcohol, and how often they usually drank. However, there were a number of differences, some quite large, between some key measures including: general health, GHQ12 score, portions of fruit and vegetables consumed, levels of physical activity, and, to a lesser extent, smoking consumption, the number of alcohol units reported consumed on the heaviest day of drinking in the last week and perceived social support (among women only. Conclusion Survey mode and context can both affect the responses given. The effect is largest for complex question modules but was also seen for identical self-completion questions. Some data collected by interview and self-completion

  18. Awareness of Atopic Dermatitis and Attitudes toward Different Types of Medical Institutions for Its Treatment among Adult Patients and the Parents of Pediatric Patients: A Survey of 500 Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Nam Kyung; Han, Song Hee; Kim, Min Jung; Park, Gyeong-Hun; Lew, Bark-Lynn; Choi, Eung Ho; Ko, Hyun Chang; Park, Young Lip; Son, Sang Wook; Seo, Young Jun; Cho, Sang Hyun; Park, Chun Wook

    2016-01-01

    Background Physicians can play a crucial role in the knowledge that patients have about a disease and its prognosis. Recently, patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are increasingly turning from western medicine to oriental herbal medicine. However, their awareness of AD and attitude toward Western medicine and oriental herbal medicine clinics are scarcely reported. Objective The aim of this study was to determine the understanding of AD among patients and their parents and to identify their awareness of and attitude toward Western medicine and oriental herbal medicine as treatments for AD. Methods An online questionnaire was administered to 500 consenting respondents with AD (age, 16~49 years) and parents of children with AD (age, 0~15 years). Results The mean percentage of correct answers to questions about AD was 52.54%. A parental history of AD was independently associated with higher respondent’s knowledge about the disease and its treatment. The satisfaction with treatment outcomes was highest among patients treated at private clinic of dermatology specialists (49.4%), while lowest among those treated at oriental herbal medicine clinics (38.4%). Many participants were aware that oriental herbal medicine requires a longer treatment period for a cure and does not burden the skin, while steroid phobia was seen in most of participants. Conclusion Physicians need to educate AD patients and their parents about the disease and its treatment. Misconceptions for Western medicine and oriental herbal medicine among AD patients and parents should be corrected to improve their prognosis. PMID:27904272

  19. Ecological Momentary Assessment in Behavioral Research: Addressing Technological and Human Participant Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Music, Edvin; Styn, Mindi A; Kriska, Andrea; Smailagic, Asim; Siewiorek, Daniel; Ewing, Linda J; Chasens, Eileen; French, Brian; Mancino, Juliet; Mendez, Dara; Strollo, Patrick; Rathbun, Stephen L

    2017-01-01

    Background Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) assesses individuals’ current experiences, behaviors, and moods as they occur in real time and in their natural environment. EMA studies, particularly those of longer duration, are complex and require an infrastructure to support the data flow and monitoring of EMA completion. Objective Our objective is to provide a practical guide to developing and implementing an EMA study, with a focus on the methods and logistics of conducting such a study. Methods The EMPOWER study was a 12-month study that used EMA to examine the triggers of lapses and relapse following intentional weight loss. We report on several studies that informed the implementation of the EMPOWER study: (1) a series of pilot studies, (2) the EMPOWER study’s infrastructure, (3) training of study participants in use of smartphones and the EMA protocol and, (4) strategies used to enhance adherence to completing EMA surveys. Results The study enrolled 151 adults and had 87.4% (132/151) retention rate at 12 months. Our learning experiences in the development of the infrastructure to support EMA assessments for the 12-month study spanned several topic areas. Included were the optimal frequency of EMA prompts to maximize data collection without overburdening participants; the timing and scheduling of EMA prompts; technological lessons to support a longitudinal study, such as proper communication between the Android smartphone, the Web server, and the database server; and use of a phone that provided access to the system’s functionality for EMA data collection to avoid loss of data and minimize the impact of loss of network connectivity. These were especially important in a 1-year study with participants who might travel. It also protected the data collection from any server-side failure. Regular monitoring of participants’ response to EMA prompts was critical, so we built in incentives to enhance completion of EMA surveys. During the first 6 months of

