WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey natural variation

  1. Exploiting Natural Variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenaar, J.A.; Keurentjes, J.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana . This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of

  2. Exploiting natural variation in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Molenaar; J.J.B. Keurentjes

    2014-01-01

    Natural variation for many traits is present within the species Arabidopsis thaliana. This chapter describes the use of natural variation to elucidate genes underlying the regulation of quantitative traits. It deals with the development and use of mapping populations, the detection and handling of g

  3. Geographic and molecular variation in a natural plant transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallenback, Pernilla; Bengtsson, Bengt O; Ghatnekar, Lena

    2010-03-01

    A PCR based survey of Festuca ovina plants from populations around the southern part of the Baltic Sea demonstrates both geographic and molecular variation in the enzyme gene PgiC2, horizontally transferred from a Poa-species. Our results show that PgiC2-a natural functional nuclear transgene-is not a local ephemeral phenomenon but is present in a very large number of individuals. We find also that its frequency is geographically variable and that it appears in more than one molecular form. The chloroplast variation in the region does not indicate any distinct subdivision due to different colonization routes after the last glaciation. Our data illustrate the geographic and molecular variation that may occur in natural populations with a polymorphic, unfixed transgene affected by diverse kinds of mutational and evolutionary processes.

  4. The nature of solar brightness variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A. I.; Solanki, S. K.; Krivova, N. A.; Cameron, R. H.; Yeo, K. L.; Schmutz, W. K.

    2017-09-01

    Determining the sources of solar brightness variations1,2, often referred to as solar noise3, is important because solar noise limits the detection of solar oscillations3, is one of the drivers of the Earth's climate system4,5 and is a prototype of stellar variability6,7—an important limiting factor for the detection of extrasolar planets. Here, we model the magnetic contribution to solar brightness variability using high-cadence8,9 observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction (SATIRE)10,11 model. The brightness variations caused by the constantly evolving cellular granulation pattern on the solar surface were computed with the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS)/University of Chicago Radiative Magnetohydrodynamics (MURaM)12 code. We found that the surface magnetic field and granulation can together precisely explain solar noise (that is, solar variability excluding oscillations) on timescales from minutes to decades, accounting for all timescales that have so far been resolved or covered by irradiance measurements. We demonstrate that no other sources of variability are required to explain the data. Recent measurements of Sun-like stars by the COnvection ROtation and planetary Transits (CoRoT)13 and Kepler14 missions uncovered brightness variations similar to that of the Sun, but with a much wider variety of patterns15. Our finding that solar brightness variations can be replicated in detail with just two well-known sources will greatly simplify future modelling of existing CoRoT and Kepler as well as anticipated Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite16 and PLAnetary Transits and Oscillations of stars (PLATO)17 data.

  5. Natural variation of model mutant phenotypes in Ciona intestinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Sordino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study of ascidians (Chordata, Tunicata has made a considerable contribution to our understanding of the origin and evolution of basal chordates. To provide further information to support forward genetics in Ciona intestinalis, we used a combination of natural variation and neutral population genetics as an approach for the systematic identification of new mutations. In addition to the significance of developmental variation for phenotype-driven studies, this approach can encompass important implications in evolutionary and population biology. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we report a preliminary survey for naturally occurring mutations in three geographically interconnected populations of C. intestinalis. The influence of historical, geographical and environmental factors on the distribution of abnormal phenotypes was assessed by means of 12 microsatellites. We identified 37 possible mutant loci with stereotyped defects in embryonic development that segregate in a way typical of recessive alleles. Local populations were found to differ in genetic organization and frequency distribution of phenotypic classes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Natural genetic polymorphism of C. intestinalis constitutes a valuable source of phenotypes for studying embryonic development in ascidians. Correlating genetic structure and the occurrence of abnormal phenotypes is a crucial focus for understanding the selective forces that shape natural finite populations, and may provide insights of great importance into the evolutionary mechanisms that generate animal diversity.

  6. Surveying of morphological variations in estuarine Nyband River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadi-Bistooni, S.; Ershadi, C.

    2009-04-01

    Rivers estuary in aspect of ecological and morphological is very sensitive in coastal zones. This area can affect from human activities and these activities have direct effective on natural state of these area. There for, overall aim of this work is steady on development of this coastal area and thus, it is investigated the morphological and sedimentation mechanism in estuarine area. For this case study, area is limited (27°11'NL ; 56°19'EL), begin from Genu mountains in southern parts of Iran and pass from mid of Bandar Abbas city and in final ends to north of Persian Gulf. There were some physical variations in this estuarine area of Nyband River due to human activities. These variations include: fixing the banks, Jetty break water in near of estuary and recently sealing the bed bottom of river and building of bridge. A numerical program was used for analysis this hydrodynamic and sediment condition. This result compares with field data for evaluation of the numerical analysis. Also, the aero photographical document in past decade was prepared for surveying morphological variations. For this purpose, the GIS (ARCVIEW) was used and finally, the effect of the human activities, such as building of new structure, on morphology of river was investigated.

  7. Variational Approach to Impulsive Problems: A Survey of Recent Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-fang Liao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a survey on the existence of nontrivial solutions to impulsive differential equations by using variational methods, including solutions to boundary value problems, periodic solutions, and homoclinic solutions.

  8. Variational inequalities and fixed point problems : a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu Chugh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The variational inequality problem provides a broad unifying setting for the study of optimization, equilibrium and related problems and serves as a useful computational framework for the solution of a host of problems in very diverse applications. Variational inequalities have been a classical subject in mathematical physics, particularly in the calculus of variations associated with the minimization of infinite-dimensional functionals. This paper presents a survey of main results related to variational inequalities and fixed point problems defined on real Hilbert spaces and Banach spaces. Keywords: Fixed Point Problem, Inverse-Strongly-Monotone Mappings, Monotone Mappings, Projection Mappings, Variational Inequality Problem.

  9. Epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Vaughn

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs, especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F(2 families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means.

  10. Epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Matthew W; Tanurdzić, Milos; Lippman, Zachary; Jiang, Hongmei; Carrasquillo, Robert; Rabinowicz, Pablo D; Dedhia, Neilay; McCombie, W Richard; Agier, Nicolas; Bulski, Agnès; Colot, Vincent; Doerge, R W; Martienssen, Robert A

    2007-07-01

    Cytosine methylation of repetitive sequences is widespread in plant genomes, occurring in both symmetric (CpG and CpNpG) as well as asymmetric sequence contexts. We used the methylation-dependent restriction enzyme McrBC to profile methylated DNA using tiling microarrays of Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 in two distinct ecotypes, Columbia and Landsberg erecta. We also used comparative genome hybridization to profile copy number polymorphisms. Repeated sequences and transposable elements (TEs), especially long terminal repeat retrotransposons, are densely methylated, but one third of genes also have low but detectable methylation in their transcribed regions. While TEs are almost always methylated, genic methylation is highly polymorphic, with half of all methylated genes being methylated in only one of the two ecotypes. A survey of loci in 96 Arabidopsis accessions revealed a similar degree of methylation polymorphism. Within-gene methylation is heritable, but is lost at a high frequency in segregating F(2) families. Promoter methylation is rare, and gene expression is not generally affected by differences in DNA methylation. Small interfering RNA are preferentially associated with methylated TEs, but not with methylated genes, indicating that most genic methylation is not guided by small interfering RNA. This may account for the instability of gene methylation, if occasional failure of maintenance methylation cannot be restored by other means.

  11. Non-commuting variations in mathematics and physics a survey

    CERN Document Server

    Preston, Serge

    2016-01-01

    This text presents and studies the method of so –called noncommuting variations in Variational Calculus. This method was pioneered by Vito Volterra who noticed that the conventional Euler-Lagrange (EL-) equations are not applicable in Non-Holonomic Mechanics and suggested to modify the basic rule used in Variational Calculus. This book presents a survey of Variational Calculus with non-commutative variations and shows that most basic properties of conventional Euler-Lagrange Equations are, with some modifications, preserved for EL-equations with K-twisted (defined by K)-variations. Most of the book can be understood by readers without strong mathematical preparation (some knowledge of Differential Geometry is necessary). In order to make the text more accessible the definitions and several necessary results in Geometry are presented separately in Appendices I and II Furthermore in Appendix III a short presentation of the Noether Theorem describing the relation between the symmetries of the differential equa...

  12. Cytoplasmic genetic variation and extensive cytonuclear interactions influence natural variation in the metabolome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joseph, Bindu; Corwin, Jason A.; Li, Baohua

    2013-01-01

    affects phenotypic variation. This showed that the cytoplasmic variation had effects similar to, if not larger than, the largest individual nuclear locus. Inclusion of cytoplasmic variation into the genetic model greatly increased the explained phenotypic variation. Cytoplasmic genetic variation...... was a central hub in the epistatic network controlling the plant metabolome. This epistatic influence manifested such that the cytoplasmic background could alter or hide pairwise epistasis between nuclear loci. Thus, cytoplasmic genetic variation plays a central role in controlling natural variation......Understanding genome to phenotype linkages has been greatly enabled by genomic sequencing. However, most genome analysis is typically confined to the nuclear genome. We conducted a metabolomic QTL analysis on a reciprocal RIL population structured to examine how variation in the organelle genomes...

  13. Natural variation of submergence tolerance among Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vashisht, D.; Hesselink, A.; Pierik, R.

    2011-01-01

    The exploitation of natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) provides a huge potential for the identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying this variation as a result of the availability of a vast array of genetic and genomic resources for this species. Eighty......-six Arabidopsis accessions were screened for natural variation in flooding tolerance. This forms the first step towards the identification and characterization of the role of candidate genes contributing to flooding tolerance. • Arabidopsis accessions at the 10-leaf stage were subjected to complete submergence...... in the dark. Survival curves were plotted to estimate median lethal times as a measure of tolerance. Flooding-associated survival parameters, such as root and shoot oxygen content, initial carbohydrate content and petiole elongation under water, were also measured. • There was a significant variation...

  14. The effect of variation in naturalness on phonetic perceptual identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remez, Robert E.; Yang, Cynthia Y.; Piorkowski, Rebecca L.; Wissig, Stephanie; Batchelder, Abigail; Nam, Heddy

    2002-05-01

    The relation between apparent naturalness and phonetic identification was assessed in six perceptual tests. A seven-step place-of-articulation series spanning [da] to [ga] was created with speech synthesis approximating the spectra of natural samples. The sensitivity of perceivers to this realization of a place contrast was assessed by estimating the cumulative d' across the series in identification tests. Four variants of this series differing in apparent naturalness were produced by altering the synthesis source function while preserving the center frequency and bandwidth of the formants, and by replicating the gross spectrotemporal patterns with time-varying sinusoids. In addition to calibrating perceivers' sensitivity to the place contrast over variation in naturalness, we conducted a naturalness tournament composed of items drawn from the five test series. A correlation of the findings of the naturalness tournament with the measures of phonetic sensitivity offers an index of the effect of variation in naturalness on phonetic perception. This study can resolve the dispute between the classic premise that intelligibility and naturalness are orthogonal attributes of speech perception, and the more recent premise entailed by episodically based accounts of perceptual categorization, that novel instances are identified by virtue of auditory similarity to prior exemplars. [Research supported by NIDCD.

  15. Exploiting natural variation to identify insect-resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekgaarden, Colette; Snoeren, Tjeerd A L; Dicke, Marcel; Vosman, Ben

    2011-10-01

    Herbivorous insects are widespread and often serious constraints to crop production. The use of insect-resistant crops is a very effective way to control insect pests in agriculture, and the development of such crops can be greatly enhanced by knowledge on plant resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. Plants have evolved diverse ways to cope with insect attack that has resulted in natural variation for resistance towards herbivorous insects. Studying the molecular genetics and transcriptional background of this variation has facilitated the identification of resistance genes and processes that lead to resistance against insects. With the development of new technologies, molecular studies are not restricted to model plants anymore. This review addresses the need to exploit natural variation in resistance towards insects to increase our knowledge on resistance mechanisms and the genes involved. We will discuss how this knowledge can be exploited in breeding programmes to provide sustainable crop protection against insect pests. Additionally, we discuss the current status of genetic research on insect-resistance genes. We conclude that insect-resistance mechanisms are still unclear at the molecular level and that exploiting natural variation with novel technologies will contribute greatly to the development of insect-resistant crop varieties.

  16. Comprehensive profiling and natural variation of flavonoids in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuekui Dong; Wei Chen; Wensheng Wang; Hongyan Zhang; Xianqing Liu; Jie Luo

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids constitute a major group of plant phenolic compounds. While extensively studied in Arabidopsis, profiling and natural y occurring variation of these compounds in rice (Oryza sativa), the monocot model plant, are less reported. Using a col ection of rice germplasm, comprehensive profiling and natural variation of flavonoids were presented in this report. Application of a widely targeted metabolomics method facilitat-ed the simultaneous identification and quantification of more than 90 flavonoids using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Comparing flavonoid contents in various tissues during different developmental stages revealed tissue-specific accumulation of most flavonoids. Further investi-gation indicated that flavone mono-C-glycosides, malonylated flavonoid O-hexosides, and some flavonoid O-glycosides accu-mulated at significantly higher levels in indica than in japonica, while the opposite was observed for aromatic acylated flavone C-hexosyl-O-hexosides. In contrast to the highly differential accumulation between the two subspecies, relatively smal variations within subspecies were detected for most flavonoids. Besides, an association analysis between flavonoid accumulation and its biosynthetic gene sequence polymorphisms disclosed that natural variation of flavonoids was probably caused by sequence polymorphisms in the coding region of flavonoid biosynthetic genes. Our work paves the way for future dissection of biosynthesis and regulation of flavonoid pathway in rice.

  17. Genetic variation in natural honeybee populations, Apis mellifera capensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Randall; Neumann, Peter; Radloff, Sarah E.

    2004-09-01

    Genetic variation in honeybee, Apis mellifera, populations can be considerably influenced by breeding and commercial introductions, especially in areas with abundant beekeeping. However, in southern Africa apiculture is based on the capture of wild swarms, and queen rearing is virtually absent. Moreover, the introduction of European subspecies constantly failed in the Cape region. We therefore hypothesize a low human impact on genetic variation in populations of Cape honeybees, Apis mellifera capensis. A novel solution to studying genetic variation in honeybee populations based on thelytokous worker reproduction is applied to test this hypothesis. Environmental effects on metrical morphological characters of the phenotype are separated to obtain a genetic residual component. The genetic residuals are then re-calculated as coefficients of genetic variation. Characters measured included hair length on the abdomen, width and length of wax plate, and three wing angles. The data show for the first time that genetic variation in Cape honeybee populations is independent of beekeeping density and probably reflects naturally occurring processes such as gene flow due to topographic and climatic variation on a microscale.

  18. Preliminary natural resource survey : Carson River Mercury Site, Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The survey in this report was conducted to determine if natural resources under the trusteeship of Interior have been affected by the release of hazardous substances...

  19. Natural enemies drive geographic variation in plant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züst, Tobias; Heichinger, Christian; Grossniklaus, Ueli; Harrington, Richard; Kliebenstein, Daniel J; Turnbull, Lindsay A

    2012-10-01

    Plants defend themselves against attack by natural enemies, and these defenses vary widely across populations. However, whether communities of natural enemies are a sufficiently potent force to maintain polymorphisms in defensive traits is largely unknown. Here, we exploit the genetic resources of Arabidopsis thaliana, coupled with 39 years of field data on aphid abundance, to (i) demonstrate that geographic patterns in a polymorphic defense locus (GS-ELONG) are strongly correlated with changes in the relative abundance of two specialist aphids; and (ii) demonstrate differential selection by the two aphids on GS-ELONG, using a multigeneration selection experiment. We thereby show a causal link between variation in abundance of the two specialist aphids and the geographic pattern at GS-ELONG, which highlights the potency of natural enemies as selective forces.

  20. Genetic architecture of natural variation in Drosophila melanogaster aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorter, John; Couch, Charlene; Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Peiffer, Jason; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-07-07

    Aggression is an evolutionarily conserved complex behavior essential for survival and the organization of social hierarchies. With the exception of genetic variants associated with bioamine signaling, which have been implicated in aggression in many species, the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression is largely unknown. Drosophila melanogaster is a favorable model system for exploring the genetic basis of natural variation in aggression. Here, we performed genome-wide association analyses using the inbred, sequenced lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and replicate advanced intercross populations derived from the most and least aggressive DGRP lines. We identified genes that have been previously implicated in aggressive behavior as well as many novel loci, including gustatory receptor 63a (Gr63a), which encodes a subunit of the receptor for CO2, and genes associated with development and function of the nervous system. Although genes from the two association analyses were largely nonoverlapping, they mapped onto a genetic interaction network inferred from an analysis of pairwise epistasis in the DGRP. We used mutations and RNAi knock-down alleles to functionally validate 79% of the candidate genes and 75% of the candidate epistatic interactions tested. Epistasis for aggressive behavior causes cryptic genetic variation in the DGRP that is revealed by changing allele frequencies in the outbred populations derived from extreme DGRP lines. This phenomenon may pertain to other fitness traits and species, with implications for evolution, applied breeding, and human genetics.

  1. Genetic and molecular dissection of naturally occurring variations in rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Masahiro [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    The progress for structural analysis of the rice genome has allowed us to embark on the sequencing of the whole rice genome. Resources - genetic markers, sequence data, and genomic clones - derived from many efforts will be used for the functional analysis of rice genes in the next decade. Although artificially induced variations, such as mutants, have been used mainly for genetic and physiological studies in rice and other plant species, the development of DNA markers has made possible access to naturally occurring allelic variations underlying complex traits. Such analysis is often referred to as quantitative traits locus (QTL) analysis. Many QTLs have been mapped for many complex traits in rice. During the analyses of several quantitative traits by the DNA marker-assisted strategy, two questions about QTL analysis have been raised: 1) Does a QTL represent a single Mendelian locus or a cluster of multiple loci? 2) Is it possible to precisely map a QTL and identify QTLs at the molecular level using map-based or other strategies? To answer these questions, a series of analyses on heading date, including the identification of putative QTLs, characterization and fine mapping of QTLs using nearly isogenic lines (NILs), and identification of genes at QTLs for heading date by the map-based strategy has been performed. In addition, several primary permanent mapping populations and secondary genetic resources, such as chromosomal segmental substitution lines, have been developed to facilitate the genetic analysis of naturally occurring allelic variation. (M. Suetake)

  2. The nature of quantitative genetic variation for Drosophila longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Trudy F C

    2002-01-01

    Longevity is a typical quantitative trait: the continuous variation in life span observed in natural populations is attributable to genetic variation at multiple quantitative trait loci (QTL), environmental sensitivity of QTL alleles, and truly continuous environmental variation. To begin to understand the genetic architecture of longevity at the level of individual QTL, we have mapped QTL for Drosophila life span that segregate between two inbred strains that were not selected for longevity. A mapping population of 98 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) was derived from these strains, and life span of virgin male and female flies measured under control culture conditions, chronic heat and cold stress, heat shock and starvation stress, and high and low density larval environments. The genotypes of the RIL were determined for polymorphic roo transposable element insertion sites, and life span QTL were mapped using composite interval mapping methods. A minimum of 19 life span QTL were detected by recombination mapping. The life span QTL exhibited strong genotype by sex, genotype by environment, and genotype by genotype (epistatic) interactions. These interactions complicate mapping efforts, but evolutionary theory predicts such properties of segregating QTL alleles. Quantitative deficiency mapping of four longevity QTL detected in the control environment by recombination mapping revealed a minimum of 11 QTL in these regions. Clearly, longevity is a complex quantitative trait. In the future, linkage disequilibrium mapping can be used to determine which candidate genes in a QTL region correspond to the genetic loci affecting variation in life span, and define the QTL alleles at the molecular level.

  3. Natural variation in biomarkers indicating mastitis in healthy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerstedt, Maria; Forsbäck, Linda; Larsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    Dairy herds are expanding and, with increasing numbers of animals in each herd, there is a need for automatic recording of indicators in milk in order to detect mastitis, inflammation of the udder. A number of biomarkers for mastitis have been suggested over the years. Mastitis usually occurs...... as markers for mastitis. Ten cows were monitored on 42 consecutive milking occasions through collection of udder quarter milk samples and representative cow composite milk samples, giving a total of 2100 individual milk samples. Each cow had its individual profile for the concentrations and variations...... quarters within an individual cow can identify deviations from the natural variations between milkings. This could be a valuable tool instead of, or in combination with, a cut-off value for each parameter in order to detect changes in the milk indicating mastitis....

  4. Environmental and biomedical applications of natural metal stable isotope variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, T.D.; Walczyk, T.

    2009-01-01

    etal stable isotopes are now being used to trace metal contaminants in the environment and as indicators of human systemic function where metals play a role. Stable isotope abundance variations provide information about metal sources and the processes affecting metals in complex natural systems, complementing information gained from surrogate tracers, such as metal abundance ratios or biochemical markers of metal metabolism. The science is still in its infancy, but the results of initial studies confirm that metal stable isotopes can provide a powerful tool for forensic and biomedical investigations.

  5. Natural epigenetic variation in bats and its role in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sen; Sun, Keping; Jiang, Tinglei; Feng, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    When facing the challenges of environmental change, such as habitat fragmentation, organisms have to adjust their phenotype to adapt to various environmental stresses. Recent studies show that epigenetic modifications could mediate environmentally induced phenotypic variation, and this epigenetic variance could be inherited by future generations, indicating that epigenetic processes have potential evolutionary effects. Bats living in diverse environments show geographic variations in phenotype, and the females usually have natal philopatry, presenting an opportunity to explore how environments shape epigenetic marks on the genome and the evolutionary potential of epigenetic variance in bat populations for adaptation. We have explored the natural epigenetic diversity and structure of female populations of the great roundleaf bat (Hipposideros armiger), the least horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus pusillus) and the eastern bent-winged bat (Miniopterus fuliginosus) using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism technique. We have also estimated the effects of genetic variance and ecological variables on epigenetic diversification. All three bat species have a low level of genomic DNA methylation and extensive epigenetic diversity that exceeds the corresponding genetic variance. DNA sequence divergence, epigenetic drift and environmental variables contribute to the epigenetic diversities of each species. Environment-induced epigenetic variation may be inherited as a result of both mitosis and meiosis, and their potential roles in evolution for bat populations are also discussed in this review.

  6. Genetic variations and miRNA-target interactions contribute to natural phenotypic variations in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinhui; Xie, Jianbo; Chen, Beibei; Quan, Mingyang; Li, Ying; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-10-01

    Variation in regulatory factors, including microRNAs (miRNAs), contributes to variation in quantitative and complex traits. However, in plants, variants in miRNAs and their target genes that contribute to natural phenotypic variation, and the underlying regulatory networks, remain poorly characterized. We investigated the associations and interactions of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in miRNAs and their target genes with phenotypes in 435 individuals from a natural population of Populus. We used RNA-seq to identify 217 miRNAs differentially expressed in a tension wood system, and identified 1196 candidate target genes; degradome sequencing confirmed 60 of the target sites. In addition, 72 miRNA-target pairs showed significant co-expression. Gene ontology (GO) term analysis showed that most of the genes in the co-regulated pairs participate in biological regulation. Genome resequencing found 5383 common SNPs (frequency ≥ 0.05) in 139 miRNAs and 31 037 SNPs in 819 target genes. Single-SNP association analyses identified 232 significant associations between wood traits (P ≤ 0.05) and SNPs in 102 miRNAs and 1387 associations with 478 target genes. Among these, 102 miRNA-target pairs associated with the same traits. Multi-SNP associations found 102 epistatic pairs associated with traits. Furthermore, a reconstructed regulatory network contained 12 significantly co-expressed pairs, including eight miRNAs and nine targets associated with traits. Lastly, both expression and genetic association showed that miR156i, miR156j, miR396a and miR6445b were involved in the formation of tension wood. This study shows that variants in miRNAs and target genes contribute to natural phenotypic variation and annotated roles and interactions of miRNAs and their target genes by genetic association analysis. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Geographical variation in radiological services: a nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Børretzen Ingelin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geographical variation in health care services challenges the basic principle of fair allocation of health care resources. This study aimed to investigate geographical variation in the use of X-ray, CT, MRI and Ultrasound examinations in Norway, the contribution from public and private institutions, and the impact of accessibility and socioeconomic factors on variation in examination rates. Methods A nationwide survey of activity in all radiological institutions for the year 2002 was used to compare the rates per thousand of examinations in the counties. The data format was files/printouts where the examinations were recorded according to a code system. Results Overall rates per thousand of radiological examinations varied by a factor of 2.4. The use of MRI varied from 170 to 2, and CT from 216 to 56 examinations per 1000 inhabitants. Single MRI examinations (knee, cervical spine and head/brain ranged high in variation, as did certain other spine examinations. For examination of specific organs, the counties' use of one modality was positively correlated with the use of other modalities. Private institutions accounted for 28% of all examinations, and tended towards performing a higher proportion of single examinations with high variability. Indicators of accessibility correlated positively to variation in examination rates, partly due to the figures from the county of Oslo. Correlations between examination rates and socioeconomic factors were also highly influenced by the figures from this county. Conclusion The counties use of radiological services varied substantially, especially CT and MRI examinations. A likely cause of the variation is differences in accessibility. The coexistence of public and private institutions may be a source of variability, along with socioeconomic factors. The findings represent a challenge to the objective of equality in access to health care services, and indicate a potential for better

  8. Independent natural genetic variation of punishment- versus relief-memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Mirjam; Kocabey, Samet; Savage, Sinead; König, Christian

    2016-01-01

    A painful event establishes two opponent memories: cues that are associated with pain onset are remembered negatively, whereas cues that coincide with the relief at pain offset acquire positive valence. Such punishment- versus relief-memories are conserved across species, including humans, and the balance between them is critical for adaptive behaviour with respect to pain and trauma. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster as a study case, we found that both punishment- and relief-memories display natural variation across wild-derived inbred strains, but they do not covary, suggesting a considerable level of dissociation in their genetic effectors. This provokes the question whether there may be heritable inter-individual differences in the balance between these opponent memories in man, with potential psycho-clinical implications. PMID:28003518

  9. Natural Variation of Molecular and Morphological Gibberellin Responses1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Dorota; Kojima, Mikiko; Van Daele, Twiggy; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Although phytohormones such as gibberellins are essential for many conserved aspects of plant physiology and development, plants vary greatly in their responses to these regulatory compounds. Here, we use genetic perturbation of endogenous gibberellin levels to probe the extent of intraspecific variation in gibberellin responses in natural accessions of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We find that these accessions vary greatly in their ability to buffer the effects of overexpression of GA20ox1, encoding a rate-limiting enzyme for gibberellin biosynthesis, with substantial differences in bioactive gibberellin concentrations as well as transcriptomes and growth trajectories. These findings demonstrate a surprising level of flexibility in the wiring of regulatory networks underlying hormone metabolism and signaling. PMID:27879393

  10. Genomic Variation in Natural Populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langley, Charles H.; Stevens, Kristian; Cardeno, Charis; Lee, Yuh Chwen G.; Schrider, Daniel R.; Pool, John E.; Langley, Sasha A.; Suarez, Charlyn; Corbett-Detig, Russell B.; Kolaczkowski, Bryan; Fang, Shu; Nista, Phillip M.; Holloway, Alisha K.; Kern, Andrew D.; Dewey, Colin N.; Song, Yun S.; Hahn, Matthew W.; Begun, David J.

    2012-01-01

    This report of independent genome sequences of two natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster (37 from North America and 6 from Africa) provides unique insight into forces shaping genomic polymorphism and divergence. Evidence of interactions between natural selection and genetic linkage is abundant not only in centromere- and telomere-proximal regions, but also throughout the euchromatic arms. Linkage disequilibrium, which decays within 1 kbp, exhibits a strong bias toward coupling of the more frequent alleles and provides a high-resolution map of recombination rate. The juxtaposition of population genetics statistics in small genomic windows with gene structures and chromatin states yields a rich, high-resolution annotation, including the following: (1) 5′- and 3′-UTRs are enriched for regions of reduced polymorphism relative to lineage-specific divergence; (2) exons overlap with windows of excess relative polymorphism; (3) epigenetic marks associated with active transcription initiation sites overlap with regions of reduced relative polymorphism and relatively reduced estimates of the rate of recombination; (4) the rate of adaptive nonsynonymous fixation increases with the rate of crossing over per base pair; and (5) both duplications and deletions are enriched near origins of replication and their density correlates negatively with the rate of crossing over. Available demographic models of X and autosome descent cannot account for the increased divergence on the X and loss of diversity associated with the out-of-Africa migration. Comparison of the variation among these genomes to variation among genomes from D. simulans suggests that many targets of directional selection are shared between these species. PMID:22673804

  11. Does natural variation in diversity affect biotic resistance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Susan; Cornell, Howard; Grace, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Theories linking diversity to ecosystem function have been challenged by the widespread observation of more exotic species in more diverse native communities. Few studies have addressed the key underlying process by dissecting how community diversity is shaped by the same environmental gradients that determine biotic and abiotic resistance to new invaders. In grasslands on highly heterogeneous soils, we used addition of a recent invader, competitor removal and structural equation modelling (SEM) to analyse soil influences on community diversity, biotic and abiotic resistance and invader success. Biotic resistance, measured by reduction in invader success in the presence of the resident community, was negatively correlated with species richness and functional diversity. However, in the multivariate SEM framework, biotic resistance was independent of all forms of diversity and was positively affected by soil fertility via community biomass. Abiotic resistance, measured by invader success in the absence of the resident community, peaked on infertile soils with low biomass and high community diversity. Net invader success was determined by biotic resistance, consistent with this invader's better performance on infertile soils in unmanipulated conditions. Seed predation added slightly to biotic resistance without qualitatively changing the results. Soil-related genotypic variation in the invader also did not affect the results. Synthesis. In natural systems, diversity may be correlated with invasibility and yet have no effect on either biotic or abiotic resistance to invasion. More generally, the environmental causes of variation in diversity should not be overlooked when considering the potential functional consequences of diversity.

  12. Spatial variation of important mulberry pests and their natural enemies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mulberry is a silkworm food plant (Bombyxmori. L that is seriously affected by many insect pests. The incidence of Diaphania pulverulentalis (Hampson, Maconellicoccus hirsutus (Green, Paracoccus marginatus (Williams and Granara de Willink, Aleurodiscus dispersus (Russels and Pseudodendrothrips mori (Niwa and their natural enemies, viz. coccinellids and spiders (/100 plants, were observed through survey and surveillance for 3 months. In February 2013, the incidence of insect pests in Vaikkalpattarai and Reddipudur villages (India was: D. pulverulentalis, 1.20 and 0.85%; P. marginatus, 6.80 and 33.10%; P. mori 42.98 and 45.50%, respectively. Further, the infestation of M. hirsutus (1.40% and A. dispersus (59.72% was also observed in February at Vaikkalpattarai. The population of coccinellids was high in December (1.02 and 0.84/100 plants, but the spider population was even higher in February and January (1.04 and 1.81/100 plants. Population of pests had a significant positive correlation with relative humidity. The population of coccinellids and spiders have positive correlation with temperature and mulberry pests infestation. The natural enemies observed in the study were mostly the ladybird beetles, Psyllobora bisoctonotata and unidentified species of spiders.

  13. Francis Bacon's natural history and civil history: a comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to offer a comparative survey of Bacon's theory and practice of natural history and of civil history, particularly centered on their relationship to natural philosophy and human philosophy. I will try to show that the obvious differences concerning their subject matter encompass a number of less obvious methodological and philosophical assumptions which reveal a significant practical and conceptual convergence of the two fields. Causes or axioms are prescribed as the theoretical end-products of natural history, whereas precepts are envisaged as the speculative outcomes derived from perfect civil history. In spite of this difference, causes and precepts are thought to enable effective action in order to change the state of nature and of man, respectively. For that reason a number of common patterns are to be found in Bacon's theory and practice of natural and civil history.

  14. Extensive Natural Variation in Arabidopsis Seed Mucilage Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin eVoiniciuc

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrated Arabidopsis thaliana seeds are coated by a gelatinous layer called mucilage, which is mainly composed of cell wall polysaccharides. Since mucilage is rich in pectin, its architecture can be visualized with the ruthenium red (RR dye. We screened the seeds of around 280 Arabidopsis natural accessions for variation in mucilage structure, and identified a large number of novel variants that differed from the Col-0 wild-type. Most of the accessions released smaller RR-stained capsules compared to the Col-0 reference. By biochemically characterizing the phenotypes of 25 of these accessions in greater detail, we discovered that distinct changes in polysaccharide structure resulted in gelatinous coatings with a deceptively similar appearance. Monosaccharide composition analysis of total mucilage extracts revealed a remarkable variation (from 50% to 200% of Col-0 levels in the content of galactose and mannose, which are important subunits of heteromannan. In addition, most of the natural variants had altered Pontamine Fast Scarlet 4B staining of cellulose and significantly reduced birefringence of crystalline structures. This indicates that the production or organization of cellulose may be affected by the presence of different amounts of hemicellulose. Although the accessions described in this study were primarily collected from Western Europe, they form five different phenotypic classes based on the combined results of our experiments. This suggests that polymorphisms at multiple loci are likely responsible for the observed mucilage structure. The transcription of MUCILAGE-RELATED10 (MUCI10, which encodes a key enzyme for galactoglucomannan synthesis, was severely reduced in multiple variants that phenocopied the muci10-1 insertion mutant. Although we could not pinpoint any causal polymorphisms in this gene, constitutive expression of fluorescently-tagged MUCI10 proteins complemented the mucilage defects of a muci10-like accession. This leads

  15. A joint history of the nature of genetic variation and the nature of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S

    2015-02-01

    This essay traces the history of concepts of genetic variation and schizophrenia from Darwin and Mendel to the present. For Darwin, the important form of genetic variation for evolution is continuous in nature and small in effect. Biometricians led by Pearson agreed and developed statistical genetic approaches utilizing trait correlations in relatives. Mendel studied discontinuous traits and subsequent Mendelians, led by Bateson, assumed that important genetic variation was large in effect producing discontinuous phenotypes. Although biometricians studied 'insanity', schizophrenia genetics under Kraepelin and Rüdin utilized Mendelian approaches congruent with their anatomical-clinical disease model of dementia praecox. Fisher showed, assuming many genes of small effect, Mendelian and Biometrical models were consilient. Echoing prior conflicts, psychiatric genetics since then has utilized both biometrical models, largely in twins, and Mendelian models, based on advancing molecular techniques. In 1968, Gottesman proposed a polygenic model for schizophrenia based on a threshold version of Fisher's theory. Since then, rigorous studies of the schizophrenia spectrum suggest that genetic risk for schizophrenia is more likely continuous than categorical. The last 5 years has seen increasingly convincing evidence from genome-wide association study (GWAS) and sequencing that genetic risk for schizophrenia is largely polygenic, and congruent with Fisher's and Gottesman's models. The gap between biometrical and molecular Mendelian models for schizophrenia has largely closed. The efforts to ground a categorical biomedical model of schizophrenia in Mendelian genetics have failed. The genetic risk for schizophrenia is widely distributed in human populations so that we all carry some degree of risk.

  16. Small RNA-directed epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixian Zhai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in epigenetics has revealed mechanisms that can heritably regulate gene function independent of genetic alterations. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of epigenetics in evolution. This is due in part to scant data on epigenetic variation among natural populations. In plants, small interfering RNA (siRNA is involved in both the initiation and maintenance of gene silencing by directing DNA methylation and/or histone methylation. Here, we report that, in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, a cluster of approximately 24 nt siRNAs found at high levels in the ecotype Landsberg erecta (Ler could direct DNA methylation and heterochromatinization at a hAT element adjacent to the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, a major repressor of flowering, whereas the same hAT element in ecotype Columbia (Col with almost identical DNA sequence, generates a set of low abundance siRNAs that do not direct these activities. We have called this hAT element MPF for Methylated region near Promoter of FLC, although de novo methylation triggered by an inverted repeat transgene at this region in Col does not alter its FLC expression. DNA methylation of the Ler allele MPF is dependent on genes in known silencing pathways, and such methylation is transmissible to Col by genetic crosses, although with varying degrees of penetrance. A genome-wide comparison of Ler and Col small RNAs identified at least 68 loci matched by a significant level of approximately 24 nt siRNAs present specifically in Ler but not Col, where nearly half of the loci are related to repeat or TE sequences. Methylation analysis revealed that 88% of the examined loci (37 out of 42 were specifically methylated in Ler but not Col, suggesting that small RNA can direct epigenetic differences between two closely related Arabidopsis ecotypes.

  17. The Non-Homologous Nature of Solar Diameter Variations

    CERN Document Server

    Sofia, S; Demarque, P; Li, L; Thuillier, G; Sofia, Sabatino; Basu, Sarbani; Demarque, Pierre; Li, Linghuai; Thuillier, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    We show in this paper that the changes of the solar diameter in response to variations of large scale magnetic fields and turbulence are not homologous. For the best current model, the variation at the photospheric level is over 1000 times larger than the variation at a depth of 5 Mm, which is about the level at which f-mode solar oscillations determine diameter variations. This model is supported by observations that indicate larger diameter changes for high degree f-modes than for low degree f-modes, since energy of the former are concentrated at shallower layers than the latter.

  18. Natural transformation and phase variation modulation in Neisseria meningitidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Heather L; Richardson, Anthony R; Stojiljkovic, Igor

    2004-05-01

    Neisseria meningitidis has evolved the ability to control the expression-state of numerous genes by phase variation. It has been proposed that the process aids this human pathogen in coping with the diversity of microenvironments and host immune systems. Therefore, increased frequencies of phase variation may augment the organism's adaptability and virulence. In this study, we found that DNA derived from various neisserial co-colonizers of the human nasopharynx increased N. meningitidis switching frequencies, indicating that heterologous neisserial DNA modulates phase variation in a transformation-dependent manner. In order to determine whether the effect of heterologous DNA was specific to the Hb receptor, HmbR, we constructed a Universal Rates of Switching cassette (UROS). With this cassette, we demonstrated that heterologous DNA positively affects phase variation throughout the meningococcal genome, as UROS phase variation frequencies were also increased in the presence of neisserial DNA. Overexpressing components of the neisserial mismatch repair system partially alleviated DNA-induced changes in phase variation frequencies, thus implicating mismatch repair titration as a cause of these transformation-dependent increases in switching. The DNA-dependent effect on phase variation was transient and may serve as a mechanism for meningococcal genetic variability that avoids the fitness costs encountered by global mutators.

  19. Exploring patterns of variation in amphipod assemblages at multiple spatial scales: natural variability versus coastal aquaculture effect

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A 5-factor design survey was carried out to examine the spatial distribution at different scales of amphipod assemblages and sedimentary variables in soft bottoms adjacent to coastal aquaculture installations. Natural variability of sediment variables showed the highest values at the scales of sites (10s of meters) and locality (1 to 10 km), while the greatest component of variation of amphipod assemblages occurred among replicates (on the scale of meters). Regarding the influence of coastal ...

  20. Exploiting induced and natural epigenetic variation for crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Nathan M; Schmitz, Robert J

    2017-09-01

    Plant breeding has traditionally relied on combining the genetic diversity present within a species to develop combinations of alleles that provide desired traits. Epigenetic diversity may provide additional sources of variation within a species that could be captured or created for crop improvement. It will be important to understand the sources of epigenetic variation and the stability of newly formed epigenetic variants over generations to fully use the potential of epigenetic variation to improve crops. The development and application of methods for widespread epigenome profiling and engineering may generate new avenues for using the full potential of epigenetics in crop improvement.

  1. Natural enemies drive geographic variation in plant defenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuest, Tobias; Heichinger, Christian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against attack by natural enemies, and these defenses vary widely across populations. However, whether communities of natural enemies are a sufficiently potent force to maintain polymorphisms in defensive traits is largely unknown. Here, we exploit the genetic resources o...

  2. A Survey of Methane Emissions from California's Natural Gas Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M. L.; Cui, X.; Jeong, S.; Conley, S. A.; Mehrotra, S.; Faloona, I. C.; Chen, T.; Blake, D. R.; Clements, C. B.; Lareau, N.; Lloyd, M.; Fairley, D.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions from natural gas infrastructure are estimated to contribute small but uncertain fractions of total natural gas consumed in California and of California's total GHG budget. Because natural gas (NG) methane is an energy resource, an economic commodity, a potential health hazard, and a potent greenhouse gas, it is important to identify and quantify and control both intentional venting, and un-intentional leakages. Here, we report results of an observational survey, measuring NG methane emissions across examples from subsectors of California's natural gas infrastructure, ranging from production and processing, to transmission and distribution, and notably including examples from the consumption subsector. At regional scales, a combination of tower and aircraft measurements are used to estimate emissions of NG methane for the San Francisco Bay Area. At facility scales, aircraft mass balance measurements are applied to estimate NG methane emissions from associated with individual petroleum production fields, NG storage facilities, and petroleum refineries. At local scales, ground-based roadway surveys are applied to place lower limits on NG emissions from aggregate leakage sources in selected urban and suburban areas, a sample of NG fueling stations, and a small number of capped gas wells. For a subset of the consumption subsector, mass balance and CH4:CO2 emission ratio measurements are used to estimate leakage from a sample of quiescent residential buildings and example operating gas appliances. In general, CH4 emissions are found to grow with the NG throughput in a given area or facility, though the observed ratio of leakage to throughput varies by more than an order of magnitude for some cases (e.g., urban areas), presumably in response to varied infrastructure type, vintage, and maintenance. Taken in sum, preliminary results of this initial survey are consistent with the commonly held assumption that total NG methane emissions from California NG

  3. Heterochrony underpins natural variation in Cardamine hirsuta leaf form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartolano, Maria; Pieper, Bjorn; Lempe, Janne; Tattersall, Alex; Huijser, Peter; Tresch, Achim; Darrah, Peter R.; Hay, Angela; Tsiantis, Miltos

    2015-01-01

    A key problem in biology is whether the same processes underlie morphological variation between and within species. Here, by using plant leaves as an example, we show that the causes of diversity at these two evolutionary scales can be divergent. Some species like the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have simple leaves, whereas others like the A. thaliana relative Cardamine hirsuta bear complex leaves comprising leaflets. Previous work has shown that these interspecific differences result mostly from variation in local tissue growth and patterning. Now, by cloning and characterizing a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for C. hirsuta leaf shape, we find that a different process, age-dependent progression of leaf form, underlies variation in this trait within species. This QTL effect is caused by cis-regulatory variation in the floral repressor ChFLC, such that genotypes with low-expressing ChFLC alleles show both early flowering and accelerated age-dependent changes in leaf form, including faster leaflet production. We provide evidence that this mechanism coordinates leaf development with reproductive timing and may help to optimize resource allocation to the next generation. PMID:26243877

  4. Sensitivity Analysis on Variation of Vane Natural Frequency of a Typical Aero Engine Impeller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selwyn Anbarasan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Centrifugal compressors are widely used in small and medium class turbo shaft and turbo prop aero engines. Inevitably the variation in the manufacturing process will lead to variation in natural frequency of blade vanes in an impeller which usually termed as Mistuning. The variation in natural frequency will increase the forced frequency response of the vanes than the tuned vanes. In-service deterioration of vanes dimension due to erosion, corrosion and FOD also adds to further variation in natural frequency. The amplification factor of the response will lead to reduced HCF life of the vanes than the tuned vanes. It is important for the designer to envisage the variation of natural frequency of the vanes to estimate the life of the impeller to avoid premature failure. This also helps in monitoring the health of the impeller during service. This paper deals with prediction of the effects of manufacturing/geometry variation and variation in material properties on impeller vane natural frequency of a turbo shaft engine. FEM model is created to accommodate the geometry variation of the impeller. The parameters influencing the natural frequency are varied and its corresponding variation in frequency is predicted. Several conditions are also simulated and sensitivity analysis is carried out with the above result to predict the order of influencing parameters. Influencing parameters are ranked and the most influencing parameter is found to be the Young’s Modulus of the material for this case of impeller. Maximum influencing parameter Young’s modulus contributes to 5.8% variation and the least contributing factor density to 0.6% variation in natural frequency. This result enables the designer to forecast the possible range of natural frequencies in the design phase, so that he can limit the analysis to predict the response due to mistuning to the estimated range of frequencies.

  5. Regional variations in the nature of the incoming plate and its implication to the subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Gou; Kodaira, Shuichi; Obana, Koichiro; Kaiho, Yuka; Sato, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Miura, Seiichi; Yamada, Tomoaki

    2017-04-01

    The megathrust earthquakes like the 2011 Tohoku earthquake are caused by the interaction between the overlying plate and the subducting oceanic plate, indicating that the properties of the subducing oceanic plate, such as their geometry, thermal state, lithology, and water content, have a potential to controll the megathrust earthquakes. Of these properties, water content (degree of hydration) is highly influential because water transported by the incoming plate lowers the temperature of the subduction zone, promotes forearc metamorphism. Moreover, the presence of water and hydrated materials like serpentine can affect interplate seismic coupling on the plate interface. Accordingly, the regional variations in the degree of the hydration within the incoming plate might have strong influences on the regional variations in the interplate earthquakes. To reveal the regional variations in the nature of the incoming oceanic plate and its evolution owing to bending-related faulting near the trench axis, we conducted extensive controlled-source seismic surveys in the trench-outer rise region off northeastern Japan arc. We confirmed the systematic changes in seismic velocities owing to the bending-realated faulting, suggesting the water content within the incoming oceanic plate increases toward the trench accompanied by the development of bending-related fractures. In addition, we found along-trench variations in the seismic structure of the incoming oceanic plate; lower seismic velocities and higher Vp/Vs ration around the ancient fracture zones associated with ridge propagation. This observation suggests that the ancient scar on the oceanic plate influences along-trench variations in the current water amount transported by the oceanic plate. If we extend the ancient fracture zone toward the forearc region, it corresponds to an area of weak interplate coupling, characterized by low Vp and high Vp/Vs ratio around the depth of the plate interface. Our observations suggest

  6. Natural variation in folate levels among tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyaya, Pallawi; Tyagi, Kamal; Sarma, Supriya; Tamboli, Vajir; Sreelakshmi, Yellamaraju; Sharma, Rameshwar

    2017-02-15

    Folate content was estimated in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) accessions using microbiological assay (MA) and by LC-MS. The MA revealed that in red-ripe fruits folate levels ranged from 4 to 60μg/100g fresh weight. The LC-MS estimation of red-ripe fruits detected three folate forms, 5-CH3-THF, 5-CHO-THF, 5,10-CH(+)THF and folate levels ranged from 14 to 46μg/100g fresh weight. In mature green and red ripe fruit, 5-CH3-THF was the most abundant folate form. Comparison of LC-MS with MA revealed that MA inaccurately estimates folate levels. The accumulation of folate forms and their distribution varied among accessions. The single nucleotide polymorphism was examined in the key genes of the folate pathway to understand its linkage with folate levels. Despite the significant variation in folate levels among tomato accessions, little polymorphism was found in folate biosynthesis genes. Our results indicate that variation in folate level is governed by a more complex regulation at cellular homeostasis level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Natural variations in the rhenium isotopic composition of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, R.; Hu, L.; Humayun, M.