  20. Community Participation in Solid Waste Management, Kathmandu

    OpenAIRE

    Gotame, Manira

    2012-01-01

    Waste management in Nepal is one of the important topics discussed today. Participation of the community is thus,being encouraged to manage solid waste. My study area is Kathmandu (Buddhajyoti, Chamati and Milijuli, Ganesh and Jagriti settlements in Kathmandu). My paper focuses in community participation in solid waste management in these settlements/communities. there are different projects working for this purpose in these settlements. I used household survey...

  1. The correlates of sports participation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downward, Paul; Lera-López, Fernando; Rasciute, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Eurobarometer data from 2009 (N = 26,788), this paper investigates the correlates of sports participation. In addition to examining standard socio-demographic, economic and lifestyle factors, the paper also focuses on the impact of motivational factors, the availability of sports infrastructure and government support, for the first time collectively at the European level. A further contribution of the paper is that it simultaneously investigates both the decision to participate in sport and the frequency of sports participation in this context. This is made possible through the application of a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit estimator. This estimator also takes into account two types of non-participants: those who have never participated in sport and those who did not participate at the time of the survey. The results show that the decision to participate in sports and the frequency of sports participation of males and females are affected by different factors, therefore distinct government policies should be applied to attract new, and retain the existing, participants. For example, women are affected more by a need to improve self-esteem, while the men to produce social integration. The provision of sports facilities is of more importance for males, which may indicate a male-oriented nature of the sports facilities, for example, the gym. However, the number of adults and the number of children in the household reduce the probability of sports participation by females. Therefore, higher provision of childcare may be important if female participation is to be increased.

  2. Impact of Participation on a Solid Organ Transplant Team on Student Pharmacists’ Perceptions of Interprofessional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Brenda S.; Woodard, Lisa J.; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; Hardinger, Karen L.; Wu, Vivian; Hayney, Mary S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To examine student pharmacists’ perceptions of interprofessional roles before and after completing an advanced pharmacy practice experience on solid organ transplantation. Methods. Student pharmacists across the United States participating in an APPE on a solid organ transplant team completed an online pre- and post-APPE survey instrument examining perceptions of interprofessional roles, communication, and teamwork. Results. Student pharmacists’ scores on interprofessionalism increased significantly on 17 of 22 items. Positive changes were seen in the interprofessional education core competency areas of roles and responsibilities, interprofessional communication, and teams and teamwork. Conclusion. Student pharmacist participation in interprofessional clinical APPEs can positively influence their professional development as they prepare to become members of multi-disciplinary teams in the healthcare workforce. PMID:23716742

  3. The body participating:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallesen, Hanne; Lund, Lone Blak; Jensen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The literature on participation in rehabilitation by those with the most severe acquired brain injury is very sparse. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore how physiotherapists promote the participation of patients with severe brain injury in therapeutic and daily-...... and low level of consciousness in terms of their participation and functioning in everyday life.......-based analyses. The results were theoretically stated and supported. Results: In an effort to achieve patient participation, the following four themes seemed to be significant: 1) consciously encountering the patient in the moment, 2) the employment of concepts surrounding the interaction between body...

  4. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  5. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  6. Dynamics of Cooperation in a Task Completion Social Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passino, Kevin M.