    2017-03-01

    Rhenium is an important element with which to test hypotheses of isotope variation. Historically, it has been difficult to precisely correct the instrumental mass bias in thermal ionization mass spectrometry. We used W as an internal standard to correct mass bias on the MC-ICP-MS, and obtained the first precise δ187Re values ( ±0.02‰, 2SE) for iron meteorites and chondritic metal. Relative to metal from H chondrites, IVB irons are systematically higher in δ187Re by 0.14 ‰. δ187Re for other irons are similar to H chondritic metal, although some individual samples show significant isotope fractionation. Since 185Re has a high neutron capture cross section, the effect of galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) irradiation on δ187Re was examined using correlations with Pt isotopes. The pre-GCR irradiation δ187Re for IVB irons is lower, but the difference in δ187Re between IVB irons and other meteoritic metal remains. Nuclear volume-dependent fractionation for Re is about the right magnitude near the melting point of iron, but because of the refractory and compatible character of Re, a compelling explanation in terms of mass-dependent fractionation is elusive. The magnitude of a nucleosynthetic s-process deficit for Re estimated from Mo and Ru isotopes is essentially unresolvable. Since thermal processing reduced nucleosynthetic effects in Pd, it is conceivable that Re isotopic variations larger than those in Mo and Ru may be present in IVBs since Re is more refractory than Mo and Ru. Thus, the Re isotopic difference between IVBs and other irons or chondritic metal remains unexplained.

  8. Natural variation and genetic covariance in adult hippocampal neurogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempermann, Gerd [Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin, Germany; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Gage, Fred [Salk Institute for Biological Studies, The, San Diego, CA

    2006-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is highly variable and heritable among laboratory strains of mice. Adult neurogenesis is also remarkably plastic and can be modulated by environment and activity. Here, we provide a systematic quantitative analysis of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in two large genetic reference panels of recombinant inbred strains (BXD and AXB?BXA, n ? 52 strains). We combined data on variation in neurogenesis with a new transcriptome database to extract a set of 190 genes with expression patterns that are also highly variable and that covary with rates of (i) cell proliferation, (ii) cell survival, or the numbers of surviving (iii) new neurons, and (iv) astrocytes. Expression of a subset of these neurogenesis-associated transcripts was controlled in cis across the BXD set. These self-modulating genes are particularly interesting candidates to control neurogenesis. Among these were musashi (Msi1h) and prominin1?CD133 (Prom1), both of which are linked to stem-cell maintenance and division. Twelve neurogenesis-associated transcripts had significant cis-acting quantitative trait loci, and, of these, six had plausible biological association with adult neurogenesis (Prom1, Ssbp2, Kcnq2, Ndufs2, Camk4, and Kcnj9). Only one cis- cting candidate was linked to both neurogenesis and gliogenesis, Rapgef6, a downstream target of ras signaling. The use of genetic reference panels coupled with phenotyping and global transcriptome profiling thus allowed insight into the complexity of the genetic control of adult neurogenesis.

  9. Unused natural variation can lift yield barriers in plant breeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Gur

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural biodiversity is an underexploited sustainable resource that can enrich the genetic basis of cultivated plants with novel alleles that improve productivity and adaptation. We evaluated the progress in breeding for increased tomato (Solanum lycopersicum yield using genotypes carrying a pyramid of three independent yield-promoting genomic regions introduced from the drought-tolerant green-fruited wild species Solanum pennellii. Yield of hybrids parented by the pyramided genotypes was more than 50% higher than that of a control market leader variety under both wet and dry field conditions that received 10% of the irrigation water. This demonstration of the breaking of agricultural yield barriers provides the rationale for implementing similar strategies for other agricultural organisms that are important for global food security.

  10. Responses of natural runoff to recent climatic variations in the Yellow River basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Y.; Tang, Q.; Tian, F.; Zhang, Z.; G. Liu

    2013-01-01

    The zero-flow phenomenon appeared frequently in the lower reaches of the Yellow River in China in the 1990s, whereas it has almost disappeared in recent years. The disappearance of the zero-flow phenomenon should be mainly attributed to the recent water management practices. However, little is known about the effects of recent climatic variations on natural runoff. In this study, we investigated the impacts of climatic variations on natural runoff above the Huayuankou statio...

  11. Seasonal variation in natural recharge of coastal aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollema, Pauline N.; Antonellini, Marco

    2013-06-01

    Many coastal zones around the world have irregular precipitation throughout the year. This results in discontinuous natural recharge of coastal aquifers, which affects the size of freshwater lenses present in sandy deposits. Temperature data for the period 1960-1990 from LocClim (local climate estimator) and those obtained from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) SRES A1b scenario for 2070-2100, have been used to calculate the potential evapotranspiration with the Thornthwaite method. Potential recharge (difference between precipitation and potential evapotranspiration) was defined at 12 locations: Ameland (The Netherlands), Auckland and Wellington (New Zealand); Hong Kong (China); Ravenna (Italy), Mekong (Vietnam), Mumbai (India), New Jersey (USA), Nile Delta (Egypt), Kobe and Tokyo (Japan), and Singapore. The influence of variable/discontinuous recharge on the size of freshwater lenses was simulated with the SEAWAT model. The discrepancy between models with continuous and with discontinuous recharge is relatively small in areas where the total annual recharge is low (258-616 mm/year); but in places with Monsoon-dominated climate (e.g. Mumbai, with recharge up to 1,686 mm/year), the difference in freshwater-lens thickness between the discontinuous and the continuous model is larger (up to 5 m) and thus important to consider in numerical models that estimate freshwater availability.

  12. Naturally occurring variation in Arabidopsis: an underexploited resource for plant genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Blanco, C; Koornneef, M

    2000-01-01

    The definition of gene functions requires the phenotypic characterization of genetic variants. Currently, such functional analysis of Arabidopsis genes is based largely on laboratory-induced mutants that are selected in forward and reverse genetic studies. An alternative complementary source of genetic variation is available: the naturally occurring variation among accessions. The multigenic nature of most of this variation has limited its application until now. However, the use of genetic methods developed to map quantitative trait loci, in combination with the characteristics and resources available for molecular biology in Arabidopsis, allow this variation to be exploited up to the molecular level. Here, we describe the current tools available for the forward genetic analysis of this variation, and review the recent progress in the detection and mapping of loci and the cloning of large-effect genes.

  13. Untangling the Nature of Spatial Variations of Cold Dust Properties in Star Forming Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Kennicutt, Robert; Galametz, Maud; Gordon, Karl; Groves, Brent; Hunt, Leslie; Dale, Daniel; Hinz, Joannah; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the far-infrared (IR) dust emission for 20 local star forming galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-IR Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. We model the far-IR/submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) using images from Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory. We calculate the cold dust temperature (T(cold)) and emissivity (beta) on a pixel by pixel basis (where each pixel ranges from 0.1-3 kpc^2) using a two temperature modified blackbody fitting routine. Our fitting method allows us to investigate the resolved nature of temperature and emissivity variations by modeling from the galaxy centers to the outskirts (physical scales of ~15-50 kpc, depending on the size of the galaxy). We fit each SED in two ways: (1) fit T(cold) and beta simultaneously, (2) hold beta constant and fit T(cold). We compare T(cold) and beta with star formation rates (calculated from L(Halpha) and L(24)), the luminosity of the old stellar population (traced through L(3.6), and ...

  14. Genomic instability is associated with natural life span variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    Full Text Available Increasing genomic instability is associated with aging in eukaryotes, but the connection between genomic instability and natural variation in life span is unknown. We have quantified chronological life span and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH in 11 natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that genomic instability increases and mitotic asymmetry breaks down during chronological aging. The age-dependent increase of genomic instability generally lags behind the drop of viability and this delay accounts for approximately 50% of the observed natural variation of replicative life span in these yeast isolates. We conclude that the abilities of yeast strains to tolerate genomic instability co-vary with their replicative life spans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative evidence that demonstrates a link between genomic instability and natural variation in life span.

  15. Natural Genetic Variation and Candidate Genes for Morphological Traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Paula Carreira

    Full Text Available Body size is a complex character associated to several fitness related traits that vary within and between species as a consequence of environmental and genetic factors. Latitudinal and altitudinal clines for different morphological traits have been described in several species of Drosophila and previous work identified genomic regions associated with such variation in D. melanogaster. However, the genetic factors that orchestrate morphological variation have been barely studied. Here, our main objective was to investigate genetic variation for different morphological traits associated to the second chromosome in natural populations of D. melanogaster along latitudinal and altitudinal gradients in Argentina. Our results revealed weak clinal signals and a strong population effect on morphological variation. Moreover, most pairwise comparisons between populations were significant. Our study also showed important within-population genetic variation, which must be associated to the second chromosome, as the lines are otherwise genetically identical. Next, we examined the contribution of different candidate genes to natural variation for these traits. We performed quantitative complementation tests using a battery of lines bearing mutated alleles at candidate genes located in the second chromosome and six second chromosome substitution lines derived from natural populations which exhibited divergent phenotypes. Results of complementation tests revealed that natural variation at all candidate genes studied, invected, Fasciclin 3, toucan, Reticulon-like1, jing and CG14478, affects the studied characters, suggesting that they are Quantitative Trait Genes for morphological traits. Finally, the phenotypic patterns observed suggest that different alleles of each gene might contribute to natural variation for morphological traits. However, non-additive effects cannot be ruled out, as wild-derived strains differ at myriads of second chromosome loci that may

  16. The Genetic Basis of Natural Variation in Caenorhabditis elegans Telomere Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel E.; Zdraljevic, Stefan; Tanny, Robyn E.; Seo, Beomseok; Riccardi, David D.; Noble, Luke M.; Rockman, Matthew V.; Alkema, Mark J.; Braendle, Christian; Kammenga, Jan E.; Wang, John; Kruglyak, Leonid; Félix, Marie-Anne; Lee, Junho; Andersen, Erik C.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are involved in the maintenance of chromosomes and the prevention of genome instability. Despite this central importance, significant variation in telomere length has been observed in a variety of organisms. The genetic determinants of telomere-length variation and their effects on organismal fitness are largely unexplored. Here, we describe natural variation in telomere length across the Caenorhabditis elegans species. We identify a large-effect variant that contributes to differences in telomere length. The variant alters the conserved oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding fold of protection of telomeres 2 (POT-2), a homolog of a human telomere-capping shelterin complex subunit. Mutations within this domain likely reduce the ability of POT-2 to bind telomeric DNA, thereby increasing telomere length. We find that telomere-length variation does not correlate with offspring production or longevity in C. elegans wild isolates, suggesting that naturally long telomeres play a limited role in modifying fitness phenotypes in C. elegans. PMID:27449056

  17. The Genetic Basis of Natural Variation in Caenorhabditis elegans Telomere Length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel E; Zdraljevic, Stefan; Tanny, Robyn E; Seo, Beomseok; Riccardi, David D; Noble, Luke M; Rockman, Matthew V; Alkema, Mark J; Braendle, Christian; Kammenga, Jan E; Wang, John; Kruglyak, Leonid; Félix, Marie-Anne; Lee, Junho; Andersen, Erik C

    2016-09-01

    Telomeres are involved in the maintenance of chromosomes and the prevention of genome instability. Despite this central importance, significant variation in telomere length has been observed in a variety of organisms. The genetic determinants of telomere-length variation and their effects on organismal fitness are largely unexplored. Here, we describe natural variation in telomere length across the Caenorhabditis elegans species. We identify a large-effect variant that contributes to differences in telomere length. The variant alters the conserved oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding fold of protection of telomeres 2 (POT-2), a homolog of a human telomere-capping shelterin complex subunit. Mutations within this domain likely reduce the ability of POT-2 to bind telomeric DNA, thereby increasing telomere length. We find that telomere-length variation does not correlate with offspring production or longevity in C. elegans wild isolates, suggesting that naturally long telomeres play a limited role in modifying fitness phenotypes in C. elegans.

  18. Natural selection and genital variation: a role for the environment, parasites and sperm ageing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Male genitalia are more variable between species (and populations) than other organs, and are more morphologically complex in polygamous compared to monogamous species. Therefore, sexual selection has been put forward as the major explanation of genital variation and complexity, in particular cryptic female choice for male copulatory courtship. As cryptic female choice is based on differences between males it is somewhat paradoxical that there is such low within-species variation in male genitalia that they are a prime morphological identification character for animal species. Processes other than sexual selection may also lead to genitalia variation but they have recently become neglected. Here I focus on pleiotropy and natural selection and provide examples how they link genitalia morphology with genital environments. Pleiotropy appears to be important because most studies that specifically tested for pleiotropic effects on genital morphology found them. Natural selection likely favours certain genital morphology over others in various environments, as well as by reducing re-infection with sexually transmitted diseases or reducing the likelihood of fertilisation with aged sperm. Both pleiotropy and natural selection differ locally and between species so may contribute to local variation in genitalia and sometimes variation between monogamous and polygamous species. Furthermore, the multitude of genital environments will lead to a multitude of genital functions via natural selection and pleiotropy, and may also contribute to explaining the complexity of genitalia.

  19. Comparing Environmental Dose Rate Meters: A Method to Determine Natural and Non-natural Variations in External Radiation Levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinen, A.J.M.; Slaper, H.; Overwater, R.M.W.; Stoop, P

    2000-07-01

    A method is described to determine low excess dose rates from a radiation source in the environment, which are small compared to the natural fluctuations of the background radiation. First a 'virtual reference dose rate meter' is constructed from data of the national monitoring network, to know the natural variations of the background radiation. Results from this virtual monitor are then compared to data of dose rate meters at sites of interest, to determine non-natural or very local natural variations and excess dose rates. Daily averaged excess dose rates down to 2 to 3 nSv.h{sup -1} can be identified. The method is applied successfully near nuclear installations in the Netherlands and can be used for all types of dose rate meters and sample frequencies. Finally, the calculations to derive the 'virtual reference dose rate meter' can also be used as a quality assessment tool for environmental radiation monitoring networks. (author)

  20. Seasonal and clonal variations in technological and thermal properties of raw Hevea natural rubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was undertaken over a ten-month period, under the environmental conditions within the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, to evaluate the causes of variation in technological and thermal properties of raw natural rubber from different clones of Hevea brasiliensis (GT 1, PR 255, FX 3864 and RRIM...

  1. Exploring and exploiting natural variation in the wings of a predatory ladybird beetle for biological control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommen, Suzanne Theresia Esther

    2013-01-01

    The central theme of this PhD thesis is natural variation in the wing length of the predatory two-spot ladybird beetle, Adalia bipunctata. ‘Wingless’ individuals of this species occur occasionally. They possess truncated wing covers and flight wings and cannot fly, but the extent of the reduction is

  2. The atomic weight and isotopic composition of boron and their variation in nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.

    1993-08-01

    The boron isotopic composition and atomic weight value and their variation in nature are reviewed. Questions are raised about the previously recommended value and the uncertainty for the atomic weight. The problem of what constitutes an acceptable range for normal material and what should then be considered geologically exceptional is discussed. Recent measurements make some previous decisions in need of re-evaluation.

  3. Natural variation of rice blast resistance gene Pi-d2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studying natural variation of rice resistance (R) genes in cultivated and wild rice relatives can predict resistance stability to rice blast fungus. In the present study, the protein coding regions of rice R gene Pi-d2 in 35 rice accessions of subgroups, aus (AUS), indica (IND), temperate japonica (...

  4. Responses of natural runoff to recent climatic variations in the Yellow River basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Tang, Q.; Tian, F.; Zhang, Z.; Liu, G.

    2013-11-01

    The zero-flow phenomenon appeared frequently in the lower reaches of the Yellow River in China in the 1990s, whereas it has almost disappeared in recent years. The disappearance of the zero-flow phenomenon should be mainly attributed to the recent water management practices. However, little is known about the effects of recent climatic variations on natural runoff. In this study, we investigated the impacts of climatic variations on natural runoff above the Huayuankou station. The results indicate that there was little increase in precipitation, but substantial recovery of natural runoff in the recent period (2003-2011) compared with the low-flow period (1991-2002). The recent precipitation was slightly greater (∼2% of the baseline precipitation in 1960-1990) than precipitation in the low-flow period. However, the recent natural runoff was much larger (∼14% baseline runoff) than runoff in the low-flow period. The runoff reduction in the low-flow period was mainly caused by precipitation decrease. In the recent period, precipitation accounted for a runoff reduction (∼21% baseline runoff), whereas net radiation, wind speed, air temperature, and relative humidity accounted for a runoff increase (∼7.5% baseline runoff). The spatial pattern of the climatic variation is a factor influencing the response of runoff to climatic variations. The reduction in runoff induced by precipitation change was offset up to half by the impacts of changes in net radiation and wind speed at most sub-basins in the recent period.

  5. Natural variation in flowering time among populations of the annual crucifer Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammad, I.; Van Tienderen, P.H.

    1997-01-01

    Genetic variation in flowering time was studied in four natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana, using greenhouse experiments. Two populations from ruderal sites flowered early, two others from river dykes late. However, the late flowering plants flowered almost as early as the others after cold

  6. Can exploiting natural genetic variation in leaf photosynthesis contribute to increasing rice productivity? A simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Junfei; Yin, Xinyou; Stomph, Tjeerd-Jan; Struik, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Rice productivity can be limited by available photosynthetic assimilates from leaves. However, the lack of significant correlation between crop yield and leaf photosynthetic rate (A) is noted frequently. Engineering for improved leaf photosynthesis has been argued to yield little increase in crop productivity because of complicated constraints and feedback mechanisms when moving up from leaf to crop level. Here we examined the extent to which natural genetic variation in A can contribute to increasing rice productivity. Using the mechanistic model GECROS, we analysed the impact of genetic variation in A on crop biomass production, based on the quantitative trait loci for various photosynthetic components within a rice introgression line population. We showed that genetic variation in A of 25% can be scaled up equally to crop level, resulting in an increase in biomass of 22-29% across different locations and years. This was probably because the genetic variation in A resulted not only from Rubisco (ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase)-limited photosynthesis but also from electron transport-limited photosynthesis; as a result, photosynthetic rates could be improved for both light-saturated and light-limited leaves in the canopy. Rice productivity could be significantly improved by mining the natural variation in existing germ-plasm, especially the variation in parameters determining light-limited photosynthesis.

  7. Radon survey in the high natural radiation region of Niska Banja, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Z S; Yarmoshenko, I V; Birovljev, A; Bochicchio, F; Quarto, M; Obryk, B; Paszkowski, M; Celiković, I; Demajo, A; Ujić, P; Budzanowski, M; Olko, P; McLaughlin, J P; Waligorski, M P R

    2007-01-01

    A radon survey has been carried out around the town of Niska Banja (Serbia) in a region partly located over travertine formations, showing an enhanced level of natural radioactivity. Outdoor and indoor radon concentrations were measured seasonally over the whole year, using CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors. Outdoor measurements were performed at 56 points distributed over both travertine and alluvium sediment formations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured in 102 living rooms and bedrooms of 65 family houses. In about 50% of all measurement sites, radon concentration was measured over each season separately, making it possible to estimate seasonal variations, which were then used to correct values measured over different periods, and to estimate annual values. The average annual indoor radon concentration was estimated at over 1500 Bq/m3 and at about 650 Bq/m3 in parts of Niska Banja located over travertine and alluvium sediment formations, respectively, with maximum values exceeding 6000 Bq/m3. The average value of outdoor annual radon concentration was 57 Bq/m3, with a maximum value of 168 Bq/m3. The high values of indoor and outdoor radon concentrations found at Niska Banja make this region a high natural background radiation area. Statistical analysis of our data confirms that the level of indoor radon concentration depends primarily on the underlying soil and building characteristics.

  8. Radon survey in the high natural radiation region of Niska Banja, Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zunic, Z.S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Yarmoshenko, I.V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ivy@ecko.uran.ru; Birovljev, A. [Radonlab Ltd., Akersveien 24C, 0177 Oslo (Norway); Bochicchio, F. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita - Italian National Institute of Health, Department of Technology and Health, Rome (Italy); Quarto, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita - Italian National Institute of Health, Department of Technology and Health, Rome (Italy); Obryk, B. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Paszkowski, M. [Institute of Geological Sciences, Polish Academy of Sciences, Senacka 1, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Celikovic, I. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Demajo, A. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Ujic, P. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Budzanowski, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Olko, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); McLaughlin, J.P. [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Waligorski, M.P.R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ), Polish Academy of Sciences, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Centre of Oncology, Cracow (Poland)

    2007-07-01

    A radon survey has been carried out around the town of Niska Banja (Serbia) in a region partly located over travertine formations, showing an enhanced level of natural radioactivity. Outdoor and indoor radon concentrations were measured seasonally over the whole year, using CR-39 diffusion type radon detectors. Outdoor measurements were performed at 56 points distributed over both travertine and alluvium sediment formations. Indoor radon concentrations were measured in 102 living rooms and bedrooms of 65 family houses. In about 50% of all measurement sites, radon concentration was measured over each season separately, making it possible to estimate seasonal variations, which were then used to correct values measured over different periods, and to estimate annual values. The average annual indoor radon concentration was estimated at over 1500 Bq/m{sup 3} and at about 650 Bq/m{sup 3} in parts of Niska Banja located over travertine and alluvium sediment formations, respectively, with maximum values exceeding 6000 Bq/m{sup 3}. The average value of outdoor annual radon concentration was 57 Bq/m{sup 3}, with a maximum value of 168 Bq/m{sup 3}. The high values of indoor and outdoor radon concentrations found at Niska Banja make this region a high natural background radiation area. Statistical analysis of our data confirms that the level of indoor radon concentration depends primarily on the underlying soil and building characteristics.

  9. Genomic analysis of QTLs and genes altering natural variation in stochastic noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Gomez, Jose M; Corwin, Jason A; Joseph, Bindu; Maloof, Julin N; Kliebenstein, Daniel J

    2011-09-01

    Quantitative genetic analysis has long been used to study how natural variation of genotype can influence an organism's phenotype. While most studies have focused on genetic determinants of phenotypic average, it is rapidly becoming understood that stochastic noise is genetically determined. However, it is not known how many traits display genetic control of stochastic noise nor how broadly these stochastic loci are distributed within the genome. Understanding these questions is critical to our understanding of quantitative traits and how they relate to the underlying causal loci, especially since stochastic noise may be directly influenced by underlying changes in the wiring of regulatory networks. We identified QTLs controlling natural variation in stochastic noise of glucosinolates, plant defense metabolites, as well as QTLs for stochastic noise of related transcripts. These loci included stochastic noise QTLs unique for either transcript or metabolite variation. Validation of these loci showed that genetic polymorphism within the regulatory network alters stochastic noise independent of effects on corresponding average levels. We examined this phenomenon more globally, using transcriptomic datasets, and found that the Arabidopsis transcriptome exhibits significant, heritable differences in stochastic noise. Further analysis allowed us to identify QTLs that control genomic stochastic noise. Some genomic QTL were in common with those altering average transcript abundance, while others were unique to stochastic noise. Using a single isogenic population, we confirmed that natural variation at ELF3 alters stochastic noise in the circadian clock and metabolism. Since polymorphisms controlling stochastic noise in genomic phenotypes exist within wild germplasm for naturally selected phenotypes, this suggests that analysis of Arabidopsis evolution should account for genetic control of stochastic variance and average phenotypes. It remains to be determined if natural

  10. Fiscal 1995 geothermal development promotion survey. Natural environment survey report; 1995 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Shizen kankyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    In Candidate C area for the geothermal development survey, the natural environment was surveyed and `the secondary landscape assessment` was summed up in which places proposed for drilling of large-size wells and for construction of power generation facilities are extracted and a simulation of the landscape is conducted. The area for survey is the Shiramizu-gawa region in the south of Lake Akan, Akan-cho, Akan-gun, Hokkaido. The field survey was carried out about three items of landscape, plants and animals during the June-November period, 1995. As to the flora, diverse florae including vegetation unique to alpine areas, wetlands, and fumarole surrounding areas were found in the region, which is covered with summer-green broad-leaved forests or mixed forests of coniferous and broad-leaved trees. As to the fauna, faunae inhabitant of the highly natural forests were found including black woodpeckers and mountain hawk eagles. As a result of studying the places proposed for geothermal development from the above-mentioned survey, two places were picked up in the west of the survey area, where geothermal development is comparatively less influential in the natural environment and landscape and there is a high locational adaptability. 19 refs., 56 figs., 49 tabs.

  11. Natural Hazards Science at the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Suzanne C.; Jones, Lucile M.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    The mission of the USGS in natural hazards is to develop and apply hazard science to help protect the safety, security, and economic well-being of the Nation. The costs and consequences of natural hazards can be enormous, and each year more people and infrastructure are at risk. The USGS conducts hazard research and works closely with stakeholders and cooperators to inform a broad range of planning and response activities at individual, local, State, national, and international levels. It has critical statutory and nonstatutory roles regarding floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides, coastal erosion, volcanic eruptions, wildfires, and magnetic storms. USGS science can help to understand and reduce risks from natural hazards by providing the information that decisionmakers need to determine which risk management activities are worth­while.

  12. Sources of measurement variation in blood pressure in large-scale epidemiological surveys with follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ulla Overgaard; Henriksen, Jens H; Jensen, Gorm

    2002-01-01

    The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS) is a longitudinal epidemiological study of 19698 subjects followed up since 1976. Variation in blood pressure (BP) measurement in the first three CCHS surveys is evaluated by assessing two components, systematic variation and random variation [daytime...

  13. Potassium Retention under Salt Stress Is Associated with Natural Variation in Salinity Tolerance among Arabidopsis Accessions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanling Sun

    Full Text Available Plants are exposed to various environmental stresses during their life cycle such as salt, drought and cold. Natural variation mediated plant growth adaptation has been employed as an effective approach in response to the diverse environmental cues such as salt stress. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is not well understood. In the present study, a collection of 82 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions (ecotypes was screened with a view to identify variation for salinity tolerance. Seven accessions showed a higher level of tolerance than Col-0. The young seedlings of the tolerant accessions demonstrated a higher K(+ content and a lower Na(+/K(+ ratio when exposed to salinity stress, but its Na(+ content was the same as that of Col-0. The K(+ transporter genes AtHAK5, AtCHX17 and AtKUP1 were up-regulated significantly in almost all the tolerant accessions, even in the absence of salinity stress. There was little genetic variation or positive transcriptional variation between the selections and Col-0 with respect to Na+-related transporter genes, as AtSOS genes, AtNHX1 and AtHKT1;1. In addition, under salinity stress, these selections accumulated higher compatible solutes and lower reactive oxygen species than did Col-0. Taken together, our results showed that natural variation in salinity tolerance of Arabidopsis seems to have been achieved by the strong capacity of K(+ retention.

  14. Copy number variation in the genomes of twelve natural isolates of Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flibotte Stephane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Copy number variation is an important component of genetic variation in higher eukaryotes. The extent of natural copy number variation in C. elegans is unknown outside of 2 highly divergent wild isolates and the canonical N2 Bristol strain. Results We have used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH to detect copy number variation in the genomes of 12 natural isolates of Caenorhabditis elegans. Deletions relative to the canonical N2 strain are more common in these isolates than duplications, and indels are enriched in multigene families on the autosome arms. Among the strains in our study, the Hawaiian and Madeiran strains (CB4856 and JU258 carry the largest number of deletions, followed by the Vancouver strain (KR314. Overall we detected 510 different deletions affecting 1136 genes, or over 5% of the genes in the canonical N2 genome. The indels we identified had a median length of 2.7 kb. Since many deletions are found in multiple isolates, deletion loci were used as markers to derive an unrooted tree to estimate genetic relatedness among the strains. Conclusion Copy number variation is extensive in C. elegans, affecting over 5% of the genes in the genome. The deletions we have detected in natural isolates of C. elegans contribute significantly to the number of deletion alleles available to researchers. The relationships between strains are complex and different regions of the genome possess different genealogies due to recombination throughout the natural history of the species, which may not be apparent in studies utilizing smaller numbers of genetic markers.

  15. Natural selection affects multiple aspects of genetic variation at putatively peutral sites across the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Albrechtsen, Anders; Li, Yingrui

    2011-01-01

    A major question in evolutionary biology is how natural selection has shaped patterns of genetic variation across the human genome. Previous work has documented a reduction in genetic diversity in regions of the genome with low recombination rates. However, it is unclear whether other summaries...... affected multiple aspects of linked neutral variation throughout the human genome and that positive selection is not required to explain these observations....... these questions by analyzing three different genome-wide resequencing datasets from European individuals. We document several significant correlations between different genomic features. In particular, we find that average minor allele frequency and diversity are reduced in regions of low recombination...

  16. Use of natural health products in children Survey of parents in waiting rooms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall Godwin; John Crellin; Maria Mathews; Nurun L. Chowdhury; Leigh Anne Newhook; Andrea Pike; Farah McCrate; Rebecca Law

    2013-01-01

    To determine how common it is for parents to give natural health products (NHPs) to their children, which NHPs are being used, why they are being used, and parents' assessments of the benefits and side effects of NHPs. Survey...

  17. Nature, Nurture and Evolution of Intra-Species Variation in Mosquito Arbovirus Transmission Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter J. Tabachnick

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes vary in their competence or ability to transmit arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses. Many arboviruses cause disease in humans and animals. Identifying the environmental and genetic causes of variation in mosquito competence for arboviruses is one of the great challenges in public health. Progress identifying genetic (nature and environmental (nurture factors influencing mosquito competence for arboviruses is reviewed. There is great complexity in the various traits that comprise mosquito competence. The complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors controlling these traits and the factors shaping variation in Nature are largely unknown. The norms of reaction of specific genes influencing competence, their distributions in natural populations and the effects of genetic polymorphism on phenotypic variation need to be determined. Mechanisms influencing competence are not likely due to natural selection because of the direct effects of the arbovirus on mosquito fitness. More likely the traits for mosquito competence for arboviruses are the effects of adaptations for other functions of these competence mechanisms. Determining these other functions is essential to understand the evolution and distributions of competence for arboviruses. This information is needed to assess risk from mosquito-borne disease, predict new mosquito-arbovirus systems, and provide novel strategies to mitigate mosquito-borne arbovirus transmission.

  18. Nature, nurture and evolution of intra-species variation in mosquito arbovirus transmission competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Walter J

    2013-01-11

    Mosquitoes vary in their competence or ability to transmit arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses). Many arboviruses cause disease in humans and animals. Identifying the environmental and genetic causes of variation in mosquito competence for arboviruses is one of the great challenges in public health. Progress identifying genetic (nature) and environmental (nurture) factors influencing mosquito competence for arboviruses is reviewed. There is great complexity in the various traits that comprise mosquito competence. The complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors controlling these traits and the factors shaping variation in Nature are largely unknown. The norms of reaction of specific genes influencing competence, their distributions in natural populations and the effects of genetic polymorphism on phenotypic variation need to be determined. Mechanisms influencing competence are not likely due to natural selection because of the direct effects of the arbovirus on mosquito fitness. More likely the traits for mosquito competence for arboviruses are the effects of adaptations for other functions of these competence mechanisms. Determining these other functions is essential to understand the evolution and distributions of competence for arboviruses. This information is needed to assess risk from mosquito-borne disease, predict new mosquito-arbovirus systems, and provide novel strategies to mitigate mosquito-borne arbovirus transmission.

  19. Naturally occurring pentaoxygenated, hexaoxygenated and dimeric xanthones: a literature survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Peres

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available This review gives information on the chemical study of 71 pentaoxygenated, 11 hexaoxygenated and 9 dimeric and more complex xanthones naturally occurring in 7 families, 29 genus and 62 species of higher plants, and 11 described as fern and fungal metabolites. The value of these groups of substances in the connection with the pharmacological activity and the therapeutic use of some species is shown. The structural formulas of 23 isolated compounds and their distribution in the species studied are given.

  20. Natural language in measuring user emotions: A qualitative approach to quantitative survey-based emotion measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonetto, L.M.; Desmet, P.M.A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to developing surveys that measure user experiences with the use of natural everyday language. The common approach to develop questionnaires that measure experience is to translate theoretical factors into verbal survey items. This theory-based approach can impair the

  1. Bird, mammal, and vegetation community surveys of research natural areas in the Tongass National Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    W.P. Smith; M.J. Stotts; B.A. Andres; J.M. Melton; A. Garibaldi; K. Boggs

    2001-01-01

    In June 1977, we surveyed seven research natural areas (RNAs) in the Tongass National Forest (Tongass). We documented the composition of biotic communities using rare plant and tidal community surveys, targeted searches for rare animals, and samples of permanent vegetation plots. Birds were sampled once along each transect with 10-minute point counts at stations 8...

  2. Natural selection affects multiple aspects of genetic variation at putatively peutral sites across the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Albrechtsen, Anders; Li, Yingrui;

    2011-01-01

    throughout the genome. Further, we show that the widespread presence of weakly deleterious alleles, rather than a small number of strongly positively selected mutations, is responsible for the correlation between neutral genetic diversity and recombination rate. This work suggests that natural selection has......A major question in evolutionary biology is how natural selection has shaped patterns of genetic variation across the human genome. Previous work has documented a reduction in genetic diversity in regions of the genome with low recombination rates. However, it is unclear whether other summaries...... and that human diversity, human-chimp divergence, and average minor allele frequency are reduced near genes. Population genetic simulations show that either positive natural selection acting on favorable mutations or negative natural selection acting against deleterious mutations can explain these correlations...

  3. Untangling the nature of spatial variations of cold dust properties in star forming galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkpatrick, Allison; Calzetti, Daniela [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01002 (United States); Kennicutt, Robert [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Galametz, Maud [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzchild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching-bei-München (Germany); Gordon, Karl [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groves, Brent; Tabatabaei, Fatemeh [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Hunt, Leslie [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Dale, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Hinz, Joannah, E-mail: kirkpatr@astro.umass.edu [MMT Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We investigate the far-infrared (IR) dust emission for 20 local star forming galaxies from the Key Insights on Nearby Galaxies: A Far-IR Survey with Herschel (KINGFISH) sample. We model the far-IR/submillimeter spectral energy distribution (SED) using images from Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory. We calculate the cold dust temperature (T{sub c} ) and emissivity (β) on a pixel by pixel basis (where each pixel ranges from 0.1 to 3 kpc{sup 2}) using a two-temperature modified blackbody fitting routine. Our fitting method allows us to investigate the resolved nature of temperature and emissivity variations by modeling from the galaxy centers to the outskirts (physical scales of ∼15-50 kpc, depending on the size of the galaxy). We fit each SED in two ways: (1) fit T{sub c} and β simultaneously, (2) hold β constant and fit T{sub c} . We compare T{sub c} and β with star formation rates (calculated from L{sub Hα} and L{sub 24μm}), the luminosity of the old stellar population (traced through L{sub 3.6μm}), and the dust mass surface density (traced by 500 μm luminosity, L{sub 500}). We find a significant trend between SFR/L{sub 500} and T{sub c} , implying that the flux of hard UV photons relative to the amount of dust is significantly contributing to the heating of the cold, or diffuse, dust component. We also see a trend between L{sub 3.6}/L{sub 500} and β, indicating that the old stellar population contributes to the heating at far-IR/submillimeter wavelengths. Finally, we find that when β is held constant, T{sub c} exhibits a strongly decreasing radial trend, illustrating that the shape of the far-IR SED is changing radially through a galaxy, thus confirming on a sample almost double in size the trends observed in Galametz et al.

  4. Variation in Genomic Methylation in Natural Populations of Chinese White Poplar

    OpenAIRE

    Kaifeng Ma; Yuepeng Song; Xiaohui Yang; Zhiyi Zhang; Deqiang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is thought that methylcytosine can be inherited through meiosis and mitosis, and that epigenetic variation may be under genetic control or correlation may be caused by neutral drift. However, DNA methylation also varies with tissue, developmental stage, and environmental factors. Eliminating these factors, we analyzed the levels and patterns, diversity and structure of genomic methylcytosine in the xylem of nine natural populations of Chinese white poplar. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: O...

  5. Natural epigenetic variation contributes to heritable flowering divergence in a widespread asexual dandelion lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschut, Rutger A; Oplaat, Carla; Snoek, L Basten; Kirschner, Jan; Verhoeven, Koen J F

    2016-04-01

    Epigenetic variation has been proposed to contribute to the success of asexual plants, either as a contributor to phenotypic plasticity or by enabling transient adaptation via selection on transgenerationally stable, but reversible, epialleles. While recent studies in experimental plant populations have shown the potential for epigenetic mechanisms to contribute to adaptive phenotypes, it remains unknown whether heritable variation in ecologically relevant traits is at least partially epigenetically determined in natural populations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DNA methylation variation contributes to heritable differences in flowering time within a single widespread apomictic clonal lineage of the common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale s. lat.). Apomictic clone members of the same apomictic lineage collected from different field sites showed heritable differences in flowering time, which was correlated with inherited differences in methylation-sensitive AFLP marker profiles. Differences in flowering between apomictic clone members were significantly reduced after in vivo demethylation using the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor zebularine. This synchronization of flowering times suggests that flowering time divergence within an apomictic lineage was mediated by differences in DNA methylation. While the underlying basis of the methylation polymorphism at functional flowering time-affecting loci remains to be demonstrated, our study shows that epigenetic variation contributes to heritable phenotypic divergence in ecologically relevant traits in natural plant populations. This result also suggests that epigenetic mechanisms can facilitate adaptive divergence within genetically uniform asexual lineages. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Natural variation in abiotic stress responsive gene expression and local adaptation to climate in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Jesse R; Des Marais, David L; Lowry, David B; Povolotskaya, Inna; McKay, John K; Richards, James H; Keitt, Timothy H; Juenger, Thomas E

    2014-09-01

    Gene expression varies widely in natural populations, yet the proximate and ultimate causes of this variation are poorly known. Understanding how variation in gene expression affects abiotic stress tolerance, fitness, and adaptation is central to the field of evolutionary genetics. We tested the hypothesis that genes with natural genetic variation in their expression responses to abiotic stress are likely to be involved in local adaptation to climate in Arabidopsis thaliana. Specifically, we compared genes with consistent expression responses to environmental stress (expression stress responsive, "eSR") to genes with genetically variable responses to abiotic stress (expression genotype-by-environment interaction, "eGEI"). We found that on average genes that exhibited eGEI in response to drought or cold had greater polymorphism in promoter regions and stronger associations with climate than those of eSR genes or genomic controls. We also found that transcription factor binding sites known to respond to environmental stressors, especially abscisic acid responsive elements, showed significantly higher polymorphism in drought eGEI genes in comparison to eSR genes. By contrast, eSR genes tended to exhibit relatively greater pairwise haplotype sharing, lower promoter diversity, and fewer nonsynonymous polymorphisms, suggesting purifying selection or selective sweeps. Our results indicate that cis-regulatory evolution and genetic variation in stress responsive gene expression may be important mechanisms of local adaptation to climatic selective gradients.

  7. Natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool for highlighting differential drought responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumaya Bouchabke

    Full Text Available To test whether natural variation in Arabidopsis could be used to dissect out the genetic basis of responses to drought stress, we characterised a number of accessions. Most of the accessions belong to a core collection that was shown to maximise the genetic diversity captured for a given number of individual accessions in Arabidopsis thaliana. We measured total leaf area (TLA, Electrolyte Leakage (EL, Relative Water Content (RWC, and Cut Rosette Water Loss (CRWL in control and mild water deficit conditions. A Principal Component Analysis revealed which traits explain most of the variation and showed that some accessions behave differently compared to the others in drought conditions, these included Ita-0, Cvi-0 and Shahdara. This study relied on genetic variation found naturally within the species, in which populations are assumed to be adapted to their environment. Overall, Arabidopsis thaliana showed interesting phenotypic variations in response to mild water deficit that can be exploited to identify genes and alleles important for this complex trait.

  8. Natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool for highlighting differential drought responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchabke, Oumaya; Chang, Fengqi; Simon, Matthieu; Voisin, Roger; Pelletier, Georges; Durand-Tardif, Mylène

    2008-02-27

    To test whether natural variation in Arabidopsis could be used to dissect out the genetic basis of responses to drought stress, we characterised a number of accessions. Most of the accessions belong to a core collection that was shown to maximise the genetic diversity captured for a given number of individual accessions in Arabidopsis thaliana. We measured total leaf area (TLA), Electrolyte Leakage (EL), Relative Water Content (RWC), and Cut Rosette Water Loss (CRWL) in control and mild water deficit conditions. A Principal Component Analysis revealed which traits explain most of the variation and showed that some accessions behave differently compared to the others in drought conditions, these included Ita-0, Cvi-0 and Shahdara. This study relied on genetic variation found naturally within the species, in which populations are assumed to be adapted to their environment. Overall, Arabidopsis thaliana showed interesting phenotypic variations in response to mild water deficit that can be exploited to identify genes and alleles important for this complex trait.

  9. Discriminating Natural Variation from Legacies of Disturbance in Semi-Arid Forests, Southwestern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetnam, T. L.; Lynch, A. M.; Falk, D. A.; Yool, S. R.; Guertin, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Characterizing differences in existing vegetation driven by natural variation versus disturbance legacies could become a critical component of applied forest management practice with important implications for monitoring ecologic succession and eco-hydrological interactions within the critical zone. Here we characterize variations in aerial LiDAR derived forest structure at individual tree scale in Arizona and New Mexico. Differences in structure result from both topographic and climatological variations and from natural and human related disturbances. We chose a priori undisturbed and disturbed sites that included preservation, development, logging and wildfire as exemplars. We compare two topographic indices, the topographic position index (TPI) and topographic wetness index (TWI), to two local indicators of spatial association (LISA): the Getis-Ord Gi and Anselin's Moran I. We found TPI and TWI correlate well to positive z-scores (tall trees in tall neighborhoods) in undisturbed areas and that disturbed areas are clearly defined by negative z-scores, in some cases better than what is visible from traditional orthophotography and existing GIS maps. These LISA methods also serve as a robust technique for creating like-clustered stands, i.e. common stands used in forest inventory monitoring. This research provides a significant advancement in the ability to (1) quantity variation in forest structure across topographically complex landscapes, (2) identify and map previously unrecorded disturbance locations, and (3) quantify the different impacts of disturbance within the perimeter of a stand or event at ecologically relevant scale.

  10. A genome-wide, fine-scale map of natural pigmentation variation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héloïse Bastide

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Various approaches can be applied to uncover the genetic basis of natural phenotypic variation, each with their specific strengths and limitations. Here, we use a replicated genome-wide association approach (Pool-GWAS to fine-scale map genomic regions contributing to natural variation in female abdominal pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster, a trait that is highly variable in natural populations and highly heritable in the laboratory. We examined abdominal pigmentation phenotypes in approximately 8000 female European D. melanogaster, isolating 1000 individuals with extreme phenotypes. We then used whole-genome Illumina sequencing to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs segregating in our sample, and tested these for associations with pigmentation by contrasting allele frequencies between replicate pools of light and dark individuals. We identify two small regions near the pigmentation genes tan and bric-à-brac 1, both corresponding to known cis-regulatory regions, which contain SNPs showing significant associations with pigmentation variation. While the Pool-GWAS approach suffers some limitations, its cost advantage facilitates replication and it can be applied to any non-model system with an available reference genome.

  11. Beliefs About Pharmaceutical Medicines and Natural Remedies Explain Individual Variation in Placebo Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkinson, Andrew; Chapman, Sarah C E; Horne, Rob

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether placebo responses were predicted by a theoretical model of specific and general treatment beliefs. Using a randomized crossover, experimental design (168 healthy individuals) we assessed whether responses to a cold pressor task were influenced by 2 placebo creams described as pharmaceutical versus natural. We assessed whether placebo responses were predicted by pretreatment beliefs about the treatments (placebo) and by beliefs about the pain. The efficacy of pharmaceutical as well as natural placebos in reducing pain intensity was predicted by aspects of pain catastrophizing including feelings of helplessness (pharmaceutical: B = .03, P natural: B = .02, P natural: B = .05, P natural: B = .16, P natural placebo were informed by general background beliefs about holistic treatments. Our findings show that treatment beliefs influence the placebo effect suggesting that they may offer an additional approach for understanding the placebo effect. Placebo effects contribute to responses to active analgesics. Understanding how beliefs about different types of treatment influence placebo analgesia may be useful in understanding variations in treatment response. Using the cold pressor paradigm we found that placebo analgesia was influenced by beliefs about natural remedies, pharmaceutical medicines, and about pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Variation in natural selection for growth and phlorotannins in the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jormalainen, V; Honkanen, T

    2004-07-01

    Directional selection for plant traits associated with resistance to herbivory tends to eliminate genetic variation in such traits. On the other hand, balancing selection arising from trade-offs between resistance and growth or spatially variable selection acts against the elimination of genetic variation. We explore both the amount of genetic variation and variability of natural selection for growth and concentration of phenolic secondary compounds, phlorotannins, in the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. We measured variation in selection at two growing depths and two levels of nutrient availability in algae that had faced two kinds of past growing environments. Genetic variation was low for growth but high for phlorotannins. The form and strength of selection for both focal traits depended on the past growing environment of the algae. We found strong directional selection for growth rate in algae previously subjected to higher ultraviolet radiation, but not in algae previously subjected to higher nutrient availability. Stabilizing selection for growth occurred especially in the deep growing environment. Selection for phlorotannins was generally weak, but in some past-environment-current-environment combinations we detected either directional selection against phlorotannins or stabilizing selection. Thus, phlorotannins are not selectively neutral but affect the fitness of F. vesiculosus. In particular, there may be a fitness cost of producing phlorotannins, but the realization of such a cost varies from one environment to another. Genetic correlations between selective environments were high for growth but nonexistent for phlorotannins, emphasizing the high phenotypic plasticity of phlorotannin production. The highly heterogeneous selection, including directional, stabilizing, and spatially variable selection as well as temporal change in selection due to responses to past environmental conditions, probably maintains a high amount of genetic variation in phlorotannins

  13. Variations of transesophageal echocardiography practices in India: A survey by Indian College of Cardiac Anaesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borde, Deepak Prakash; George, Antony; Joshi, Shreedhar; Nair, Suresh; Koshy, Thomas; Gandhe, Uday; Chakravarthy, Murali

    2016-01-01

    Context: Use of perioperative transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) has expanded in India. Despite attempts to standardize the practice of TEE in cardiac surgical procedures, variation in practice and application exists. This is the first online survey by Indian College of Cardiac Anaesthesia, research and academic wing of the Indian Association of Cardiovascular Thoracic Anaesthesiologists (IACTA). Aims: We hypothesized that variations in practice of intraoperative TEE exist among centers and this survey aimed at analyzing them. Settings and Design: This is an online survey conducted among members of the IACTA. Subjects and Methods: All members of IACTA were contacted using online questionnaire fielded using SurveyMonkey™ software. There were 21 questions over four pages evaluating infrastructure, documentation of TEE, experience and accreditation of anesthesiologist performing TEE, and finally impact of TEE on clinical practice. Questions were also asked about national TEE workshop conducted by the IACTA, and suggestions were invited by members on overseas training. Results: Response rate was 29.7% (382/1222). 53.9% were from high-volume centers (>500 cases annually). TEE machine/probe was available to 75.9% of the respondents and those in high-volume centers had easier (86.9%) access. There was poor documentation of preoperative consent (23.3%) as well as TEE findings (66%). Only 18.2% of responders were board qualified. Almost 90% of the responders felt surgeons respected their TEE diagnosis. Around half of the responders felt that new intraoperative findings by TEE were considered in decision-making in most of the cases and 70% of the responders reported that surgical plan was altered based on TEE finding more than 10 times in the last year. Despite this, only 5% of the responders in this survey were monetarily awarded for performing impactful skill of TEE. Majority (57%) felt that there is no need for overseas training for Indian cardiac anesthesiologists

  14. The Survey of Ermia mangshanensis Resource in South China Tiger Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heping; XIE; Shizhou; LI; Jianrong; WANG; Yuanhui; CHEN; Lianchao; CHEN; Shengqiao; LEI

    2014-01-01

    In 2007,one living Ermia mangshanensis was found in the Shapingpian area at the junction of South China Tiger Nature Reserve in North Guangdong and Hunan Mangshan National Nature Reserve.To learn more about Ermia mangshanensis resource,the researchers in South China Tiger Nature Reserve in North Guangdong and Hunan Mangshan National Nature Reserve conducted field survey of Ermia mangshanensis in the Shapingpian area during the period 2010- 2012.The results show that there is Ermia mangshanensis in the Shapingpian area of South China Tiger Nature Reserve at the elevation of 800- 1200 m,and the population number is estimated at 48- 80.

  15. Survey of Korean pedestrians' natural preference for walking directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hwa S; Jung, Hyung-Shik

    2013-11-01

    The primary objective of this study was to investigate the stereotypes of Koreans regarding preferred walking directions when encountering various public walking facilities, and to provide useful information to pedestrians and traffic policy legislators. To this end, this study was conducted in two phases. In the first phase, we conducted observational research on pedestrians' walking directions in ten different situations. In the second phase, six hundred Korean male and female subjects were selected to investigate the various statistics about their preferred walking directions and their employment characteristics in diverse walking facilities. The results showed that 59.3% abided by the Left-side Traffic rule while 40.7% abided by the Right-side rule. On the contrary, 73.7% of respondents showed preferences to the Right-side Traffic rule. Moreover, right-handed people showed strong tendencies to walk on the right side of the road and vice versa, hence suggesting that the direction people naturally prefer in walking should be a crucial determinant when regulating traffic policies.

  16. Cyclic Combustion Variations in Dual Fuel Partially Premixed Pilot-Ignited Natural Gas Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, K. K. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krishnan, S. R. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Qi, Y. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    2012-05-09

    Dual fuel pilot ignited natural gas engines are identified as an efficient and viable alternative to conventional diesel engines. This paper examines cyclic combustion fluctuations in conventional dual fuel and in dual fuel partially premixed low temperature combustion (LTC). Conventional dual fueling with 95% (energy basis) natural gas (NG) substitution reduces NOx emissions by almost 90%t relative to straight diesel operation; however, this is accompanied by 98% increase in HC emissions, 10 percentage points reduction in fuel conversion efficiency (FCE) and 12 percentage points increase in COVimep. Dual fuel LTC is achieved by injection of a small amount of diesel fuel (2-3 percent on an energy basis) to ignite a premixed natural gas₋air mixture to attain very low NOx emissions (less than 0.2 g/kWh). Cyclic variations in both combustion modes were analyzed by observing the cyclic fluctuations in start of combustion (SOC), peak cylinder pressures (Pmax), combustion phasing (Ca50), and the separation between the diesel injection event and Ca50 (termed "relative combustion phasing" ). For conventional dual fueling, as % NG increases, Pmax decreases, SOC and Ca50 are delayed, and cyclic variations increase. For dual fuel LTC, as diesel injection timing is advanced from 20° to 60° BTDC, the relative combustion phasing is identified as an important combustion parameter along with SoC, Pmax, and CaPmax. For both combustion modes, cyclic variations were characterized by alternating slow and fast burn cycles, especially at high %NG and advanced injection timings. Finally, heat release return maps were analyzed to demonstrate thermal management strategies as an effective tool to mitigate cyclic combustion variations, especially in dual fuel LTC.

  17. Spatial scales of variation in lichens: implications for sampling design in biomonitoring surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Paolo; Brunialti, Giorgio; Frati, Luisa; Incerti, Guido; Ianesch, Luca; Vallone, Emanuele; Bacaro, Giovanni; Maccherini, Simona

    2013-02-01

    The variability of biological data is a main constraint affecting the quality and reliability of lichen biomonitoring surveys for estimation of the effects of atmospheric pollution. Although most epiphytic lichen bioindication surveys focus on between-site differences at the landscape level, associated with the large scale effects of atmospheric pollution, current protocols are based on multilevel sampling, thus adding further sources of variation and affecting the error budget. We test the hypothesis that assemblages of lichen communities vary at each spatial scale examined, in order to determine what scales should be included in future monitoring studies. We compared four sites in Italy, along gradients of atmospheric pollution and climate, to test the partitioning of the variance components of lichen diversity across spatial scales (from trunks to landscapes). Despite environmental heterogeneity, we observed comparable spatial variance. However, residuals often overcame between-plot variability, leading to biased estimation of atmospheric pollution effects.

  18. Measurement of isotope abundance variations in nature by gravimetric spiking isotope dilution analysis (GS-IDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Gina; Walczyk, Thomas

    2013-04-02

    Subtle variations in the isotopic composition of elements carry unique information about physical and chemical processes in nature and are now exploited widely in diverse areas of research. Reliable measurement of natural isotope abundance variations is among the biggest challenges in inorganic mass spectrometry as they are highly sensitive to methodological bias. For decades, double spiking of the sample with a mix of two stable isotopes has been considered the reference technique for measuring such variations both by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) and multicollector-thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS). However, this technique can only be applied to elements having at least four stable isotopes. Here we present a novel approach that requires measurement of three isotope signals only and which is more robust than the conventional double spiking technique. This became possible by gravimetric mixing of the sample with an isotopic spike in different proportions and by applying principles of isotope dilution for data analysis (GS-IDA). The potential and principle use of the technique is demonstrated for Mg in human urine using MC-TIMS for isotopic analysis. Mg is an element inaccessible to double spiking methods as it consists of three stable isotopes only and shows great potential for metabolically induced isotope effects waiting to be explored.

  19. Genetic architecture of natural variation of telomere length in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nick; Teubenbacher, Astrid; Kerdaffrec, Envel; Farlow, Ashley; Nordborg, Magnus; Riha, Karel

    2015-02-01

    Telomeres represent the repetitive sequences that cap chromosome ends and are essential for their protection. Telomere length is known to be highly heritable and is derived from a homeostatic balance between telomeric lengthening and shortening activities. Specific loci that form the genetic framework underlying telomere length homeostasis, however, are not well understood. To investigate the extent of natural variation of telomere length in Arabidopsis thaliana, we examined 229 worldwide accessions by terminal restriction fragment analysis. The results showed a wide range of telomere lengths that are specific to individual accessions. To identify loci that are responsible for this variation, we adopted a quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping approach with multiple recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations. A doubled haploid RIL population was first produced using centromere-mediated genome elimination between accessions with long (Pro-0) and intermediate (Col-0) telomere lengths. Composite interval mapping analysis of this population along with two established RIL populations (Ler-2/Cvi-0 and Est-1/Col-0) revealed a number of shared and unique QTL. QTL detected in the Ler-2/Cvi-0 population were examined using near isogenic lines that confirmed causative regions on chromosomes 1 and 2. In conclusion, this work describes the extent of natural variation of telomere length in A. thaliana, identifies a network of QTL that influence telomere length homeostasis, examines telomere length dynamics in plants with hybrid backgrounds, and shows the effects of two identified regions on telomere length regulation.

  20. Natural allelic variation of the IL-21 receptor modulates ischemic stroke infarct volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Kyu; Keum, Sehoon; Sheng, Huaxin; Warner, David S; Lo, Donald C; Marchuk, Douglas A

    2016-08-01

    Risk for ischemic stroke has a strong genetic basis, but heritable factors also contribute to the extent of damage after a stroke has occurred. We previously identified a locus on distal mouse chromosome 7 that contributes over 50% of the variation in postischemic cerebral infarct volume observed between inbred strains. Here, we used ancestral haplotype analysis to fine-map this locus to 12 candidate genes. The gene encoding the IL-21 receptor (Il21r) showed a marked difference in strain-specific transcription levels and coding variants in neonatal and adult cortical tissue. Collateral vessel connections were moderately reduced in Il21r-deficient mice, and cerebral infarct volume increased 2.3-fold, suggesting that Il21r modulates both collateral vessel anatomy and innate neuroprotection. In brain slice explants, oxygen deprivation (OD) activated apoptotic pathways and increased neuronal cell death in IL-21 receptor-deficient (IL-21R-deficient) mice compared with control animals. We determined that the neuroprotective effects of IL-21R arose from signaling through JAK/STAT pathways and upregulation of caspase 3. Thus, natural genetic variation in murine Il21r influences neuronal cell viability after ischemia by modulating receptor function and downstream signal transduction. The identification of neuroprotective genes based on naturally occurring allelic variations has the potential to inform the development of drug targets for ischemic stroke treatment.

  1. Transmission line of 1MV in natural parks. Environmental survey relating to the construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesugi, Tetsuro (Environmental Agency, Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-03-31

    Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd.(TEPCO) determined to construct a new transmission line of 1MV and 250km long from a power station facing the Japan Sea (Niigata Pref.) to the Pacific Ocean side(Yamanashi Pref.). It is realistically difficult to construct the transmission line, avoiding perfectly the natural park regions located in the middle part of the Main Island, and therefore many kinds of environmental survey were carried out from the beginning of the plan to minimize hindrances to these natural parks. The Environment Agency summarized the outline to use as the reference to similar constructions. Following surveys or assessments were conducted: planning assessment to minimize influences on natural parks in the route selecting stage; executing assessment to evaluate influences of concrete constructing contents such as tower locations and scale, etc. on the natural environment; fundamental survey to grasp outline of the natural parks or maintaining countermeasures carried out before or parallel to these assessments; and finally survey during the construction and the subsequent surveys until the suitable time after the completion to check the influence. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Natural variation in the Pto disease resistance gene within species of wild tomato (Lycopersicon). II. Population genetics of Pto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Laura E; Michelmore, Richard W; Langley, Charles H

    2007-03-01

    Disease resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in the host species Lycopersicon esculentum, the cultivated tomato, and the closely related L. pimpinellifolium is triggered by the physical interaction between the protein products of the host resistance (R) gene Pto and the pathogen avirulence genes AvrPto and AvrPtoB. Sequence variation at the Pto locus was surveyed in natural populations of seven species of Lycopersicon to test hypotheses of host-parasite coevolution and functional adaptation of the Pto gene. Pto shows significantly higher nonsynonymous polymorphism than 14 other non-R-gene loci in the same samples of Lycopersicon species, while showing no difference in synonymous polymorphism, suggesting that the maintenance of amino acid polymorphism at this locus is mediated by pathogen selection. Also, a larger proportion of ancestral variation is maintained at Pto as compared to these non-R-gene loci. The frequency spectrum of amino acid polymorphisms known to negatively affect Pto function is skewed toward low frequency compared to amino acid polymorphisms that do not affect function or silent polymorphisms. Therefore, the evolution of Pto appears to be influenced by a mixture of both purifying and balancing selection.

  3. Exploiting natural variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify genes for increased ethanol resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jeffrey A; Elkon, Isaac M; McGee, Mick A; Higbee, Alan J; Gasch, Audrey P

    2010-12-01

    Ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass holds promise as an alternative fuel. However, industrial stresses, including ethanol stress, limit microbial fermentation and thus prevent cost competitiveness with fossil fuels. To identify novel engineering targets for increased ethanol tolerance, we took advantage of natural diversity in wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. We previously showed that an S288c-derived lab strain cannot acquire higher ethanol tolerance after a mild ethanol pretreatment, which is distinct from other stresses. Here, we measured acquired ethanol tolerance in a large panel of wild strains and show that most strains can acquire higher tolerance after pretreatment. We exploited this major phenotypic difference to address the mechanism of acquired ethanol tolerance, by comparing the global gene expression response to 5% ethanol in S288c and two wild strains. Hundreds of genes showed variation in ethanol-dependent gene expression across strains. Computational analysis identified several transcription factor modules and known coregulated genes as differentially expressed, implicating genetic variation in the ethanol signaling pathway. We used this information to identify genes required for acquisition of ethanol tolerance in wild strains, including new genes and processes not previously linked to ethanol tolerance, and four genes that increase ethanol tolerance when overexpressed. Our approach shows that comparative genomics across natural isolates can quickly identify genes for industrial engineering while expanding our understanding of natural diversity.

  4. The consequence of natural selection on genetic variation in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuveni, Eli; Birney, Ewan; Gross, Cornelius T

    2010-04-01

    Laboratory mouse strains are known to have emerged from recent interbreeding between individuals of Mus musculus isolated populations. As a result of this breeding history, the collection of polymorphisms observed between laboratory mouse strains is likely to harbor the effects of natural selection between reproductively isolated populations. Until now no study has systematically investigated the consequences of this breeding history on gene evolution. Here we have used a novel, unbiased evolutionary approach to predict the founder origin of laboratory mouse strains and to assess the balance between ancient and newly emerged mutations in the founder subspecies. Our results confirm a contribution from at least four distinct subspecies. Additionally, our method allowed us to identify regions of relaxed selective constraint among laboratory mouse strains. This unique structure of variation is likely to have significant consequences on the use of mouse to find genes underlying phenotypic variation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The atomic weight and isotopic composition of nitrogen and their variation in nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two stable isotopes of nitrogen exist in nature, /sup 14/N and /sup 15/N. The less abundant isotope, /sup 15/N, was discovered in 1929 by Naude, who studied the band spectra of nitric oxide, NO. However, the main source of a standard for this element is the air in the atmosphere, which is made up of approximately 78% N/sub 2/. Reviewed in this paper is the measurements of the isotopic composition in air and its variation around the world. Also investigated is the variation of the isotopic composition in the various compounds or sources of nitrogen compared to the value in air. Data on the atomic weight and non-terrestrial data for nitrogen is also reviewed.

  6. Egg discrimination along a gradient of natural variation in eggshell coloration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Tomáš; Igic, Branislav; Samaš, Peter; López, Analía V.; Shawkey, Matthew D.; Hauber, Mark E.

    2017-01-01

    Accurate recognition of salient cues is critical for adaptive responses, but the underlying sensory and cognitive processes are often poorly understood. For example, hosts of avian brood parasites have long been assumed to reject foreign eggs from their nests based on the total degree of dissimilarity in colour to their own eggs, regardless of the foreign eggs' colours. We tested hosts' responses to gradients of natural (blue-green to brown) and artificial (green to purple) egg colours, and demonstrate that hosts base rejection decisions on both the direction and degree of colour dissimilarity along the natural, but not artificial, gradient of egg colours. Hosts rejected brown eggs and accepted blue-green eggs along the natural egg colour gradient, irrespective of the total perceived dissimilarity from their own egg's colour. By contrast, their responses did not vary along the artificial colour gradient. Our results demonstrate that egg recognition is specifically tuned to the natural gradient of avian eggshell colour and suggest a novel decision rule. These results highlight the importance of considering sensory reception and decision rules when studying perception, and illustrate that our understanding of recognition processes benefits from examining natural variation in phenotypes. PMID:28179521

  7. Natural variation of folate content and composition in spinach (Spinacia oleracea) germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohag, M J I; Wei, Yan-yan; Yu, Ning; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Kai; Patring, Johan; He, Zhen-li; Yang, Xiao-e

    2011-12-14

    Breeding to increase folate levels in edible parts of plants, termed folate biofortification, is an economical approach to fight against folate deficiency in humans, especially in the developing world. Germplasm with elevated folates are a useful genetic source for both breeding and direct use. Spinach is one of the well-know vegetables that contains a relatively high amount of folate. Currently, little is known about how much folate, and their composition varies in different spinach accessions. The aim of this study was to investigate natural variation in the folate content and composition of spinach genotypes grown under controlled environmental conditions. The folate content and composition in 67 spinach accessions were collected from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Asian Vegetable Research and Development Center (AVRDC) germplasm collections according to their origin, grown under control conditions to screen for natural diversity. Folates were extracted by a monoenzyme treatment and analyzed by a validated liquid chromatography (LC) method. The total folate content ranged from 54.1 to 173.2 μg/100 g of fresh weight, with 3.2-fold variation, and was accession-dependent. Four spinach accessions (PI 499372, NSL 6095, PI 261787, and TOT7337-B) have been identified as enriched folate content over 150 μg/100 g of fresh weight. The folate forms found were H(4)-folate, 5-CH(3)-H(4)-folate, and 5-HCO-H(4)-folate, and 10-CHO-folic acid also varied among different accessions and was responsible for variation in the total folate content. The major folate vitamer was represented by 5-CH(3)-H(4)-folate, which on average accounted for up to 52% of the total folate pool. The large variation in the total folate content and composition in diverse spinach accessions demonstrates the great genetic potential of diverse genotypes to be exploited by plant breeders.

  8. The standing pool of genomic structural variation in a natural population of Mimulus guttatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flagel, Lex E; Willis, John H; Vision, Todd J

    2014-01-01

    Major unresolved questions in evolutionary genetics include determining the contributions of different mutational sources to the total pool of genetic variation in a species, and understanding how these different forms of genetic variation interact with natural selection. Recent work has shown that structural variants (SVs) (insertions, deletions, inversions, and transpositions) are a major source of genetic variation, often outnumbering single nucleotide variants in terms of total bases affected. Despite the near ubiquity of SVs, major questions about their interaction with natural selection remain. For example, how does the allele frequency spectrum of SVs differ when compared with single nucleotide variants? How often do SVs affect genes, and what are the consequences? To begin to address these questions, we have systematically identified and characterized a large set of submicroscopic insertion and deletion (indel) variants (between 1 and 200 kb in length) among ten inbred lines from a single natural population of the plant species Mimulus guttatus. After extensive computational filtering, we focused on a set of 4,142 high-confidence indels that showed an experimental validation rate of 73%. All but one of these indels were less than 200 kb. Although the largest were generally at lower frequencies in the population, a surprising number of large indels are at intermediate frequencies. Although indels overlapping with genes were much rarer than expected by chance, approximately 600 genes were affected by an indel. Nucleotide-binding site leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) defense response genes were the most enriched among the gene families affected. Most indels associated with genes were rare and appeared to be under purifying selection, though we do find four high-frequency derived insertion alleles that show signatures of recent positive selection.

  9. Neutron Moderation in the Oklo Natural Reactor and the Time Variation of alpha

    CERN Document Server

    Lamoreaux, S K

    2003-01-01

    In the analysis of the Oklo (gabon) natural reactor to test for a possible time variation of the fine structure constant alpha, a Maxwell-Boltzmann low energy neutron spectrum was assumed. We present here an analysis where a more realistic spectrum is employed and show that the most recent isotopic analysis of samples implies a non-zero change in alpha, over the last two billion years since the reactor was operating, of \\Delta\\alpha/\\alpha\\geq 2.2\\times 10^{-7} (6\\sigma confidence). Issues regarding the interpretation of the shifts of the low energy neutron resonances are discussed.

  10. Neutron moderation in the Oklo natural reactor and the time variation of α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, S. K.; Torgerson, J. R.

    2004-06-01

    In previous analyses of the Oklo (Gabon) natural reactor to test for a possible time variation of the fine-structure constant α, a Maxwell-Boltzmann low energy neutron spectrum was assumed. We present here an analysis where a more realistic spectrum is employed and show that the most recent isotopic analysis of samples implies a decrease in α, over the last 2×109 years since the reactor was operating, of (αpast-αnow)/α⩾4.5×10-8 (6σ confidence). Issues regarding the interpretation of the shifts of the low energy neutron absorption resonances are discussed.

  11. Modelling natural grass production and its spatio-temporal variations in a semiarid Mediterranean watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Susanne; Lozano-Parra, Javier; Maneta-López, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Natural grasses are found in semiarid rangelands with disperse tree cover of part of the Iberian Peninsula and constitute a resource with high ecologic and economic value worth, being an important source of food for livestock, playing a significant role in the hydrologic cycle, controlling the soil thermal regime, and are a key factor in reducing soil erosion and degradation. However, increasing pressure on the resources, changes in land use as well as possible climate variations threaten the sustainability of natural grasses. Despite of their importance, the spatio-temporal variations of pasture production over whole watersheds are poorly known. In this sense, previous studies by other authors have indicated its dependence on a balance of positive and negative effects brought about by the main limiting factors: water, light, nutrients and space. Nevertheless, the specific weight of each factor is not clear because they are highly variable due to climate characteristics and the structure of these agroforestry systems. We have used a physical spatially-distributed ecohydrologic model to investigate the specific weight of factors that contribute to pasture production in a semiarid watershed of 99.5 ha in western Spain. This model couples a two layer (canopy and understory) vertical local closure energy balance scheme, a hydrologic model and a carbon uptake and vegetation growth component, and it was run using a synthetic daily climate dataset generated by a stochastic weather generator, which reproduced the range of climatic variations observed under mediterranean current climate. The modelling results reproduced satisfactorily the seasonality effects of climate as precipitation and temperatures, as well as annual and inter-annual variations of pasture production. Spatial variations of pasture production were largely controlled by topographic and tree effects, showing medium-low values depending of considered areas. These low values require introduction of feed to

  12. Natural variation in populations of persistently colonizing bacteria affect human host cell phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rahul A; Lee, Yongchan; Kim, Sung-Kook; Israel, Dawn; Peek, Richard M; Blaser, Martin J

    2003-08-15

    The highly diverse bacterium Helicobacter pylori, which persistently colonizes the human stomach, provides models to study the role of genome plasticity in host adaptation. Within H. pylori populations from 2 colonized individuals, intragenomic recombination between cagA DNA repeat sequences leads to deletion or duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the CagA protein, which is injected by a type IV secretion system into host cells. Experimental coculture of gastric epithelial cells with the strains containing these naturally occurring CagA phosphorylation site variants induced markedly divergent host cell morphologic responses. Mutants were constructed in which a phosphorylation site was either added or deleted in the expressed CagA protein; coculture studies confirmed that the naturally occurring differences in CagA phosphorylation are responsible for the observed phenotypic variation. These findings indicate that within an individual host, intragenomic recombination between H. pylori repetitive DNA produces strain variants differing in their signals to host cells.

  13. A genome-wide survey of genetic variation in gorillas using reduced representation sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylwyn Scally

    Full Text Available All non-human great apes are endangered in the wild, and it is therefore important to gain an understanding of their demography and genetic diversity. Whole genome assembly projects have provided an invaluable foundation for understanding genetics in all four genera, but to date genetic studies of multiple individuals within great ape species have largely been confined to mitochondrial DNA and a small number of other loci. Here, we present a genome-wide survey of genetic variation in gorillas using a reduced representation sequencing approach, focusing on the two lowland subspecies. We identify 3,006,670 polymorphic sites in 14 individuals: 12 western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla and 2 eastern lowland gorillas (Gorilla beringei graueri. We find that the two species are genetically distinct, based on levels of heterozygosity and patterns of allele sharing. Focusing on the western lowland population, we observe evidence for population substructure, and a deficit of rare genetic variants suggesting a recent episode of population contraction. In western lowland gorillas, there is an elevation of variation towards telomeres and centromeres on the chromosomal scale. On a finer scale, we find substantial variation in genetic diversity, including a marked reduction close to the major histocompatibility locus, perhaps indicative of recent strong selection there. These findings suggest that despite their maintaining an overall level of genetic diversity equal to or greater than that of humans, population decline, perhaps associated with disease, has been a significant factor in recent and long-term pressures on wild gorilla populations.

  14. Scale-dependent variation in forest structures in naturally dynamic boreal forest landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulha, Niko; Pasanen, Leena; De Grandpré, Louis; Kuuluvainen, Timo; Aakala, Tuomas

    2017-04-01

    Natural forest structures vary at multiple spatial scales. This variation reflects the occurrence of driving factors, such as disturbances and variation in soil or topography. To explore and understand the linkages of forest structural characteristics and factors driving their variation, we need to recognize how the structural characteristics vary in relation to spatial scale. This can be achieved by identifying scale-dependent features in forest structure within unmanaged forest landscapes. By identifying these features and examining their relationship with potential driving factors, we can better understand the dynamics of forest structural development. Here, we examine the spatial variation in forest structures at multiple spatial scales, utilizing data from old-growth boreal forests in two regions with contrasting disturbance regimes: northern Finland and north-eastern Québec, Canada ( 67° 45'N, 29° 36'E, 49° 39'N, 67° 55'W, respectively). The three landscapes (4 km2 each) in Finland are dominated by Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies, whereas the two landscapes in Québec are dominated by Abies balsamea and Picea mariana. Québec's forests are a subject to cyclic outbreaks of the eastern spruce budworm, causing extensive mortality especially in A. balsamea-dominated stands. In the Finnish landscapes, gap- to patch-scale disturbances due to tree senescence, fungi and wind, as well as infrequent surface fires in areas dominated by P. sylvestris, prevail. Owing to the differences in the species compositions and the disturbance regimes, we expect differing scales of variation between the landscapes. To quantify patterns of variation, we visually interpret stereopairs of recent aerial photographs. From the photographs, we collect information on forest canopy coverage, species composition and dead wood. For the interpretation, each 4 km2 plot is divided into 0.1ha square cells (4096 per plot). Interpretations are validated against field observations and compiled

  15. Survey: UPSTREAM SECTOR OIL AND NATURAL GAS MOST PROFITABLE IN CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Zuxi

    2006-01-01

    @@ The upstream sector of oil and natural gas industry becomes the most profitable industry in China in 2005, according to a survey released by the China's State Information Center in mid-February. The results of the study show that oil and natural gas mining made a profit of 292.7 billion yuan (about US$36 billion) made in the upstream sector of oil and gas industry, up 68 percent from 2004.

  16. Natural variation of male ornamental traits of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Namita; Hoffmann, Margarete; Dreyer, Christine

    2008-12-01

    Male ornamental traits of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, provide an outstanding example of natural variation in sex-linked male-advantageous traits that are shaped by both sexual and environmental selection. A substantial fraction of the underlying genes is known to be genetically linked to the sex-determining region on the differentiating Y-chromosome. Intercrosses between parental populations originating from geographically distant locations in East Trinidad and Cumaná (Venezuela) were used to study segregation of ornamental traits in male progeny. In addition, we performed backcrosses to compare segregation of ornaments in presence or absence of prominent traits linked to the Y-chromosome. Another backcross strategy involving XY females from the laboratory strain zebrinus maculatus allowed studying additive and dominant effects of alleles on two different Y-chromosomes on pattern formation. For genetic mapping, we have previously developed nuclear SNP markers linked to expressed genes, including several genes known to be important for pattern formation in other species. Of these candidate genes 15 were placed on 11 different linkage groups. Our phenotypic and genotypic analysis of progeny from mapping crosses and backcrosses suggests several genetic mechanisms that enhance natural variation, namely, additive effects of codominant alleles, suppressive actions of dominant alleles, and a complex interplay between sex-linked and autosomal cofactors.

  17. The genetic basis of natural variation in oenological traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Salinas

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main microorganism responsible for wine alcoholic fermentation. The oenological phenotypes resulting from fermentation, such as the production of acetic acid, glycerol, and residual sugar concentration are regulated by multiple genes and vary quantitatively between different strain backgrounds. With the aim of identifying the quantitative trait loci (QTLs that regulate oenological phenotypes, we performed linkage analysis using three crosses between highly diverged S. cerevisiae strains. Segregants from each cross were used as starter cultures for 20-day fermentations, in synthetic wine must, to simulate actual winemaking conditions. Linkage analysis on phenotypes of primary industrial importance resulted in the mapping of 18 QTLs. We tested 18 candidate genes, by reciprocal hemizygosity, for their contribution to the observed phenotypic variation, and validated five genes and the chromosome II right subtelomeric region. We observed that genes involved in mitochondrial metabolism, sugar transport, nitrogen metabolism, and the uncharacterized ORF YJR030W explained most of the phenotypic variation in oenological traits. Furthermore, we experimentally validated an exceptionally strong epistatic interaction resulting in high level of succinic acid between the Sake FLX1 allele and the Wine/European MDH2 allele. Overall, our work demonstrates the complex genetic basis underlying wine traits, including natural allelic variation, antagonistic linked QTLs and complex epistatic interactions between alleles from strains with different evolutionary histories.

  18. Variation in genomic methylation in natural populations of chinese white poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Kaifeng; Song, Yuepeng; Yang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyi; Zhang, Deqiang

    2013-01-01

    It is thought that methylcytosine can be inherited through meiosis and mitosis, and that epigenetic variation may be under genetic control or correlation may be caused by neutral drift. However, DNA methylation also varies with tissue, developmental stage, and environmental factors. Eliminating these factors, we analyzed the levels and patterns, diversity and structure of genomic methylcytosine in the xylem of nine natural populations of Chinese white poplar. On average, the relative total methylation and non-methylation levels were approximately 26.567% and 42.708% (Pdifferentiation (GST  = 0.159) were assessed by Shannon's diversity index. Co-inertia analysis indicated that methylation-sensitive polymorphism (MSP) and genomic methylation pattern (CG-CNG) profiles gave similar distributions. Using a between-group eigen analysis, we found that the Hebei and Shanxi populations were independent of each other, but the Henan population intersected with the other populations, to some degree. Genome methylation in Populus tomentosa presented tissue-specific characteristics and the relative 5'-CCGG methylation level was higher in xylem than in leaves. Meanwhile, the genome methylation in the xylem shows great epigenetic variation and could be fixed and inherited though mitosis. Compared to genetic structure, data suggest that epigenetic and genetic variation do not completely match.

  19. Extensive natural variation for cellular hydrogen peroxide release is genetically controlled.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homa Attar

    Full Text Available Natural variation in DNA sequence contributes to individual differences in quantitative traits. While multiple studies have shown genetic control over gene expression variation, few additional cellular traits have been investigated. Here, we investigated the natural variation of NADPH oxidase-dependent hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 release, which is the joint effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS production, superoxide metabolism and degradation, and is related to a number of human disorders. We assessed the normal variation of H(2O(2 release in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL in a family-based 3-generation cohort (CEPH-HapMap, and in 3 population-based cohorts (KORA, GenCord, HapMap. Substantial individual variation was observed, 45% of which were associated with heritability in the CEPH-HapMap cohort. We identified 2 genome-wide significant loci of Hsa12 and Hsa15 in genome-wide linkage analysis. Next, we performed genome-wide association study (GWAS for the combined KORA-GenCord cohorts (n = 279 using enhanced marker resolution by imputation (>1.4 million SNPs. We found 5 significant associations (p<5.00×10-8 and 54 suggestive associations (p<1.00×10-5, one of which confirmed the linked region on Hsa15. To replicate our findings, we performed GWAS using 58 HapMap individuals and ∼2.1 million SNPs. We identified 40 genome-wide significant and 302 suggestive SNPs, and confirmed genome signals on Hsa1, Hsa12, and Hsa15. Genetic loci within 900 kb from the known candidate gene p67phox on Hsa1 were identified in GWAS in both cohorts. We did not find replication of SNPs across all cohorts, but replication within the same genomic region. Finally, a highly significant decrease in H(2O(2 release was observed in Down Syndrome (DS individuals (p<2.88×10-12. Taken together, our results show strong evidence of genetic control of H(2O(2 in LCL of healthy and DS cohorts and suggest that cellular phenotypes, which themselves are also complex, may be

  20. Dust Abundance Variations in the Magellanic Clouds: Probing the Life-cycle of Metals with All-sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Bot, Caroline; Chastenet, Jeremy; Gordon, Karl

    2017-06-01

    Observations and modeling suggest that dust abundance (gas-to-dust ratio, G/D) depends on (surface) density. Variations of the G/D provide timescale constraints for the different processes involved in the life cycle of metals in galaxies. Recent G/D measurements based on Herschel data suggest a factor of 5-10 decrease in dust abundance between the dense and diffuse interstellar media (ISM) in the Magellanic Clouds. However, the relative nature of the Herschel measurements precludes definitive conclusions as to the magnitude of those variations. We investigate variations of the dust abundance in the LMC and SMC using all-sky far-infrared surveys, which do not suffer from the limitations of Herschel on their zero-point calibration. We stack the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at 100, 350, 550, and 850 microns from IRAS and Planck in intervals of gas surface density, model the stacked SEDs to derive the dust surface density, and constrain the relation between G/D and gas surface density in the range 10-100 M ⊙ pc-2 on ˜80 pc scales. We find that G/D decreases by factors of 3 (from 1500 to 500) in the LMC and 7 (from 1.5× {10}4 to 2000) in the SMC between the diffuse and dense ISM. The surface-density-dependence of G/D is consistent with elemental depletions, and with simple modeling of the accretion of gas-phase metals onto dust grains. This result has important implications for the sub-grid modeling of galaxy evolution, and for the calibration of dust-based gas-mass estimates, both locally and at high redshift.

  1. Inter-clinic variation in the chances of natural conception of subfertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjon-Kon-Fat, R I; Lar, D N; Steyerberg, E W; Broekmans, F J; Hompes, P; Mol, B W J; Steures, P; Bossuyt, P M M; van der Veen, F; van der Steeg, J W; Eijkemans, M J C

    2013-05-01

    Are there differences between clinics in the chances of natural conception of couples? We found significant differences between clinics in the couples' natural conception chances, which could not be explained by differences in characteristics of the patients or the clinics. In pooled data from multiple centers the synthesis prediction model for natural conception was found to be valid, yet the outcome of interest (i.e. natural conception) might differ between centers. Possible differences between clinics in natural conception rates, as well as the validity of the prediction model in each individual clinic are addressed in this paper. A secondary data-analysis of a prospective cohort study among 3020 subfertile couples recruited in 38 clinics in the Netherlands between January 2002 and December 2004. Clinics with less than 20 couples were excluded from the analyses, resulting in 21 clinics with 2916 couples. Inclusion of 2916 subfertile couples who underwent a basic fertility work-up. Couples were excluded who had a fertility disorder (one or two-sided tubal pathology, ovulation disorder, total motile sperm count post-coital test (P < 0.001). Adjusted hazard ratios and EB estimates ranged from 0.50 to 2.21 and 0.58 to 1.53, respectively. Among the 21 clinics, there were 4 university hospitals, 10 non-university hospitals with an ACU and 7 non-university hospitals without an ACU. In the multivariable analysis, the type of clinic was not significant (P = 0.11). Calibration gave an average intercept of -0.25 (95% range: -1.04-0.53) and average slope of 0.81 (95% range: 0.03-1.60). Six clinics had a negative intercept that differed significantly from zero and three clinics had a negative or positive slope that differed significantly from one. A more extensive model including more predictors could give less variation in the differences between the clinics. Variation in work-up protocol between clinics could also have played a role. In fertility prediction research the

  2. Variation in genomic methylation in natural populations of chinese white poplar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaifeng Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is thought that methylcytosine can be inherited through meiosis and mitosis, and that epigenetic variation may be under genetic control or correlation may be caused by neutral drift. However, DNA methylation also varies with tissue, developmental stage, and environmental factors. Eliminating these factors, we analyzed the levels and patterns, diversity and structure of genomic methylcytosine in the xylem of nine natural populations of Chinese white poplar. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: On average, the relative total methylation and non-methylation levels were approximately 26.567% and 42.708% (P<0.001, respectively. Also, the relative CNG methylation level was higher than the relative CG methylation level. The relative methylation/non-methylation levels were significantly different among the nine natural populations. Epigenetic diversity ranged from 0.811 (Gansu to 1.211 (Shaanxi, and the coefficients of epigenetic differentiation (GST  = 0.159 were assessed by Shannon's diversity index. Co-inertia analysis indicated that methylation-sensitive polymorphism (MSP and genomic methylation pattern (CG-CNG profiles gave similar distributions. Using a between-group eigen analysis, we found that the Hebei and Shanxi populations were independent of each other, but the Henan population intersected with the other populations, to some degree. CONCLUSIONS: Genome methylation in Populus tomentosa presented tissue-specific characteristics and the relative 5'-CCGG methylation level was higher in xylem than in leaves. Meanwhile, the genome methylation in the xylem shows great epigenetic variation and could be fixed and inherited though mitosis. Compared to genetic structure, data suggest that epigenetic and genetic variation do not completely match.

  3. Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for responsiveness to plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintermans, Paul C A; Bakker, Peter A H M; Pieterse, Corné M J

    2016-04-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r stimulates lateral root formation and increases shoot growth in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). These plant growth-stimulating effects are partly caused by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced by the bacterium. Here, we performed a genome-wide association (GWA) study on natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis for the ability to profit from rhizobacteria-mediated plant growth-promotion. To this end, 302 Arabidopsis accessions were tested for root architecture characteristics and shoot fresh weight in response to exposure to WCS417r. Although virtually all Arabidopsis accessions tested responded positively to WCS417r, there was a large variation between accessions in the increase in shoot fresh weight, the extra number of lateral roots formed, and the effect on primary root length. Correlation analyses revealed that the bacterially-mediated increase in shoot fresh weight is related to alterations in root architecture. GWA mapping for WCS417r-stimulated changes in root and shoot growth characteristics revealed 10 genetic loci highly associated with the responsiveness of Arabidopsis to the plant growth-promoting activity of WCS417r. Several of the underlying candidate genes have been implicated in important plant growth-related processes. These results demonstrate that plants possess natural genetic variation for the capacity to profit from the plant growth-promoting function of a beneficial rhizobacterium in their rhizosphere. This knowledge is a promising starting point for sustainable breeding strategies for future crops that are better able to maximize profitable functions from their root microbiome.

  4. Natural variation in expression of genes associated with carotenoid biosynthesis and accumulation in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several groups have reported on massive accumulation of total carotenoids in cassava storage root (CSR). Naturally occurring color variation associated with carotenoid accumulation was observed in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) storage root of landraces from Amazon. Here carotenoid profiles from...

  5. Natural variation in DNA methylation in ribosomal RNA genes of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Eric J

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA methylation is an important biochemical mark that silences repetitive sequences, such as transposons, and reinforces epigenetic gene expression states. An important class of repetitive genes under epigenetic control in eukaryotic genomes encodes ribosomal RNA (rRNA transcripts. The ribosomal genes coding for the 45S rRNA precursor of the three largest eukaryotic ribosomal RNAs (18S, 5.8S, and 25–28S are found in nucleolus organizer regions (NORs, comprised of hundreds to thousands of repeats, only some of which are expressed in any given cell. An epigenetic switch, mediated by DNA methylation and histone modification, turns rRNA genes on and off. However, little is known about the mechanisms that specify and maintain the patterns of NOR DNA methylation. Results Here, we explored the extent of naturally-occurring variation in NOR DNA methylation among accessions of the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. DNA methylation in coding regions of rRNA genes was positively correlated with copy number of 45S rRNA gene and DNA methylation in the intergenic spacer regions. We investigated the inheritance of NOR DNA methylation patterns in natural accessions with hypomethylated NORs in inter-strain crosses and defined three different categories of inheritance in F1 hybrids. In addition, subsequent analysis of F2 segregation for NOR DNA methylation patterns uncovered different patterns of inheritance. We also revealed that NOR DNA methylation in the Arabidopsis accession Bor-4 is influenced by the vim1-1 (variant in methylation 1-1 mutation, but the primary effect is specified by the NORs themselves. Conclusion Our results indicate that the NORs themselves are the most significant determinants of natural variation in NOR DNA methylation. However, the inheritance of NOR DNA methylation suggests the operation of a diverse set of mechanisms, including inheritance of parental methylation patterns, reconfiguration of parental NOR DNA

  6. Differentially expressed genes linked to natural variation in long-term memory formation in Cotesia parasitic wasps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vugt, van J.J.F.A.; Hoedjes, K.M.; Geest, van de H.C.; Schijlen, E.G.W.M.; Vet, L.E.M.; Smid, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Even though learning and memory are universal traits in the Animal Kingdom, closely related species reveal substantial variation in learning rate and memory dynamics. To determine the genetic background of this natural variation, we studied two congeneric parasitic wasp species, Cotesia glomerata

  7. Differentially expressed genes linked to natural variation in long-term memory formation in Cotesia parasitic wasps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Vugt, Joke J. F. A.; Hoedjes, Katja M.; Van de Geest, Henri C.; Schijlen, Elio W. G. M.; Vet, Louise E. M.; Smid, Hans M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Even though learning and memory are universal traits in the Animal Kingdom, closely related species reveal substantial variation in learning rate and memory dynamics. To determine the genetic background of this natural variation, we studied two congeneric parasitic wasp species, Cotesia

  8. Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    Suggestions for studying the topic of variation of individuals and objects (balls) to help develop elementary school students' measurement, comparison, classification, evaluation, and data collection and recording skills are made. General suggestions of variables that can be investigated are made for the study of human variation. Twelve specific…

  9. Variation at the transcriptional level among Chinese natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana in response to cold stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Fei; KANG JiuQing; ZHOU Xin; SU Zhen; QU LiJia; GU HongYa

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis 25K GeneChip (ATH1, Affymetrix) was used to make a survey of the variation of the transcriptional profiles among 5 Chinese natural populations of Arabidopsis thaliana under cold treatment. In normal growth condition, the expression level of 2.26% (513 genes in the population from Jiujiang, Jiangxi, JXjjx)to 6.52% (1482 genes in the population from Tongliang, Chongqing, CQtlx) genes was 2-fold higher than that of Col ecotype. Under cold treatment, the expression of 12.84% (2920 genes in the population from Chenggu, Shaanxi, SXcgx) to 19.46% (4426 genes in the population from Qinghe, Xinjiang, XJqhx) genes was up- or down-regulated by at least two-fold that of their controls. In general, most of up-regulated genes might be the genes essential for plant surviving at low temperature, such as genes in CBF pathway and the genes responsible for synthesizing molecules accumulated for cold tolerance. However, each natural population had some specific genes induced under cold treat-ment. The data indicated that some of the cold-responding genes were differentiated among the popu-lations distributed in the natural habitats with different climate conditions. CBF3, one of the key tran-scription factor genes in cold responding pathway, showed significant differences in expression among populations. The sequence analysis indicated that the changes in its regulation region caused the dramatic difference in the expression pattern. Further studies on the correlation of the function of the differentially expressed genes and the cold tolerance in different populations may provide some new insight into the molecular mechanism of adaptation to local environment in Arabidopsis thaliana in China.

  10. Transcriptome-wide mining of the differentially expressed transcripts for natural variation of floral organ size in Physalis philadelphica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Li, Zhichao; He, Chaoying

    2012-11-01

    Natural phenotypic variation, a result of genetic variation, developed during evolution in response to environmental selections. Physalis philadelphica, known as tomatillo in the Solanaceae, is rich in floral and post-floral organ size diversity. However, its genetic variation is unknown. Here P. philadelphica was classified into three groups with large, intermediate, and small reproductive organ size, and a positive correlation was observed between floral organ and berry sizes. Through cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses, 263 differentially expressed transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) were isolated from two accessions with different floral organ sizes. The genes encode various transcription factors, protein kinases, and enzymes, and they displayed multiple expression patterns during floral development, indicating a complexity in the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. Detailed expression analyses revealed that they were differentially expressed during floral and post-floral development, implying that they have roles in the development of flowers and fruits. Expression of three genes was further monitored in 26 accessions, and in particular the expression variation of Pp30, encoding an AP2-like transcription factor, correlates well with the observed phenotypic variations, which strongly supports an essential role for the gene in the natural variation of floral and post-floral organ size in Physalis. The results suggest that alteration in the expression pattern of a few key regulatory genes in the developmental process may be an important source of genetic variations that lead to natural variation in morphological traits.

  11. Natural variation and dosage of the HEI10 meiotic E3 ligase control Arabidopsis crossover recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziolkowski, Piotr A.; Underwood, Charles J.; Lambing, Christophe; Martinez-Garcia, Marina; Lawrence, Emma J.; Ziolkowska, Liliana; Griffin, Catherine; Choi, Kyuha; Franklin, F. Chris H.; Martienssen, Robert A.; Henderson, Ian R.

    2017-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes undergo crossover recombination, which creates genetic diversity and balances homolog segregation. Despite these critical functions, crossover frequency varies extensively within and between species. Although natural crossover recombination modifier loci have been detected in plants, causal genes have remained elusive. Using natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, we identified two major recombination quantitative trait loci (rQTLs) that explain 56.9% of crossover variation in Col×Ler F2 populations. We mapped rQTL1 to semidominant polymorphisms in HEI10, which encodes a conserved ubiquitin E3 ligase that regulates crossovers. Null hei10 mutants are haploinsufficient, and, using genome-wide mapping and immunocytology, we show that transformation of additional HEI10 copies is sufficient to more than double euchromatic crossovers. However, heterochromatic centromeres remained recombination-suppressed. The strongest HEI10-mediated crossover increases occur in subtelomeric euchromatin, which is reminiscent of sex differences in Arabidopsis recombination. Our work reveals that HEI10 naturally limits Arabidopsis crossovers and has the potential to influence the response to selection. PMID:28223312

  12. Genetic variation of natural and cultured stocks of Paralichthys olivaceus by allozyme and RAPD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Feng; ZHANG Peijun; WANG Keling; XIANG Jianhai

    2007-01-01

    Population genetics of the left-eyed flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, including natural and cultured stocks distributed in the coastal waters near Qingdao of eastern maritime China, was analyzed in allozyme and RAPD. The results showed that among total 29 gene loci of 15 isozymes, 9 and 7 were polymorphic in natural and cultured stocks, respectively. The status of genetic diversity in P olivaceus is low in terms of polymorphic loci in chi-square test and genetic departure index of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. More alleles in IDHP, CAT, GDH and Ldh-C allozymes were found in the fish, which could be used as markers in assortive breeding and distinguishing stock, population or species evolution. Total 88 and 86 RAPD bands ranging from 200 to 2 500 bp were recognized individually in average of 7.8-8.0 bands per primer. The genetic diversity in cultured stock is lower than that in natural ones showing an obviously decreasing genetic divergence. Therefore, effective countermeasures must be taken to protect genetic resources of marine cultured fishes. The 2 markers have their own pros and cons. Combining the 2 markers to investigate the genetic variation of populations is suggested. The results provide basic data of this flounder and they are useful for studying genetic improvement and genetic resources of the fish.