    2017-01-01

    We study the situation where the members of a community have the choice to participate in the completion of a common task. The process of completing the task involves only costs and no benefits to the individuals that participate in this process. However, completing the task results in changes that significantly benefit the community and that exceed the participation efforts. A task completion social dilemma arises when the short-term participation costs dissipate any interest in the community members to contribute to the task completion process and therefore to obtain the benefits that result from completing the task. In this work, we model the task completion problem using a dynamical system that characterizes the participation dynamics in the community and the task completion process. We show how this model naturally allows for the incorporation of several mechanisms that facilitate the emergence of cooperation and that have been studied in previous research on social dilemmas, including communication across a network, and indirect reciprocity through relative reputation. We provide mathematical analyses and computer simulations to study the qualitative properties of the participation dynamics in the community for different scenarios. PMID:28125721

  7. PARTICIPATION IN ONLINE FORUMS: Some Insights of Malaysian Distance Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramela KRISH

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of technology is particularly significant in today’s distance learning scenario. It has maximized the opportunities for interaction between discussion groups separated by time and space. This article reports the responses to a survey carried out with distance learners at a selected institution of higher learning. The learners responded to a questionnaire on their participation in online forums. It also looks at the postings or entries in the learner management system by these learners for the completion of a course. The findings suggest that both learners and instructors need to play their respective roles effectively in the cyber space to promote online interaction which is crucial to the learning.

  8. Completion of an Online Library Module Improves Engineering Student Performance on Information Literacy Skills Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Scott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Zhang, Q., Goodman, M., & Xie, S. (2015. Integrating library instruction into the Course Management System for a first-year engineering class: An evidence-based study measuring the effectiveness of blended learning on students’ information literacy levels. College & Research Libraries, 76(7, 934-958. http://dx.doi.org/10.5860/crl.76.7.934 Objective – To assess the efficacy of an online library module and of blended learning methods on students’ information literacy skills. Design – Multi-modal, pre- and posttests, survey questionnaire, and focus groups. Setting – Public research university in London, Ontario, Canada. Subjects – First-year engineering students. Methods – Of 413 students enrolled in Engineering Science (ES 1050, 252 volunteered to participate in the study. Participants were asked to complete the online module, a pretest, a posttest, an online follow-up survey, and to take part in a focus group. Researchers generated a pretest and a posttest, each comprised of 15 questions:; multiple choice, true or false, and matching questions which tested students’ general and engineering-specific information literacy skills. The pretest and posttest had different, but similarly challenging, questions to ensure that students involved in the study would not have an advantage over those who had opted out. While all components of the study were voluntary, the posttest was a graded course assignment. In-person tutorials were offered on 4 occasions, with only 15 students participating. Both tutorial and module content were designed to cover all questions and competencies tested in the pretest and the posttest, including Boolean operators, peer review, identifying plagiarism, engineering standards, engineering handbooks, search strategies, patents, article citations, identifying reliable sources, and how to read journal articles. The posttest survey was delivered in the CMS immediately after the posttest was completed. It

  9. Sense of participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohorques Montemayor, L.; Nevejan, C.I.M.; Brazier, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sense of participation of a spatially distributed individual—in the intersections of physical and mediated networks. This sense is fundamental to an individuals’ experience as a participant in systems designed to this purpose including today’s social media and new media gener

  10. Sense of participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bohorques Montemayor, L.; Nevejan, C.I.M.; Brazier, F.M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the sense of participation of a spatially distributed individual—in the intersections of physical and mediated networks. This sense is fundamental to an individuals’ experience as a participant in systems designed to this purpose including today’s social media and new media

  11. Participation beyond observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    , however, the researchers typically uphold the notion that all they methodically engage in is participant observation. The paper argues that important aspects of children’s living and understanding may be lost when considering them mere objects of one’s visual and verbal research practices. First I delve...... on investigating children’s perspectives through participant observation, but also ontological and political ones....

  12. Depression and Political Participation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument—whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group. PMID:26924857

  13. Depression and Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument-whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group.

  14. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are reconstructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  15. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... a participant and, as such, co-producer of the observed phenomenon. There is no such thing as a neutral or objective description. As observation deals with differences and process meaning, all descriptions are re-constructions and interpretations of the observed. Hence, the idea of neutral descriptions as well...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  16. Student Expectations from Participating in a Small Spacecraft Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Straub

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The number of small spacecraft development programs in the United States and worldwide have increased significantly over the course of the last 10 years. This paper analyzes reasons for the growth in these programs by assessing what student participants hope to gain from their participation. Participants in the OpenOrbiter Small Spacecraft Development Initiative at the University of North Dakota were surveyed at the beginning of an academic year to determine why they were planning to participate in the program again or join and participate for the first time. This paper presents the results of this survey.