  13. AN EXHAUSTIVE SURVEY ON NATURE INSPIRED METAHEURISTIC ALGORITHMS FOR ENERGY OPTIMIZATION IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumitra Das

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Todays engineering research is highly motivated towards the nature inspired metaheuristic computational algorithm as they have the capability to give better results as compared to the conventional methods. Wireless Sensor Networks(WSNs have become increasingly popular due to their extensive array of applications. Desing of energy efficient routing algorithms is an important issue in the designing of WSNs applications as the lifetime of the sensor node is based on the limited battery powered devices. Therefore to maximize the lifetime of sensor node a comprehensive survey of energy efficient routing algorithms based on natural science have been addressed in this paper. The paper will take the readers into the detailed survey of existing energy optimized routing algorithms considering the natural science (metaheuristic as the base and considering parameters related to energy efficiency as the core objective. The final part of the paper discusses the limitations of various algorithms that has been addressed in this paper and suggestions to overcome them.

  14. Survey of Period Variations of Superhumps in SU UMa-Type Dwarf Novae

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Taichi; Uemura, Makoto; Nogami, Daisaku; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Ishioka, Ryoko; Baba, Hajime; Matsumoto, Katsura; Iwamatsu, Hidetoshi; Kubota, Kaori; Sugiyasu, Kei; Soejima, Yuichi; Moritani, Yuuki; Ohshima, Tomohito; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Junpei; Sasada, Mahito; Arai, Akira; Nakajima, Kazuhiro; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Tanabe, Kenji; Imamura, Kayuyoshi; Kunitomi, Nanae; Kunihiro, Kenji; Taguchi, Hiroki; Koizumi, Mitsuo; Yamada, Norimi; Nishi, Yuichi; Kida, Mayumi; Tanaka, Sawa; Ueoka, Rie; Yasui, Hideki; Maruoka, Koichi; Henden, Arne; Oksanen, Arto; Moilanen, Marko; Tikkanen, Petri; Aho, Mika; Monard, Berto; Itoh, Hiroshi; Dubovsky, Pavol A; Kudzej, Igor; Dancikova, Radka; Vanmunster, Tonny; Pietz, Jochen; Bolt, Greg; Boyd, David; Nelson, Peter; Krajci, Thomas; Cook, Lewis M; Torii, Ken'ichi; Starkey, Donn R; Shears, Jeremy; Jensen, Lasse-Teist; Masi, Gianluca; Novak, Rudolf; Hynek, Tomas; Kocian, Radek; Kral, Lukas; Kucakova, Hana; Kolasa, Marek; Stastny, Petr; Staels, Bart

    2009-01-01

    We systematically surveyed period variations of superhumps in SU UMa-type dwarf novae based on newly obtained data and past publications. In many systems, the evolution of superhump period are found to be composed of three distinct stages: early evolutionary stage with a longer superhump period, middle stage with systematically varying periods, final stage with a shorter, stable superhump period. During the middle stage, many systems with superhump periods less than 0.08 d show positive period derivatives. Contrary to the earlier claim, we found no clear evidence for variation of period derivatives between superoutburst of the same object. We present an interpretation that the lengthening of the superhump period is a result of outward propagation of the eccentricity wave and is limited by the radius near the tidal truncation. We interprete that late stage superhumps are rejuvenized excitation of 3:1 resonance when the superhumps in the outer disk is effectively quenched. Many of WZ Sge-type dwarf novae showed...

  15. Variations in breast tangent radiotherapy: a survey of practice in New South Wales and the Australian Capital Territory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veness, M.J.; Delaney, G.; Berry, M. [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, NSW (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1999-08-01

    The breast is a complex anatomical structure where achieving a homogeneous dose distribution with radiation treatment is difficult. Despite obvious similarities in the approach to such treatment (using tangents) there is variation in the process of simulation, planning and treatment between radiation oncologists. Previous Australasian studies in the treatment of lung cancer, prostate cancer and Hodgkin`s disease highlighted considerable variation in many areas of treatment. As part of a multicentre breast phantom study involving 10 radiation oncology departments throughout New South Wales (NSW) and the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), a 22-question survey was distributed. The aim of the survey was to assess the extent of variation in the approach to the simulation, planning and treatment of early breast cancer using tangents. Responses from 10 different radiation oncology departments revealed variation in most areas of the survey. There is no reason to assume similar variations do not occur Australasia wide. Studies involving overseas radiation oncologists also reveal a wide variation in treating early breast cancer. The consequences of such variations remain unclear. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 15 refs., 1 tab.

  16. The Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey. I. Substantial variation in the diffuse stellar halos around spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Merritt, Allison; Abraham, Roberto; Zhang, Jielai

    2016-01-01

    Galaxies are thought to grow through accretion; as less massive galaxies are disrupted and merge over time, their debris results in diffuse, clumpy stellar halos enveloping the central galaxy. Here we present a study of the variation in the stellar halos of galaxies, using data from the Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey (DNGS). The survey consists of wide field, deep ($\\mu_{g} > 31$ mag arcsec$^{-2}$) optical imaging of nearby galaxies using the Dragonfly Telephoto Array. Our sample includes eight spiral galaxies with stellar masses similar to that of the Milky Way, inclinations of $16-90$ degrees and distances between $7-18$ Mpc. We construct stellar mass surface density profiles from the observed $g$-band surface brightness in combination with the $g-r$ color as a function of radius, and compute the halo fractions from the excess stellar mass (relative to a disk$+$bulge fit) beyond $5$ half-mass radii. We find a mean halo fraction of $0.009 \\pm 0.005$ and a large RMS scatter of $1.01^{+0.9}_{-0.26}$ dex. The...

  17. Natural strain variation and antibody neutralization of dengue serotype 3 viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahala M P B Wahala

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viruses (DENVs are emerging, mosquito-borne flaviviruses which cause dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever. The DENV complex consists of 4 serotypes designated DENV1-DENV4. Following natural infection with DENV, individuals develop serotype specific, neutralizing antibody responses. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been used to map neutralizing epitopes on dengue and other flaviviruses. Most serotype-specific, neutralizing MAbs bind to the lateral ridge of domain III of E protein (EDIII. It has been widely assumed that the EDIII lateral ridge epitope is conserved within each DENV serotype and a good target for vaccines. Using phylogenetic methods, we compared the amino acid sequence of 175 E proteins representing the different genotypes of DENV3 and identified a panel of surface exposed amino acids, including residues in EDIII, that are highly variant across the four DENV3 genotypes. The variable amino acids include six residues at the lateral ridge of EDIII. We used a panel of DENV3 mouse MAbs to assess the functional significance of naturally occurring amino acid variation. From the panel of antibodies, we identified three neutralizing MAbs that bound to EDIII of DENV3. Recombinant proteins and naturally occurring variant viruses were used to map the binding sites of the three MAbs. The three MAbs bound to overlapping but distinct epitopes on EDIII. Our empirical studies clearly demonstrate that the antibody binding and neutralization capacity of two MAbs was strongly influenced by naturally occurring mutations in DENV3. Our data demonstrate that the lateral ridge "type specific" epitope is not conserved between strains of DENV3. This variability should be considered when designing and evaluating DENV vaccines, especially those targeting EDIII.

  18. Optimal fishery management accounting for variation in natural mortality: the Baltic sprat and herring case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Rudi; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Quaas, Martin F.

    2010-01-01

    possible, we adopt an economic objective function (present value of resource rents) and determine optimal management. In the Baltic Sea, mortality rates of sprat and young herring are strongly influenced by adult cod stock dynamics via predation. Furthermore, both clupeid stocks show temperature......–recruitment function. By applying the age‐structured ecological–economic model, we derive the optimal management strategy in terms of net present value of resource rents. We compare the relative importance of both processes (i.e. temperature increase via global change and variation in predation pressure via management......Economic–ecological modelling has received increasing attention in the effort to achieve sustainable fisheries. So far, mainly single‐species models have been used, which do not account for species interaction and/or climate change. However, both of these processes alter the associated natural...

  19. Duality-based domain decomposition with natural coarse-space for variational inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, Zdenek; Neto, Francisco A. M. Gomes; Santos, Sandra A.

    2000-12-01

    An efficient non-overlapping domain decomposition algorithm of Neumann-Neumann type for solving variational inequalities arising from the elliptic boundary value problems with inequality boundary conditions has been presented. The discretized problem is first turned by the duality theory of convex programming into a quadratic programming problem with bound and equality constraints and the latter is further modified by means of orthogonal projectors to the natural coarse space introduced recently by Farhat and Roux. The resulting problem is then solved by an augmented Lagrangian type algorithm with an outer loop for the Lagrange multipliers for the equality constraints and an inner loop for the solution of the bound constrained quadratic programming problems. The projectors are shown to guarantee an optimal rate of convergence of iterative solution of auxiliary linear problems. Reported theoretical results and numerical experiments indicate high numerical and parallel scalability of the algorithm.

  20. Genetic variation detected by RAPD markers in natural populations of babassu palm (Attalea speciosa Mart.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M F; Damasceno-Silva, K J; Carvalhaes, M A; Lima, P S C

    2015-06-10

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of management on the genetic structure of natural populations of Attalea speciosa in the State of Piauí, Brazil, using random-amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Three babassu populations under different management systems were selected. Polymerase chain reactions were performed for 20 RAPD primers. A total of 146 bands were generated, 141 of which were polymorphic (96.58%), with a variation of 4 and 12 loci and an average of 7 bands per primer. A dendrogram revealed a clear separation between the three populations (0.57). Data reliability and node consistency were verified by bootstrap values and the cophenetic correlation coefficient (88.15%). Coefficients of similarity between pairs of genotypes ranged from 0.26 to 0.86, with a mean of 0.57. Nei's genetic diversity index (HE) value of the population sampled in Teresina was 0.212, of Esperantina it was 0.195, and of José de Freitas it was 0.207. After the HE was decomposed, the complete diversity was found to be 0.3213. Genetic differentiation between populations was 0.362, and the estimation of gene flow between populations was low (0.879). Analysis of molecular variance revealed that 59.52% of the variation was contained within populations, and 40.48% was between populations. RAPD markers were effective for genetic diversity analysis within and between natural babassu populations, and exhibited a high level of polymorphism. Genetic diversity was the highest within populations; variability was lower in the managed populations than in the undisturbed populations.

  1. Natural variation in genome architecture among 205 Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Massouras, Andreas; Inoue, Yutaka; Peiffer, Jason; Ràmia, Miquel; Tarone, Aaron M; Turlapati, Lavanya; Zichner, Thomas; Zhu, Dianhui; Lyman, Richard F; Magwire, Michael M; Blankenburg, Kerstin; Carbone, Mary Anna; Chang, Kyle; Ellis, Lisa L; Fernandez, Sonia; Han, Yi; Highnam, Gareth; Hjelmen, Carl E; Jack, John R; Javaid, Mehwish; Jayaseelan, Joy; Kalra, Divya; Lee, Sandy; Lewis, Lora; Munidasa, Mala; Ongeri, Fiona; Patel, Shohba; Perales, Lora; Perez, Agapito; Pu, LingLing; Rollmann, Stephanie M; Ruth, Robert; Saada, Nehad; Warner, Crystal; Williams, Aneisa; Wu, Yuan-Qing; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Zhang, Yiqing; Zhu, Yiming; Anholt, Robert R H; Korbel, Jan O; Mittelman, David; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Barbadilla, Antonio; Johnston, J Spencer; Stone, Eric A; Richards, Stephen; Deplancke, Bart; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2014-07-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a community resource of 205 sequenced inbred lines, derived to improve our understanding of the effects of naturally occurring genetic variation on molecular and organismal phenotypes. We used an integrated genotyping strategy to identify 4,853,802 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 1,296,080 non-SNP variants. Our molecular population genomic analyses show higher deletion than insertion mutation rates and stronger purifying selection on deletions. Weaker selection on insertions than deletions is consistent with our observed distribution of genome size determined by flow cytometry, which is skewed toward larger genomes. Insertion/deletion and single nucleotide polymorphisms are positively correlated with each other and with local recombination, suggesting that their nonrandom distributions are due to hitchhiking and background selection. Our cytogenetic analysis identified 16 polymorphic inversions in the DGRP. Common inverted and standard karyotypes are genetically divergent and account for most of the variation in relatedness among the DGRP lines. Intriguingly, variation in genome size and many quantitative traits are significantly associated with inversions. Approximately 50% of the DGRP lines are infected with Wolbachia, and four lines have germline insertions of Wolbachia sequences, but effects of Wolbachia infection on quantitative traits are rarely significant. The DGRP complements ongoing efforts to functionally annotate the Drosophila genome. Indeed, 15% of all D. melanogaster genes segregate for potentially damaged proteins in the DGRP, and genome-wide analyses of quantitative traits identify novel candidate genes. The DGRP lines, sequence data, genotypes, quality scores, phenotypes, and analysis and visualization tools are publicly available.

  2. A Photoreceptor Contributes to the Natural Variation of Diapause Induction in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Anne C; Bourgeois, Yann; Stiefel, Urs; Walser, Jean-Claude; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    Diapause is an adaptation that allows organisms to survive harsh environmental conditions. In species occurring over broad habitat ranges, both the timing and the intensity of diapause induction can vary across populations, revealing patterns of local adaptation. Understanding the genetic architecture of this fitness-related trait would help clarify how populations adapt to their local environments. In the cyclical parthenogenetic crustacean Daphnia magna, diapause induction is a phenotypic plastic life history trait linked to sexual reproduction, as asexual females have the ability to switch to sexual reproduction and produce resting stages, their sole strategy for surviving habitat deterioration. We have previously shown that the induction of resting stage production correlates with changes in photoperiod that indicate the imminence of habitat deterioration and have identified a Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) responsible for some of the variation in the induction of resting stages. Here, new data allows us to anchor the QTL to a large scaffold and then, using a combination of a new mapping panel, targeted association mapping and selection analysis in natural populations, to identify candidate genes within the QTL. Our results show that variation in a rhodopsin photoreceptor gene plays a significant role in the variation observed in resting stage induction. This finding provides a mechanistic explanation for the link between diapause and day-length perception that has been suggested in diverse arthropod taxa. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Micro-geographic variation of inversions in natural populations of Drosophila pseudoobscura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salceda Víctor M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal polymorphism for the third chromosome in Drosophila pseudoobscura has been widely studied for genetic variation in different environments or locations far apart. However, there is less information regarding sites geographically near one another. Targeting on possible micro-geographic variation in the species, a serial study was done on 12 Mexican populations grouped in four regions, including locations in Durango (DU, the border area of Guanajuato-San Luis Potosi states (GP, Chiapas (CH and Saldilo (SA. Flies were trapped in their natural habitats using fermenting bananas as bait. They were individually cultivated in the laboratory for larvae production. In a given population sample several flies were cultivated together but only one larva per culture provided salivary tissue to observe polytene chromosomes. Gene arrangements or inversions were identified and frequencies were calculated. A total of 767 third chromosomes were studied and 11 different inversions detected. The type and relative frequencies of the arrangements varied among regions. From the 11 inversions observed, 10 were found in Durango, five in Guanajuato-San Luis Potosi and Chiapas, and eight in Saltillo. The inversion frequencies in the Durango locations varied in four cases, but only one in Chiapas, three cases in Guanajuato-San Luis Potosi, and five in Saltillo. It was also observed that there were geographical gradients for inversions within regions as follows: four arrangements in Saltillo and Durango, three in Guanajuato-San Luis Potosí and one in Chiapas. Moreover, all four regions studied showed evidences for micro-geographical variation. Nevertheless, more studies are needed to elucidate the relevance of the inversion frequencies changes in neighboring populations and also any seasonal-annual frequencies observed in the locations studied here.

  4. Natural variation and gene regulatory basis for the responses of asparagus beans to soil drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei eXu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Asparagus bean (Vigna unguiculata ssp. sesquipedalis is the Asian subspecies of cowpea, a drought-resistant legume crop native to Africa. In order to explore the genetic variation of drought responses in asparagus bean, we conducted multi-year phenotyping of drought resistance traits across the Chinese asparagus bean mini-core. The phenotypic distribution indicated that the ssp. sesquipedalis subgene pool has maintained high natural variation in drought responses despite known domestic bottleneck. Thirty-nine SNP loci were found to show an association with drought resistance via a genome-wide association study (GWAS. Whole-plant water relations were compared among four genotypes by lysimetric assay. Apparent genotypic differences in transpiration patterns and the critical soil water threshold in relation to dehydration avoidance were observed, indicating a delicate adaptive mechanism for each genotype to its own climate. Microarray gene expression analyses revealed that known drought resistance pathways such as the ABA and phosphate lipid signaling pathways are conserved between genotypes, while differential regulation of certain aquaporin genes and hormonal genes may be important for the genotypic differences. Our results suggest that divergent sensitivity to soil water content is an important mechanism configuring the genotypic specific responses to water deficit. The SNP markers identified provide useful resources for marker-assisted breeding.

  5. Nucleotide variation at the dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) gene in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrey Tatarenkov; Francisco J. Ayala

    2007-08-01

    We studied nucleotide sequence variation at the gene coding for dopa decarboxylase (Ddc) in seven populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Strength and pattern of linkage disequilibrium are somewhat distinct in the extensively sampled Spanish and Raleigh populations. In the Spanish population, a few sites are in strong positive association, whereas a large number of sites in the Raleigh population are associated nonrandomly but the association is not strong. Linkage disequilibrium analysis shows presence of two groups of haplotypes in the populations, each of which is fairly diverged, suggesting epistasis or inversion polymorphism. There is evidence of two forms of natural selection acting on Ddc. The McDonald–Kreitman test indicates a deficit of fixed amino acid differences between D. melanogaster and D. simulans, which may be due to negative selection. An excess of derived alleles at high frequency, significant according to the -test, is consistent with the effect of hitchhiking. The hitchhiking may have been caused by directional selection downstream of the locus studied, as suggested by a gradual decrease of the polymorphism-to-divergence ratio. Altogether, the Ddc locus exhibits a complicated pattern of variation apparently due to several evolutionary forces. Such a complex pattern may be a result of an unusually high density of functionally important genes.

  6. WormQTL--public archive and analysis web portal for natural variation data in Caenorhabditis spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, L Basten; Van der Velde, K Joeri; Arends, Danny; Li, Yang; Beyer, Antje; Elvin, Mark; Fisher, Jasmin; Hajnal, Alex; Hengartner, Michael O; Poulin, Gino B; Rodriguez, Miriam; Schmid, Tobias; Schrimpf, Sabine; Xue, Feng; Jansen, Ritsert C; Kammenga, Jan E; Swertz, Morris A

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present WormQTL (http://www.wormqtl.org), an easily accessible database enabling search, comparative analysis and meta-analysis of all data on variation in Caenorhabditis spp. Over the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has become instrumental for molecular quantitative genetics and the systems biology of natural variation. These efforts have resulted in a valuable amount of phenotypic, high-throughput molecular and genotypic data across different developmental worm stages and environments in hundreds of C. elegans strains. WormQTL provides a workbench of analysis tools for genotype-phenotype linkage and association mapping based on but not limited to R/qtl (http://www.rqtl.org). All data can be uploaded and downloaded using simple delimited text or Excel formats and are accessible via a public web user interface for biologists and R statistic and web service interfaces for bioinformaticians, based on open source MOLGENIS and xQTL workbench software. WormQTL welcomes data submissions from other worm researchers.

  7. Population size, habitat fragmentation, and the nature of adaptive variation in a stream fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Dylan J; Debes, Paul V; Bernatchez, Louis; Hutchings, Jeffrey A

    2014-09-07

    Whether and how habitat fragmentation and population size jointly affect adaptive genetic variation and adaptive population differentiation are largely unexplored. Owing to pronounced genetic drift, small, fragmented populations are thought to exhibit reduced adaptive genetic variation relative to large populations. Yet fragmentation is known to increase variability within and among habitats as population size decreases. Such variability might instead favour the maintenance of adaptive polymorphisms and/or generate more variability in adaptive differentiation at smaller population size. We investigated these alternative hypotheses by analysing coding-gene, single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with different biological functions in fragmented brook trout populations of variable sizes. Putative adaptive differentiation was greater between small and large populations or among small populations than among large populations. These trends were stronger for genetic population size measures than demographic ones and were present despite pronounced drift in small populations. Our results suggest that fragmentation affects natural selection and that the changes elicited in the adaptive genetic composition and differentiation of fragmented populations vary with population size. By generating more variable evolutionary responses, the alteration of selective pressures during habitat fragmentation may affect future population persistence independently of, and perhaps long before, the effects of demographic and genetic stochasticity are manifest. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of a Miniaturized and Portable Methane Analyzer for Natural Gas Leak Walking Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Y. W.; Leen, J. B.; Gupta, M.; Baer, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    Traditional natural gas leak walking surveys have been conducted with devices that are based on technologies such as flame ionization detector (FID), IR-based spectrometer and IR camera. The sensitivity is typically on the ppm level. The low sensitivity means the device cannot pick up leaks far from it, and more time is spent surveying the area before pinpointing the leak location. A miniaturized methane analyzer has been developed to significantly improve the sensitivity of the device used in walking surveys to detect natural gas leaks at greater distance. ABB/LGR's patented Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) is utilized to offer rugged and highly sensitive methane detection in a portable package. The miniaturized package weighs 13.5 lb, with a 4-hour rechargeable battery inside. The precision of the analyzer for methane is 2 ppb at 1 second. The analyzer operates at 10 Hz and its flow response time is 3 seconds for measurements through a 1-meter long sampling wand to registering on the data stream. The data can be viewed in real-time on a tablet or a smartphone. The compact and simplified package of the methane analyzer allows for more efficient walking surveys. It also allows for other applications that require low-power, low-weight and a portable package. We present data from walking surveys to demonstrate its ability to detect methane leaks.

  9. Nature as the Most Important Coping Strategy Among Cancer Patients: A Swedish Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Fereshteh; Ahmadi, Nader

    2015-08-01

    The authors have conducted a quantitative survey to examine the extent to which the results obtained in a qualitative study among cancer patients in Sweden (Ahmadi, Culture, religion and spirituality in coping: The example of cancer patients in Sweden, Uppsala, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2006) are applicable to a wider population of cancer patients in this country. In addition to questions relating to the former qualitative study, this survey also references the RCOPE questionnaire (designed by Kenneth I Pargament) in the design of the new quantitative study. In this study, questionnaires were distributed among persons diagnosed with cancer; 2,355 people responded. The results show that nature has been the most important coping method among cancer patients in Sweden. The highest mean value (2.9) is the factor 'nature has been an important resource to you so that you could deal with your illnesses'. Two out of three respondents (68 %) affirm that this method helped them feel significantly better during or after illness. The second highest average (2.8) is the factor 'listening to 'natural music' (birdsong and the wind)'. Two out of three respondents (66 %) answered that this coping method significantly helped them feel better during illness. The third highest average (2.7) is the factor 'to walk or engage in any activity outdoors gives you a spiritual sense'. This survey concerning the role of nature as the most important coping method for cancer patients confirms the result obtained from the previous qualitative studies.

  10. 1995 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-25

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys performed at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) from January through December of 1995 as compared with results from previous years. These surveys were performed as part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and describing fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in species using RFETS. The NRPCP provides support to the Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as Natural Resource Trustee, and provides data essential to accomplishing the goal of preserving the unique ecological values of RFETS in keeping with the Rocky Flats Vision presented in the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement Public Comment Draft. Wildlife population densities vary due to natural pressures and human influences, and only long-term monitoring can verify which factors influencing wildlife populations are the consequence of natural fluctuations, and which are due to human influences. The wildlife monitoring described in this report provides qualitative data that give an indication of the ecological health of RFETS. Monitoring numbers, habitat affinities, and apparent health of the wildlife populations makes it possible to evaluate the overall ecological health of the site. Monitoring and surveys such as those carried out by the NRPCP can indicate trends of this sort, and act as an {open_quotes}early warning system{close_quotes} for impending ecological problems.

  11. HIV-1 Tat and Viral Latency: What We Can Learn from Naturally Occurring Sequence Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamori, Doreen; Ueno, Takamasa

    2017-01-01

    Despite the effective use of antiretroviral therapy, the remainder of a latently HIV-1-infected reservoir mainly in the resting memory CD4+ T lymphocyte subset has provided a great setback toward viral eradication. While host transcriptional silencing machinery is thought to play a dominant role in HIV-1 latency, HIV-1 protein such as Tat, may affect both the establishment and the reversal of latency. Indeed, mutational studies have demonstrated that insufficient Tat transactivation activity can result in impaired transcription of viral genes and the establishment of latency in cell culture experiments. Because Tat protein is one of highly variable proteins within HIV-1 proteome, it is conceivable that naturally occurring Tat mutations may differentially modulate Tat functions, thereby influencing the establishment and/or the reversal of viral latency in vivo. In this mini review, we summarize the recent findings of Tat naturally occurring polymorphisms associating with host immune responses and we highlight the implication of Tat sequence variations in relation to HIV latency.

  12. The Expanding Family of Natural Anion Channelrhodopsins Reveals Large Variations in Kinetics, Conductance, and Spectral Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govorunova, Elena G.; Sineshchekov, Oleg A.; Rodarte, Elsa M.; Janz, Roger; Morelle, Olivier; Melkonian, Michael; Wong, Gane K.-S.; Spudich, John L.

    2017-01-01

    Natural anion channelrhodopsins (ACRs) discovered in the cryptophyte alga Guillardia theta generate large hyperpolarizing currents at membrane potentials above the Nernst equilibrium potential for Cl− and thus can be used as efficient inhibitory tools for optogenetics. We have identified and characterized new ACR homologs in different cryptophyte species, showing that all of them are anion-selective, and thus expanded this protein family to 20 functionally confirmed members. Sequence comparison of natural ACRs and engineered Cl−-conducting mutants of cation channelrhodopsins (CCRs) showed radical differences in their anion selectivity filters. In particular, the Glu90 residue in channelrhodopsin 2, which needed to be mutated to a neutral or alkaline residue to confer anion selectivity to CCRs, is nevertheless conserved in all of the ACRs identified. The new ACRs showed a large variation of the amplitude, kinetics, and spectral sensitivity of their photocurrents. A notable variant, designated “ZipACR”, is particularly promising for inhibitory optogenetics because of its combination of larger current amplitudes than those of previously reported ACRs and an unprecedentedly fast conductance cycle (current half-decay time 2–4 ms depending on voltage). ZipACR expressed in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons enabled precise photoinhibition of individual spikes in trains of up to 50 Hz frequency. PMID:28256618

  13. Variation in performance of surfactant loading and resulting nitrate removal among four selected natural zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huade; Bestland, Erick; Zhu, Chuanyu; Zhu, Honglin; Albertsdottir, Dora; Hutson, John; Simmons, Craig T; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Tao, Xian; Ellis, Amanda V

    2010-11-15

    Surfactant modified zeolites (SMZs) have the capacity to target various types of water contaminants at relatively low cost and thus are being increasingly considered for use in improving water quality. It is important to know the surfactant loading performance of a zeolite before it is put into application. In this work we compare the loading capacity of a surfactant, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (HDTMA-Br), onto four natural zeolites obtained from specific locations in the USA, Croatia, China, and Australia. The surfactant loading is examined using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. We then compare the resulting SMZs performance in removing nitrate from water. Results show that TGA is useful to determine the HDTMA loading capacity on natural zeolites. It is also useful to distinguish between a HDTMA bi-layer and a HDTMA mono-layer on the SMZ surface, which has not been previously reported in the literature. TGA results infer that HDTMA (bi-layer) loading decreases in the order of US zeolite>Croatian zeolite>Chinese zeolite>Australian zeolite. This order of loading explains variation in performance of nitrate removal between the four SMZs. The SMZs remove 8-18 times more nitrate than the raw zeolites. SMZs prepared from the selected US and Croatian zeolites were more efficient in nitrate removal than the two zeolites commercially obtained from Australia and China.

  14. Natural variation in petal color in Lycoris longituba revealed by anthocyanin components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qiuling; Shen, Ye; Wang, Mingxiu; Huang, Minren; Yang, Ruizhen; Zhu, Shuijin; Wang, Liangsheng; Xu, Yanjun; Wu, Rongling

    2011-01-01

    Lycoris longituba is one of the species belonging to the Amaryllidaceae family. Despite its limited distribution, endemic to central eastern China, this species displays an exceptionally wide diversity of flower colors from purple, red, orange, to yellow, in nature. We study the natural variation of floral color in L. longituba by testing the components of water-soluble vacuolar pigments--anthocyanins--in its petals using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Four anthocyanins were identified, cyanidin-3-sophoroside (Cy3So), cyanidin-3-xylosylglucoside (Cy3XyGlc), cyanidin-3-sambubioside (Cy3Sa), and pelargonidin-3-xylosylglucoside (Pg3XyGlc), which occur at various amounts in L. longituba petals of different colors. A multivariate analysis was used to explore the relationship between pigments and flower color. Anthocyanins have been thought to play a major role in acting as a UV screen that protects the plant's DNA from sunlight damage and attracting insects for the purpose of pollination. Thus, knowledge about the content and type of anthocyanins determining the petal coloration of Lycoris longituba will help to study the adaptive evolution of flowers and provide useful information for the ornamental breeding of this species.

  15. Neutrons reveal how nature uses structural themes and variation in biological regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trewhella, Jill [School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences, University of Sydney, Sydney 2006 (Australia)]. E-mail: jtrewhella@usyd.edu.au

    2006-11-15

    Healthy cellular function requires tight regulation of a multitude of bio-molecular interactions and processes, often in response to external stimuli. In achieving this regulation, nature uses a number of 'second messengers' that are released inside cells in response to first messengers, such as hormones that bind to the cell surface. Divalent calcium and cyclic nucleotides, like cAMP, are among nature's second messengers that bind to receptor proteins inside cells order to regulate the activities of various targets, including many protein kinases. Kinases are enzymes that catalyze the attachment of phosphate groups to proteins in order to modulate their functions. We have been using neutron contrast variation and small-angle solution scattering to study the interactions of the second messenger receptor proteins and their regulatory targets in order to understand the structural basis for these complex processes that use a number of common structural motifs to accomplish highly regulated function. Our most recent work has focused on the different isoforms of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the muscle regulatory complex troponin.

  16. Natural variation in petal color in Lycoris longituba revealed by anthocyanin components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuling He

    Full Text Available Lycoris longituba is one of the species belonging to the Amaryllidaceae family. Despite its limited distribution, endemic to central eastern China, this species displays an exceptionally wide diversity of flower colors from purple, red, orange, to yellow, in nature. We study the natural variation of floral color in L. longituba by testing the components of water-soluble vacuolar pigments--anthocyanins--in its petals using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Four anthocyanins were identified, cyanidin-3-sophoroside (Cy3So, cyanidin-3-xylosylglucoside (Cy3XyGlc, cyanidin-3-sambubioside (Cy3Sa, and pelargonidin-3-xylosylglucoside (Pg3XyGlc, which occur at various amounts in L. longituba petals of different colors. A multivariate analysis was used to explore the relationship between pigments and flower color. Anthocyanins have been thought to play a major role in acting as a UV screen that protects the plant's DNA from sunlight damage and attracting insects for the purpose of pollination. Thus, knowledge about the content and type of anthocyanins determining the petal coloration of Lycoris longituba will help to study the adaptive evolution of flowers and provide useful information for the ornamental breeding of this species.

  17. Survey of marine natural product structure revisions: a synergy of spectroscopy and chemical synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Takashi L; Gerwick, William H; McPhail, Kerry L

    2011-11-15

    The structural assignment of new natural product molecules supports research in a multitude of disciplines that may lead to new therapeutic agents and or new understanding of disease biology. However, reports of numerous structural revisions, even of recently elucidated natural products, inspired the present survey of techniques used in structural misassignments and subsequent revisions in the context of constitutional or configurational errors. Given the comparatively recent development of marine natural products chemistry, coincident with modern spectroscopy, it is of interest to consider the relative roles of spectroscopy and chemical synthesis in the structure elucidation and revision of those marine natural products that were initially misassigned. Thus, a tabulated review of all marine natural product structural revisions from 2005 to 2010 is organized according to structural motif revised. Misassignments of constitution are more frequent than perhaps anticipated by reliance on HMBC and other advanced NMR experiments, especially when considering the full complement of all natural products. However, these techniques also feature prominently in structural revisions, specifically of marine natural products. Nevertheless, as is the case for revision of relative and absolute configuration, total synthesis is a proven partner for marine, as well as terrestrial, natural products structure elucidation. It also becomes apparent that considerable 'detective work' remains in structure elucidation, in spite of the spectacular advances in spectroscopic techniques.

  18. Natural variation of piRNA expression affects immunity to transposable elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radion, Elizaveta; Mironova, Anastasia; Akulenko, Natalia; Abramov, Yuri; Morgunova, Valeriya; Kordyukova, Maria Y.; Olovnikov, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    In the Drosophila germline, transposable elements (TEs) are silenced by PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) that originate from distinct genomic regions termed piRNA clusters and are processed by PIWI-subfamily Argonaute proteins. Here, we explore the variation in the ability to restrain an alien TE in different Drosophila strains. The I-element is a retrotransposon involved in the phenomenon of I-R hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila melanogaster. Genomes of R strains do not contain active I-elements, but harbour remnants of ancestral I-related elements. The permissivity to I-element activity of R females, called reactivity, varies considerably in natural R populations, indicating the existence of a strong natural polymorphism in defense systems targeting transposons. To reveal the nature of such polymorphisms, we compared ovarian small RNAs between R strains with low and high reactivity and show that reactivity negatively correlates with the ancestral I-element-specific piRNA content. Analysis of piRNA clusters containing remnants of I-elements shows increased expression of the piRNA precursors and enrichment by the Heterochromatin Protein 1 homolog, Rhino, in weak R strains, which is in accordance with stronger piRNA expression by these regions. To explore the nature of the differences in piRNA production, we focused on two R strains, weak and strong, and showed that the efficiency of maternal inheritance of piRNAs as well as the I-element copy number are very similar in both strains. At the same time, germline and somatic uni-strand piRNA clusters generate more piRNAs in strains with low reactivity, suggesting the relationship between the efficiency of primary piRNA production and variable response to TE invasions. The strength of adaptive genome defense is likely driven by naturally occurring polymorphisms in the rapidly evolving piRNA pathway proteins. We hypothesize that hyper-efficient piRNA production is contributing to elimination of a telomeric retrotransposon He

  19. Mobile natural gas leak surveys indicate that two utilities have high false negative rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Fischer, J. C.; Brewer, P. E.; Chamberlain, S.; Gaylord, A.; von Fischer, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the distribution systems that carry natural gas to consumers, leaks need to be discovered for safety reasons and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. However, few utilities have adopted newer laser-based technologies that have greater sensitivity and precision, and instead rely on "industry standard" equipment that is far less sensitive. In partnership with the Environmental Defense Fund and Google, we mapped natural gas leaks in the domains of two anonymous utilities (Utility "A" and "B") using high sensitivity Picarro methane analyzers in Google Street View Cars. Surprisingly, when we shared these results with utilities, their survey crews were unable to find most of the leaks that our survey indicated (84% in A and 80% in B). To investigate this phenomenon, our team visited a subset of the leaks in each utility domain (n=32 in A and n=30 in B), and worked alongside utility surveyors to search the leak indication area, using a Los Gatos Research ultraportable methane analyzer to pinpoint leak locations. We found evidence of natural gas leaks at 69% and 68% of the locations in Utilities A and B respectively where survey crews had found nothing. We describe this as a "false negative" rate for the utility because the utility survey falsely indicated that there was no leak at these locations. Of these false negatives, 7% (n=2 of 32 in A, n=2 of 30 in B) were determined to be Grade 1 leaks requiring immediate repair due to high safety risk. Instrument sensitivity appears to explain some of the false negative rates. In particular, use of some industry standard equipment appears to have created a false sense of confidence among utility surveyors that leaks were not present. However, there was also evidence of communication failures and that surveyors did not use optimal approaches in their search. Based on these findings, we suggest that: 1) mobile deployment of high-precision methane analyzers can help find more natural gas leaks, and 2) use of some hand-held survey

  20. USE OF NATURAL WATERS AS U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY REFERENCE SAMPLES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzer, Victor J.

    1985-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey conducts research and collects hydrologic data relating to the Nation's water resources. Seven types of natural matrix reference water samples are prepared for use in the Survey's quality assurance program. These include samples containing major constituents, trace metals, nutrients, herbicides, insecticides, trace metals in a water and suspended-sediment mixture, and precipitation (snowmelt). To prepare these reference samples, natural water is collected in plastic drums and the sediment is allowed to settle. The water is then filtered, selected constituents are added, and if necessary the water is acidified and sterilized by ultraviolet irradiation before bottling in plastic or glass. These reference samples are distributed twice yearly to more than 100 laboratories for chemical analysis. The most probable values for each constituent are determined by evaluating the data submitted by the laboratories using statistical techniques recommended by ASTM.

  1. Natural language processing-based COTS software and related technologies survey.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stickland, Michael G.; Conrad, Gregory N.; Eaton, Shelley M.

    2003-09-01

    Natural language processing-based knowledge management software, traditionally developed for security organizations, is now becoming commercially available. An informal survey was conducted to discover and examine current NLP and related technologies and potential applications for information retrieval, information extraction, summarization, categorization, terminology management, link analysis, and visualization for possible implementation at Sandia National Laboratories. This report documents our current understanding of the technologies, lists software vendors and their products, and identifies potential applications of these technologies.

  2. The Dragonfly nearby Galaxies Survey. I. Substantial Variation in the Diffuse Stellar Halos around Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Allison; van Dokkum, Pieter; Abraham, Roberto; Zhang, Jielai

    2016-10-01

    Galaxies are thought to grow through accretion; as less massive galaxies are disrupted and merge over time, their debris results in diffuse, clumpy stellar halos enveloping the central galaxy. Here we present a study of the variation in the stellar halos of galaxies, using data from the Dragonfly Nearby Galaxies Survey (DNGS). The survey consists of wide field, deep ({μ }g\\gt 31 mag arcsec‑2) optical imaging of nearby galaxies using the Dragonfly Telephoto Array. Our sample includes eight spiral galaxies with stellar masses similar to that of the Milky Way, inclinations of 16-19 degrees and distances between 7-18 Mpc. We construct stellar mass surface density profiles from the observed g-band surface brightness in combination with the g ‑ r color as a function of radius, and compute the halo fractions from the excess stellar mass (relative to a disk+bulge fit) beyond 5 half-mass radii. We find a mean halo fraction of 0.009 ± 0.005 and a large rms scatter of {1.01}-0.26+0.9 dex. The peak-to-peak scatter of the halo fraction is a factor of \\gt 100—while some galaxies feature strongly structured halos resembling that of M31, three of the eight have halos that are completely undetected in our data. We conclude that spiral galaxies as a class exhibit a rich variety in stellar halo properties, implying that their assembly histories have been highly non-uniform. We find no convincing evidence for an environmental or stellar mass dependence of the halo fraction in the sample.

  3. Spatial variations in daily average CO2 concentrations above wetland surface of Xianghai National Nature Reserve, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Jun-hong; OUYANG Hua; WANG Qing-gai; ZHOU Cai-ping; XU Xiao-feng

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal and vertical variations of daily average CO2 concentration above the wetland surface were studied in Xianghai National Nature Reserve of China in August, 2000. The primary purpose was to study spatial distribution characteristics of CO2 concentration on the four levels of height(0. 1 m, 0.6 m, 1.2 m and 2 m) and compare the differences of CO2 concentration under different land covers. Results showed that daily average CO2 concentration above wetland surface in Xianghai National Natural Reserve was lower than that above other wetlands in northeast China as well as the worldwide average, suggesting that Xianghai wetland absorbed CO2 in August and acted as"sink" of CO2. The horizontal variations on the four levels of height along the latitude were distinct, and had the changing tendency of"decreasing after increasing" with the increase of height. The areas with obvious variations were consistent on different levels of height,and those with the highest variations appeared above surface of shore, sloping field, Typha wetland and Phragmites wetland; the vertical variations were greatly different, with the higher variations in Phragmites wetland and Typha wetland, and the lands near the shore and the sloping field with the lower variations. Spatial variations of daily average CO2 concentrations above wetland surface were affected by surface qualities and land covers.

  4. Fluvial filtering of land-to-ocean fluxes: from natural Holocene variations to Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meybeck, Michel; Vörösmarty, Charles

    2005-02-01

    The evolution of river systems and their related fluxes is considered at various time scales: ( i) over the last 18 000 years, under climatic variability control, ( ii) over the last 50 to 200 years (Anthropocene) due to direct human impacts. Natural Holocene variations in time and space depend on ( i) land-to-ocean connections (endorheism, glacial cover, exposure of continental shelf); ( ii) types of natural fluvial filters (e.g., wetlands, lakes, floodplains, estuaries). Anthropocene changes concern ( i) land-ocean connection (e.g., partial to total runoff reduction resulting from water management), ( ii) modification and removal of natural filters, ( iii) creation of new filters, particularly irrigated fields and reservoirs, ( iv) acceleration and/or development of material sources from human activities. The total river basin area directly affected by human activities is of the same order of magnitude ( >40 Mkm) as the total area affected over the last 18 000 years. A tentative analysis of 38 major river systems totaling 55 Mkm is proposed for several criteria: ( i) trajectories of Holocene evolution, ( ii) occurrence of natural fluvial filters, ( iii) present-day fluvial filters: most river basins are unique. Riverine fluxes per unit area are characterized by hot spots that exceed the world average by one order of magnitude. At the Anthropocene (i.e., since 1950), many riverine fluxes have globally increased (sodium, chloride, sulfate, nitrogen, phosphorous, heavy metals), others are stable (calcium, bicarbonate, sediments) or likely to decrease (dissolved silica). Future trajectories of river fluxes will depend on the balance between increased sources of material (e.g., soil erosion, pollution, fertilization), water abstraction for irrigation and the modification of fluvial filters, particularly the occurrence of reservoirs that already intercept half of the water and store at least 30% of river sediment fluxes. In some river systems, retention actually

  5. Topographic monitoring of a middle estuary mudflat, Humber estuary, UK--anthropogenic impacts and natural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyes, Suzanne J; Allen, James H

    2007-01-01

    Annual topographic surveys were carried out at the Saltend mudflat (Humber estuary, UK) between 1998 and 2006. These surveys formed part of an ongoing monitoring programme to examine the potential effects on the mudflat topography of the construction and operation of a waste water treatment works (WwTW) development by Yorkshire Water. Of particular concern was the potential disruption to the sedimentological regime within the special protection area (SPA) and candidate special area of conservation (cSAC) which could affect the invertebrate communities and ornithological functioning of the site. In addition to the development of the WwTW located to the extreme north-west of the site, a port extension removing 10ha of the Saltend intertidal mudflat (outside the SPA but immediately south east of the WwTW) also occurred between 1999 and 2006. Minimal change was noted across the site following the construction and operation of the WwTW between 1998 and 2000. However, the construction of the bund in closer proximity to the SPA and cSAC masked any potential impact the WwTW could have had across the site after 2000. Profiles and contour mapping indicate that significant mudflat accretion occurred in the immediate area of the bund, with a general increase recorded across the western section of the site since 2000. In contrast the alternations to channel planform and subsequent rapid accretion of the mudflat to the east of the jetty, being a significant distance from the developments, are attributed to natural cyclical changes.

  6. Shifting patterns of natural variation in the nuclear genome of caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Kazufusa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide analysis of variation within a species can reveal the evolution of fundamental biological processes such as mutation, recombination, and natural selection. We compare genome wide sequence differences between two independent isolates of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (CB4856 and CB4858 and the reference genome (N2. Results The base substitution pattern when comparing N2 against CB4858 reveals a transition over transversion bias (1.32:1 that is not present in CB4856. In CB4856, there is a significant bias in the direction of base substitution. The frequency of A or T bases in N2 that are G or C bases in CB4856 outnumber the opposite frequencies for transitions as well as transversions. These differences were not observed in the N2/CB4858 comparison. Similarly, we observed a strong bias for deletions over insertions in CB4856 (1.44: 1 that is not present in CB4858. In both CB4856 and CB4858, there is a significant correlation between SNP rate and recombination rate on the autosomes but not on the X chromosome. Furthermore, we identified numerous significant hotspots of variation in the CB4856-N2 comparison. In both CB4856 and CB4858, based on a measure of the strength of selection (ka/ks, all the chromosomes are under negative selection and in CB4856, there is no difference in the strength of natural selection in either the autosomes versus X or between any of the chromosomes. By contrast, in CB4858, ka/ks values are smaller in the autosomes than in the X chromosome. In addition, in CB4858, ka/ks values differ between chromosomes. Conclusions The clear bias of deletions over insertions in CB4856 suggests that either the CB4856 genome is becoming smaller or the N2 genome is getting larger. We hypothesize the hotspots found represent alleles that are shared between CB4856 and CB4858 but not N2. Because the ka/ks ratio in the X chromosome is higher than the autosomes on average in CB4858, purifying selection is

  7. Shifting patterns of natural variation in the nuclear genome of caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solorzano, Eleanne; Okamoto, Kazufusa; Datla, Pushpa; Sung, Way; Bergeron, R D; Thomas, W K

    2011-06-16

    Genome wide analysis of variation within a species can reveal the evolution of fundamental biological processes such as mutation, recombination, and natural selection. We compare genome wide sequence differences between two independent isolates of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (CB4856 and CB4858) and the reference genome (N2). The base substitution pattern when comparing N2 against CB4858 reveals a transition over transversion bias (1.32:1) that is not present in CB4856. In CB4856, there is a significant bias in the direction of base substitution. The frequency of A or T bases in N2 that are G or C bases in CB4856 outnumber the opposite frequencies for transitions as well as transversions. These differences were not observed in the N2/CB4858 comparison. Similarly, we observed a strong bias for deletions over insertions in CB4856 (1.44: 1) that is not present in CB4858. In both CB4856 and CB4858, there is a significant correlation between SNP rate and recombination rate on the autosomes but not on the X chromosome. Furthermore, we identified numerous significant hotspots of variation in the CB4856-N2 comparison.In both CB4856 and CB4858, based on a measure of the strength of selection (ka/ks), all the chromosomes are under negative selection and in CB4856, there is no difference in the strength of natural selection in either the autosomes versus X or between any of the chromosomes. By contrast, in CB4858, ka/ks values are smaller in the autosomes than in the X chromosome. In addition, in CB4858, ka/ks values differ between chromosomes. The clear bias of deletions over insertions in CB4856 suggests that either the CB4856 genome is becoming smaller or the N2 genome is getting larger. We hypothesize the hotspots found represent alleles that are shared between CB4856 and CB4858 but not N2. Because the ka/ks ratio in the X chromosome is higher than the autosomes on average in CB4858, purifying selection is reduced on the X chromosome.

  8. Natural variation in SAR11 marine bacterioplankton genomes inferred from metagenomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Larry J

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One objective of metagenomics is to reconstruct information about specific uncultured organisms from fragmentary environmental DNA sequences. We used the genome of an isolate of the marine alphaproteobacterium SAR11 ('Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique'; strain HTCC1062, obtained from the cold, productive Oregon coast, as a query sequence to study variation in SAR11 metagenome sequence data from the Sargasso Sea, a warm, oligotrophic ocean gyre. Results The average amino acid identity of SAR11 genes encoded by the metagenomic data to the query genome was only 71%, indicating significant evolutionary divergence between the coastal isolates and Sargasso Sea populations. However, an analysis of gene neighbors indicated that SAR11 genes in the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data match the gene order of the HTCC1062 genome in 96% of cases (> 85,000 observations, and that rearrangements are most frequent at predicted operon boundaries. There were no conserved examples of genes with known functions being found in the coastal isolates, but not the Sargasso Sea metagenomic data, or vice versa, suggesting that core regions of these diverse SAR11 genomes are relatively conserved in gene content. However, four hypervariable regions were observed, which may encode properties associated with variation in SAR11 ecotypes. The largest of these, HVR2, is a 48 kb region flanked by the sole 5S and 23S genes in the HTCC1062 genome, and mainly encodes genes that determine cell surface properties. A comparison of two closely related 'Candidatus Pelagibacter' genomes (HTCC1062 and HTCC1002 revealed a number of "gene indels" in core regions. Most of these were found to be polymorphic in the metagenomic data and showed evidence of purifying selection, suggesting that the same "polymorphic gene indels" are maintained in physically isolated SAR11 populations. Conclusion These findings suggest that natural selection has conserved many core features of SAR11

  9. Does variability matter? Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) variation and its associations to parasitism in natural small mammal populations

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Lucht, Yvonne

    2009-01-01

    The adaptive evolutionary potential of a species or population to cope with omnipresent environmental challenges is based on its genetic variation. Variability at immune genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, is assumed to be a very powerful and effective tool to keep pace with diverse and rapidly evolving pathogens. In my thesis, I studied natural levels of variation at the MHC genes, which have a key role in immune defence, and parasite burden in different small ma...

  10. Natural variations in xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes: developing tools for coral monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougée, L. R. A.; Richmond, R. H.; Collier, A. C.

    2014-06-01

    The continued deterioration of coral reefs worldwide demonstrates the need to develop diagnostic tools for corals that go beyond general ecological monitoring and can identify specific stressors at sublethal levels. Cellular diagnostics present an approach to defining indicators (biomarkers) that have the potential to reflect the impact of stress at the cellular level, allowing for the detection of intracellular changes in corals prior to outright mortality. Detoxification enzymes, which may be readily induced or inhibited by environmental stressors, present such a set of indicators. However, in order to apply these diagnostic tools for the detection of stress, a detailed understanding of their normal, homeostatic levels within healthy corals must first be established. Herein, we present molecular and biochemical evidence for the expression and activity of major Phase I detoxification enzymes cytochrome P450 (CYP450), CYP2E1, and CYP450 reductase, as well as the Phase II enzymes UDP, glucuronosyltransferase (UGT), β-glucuronidase, glutathione- S-transferase (GST), and arylsulfatase C (ASC) in the coral Pocillopora damicornis. Additionally, we characterized enzyme expression and activity variations over a reproductive cycle within a coral's life history to determine natural endogenous changes devoid of stress exposure. Significant changes in enzyme activity over the coral's natural lunar reproductive cycle were observed for CYP2E1 and CYP450 reductase as well as UGT and GST, while β-glucuronidase and ASC did not fluctuate significantly. The data represent a baseline description of `health' for the expression and activity of these enzymes that can be used toward understanding the impact of environmental stressors on corals. Such knowledge can be applied to address causes of coral reef ecosystem decline and to monitor effectiveness of mitigation strategies. Achieving a better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships between putative stressors and biological

  11. Natural variation in the thermotolerance of neural function and behavior due to a cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Dawson-Scully

    Full Text Available Although it is acknowledged that genetic variation contributes to individual differences in thermotolerance, the specific genes and pathways involved and how they are modulated by the environment remain poorly understood. We link natural variation in the thermotolerance of neural function and behavior in Drosophila melanogaster to the foraging gene (for, which encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG as well as to its downstream target, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations revealed that reduced PKG (or PP2A activity caused increased thermotolerance of synaptic transmission at the larval neuromuscular junction. Like synaptic transmission, feeding movements were preserved at higher temperatures in larvae with lower PKG levels. In a comparative assay, pharmacological manipulations altering thermotolerance in a central circuit of Locusta migratoria demonstrated conservation of this neuroprotective pathway. In this circuit, either the inhibition of PKG or PP2A induced robust thermotolerance of neural function. We suggest that PKG and therefore the polymorphism associated with the allelic variation in for may provide populations with natural variation in heat stress tolerance. for's function in behavior is conserved across most organisms, including ants, bees, nematodes, and mammals. PKG's role in thermotolerance may also apply to these and other species. Natural variation in thermotolerance arising from genes involved in the PKG pathway could impact the evolution of thermotolerance in natural populations.

  12. Natural variations in expression of regulatory and detoxification related genes under limiting phosphate and arsenate stress in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapsi eShukla

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Abiotic stress including nutrient deficiency and heavy metal toxicity severely affects plant growth, development, and productivity. Genetic variations within and in between species are one of the important factors in establishing interactions and responses of plants with the environment. In the recent past, natural variations in Arabidopsis thaliana have been used to understand plant development and response towards different stresses at genetic level. Phosphorus (Pi deficiency negatively affects plant growth and metabolism and modulates expression of the genes involved in Pi homeostasis. Arsenate, As(V, a chemical analogue of Pi, is taken up by the plants via phosphate transport system. Studies suggest that during Pi deficiency, enhanced As(V uptake leads to increased toxicity in plants. Here, the natural variations in Arabidopsis have been utilized to study the As(V stress response under limiting Pi condition. The primary root length was compared to identify differential response of three Arabidopsis accessions (Col-0, Sij-1 and Slavi-1 under limiting Pi and As(V stress. To study the molecular mechanisms responsible for the differential response, comprehensive expression profiling of the genes involved in uptake, detoxification and regulatory mechanisms was carried out. Analysis suggests genetic variation-dependent regulatory mechanisms may affect differential response of Arabidopsis natural variants towards As(V stress under limiting Pi condition. Therefore, it is hypothesized that detailed analysis of the natural variations under multiple stress conditions might help in the better understanding of the biological processes involved in stress tolerance and adaptation.

  13. Assessing spatiotemporal variation of drought in China and its impact on agriculture during 1982-2011 by using PDSI indices and agriculture drought survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hao; Wang, Shao-Qiang; Wang, Jun-Bang; Lu, Hou-Quan; Guo, An-Hong; Zhu, Zai-Chun; Myneni, Ranga B.; Shugart, Herman H.

    2016-03-01

    Inspired by concerns of the effects of a warming climate, drought variation and its impacts have gained much attention in China. Arguments about China's drought persist and little work has utilized agricultural drought survey area to evaluate the impact of natural drought on agriculture. Based on a newly revised self-calibrating Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) model driven with air-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E0 (PDSIARTS; Yan et al., 2014), spatial and temporal variations of drought were analyzed for 1982-2011 in China, which indicates that there was nonsignificant change of drought over this interval but with an extreme drought event happened in 2000-2001. However, using air temperature (Ta)-based Thornthwaite potential evaporation (EP_Th) and Penman-Monteith potential evaporation (EP_PM) to drive the PDSI model, their corresponding PDSITh and PDSIPM all gave a significant drying trend for 1982-2011. This suggests that PDSI model was sensitive to EP parameterization in China. Annual drought-covered area from agriculture survey was initially adopted to evaluate impact of PDSI drought on agriculture in China during 1982-2011. The results indicate that PDSIARTS drought area (defined as PDSIARTS evaluating the impact of natural drought on agriculture.

  14. Ionic nature of burn-induced variation potential in wheat leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katicheva, Lyubov; Sukhov, Vladimir; Akinchits, Elena; Vodeneev, Vladimir

    2014-08-01

    Variation potential (VP) in higher plants cells is a transitory depolarization of the plasma membrane occurring in response to external damage. The effects of VP on different physiological processes are actively studied, but little is known about their ionic nature, which limits the interpretation of VP-induced functional changes. It is thought that VP generation is based on transient inactivation of plasma membrane proton pumps and is not connected to passive ionic fluxes. To study burn-induced VP in wheat seedlings, we measured membrane electric potential and cell input resistance. Cell input resistance decreased during VP generation, indicating that ionic channels were activated. In addition, VP amplitude decreased when the extracellular calcium concentration was lowered. When anion channels were blocked by ethacrynic acid addition, the VP had poor depolarization speed and amplitude. A decrease in the chlorine gradient by extracellular chlorine concentration shift leads to lowering of the VP amplitude and depolarization speed. This result indicates the role of chlorine efflux in depolarization phase formation. The VP repolarization is connected to potassium ion efflux, that is confirmed by repolarization suppression under addition of the potassium channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) and an increase in the extracellular potassium concentration. We also showed that the addition of a proton pump inhibitor leads to membrane potential depolarization and inhibition of VP generation. These results suggest that the VP may be formed not only by transient suppression of proton pumps but also by passive ionic fluxes through the membrane.

  15. Natural variation in gestational cortisol is associated with patterns of growth in marmoset monkeys (Callithrix geoffroyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustoe, Aaryn C; Birnie, Andrew K; Korgan, Austin C; Santo, Jonathan B; French, Jeffrey A

    2012-02-01

    High levels of prenatal cortisol have been previously reported to retard fetal growth. Although cortisol plays a pivotal role in prenatal maturation, heightened exposure to cortisol can result in lower body weights at birth, which have been shown to be associated with adult diseases like hypertension and cardiovascular disease. This study examines the relationship between natural variation in gestational cortisol and fetal and postnatal growth in marmoset monkeys. Urinary samples obtained during the mother's gestation were analyzed for cortisol. Marmoset body mass index (BMI) was measured from birth through 540 days in 30- or 60-day intervals. Multi-level modeling was used to test if marmoset growth over time was predicted by changes in gestational cortisol controlling for time, sex, litter, and litter size. The results show that offspring exposed to intra-uterine environments with elevated levels of cortisol had lower linear BMI rates of change shortly after birth than did offspring exposed to lower levels of cortisol, but exhibited a higher curvilinear growth rate during adolescence. Average daily change in gestational cortisol during the first trimester had a stronger relationship with postnatal growth than change during the third trimester. Higher exposure to cortisol during gestation does alter developmental trajectories, however there appears to be a catch-up period during later post-natal growth. These observations contribute to a larger discussion about the relationship of maternal glucocorticoids on offspring development and the possibility of an earlier vulnerable developmental window.

  16. Multigenic natural variation underlies Caenorhabditis elegans olfactory preference for the bacterial pathogen Serratia marcescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glater, Elizabeth E; Rockman, Matthew V; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2014-02-19

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans can use olfaction to discriminate among different kinds of bacteria, its major food source. We asked how natural genetic variation contributes to choice behavior, focusing on differences in olfactory preference behavior between two wild-type C. elegans strains. The laboratory strain N2 strongly prefers the odor of Serratia marcescens, a soil bacterium that is pathogenic to C. elegans, to the odor of Escherichia coli, a commonly used laboratory food source. The divergent Hawaiian strain CB4856 has a weaker attraction to Serratia than the N2 strain, and this behavioral difference has a complex genetic basis. At least three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) from the CB4856 Hawaii strain (HW) with large effect sizes lead to reduced Serratia preference when introgressed into an N2 genetic background. These loci interact and have epistatic interactions with at least two antagonistic QTLs from HW that increase Serratia preference. The complex genetic architecture of this C. elegans trait is reminiscent of the architecture of mammalian metabolic and behavioral traits.

  17. Heterotaxy in Caenorhabditis: widespread natural variation in left-right arrangement of the major organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcorn, Melissa R; Callander, Davon C; López-Santos, Agustín; Torres Cleuren, Yamila N; Birsoy, Bilge; Joshi, Pradeep M; Santure, Anna W; Rothman, Joel H

    2016-12-19

    Although the arrangement of internal organs in most metazoans is profoundly left-right (L/R) asymmetric with a predominant handedness, rare individuals show full (mirror-symmetric) or partial (heterotaxy) reversals. While the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is known for its highly determinate development, including stereotyped L/R organ handedness, we found that L/R asymmetry of the major organs, the gut and gonad, varies among natural isolates of the species in both males and hermaphrodites. In hermaphrodites, heterotaxy can involve one or both bilaterally asymmetric gonad arms. Male heterotaxy is probably not attributable to relaxed selection in this hermaphroditic species, as it is also seen in gonochoristic Caenorhabditis species. Heterotaxy increases in many isolates at elevated temperature, with one showing a pregastrulation temperature-sensitive period, suggesting a very early embryonic or germline effect on this much later developmental outcome. A genome-wide association study of 100 isolates showed that male heterotaxy is associated with three genomic regions. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines suggests that a small number of loci are responsible for the observed variation. These findings reveal that heterotaxy is a widely varying quantitative trait in an animal with an otherwise highly stereotyped anatomy, demonstrating unexpected plasticity in an L/R arrangement of the major organs even in a simple animal.This article is part of the themed issue 'Provocative questions in left-right asymmetry'.

  18. Heterotaxy in Caenorhabditis: widespread natural variation in left–right arrangement of the major organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callander, Davon C.; López-Santos, Agustín; Torres Cleuren, Yamila N.; Santure, Anna W.

    2016-01-01

    Although the arrangement of internal organs in most metazoans is profoundly left–right (L/R) asymmetric with a predominant handedness, rare individuals show full (mirror-symmetric) or partial (heterotaxy) reversals. While the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is known for its highly determinate development, including stereotyped L/R organ handedness, we found that L/R asymmetry of the major organs, the gut and gonad, varies among natural isolates of the species in both males and hermaphrodites. In hermaphrodites, heterotaxy can involve one or both bilaterally asymmetric gonad arms. Male heterotaxy is probably not attributable to relaxed selection in this hermaphroditic species, as it is also seen in gonochoristic Caenorhabditis species. Heterotaxy increases in many isolates at elevated temperature, with one showing a pregastrulation temperature-sensitive period, suggesting a very early embryonic or germline effect on this much later developmental outcome. A genome-wide association study of 100 isolates showed that male heterotaxy is associated with three genomic regions. Analysis of recombinant inbred lines suggests that a small number of loci are responsible for the observed variation. These findings reveal that heterotaxy is a widely varying quantitative trait in an animal with an otherwise highly stereotyped anatomy, demonstrating unexpected plasticity in an L/R arrangement of the major organs even in a simple animal. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Provocative questions in left–right asymmetry’. PMID:27821534

  19. Untangling natural seascape variation from marine reserve effects using a landscape approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany E Huntington

    Full Text Available Distinguishing management effects from the inherent variability in a system is a key consideration in assessing reserve efficacy. Here, we demonstrate how seascape heterogeneity, defined as the spatial configuration and composition of coral reef habitats, can mask our ability to discern reserve effects. We then test the application of a landscape approach, utilizing advances in benthic habitat mapping and GIS techniques, to quantify this heterogeneity and alleviate the confounding influence during reserve assessment. Seascape metrics were quantified at multiple spatial scales using a combination of spatial image analysis and in situ surveys at 87 patch reef sites in Glover's Reef Lagoon, Belize, within and outside a marine reserve enforced since 1998. Patch reef sites were then clustered into classes sharing similar seascape attributes using metrics that correlated significantly to observed variations in both fish and coral communities. When the efficacy of the marine reserve was assessed without including landscape attributes, no reserve effects were detected in the diversity and abundance of fish and coral communities, despite 10 years of management protection. However, grouping sites based on landscape attributes revealed significant reserve effects between site classes. Fish had higher total biomass (1.5x and commercially important biomass (1.75x inside the reserve and coral cover was 1.8 times greater inside the reserve, though direction and degree of response varied by seascape class. Our findings show that the application of a landscape classification approach vastly improves our ability to evaluate the efficacy of marine reserves by controlling for confounding effects of seascape heterogeneity and suggests that landscape heterogeneity should be considered in future reserve design.

  20. Estimating spatial variations in soil water content from electrical conductivity surveys across semiarid Mediterranean agrosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekki, Insaf; Jaiez, Zeineb; Jacob, Frédéric

    2014-05-01

    Soil water content (SWC) is an important driver for number of soil, water and energy fluxes at different temporal and spatial scales. The non-invasive electromagnetic induction sensor, such as EM38, that measures the soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa), has been widely used to infer spatial and temporal patterns of soil properties. The objective of this study has been to explore the opportunity for estimating and mapping the soil water content (SWC) based on in-situ data collected in different fields and during dry and wet soil conditions in a hilly landscape. The experiment was carried out during two campaigns under dry and wet conditions to represent the major soil association, land use and topographic attributes at the cultivated semiarid Mediterranean Lebna catchment, northeastern Tunisia. The temporal evolution of SWC is a dry-wet-dry pattern. Gravimetric soil water content sampling and ECa measured with EM38 (Geonics Ltd., Ontario, Canada) surveys have been performed simultaneously. ECa measurements, geo-referenced with GPS, were collected raising the EM38 to sample at various depths of the soil. The EM38 was placed in both horizontal and vertical dipole modes on a PVC stand 150 cm above the soil surface. The number of investigated points varied between n=70 in February to n=38 in October 2012. Results showed that different SWC related to the soil spatial variability and lead to differences in ECa averaged values and a substantial changes in the ECa as SWC changed. The relationship between SWC an ECa in a separate vertical and horizontal mode using all possible sets of surveys was tested with linear regression. The correlation coefficient between ECa and SWC for the horizontal mode was lower than the vertical mode. Coefficients of determination of linear regressions between SWC in 0-100 cm soil depth and ECa in the vertical mode were, r²=0.74, in February 2013, r²=0.52 in October 2012. The lowest correlations were found in horizontal mode when SWC

  1. Genetic variation in plant volatile emission does not result in differential attraction of natural enemies in the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wason, Elizabeth L; Hunter, Mark D

    2014-02-01

    Volatile organic chemical (VOC) emission by plants may serve as an adaptive plant defense by attracting the natural enemies of herbivores. For plant VOC emission to evolve as an adaptive defense, plants must show genetic variability for the trait. To date, such variability has been investigated primarily in agricultural systems, yet relatively little is known about genetic variation in VOCs emitted by natural populations of native plants. Here, we investigate intraspecific variation in constitutive and herbivore-induced plant VOC emission using the native common milkweed plant (Asclepias syriaca) and its monarch caterpillar herbivore (Danaus plexippus) in complementary field and common garden greenhouse experiments. In addition, we used a common garden field experiment to gauge natural enemy attraction to milkweed VOCs induced by monarch damage. We found evidence of genetic variation in the total constitutive and induced concentrations of VOCs and the composition of VOC blends emitted by milkweed plants. However, all milkweed genotypes responded similarly to induction by monarchs in terms of their relative change in VOC concentration and blend. Natural enemies attacked decoy caterpillars more frequently on damaged than on undamaged milkweed, and natural enemy visitation was associated with higher total VOC concentrations and with VOC blend. Thus, we present evidence that induced VOCs emitted by milkweed may function as a defense against herbivores. However, plant genotypes were equally attractive to natural enemies. Although milkweed genotypes diverge phenotypically in their VOC concentrations and blends, they converge into similar phenotypes with regard to magnitude of induction and enemy attraction.

  2. Nuclear genomic control of naturally occurring variation in mitochondrial function in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbo-Lucioni, Patricia; Bu, Su; Harbison, Susan T; Slaughter, Juanita C; Mackay, Trudy F C; Moellering, Douglas R; De Luca, Maria

    2012-11-22

    Mitochondria are organelles found in nearly all eukaryotic cells that play a crucial role in cellular survival and function. Mitochondrial function is under the control of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. While the latter has been the focus of most genetic research, we remain largely ignorant about the nuclear-encoded genomic control of inter-individual variability in mitochondrial function. Here, we used Drosophila melanogaster as our model organism to address this question. We quantified mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiration rates and P:O ratio in mitochondria isolated from the thoraces of 40 sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel. We found significant within-population genetic variability for all mitochondrial traits. Hence, we performed genome-wide association mapping and identified 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with differences in mitochondrial respiration and efficiency (P ≤1 × 10-5). Gene-centered regression models showed that 2-3 SNPs can explain 31, 13, and 18% of the phenotypic variation in state 3, state 4, and P:O ratio, respectively. Most of the genes tagged by the SNPs are involved in organ development, second messenger-mediated signaling pathways, and cytoskeleton remodeling. One of these genes, sallimus (sls), encodes a component of the muscle sarcomere. We confirmed the direct effect of sls on mitochondrial respiration using two viable mutants and their coisogenic wild-type strain. Furthermore, correlation network analysis revealed that sls functions as a transcriptional hub in a co-regulated module associated with mitochondrial respiration and is connected to CG7834, which is predicted to encode a protein with mitochondrial electron transfer flavoprotein activity. This latter finding was also verified in the sls mutants. Our results provide novel insights into the genetic factors regulating natural variation in mitochondrial function in D. melanogaster. The integrative genomic

  3. 1994 Annual wildlife survey report. Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-24

    This report summarizes the results of wildlife surveys and other wildlife monitoring performed from January through December 1994. These surveys are part of a long-term ecological monitoring program conducted under the Natural Resource Protection and Compliance Program (NRPCP). This program is essential in identifying and quantifying fluctuations of wildlife populations, wildlife habitat use, and changes in the species using the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) as year-round or seasonal habitat. Wildlife population densities vary constantly due to natural pressures, and only well-integrated, long-term monitoring can identify which factors influencing wildlife populations are a consequence of natural causes, and which are due to human activities. An integrated monitoring program that gathers data on ecologically interactive species is essential in evaluating population fluctuations. Such data can be an invaluable tool in predicting and avoiding impacts on the ecology of an area due to projected human activities. With 167 species of birds, three big game species, nine species of carnivores, nine species of mid-sized mammals, and 15 small mammal species, the Site provides habitat to a surprising variety of wildlife. Many of these species are sensitive species or indicator organisms that by their presence or, more significantly, by their absence can indicate the ecological health of an area. Their presence at the Site indicates a very healthy ecosystem.

  4. Coexistence of trichome variation in a natural plant population: a combined study using ecological and candidate gene approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuhiro Kawagoe

    Full Text Available The coexistence of distinct phenotypes within populations has long been investigated in evolutionary ecology. Recent studies have identified the genetic basis of distinct phenotypes, but it is poorly understood how the variation in candidate loci is maintained in natural environments. In this study, we examined fitness consequences and genetic basis of variation in trichome production in a natural population of Arabidopsis halleri subsp. gemmifera. Half of the individuals in the study population produced trichomes while the other half were glabrous, and the leaf beetle Phaedon brassicae imposed intensive damage to both phenotypes. The fitness of hairy and glabrous plants showed no significant differences in the field during two years. A similar result was obtained when sibling hairy and glabrous plants were transplanted at the same field site, whereas a fitness cost of trichome production was detected under a weak herbivory condition. Thus, equivalent fitness of hairy and glabrous plants under natural herbivory allows their coexistence in the contemporary population. The pattern of polymorphism of the candidate trichome gene GLABROUS1 (GL1 showed no evidence of long-term maintenance of trichome variation within the population. Although balancing selection under fluctuating biotic environments is often proposed to explain the maintenance of defense variation, the lack of clear evidence of balancing selection in the study population suggests that other factors such as gene flow and neutral process may have played relatively large roles in shaping trichome variation at least for the single population level.

  5. Variations in the slope of the psychometric functions for speech intelligibility: a systematic survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Alexandra; Akeroyd, Michael A

    2014-06-06

    Although many studies have looked at the effects of different listening conditions on the intelligibility of speech, their analyses have often concentrated on changes to a single value on the psychometric function, namely, the threshold. Far less commonly has the slope of the psychometric function, that is, the rate at which intelligibility changes with level, been considered. The slope of the function is crucial because it is the slope, rather than the threshold, that determines the improvement in intelligibility caused by any given improvement in signal-to-noise ratio by, for instance, a hearing aid. The aim of the current study was to systematically survey and reanalyze the psychometric function data available in the literature in an attempt to quantify the range of slope changes across studies and to identify listening conditions that affect the slope of the psychometric function. The data for 885 individual psychometric functions, taken from 139 different studies, were fitted with a common logistic equation from which the slope was calculated. Large variations in slope across studies were found, with slope values ranging from as shallow as 1% per dB to as steep as 44% per dB (median = 6.6% per dB), suggesting that the perceptual benefit offered by an improvement in signal-to-noise ratio depends greatly on listening environment. The type and number of maskers used were found to be major factors on the value of the slope of the psychometric function while other minor effects of target predictability, target corpus, and target/masker similarity were also found. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. A WEAVE Radial Velocity Survey to Unravel the Nature of the Milky Way's Spiral Arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguió, M.; Figueras, F.; Grosbøl, P.

    2016-10-01

    The nature of the spiral arms of our Milky Way Galaxy is still a matter of debate. Different theories have been suggested (density waves, swing amplification, invariant manifolds...) which impose several constraints on the observables. For the first time it will be possible to disentangle these theories by combining Gaia and WEAVE data. Great advantage comes from the fact that WEAVE is in the Northern Hemisphere, that is with good coverage towards the galactic anticenter. We plan to quantify the kinematic perturbation induced by the Perseus spiral arm through radial velocity measurements. We show how, for the first time, we have detected the stellar overdensity associated with the Perseus arm using a Strömgren photometric survey with the Wide Field Camera on the Isaac Newton Telescope. This survey has allowed us to perform first tests on WEAVE capabilities.

  7. Nonlinear selection and a blend of convergent, divergent and parallel evolution shapes natural variation in glucosinolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliebenstein, Daniel James; Cacho, N. Ivalú

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying organismal fitness in complex environments is just beginning to be illuminated. One of the pre-eminent model systems that span the molecular to field fitness chasm is the natural variation in glucosinolate defence metabolites within the Capparales. In this syst...

  8. The genetics of phytate and phosphate accumulation in seeds and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana, using natural variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentsink, L.; Yuan, K.; Koornneef, M.; Vreugdenhil, D.

    2003-01-01

    Phytate (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate, InsP6) is the most abundant P-containing compound in plants, and an important anti-nutritional factor, due to its ability to complex essential micro-nutrients, e.g. iron and zinc. Analysis of natural variation for InsP6 and Pi accumulation in seeds

  9. Evidence from pyrosequencing indicates that natural variation in animal personality is associated with DRD4 DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, Eveline C.; Mateman, A.C.; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Caro, Samuel P.; Verhoeven, Koen J.F.; Oers, Van Kees

    2016-01-01

    Personality traits are heritable and respond to natural selection, but are at the same time influenced by the ontogenetic environment. Epigenetic effects, such as DNA methylation, have been proposed as a key mechanism to control personality variation. However, to date little is known about the co

  10. Evidence from Pyrosequencing Indicates that Natural Variation in Animal Personality is Associated with DRD4 DNA Methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, Eveline; Mateman, A.C.; Zwier, M.V.; Caro, S.P.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; van Oers, K.

    2016-01-01

    Personality traits are heritable and respond to natural selection, but are at the same time influenced by the ontogenetic environment. Epigenetic effects, such as DNA methylation, have been proposed as a key mechanism to control personality variation. However, to date little is known about the contr

  11. Evidence from pyrosequencing indicates that natural variation in animal personality is associated with DRD4 DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, Eveline C.; Mateman, A. Christa; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Caro, Samuel P.; Verhoeven, Koen J. F.; Van Oers, Kees

    2016-01-01

    Personality traits are heritable and respond to natural selection, but are at the same time influenced by the ontogenetic environment. Epigenetic effects, such as DNA methylation, have been proposed as a key mechanism to control personality variation. However, to date little is known about the contr

  12. Naturally occurring variation in trophoblast invasion as a source of novel (epigenetic biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie eVan DIjk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available During the first trimester of pregnancy fetal trophoblasts invade the maternal decidua, thereby remodelling the maternal spiral arteries. This process of trophoblast invasion is very similar to cancer cell invasion, with multiple signaling pathways shared between the two. Pregnancy-related diseases, e.g. pre-eclampsia, and cancer metastasis start with a decrease or increase in cellular invasion, respectively. Here, we investigate if first trimester placental explants can be used to identify epigenetic factors associated with changes in cellular invasion and their potential use as biomarkers. We show that the outgrowth potential of first trimester explants significantly correlates with promoter methylation of PRKCDBP and MMP2, two genes known to be differentially methylated in both placenta and cancer. The increase in methylation percentage coincides with an increase in invasion potential. Subsequently, as a non-invasive marker must be detectable in blood, plasma samples of pregnant and non-pregnant women were analyzed. The MMP2 promoter showed high methylation levels in non-pregnant plasma samples, which decreased in pregnant plasma. The decrease in methylated plasma DNA during pregnancy is most likely due to the fractional increase in unmethylated placental DNA. This suggests that the level of unmethylated DNA has the potential to be used as an invasion marker, where higher levels of unmethylated DNA indicate a lower invasion potential of trophoblasts.These proof of principle data provide evidence that human first trimester placental explants are an excellent ex vivo model system to identify (epigenetic factors and thus potential biomarkers associated with changes in cellular invasion, e.g. to detect pregnancy-related diseases or cancer metastasis. To identify novel biomarkers the next step is to correlate naturally occurring variation in invasion potential to changes in (epigenetic factors by genome-wide approaches such as massively parallel

  13. Linking dynamic phenotyping with metabolite analysis to study natural variation in drought responses of Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine H.C. Fisher

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is an important environmental stress limiting the productivity of major crops worldwide. Understanding drought tolerance and possible mechanisms for improving drought resistance is therefore a prerequisite to develop drought-tolerant crops that produce significant yields with reduced amounts of water. Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium is a key model species for cereals, forage grasses and energy grasses. In this study, initial screening of a Brachypodium germplasm collection consisting of 138 different ecotypes exposed to progressive drought, highlighted the natural variation in morphology, biomass accumulation and responses to drought stress. A core set of ten ecotypes, classified as being either tolerant, susceptible or intermediate, in response to drought stress, were exposed to mild or severe (respectively 15% and 0% soil water content drought stress and phenomic parameters linked to growth and colour changes were assessed. When exposed to severe drought stress, phenotypic data and metabolite profiling combined with multivariate analysis revealed a remarkable consistency in separating the selected ecotypes into their different pre-defined drought tolerance groups. Increases in several metabolites, including for the phytohormones jasmonic acid and salicylic acid, and TCA-cycle intermediates, were positively correlated with biomass yield and with reduced yellow pixel counts; suggestive of delayed senescence, both key target traits for crop improvement to drought stress. While metabolite analysis also separated ecotypes into the distinct tolerance groupings after exposure to mild drought stress, similar analysis of the phenotypic data failed to do so, confirming the value of metabolomics to investigate early responses to drought stress. The results highlight the potential of combining the analyses of phenotypic and metabolic responses to identify key mechanisms and markers associated with drought tolerance in both the Brachypodium

  14. Natural variations of copper and sulfur stable isotopes in blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Vincent; Nogueira da Costa, Andre; Paky Bondanese, Victor; Jaouen, Klervia; Lamboux, Aline; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Vincent, Nicolas; Fourel, François; Télouk, Philippe; Gigou, Michelle; Lécuyer, Christophe; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Bréchot, Christian; Albarède, Francis; Hainaut, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The widespread hypoxic conditions of the tumor microenvironment can impair the metabolism of bioessential elements such as copper and sulfur, notably by changing their redox state and, as a consequence, their ability to bind specific molecules. Because competing redox state is known to drive isotopic fractionation, we have used here the stable isotope compositions of copper (65Cu/63Cu) and sulfur (34S/32S) in the blood of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a tool to explore the cancer-driven copper and sulfur imbalances. We report that copper is 63Cu-enriched by ∼0.4‰ and sulfur is 32S-enriched by ∼1.5‰ in the blood of patients compared with that of control subjects. As expected, HCC patients have more copper in red blood cells and serum compared with control subjects. However, the isotopic signature of this blood extra copper burden is not in favor of a dietary origin but rather suggests a reallocation in the body of copper bound to cysteine-rich proteins such as metallothioneins. The magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect is similar in red blood cells and serum of HCC patients, implying that sulfur fractionation is systemic. The 32S-enrichment of sulfur in the blood of HCC patients is compatible with the notion that sulfur partly originates from tumor-derived sulfides. The measurement of natural variations of stable isotope compositions, using techniques developed in the field of Earth sciences, can provide new means to detect and quantify cancer metabolic changes and provide insights into underlying mechanisms.

  15. Natural Variation of Leaf Thickness and Its Association to Yield Traits in indica Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chuan-guang; ZHOU Xin-qiao; CHEN Da-gang; LI Li-jun; LI Ju-chang; CHEN You-ding

    2014-01-01

    Leaf thickness is an important morphological trait in rice. Its association to the yield potential, as of now has not been documented because of the shortage of the equipment which could conveniently measure the leaf thickness in rice. In this study, the thickness of top three leaves of 208 cultivars had been determined by a nondestructive rice leaf thickness instrument for the research of the natural variation of leaves thickness and its association to yield traits inindica rice. The results showed that the lfag leaf was the thickest, and the 2nd leaf was thicker than the 3rd leaf. Analysis of variance indicated the existence of wide genetic diversity of leaf thickness among the investigatedindica rice genotypes. The tight correlation among the thicknesses of the top three leaves means that the leaf thickness traits share one genetic control system. Leaf thickness had a signiifcant positive correlation with leaf length and a positive correlation with leaf width, indicated that thicker leaf was beneifcial to increasing the single leaf area. The results of correlation analysis revealed that thicker leaf should be proiftable to the leaf erection, higher numbers of grains per panicle and higher grains weight per panicle. However, the signiifcantly negative correlation between leaf thickness and number of panicles per plant counteracted the proiftability from increased grains weight per panicle, so that the correlations of the thicknesses of the top three leaves to yield and biomass were positive but not signiifcantly. It has made great progress in the genetic improvement of leaves thickness in inbredindica rice breeding in Guangdong Province, China, since the 1990s.

  16. Toward Understanding The B[e] Phenomenon. VI. Nature and Spectral Variations of HD 85567.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlov, S. A.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Mennickent, R.; Cabezas, M.; Zhanabaev, Z. Zh.; Reichart, D. E.; Ivarsen, K. M.; Haislip, J. B.; Nysewander, M. C.; LaCluyze, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    We report the results of high-resolution (R ∼ 80,000) spectroscopic observations of the emission-line object HD 85567, which has been classified as an FS CMa type object or a pre-main-sequence star. The main goal is to put more constraints on the object’s fundamental parameters, as well as on its nature and evolutionary state. Absorption lines in the spectrum of HD 85567 were found to be similar to those of mid-B-type dwarfs and correspond to the following fundamental parameters: Teff = 15,000 ± 500 K, v\\sin i=31+/- 3 km s‑1, and {log} g∼ 4.0. The interstellar extinction, AV = 0.50 ± 0.02 mag, was measured using the strengths of some diffuse interstellar bands. We also obtained UBV(RI)c images of a 10‧ × 10‧ region around the object. Photometry of projectionally close stars was used to derive an interstellar extinction law in this direction and resulted in a distance of 1300 ± 100 pc to the object and a luminosity of log L/L⊙ = 3.3 ± 0.2. We found no significant radial velocity variations of the absorption lines in the spectra of HD 85567 obtained during two-month-long periods of time in 2012 and 2015. Our analysis of the spectroscopic and photometric data available for the star led us to a conclusion that it cannot be a pre-main-sequence Herbig Ae/Be star. We argue that the circumstellar gas and dust were produced during the object’s evolution as most likely a binary system, which contains an undetected secondary component and is unlikely to be a merger product. This paper is partly based on observations obtained at the 1.5 m telescope of the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory under CNTAC proposal 2012A–016.

  17. Natural variations of copper and sulfur stable isotopes in blood of hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balter, Vincent; Nogueira da Costa, Andre; Bondanese, Victor Paky; Jaouen, Klervia; Lamboux, Aline; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Vincent, Nicolas; Fourel, François; Télouk, Philippe; Gigou, Michelle; Lécuyer, Christophe; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Bréchot, Christian; Albarède, Francis; Hainaut, Pierre

    2015-01-27

    The widespread hypoxic conditions of the tumor microenvironment can impair the metabolism of bioessential elements such as copper and sulfur, notably by changing their redox state and, as a consequence, their ability to bind specific molecules. Because competing redox state is known to drive isotopic fractionation, we have used here the stable isotope compositions of copper ((65)Cu/(63)Cu) and sulfur ((34)S/(32)S) in the blood of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a tool to explore the cancer-driven copper and sulfur imbalances. We report that copper is (63)Cu-enriched by ∼0.4‰ and sulfur is (32)S-enriched by ∼1.5‰ in the blood of patients compared with that of control subjects. As expected, HCC patients have more copper in red blood cells and serum compared with control subjects. However, the isotopic signature of this blood extra copper burden is not in favor of a dietary origin but rather suggests a reallocation in the body of copper bound to cysteine-rich proteins such as metallothioneins. The magnitude of the sulfur isotope effect is similar in red blood cells and serum of HCC patients, implying that sulfur fractionation is systemic. The (32)S-enrichment of sulfur in the blood of HCC patients is compatible with the notion that sulfur partly originates from tumor-derived sulfides. The measurement of natural variations of stable isotope compositions, using techniques developed in the field of Earth sciences, can provide new means to detect and quantify cancer metabolic changes and provide insights into underlying mechanisms.

  18. Copy number variation of ribosomal DNA and Pokey transposons in natural populations of Daphnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite their ubiquity and high diversity in eukaryotic genomes, DNA transposons are rarely encountered in ribosomal DNA (rDNA). In contrast, R-elements, a diverse group of non-LTR retrotransposons, specifically target rDNA. Pokey is a DNA transposon that targets a specific rDNA site, but also occurs in many other genomic locations, unlike R-elements. However, unlike most DNA transposons, Pokey has been a stable component of Daphnia genomes for over 100 million years. Here we use qPCR to estimate the number of 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes and Pokey elements in rDNA (rPokey), as well as other genomic locations (gPokey) in two species of Daphnia. Our goals are to estimate the correlation between (1) the number of 18S and 28S rRNA genes, (2) the number of 28S genes and rPokey, and (3) the number of rPokey and gPokey. In addition, we ask whether Pokey number and distribution in both genomic compartments are affected by differences in life history between D. pulex and D. pulicaria. Results We found differences in 18S and 28S gene number within isolates that are too large to be explained by experimental variation. In general, Pokey number within isolates is modest (18S and 28S genes suggests that rDNA is much more complicated than once thought, and warrants further study. In addition, the lack of correlation between rPokey, gPokey and rDNA unit numbers suggests that Pokey transposition rate is generally very low, and that recombination, in combination with natural selection, eliminates rPokey much faster than gPokey. Our results suggest that further research to determine the mechanisms by which Pokey has escaped complete inactivation by its host (the usual fate of DNA transposons), would provide important insights into transposon biology. PMID:22390386

  19. Evaluation of intra-annual variation in U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment ground water quality data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael R; Voss, Frank D; Arufe, Jorge A

    2008-01-01

    Assessment of ground-water quality trends under the U.S. Geological Survey National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) included the analysis of samples collected on a quarterly basis for 1 yr between 2001 and 2005. The purpose of this quarterly sampling was to test the hypothesis that variations in the concentration of water-quality parameters of selected individual wells could demonstrate that the intra-annual variation was greater or less than the decadal changes observed for a trend network. Evaluation of more than 100 wells over this period indicates that 1 yr of quarterly sampling is not adequate to address the issue of intra-annual variation because variations seem to be random and highly variable between different wells in the same networks and among networks located in different geographical areas of the USA. In addition, the data from only 1 yr makes it impossible to assess whether variations are due to univariate changes caused by land use changes, hydrologic variations due to variable recharge, or variations caused by ground-water pumping. These data indicate that funds allocated to this activity can be directed to the collection of more effective trend data, including age dating of all wells in the NAWQA network using multiple techniques. Continued evaluation of data and updating of monitoring plans of the NAWQA program is important for maintaining relevance to national goals and scientific objectives.

  20. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  1. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Transit Bus Experience Survey: April 2009--April 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, R.; Horne, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    This survey was commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect and analyze experiential data and information from a cross-section of U.S. transit agencies with varying degrees of compressed natural gas (CNG) bus and station experience. This information will be used to assist DOE and NREL in determining areas of success and areas where further technical or other assistance might be required, and to assist them in focusing on areas judged by the CNG transit community as priority items.

  2. Natural variation in rosette size under salt stress conditions corresponds to developmental differences between Arabidopsis accessions and allelic variation in the LRR-KISS gene

    KAUST Repository

    Julkowska, Magdalena M.

    2016-02-11

    Natural variation among Arabidopsis accessions is an important genetic resource to identify mechanisms underlying plant development and stress tolerance. To evaluate the natural variation in salinity stress tolerance, two large-scale experiments were performed on two populations consisting of 160 Arabidopsis accessions each. Multiple traits, including projected rosette area, and fresh and dry weight were collected as an estimate for salinity tolerance. Our results reveal a correlation between rosette size under salt stress conditions and developmental differences between the accessions grown in control conditions, suggesting that in general larger plants were more salt tolerant. This correlation was less pronounced when plants were grown under severe salt stress conditions. Subsequent genome wide association study (GWAS) revealed associations with novel candidate genes for salinity tolerance such as LRR-KISS (At4g08850), flowering locus KH-domain containing protein and a DUF1639-containing protein. Accessions with high LRR-KISS expression developed larger rosettes under salt stress conditions. Further characterization of allelic variation in candidate genes identified in this study will provide more insight into mechanisms of salt stress tolerance due to enhanced shoot growth.

  3. A high-definition view of functional genetic variation from natural yeast genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Anders; Simpson, Jared T; Salinas, Francisco; Barré, Benjamin; Parts, Leopold; Zia, Amin; Nguyen Ba, Alex N; Moses, Alan M; Louis, Edward J; Mustonen, Ville; Warringer, Jonas; Durbin, Richard; Liti, Gianni

    2014-04-01

    The question of how genetic variation in a population influences phenotypic variation and evolution is of major importance in modern biology. Yet much is still unknown about the relative functional importance of different forms of genome variation and how they are shaped by evolutionary processes. Here we address these questions by population level sequencing of 42 strains from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its closest relative S. paradoxus. We find that genome content variation, in the form of presence or absence as well as copy number of genetic material, is higher within S. cerevisiae than within S. paradoxus, despite genetic distances as measured in single-nucleotide polymorphisms being vastly smaller within the former species. This genome content variation, as well as loss-of-function variation in the form of premature stop codons and frameshifting indels, is heavily enriched in the subtelomeres, strongly reinforcing the relevance of these regions to functional evolution. Genes affected by these likely functional forms of variation are enriched for functions mediating interaction with the external environment (sugar transport and metabolism, flocculation, metal transport, and metabolism). Our results and analyses provide a comprehensive view of genomic diversity in budding yeast and expose surprising and pronounced differences between the variation within S. cerevisiae and that within S. paradoxus. We also believe that the sequence data and de novo assemblies will constitute a useful resource for further evolutionary and population genomics studies.

  4. The Genetic Basis of Natural Variation in Caenorhabditis elegans Telomere Length

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, D.C.; Zdraljevic, S.; Tanny, R.E.; Seo, B.; Riccardi, D.D.; Noble, L.M.; Rockman, M.V.; Alkema, M.J.; Braendle, C.; Kammenga, J.E.; Wang, J.; Kruglyak, L.; Felix, M.A.; Lee, J.; Andersen, E.C.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are involved in the maintenance of chromosomes and the prevention of genome instability. Despite this central importance, significant variation in telomere length has been observed in a variety of organisms. The genetic determinants of telomere-length variation and their effects on organis

  5. Applications of UAV Photogrammetric Surveys to Natural Hazard Detection and Cultural Heritage Documentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trizzino, Rosamaria; Caprioli, Mauro; Mazzone, Francesco; Scarano, Mario

    2017-04-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems are increasingly seen as an attractive low-cost alternative or supplement to aerial and terrestrial photogrammetry due to their low cost, flexibility, availability and readiness for duty. In addition, UAVs can be operated in hazardous or temporarily inaccessible locations. The combination of photogrammetric aerial and terrestrial recording methods using a mini UAV (also known as "drone") opens a broad range of applications, such as surveillance and monitoring of the environment and infrastructural assets. In particular, these methods and techniques are of paramount interest for the documentation of cultural heritage sites and areas of natural importance, facing threats from natural deterioration and hazards. In order to verify the reliability of these technologies an UAV survey and a LIDAR survey have been carried out along about 1 km of coast in the Salento peninsula, near the towns of San Foca, Torre dell' Orso and SantAndrea ( Lecce, Southern Italy). This area is affected by serious environmental hazards due to the presence of dangerous rocky cliffs named "falesie". The UAV platform was equipped with a photogrammetric measurement system that allowed us to obtain a mobile mapping of the fractured fronts of dangerous rocky cliffs. UAV-images data have been processed using dedicated software (Agisoft Photoscan). The point clouds obtained from both the UAV and LIDAR surveys have been processed using Cloud Compare software, with the aim of testing the UAV results with respect to the LIDAR ones. The analysis were done using the C2C algorithm which provides good results in terms of Euclidian distances, highlighting differences between the 3D models obtained from both the survey techiques. The total error obtained was of centimeter-order that is a very satisfactory result. In the the 2nd study area, the opportunities of obtaining more detailed documentation of cultural goods throughout UAV survey have been investigated. The study

  6. An Amphibious Being: How Maritime Surveying Reshaped Darwin's Approach to Natural History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponsel, Alistair

    2016-06-01

    This essay argues that Charles Darwin's distinctive approach to studying distribution and diversity was shaped by his face-to-face interactions with maritime surveyors during the voyage of H.M.S. Beagle (1831-1836). Introducing their hydrographic surveying methods into natural history enabled him to compare fossil and living marine organisms, to compare sedimentary rocks to present-day marine sediments, and to compare landscapes to submarine topology, thereby realizing Charles Lyell's fanciful ambition for a superior form of geology that might be practiced by an "amphibious being." Darwin's theories of continental uplift, coral reef formation, and the origin of species all depended on his amphibious natural history. This essay contributes to our understanding of theorizing in nineteenth-century natural history by illustrating that specific techniques of observing and collecting could themselves help to generate a particular theoretical orientation and, indeed, that such practical experiences were a more proximate source of Darwin's "Humboldtian" interest in distribution and diversity than Alexander von Humboldt's writings themselves. Darwin's debt to the hydrographers became obscured in two ways: through the "funneling" of credit produced by single-authorship publication in natural history and the "telescoping" of memory by which Darwin's new theories made him recall his former researches as though he had originally undertaken them for the very purpose of producing the later theory.