  17. High resolution survey for topographic surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, L. C.; Setan, H.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A. K.; Tan, Z.

    2014-02-01

    In this decade, terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is getting popular in many fields such as reconstruction, monitoring, surveying, as-built of facilities, archaeology, and topographic surveying. This is due the high speed in data collection which is about 50,000 to 1,000,000 three-dimensional (3D) points per second at high accuracy. The main advantage of 3D representation for the data is that it is more approximate to the real world. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to show the use of High-Definition Surveying (HDS), also known as 3D laser scanning for topographic survey. This research investigates the effectiveness of using terrestrial laser scanning system for topographic survey by carrying out field test in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, Johor. The 3D laser scanner used in this study is a Leica ScanStation C10. Data acquisition was carried out by applying the traversing method. In this study, the result for the topographic survey is under 1st class survey. At the completion of this study, a standard of procedure was proposed for topographic data acquisition using laser scanning systems. This proposed procedure serves as a guideline for users who wish to utilize laser scanning system in topographic survey fully.

  18. Family participation in intensive care unit rounds: Comparing family and provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Selena S; Roze des Ordons, Amanda; Soo, Andrea; Guienguere, Simon; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-04-01

    To describe and compare intensive care unit (ICU) patient family member and provider experiences, preferences, and perceptions of family participation in ICU rounds. Cross-sectional survey of ICU family members and providers of patients admitted to 4 medical-surgical ICUs from September 2014 to March 2015. Surveys were completed by 63 (62%) family members and 258 (43%) providers. Provider respondents included physicians (9%), nurses (56%), respiratory therapists (24%), and other ICU team members (11%). Although 38% of providers estimated only moderate family member interest in participating in rounds, 97% of family members expressed high interest. Family members and providers reported listening (95% vs 96%; P=.594) and sharing information about the patient (82% vs 82%; P=.995) as appropriate roles for family members during rounds, but differed in their perceptions on asking questions (75% vs 86%; P=.043) and participating in decision making (36% vs 59%; P=.003). Compared with family members, providers were more likely to perceive family participation in rounds to cause family stress (7% vs 22%; P=.020) and confusion (0% vs 28%; PFamily members and providers share some perspectives on family participation in ICU rounds although other perspectives are discordant, with implications for communication strategies and collaborative decision making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [The Dutch National Colesterol Test: participants mainly healthy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutekom, M; Aziz, Y; van Dis, I; Stronks, K; Bossuyt, P M M

    2008-11-01

    To determine, in people who participated in the Netherlands Heart Foundation's National Cholesterol Test in supermarkets, risk factors for cardiovascular disease and expectations concerning the test result using a questionnaire, and to compare their cholesterol levels with reference values. Descriptive study and questionnaire survey. Participants who underwent the National Cholesterol Test in 9 supermarkets during the summer of 2007 were invited to complete a short questionnaire about risk factors for cardiovascular disease and expectations concerning the test result. Statements about the intention to change behaviour were offered, and the measured total cholesterol level was recorded. The average age of the 684 respondents was 57 years (SD: 16); 72% were female. Participants had on average a lower risk of cardiovascular disease than the general population; they suffered less frequently from diabetes, hypertension and being overweight, and smoked less. The measured cholesterol level was 5.0-6.5 mmol/l in 37% and > 6.5 mmoll in 11%. Elevated cholesterol levels were less common in this group than in the general population. The intention to change behaviour was substantial. The results of this study showed that the National Cholesterol Test reached relatively many healthy, somewhat worried people. The intention to change behaviour was substantial.