  7. Methods for Global Survey of Natural Gas Flaring from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D. Elvidge

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A set of methods are presented for the global survey of natural gas flaring using data collected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NASA/NOAA Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS. The accuracy of the flared gas volume estimates is rated at ±9.5%. VIIRS is particularly well suited for detecting and measuring the radiant emissions from gas flares through the collection of shortwave and near-infrared data at night, recording the peak radiant emissions from flares. In 2012, a total of 7467 individual flare sites were identified. The total flared gas volume is estimated at 143 (±13.6 billion cubic meters (BCM, corresponding to 3.5% of global production. While the USA has the largest number of flares, Russia leads in terms of flared gas volume. Ninety percent of the flared gas volume was found in upstream production areas, 8% at refineries and 2% at liquified natural gas (LNG terminals. The results confirm that the bulk of natural gas flaring occurs in upstream production areas. VIIRS data can provide site-specific tracking of natural gas flaring for use in evaluating efforts to reduce and eliminate routine flaring.

  8. Genetic architecture of natural variation in cuticular hydrocarbon composition in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembeck, Lauren M; Böröczky, Katalin; Huang, Wen; Schal, Coby; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-11-14

    Insect cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) prevent desiccation and serve as chemical signals that mediate social interactions. Drosophila melanogaster CHCs have been studied extensively, but the genetic basis for individual variation in CHC composition is largely unknown. We quantified variation in CHC profiles in the D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) and identified novel CHCs. We used principal component (PC) analysis to extract PCs that explain the majority of CHC variation and identified polymorphisms in or near 305 and 173 genes in females and males, respectively, associated with variation in these PCs. In addition, 17 DGRP lines contain the functional Desat2 allele characteristic of African and Caribbean D. melanogaster females (more 5,9-C27:2 and less 7,11-C27:2, female sex pheromone isomers). Disruption of expression of 24 candidate genes affected CHC composition in at least one sex. These genes are associated with fatty acid metabolism and represent mechanistic targets for individual variation in CHC composition.

  9. Regulatory change at Physalis Organ Size 1 correlates to natural variation in tomatillo reproductive organ size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; He, Lingli; Li, Jing; Zhao, Jing; Li, Zhichao; He, Chaoying

    2014-07-01

    The genetic basis of size variation in the reproductive organs of tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica) is unknown. Here we report that the expression levels of the gene Physalis Organ Size 1 (POS1) are positively associated with size variation in P. philadelphica reproductive organs such flowers, berries and seeds. POS1 knockdown results in smaller flowers and berries with smaller cells as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Conversely, POS1 overexpression promotes organ size without increasing the cell number. The first introns of the POS1 alleles from the large, intermediate and small tomatillo groups contain one, two and three 37-bp repeats, respectively. Furthermore, our results show that copy variation of repeats in the first intron of POS1 alleles results in differential expression of this gene. Thus, co-variation in tomatillo reproductive organ sizes can be attributed to the novel regulatory variation in POS1.

  10. A systems approach to model natural variation in reactive properties of bacterial ribosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural variation in protein output from translation in bacteria and archaea may be an organism-specific property of the ribosome. This paper adopts a systems approach to model the protein output as a measure of specific ribosome reactive properties in a ribosome-mediated translation apparatus. We use the steady-state assumption to define a transition state complex for the ribosome, coupled with mRNA, tRNA, amino acids and reaction factors, as a subsystem that allows a focus on the completed translational output as a measure of specific properties of the ribosome. Results In analogy to the steady-state reaction of an enzyme complex, we propose a steady-state translation complex for mRNA from any gene, and derive a maximum specific translation activity, Ta(max, as a property of the ribosomal reaction complex. Ta(max has units of a-protein output per time per a-specific mRNA. A related property of the ribosome, T˜a(max⁡ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaagaart1ev2aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGaciGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafmivaqLbaGaadaWgaaWcbaGaemyyaeMaeiikaGIagiyBa0MaeiyyaeMaeiiEaGNaeiykaKcabeaaaaa@3464@, has units of a-protein per time per total RNA with the relationship T˜a(max⁡ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaagaart1ev2aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGaciGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafmivaqLbaGaadaWgaaWcbaGaemyyaeMaeiikaGIagiyBa0MaeiyyaeMaeiiEaGNaeiykaKcabeaaaaa@3464@ = ρa Ta(max, where ρa represents the fraction of total RNA committed to translation output of Pa from gene a message. Ta(max as a ribosome property is analogous to kcat for a purified enzyme, and T˜a(max⁡ MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaagaart1ev2aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9g

  11. Natural gas and CO2 price variation: impact on the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulvestad, Marte; Overland, Indra

    2012-06-01

    THIS ARTICLE DEVELOPS A FORMAL MODEL FOR COMPARING THE COST STRUCTURE OF THE TWO MAIN TRANSPORT OPTIONS FOR NATURAL GAS: liquefied natural gas (LNG) and pipelines. In particular, it evaluates how variations in the prices of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions affect the relative cost-efficiency of these two options. Natural gas is often promoted as the most environmentally friendly of all fossil fuels, and LNG as a modern and efficient way of transporting it. Some research has been carried out into the local environmental impact of LNG facilities, but almost none into aspects related to climate change. This paper concludes that at current price levels for natural gas and CO2 emissions the distance from field to consumer and the volume of natural gas transported are the main determinants of transport costs. The pricing of natural gas and greenhouse emissions influence the relative cost-efficiency of LNG and pipeline transport, but only to a limited degree at current price levels. Because more energy is required for the LNG process (especially for fuelling the liquefaction process) than for pipelines at distances below 9100 km, LNG is more exposed to variability in the price of natural gas and greenhouse gas emissions up to this distance. If the prices of natural gas and/or greenhouse gas emission rise dramatically in the future, this will affect the choice between pipelines and LNG. Such a price increase will be favourable for pipelines relative to LNG.

  12. Novel approach for evaluation of air change rate in naturally ventilated occupied spaces based on metabolic CO2 time variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor; Markov, Detelin G.

    2014-01-01

    at low rate. This paper describes a new approach for ACR evaluation in naturally ventilated occupied spaces. Actual metabolic CO2 time variation record in an interval of time is compared with the computed variation of metabolic CO2 for the same time interval under reference conditions: sleeping occupants......, air-tight space, constant indoor pressure and temperature. The proposed approach for ACR evaluation can be applied to time intervals with any length, even with varying parameters of both indoor and outdoor air, in which metabolic CO2 generation rate is known and constant. This approach makes possible...

  13. Evidence from pyrosequencing indicates that natural variation in animal personality is associated with DRD4 DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, Eveline C; Mateman, A Christa; Zwier, Mathijs V; Caro, Samuel P; Verhoeven, Koen J F; van Oers, Kees

    2016-04-01

    Personality traits are heritable and respond to natural selection, but are at the same time influenced by the ontogenetic environment. Epigenetic effects, such as DNA methylation, have been proposed as a key mechanism to control personality variation. However, to date little is known about the contribution of epigenetic effects to natural variation in behaviour. Here, we show that great tit (Parus major) lines artificially selected for divergent exploratory behaviour for four generations differ in their DNA methylation levels at the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene. This D4 receptor is statistically associated with personality traits in both humans and nonhuman animals, including the great tit. Previous work in this songbird failed to detect functional genetic polymorphisms within DRD4 that could account for the gene-trait association. However, our observation supports the idea that DRD4 is functionally involved in exploratory behaviour but that its effects are mediated by DNA methylation. While the exact mechanism underlying the transgenerational consistency of DRD4 methylation remains to be elucidated, this study shows that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in shaping natural variation in personality traits. We outline how this first finding provides a basis for investigating the epigenetic contribution to personality traits in natural systems and its subsequent role for understanding the ecology and evolution of behavioural consistency. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The roles of allopatric divergence and natural selection in quantitative trait variation across a secondary contact zone in the lizard Anolis roquet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Helena; Surget-Groba, Yann; Thorpe, Roger S

    2008-12-01

    Populations of the Caribbean lizard, Anolis roquet, are thought to have experienced long periods of allopatry before recent secondary contact. To elucidate the effects of past allopatry on population divergence in A. roquet, we surveyed parallel transects across a secondary contact zone in northeastern Martinique. We used diagnostic molecular mitochondrial DNA markers to test fine-scale association of mitochondrial DNA lineage and geological region, multivariate statistical techniques to explore quantitative trait pattern, and cline fitting techniques to model trait variation across the zone of secondary contact. We found that lineages were strongly associated with geological regions along both transects, but quantitative trait patterns were remarkably different. Patterns of morphological and mitochondrial DNA variation were consistent with a strong barrier to gene flow on the coast, whereas there were no indications of barriers to gene flow in the transitional forest. Hence, the coastal populations behaved as would be predicted by an allopatric model of divergence in this complex, while those in the transitional forest did not, despite the close proximity of the transects and their shared geological history. Patterns of geographical variation in this species complex, together with environmental data, suggest that on balance, selection regimes on either side of the secondary contact zone in the transitional forest may be more convergent, while those either side of the secondary contact zone on the coast are more divergent. Hence, the evolutionary consequences of allopatry may be strongly influenced by local natural selection regimes.

  15. Measurement and Socio-Demographic Variation of Social Capital in a Large Population-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Tarja; Martelin, Tuija; Koskinen, Seppo; Simpura, Jussi; Alanen, Erkki; Harkanen, Tommi; Aromaa, Arpo

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The main objective of this study was to describe the variation of individual social capital according to socio-demographic factors, and to develop a suitable way to measure social capital for this purpose. The similarity of socio-demographic variation between the genders was also assessed. Data and methods: The study applied…

  16. Consensus and variations in opinions on delirium care : a survey of European delirium specialists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morandi, A; Davis, D; Taylor, J K; Bellelli, G; Olofsson, B; Kreisel, S; Teodorczuk, A; Kamholz, B; Hasemann, W; Young, J; Agar, M; de Rooij, S E; Meagher, D; Trabucchi, M; MacLullich, A M

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There are still substantial uncertainties over best practice in delirium care. The European Delirium Association (EDA) conducted a survey of its members and other interested parties on various aspects of delirium care. METHODS: The invitation to participate in the online survey was distr

  17. Genetic variations in marine natural population - Measurement and utility in resource management and conservation: A review

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.; Parulekar, A.H.

    the laboratory methods and genetic interpretation of gel phenotypes along with statistical methods for data analysis. The applications and perspectives for identifying and protecting genetic variation within and among marine populations are discussed in the light...

  18. Natural epigenetic variation contributes to heritable flowering divergence in a widespread asexual dandelion lineage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilschut, Rutger; Oplaat, C.; Snoek, L.B.; Kirschner, J.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic variation has been proposed to contribute to the success of asexual plants, either as a contributor to phenotypic plasticity or by enabling transient adaptation via selection on transgenerationally stable, but reversible, epialleles. While recent studies in experimental plant populations

  19. A role for gene duplication and natural variation of gene expression in the evolution of metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kliebenstein

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most eukaryotic genomes have undergone whole genome duplications during their evolutionary history. Recent studies have shown that the function of these duplicated genes can diverge from the ancestral gene via neo- or sub-functionalization within single genotypes. An additional possibility is that gene duplicates may also undergo partitioning of function among different genotypes of a species leading to genetic differentiation. Finally, the ability of gene duplicates to diverge may be limited by their biological function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test these hypotheses, I estimated the impact of gene duplication and metabolic function upon intraspecific gene expression variation of segmental and tandem duplicated genes within Arabidopsis thaliana. In all instances, the younger tandem duplicated genes showed higher intraspecific gene expression variation than the average Arabidopsis gene. Surprisingly, the older segmental duplicates also showed evidence of elevated intraspecific gene expression variation albeit typically lower than for the tandem duplicates. The specific biological function of the gene as defined by metabolic pathway also modulated the level of intraspecific gene expression variation. The major energy metabolism and biosynthetic pathways showed decreased variation, suggesting that they are constrained in their ability to accumulate gene expression variation. In contrast, a major herbivory defense pathway showed significantly elevated intraspecific variation suggesting that it may be under pressure to maintain and/or generate diversity in response to fluctuating insect herbivory pressures. CONCLUSION: These data show that intraspecific variation in gene expression is facilitated by an interaction of gene duplication and biological activity. Further, this plays a role in controlling diversity of plant metabolism.

  20. From Natural Language Text to Visual Models: A survey of Issues and Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina-Claudia OSMAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years, research groups focused on automating the process of extracting valuable information from Natural Language text in order to discover data and process models. In this context, several tools and approaches have been proposed. The overall objective of this survey is to examine existing literature works that transform textual specifications into visual models. This paper aims to give a comprehensive account of the existing tools meant to discover data and process models from natural language text. Our analysis focuses on approaches of these tools in the model extraction process and highlight issues of each proposed approach. In the case of object oriented software modelling of data models extraction we analyze the degree of automation, efficiency and completeness of the transformation process. Regarding process models extraction, the study is not limited only to business process discovery, but it also provides case studies from several fields such as medical or archaeological. Even if not all the tools developed are clearly depicting a Natural Language Processing technique, a review of each approach is presented.

  1. Flood- and Drought-Related Natural Hazards Activities of the U.S. Geological Survey in New England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombard, Pamela J.

    2016-03-23

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has many ongoing and recent water-related natural hazard activities in New England that can be used to help mitigate the effects of natural hazards in cooperation with other agencies. The themes related to potential hazards and the tools and science to better understand and address them include the following:

  2. The bursting nature of star formation in compact star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izotov, Y. I.; Guseva, N. G.; Fricke, K. J.; Henkel, C.

    2016-11-01

    We study integrated characteristics of ˜14 000 low-redshift (0 < z < 1) compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) selected from the Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. It is found that emission of these galaxies is dominated by strong young bursts of star formation, implying that their luminosities experience rapid variations on a time-scale of a few Myr. Reducing integrated characteristics of these galaxies to zero burst age would result in a considerably tighter and almost linear relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). The same correction implies that the specific star formation rate (the ratio of SFR and stellar mass) is not dependent on the galaxy stellar mass. We conclude that the correction for rapid luminosity evolution must be taken into account in a similar way when comparing different samples of low- and high-redshift SFGs. If the bursting nature of star formation and young burst ages are characteristics of the galaxies selected at high redshifts, the age correction of observed SFRs derived from the Hβ emission line or UV continua would modify the derived SFR densities in the early universe.

  3. The bursting nature of star formation in compact star-forming galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Izotov, Y I; Fricke, K J; Henkel, C

    2016-01-01

    We study integrated characteristics of ~14000 low-redshift (0Survey. It is found that emission of these galaxies is dominated by strong young bursts of star formation, implying that their luminosities experience rapid variations on a time scale of a few Myr. Reducing integrated characteristics of these galaxies to zero burst age would result in a considerably tighter and almost linear relation between stellar mass and star formation rate (SFR). The same correction implies that the specific star formation rate (the ratio of SFR and stellar mass) is not dependent on the galaxy stellar mass. We conclude that the correction for rapid luminosity evolution must be taken into account in a similar way when comparing different samples of low- and high-redshift SFGs. If the bursting nature of star formation and young burst ages are characteristics of the galaxies selected at high redshifts, the age correction of ...

  4. Sensitivity of benzene natural attenuation to variations in kinetic and transport parameters in Liwa Aquifer, UAE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamed M; Saleh, Nawal E; Sherif, Mohsen M

    2010-04-01

    Dissolved benzene was detected in the shallow unconfined Liwa aquifer (UAE). This aquifer represents the main freshwater source for a nearby residence camp area. A finite element model is used to simulate the fate, transport, and attenuation of the dissolved benzene plume to help decision makers assess natural attenuation as a viable remediation option. Sensitivity of benzene attenuation to uncertainties in the estimation of some of the kinetic and transport parameters is studied. It was found that natural attenuation is more sensitive to microbial growth rate and half saturation coefficients of both benzene and oxygen than initial biomass concentration and dispersivity coefficients. Increasing microbial growth rate by fourfold increased natural attenuation effectiveness after 40 years by 10%; while decreasing it by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 77%. On the other hand, increasing half saturation coefficient by fourfold decreased natural attenuation effectiveness by 46% in 40 years. Decreasing the same parameter fourfold caused natural attenuation effectiveness to increase by 9%.

  5. The Natural Variation in Lifespans of Single Yeast Cells Is Related to Variation in Cell Size, Ribosomal Protein, and Division Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Georges E; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

    2016-01-01

    There is a large variability in lifespans of individuals even if they are genetically identical and raised under the same environmental conditions. Our recent system wide study of replicative aging in baker's yeast predicts that protein biogenesis is a driver of aging. Here, we address how the natural variation in replicative lifespan within wild-type populations of yeast cells correlates to three biogenesis-related parameters, namely cell size, ribosomal protein Rpl13A-GFP levels, and division times. Imaging wild type yeast cells in microfluidic devices we observe that in all cells and at all ages, the division times as well as the increase in cell size that single yeast undergo while aging negatively correlate to their lifespan. In the longer-lived cells Rpl13A-GFP levels also negatively correlate to lifespan. Interestingly however, at young ages in the population, ribosome concentration was lowest in the cells that increased the most in size and had shorter lifespans. The correlations between these molecular and cellular properties related to biogenesis and lifespan explain a small portion of the variation in lifespans of individual cells, consistent with the highly individual and multifactorial nature of aging.

  6. Natural variation reveals that intracellular distribution of ELF3 protein is associated with function in the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, Muhammad Usman; Boikoglou, Eleni; Herrero, Eva; Hallstein, Marc; Davis, Amanda Melaragno; Velikkakam James, Geo; Nagy, Ferenc; Davis, Seth Jon

    2014-05-27

    Natural selection of variants within the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock can be attributed to adaptation to varying environments. To define a basis for such variation, we examined clock speed in a reporter-modified Bay-0 x Shakdara recombinant inbred line and localized heritable variation. Extensive variation led us to identify EARLY FLOWERING3 (ELF3) as a major quantitative trait locus (QTL). The causal nucleotide polymorphism caused a short-period phenotype under light and severely dampened rhythm generation in darkness, and entrainment alterations resulted. We found that ELF3-Sha protein failed to properly localize to the nucleus, and its ability to accumulate in darkness was compromised. Evidence was provided that the ELF3-Sha allele originated in Central Asia. Collectively, we showed that ELF3 protein plays a vital role in defining its light-repressor action in the circadian clock and that its functional abilities are largely dependent on its cellular localization.

  7. Natural variation in life history and aging phenotypes is associated with mitochondrial DNA deletion frequency in Caenorhabditis briggsae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Samson W

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations that impair mitochondrial functioning are associated with a variety of metabolic and age-related disorders. A barrier to rigorous tests of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in aging processes has been the lack of model systems with relevant, naturally occurring mitochondrial genetic variation. Toward the goal of developing such a model system, we studied natural variation in life history, metabolic, and aging phenotypes as it relates to levels of a naturally-occurring heteroplasmic mitochondrial ND5 deletion recently discovered to segregate among wild populations of the soil nematode, Caenorhabditis briggsae. The normal product of ND5 is a central component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain and integral to cellular energy metabolism. Results We quantified significant variation among C. briggsae isolates for all phenotypes measured, only some of which was statistically associated with isolate-specific ND5 deletion frequency. We found that fecundity-related traits and pharyngeal pumping rate were strongly inversely related to ND5 deletion level and that C. briggsae isolates with high ND5 deletion levels experienced a tradeoff between early fecundity and lifespan. Conversely, oxidative stress resistance was only weakly associated with ND5 deletion level while ATP content was unrelated to deletion level. Finally, mean levels of reactive oxygen species measured in vivo showed a significant non-linear relationship with ND5 deletion level, a pattern that may be driven by among-isolate variation in antioxidant or other compensatory mechanisms. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the ND5 deletion may adversely affect fitness and mitochondrial functioning while promoting aging in natural populations, and help to further establish this species as a useful model for explicit tests of hypotheses in aging biology and mitochondrial genetics.

  8. Genome-wide association implicates numerous genes and pleiotropy underlying ecological trait variation in natural populations of Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKown, Athena [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Klapste, Jaroslav [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Guy, Robert [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Geraldes, Armando [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Porth, Ilga [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Hannemann, Jan [University of Victoria, Canada; Friedmann, Michael [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Muchero, Wellington [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Ehlting, Juergen [University of Victoria, Canada; Cronk, Quentin [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; El-Kassaby, Yousry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Mansfield, Shawn [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Douglas, Carl [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    2014-01-01

    To uncover the genetic basis of phenotypic trait variation, we used 448 unrelated wild accessions of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) from natural populations throughout western North America. Extensive information from large-scale trait phenotyping (with spatial and temporal replications within a common garden) and genotyping (with a 34K Populus SNP array) of all accessions were used for gene discovery in a genome-wide association study (GWAS).

  9. Phase reconstruction from velocity-encoded MRI measurements – A survey of sparsity-promoting variational approaches

    KAUST Repository

    Benning, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years there has been significant developments in the reconstruction of magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. While showing a strong improvement in reconstruction quality compared to classical approaches, the vast number of different methods, and the challenges in setting them up, often leaves the user with the difficult task of choosing the correct approach, or more importantly, not selecting a poor approach. In this paper, we survey variational approaches for the reconstruction of phase-encoded magnetic resonance velocity images from sub-sampled k-space data. We are particularly interested in regularisers that correctly treat both smooth and geometric features of the image. These features are common to velocity imaging, where the flow field will be smooth but interfaces between the fluid and surrounding material will be sharp, but are challenging to represent sparsely. As an example we demonstrate the variational approaches on velocity imaging of water flowing through a packed bed of solid particles. We evaluate Wavelet regularisation against Total Variation and the relatively recent second order Total Generalised Variation regularisation. We combine these regularisation schemes with a contrast enhancement approach called Bregman iteration. We verify for a variety of sampling patterns that Morozov\\'s discrepancy principle provides a good criterion for stopping the iterations. Therefore, given only the noise level, we present a robust guideline for setting up a variational reconstruction scheme for MR velocity imaging. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Natural variation in the Pto pathogen resistance gene within species of wild tomato (Lycopersicon). I. Functional analysis of Pto alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Laura E; Langley, Charles H; Bernal, Adriana J; Michelmore, Richard W

    2005-09-01

    Disease resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) in the cultivated tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, and the closely related L. pimpinellifolium is triggered by the physical interaction between plant disease resistance protein, Pto, and the pathogen avirulence protein, AvrPto. To investigate the extent to which variation in the Pto gene is responsible for naturally occurring variation in resistance to Pst, we determined the resistance phenotype of 51 accessions from seven species of Lycopersicon to isogenic strains of Pst differing in the presence of avrPto. One-third of the plants displayed resistance specifically when the pathogen expressed AvrPto, consistent with a gene-for-gene interaction. To test whether this resistance in these species was conferred specifically by the Pto gene, alleles of Pto were amplified and sequenced from 49 individuals and a subset (16) of these alleles was tested in planta using Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays. Eleven alleles conferred a hypersensitive resistance response (HR) in the presence of AvrPto, while 5 did not. Ten amino acid substitutions associated with the absence of AvrPto recognition and HR were identified, none of which had been identified in previous structure-function studies. Additionally, 3 alleles encoding putative pseudogenes of Pto were isolated from two species of Lycopersicon. Therefore, a large proportion, but not all, of the natural variation in the reaction to strains of Pst expressing AvrPto can be attributed to sequence variation in the Pto gene.

  11. Running vacuum in the Universe and the time variation of the fundamental constants of Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsch, Harald [Nanyang Technological University, Institute for Advanced Study, Singapore (Singapore); Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department, Munich (Germany); Sola, Joan [Nanyang Technological University, Institute for Advanced Study, Singapore (Singapore); Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Quantica i Astrofisica, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona (ICCUB), Institute of Cosmos Sciences, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Nunes, Rafael C. [Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Dept. de Fisica, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    We compute the time variation of the fundamental constants (such as the ratio of the proton mass to the electron mass, the strong coupling constant, the fine-structure constant and Newton's constant) within the context of the so-called running vacuum models (RVMs) of the cosmic evolution. Recently, compelling evidence has been provided that these models are able to fit the main cosmological data (SNIa+BAO+H(z)+LSS+BBN+CMB) significantly better than the concordance ΛCDM model. Specifically, the vacuum parameters of the RVM (i.e. those responsible for the dynamics of the vacuum energy) prove to be nonzero at a confidence level >or similar 3σ. Here we use such remarkable status of the RVMs to make definite predictions on the cosmic time variation of the fundamental constants. It turns out that the predicted variations are close to the present observational limits. Furthermore, we find that the time evolution of the dark matter particle masses should be crucially involved in the total mass variation of our Universe. A positive measurement of this kind of effects could be interpreted as strong support to the ''micro-macro connection'' (viz. the dynamical feedback between the evolution of the cosmological parameters and the time variation of the fundamental constants of the microscopic world), previously proposed by two of us (HF and JS). (orig.)

  12. Diurnal and circadian variation of sleep and alertness in men vs. naturally cycling women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Diane B; Shechter, Ari; Boudreau, Philippe; Begum, Esmot Ara; Ng Ying-Kin, Ng Mien Kwong

    2016-09-27

    This study quantifies sex differences in the diurnal and circadian variation of sleep and waking while controlling for menstrual cycle phase and hormonal contraceptive use. We compared the diurnal and circadian variation of sleep and alertness of 8 women studied during two phases of the menstrual cycle and 3 women studied during their midfollicular phase with that of 15 men. Participants underwent an ultradian sleep-wake cycle (USW) procedure consisting of 36 cycles of 60-min wake episodes alternating with 60-min nap opportunities. Core body temperature (CBT), salivary melatonin, subjective alertness, and polysomnographically recorded sleep were measured throughout this procedure. All analyzed measures showed a significant diurnal and circadian variation throughout the USW procedure. Compared with men, women demonstrated a significant phase advance of the CBT but not melatonin rhythms, as well as an advance in the diurnal and circadian variation of sleep measures and subjective alertness. Furthermore, women experienced an increased amplitude of the diurnal and circadian variation of alertness, mainly due to a larger decline in the nocturnal nadir. Our results indicate that women are likely initiating sleep at a later circadian phase than men, which may be one factor contributing to the increased susceptibility to sleep disturbances reported in women. Lower nighttime alertness is also observed, suggesting a physiological basis for a greater susceptibility to maladaptation to night shift work in women.

  13. Copy number variation of ribosomal DNA and Pokey transposons in natural populations of Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eagle Shannon HC

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite their ubiquity and high diversity in eukaryotic genomes, DNA transposons are rarely encountered in ribosomal DNA (rDNA. In contrast, R-elements, a diverse group of non-LTR retrotransposons, specifically target rDNA. Pokey is a DNA transposon that targets a specific rDNA site, but also occurs in many other genomic locations, unlike R-elements. However, unlike most DNA transposons, Pokey has been a stable component of Daphnia genomes for over 100 million years. Here we use qPCR to estimate the number of 18S and 28S ribosomal RNA genes and Pokey elements in rDNA (rPokey, as well as other genomic locations (gPokey in two species of Daphnia. Our goals are to estimate the correlation between (1 the number of 18S and 28S rRNA genes, (2 the number of 28S genes and rPokey, and (3 the number of rPokey and gPokey. In addition, we ask whether Pokey number and distribution in both genomic compartments are affected by differences in life history between D. pulex and D. pulicaria. Results We found differences in 18S and 28S gene number within isolates that are too large to be explained by experimental variation. In general, Pokey number within isolates is modest (Pokey. There is no correlation between the number of rRNA genes and rPokey, or between rPokey and gPokey. However, we identified three isolates with unusually high numbers of both rPokey and gPokey, which we infer is a consequence of recent transposition. We also detected other rDNA insertions (rInserts that could be degraded Pokey elements, R- elements or the divergent PokeyB lineage recently detected in the Daphnia genome sequence. Unlike rPokey, rInserts are positively correlated with rRNA genes, suggesting that they are amplified by the same mechanisms that amplify rDNA units even though rPokey is not. Overall, Pokey frequency and distribution are similar in D. pulex and D. pulicaria suggesting that differences in life history have no impact on Pokey. Conclusions The

  14. Natural variation in Pristionchus pacificus dauer formation reveals cross-preference rather than self-preference of nematode dauer pheromones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Melanie G.; Sommer, Ralf J.

    2011-01-01

    Many free-living nematodes, including the laboratory model organisms Caenorhabditis elegans and Pristionchus pacificus, have a choice between direct and indirect development, representing an important case of phenotypic plasticity. Under harsh environmental conditions, these nematodes form dauer larvae, which arrest development, show high resistance to environmental stress and constitute a dispersal stage. Pristionchus pacificus occurs in a strong association with scarab beetles in the wild and remains in the dauer stage on the living beetle. Here, we explored the circumstances under which P. pacificus enters and exits the dauer stage by using a natural variation approach. The analysis of survival, recovery and fitness after dauer exit of eight P. pacificus strains revealed that dauer larvae can survive for up to 1 year under experimental conditions. In a second experiment, we isolated dauer pheromones from 16 P. pacificus strains, and tested for natural variation in pheromone production and sensitivity in cross-reactivity assays. Surprisingly, 13 of the 16 strains produce a pheromone that induces the highest dauer formation in individuals of other genotypes. These results argue against a simple adaptation model for natural variation in dauer formation and suggest that strains may have evolved to induce dauer formation precociously in other strains in order to reduce the fitness of these strains. We therefore discuss intraspecific competition among genotypes as a previously unconsidered aspect of dauer formation. PMID:21307052

  15. A Brief Survey of the History of the Calculus of Variations and its Applications

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we trace the development of the theory of the calculus of variations. From its roots in the work of Greek thinkers and continuing through to the Renaissance, we see that advances in physics serve as a catalyst for developments in the mathematical theory. From the 18th century onwards, the task of establishing a rigourous framework of the calculus of variations is studied, culminating in Hilbert's work on the Dirichlet problem and the development of optimal control theory. Final...

  16. Inter-clinic variation in the chances of natural conception of subfertile couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon-Kon-Fat, R. I.; Lar, D. N.; Steyerberg, E. W.; Broekmans, F. J.; Hompes, P.; Mol, B. W. J.; Steures, P.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; van der Veen, F.; van der Steeg, J. W.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Are there differences between clinics in the chances of natural conception of couples? We found significant differences between clinics in the couples natural conception chances, which could not be explained by differences in characteristics of the patients or the clinics. In pooled data from multip

  17. Inter-clinic variation in the chances of natural conception of subfertile couples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjon-Kon-Fat, R. I.; Lar, D. N.; Steyerberg, E. W.; Broekmans, F. J.; Hompes, P.; Mol, B. W. J.; Steures, P.; Bossuyt, P. M. M.; van der Veen, F.; van der Steeg, J. W.; Eijkemans, M. J. C.

    2013-01-01

    Are there differences between clinics in the chances of natural conception of couples? We found significant differences between clinics in the couples natural conception chances, which could not be explained by differences in characteristics of the patients or the clinics. In pooled data from multip

  18. Microsatellite development and survey of genetic variation in skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Menezes, M.R.; Noguchi, D.; Nakajima, M.; Taniguchi, N.

    of Population Genetic Informatics, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 981-8555, Japan (Received 23 October 2007, Accepted 26 March 2008) A survey of five newly developed microsatellite DNA markers in skipjack tuna Katsuwonus pelamis revealed high levels...

  19. Estimation of geographic variation in human papillomavirus vaccine uptake in men and women: an online survey using facebook recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Erik J; Hughes, John; Oakes, J Michael; Pankow, James S; Kulasingam, Shalini L

    2014-09-01

    Federally funded surveys of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake are important for pinpointing geographically based health disparities. Although national and state level data are available, local (ie, county and postal code level) data are not due to small sample sizes, confidentiality concerns, and cost. Local level HPV vaccine uptake data may be feasible to obtain by targeting specific geographic areas through social media advertising and recruitment strategies, in combination with online surveys. Our goal was to use Facebook-based recruitment and online surveys to estimate local variation in HPV vaccine uptake among young men and women in Minnesota. From November 2012 to January 2013, men and women were recruited via a targeted Facebook advertisement campaign to complete an online survey about HPV vaccination practices. The Facebook advertisements were targeted to recruit men and women by location (25 mile radius of Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States), age (18-30 years), and language (English). Of the 2079 men and women who responded to the Facebook advertisements and visited the study website, 1003 (48.2%) enrolled in the study and completed the survey. The average advertising cost per completed survey was US $1.36. Among those who reported their postal code, 90.6% (881/972) of the participants lived within the previously defined geographic study area. Receipt of 1 dose or more of HPV vaccine was reported by 65.6% women (351/535), and 13.0% (45/347) of men. These results differ from previously reported Minnesota state level estimates (53.8% for young women and 20.8% for young men) and from national estimates (34.5% for women and 2.3% for men). This study shows that recruiting a representative sample of young men and women based on county and postal code location to complete a survey on HPV vaccination uptake via the Internet is a cost-effective and feasible strategy. This study also highlights the need for local estimates to assess the variation in HPV

  20. Variation in Management of Fever and Neutropenia Among Pediatric Patients With Cancer: A Survey of Providers in Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Emily L; Walkovich, Kelly J; Yanik, Gregory A; Clark, Sarah J

    2015-01-01

    Considerable variation in the management of fever and neutropenia (FN) exists, with factors associated with treatment variation not well described. An online survey of 90 pediatric cancer providers in Michigan was performed in Spring 2014. The survey frame was pediatric patients with cancer receiving treatment, with a Port-a-cath, who were clinically stable. Criteria for "Decreased" and "Increased" risk groups were defined by respondents. Survey questions addressed FN definitions, risk groups conceptualization, routine clinical practice, and management guidelines, in the context of risk groups and distance to treating institution. Fifty providers responded (56%); the majority defined a febrile event as temperature >38.3°C and/or 2 events >38.0°C within a 24-hour period. Neutropenia was defined as current or anticipated absolute neutrophil count (ANC) 2 hours away. Respondents were significantly more likely to have a "Decreased Risk" patient travel over 2 hours if they rated the local ED as "Poor to Fair" on ability to access Port-a-caths (P = .048). Most respondents would discharge patients who are afebrile for 24 hours, blood cultures negative for 48 hours, and neutrophil count of greater than 200/μL; 40% preferred discharge on oral antibiotics when the ANC febrile pediatric patients with cancer is significantly influenced by the providers' perceptions of local EDs. Future investigation of local hospitals' ability to provide urgent evaluation, combined with parental perspectives, could lead to improvements in timely and effective management.

  1. On the Nature of Syntactic Variation: Evidence from Complex Predicates and Complex Word-Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, William

    2001-01-01

    Provides evidence from child language acquisition and comparative syntax for existence of a syntactic parameter in the classical sense of Chomsky (1981), with simultaneous effects on syntactic argument structure. Implications are that syntax is subject to points of substantive parametric variation as envisioned in Chomsky, and the time course of…

  2. Segregating YKU80 and TLC1 alleles underlying natural variation in telomere properties in wild yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianni Liti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In yeast, as in humans, telomere length varies among individuals and is controlled by multiple loci. In a quest to define the extent of variation in telomere length, we screened 112 wild-type Saccharomyces sensu stricto isolates. We found extensive telomere length variation in S. paradoxus isolates. This phenotype correlated with their geographic origin: European strains were observed to have extremely short telomeres (400 bp. Insertions of a URA3 gene near telomeres allowed accurate analysis of individual telomere lengths and telomere position effect (TPE. Crossing the American and European strains resulted in F1 spores with a continuum of telomere lengths consistent with what would be predicted if many quantitative trait loci (QTLs were involved in length maintenance. Variation in TPE is similarly quantitative but only weakly correlated with telomere length. Genotyping F1 segregants indicated several QTLs associated with telomere length and silencing variation. These QTLs include likely candidate genes but also map to regions where there are no known genes involved in telomeric properties. We detected transgressive segregation for both phenotypes. We validated by reciprocal hemizygosity that YKU80 and TLC1 are telomere-length QTLs in the two S. paradoxus subpopulations. Furthermore, we propose that sequence divergence within the Ku heterodimer generates negative epistasis within one of the allelic combinations (American-YKU70 and European-YKU80 resulting in very short telomeres.

  3. Natural Selection and Evolution: Using Multimedia Slide Shows to Emphasize the Role of Genetic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Most middle school students comprehend that organisms have adaptations that enable their survival and that successful adaptations prevail in a population over time. Yet they often miss that those bird beaks, moth-wing colors, or whatever traits are the result of random, normal genetic variations that just happen to confer a negative, neutral, or…

  4. Running vacuum in the Universe and the time variation of the fundamental constants of Nature

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald; Sola, Joan

    2016-01-01

    We compute the time variation of the fundamental constants (such as the ratio of the proton mass to the electron mass, the strong coupling constant, the fine structure constant and Newton's constant) within the context of the so-called running vacuum models (RVM's) of the cosmic evolution. Recently, compelling evidence has been provided showing that these models are able to fit the main cosmological data (SNIa+BAO+H(z)+LSS+BBN+CMB) significantly better than the concordance $\\Lambda$CDM model. Specifically, the vacuum parameters of the RVM (i.e. those responsible for the dynamics of the vacuum energy) prove to be nonzero at a confidence level of $\\gtrsim3\\sigma$. Here we use such remarkable status of the RVM's to make definite predictions on the cosmic time variation of the fundamental constants. It turns out that the predicted variations are close to the present observational limits. Furthermore, we find that the time variation of the dark matter particles should be necessarily involved in the total mass vari...

  5. Analysis of natural allelic variation at seed dormancy loci of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Blanco, C.; Bentsink, L.; Hanhart, C.J.; Vries, de M.H.C.; Koornneef, M.

    2003-01-01

    Arabidopsis accessions differ largely in their seed dormancy behavior. To understand the genetic basis of this intraspecific variation we analyzed two accessions: the laboratory strain Landsberg erecta (Ler) with low dormancy and the strong-dormancy accession Cape Verde Islands (Cvi). We used a quan

  6. Natural variation for gene expression responses to abiotic stress in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Amanda J; Makarevitch, Irina; Noshay, Jaclyn; Burghardt, Liana T; Hirsch, Candice N; Hirsch, Cory D; Springer, Nathan M

    2017-02-01

    Plants respond to abiotic stress through a variety of physiological, biochemical, and transcriptional mechanisms. Many genes exhibit altered levels of expression in response to abiotic stress, which requires concerted action of both cis- and trans-regulatory features. In order to study the variability in transcriptome response to abiotic stress, RNA sequencing was performed using 14-day-old maize seedlings of inbreds B73, Mo17, Oh43, PH207 and B37 under control, cold and heat conditions. Large numbers of genes that responded differentially to stress between parental inbred lines were identified. RNA sequencing was also performed on similar tissues of the F1 hybrids produced by crossing B73 and each of the three other inbred lines. By evaluating allele-specific transcript abundance in the F1 hybrids, we were able to measure the abundance of cis- and trans-regulatory variation between genotypes for both steady-state and stress-responsive expression differences. Although examples of trans-regulatory variation were observed, cis-regulatory variation was more common for both steady-state and stress-responsive expression differences. The genes with cis-allelic variation for response to cold or heat stress provided an opportunity to study the basis for regulatory diversity.

  7. WormQTL—public archive and analysis web portal for natural variation data in Caenorhabditis spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, L.B.; Velde, van der K.J.; Arends, D.; Li, Y.; Beyer, A.; Elvin, M.; Fisher, J.; Hajnal, A.; Hengartner, M.; Poulin, G.; Rodriguez Sanchez, M.; Schmid, T.; Schrimpf, S.; Xue, F.; Jansen, R.C.; Kammenga, J.E.; Swertz, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present WormQTL (http://www.wormqtl.org), an easily accessible database enabling search, comparative analysis and meta-analysis of all data on variation in Caenorhabditis spp. Over the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has become instrumental for molecular quantitative genetics and the sy

  8. WormQTL-public archive and analysis web portal for natural variation data in Caenorhabditis spp

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, L. Basten; Van der Velde, K. Joeri; Arends, Danny; Li, Yang; Beyer, Antje; Elvin, Mark; Fisher, Jasmin; Hajnal, Alex; Hengartner, Michael O.; Poulin, Gino B.; Rodriguez, Miriam; Schmid, Tobias; Schrimpf, Sabine; Xue, Feng; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Swertz, Morris A.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present WormQTL (http://www.wormqtl.org), an easily accessible database enabling search, comparative analysis and meta-analysis of all data on variation in Caenorhabditis spp. Over the past decade, Caenorhabditis elegans has become instrumental for molecular quantitative genetics and the sy

  9. Allelic heterogeneity and trade-off shape natural variation for response to soil micronutrient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifollah Poormohammad Kiani

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants have to cope with diverse environmental constraints that may vary through time and space, eventually leading to changes in the phenotype of populations through fixation of adaptive genetic variation. To fully comprehend the mechanisms of evolution and make sense of the extensive genotypic diversity currently revealed by new sequencing technologies, we are challenged with identifying the molecular basis of such adaptive variation. Here, we have identified a new variant of a molybdenum (Mo transporter, MOT1, which is causal for fitness changes under artificial conditions of both Mo-deficiency and Mo-toxicity and in which allelic variation among West-Asian populations is strictly correlated with the concentration of available Mo in native soils. In addition, this association is accompanied at different scales with patterns of polymorphisms that are not consistent with neutral evolution and show signs of diversifying selection. Resolving such a case of allelic heterogeneity helps explain species-wide phenotypic variation for Mo homeostasis and potentially reveals trade-off effects, a finding still rarely linked to fitness.

  10. Allelic heterogeneity and trade-off shape natural variation for response to soil micronutrient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seifollah Poormohammad Kiani

    Full Text Available As sessile organisms, plants have to cope with diverse environmental constraints that may vary through time and space, eventually leading to changes in the phenotype of populations through fixation of adaptive genetic variation. To fully comprehend the mechanisms of evolution and make sense of the extensive genotypic diversity currently revealed by new sequencing technologies, we are challenged with identifying the molecular basis of such adaptive variation. Here, we have identified a new variant of a molybdenum (Mo transporter, MOT1, which is causal for fitness changes under artificial conditions of both Mo-deficiency and Mo-toxicity and in which allelic variation among West-Asian populations is strictly correlated with the concentration of available Mo in native soils. In addition, this association is accompanied at different scales with patterns of polymorphisms that are not consistent with neutral evolution and show signs of diversifying selection. Resolving such a case of allelic heterogeneity helps explain species-wide phenotypic variation for Mo homeostasis and potentially reveals trade-off effects, a finding still rarely linked to fitness.

  11. Natural variation at Strubbelig Receptor Kinase 3 drives immune-triggered incompatibilities between Arabidopsis thaliana accessions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alcazar, R.; Garcia, A.V.; Kronholm, I.; Meaux, De J.; Koornneef, M.; Parker, J.E.; Reymond, M.

    2010-01-01

    Accumulation of genetic incompatibilities within species can lead to reproductive isolation and, potentially, speciation. In this study, we show that allelic variation at SRF3 (Strubbelig Receptor Family 3), encoding a receptor-like kinase, conditions the occurrence of incompatibility between Arabid

  12. Fiscal 1999 research report. Survey on geothermal development sites (Survey on natural environment); 1999 nendo chinetsu kaihatsu sokushin chosa. Shizen kankyo chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report summarizes the result on selecting sites for large-caliber production wells, and landscape characteristic evaluation for simulation, based on the landscape survey on C candidate site for geothermal development. Field survey was made on landscape, plants and animals in the Kirishima Eboshidake area. It was clarified that this area has diverse flora including some rare species such as rein orchid and monkshood which are listed as endangered species. In addition, not a few epiphytes were identified. The zoological survey result showed that planted forests of evergreen coniferous trees which cover a wide range of the surveyed area, and peripheral grassland, scrub and natural forests provide good habitats for mammals such as sika deer and wild boars. On the other hand, no animal species in need of special protection were found. Geologically some traces of landslide occurrence in the past were detected in the northern part of the surveyed area relatively. As the survey result, some promising sites suitable for geothermal development were selected, which are judged to have a relatively small impact on natural environment and landscape. (NEDO)

  13. Genome Size Variation in Central European Species of Cirsium (Compositae) and their Natural Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Bureš, Petr; Wang, Yi-Feng; Horová, Lucie; Suda, Jan

    2004-01-01

    • Background and Aims Nuclear DNA amounts of 12 diploid and one tetraploid taxa and 12 natural interspecific hybrids of Cirsium from 102 populations in the Czech Republic, Austria, Slovakia and Hungary were estimated.

  14. Connectedness to nature and public (skin) health perspectives: results of a representative, population-based survey among Austrian residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haluza, Daniela; Simic, Stana; Höltge, Jan; Cervinka, Renate; Moshammer, Hanns

    2014-01-20

    Connectedness to nature (CN) influences motivation to have contact with outdoor natural environments. Spending leisure time in natural environments is beneficial for human health and well-being. Besides these positive effects, health risks of open-air activities are mainly related to unprotected sun light exposure-associated acute and chronic skin hazards. Thus, we conducted a cross-sectional, representative telephone survey among Austrian residents to study the association of perceived CN level with sun-exposure knowledge, tanning habits, and sun protective behaviour. In total, 1,500 study subjects (50.5% females) participated in this questionnaire survey. Although knowledge about tanning and motives to tan were similar among genders, females performed more photoprotective measures and were more connected to nature (all p nature connectedness and skin health-relevant recreational habits of Austrian residents. The findings suggest to integrate hitherto neglected gender-specific Public (Skin) Health promotion when counselling on the manifold health advantages of outdoor activities.

  15. PEP1 of Arabis alpina is encoded by two overlapping genes that contribute to natural genetic variation in perennial flowering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C Albani

    Full Text Available Higher plants exhibit a variety of different life histories. Annual plants live for less than a year and after flowering produce seeds and senesce. By contrast perennials live for many years, dividing their life cycle into episodes of vegetative growth and flowering. Environmental cues control key check points in both life histories. Genes controlling responses to these cues exhibit natural genetic variation that has been studied most in short-lived annuals. We characterize natural genetic variation conferring differences in the perennial life cycle of Arabis alpina. Previously the accession Pajares was shown to flower after prolonged exposure to cold (vernalization and only for a limited period before returning to vegetative growth. We describe five accessions of A. alpina that do not require vernalization to flower and flower continuously. Genetic complementation showed that these accessions carry mutant alleles at PERPETUAL FLOWERING 1 (PEP1, which encodes a MADS box transcription factor orthologous to FLOWERING LOCUS C in the annual Arabidopsis thaliana. Each accession carries a different mutation at PEP1, suggesting that such variation has arisen independently many times. Characterization of these alleles demonstrated that in most accessions, including Pajares, the PEP1 locus contains a tandem arrangement of a full length and a partial PEP1 copy, which give rise to two full-length transcripts that are differentially expressed. This complexity contrasts with the single gene present in A. thaliana and might contribute to the more complex expression pattern of PEP1 that is associated with the perennial life-cycle. Our work demonstrates that natural accessions of A. alpina exhibit distinct life histories conferred by differences in PEP1 activity, and that continuous flowering forms have arisen multiple times by inactivation of the floral repressor PEP1. Similar phenotypic variation is found in other herbaceous perennial species, and our results

  16. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Exploring the complex nature and origins of the Galactic bulge populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Arriagada, A.; Recio-Blanco, A.; de Laverny, P.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Matteucci, F.; Spitoni, E.; Schultheis, M.; Hayden, M.; Hill, V.; Zoccali, M.; Minniti, D.; Gonzalez, O. A.; Gilmore, G.; Randich, S.; Feltzing, S.; Alfaro, E. J.; Babusiaux, C.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Koposov, S. E.; Pancino, E.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Damiani, F.; Donati, P.; Franciosini, E.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; Lewis, J.; Lind, K.; Magrini, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2017-05-01

    Context. As observational evidence steadily accumulates, the nature of the Galactic bulge has proven to be rather complex: the structural, kinematic, and chemical analyses often lead to contradictory conclusions. The nature of the metal-rich bulge - and especially of the metal-poor bulge - and their relation with other Galactic components, still need to be firmly defined on the basis of statistically significant high-quality data samples. Aims: We used the fourth internal data release of the Gaia-ESO survey to characterize the bulge metallicity distribution function (MDF), magnesium abundance, spatial distribution, and correlation of these properties with kinematics. Moreover, the homogeneous sampling of the different Galactic populations provided by the Gaia-ESO survey allowed us to perform a comparison between the bulge, thin disk, and thick disk sequences in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane in order to constrain the extent of their eventual chemical similarities. Methods: We obtained spectroscopic data for 2500 red clump stars in 11 bulge fields, sampling the area -10° ≤ l ≤ + 8° and -10° ≤ b ≤ -4° from the fourth internal data release of the Gaia-ESO survey. A sample of 6300 disk stars was also selected for comparison. Spectrophotometric distances computed via isochrone fitting allowed us to define a sample of stars likely located in the bulge region. Results: From a Gaussian mixture models (GMM) analysis, the bulge MDF is confirmed to be bimodal across the whole sampled area. The relative ratio between the two modes of the MDF changes as a function of b, with metal-poor stars dominating at high latitudes. The metal-rich stars exhibit bar-like kinematics and display a bimodality in their magnitude distribution, a feature which is tightly associated with the X-shape bulge. They overlap with the metal-rich end of the thin disk sequence in the [Mg/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] plane. On the other hand, metal-poor bulge stars have a more isotropic hot kinematics and do

  17. The Relationship Between Variation in Size of the Primordial Follicle Pool and Age at Natural Menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depmann, M; Faddy, M J; van der Schouw, Y T; Peeters, P H M; Broer, S L; Kelsey, T W; Nelson, S M; Broekmans, F J M

    2015-06-01

    Menopause has been hypothesized to occur when the nongrowing follicle (NGF) number falls below a critical threshold. Age at natural menopause can be predicted using NGF numbers and this threshold. These predictions support the use of ovarian reserve tests, reflective of the ovarian follicle pool, in menopause forecasting. The objective of the study was to investigate the hypothesis that age-specific NGF numbers reflect age at natural menopause. Histologically derived NGF numbers obtained from published literature (n = 218) and distribution of menopausal ages derived from the population-based Prospect-European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (Prospect-EPIC) cohort (n = 4037) were combined. NGF data were from single ovaries that had been obtained postnatally for various reasons, such as elective surgery or autopsy. From the Prospect-EPIC cohort, women aged 58 years and older with a known age at natural menopause were selected. There were no interventions. Conformity between observed age at menopause in the Prospect-EPIC cohort and NGF-predicted age at menopause from a model for age-related NGF decline constructed using a robust regression analysis. A critical threshold for NGF number was estimated by comparing the probability distribution of the age at which the NGF numbers fall below this threshold with the observed distribution of age at natural menopause from the Prospect-EPIC cohort. The distributions of observed age at natural menopause and predicted age at natural menopause showed close conformity. The close conformity observed between NGF-predicted and actual age at natural menopause supports the hypothesis that that the size of the primordial follicle pool is an important determinant for the length of the individual ovarian life span and supports the concept of menopause prediction using ovarian reserve tests, such as anti-Müllerian hormone and antral follicle count, as derivatives of the true ovarian reserve.

  18. Modeling Modern Methane Emissions from Natural Wetlands. 2; Interannual Variations 1982-1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Bernadette P.; Heimann, Martin; Mattews, Elaine; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A global run of a process-based methane model [Walter et al., this issue] is performed using high-frequency atmospheric forcing fields from ECMWF reanalyses of the period from 1982 to 1993. We calculate global annual methane emissions to be 260 Tg/ yr. 25% of methane emissions originate from wetlands north of 30 deg. N. Only 60% of the produced methane is emitted, while the rest is re-oxidized. A comparison of zonal integrals of simulated global wetland emissions and results obtained by an inverse modeling approach shows good agreement. In a test with data from two wetlands, the seasonality of simulated and observed methane emissions agrees well. The effects of sub-grid scale variations in model parameters and input data are examined. Modeled methane emissions show high regional, seasonal and interannual variability. Seasonal cycles of methane emissions are dominated by temperature in high latitude wetlands, and by changes in the water table in tropical wetlands. Sensitivity tests show that +/- 1 C changes in temperature lead to +/- 20 % changes in methane emissions from wetlands. Uniform changes of +/- 20% in precipitation alter methane emissions by about +/- 18%. Limitations in the model are analyzed. Simulated interannual variations in methane emissions from wetlands are compared to observed atmospheric growth rate anomalies. Our model simulation results suggest that contributions from other sources than wetlands and/or the sinks are more important in the tropics than north-of 30 deg. N. In higher northern latitudes, it seems that a large part, of the observed interannual variations can be explained by variations in wetland emissions. Our results also suggest that reduced wetland emissions played an important role in the observed negative methane growth rate anomaly in 1992.

  19. Population variation and natural selection on leaf traits in cork oak throughout its distribution range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Valiente, José Alberto; Valladares, Fernando; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Delgado, Antonio; Aranda, Ismael

    2014-07-01

    A central issue in evolutionary biology is the exploration of functional trait variation among populations and the extent to which this variation has adaptive value. It was recently proposed that specific leaf area (SLA), leaf nitrogen concentration per mass (Nmass) and water use efficiency in cork oak play an important role in adaptation to water availability in the environment. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we explored, first, whether there was population-level variation in cork oak (Quercus suber) for these functional traits throughout its distribution range; if this were the case, it would be consistent with the hypothesis that different rainfall patterns have led to ecotypic differentiation in this species. Second, we studied whether the population-level variation matched short-term selection on these traits under different water availability conditions using two fitness components: survival and growth. We found high population-level differentiation in SLA and Nmass, with populations from dry places exhibiting the lowest values for SLA and Nmass. Likewise, reduced SLA had fitness benefits in terms of growth for plants under dry conditions. However, contrary to our expectations, we did not find any pattern of association between functional traits and survival in nine-year-old saplings despite considerable drought during one year of the study period. These results together with findings from the literature suggest that early stages of development are the most critical period for this species. Most importantly, these findings suggest that cork oak saplings have a considerable potential to cope with dry conditions. This capacity to withstand aridity has important implications for conservation of cork oak woodlands under the ongoing climate change.

  20. Natural variation in steroid hormone profiles of male Timber Rattlesnakes, Crotalus horridus, in northwest Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Craig M; Beaupre, Steven J

    2014-09-15

    We describe the seasonal profile of circulating steroid hormones (testosterone and corticosterone) in relation to the breeding season in free ranging male Timber Rattlesnakes, Crotalus horridus, over the course of three active seasons. In addition, we examine variation in steroid concentrations across years and in relation to body condition. We found that seasonal profiles of plasma testosterone were different compared to other crotalines with similar mating patterns. Concentrations of testosterone were elevated above baseline in the three months leading up to the single late summer breeding season. Testosterone peaked in July at the onset of the breeding season and dropped to baseline during the peak months of breeding (August and September). Testosterone concentrations also varied annually. Although the exact cause of annual variation could not be established, our results indicate that weather patterns may have driven observed differences. Testosterone concentrations were positively related to body condition, indicating that testosterone production is modulated according to energetic status (particularly in the two months prior to the breeding season). Corticosterone did not vary seasonally or with any measured variable, a result similar to other studied crotalines. Our results highlight the importance of long-term descriptive studies of the regulatory mechanisms that underlie behavior and physiology in diverse taxa, as these mechanisms can vary greatly within and among populations and are valuable in elucidating the intrinsic and extrinsic sources of such variation.

  1. Electrophoretically detectable protein variation in natural populations of the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburn, L R; Sattler, P W

    1986-08-01

    Nine populations of Amblyomma americanum (L.) were examined electrophoretically for variation of 21 enzymes. Only three enzymes were not polymorphic and the average heterozygosity per individual (h) for the species was 0.085 with a range of 0.077 to 0.110, comparing well with values in other arthropods. The average Nei identity value for pairwise comparisons among the nine populations was high, 0.994 +/- 0.004 (I +/- SD). These high identity values and the absence of geographic structuring of the protein variation suggest that this species is genetically homogeneous. Normal levels of genic variability within and a lack of divergence between populations were not predicted by models developed to describe these genetic characteristics on the basis of the heterogeneities encountered by parasites in their environment. An analysis of data from several different species of ticks suggests host mobility and abundance, as well as tick abundance and selectivity in choosing a host, are important parameters in determining genetic variation in these ectoparasites.

  2. Impurities and Electronic Property Variations of Natural MoS 2 Crystal Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Addou, Rafik

    2015-09-22

    Room temperature X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS), high resolution Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (HR-RBS), Kelvin probe method, and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are employed to study the properties of a freshly exfoliated surface of geological MoS2 crystals. Our findings reveal that the semiconductor 2H-MoS2 exhibits both n- and p-type behavior, and the work function as measured by the Kelvin probe is found to vary from 4.4 to 5.3 eV. The presence of impurities in parts-per-million (ppm) and a surface defect density of up to 8% of the total area could explain the variation of the Fermi level position. High resolution RBS data also show a large variation in the MoSx composition (1.8 < x < 2.05) at the surface. Thus, the variation in the conductivity, the work function, and stoichiometry across small areas of MoS2 will have to be controlled during crystal growth in order to provide high quality uniform materials for future device fabrication. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  3. Modelling seasonal variations of natural radioactivity in soils: A case study in southern Italy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ilaria Guagliardi; Natalia Rovella; Carmine Apollaro; Andrea Bloise; Rosanna De Rosa; Fabio Scarciglia; Gabriele Buttafuoco

    2016-12-01

    The activity of natural radionuclides in soil has become an environmental concern for local public and national authorities because of the harmful effects of radiation exposure on human health. In this context, modelling and mapping the activity of natural radionuclides in soil is an important research topic. The study was aimed to model, in a spatial sense, the soil radioactivity in an urban and peri-urban soils area in southern Italy to analyse the seasonal influence on soil radioactivity. Measures of gamma radiation naturally emitted through the decay of radioactive isotopes (potassium, uranium and thorium) were analysed using a geostatistical approach to map the spatial distribution of soil radioactivity. The activity of three radionuclides was measured at 181 locations using a high-resolution γ-ray spectrometry. To take into account the influence of season, the measurements were carried out in summer and in winter. Activity data were analysed by using a geostatistical approach and zones of relatively high or low radioactivity were delineated. Among the main processes which influence natural radioactivity such as geology, geochemical, pedological, and ecological processes, results of this study showed a prominent control of radio-emission measurements by seasonal changes. Low natural radioactivity levels were measured in December associated with winter weather and moist soil conditions (due to high rainfall and low temperature), and higher activity values in July, when the soil was dry and no precipitations occurred.

  4. Seasonal Imbalances in Natural Gas Imports in Major Northeast Asian Countries: Variations, Reasons, Outlooks and Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyang Kong

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal imbalances and price premiums of natural gas imports (NGIs seriously affect the sustainability of these imports in major Northeast Asian countries, namely, China, Japan, and South Korea. Research on NGI seasonality might provide new insights that may help solve these issues. Unfortunately, little research has been conducted on this topic. Therefore, this paper examined the seasonalities of Chinese, Japanese, and South Korean NGIs using the X-12-ARIMA model to analyze monthly and quarterly data. The results suggest that Chinese NGIs lacks identifiable monthly or quarterly seasonality, while South Korea and Japan exhibit clearly identifiable seasonality. In Japan, NGIs exceed their average levels in January, February, July, August, September, and December; that is, Japan imports more natural gas during the winter and summer. In South Korea, NGIs exceed their average levels in January, February, March and December. In other words, South Korea typically imports more natural gas during the winter. The seasonal differences in NGIs among these countries might be explained by differences in natural gas consumption characteristics, domestic natural gas production capacity, NGI capacity, price sensitivity, and means of transportation. Based on seasonal differences and their probable causes, some suggestions are provided to promote the sustainable development of NGI.

  5. Seasonal variation of natural mortality factors of the guava psyllid Triozoida limbata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeão, A A; Martins, J C; Picanço, M C; Chediak, M; da Silva, E M; Silva, G A

    2012-12-01

    It is important to understand how components of the agroecosystem interfere with the attack of a pest species and their seasonality in order to use these components in IPM programs. This study focused on the evaluation of the seasonality of natural control factors associated with the guava psyllid Triozoida limbata (Enderlein) in Brazil. Life-table data were collected from an experimental guava orchard during four periods that roughly represented four seasons. Natural mortality was monitored daily through the immature stages, and the relative importance of each natural mortality factor and its seasonality was determined. Significant statistical differences were observed in the mortality during the four periods (P analysis (PCA) showed some trends in the relationship of natural control agents and weather conditions. For example, the occurrence of predatory wasps was positively correlated with temperature and occurrence of winds; the occurrence of syrphids and Psyllaephagus sp. were negatively correlated with temperature and winds; and the occurrence of other generalist predators were negatively correlated with the occurrence of rainfall and photoperiod. The results showed the importance of natural mortality factors for the management of T. limbata and their changes through the different seasons which should be considered when implementing IPM programs in guava orchards.

  6. Modelling seasonal variations of natural radioactivity in soils: A case study in southern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guagliardi, Ilaria; Rovella, Natalia; Apollaro, Carmine; Bloise, Andrea; Rosa, Rosanna De; Scarciglia, Fabio; Buttafuoco, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    The activity of natural radionuclides in soil has become an environmental concern for local public and national authorities because of the harmful effects of radiation exposure on human health. In this context, modelling and mapping the activity of natural radionuclides in soil is an important research topic. The study was aimed to model, in a spatial sense, the soil radioactivity in an urban and peri-urban soils area in southern Italy to analyse the seasonal influence on soil radioactivity. Measures of gamma radiation naturally emitted through the decay of radioactive isotopes (potassium, uranium and thorium) were analysed using a geostatistical approach to map the spatial distribution of soil radioactivity. The activity of three radionuclides was measured at 181 locations using a high-resolution ?-ray spectrometry. To take into account the influence of season, the measurements were carried out in summer and in winter. Activity data were analysed by using a geostatistical approach and zones of relatively high or low radioactivity were delineated. Among the main processes which influence natural radioactivity such as geology, geochemical, pedological, and ecological processes, results of this study showed a prominent control of radio-emission measurements by seasonal changes. Low natural radioactivity levels were measured in December associated with winter weather and moist soil conditions (due to high rainfall and low temperature), and higher activity values in July, when the soil was dry and no precipitations occurred.

  7. Evidence that Natural Selection is the Primary Cause of the Guanine-cytosine Content Variation in Rice Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoli Shi; Xiyin Wang; Zhe Li; Qihui Zhu; Ji Yang; Song Ge; Jingchu Luo

    2007-01-01

    Cereal genes are classified into two distinct classes according to the guanine-cytosine (GC) content at the third codon sites (GC3). Natural selection and mutation bias have been proposed to affect the GC content. However, there has been controversy about the cause of GC variation. Here, we characterized the GC content of 1 092 paralogs and other single-copy genes in the duplicated chromosomal regions of the rice genome (ssp. indica) and classified the paralogs into GC3-rich and GC3-poor groups. By referring to out-group sequences from Arabidopsis and maize, we confirmed that the average synonymous substitution rate of the GC3-rich genes is significantly lower than that of the GC3-poor genes. Furthermore,we explored the other possible factors corresponding to the GC variation including the length of coding sequences, the number of exons in each gene, the number of genes in each family, the location of genes on chromosomes and the protein functions. Consequently, we propose that natural selection rather than mutation bias was the primary cause of the GC variation.

  8. Survey and cartography of the spatial variation of the pollution of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SARAH

    2015-01-30

    Jan 30, 2015 ... Faecal contamination of human kind concerns all the lake nearby well and the animal type .... Indeed, these last are of weak depths (20 m about) and are exposed ... thermotolerants and banal germs) have been measured according to ...... survey zone are polluted on the plane physical and chemical and ...

  9. eIF4E Resistance: Natural Variation Should Guide Gene Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastet, Anna; Robaglia, Christophe; Gallois, Jean-Luc

    2017-02-28

    eIF4E translation initiation factors have emerged as major susceptibility factors for RNA viruses. Natural eIF4E-based resistance alleles are found in many species and are mostly variants that maintain the translation function of the protein. eIF4E genes represent major targets for engineering viral resistance, and gene-editing technologies can be used to make up for the lack of natural resistance alleles in some crops, often by knocking out eIF4E susceptibility factors. However, we report here how redundancy among eIF4E genes can restrict the efficient use of knockout alleles in breeding. We therefore discuss how gene-editing technologies can be used to design de novo functional alleles, using knowledge about the natural evolution of eIF4E genes in different species, to drive resistance to viruses without affecting plant physiology.

  10. Intraspecific shape variation in horseshoe crabs: the importance of sexual and natural selection for local adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurby, Søren; Nielsen, Kasper Sauer Kollerup; Bussarawit, Somchai

    2011-01-01

    A morphometric analysis of the body shape of three species of horseshoe crabs was undertaken in order to infer the importance of natural and sexual selection. It was expected that natural selection would be most intense, leading to highest regional differentiation, in the American species Limulus...... polyphemus, which has the largest climatic differences between different populations. Local adaptation driven by sexual selection was expected in males but not females because horseshoe crab mating behaviour leads to competition between males, but not between females. Three hundred fifty-nine horseshoe crabs...

  11. Natural variation in learning rate and memory dynamics in parasitoid wasps: opportunities for converging ecology and neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedjes, Katja M.; Kruidhof, H. Marjolein; Huigens, Martinus E.; Dicke, Marcel; Vet, Louise E. M.; Smid, Hans M.

    2011-01-01

    Although the neural and genetic pathways underlying learning and memory formation seem strikingly similar among species of distant animal phyla, several more subtle inter- and intraspecific differences become evident from studies on model organisms. The true significance of such variation can only be understood when integrating this with information on the ecological relevance. Here, we argue that parasitoid wasps provide an excellent opportunity for multi-disciplinary studies that integrate ultimate and proximate approaches. These insects display interspecific variation in learning rate and memory dynamics that reflects natural variation in a daunting foraging task that largely determines their fitness: finding the inconspicuous hosts to which they will assign their offspring to develop. We review bioassays used for oviposition learning, the ecological factors that are considered to underlie the observed differences in learning rate and memory dynamics, and the opportunities for convergence of ecology and neuroscience that are offered by using parasitoid wasps as model species. We advocate that variation in learning and memory traits has evolved to suit an insect's lifestyle within its ecological niche. PMID:21106587

  12. Benthic community response to habitat variation: A case of study from a natural protected area, the Celestun coastal lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, Daniel; Ardisson, Pedro-Luis; Hernández-Guevara, Norma A.

    2007-12-01

    Little information currently exists on spatial and temporal benthic community variations in tropical coastal lagoons. Here, the benthic community response to habitat variation in the Celestun coastal lagoon, northwest Yucatan peninsula, was seasonally examined during the 1994-1995 climatic cycle into a grid of 12 sampling sites distributed along the salinity gradient of the lagoon. Habitat variation was assessed through physical factors associated both to the water column (e.g. salinity) and the bottom sediment (e.g. sand, silt and clay fractions). The benthic community response was assessed through species diversity measures and abundance. Under the influence of climatic seasonality, variations in habitat conditions followed by changes in the benthic community characteristics were expected. Results from two-way ANOVAs showed that for the period of study, Celestun lagoon was more heterogeneous along the spatial axis of variability than along the temporal one. Multiple regression analysis showed that salinity was spatially the main factor influencing the benthic community characteristics. Temporally, the sediment characteristics were observed to exert significant effects on the species diversity characteristics but not on abundance. Other variables assessed (dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature and water column transparency) exhibited no significant covariance with species diversity and abundance. Since generated from historical data, these results have the potential to be useful as a benchmark to the establishment of monitoring programs in the light of the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the natural resources of the lagoon and surrounding coastal area.

  13. Additive genetic variation for tolerance to estrogen pollution in natural populations of Alpine whitefish (Coregonus sp., Salmonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazzola, Gregory; Chèvre, Nathalie; Wedekind, Claus

    2014-11-01

    The evolutionary potential of natural populations to adapt to anthropogenic threats critically depends on whether there exists additive genetic variation for tolerance to the threat. A major problem for water-dwelling organisms is chemical pollution, and among the most common pollutants is 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), the synthetic estrogen that is used in oral contraceptives and that can affect fish at various developmental stages, including embryogenesis. We tested whether there is variation in the tolerance to EE2 within Alpine whitefish. We sampled spawners from two species of different lakes, bred them in vitro in a full-factorial design each, and studied growth and mortality of embryos. Exposure to EE2 turned out to be toxic in all concentrations we tested (≥1 ng/L). It reduced embryo viability and slowed down embryogenesis. We found significant additive genetic variation in EE2-induced mortality in both species, that is, genotypes differed in their tolerance to estrogen pollution. We also found maternal effects on embryo development to be influenced by EE2, that is, some maternal sib groups were more susceptible to EE2 than others. In conclusion, the toxic effects of EE2 were strong, but both species demonstrated the kind of additive genetic variation that is necessary for an evolutionary response to this type of pollution.

  14. Whole-Genome Resequencing Reveals Extensive Natural Variation in the Model Green Alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzouri, Khaled M.; Rosas, Ulises; Bahmani, Tayebeh; Nelson, David R.; Abdrabu, Rasha; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    We performed whole-genome resequencing of 12 field isolates and eight commonly studied laboratory strains of the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to characterize genomic diversity and provide a resource for studies of natural variation. Our data support previous observations that Chlamydomonas is among the most diverse eukaryotic species. Nucleotide diversity is ∼3% and is geographically structured in North America with some evidence of admixture among sampling locales. Examination of predicted loss-of-function mutations in field isolates indicates conservation of genes associated with core cellular functions, while genes in large gene families and poorly characterized genes show a greater incidence of major effect mutations. De novo assembly of unmapped reads recovered genes in the field isolates that are absent from the CC-503 assembly. The laboratory reference strains show a genomic pattern of polymorphism consistent with their origin as the recombinant progeny of a diploid zygospore. Large duplications or amplifications are a prominent feature of laboratory strains and appear to have originated under laboratory culture. Extensive natural variation offers a new source of genetic diversity for studies of Chlamydomonas, including naturally occurring alleles that may prove useful in studies of gene function and the dissection of quantitative genetic traits. PMID:26392080

  15. Challenges and prospects in genome-wide quantitative trait loci mapping of standing genetic variation in natural populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schielzeth, Holger; Husby, Arild

    2014-07-01

    A considerable challenge in evolutionary genetics is to understand the genetic mechanisms that facilitate or impede evolutionary adaptation in natural populations. For this, we must understand the genetic loci contributing to trait variation and the selective forces acting on them. The decreased costs and increased feasibility of obtaining genotypic data on a large number of individuals have greatly facilitated gene mapping in natural populations, particularly because organisms whose genetics have been historically difficult to study are now within reach. Here we review the methods available to evolutionary ecologists interested in dissecting the genetic basis of traits in natural populations. Our focus lies on standing genetic variation in outbred populations. We present an overview of the current state of research in the field, covering studies on both plants and animals. We also draw attention to particular challenges associated with the discovery of quantitative trait loci and discuss parallels to studies on crops, livestock, and humans. Finally, we point to some likely future developments in genetic mapping studies.

  16. Plant performance: a physiological and genetic analysis using Arabidopsis thaliana natural variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Lithy, M.E.M.

    2005-01-01

    Plant performance implies complex traits, controlled by a large set of genes and affected by the environment. In this thesis we have tried to take the first steps in unravelling the genes controlling plant performance using naturally occurring accessions (ecotypes) of the model plant Arabidopsis

  17. Natural variation in synthesis and catabolism genes influences dhurrin content in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanogenic glucosides are natural compounds found in over 1,000 species of angiosperms that produce HCN and are deemed undesirable for agricultural use. However, these compounds are important components of primary defensive mechanisms of many plant species. One of the best-studied cyanogenic glucos...

  18. Large-Sample Theory for Generalized Linear Models with Non-natural Link and Random Variates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie-li Ding; Xi-ru Chen

    2006-01-01

    For generalized linear models (GLM), in the case that the regressors are stochastic and have different distributions and the observations of the responses may have different dimensionality, the asymptotic theory of the maximum likelihood estimate (MLE) of the parameters are studied under the assumption of a non-natural link function.

  19. The relationship between variation in size of the primordial follicle pool and age at natural menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depmann, M.; Faddy, M. J.; Van Der Schouw, Y. T.; Peeters, P. H M; Broer, S. L.; Kelsey, T. W.; Nelson, S. M.; Broekmans, F. J M

    2015-01-01

    Context: Menopause has been hypothesized to occur when the nongrowing follicle (NGF) number falls below a critical threshold. Age at natural menopause can be predicted using NGF numbers and this threshold. These predictions support the use of ovarian reserve tests, reflective of the ovarian follicle

  20. The relationship between variation in size of the primordial follicle pool and age at natural menopause

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depmann, M.; Faddy, M. J.; Van Der Schouw, Y. T.; Peeters, P. H M; Broer, S. L.; Kelsey, T. W.; Nelson, S. M.; Broekmans, F. J M

    2015-01-01

    Context: Menopause has been hypothesized to occur when the nongrowing follicle (NGF) number falls below a critical threshold. Age at natural menopause can be predicted using NGF numbers and this threshold. These predictions support the use of ovarian reserve tests, reflective of the ovarian follicle

  1. Natural variation in the strength and direction of male mating preferences for female pheromones in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischedda, Alison; Shahandeh, Michael P; Cochrane, Wesley G; Cochrane, Veronica A; Turner, Thomas L

    2014-01-01

    Many animal species communicate using chemical signals. In Drosophila, cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) are involved in species and sexual identification, and have long been thought to act as stimulatory pheromones as well. However, a previous study reported that D. melanogaster males were more attracted to females that were lacking CHCs. This surprising result is consistent with several evolutionary hypotheses but is at odds with other work demonstrating that female CHCs are attractive to males. Here, we investigated natural variation in male preferences for female pheromones using transgenic flies that cannot produce CHCs. By perfuming females with CHCs and performing mate choice tests, we found that some male genotypes prefer females with pheromones, some have no apparent preference, and at least one male genotype prefers females without pheromones. This variation provides an excellent opportunity to further investigate the mechanistic causes and evolutionary implications of divergent pheromone preferences in D. melanogaster males.

  2. A brief survey of constrained mechanics and variational problems in terms of differential forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Robert

    1994-01-01

    There has been considerable interest recently in constrained mechanics and variational problems. This is in part due to applied interests (such as 'non-holonomic mechanics in robotics') and in other part due to the fact that several schools of 'pure' mathematics have found that this classical subject is of importance for what they are trying to do. I have made various attempts at developing these subjects since my Lincoln lab days of the late 1950's. In this Chapter, I will sketch a Unified point of view, using Cartan's approach with differential forms. This has the advantage from the C-O-R viewpoint being developed in this Volume that the extension from 'smooth' to 'generalized' data is very systematic and algebraic. (I will only deal with the 'smooth' point of view in this Chapter; I will develop the 'generalized function' material at a later point.) The material presented briefly here about Variational Calculus and Constrained Mechanics can be found in more detail in my books, 'Differential Geometry and the Calculus of Variations', 'Lie Algebras and Quantum Mechanics', and 'Geometry, Physics and Systems'.

  3. The frontal bone in the genus Homo: a survey of functional and phylogenetic sources of variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athreya, Sheela

    2012-01-01

    The frontal bone is a useful aspect of the craniofacial skeleton to study in physical anthropology because it contains several characters considered to be important for both population- and species-level distinctions. These include forehead (frontal squama) inclination and supraorbital morphology. Because it lies at the interface between the anterior neurocranium and the upper face, it is also informative about the evolution of both of these regions of the skull. Previous research on frontal bone morphology can be grouped into two broad categories. One set of studies explored the relationship between craniofacial structure and function in an attempt to explain biological sources of variation in the torus development of various extant primate species, including modern humans. The second group of studies examined geographical and temporal patterns of variation in frontal morphology to make inferences about the phylogenetic relationship relationships among fossil hominin populations in the Pleistocene. This paper offers a review of both phylogenetic and functional studies of variation in frontal bone morphology, and synthesizes them to offer a comprehensive understanding of what the frontal bone can tell us about bio-behavioral and evolutionary differences both among extant and extinct members of the genus Homo.

  4. Genetic basis of natural variation in body pigmentation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembeck, Lauren M; Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-01-01

    Body pigmentation in insects and other organisms is typically variable within and between species and is often associated with fitness. Regulatory variants with large effects at bab1, t and e affect variation in abdominal pigmentation in several populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Recently, we performed a genome wide association (GWA) analysis of variation in abdominal pigmentation using the inbred, sequenced lines of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). We confirmed the large effects of regulatory variants in bab1, t and e; identified 81 additional candidate genes; and validated 17 candidate genes (out of 28 tested) using RNAi knockdown of gene expression and mutant alleles. However, these analyses are imperfect proxies for the effects of segregating variants. Here, we describe the results of an extreme quantitative trait locus (xQTL) GWA analysis of female body pigmentation in an outbred population derived from light and dark DGRP lines. We replicated the effects on pigmentation of 28 genes implicated by the DGRP GWA study, including bab1, t and e and 7 genes previously validated by RNAi and/or mutant analyses. We also identified many additional loci. The genetic architecture of Drosophila pigmentation is complex, with a few major genes and many other loci with smaller effects.

  5. The enhanced greenhouse signal versus natural variations in observed climate time series: a statistical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenwiese, C.D. [J.W. Goethe Univ., Frankfurt (Germany). Inst. for Meteorology and Geophysics

    1995-12-31

    It is a well-known fact that human activities lead to an atmospheric concentration increase of some IR-active trace gases (greenhouse gases GHG) and that this influence enhances the `greenhouse effect`. However, there are major quantitative and regional uncertainties in the related climate model projections and the observational data reflect the whole complex of both anthropogenic and natural forcing of the climate system. This contribution aims at the separation of the anthropogenic enhanced greenhouse signal in observed global surface air temperature data versus other forcing using statistical methods such as multiple (multiforced) regressions and neural networks. The competitive natural forcing considered are volcanic and solar activity, in addition the ENSO (El Nino/Southern Oscillation) mechanism. This analysis will be extended also to the NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) and anthropogenic sulfate formation in the troposphere

  6. Optimal fishery management accounting for variation in natural mortality: the Baltic sprat and herring case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Rudi; Neuenfeldt, Stefan; Quaas, Martin F.

    2010-01-01

    into account economic considerations. To overcome these shortcomings, we have developed an age‐structured, economic–ecological model that accounts for the dominant processes affecting natural mortality. With the goal of ultimately providing the most appropriate management advice for the operating fishery......Economic–ecological modelling has received increasing attention in the effort to achieve sustainable fisheries. So far, mainly single‐species models have been used, which do not account for species interaction and/or climate change. However, both of these processes alter the associated natural...... possible, we adopt an economic objective function (present value of resource rents) and determine optimal management. In the Baltic Sea, mortality rates of sprat and young herring are strongly influenced by adult cod stock dynamics via predation. Furthermore, both clupeid stocks show temperature...

  7. Variation in oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved orthophosphate induced by uptake process in natural coral holobionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrera, Charissa M.; Miyajima, Toshihiro; Watanabe, Atsushi; Umezawa, Yu; Morimoto, Naoko; San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes; Nadaoka, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A model incubation experiment using natural zooxanthellate corals was conducted to evaluate the influence of phosphate uptake by coral holobionts on oxygen isotope ratio of dissolved PO4 3- (δ18Op). Live coral samples of Acropora digitifera, Porites cylindrica, and Heliopora coerulea were collected from coral reefs around Ishigaki Island (Okinawa, Japan) and Bolinao (northern Luzon, Philippines) and incubated for 3-5 d after acclimatization under natural light conditions with elevated concentrations of PO4 3-. Phosphate uptake by corals behaved linearly with incubation time, with uptake rate depending on temperature. δ18Op usually increased with time toward the equilibrium value with respect to oxygen isotope exchange with ambient seawater, but sometimes became higher than equilibrium value at the end of incubation. The magnitude of the isotope effect associated with uptake depended on coral species; the greatest effect was in A. digitifera and the smallest in H. coerulea. However, it varied even within samples of a single coral species, which suggests multiple uptake processes with different isotope effects operating simultaneously with varying relative contributions in the coral holobionts used. In natural environments where concentrations of PO4 3- are much lower than those used during incubation, PO4 3- is presumably turned over much faster and the δ18Op easily altered by corals and other major primary producers. This should be taken into consideration when using δ18Op as an indicator of external PO4 3- sources in coastal ecosystems.

  8. The national survey of natural radioactivity in concrete produced in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovler, Konstantin

    2017-03-01

    The main goal of the current survey was to collect the results of the natural radiation tests of concrete produced in the country, to analyze the results statistically and make recommendations for further regulation on the national scale. Totally 109 concrete mixes produced commercially during the years 2012-2014 by concrete plants in Israel were analyzed. The average concentrations of NORM did not exceed the values recognized in the EU and were close to the values obtained from the Mediterranean countries such as Greece, Spain and Italy. It was also found that although the average value of the radon emanation coefficient of concrete containing coal fly ash (FA) was lower, than that of concrete mixes without FA, there was no significant difference between the indexes of both total radiation (addressing gamma radiation and radon together), and gamma radiation only, of the averages of the two sub-populations of concrete mixes: with and without FA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Field-lysimeter and Column Studies As Complementary Survey Tools For Monitored Natural Attenuation (mna)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totsche, K. U.; Hensel, D.; Jann, S.; Jaesche, P.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Scheibke, R.

    The contamination of the unsaturated soil zone with organic pollutants (PAH, BTEX, PCB, Phenols, etc.) and pollutant mixtures, e.g. light/dense non-aqueous phase liq- uids (L/D-NAPLs), represents a specific challenge for sanitation and remediation of contaminated sites. Monitored natural attenuation as an alternative option for remedi- ation of such sites requires (1) the proof of an effective pollutant reduction potential and (2) the proof that a further spreading of the contaminants and their potentially toxic metabolites is minimized to an acceptable minimum concentration level. These demands apply equally likely to contaminated soil and groundwater environments. However, a major problem arises when the task is to monitor the release and transport of contaminants within the unsaturated soil zone over a longer period (> 10 years) of time at an expenditure as small as possible. The aim of our presentation is to employ and test a survey technique to monitor pollutant release and redistribution within the unsaturated soil zone in the context of MNA. The proposed technique is based on the combination of laboratory-column and field-lysimeter studies. The first is used to ac- quire knowledge on the governing processes, the latter is used to monitor release and transport of the contaminants.

  10. Nationwide survey on the natural radionuclides in industrial raw minerals in South Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, B.U. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Guseong-dong 19, Yuseong-gu, 305-338 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hafadai@kins.re.kr; Koh, S.M. [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gajeong-dong 30, Yuseong-gu, 305-350 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.J.; Seo, J.S. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Guseong-dong 19, Yuseong-gu, 305-338 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Y.Y. [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Gajeong-dong 30, Yuseong-gu, 305-350 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Row, J.W.; Lee, D.M. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Guseong-dong 19, Yuseong-gu, 305-338 Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    A Nationwide survey on the natural radioactivity in industrial raw mineral commodities (17 kinds of domestic and 18 kinds of imported) that are representative minerals used in production and consumption in South Korea was conducted. The target industrial minerals can be categorized into two groups. The first group covers non-metallic and metallic raw minerals with low levels of radioactivity such as clay, silica sand, carbonates, bituminous and anthracite coal, iron ores, ilmenite, rutile, and phosphate ore. The other group comprises minerals with high levels of radioactivity including zircon and monazite. One hundred and sixty-four domestic and imported samples were analysed by {gamma}-ray spectroscopy using an HPGe detector. The {sup 40}K content ranges from <0.00131 to 2.69 Bq g{sup -1}, and {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th range over <0.0006 to 0.630 and <0.0008 to 0.474 Bq g{sup -1}, respectively. There was no anthropogenic radioactive signal in any of the samples.

  11. Fornax compact object survey FCOS: On the nature of Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Mieske, S; Infante, L

    2004-01-01

    The results of the Fornax Compact Object Survey (FCOS) are presented. The FCOS aims at investigating the nature of the Ultra Compact Dwarf galaxies (UCDs) recently discovered in the center of the Fornax cluster (Drinkwater et al. 2000). 280 unresolved objects in the magnitude space covering UCDs and bright globular clusters (1820 mag) at 96% confidence. The mean velocity of the bright compact objects is consistent with that of the dwarf galaxy population in Fornax, but inconsistent with that of NGC 1399's globular cluster system at 93.5% confidence. The compact objects follow a colour magnitude relation with a slope very similar to that of normal dEs, but shifted about 0.2 mag redwards. The magnitude distribution of compact objects shows a fluent transition between UCDs and GCs with an overpopulation of 8 +/- 4 objects for V<20 mag with respect to the extrapolation of NGC 1399's GC luminosity function. The spatial distribution of bright compact objects is in comparison to the faint ones more extended at 88...

  12. Molecular Survey on Brucellosis in Rodents and Shrews - Natural Reservoirs of Novel Brucella Species in Germany?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerl, J A; Ulrich, R G; Imholt, C; Scholz, H C; Jacob, J; Kratzmann, N; Nöckler, K; Al Dahouk, S

    2017-04-01

    Brucellosis is a widespread zoonotic disease introduced from animal reservoirs to humans. In Germany, bovine and ovine/caprine brucellosis were eradicated more than a decade ago and mandatory measures in livestock have been implemented to keep the officially brucellosis-free status. In contrast, surveillance of wildlife is still challenging, and reliable data on the prevalence of brucellae in small mammal populations do not exist. To assess the epidemiology of Brucella spp. in rodents and shrews, a molecular survey was carried out. A total of 537 rodents and shrews were trapped in four federal states located throughout Germany and investigated for the presence of Brucella. Using a two-step molecular assay based on the detection of the Brucella-specific bcsp31 and IS711 sequences in tissue samples, 14.2% (n = 76) of the tested animals were positive. These originated mainly from western and south-western Germany, where preliminary analyses indicate population density-dependent Brucella prevalence in voles (Myodes glareolus) and mice (Apodemus spp.). recA typing revealed a close relationship to a potentially novel Brucella species recently isolated from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Austria. The molecular detection of brucellae in various rodent taxa and for the first time in shrew species shows that these animals may be naturally infected or at least have a history of exposure to Brucella spp. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Natural Environment of Valdai on the Materials of General Land Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliya G. Stepanova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the data on the composition of forests, species of animals and birds in the Valdai district of Novgorod province, available in the notes to the General Economic surveying conducted by Catherine II. The study database containing information about the natural environment of the Valdai district in the second half of the XVIII century was created, the state of forests, composition of species and the number of mammals and birds was assessed as well. The author concludes that the surveyors inscribed the notes about specific trees, animals and birds on the basis of their relevance to population and greater prevalence of a particular area in the economic records. Over the past centuries on the territory of the Valdai there was a steady tendency of spreading spruce-deciduous and pine forests with a large number of birches, replacing the primary spruce forests as a result of the economic development of the territory. As referred to Economic notes specific composition of trees, mammals and birds has in general survived to our time. At the same time, a sharp reduction in the number of hunting birds on the territory of the Valdai as well as the spreading of animals previously unknown in this territory, including specially imported for breeding or expanding an area of their habitat is observed.

  14. International variation in policies and practices related to informed consent in acute cardiovascular research: Results from a 44 country survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Belle, Gerald; Mentzelopoulos, Spyros D; Aufderheide, Tom; May, Susanne; Nichol, Graham

    2015-06-01

    Research in an emergency setting such as that with an acute cardiovascular event is challenging because the window of opportunity to treat may be short and may preclude time to obtain informed consent from the patient or their representative. Some perceive that requiring informed consent in emergency situations has limited improvements in care. Vulnerable populations including minorities or residents of low-income countries are at greatest risk of need for resuscitation. Lack of enrollment of such patients would increase uncertainties in treatment benefit or harm in those at greater risk of need for resuscitation. We sought to assess international variation in policies and procedures related to exception from informed consent (EFIC) or deferred consent for emergency research. A brief survey instrument was developed and modified by consensus among the investigators. Included were multiple choice and open-ended responses. The survey included an illustrative example of a hypothetical randomized study. Elicited information included the possibility of conducting such a study in the respondent's country, as well as approvals required to conduct the study. The population of interest was emergency physicians or other practitioners of acute cardiovascular event research. Usable responses were obtained from 44 countries (76% of surveyed). Community opposition to EFIC was noted in 6 (14%) countries. Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers in 8 (20%) countries were judged unable or unwilling to participate. A majority of countries (36, 82%) required approval by a Research Ethics Committee or similar. Government approval was required in 25 (57%) countries. There is international variation in practices and policies related to consent for emergency research. There is an ongoing need to converge regulations based on the usefulness of multinational emergency research to benefit both affluent and disadvantaged populations. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Revisiting diversity: cultural variation reveals the constructed nature of emotion perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Maria

    2017-10-01

    The extent of cultural variation in emotion perception has long been assumed to be bounded by underlying universality. A growing body of research reveals, however, that evidence of universality in emotion perception is method-bound. Without the assumption of underlying universality, new lines of inquiry become relevant. Accumulating evidence suggests that cultures vary in what cues are relevant to perceptions of emotion. Further, cultural groups vary in their spontaneous inferences; mental state inference does not appear to be the only, or even most routine, mode of perception across cultures. Finally, setting universality assumptions aside requires innovation in the theory and measurement of culture. Recent studies reveal the promise of refinements in psychological approaches to culture. Together, the available evidence is consistent with a view of emotion perceptions as actively constructed by perceivers to fit the social and physical constraints of their cultural worlds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-05

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p stoichiometry and compositions (p stoichiometry and composition and physiological regulations of nutritional needs in organisms and provide possible stoichiometric responses of both plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  17. Experimental approaches to studying the nature and impact of splicing variation in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keightley, M C; Markmiller, S; Love, C G; Rasko, J E J; Lieschke, G J; Heath, J K

    2016-01-01

    From a fixed number of genes carried in all cells, organisms create considerable diversity in cellular phenotype through differential regulation of gene expression. One prevalent source of transcriptome diversity is alternative pre-mRNA splicing, which is manifested in many different forms. Zebrafish models of splicing dysfunction due to mutated spliceosome components provide opportunity to link biochemical analyses of spliceosome structure and function with whole organism phenotypic outcomes. Drawing from experience with two zebrafish mutants: cephalophŏnus (a prpf8 mutant, isolated for defects in granulopoiesis) and caliban (a rnpc3 mutant, isolated for defects in digestive organ development), we describe the use of glycerol gradient sedimentation and native gel electrophoresis to resolve components of aberrant splicing complexes. We also describe how RNAseq can be employed to examine relatively rare alternative splicing events including intron retention. Such experimental approaches in zebrafish can promote understanding of how splicing variation and dysfunction contribute to phenotypic diversity and disease pathogenesis.

  18. Elemental stoichiometry and compositions of weevil larvae and two acorn hosts under natural phosphorus variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Huawei; Du, Baoming; Liu, Chunjiang

    2017-04-01

    To understand how different trophic organisms in a parasite food chain adapt to the differences in soil nutrient conditions, we investigated stoichiometric variation and homeostasis of multiple elements in two acorn trees, Quercus variabilis and Quercus acutissima, and their parasite weevil larvae (Curculio davidi Fairmaire) at phosphorus (P)-deficient and P-rich sites in subtropical China where P-rich ores are scattered among dominant P-deficient soils. Results showed that elemental stoichiometry and compositions of both acorns and weevil larvae differed significantly between P-deficient and P-rich sites (p plants and animals to P loading, a worldwide issue from excess release of P into the environment.

  19. Natural variation in long-term memory formation among Nasonia parasitic wasp species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoedjes, Katja M; Smid, Hans M

    2014-06-01

    Closely related species of parasitic wasps can differ substantially in memory dynamics. In this study we demonstrate differences in the number of conditioning trials required to form long-term memory between the closely related parasitic wasp species Nasonia vitripennis and Nasonia giraulti (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae). A single conditioning trial, in which a female wasp associates an odour with the reward of finding a host, results in the formation of transcription-dependent long-term memory in N. vitripennis, whereas N. giraulti requires spaced training to do so. Memory formation does not depend on the type of reward: oviposition, which was hypothesized to be a 'larger' reward results in similar memory retention as host feeding in both Nasonia species. There are several genetic and genomic tools available for Nasonia species to identify genetic mechanisms that underlie the observed variation in the number of trials required to form long-term memory. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Reappraisal of the limit on the variation in α implied by the Oklo natural fission reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Edward D.; Hamdan, Leila

    2015-07-01

    Background: A signature of many dynamical models of dark energy is that they admit variation in the fine structure constant α over cosmological time scales. Purpose: We reconsider the analysis of the sensitivity of neutron resonance energies Ei to changes in α with a view to resolving uncertainties that plague earlier treatments. Methods: We point out that with more appropriate choices of nuclear parameters, the standard estimate (from Damour and Dyson) of the sensitivity for resonances in Sm is increased by a factor of 2.5. We go on to identify and compute excitation, Coulomb, and deformation corrections. To this end, we use deformed Fermi density distributions fitted to the output of Hartree-Fock (HF) + BCS calculations (with both the SLy4 and SkM* Skyrme functionals), the energetics of the surface diffuseness of nuclei, and thermal properties of their deformation. We also invoke the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis, performing the requisite microcanonical averages with two phenomenological level densities which, via the leptodermous expansion of the level density parameter, include the effect of increased surface diffuseness. Theoretical uncertainties are assessed with the inter-model prescription of Dobaczewski et al. [J. Phys. G: Nucl. Part. Phys. 41, 074001 (2014), 10.1088/0954-3899/41/7/074001]. Results: The corrections diminish the revised Sm sensitivity but not by more than 25%. Subject to a weak and testable restriction on the change in mq/Λ (relative to the change in α ) since the time when the Oklo reactors were active (mq is the average of the u and d current quark masses, and Λ is the mass scale of quantum chromodynamics), we deduce that | αOklo-αnow|Oklo bound on changes in α is reliable. It is one order of magnitude lower than the Oklo-based bound most commonly adopted in earlier attempts to identify phenomenologically successful models of α variation.