  20. Participation in a US community-based cardiovascular health study: investigating nonrandom selection effects related to employment, perceived stress, work-related stress, and family caregiving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Leslie A; Fujishiro, Kaori; Howard, Virginia J; Landsbergis, Paul; Hein, Misty J

    2017-08-15

    Participation in health studies may be inversely associated with employment and stress. We investigated whether employment, perceived stress, work-related stress, and family caregiving were related to participation in a longitudinal US community-based health study of black and white men and women aged ≥45 years. Prevalence ratios and confidence intervals were estimated for completion of the second stage (S2) of a two-stage enrollment process by employment (status, type), and stress (perceived stress, work-related stress, caregiving), adjusting for age, sex, race, region, income, and education. Eligibility and consent for a follow-up occupational survey were similarly evaluated. Wage- but not self-employed participants were less likely than the unemployed to complete S2. Among the employed, S2 completion did not vary by stress; however, family caregivers with a short time burden of care (<2 hour/d) were more likely to complete S2, compared to noncaregivers. Eligibility and participation in the follow-up occupational survey were higher among those employed (vs. unemployed) at enrollment but were not associated with enrollment stress levels. Limited evidence of selection bias was seen by employment and stress within a large US community-based cohort, but findings suggest the need for enrollment procedures to consider possible barriers to participation among wage-employed individuals. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Canadian plans for participation in GSETT 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. North

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available The Geological Survey of Canada (GSC is making preparations for Canadian participation in GSETT 3 but will be unable to make a formal commitment until the necessary resources have been secured. As Canada is expected to provide at least four alpha stations, and a significant number of beta stations, the financial resources that will be needed are substantial, even though in many respccts the GSC is, with the recent modernization of the Yellowknife array and the ongoing installation of the Canadian National Seismograph Network (CNSN, well positioned to make a significant contribution to GSETT 3. The CNSN currently (October 1993 consists of 17 broad band stations and will grow to 23 and 33 such stations by December 1993 and December 1994 respectively. Some 40 50 short period stations will complete the network. Data from all sites are continuously telemetered in real time to network acquisition centres in Ottawa and Sidney, British Columbia, archived to optical disk, and kept on line in a 72 h ring buffer. Most of the broadband sites could serve as either alpha or beta stations once the necessary software for continuous data transfer, or on request provision, of data from the selected sites has been completed. This software wili be configured so that changes in station selection are easy to implement, and this will provide considerable flexibility to the GSETT 3 planning and operations working groups in selecting the optimum network. Backup stations can be designated in the case of station failures, and the network centre in British Columbia will serve, at least for beta stations, as a backup NDC to that in Ottawa. Data from. the Yellowknife array are collected in Yellowknife and forwarded in ten minute files to Ottawa, where processing is completed and the results archived. This arrangement would not meet the deadlines for receipt of alpha station data at the IDC and new hardware and software will be needed to forward the data more immediately from

  2. Participants in "Friends with Benefits" Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Jennifer; Knox, David; Zusman, Marty E.

    2008-01-01

    Analysis of survey data from 1013 undergraduates at a large southeastern university revealed that over half (51%) reported experience in a "friends with benefits" relationship. In comparing the background characteristics of participants with nonpartipants in a FWBR, ten statistically significant findings emerged. Findings included that…

  3. Descriptive Epidemiology of Dance Participation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer R.; Pate, Russell R.; Liese, Angela D.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of dance participation in U.S. adolescents and to estimate the contribution of dance to total moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The sample was composed of 3,598 adolescents from the 2003-06 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Youth reported frequency and duration of…

  4. Mothers' Community Participation and Child Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Jenna; Frankenberg, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    We use rich data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey to assess the relationship between mothers' access to social capital via participation in community activities and their children's health. We exploit the advantages of longitudinal data and community fixed effects to mitigate some of the concerns about spuriousness and reverse causality that…

  5. Descriptive Epidemiology of Dance Participation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Jennifer R.; Pate, Russell R.; Liese, Angela D.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to describe the prevalence of dance participation in U.S. adolescents and to estimate the contribution of dance to total moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). The sample was composed of 3,598 adolescents from the 2003-06 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Youth reported frequency and duration of…

  6. Long-Term Stability of Social Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyyppa, Markku T.; Maki, Juhani; Alanen, Erkki; Impivaara, Olli; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of social participation was investigated in a representative urban population of 415 men and 579 women who had taken part in the nationwide Mini-Finland Health Survey in the years 1978-1980 and were re-examined 20 years later. Stability was assessed by means of the following tracking coefficients: kappa, proportion of…

  7. Family Members as Participants on Craniofacial Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, James; Seaver, Earl; Stevens, George; Whiteley, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Family members (N=83) who participated in professional team staffing concerning treatment plans for their child with a craniofacial difference (typically, cleft lip and/or palate) were surveyed. Ninety-seven percent of respondents said they would choose to meet with the team on their next visit to the clinic. The role of early interventionists on…

  8. Retrospective analysis of 55,769 HbA1c EQA results obtained from professional laboratories and medical offices participating in surveys organized by two European EQA centers over a nine-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Pierre-Alain; Deom, André; Kesseler, Dagmar; Cohen, Richard

    2011-01-01

    External Quality Assessment (EQA) is an essential tool for laboratories to monitor the performances of their analyses. It also allows a comparison of methods and types of laboratories (professional laboratories vs. medical offices). We, therefore, compared 55,769 HbA1c EQA results obtained between 1999 and 2008 by laboratories participating in EQA schemes organized by two European centers, Switzerland (center 1) and France (center 2). We used simple, nonparametrical statistics suited to EQA results to calculate the yearly and global precision performances. All the results, including the outliers, were included in the calculations. The best global precision performances were obtained by professional laboratories and medical offices using DCA POCT devices, followed by professional laboratories with the Integra, Hitachi, Cobas Mira, and HPLC groups of devices, and finally by both types of laboratories with the NycoCard POCT devices. When considering yearly precision performances, an overall improvement over time was observed for almost all diagnostic devices of center 1, whereas the trend was less clear for center 2. The HbA1c EQA results collected and analyzed over a 9-year period showed that the DCA POCT devices used either by professional laboratories or medical offices had better reproducibility than laboratory devices (other than POCT) and that a general improvement of yearly precision performances was observed, especially when frequent EQA schemes were organized. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  10. Spiraling toward market completeness and financial instability

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    I study the limit of a large random economy, where a set of consumers invests in financial instruments engineered by banks, in order to optimize their future consumption. This exercise shows that, even in the ideal case of perfect competition, where full information is available to all market participants, the equilibrium develops a marked vulnerability (or susceptibility) to market imperfections, as markets approach completeness and transaction costs vanish. The decrease in transaction costs...

  11. Methods for Evaluating Respondent Attrition in Web-Based Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochheimer, Camille J; Sabo, Roy T; Krist, Alex H; Day, Teresa; Cyrus, John; Woolf, Steven H

    2016-11-22

    Electronic surveys are convenient, cost effective, and increasingly popular tools for collecting information. While the online platform allows researchers to recruit and enroll more participants, there is an increased risk of participant dropout in Web-based research. Often, these dropout trends are simply reported, adjusted for, or ignored altogether. To propose a conceptual framework that analyzes respondent attrition and demonstrates the utility of these methods with existing survey data. First, we suggest visualization of attrition trends using bar charts and survival curves. Next, we propose a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to detect or confirm significant attrition points. Finally, we suggest applications of existing statistical methods to investigate the effect of internal survey characteristics and patient characteristics on dropout. In order to apply this framework, we conducted a case study; a seventeen-item Informed Decision-Making (IDM) module addressing how and why patients make decisions about cancer screening. Using the framework, we were able to find significant attrition points at Questions 4, 6, 7, and 9, and were also able to identify participant responses and characteristics associated with dropout at these points and overall. When these methods were applied to survey data, significant attrition trends were revealed, both visually and empirically, that can inspire researchers to investigate the factors associated with survey dropout, address whether survey completion is associated with health outcomes, and compare attrition patterns between groups. The framework can be used to extract information beyond simple responses, can be useful during survey development, and can help determine the external validity of survey results.

  12. Adolescent Participation in HPV Vaccine Clinical Trials: Are Parents Willing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erves, Jennifer Cunningham; Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L; Hull, Pamela C; Duke, Lauren; Miller, Stephania T

    2017-03-21

    Approximately one-quarter of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are acquired by adolescents, with a higher burden among racial/ethnic minorities. However, racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in previous HPV vaccine trials. Ongoing and future HPV vaccine optimization trials would benefit from racially- and ethnically-diverse sample of adolescent trial participants. This study examined factors influencing parental willingness to consent to their adolescents' participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials and tested for possible racial differences. A convenience sample of parents of adolescents (N = 256) completed a cross-sectional survey. Chi square analyses were used to assess racial differences in parental HPV vaccine awareness and intentions and willingness to consent to their child participating in an HPV vaccine clinical trial. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with willingness. Approximately 47% of parents were willing to allow their adolescent to participate in HPV vaccine clinical trials (30.7% African American and 48.3% Caucasian, p = .081). African Americans had lower HPV vaccine awareness (p = .006) but not lower intentions to vaccinate (p = .086). Parental willingness was positively associated with the following variables: Child's age (p < .039), Perceived Advantages of HPV Vaccination for Adolescents (p = .002), Parental Trust in Medical Researchers (p < .001), and Level of Ease in Understanding Clinical Trial Information (p = .010). Educating parents about the advantages of HPV vaccines for younger adolescents using low-literacy educational materials and building trust between parents and researchers may increase parental willingness to consent to adolescent participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials.

  13. A survey of NAPNAP members' clinical and professional research priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Kathleen J; Lewin, Linda C; Niederhauser, Victoria P; Brady, Margaret A; Jones, Dolores; Butz, Arlene; Gallo, Agatha M; Schindler, Christine A; Trent, Cynthia A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this methodological article is to describe the development, implementation, and analysis of the survey used to determine NAPNAP members' ranking of research priorities, to describe the top priorities ranked by participants, and to determine if priorities differed by area of practice (primary, acute, or specialty care) or participant age. A cross-sectional descriptive design with an online survey was used. Completed by 324 NAPNAP members, the survey consisted of a demographic section and 90 statements in two domains: Clinical Priorities and Professional Role Priorities. Survey respondents strongly supported the top priorities with an average overall mean score of 4.0 or above on a 5-point Likert scale. Only three of the top 10 clinical and professional priorities differed by area of practice. No clinical priorities and only three professional priorities differed by age. The survey results were used to develop the NAPNAP Research Agenda. Both the survey results and the agenda can provide guidance for the NAPNAP Board, committees and interests groups as they develop initiatives and programs. Copyright © 2012 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Public Perceptions of Child Care in Alberta, Canada: Evidence for Policies and Practice from a Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tough, Suzanne; Rikhy, Shivani; Benzies, Karen; Vekved, Monica; Kehler, Heather; Johnston, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: This study assessed public perceptions of child care and its providers in a Canadian province where government funding for child care includes subsidies and a voluntary accreditation process. In 2007-2008, 1,443 randomly selected adults in Alberta, Canada, completed a telephone survey. Individuals were eligible to participate if…

  15. International Medical School Faculty Development: The Results of a Needs Assessment Survey among Medical Educators in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Sippola, Emily; Feng, Xinglin; Dong, Zhe; Wang, Debing; Moyer, Cheryl A.; Stern, David T.

    2009-01-01

    To explore the need for faculty development among Chinese medical educators. Leaders at each medical school in China were asked to complete a 123-item survey to identify interest in various topics and barriers and perceived benefits of participating in faculty development programs. Interest levels were high for all topics. Experience with Hospital…

  16. User participation in urban green spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fors, Hanna; Molin, Julie Frøik; Murphyc, Melissa Anna

    2015-01-01

    The provision and administration of high quality urban public green spaces intertwines issues of planning, design, management and maintenance with governance. The benefits of such spaces are often tied to social justice, public health and recreation, biodiversity and helping cities to deal...... participation affects the physical quality of green spaces. This literature review surveyed empirical scientific studies seeking to answer the following research question: How does research to date reflect over user participation's contribution to public urban green space quality? The review includes 31...... for participation are taken for granted. A particularly large disparity was found between the discussing and testing of many arguments regarding how participation may directly benefit urban green spaces. Rather than assessing the physical outputs of participation, most of the empirical studies tested process...

  17. Participation of nursing faculty in university governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrawy, A A

    1992-03-01

    It has been suggested that faculty participation in governance in American colleges is low, and that faculty in schools of nursing are particularly unlikely to be involved in governance activities. This study was designed to determine actual and ideal levels of nursing faculty participation in five areas of governance: academic, student, personnel, public, and financial affairs. A survey of nursing faculty suggested that they were involved substantially in academic affairs, but less involved in the other areas of governance. Generally, the faculty indicated satisfaction with their high level of participation in academic affairs, and with their lower level of participation in student affairs, personnel affairs, and public affairs; the faculty did indicate dissatisfaction with their low level of participation in financial affairs.

  18. From spectator to participant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Birgitte; Kofoed, Jens

    The book collects experiences and methods for citizens’ participation in order to strengthen the local Agenda 21 process. 5 different types of methods is presented: Methods of analyses and evaluation, methods of dialogue, methods for action, methods for networking, and finely methods for involvin...... local institutions. In the opening part the book deals with fundamental themes in participation processes such as planning of changes and changes and conflicts.......The book collects experiences and methods for citizens’ participation in order to strengthen the local Agenda 21 process. 5 different types of methods is presented: Methods of analyses and evaluation, methods of dialogue, methods for action, methods for networking, and finely methods for involving...

  19. Contact Quality in Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Jensen, Olav Storm

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the concept of participation from the perspective of quality of the contact in the communicative interactions between participants. We argue for the need for an academic-personal competence that qualifies the human contact central in all Participatory Design (PD) activities as a way...... to contribute to “an era of participation.” We describe a contact perspective in PD developed through a collaboration with body-oriented psychotherapeutic research that have specialized experiences in investigating open-minded contact and authentic meetings as body-related experiences....

  20. Web based health surveys: Using a Two Step Heckman model to examine their potential for population health analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Karyn; Kinderman, Peter; Pontin, Eleanor; Tai, Sara; Schwannauer, Mathias

    2016-08-01

    In June 2011 the BBC Lab UK carried out a web-based survey on the causes of mental distress. The 'Stress Test' was launched on 'All in the Mind' a BBC Radio 4 programme and the test's URL was publicised on radio and TV broadcasts, and made available via BBC web pages and social media. Given the large amount of data created, over 32,800 participants, with corresponding diagnosis, demographic and socioeconomic characteristics; the dataset are potentially an important source of data for population based research on depression and anxiety. However, as respondents self-selected to participate in the online survey, the survey may comprise a non-random sample. It may be only individuals that listen to BBC Radio 4 and/or use their website that participated in the survey. In this instance using the Stress Test data for wider population based research may create sample selection bias. Focusing on the depression component of the Stress Test, this paper presents an easy-to-use method, the Two Step Probit Selection Model, to detect and statistically correct selection bias in the Stress Test. Using a Two Step Probit Selection Model; this paper did not find a statistically significant selection on unobserved factors for participants of the Stress Test. That is, survey participants who accessed and completed an online survey are not systematically different from non-participants on the variables of substantive interest.