  1. Natural Variation Identifies ICARUS1, a Universal Gene Required for Cell Proliferation and Growth at High Temperatures in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangsheng Zhu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants are highly sensitive to environmental changes and even small variations in ambient temperature have severe consequences on their growth and development. Temperature affects multiple aspects of plant development, but the processes and mechanisms underlying thermo-sensitive growth responses are mostly unknown. Here we exploit natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana to identify and characterize novel components and processes mediating thermo-sensitive growth responses in plants. Phenotypic screening of wild accessions identified several strains displaying pleiotropic growth defects, at cellular and organism levels, specifically at high ambient temperatures. Positional cloning and characterization of the underlying gene revealed that ICARUS1 (ICA1, which encodes a protein of the tRNAHis guanylyl transferase (Thg1 superfamily, is required for plant growth at high temperatures. Transcriptome and gene marker analyses together with DNA content measurements show that ICA1 loss-of-function results in down regulation of cell cycle associated genes at high temperatures, which is linked with a block in G2/M transition and endoreduplication. In addition, plants with mutations in ICA1 show enhanced sensitivity to DNA damage. Characterization of additional strains that carry lesions in ICA1, but display normal growth, shows that alternative splicing is likely to alleviate the deleterious effects of some natural mutations. Furthermore, analyses of worldwide and regional collections of natural accessions indicate that ICA1 loss-of-function has arisen several times independently, and that these occur at high frequency in some local populations. Overall our results suggest that ICA1-mediated-modulation of fundamental processes such as tRNAHis maturation, modify plant growth responses to temperature changes in a quantitative and reversible manner, in natural populations.

  2. Assessing risk of baleen whale hearing loss from seismic surveys: The effect of uncertainty and individual variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedamke, Jason; Gales, Nick; Frydman, Sascha

    2011-01-01

    The potential for seismic airgun "shots" to cause acoustic trauma in marine mammals is poorly understood. There are just two empirical measurements of temporary threshold shift (TTS) onset levels from airgun-like sounds in odontocetes. Considering these limited data, a model was developed examining the impact of individual variability and uncertainty on risk assessment of baleen whale TTS from seismic surveys. In each of 100 simulations: 10000 "whales" are assigned TTS onset levels accounting for: inter-individual variation; uncertainty over the population's mean; and uncertainty over weighting of odontocete data to obtain baleen whale onset levels. Randomly distributed whales are exposed to one seismic survey passage with cumulative exposure level calculated. In the base scenario, 29% of whales (5th/95th percentiles of 10%/62%) approached to 1-1.2 km range were exposed to levels sufficient for TTS onset. By comparison, no whales are at risk outside 0.6 km when uncertainty and variability are not considered. Potentially "exposure altering" parameters (movement, avoidance, surfacing, and effective quiet) were also simulated. Until more research refines model inputs, the results suggest a reasonable likelihood that whales at a kilometer or more from seismic surveys could potentially be susceptible to TTS and demonstrate that the large impact uncertainty and variability can have on risk assessment.

  3. Predation in Ground-Nesting Birds: an Experimental Study Using Natural Egg-Color Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurora M. Castilla

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that cryptically colored eggs would suffer less predation than conspicuous eggs in the ground-nesting red-legged partridge, Alectoris rufa. We used A. rufa as a model species because it has a wide range of natural egg colors, the eggs are widely available from breeding farms, and nests are easily mimicked because they are scrapes containing no vegetation. The study was conducted in the spring of 2001 in forest and fallow fields of central Spain in Castilla La Mancha, Ciudad Real. We used 384 clutches of natural eggs that were white, white spotted, brown, or brown spotted. Within clutches, eggs were consistent in color and size; among clutches, color differences were distributed across habitats. Clutches were checked once after 2 wk of exposure. Cryptic coloration had a survival advantage that was dependent on the local suite of predators. Rodent predation was nonselective with respect to clutch color; however, avian predation was significantly higher for conspicuous clutches. In addition, there was an interaction of landscape and egg color for avian predation. In forest landscapes, the clutches with highest survival were brown spotted, whereas in fallow landscapes, brown and brown spotted clutches had higher survival than white and white potted clutches. Thus, both the predator suite and the landscape had significant effects on the value of cryptic egg coloration. Our study is relevant for conservationists and managers in charge of restocking programs in hunting areas. The release of other partridge species or their hybrids could result in hybridization with wild partridges, potentially leading to nonoptimal clutch pigmentation and reduced survival of the native species. We therefore recommend that local authorities, managers, and conservationists be cautious with the use of alien species and hybrids and release only autochthonous species of partridges within their natural ranges.

  4. Variations in timing of lithospheric failure on terrestrial planets due to chaotic nature of mantle convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Teresa; Solomatov, Viatcheslav S.

    2016-05-01

    We perform numerical simulations of lithospheric failure in the stagnant lid regime of temperature-dependent viscosity convection, using the yield stress approach. We find that the time of failure can vary significantly for the same values of the controlling parameters due to the chaotic nature of the convective system. The general trend of the dependence of the time of lithospheric failure on the yield stress can be explained by treating lithospheric failure as a type of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This study suggests that it is important to address not only the question of whether plate tectonics can occur on a planet but also when it would occur if conditions are favorable.

  5. A global survey on the seasonal variation of the marginal distribution of daily precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2016-08-01

    To characterize the seasonal variation of the marginal distribution of daily precipitation, it is important to find which statistical characteristics of daily precipitation actually vary the most from month-to-month and which could be regarded to be invariant. Relevant to the latter issue is the question whether there is a single model capable to describe effectively the nonzero daily precipitation for every month worldwide. To study these questions we introduce and apply a novel test for seasonal variation (SV-Test) and explore the performance of two flexible distributions in a massive analysis of approximately 170,000 monthly daily precipitation records at more than 14,000 stations from all over the globe. The analysis indicates that: (a) the shape characteristics of the marginal distribution of daily precipitation, generally, vary over the months, (b) commonly used distributions such as the Exponential, Gamma, Weibull, Lognormal, and the Pareto, are incapable to describe "universally" the daily precipitation, (c) exponential-tail distributions like the Exponential, mixed Exponentials or the Gamma can severely underestimate the magnitude of extreme events and thus may be a wrong choice, and (d) the Burr type XII and the Generalized Gamma distributions are two good models, with the latter performing exceptionally well.

  6. National survey on the natural radioactivity and Rn-222 exhalation rate of building materials in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P.; van Dijk, W.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Groot, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The present study reports on results of a nationwide survey on the natural radioactivity concentrations and Rn-222 exhalation rates of the prevailing building materials in the Netherlands. In total 100 samples were taken and analyzed for the activity concentrations of Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, and K-4

  7. National survey on the natural radioactivity and Rn-222 exhalation rate of building materials in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, P.; van Dijk, W.; van der Graaf, E.R.; de Groot, A.V.

    2006-01-01

    The present study reports on results of a nationwide survey on the natural radioactivity concentrations and Rn-222 exhalation rates of the prevailing building materials in the Netherlands. In total 100 samples were taken and analyzed for the activity concentrations of Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-228, and K-4

  8. Variation in Essential Oil and Bioactive Compounds of Curcuma kwangsiensis Collected from Natural Habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lanyue; Yang, Zhiwen; Huang, Zebin; Zhao, Mincong; Li, Penghui; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi; Lin, Li; Tang, Jian; Fang, Yanxiong; Du, Zhiyun

    2017-07-01

    The chemical compositions of essential oils (EOs) extracted from Curcuma kwangsiensis rhizomes collected from six natural habitats in P. R. China were evaluated using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Fifty-seven components were identified from the six EOs, and their main constituents were 8,9-dehydro-9-formyl-cycloisolongifolene (2.37 - 42.59%), germacrone (6.53 - 22.20%), and l-camphor (0.19 - 6.12%). The six EOs exhibited different DPPH radical-scavenging activities (IC50 , 2.24 - 31.03 μg/ml), with the activity of most of EOs being much higher than that of Trolox C (IC50 , 10.49 μg/ml) and BHT (IC50 , 54.13 μg/ml). Most EOs had potent antimicrobial effects against the tested bacteria and fungus. They also exhibited cytotoxicity against B16 (IC50 , 4.44 - 147.4 μg/ml) and LNCaP cells (IC50 , 73.94 - 429.25 μg/ml). The EOs showed excellent anti-inflammatory action by significantly downregulating expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α. This study provides insight into the interrelation among growth location, phytoconstituents, and bioactivities, and the results indicate the potential of C. kwangsiensis as natural nutrients, medicines, and others additives. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  9. Acceptability of variations in question intonation in natural and synthesized American English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrdal, Ann K.; Jilka, Matthias

    2004-05-01

    In a previous study exploring American English question intonation, we found that some speakers deviated considerably from expected question prosody. In this study, we focus on listener-rated acceptability of the various prosodic patterns observed for yes/no and wh questions. A variety of intonational patterns realized in both question utterances recorded from five female and three male professional speakers and in questions synthesized from several TTS voices of both genders was presented to listeners. Subjects judged the acceptability of each utterance in the context of a dialogue between a travel agent and customer. We hypothesized that question utterances with the expected intonational features (phrase-final fall in wh questions, phrase-final rise in yes/no questions) would be rated as more acceptable than question utterances with deviating intonational features, and that this result would hold for both natural and synthetic speech conditions. In addition, following our previous results, we hypothesized that the unexpected intonation pattern of phrase-final falls for yes/no questions would be more acceptable for lower-pitched than for higher-pitched voices. We also varied the prominence of the interrogative pronouns in synthetic wh questions in order to see whether simulating their high intonational prominence in natural wh questions improved the acceptability of synthetic wh questions.

  10. Arabidopsis thaliana natural variation reveals connections between UV radiation stress and plant pathogen-like defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piofczyk, Thomas; Jeena, Ganga; Pecinka, Ales

    2015-08-01

    UV radiation is a ubiquitous component of solar radiation that affects plant growth and development. Here we studied growth related traits of 345 Arabidopsis thaliana accessions in response to UV radiation stress. We analyzed the genetic basis of this natural variation by genome-wide association studies, which suggested a specific candidate genomic region. RNA-sequencing of three sensitive and three resistant accessions combined with mutant analysis revealed five large effect genes. Mutations in PHE ammonia lyase 1 (PAL1) and putative kinase At1g76360 rendered Arabidopsis hypersensitive to UV stress, while loss of function from putative methyltransferase At4g22530, novel plant snare 12 (NPSN12) and defense gene activated disease resistance 2 (ADR2) conferred higher UV stress resistance. Three sensitive accessions showed strong ADR2 transcriptional activation, accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) and dwarf growth upon UV stress, while these phenotypes were much less affected in resistant plants. The phenotype of sensitive accessions resembles autoimmune reactions due to overexpression of defense related genes, and suggests that natural variation in response to UV radiation stress is driven by pathogen-like responses in Arabidopsis.

  11. Variation in cone and seed characters in blue pine (Pinus wallichiana) across natural distribution in western Himalayas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ombir Singh; Manisha Thapliyal

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed 17 seed sources (seed stands) of Pinus wallichiana for variations present in cone and seed characters,scattered over natural distribution in north-west Himalayan states (Uttarakhand and Himachal Pradesh) of India.The significant variations were observed in cone weight,cone length,cone width,seed length,seed width,seed weight,seed germination,radicle length,and plumule length among different seed sources of the species.Significant positive correlation between seed weight,cone weight and cone width showed that seed weight in the species depend more on the cone size.Seed germination was also positively correlated with seed weight,cone weight and radicle length in the study.The estimates of variability with regard to genetic parameters for seed weight,seed germination,cone length,cone width,cone weight showed wide range of variation in the study.Seed weight showed high heritability values coupled with maximum genetic gain.Traits with such values indicate presence of good amount of heritable additive components and are under strong genetic control.The findings of the study revealed that seed sources expressed both phenotypic and genotypic differences in the seed and cone traits which might be due to the differences in genetic make up of various seed sources and environmental factors i.e.genotypic and environmental interaction.The study suggests that the seed weight should be given the top priority for the further improvement of this species.

  12. Patterns of cuticular hydrocarbon variation and genetic similarity between natural populations of Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Peña, A; Guglielmone, A A; Mangold, A J; Castellá, J

    1993-10-01

    Gas chromatography has been used to analyze the variation in cuticular hydrocarbon patterns between several populations of Amblyomma cajennense. 88 compounds were detected and these could be divided into 17 groups of hydrocarbons. Heterozygosis in the populations ranges from 0% to 25.84%. Isomers for pentacosane, heptacosane and nonatriacontane are the most variable, with 13, 10 and 11 variants, respectively. Nei's genetic identity and genetic distance show that populations may be considered as regional variants of only one species: the results do not indicate the presence of sibling species. However, a relatively high genetic distance has been observed between several Cuban and continental populations, suggesting a long reproductive isolation. Gas chromatography of cuticular hydrocarbons is a good alternative to isozyme analysis for population studies, when collecting conditions do not allow the use of live ticks and only alcohol-preserved collections are available. The high number of compounds available for genetic studies will provide excellent markers for evaluating the extent of gene flow and migration of tick species.

  13. Genomic analysis of natural selection and phenotypic variation in high-altitude mongolians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinchuan Xing

    Full Text Available Deedu (DU Mongolians, who migrated from the Mongolian steppes to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau approximately 500 years ago, are challenged by environmental conditions similar to native Tibetan highlanders. Identification of adaptive genetic factors in this population could provide insight into coordinated physiological responses to this environment. Here we examine genomic and phenotypic variation in this unique population and present the first complete analysis of a Mongolian whole-genome sequence. High-density SNP array data demonstrate that DU Mongolians share genetic ancestry with other Mongolian as well as Tibetan populations, specifically in genomic regions related with adaptation to high altitude. Several selection candidate genes identified in DU Mongolians are shared with other Asian groups (e.g., EDAR, neighboring Tibetan populations (including high-altitude candidates EPAS1, PKLR, and CYP2E1, as well as genes previously hypothesized to be associated with metabolic adaptation (e.g., PPARG. Hemoglobin concentration, a trait associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans, is at an intermediate level in DU Mongolians compared to Tibetans and Han Chinese at comparable altitude. Whole-genome sequence from a DU Mongolian (Tianjiao1 shows that about 2% of the genomic variants, including more than 300 protein-coding changes, are specific to this individual. Our analyses of DU Mongolians and the first Mongolian genome provide valuable insight into genetic adaptation to extreme environments.

  14. Comparative analysis of maize (Zea mays) crop performance: natural variation, incremental improvements and economic impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibman, Mark; Shryock, Jereme J; Clements, Michael J; Hall, Michael A; Loida, Paul J; McClerren, Amanda L; McKiness, Zoe P; Phillips, Jonathan R; Rice, Elena A; Stark, Steven B

    2014-09-01

    Grain yield from maize hybrids continues to improve through advances in breeding and biotechnology. Despite genetic improvements to hybrid maize, grain yield from distinct maize hybrids is expected to vary across growing locations due to numerous environmental factors. In this study, we examine across-location variation in grain yield among maize hybrids in three case studies. The three case studies examine hybrid improvement through breeding, introduction of an insect protection trait or introduction of a transcription factor trait associated with increased yield. In all cases, grain yield from each hybrid population had a Gaussian distribution. Across-location distributions of grain yield from each hybrid partially overlapped. The hybrid with a higher mean grain yield typically outperformed its comparator at most, but not all, of the growing locations (a 'win rate'). These results suggest that a broad set of environmental factors similarly impacts grain yields from both conventional- and biotechnology-derived maize hybrids and that grain yields among two or more hybrids should be compared with consideration given to both mean yield performance and the frequency of locations at which each hybrid 'wins' against its comparators. From an economic standpoint, growers recognize the value of genetically improved maize hybrids that outperform comparators in the majority of locations. Grower adoption of improved maize hybrids drives increases in average U.S. maize grain yields and contributes significant value to the economy.

  15. Relations of Naturally Occurring Variations in State Anxiety and Cognitive Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissel, Emily E E; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2016-08-01

    Although effects of anxiety on cognitive performance have been extensively examined, anxiety-cognition relationships are often defined by between-person relationships. The current research investigated the effects of within-person variations in state anxiety on cognitive performance based on measures from three separate sessions in a sample of 1,769 healthy adults ranging from 18 to 99 years of age. Some of the adults in the sample exhibited a wide range of state anxiety across the three sessions, whereas others were fairly stable. Although one might have expected that cognitive performance would be low only on sessions in which the level of state anxiety was high, this pattern was not evident in any of five different cognitive abilities (vocabulary, memory, reasoning, spatial relations, or perceptual speed tasks). Instead, one's average level of anxiety was a more important determinant of cognitive performance than one's current level of state anxiety. Specifically, for memory and reasoning abilities, trait anxiety alone related to decreased cognitive function, regardless of state anxiety. For spatial relations and speed abilities, low state anxiety was related to decreased cognitive function in participants with high trait anxiety.

  16. Exploring the natural variation for seedling traits and their link with seed dimensions in tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noorullah Khan

    Full Text Available The success of germination, growth and final yield of every crop depends to a large extent on the quality of the seeds used to grow the crop. Seed quality is defined as the viability and vigor attribute of a seed that enables the emergence and establishment of normal seedlings under a wide range of environments. We attempt to dissect the mechanisms involved in the acquisition of seed quality, through a combined approach of physiology and genetics. To achieve this goal we explored the genetic variation found in a RIL population of Solanum lycopersicum (cv. Moneymaker x Solanum pimpinellifolium through extensive phenotyping of seed and seedling traits under both normal and nutrient stress conditions and root system architecture (RSA traits under optimal conditions. We have identified 62 major QTLs on 21 different positions for seed, seedling and RSA traits in this population. We identified QTLs that were common across both conditions, as well as specific to stress conditions. Most of the QTLs identified for seedling traits co-located with seed size and seed weight QTLs and the positive alleles were mostly contributed by the S. lycopersicum parent. Co-location of QTLs for different traits might suggest that the same locus has pleiotropic effects on multiple traits due to a common mechanistic basis. We show that seed weight has a strong effect on seedling vigor and these results are of great importance for the isolation of the corresponding genes and elucidation of the underlying mechanisms.

  17. Differentially expressed genes linked to natural variation in long-term memory formation in Cotesia parasitic wasps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke J. F. A. Van Vugt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Even though learning and memory are universal traits in the Animal Kingdom, closely related species reveal substantial variation in learning rate and memory dynamics. To determine the genetic background of this natural variation, we studied two congeneric parasitic wasp species, Cotesia glomerata and C. rubecula, which lay their eggs in caterpillars of the large and small cabbage white butterfly. A successful egg laying event serves as an unconditioned stimulus in a classical conditioning paradigm, where plant odors become associated to the encounter of a suitable host caterpillar. Depending on the host species, the number of conditioning trials and the parasitic wasp species, three different types of transcription-dependent long-term memory (LTM and one type of transcription-independent, anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM can be distinguished. To identify transcripts underlying these differences in memory formation, we isolated mRNA from parasitic wasp heads at three different time points between induction and consolidation of each of the four memory types, and for each sample three biological replicates, where after strand-specific paired-end 100 bp deep sequencing. Transcriptomes were assembled de novo and differential expression was determined for each memory type and time point after conditioning, compared to unconditioned wasps. Most differentially expressed (DE genes and antisense transcripts were only DE in one of the LTM types. Among the DE genes that were DE in two or more LTM types, were many protein kinases and phosphatases, small GTPases, receptors and ion channels. Some genes were DE in opposing directions between any of the LTM memory types and ARM, suggesting that ARM in Cotesia requires the transcription of genes inhibiting LTM or vice versa. We discuss our findings in the context of neuronal functioning, including RNA splicing and transport, epigenetic regulation, neurotransmitter/peptide synthesis and antisense transcription. In

  18. Trends and variation in the management of oesophagogastric cancer patients: a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenberg David C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates potential variation in the quality of care of cancer patients. We aimed to examine whether recent changes in the treatment of oesophagogastric cancers have been distributed equally among different patient subgroups. Methods We analysed population-based cancer registry data about the treatment patterning of oesophagogastric cancer (other than oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma during 1995-2006. Results There were 14,077 patients aged ≥40 years (69% men. There was only limited information on stage, and no information on co-morbidity status. During successive triennia, curative surgery use decreased from 28% to 20% (p Conclusions During the study period, curative surgery decreased by a third and chemotherapy use increased by more than three-fold, reflecting improvements in the appropriateness and quality of management, but chemotherapy use, in particular, was unequal, both by socioeconomic status and gender.

  19. Natural Diversity in Pentose Fermentation Is Explained by Variations in Histone Deacetylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvi Tamari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The extent to which carbon flux is directed toward fermentation versus respiration differs between cell types and environmental conditions. Understanding the basic cellular processes governing carbon flux is challenged by the complexity of the metabolic and regulatory networks. To reveal the genetic basis for natural diversity in channeling carbon flux, we applied quantitative trait loci analysis by phenotyping and genotyping hundreds of individual F2 segregants of budding yeast that differ in their capacity to ferment the pentose sugar xylulose. Causal alleles were mapped to the RXT3 and PHO23 genes, two components of the large Rpd3 histone deacetylation complex. We show that these allelic variants modulate the expression of SNF1/AMPK-dependent respiratory genes. Our results suggest that over close evolutionary distances, diversification of carbon flow is driven by changes in global regulators, rather than adaptation of specific metabolic nodes. Such regulators may improve the ability to direct metabolic fluxes for biotechnological applications.

  20. Regulation of flowering in rice: two florigen genes, a complex gene network, and natural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Hiroyuki; Taoka, Ken-ichiro; Shimamoto, Ko

    2011-02-01

    Photoperiodic control of flowering time consists of a complicated network that converges into the generation of a mobile flowering signal called florigen. Recent advances identifying the protein FT/Hd3a as the molecular nature responsible for florigen activity have focused current research on florigen genes as the important output of this complex signaling network. Rice is a model system for short-day plants and recent progress in elucidating the flowering network from rice and Arabidopsis, a long-day plant, provides an evolutionarily comparative view of the photoperiodic flowering pathway. This review summarizes photoperiodic flowering control in rice, including the interaction of complex layers of gene networks contributed from evolutionarily unique factors and the regulatory adaptation of conserved factors.

  1. Connectedness to Nature and Public (Skin Health Perspectives: Results of a Representative, Population-Based Survey among Austrian Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Haluza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Connectedness to nature (CN influences motivation to have contact with outdoor natural environments. Spending leisure time in natural environments is beneficial for human health and well-being. Besides these positive effects, health risks of open-air activities are mainly related to unprotected sun light exposure-associated acute and chronic skin hazards. Thus, we conducted a cross-sectional, representative telephone survey among Austrian residents to study the association of perceived CN level with sun-exposure knowledge, tanning habits, and sun protective behaviour. In total, 1,500 study subjects (50.5% females participated in this questionnaire survey. Although knowledge about tanning and motives to tan were similar among genders, females performed more photoprotective measures and were more connected to nature (all p < 0.001 compared to males. Older age and outdoor sport were significant gender-independent predictor variables influencing perceived CN level. Additionally, level of education was relevant in male CN, whereas non-smoking and higher knowledge were predictive of female CN. This survey provides so far unreported empirical data on the relationship between nature connectedness and skin health-relevant recreational habits of Austrian residents. The findings suggest to integrate hitherto neglected gender-specific Public (Skin Health promotion when counselling on the manifold health advantages of outdoor activities.

  2. Natural and anthropogenic variations in atmospheric mercury deposition during the Holocene near Quelccaya Ice Cap, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Samuel A.; Kelly, Meredith A.; Stroup, Justin S.; Jackson, Brian P.; Lowell, Thomas V.; Tapia, Pedro M.

    2014-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a toxic metal that is transported globally through the atmosphere. Emissions of Hg from mineral reservoirs and recycling between soil/biomass, oceans, and the atmosphere are fundamental to the global Hg cycle, yet past emissions from anthropogenic and natural sources are not fully constrained. We use a sediment core from Yanacocha, a headwater lake in southeastern Peru, to study the anthropogenic and natural controls on atmospheric Hg deposition during the Holocene. From 12.3 to 3.5 ka, Hg fluxes in the record are relatively constant (mean ± 1σ: 1.4 ± 0.6 µg m-2 a-1). Past Hg deposition does not correlate with changes in regional temperature and precipitation or with most large volcanic events that occurred regionally (~300-400 km from Yanacocha) and globally. In 1450 B.C. (3.4 ka), Hg fluxes abruptly increased and reached the Holocene-maximum flux (6.7 µg m-2 a-1) in 1200 B.C., concurrent with a ~100 year peak in Fe and chalcophile metals (As, Ag, Tl) and the presence of framboidal pyrite. Continuously elevated Hg fluxes from 1200 to 500 B.C. suggest a protracted mining-dust source near Yanacocha that is identical in timing to documented pre-Incan cinnabar mining in central Peru. During Incan and Colonial time (A.D. 1450-1650), Hg deposition remains elevated relative to background levels but lower relative to other Hg records from sediment cores in central Peru, indicating a limited spatial extent of preindustrial Hg emissions. Hg fluxes from A.D. 1980 to 2011 (4.0 ± 1.0 µg m-2 a-1) are 3.0 ± 1.5 times greater than preanthropogenic fluxes.

  3. Natural variation in maternal care and cross-tissue patterns of oxytocin receptor gene methylation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Annaliese K; McEwen, Lisa M; MacIsaac, Julia L; Francis, Darlene D; Kobor, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care". Since the first report of maternal care effects on DNA methylation in rats, epigenetic modifications of the genome in response to life experience have become the subject of intense focus across many disciplines. Oxytocin receptor expression varies in response to early experience, and both oxytocin signaling and methylation status of the oxytocin receptor gene (Oxtr) in blood have been related to disordered social behavior. It is unknown whether Oxtr DNA methylation varies in response to early life experience, and whether currently employed peripheral measures of Oxtr methylation reflect variation in the brain. We examined the effects of early life rearing experience via natural variation in maternal licking and grooming during the first week of life on behavior, physiology, gene expression, and epigenetic regulation of Oxtr across blood and brain tissues (mononucleocytes, hippocampus, striatum, and hypothalamus). Rats reared by "high" licking-grooming (HL) and "low" licking-grooming (LL) rat dams exhibited differences across study outcomes: LL offspring were more active in behavioral arenas, exhibited lower body mass in adulthood, and showed reduced corticosterone responsivity to a stressor. Oxtr DNA methylation was significantly lower at multiple CpGs in the blood of LL versus HL males, but no differences were found in the brain. Across groups, Oxtr transcript levels in the hypothalamus were associated with reduced corticosterone secretion in response to stress, congruent with the role of oxytocin signaling in this region. Methylation of specific CpGs at a high or low level was consistent across tissues, especially within the brain. However, individual variation in DNA methylation relative to these global patterns was not consistent across tissues. These results suggest that blood Oxtr DNA methylation may reflect early experience of maternal care, and that Oxtr methylation across tissues is highly concordant

  4. A Natural History Summary and Survey Protocol for the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogge, Mark K.; ,; Ahlers, Darrell; ,; Sferra, Susan J.; ,

    2010-01-01

    The Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus) has been the subject of substantial research, monitoring, and management activity since it was listed as an endangered species in 1995. When proposed for listing in 1993, relatively little was known about the flycatcher's natural history, and there were only 30 known breeding sites supporting an estimated 111 territories rangewide (Sogge and others, 2003a). Since that time, thousands of presence/absences surveys have been conducted throughout the historical range of the flycatcher, and many studies of its natural history and ecology have been completed. As a result, the ecology of the flycatcher is much better understood than it was just over a decade ago. In addition, we have learned that the current status of the flycatcher is better than originally thought: as of 2007, the population was estimated at approximately 1,300 territories distributed among approximately 280 breeding sites (Durst and others, 2008a). Concern about the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher on a rangewide scale was brought to focus by Unitt (1987), who described declines in flycatcher abundance and distribution throughout the Southwest. E. t. extimus populations declined during the 20th century, primarily because of habitat loss and modification from activities, such as dam construction and operation, groundwater pumping, water diversions, and flood control. In 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) designated the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher as a candidate category 1 species (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1991). In July 1993, the USFWS proposed to list E. t. extimus as an endangered species and to designate critical habitat under the Act (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1993). A final rule listing E. t. extimus as endangered was published in February 1995 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1995); critical habitat was designated in 1997 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1997). The USFWS Service released a Recovery Plan for

  5. Natural variation of magnesium isotopes in mammal bones and teeth from two South African trophic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeremy E.; Vance, Derek; Balter, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    Isotopic fractionations accompanying element transfer through terrestrial ecosystems have the potential to shed light on ecological interactions between primary producers and consumers, but with the exception of carbon and nitrogen this potential has barely been exploited. Here, the magnesium stable isotope composition of bones and teeth of extant mammals from Kruger National Park (KNP) and Western Cape (WC), South Africa was measured for the first time. The nature of the geological substrate proves to be a major determinant of the ecosystem isotope baseline, as indicated by the lighter magnesium isotope ratios measured in WC mammals (ranging from -1.58‰ to -0.79‰) compared to those from KNP mammals (ranging from -1.01‰ to -0.04‰). Therefore, comparisons between the isotope signatures of taxa must be restricted to a pre-defined geographic area with a homogeneous substrate. In both parks, Mg shows slight enrichment in heavier isotopes from herbivores to carnivores. Plant remains trapped in the dentition of herbivores provide direct evidence of dietary source and, when available, were measured. In KNP only, δ26Mg of plant remains is systematically lighter than the values for herbivore teeth. These results invite further exploration of the variability of Mg isotopes in vertebrate ecosystems in order to test whether magnesium, a bio-essential element present in relatively large proportions in bone and teeth apatite, may serve as an additional trophic tracer to nitrogen, which is a constituent of collagen that rapidly degrades after burial.

  6. The role of natural climatic variation in perturbing the observed global mean temperature trend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, B.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research, Aspendale, VIC (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    Controversy continues to prevail concerning the reality of anthropogenically-induced climatic warming. One of the principal issues is the cause of the hiatus in the current global warming trend. There appears to be a widely held view that climatic change warming should exhibit an inexorable upwards trend, a view that implies there is no longer any input by climatic variability in the existing climatic system. The relative roles of climatic change and climatic variability are examined here using the same coupled global climatic model. For the former, the model is run using a specified CO{sub 2} growth scenario, while the latter consisted of a multi-millennial simulation where any climatic variability was attributable solely to internal processes within the climatic system. It is shown that internal climatic variability can produce global mean surface temperature anomalies of {+-}0.25 K and sustained positive and negative anomalies sufficient to account for the anomalous warming of the 1940s as well as the present hiatus in the observed global warming. The characteristics of the internally-induced negative temperature anomalies are such that if this internal natural variability is the cause of the observed hiatus, then a resumption of the observed global warming trend is to be expected within the next few years. (orig.)

  7. Natural genetic variation in selected populations of Arabidopsis thaliana is associated with ionomic differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Buescher

    Full Text Available Controlling elemental composition is critical for plant growth and development as well as the nutrition of humans who utilize plants for food. Uncovering the genetic architecture underlying mineral ion homeostasis in plants is a critical first step towards understanding the biochemical networks that regulate a plant's elemental composition (ionome. Natural accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana provide a rich source of genetic diversity that leads to phenotypic differences. We analyzed the concentrations of 17 different elements in 12 A. thaliana accessions and three recombinant inbred line (RIL populations grown in several different environments using high-throughput inductively coupled plasma- mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS. Significant differences were detected between the accessions for most elements and we identified over a hundred QTLs for elemental accumulation in the RIL populations. Altering the environment the plants were grown in had a strong effect on the correlations between different elements and the QTLs controlling elemental accumulation. All ionomic data presented is publicly available at www.ionomicshub.org.

  8. Variations in the clinical practice of physicians managing Takayasu arteritis: a nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barra L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lillian Barra,1 Patrick Liang,2 Susanne M Benseler,3 David A Cabral,4 Aurore Fifi-Mah,5 Yueyang Li,1 Nataliya Milman,6 Marinka Twilt,3 Elaine Yacyshyn,7 Christian Pagnoux8 1Division of Rheumatology, The University of Western Ontario, St Joseph’s Health Care, London, Ontario, 2Division of Rheumatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, 3Division of Rheumatology, Department of Paediatrics, Alberta Children’s Hospital, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, 4Division of Rheumatology, BC Children’s Hospital, Vancouver, British Columbia, 5Division of Rheumatology, South Health Campus, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, 6Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, 7Division of Rheumatology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, 8Department of Rheumatology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada Objective: Takayasu arteritis (TAK is a large vessel vasculitis that predominately affects young women and can cause severe ischemic complications. Given the rarity of TAK, the management of this condition is challenging. We aim to describe current rheumatologist practices for the management of TAK and identify discrepancies and gaps in knowledge. Methods: An online survey (developed by the Canadian Vasculitis Network and approved by the Canadian Rheumatology Association containing 48 questions with regard to the diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of TAK was distributed to 495 Canadian adult and pediatric rheumatologists by email. Results: Sixty-six rheumatologists completed the survey (13% response rate: the majority (73% were from academic centers and ≤25% reported managing more than ten patients in their career. For establishing the diagnosis of TAK, they relied on a combination of signs and symptoms of ischemia, elevations of inflammatory markers and vascular imaging (typically computed tomography and magnetic resonance angiography. The

  9. Using large scale surveys to investigate seasonal variations in seabird distribution and abundance. Part I: The North Western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettex, Emeline; David, Léa; Authier, Matthieu; Blanck, Aurélie; Dorémus, Ghislain; Falchetto, Hélène; Laran, Sophie; Monestiez, Pascal; Van Canneyt, Olivier; Virgili, Auriane; Ridoux, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    Scientific investigation in offshore areas are logistically challenging and expensive, therefore the available knowledge on seabird at sea distribution and abundance, as well as their seasonal variations, remains limited. To investigate the seasonal variability in seabird distribution and abundance in the North-Western Mediterranean Sea (NWMS), we conducted two large-scale aerial surveys in winter 2011-12 and summer 2012, covering a 181,400 km2 area. Following a strip-transect method, observers recorded a total of 4141 seabird sightings in winter and 2334 in summer, along 32,213 km. Using geostatistical methods, we generated sightings density maps for both seasons, as well as estimates of density and abundance. Most taxa showed seasonal variations in their density and distribution patterns, as they used the area either for wintering or for breeding. Highest densities of seabirds were recorded during winter, although large-sized shearwaters, storm petrels and terns were more abundant during summer. Consequently, with nearly 170,000 seabirds estimated in winter, the total abundance was twice higher in winter. Coastal waters of the continental shelf were generally more exploited by seabirds, even though some species, such as Mediterranean gulls, black-headed gulls, little gulls and storm petrels were found at high densities in highly offshore waters. Our results revealed areas highly exploited by the seabird community in the NWMS, such as the Gulf of Lion, the Tuscan region, and the area between Corsica and Sardinia. In addition, these large-scale surveys provide a baseline for the monitoring of seabird at sea distribution, and could inform the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive.

  10. A genome wide survey of SNP variation reveals the genetic structure of sheep breeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Kijas

    Full Text Available The genetic structure of sheep reflects their domestication and subsequent formation into discrete breeds. Understanding genetic structure is essential for achieving genetic improvement through genome-wide association studies, genomic selection and the dissection of quantitative traits. After identifying the first genome-wide set of SNP for sheep, we report on levels of genetic variability both within and between a diverse sample of ovine populations. Then, using cluster analysis and the partitioning of genetic variation, we demonstrate sheep are characterised by weak phylogeographic structure, overlapping genetic similarity and generally low differentiation which is consistent with their short evolutionary history. The degree of population substructure was, however, sufficient to cluster individuals based on geographic origin and known breed history. Specifically, African and Asian populations clustered separately from breeds of European origin sampled from Australia, New Zealand, Europe and North America. Furthermore, we demonstrate the presence of stratification within some, but not all, ovine breeds. The results emphasize that careful documentation of genetic structure will be an essential prerequisite when mapping the genetic basis of complex traits. Furthermore, the identification of a subset of SNP able to assign individuals into broad groupings demonstrates even a small panel of markers may be suitable for applications such as traceability.

  11. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkelbein, Jochen; Neuhaus, Christopher; Böhm, Lennert; Kalina, Steffen; Braunecker, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Data on the incidence of in-flight medical emergencies on-board civil aircraft are uncommon and rarely published. Such data could provide information regarding required medical equipment on-board aircraft and requisite training for cabin crew. The aim of the present study was to gather data on the incidences, nature, and medical equipment for in-flight medical emergencies by way of a survey of physician members of a German aerospace medical society. Using unipark.de (QuestBack GmbH, Cologne, Germany), an online survey was developed and used to gather specific information. Members of the German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin e.V.; DGLRM) were invited to participate in the survey during a 4-week period (21 March 2015 to 20 April 2015). Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (pairline flights per year (median). Cardiovascular (40.0%) and neurological disorders (17.8%) were the most frequent diagnoses. The medical equipment (78.7%) provided was sufficient. An emergency diversion was undertaken in 10.6% of the cases. Although using a different method of data acquisition, this survey confirms previous data on the nature of emergencies and gives plausible numbers. Our data strongly argue for the establishment of a standardized database for recording the incidence and nature of in-flight medical emergencies. Such a database could inform on required medical equipment and cabin crew training.

  12. Regional variation in the biogeochemical and physical characteristics of natural peatland pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, T Edward; Billett, Michael F; Baird, Andy J; Chapman, Pippa J; Dinsmore, Kerry J; Holden, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Natural open-water pools are a common feature of northern peatlands and are known to be an important source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Pool environmental variables, particularly water chemistry, vegetation community and physical characteristics, have the potential to exert strong controls on carbon cycling in pools. A total of 66 peatland pools were studied across three regions of the UK (northern Scotland, south-west Scotland, and Northern Ireland). We found that within-region variability of pool water chemistry was low; however, for many pool variables measured there were significant differences between regions. PCA analysis showed that pools in SW Scotland were strongly associated with greater vegetative cover and shallower water depth which is likely to increase dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mineralisation rates, whereas pools in N Scotland were more open and deeper. Pool water DOC, particulate organic carbon and dissolved CH4 concentrations were significantly different between regions. Pools in Northern Ireland had the highest concentrations of DOC (mean=14.5 mg L(-1)) and CH4 (mean=20.6 μg C L(-1)). Chloride and sulphate concentrations were significantly higher in the pools in N Scotland (mean values 26.3 and 2.40 mg L(-1), respectively) than elsewhere, due to a stronger marine influence. The ratio of UV absorbance at 465 nm to absorbance at 665 nm for pools in Northern Ireland indicated that DOC was sourced from poorly humified peat, potentially increasing the bioavailability and mineralisation of organic carbon in pools compared to the pools elsewhere. This study, which specifically aims to address a lack of basic biogeochemical knowledge about pool water chemistry, clearly shows that peatland pools are highly regionally variable. This is likely to be a reflection of significant regional-scale differences in peatland C cycling.

  13. Intraspecies variation in the emergence of hyperinfectious bacterial strains in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Heithoff

    Full Text Available Salmonella is a principal health concern because of its endemic prevalence in food and water supplies, the rise in incidence of multi-drug resistant strains, and the emergence of new strains associated with increased disease severity. Insights into pathogen emergence have come from animal-passage studies wherein virulence is often increased during infection. However, these studies did not address the prospect that a select subset of strains undergo a pronounced increase in virulence during the infective process- a prospect that has significant implications for human and animal health. Our findings indicate that the capacity to become hypervirulent (100-fold decreased LD(50 was much more evident in certain S. enterica strains than others. Hyperinfectious salmonellae were among the most virulent of this species; restricted to certain serotypes; and more capable of killing vaccinated animals. Such strains exhibited rapid (and rapidly reversible switching to a less-virulent state accompanied by more competitive growth ex vivo that may contribute to maintenance in nature. The hypervirulent phenotype was associated with increased microbial pathogenicity (colonization; cytotoxin production; cytocidal activity, coupled with an altered innate immune cytokine response within infected cells (IFN-β; IL-1β; IL-6; IL-10. Gene expression analysis revealed that hyperinfectious strains display altered transcription of genes within the PhoP/PhoQ, PhoR/PhoB and ArgR regulons, conferring changes in the expression of classical virulence functions (e.g., SPI-1; SPI-2 effectors and those involved in cellular physiology/metabolism (nutrient/acid stress. As hyperinfectious strains pose a potential risk to human and animal health, efforts toward mitigation of these potential food-borne contaminants may avert negative public health impacts and industry-associated losses.

  14. Natural variation of the RICE FLOWERING LOCUS T 1 contributes to flowering time divergence in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Ogiso-Tanaka

    Full Text Available In rice (Oryza sativa L., there is a diversity in flowering time that is strictly genetically regulated. Some indica cultivars show extremely late flowering under long-day conditions, but little is known about the gene(s involved. Here, we demonstrate that functional defects in the florigen gene RFT1 are the main cause of late flowering in an indica cultivar, Nona Bokra. Mapping and complementation studies revealed that sequence polymorphisms in the RFT1 regulatory and coding regions are likely to cause late flowering under long-day conditions. We detected polymorphisms in the promoter region that lead to reduced expression levels of RFT1. We also identified an amino acid substitution (E105K that leads to a functional defect in Nona Bokra RFT1. Sequencing of the RFT1 region in rice accessions from a global collection showed that the E105K mutation is found only in indica, and indicated a strong association between the RFT1 haplotype and extremely late flowering in a functional Hd1 background. Furthermore, SNPs in the regulatory region of RFT1 and the E105K substitution in 1,397 accessions show strong linkage disequilibrium with a flowering time-associated SNP. Although the defective E105K allele of RFT1 (but not of another florigen gene, Hd3a is found in many cultivars, relative rate tests revealed no evidence for differential rate of evolution of these genes. The ratios of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions suggest that the E105K mutation resulting in the defect in RFT1 occurred relatively recently. These findings indicate that natural mutations in RFT1 provide flowering time divergence under long-day conditions.

  15. Regional variations in mortality rates of pancreatic cancer in China:Results from 1990-1992 national mortality survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xin Chen; Peizhong Peter Wang; Si-Wei Zhang; Lian-Di Li; Feng-Zhu Lu; Xi-Shan Hao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To examine the regional variations in mortality rates of pancreatic cancer in China.METHODS: Aggregated mortality data of pancreatic cancer were extracted from the 1990-1992 national death of all causes and its mortality survey in China. Age specific and standardized mortality rates were calculated at both national and provincial levels with selected characteristics including sex and residence status.RESULTS: Mortality of pancreatic cancer ranked the ninth and accounted for 1.38 percent of the total malignancy deaths. The crude and age standardized mortality rates of pancreatic cancer in China in the period of 1990-1992 were 1.48/100 000 and 1.30/100 000, respectively. Substantial regional variations in mortality rates across China were observed with adjusted mortality rates ranging from 0.43/100 000 to 3.70/100 000 with an extremal value of 8.7.Urban residents had significant higher pancreatic mortality than rural residents.CONCLUSION: The findings of this study show different mortality rates of this disease and highlight the importance of further investigation on factors, which might contribute to the observed epidemiological patterns.

  16. Standardization of total cholesterol measurement in population surveys--pre-analytic sources of variation and their effect on the prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Ferrario, Marco; Kuulasmaa, Kari

    2005-06-01

    The estimation of population distribution of total cholesterol, as well as other blood lipids requires population surveys. Comparability of the estimates over time or between populations requires a predefined, standardized measurement protocol. This paper will assess the effect of variation in the pre-analytic procedures, on the estimation of population distribution of total cholesterol and the prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia. Implications of variation to real survey results are demonstrated on data collected during the WHO MONICA Project. The extent (%) of pre-analytic variations were determined by literature review. Simulations were then used to estimate the effect of these variations on the distribution of total cholesterol values. Three populations were selected as examples for different population distributions of total cholesterol levels and variations resulting from seasonal and postural changes, use of tourniquet, and serum versus plasma collection were simulated both individually and in combinations. Depending on the population distribution of total cholesterol, differences in pre-analytic procedures can explain a difference of up to 1.12 mmol/l in the mean total cholesterol between populations, and a difference up to 41% in the prevalence of hypercholesterolaemia (> or =6.5 mmol/l). Variation in results on measured total cholesterol levels due to differences in procedures during the pre-analytic stage can diminish substantially the reliability and comparability of measurements among surveys over time and between populations. The effect of pre-analytic variation in the population estimates of total cholesterol can be extensively reduced by standardization and training.

  17. An exploration of socioeconomic variation in lifestyle factors and adiposity in the Ontario Food Survey through structural equation modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendelson Rena

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Title An exploration of socioeconomic variation in lifestyle factors and adiposity in the Ontario Food Survey through structural equation models. Background Socioeconomic indicators have been inversely associated with overweight and obesity, with stronger associations observed among women. The objective of the present secondary analysis was to examine the relationships among socioeconomic measures and adiposity for men and women participating in the Ontario Food Survey (OFS, and to explore lifestyle factors as potential mediators of these associations. Methods The cross-sectional 1997/98 OFS collected anthropometric measurements, a food frequency questionnaire, data on socio-demographics (age, sex, income, and education and physical activity from 620 women and 467 men, ages 18 to 75. Based on the 2003 Health Canada guidelines, waist circumference and BMI values were used to derive least risk, increased risk, and high risk adiposity groups. Structural equation modeling was conducted to examine increased risk and high risk adiposity in relation to education and income, with leisure time physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, and smoking status included as potential mediators of these associations. Results The probability of high risk adiposity was directly associated with education (β-0.19, p Conclusion The socioeconomic context of adiposity continues to differ greatly between men and women. For women only in the OFS, fruit and vegetable intake contributed to the inverse association between education and high risk adiposity; however, additional explanatory factors are yet to be determined.

  18. Combining satellite remote sensing and surveys to understand persistent yield variation--- a case study in North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Lobell, D. B.; Chen, X.

    2015-12-01

    A large gap between maize yields on average farmers' fields and the highest yields achieved by either experiment or farmers is typical throughout the developing world, including in the North China Plain (NCP). This maize yield gap as identified by previous studies indicates large opportunities for raising yield by improving agronomy. Quzhou county is typical of the winter-wheat summer-maize system in NCP where the average plot size is as small as 0.25 hectares. To analyze this cropping system amidst the challenge of substantial heterogeneity, we identified fields that were either persistently higher or lower yielding according to the remote sensing yield estimates, and then conducted detailed field surveys. We found irrigation facility to be a major constraint to yield both in terms of irrigation water quality and farmers' access to wells. In total, improving the access to unsalty water would be associated with a 0.32t/ha (4.2%) increase in multi-year average yield. In addition, farmers' method of choosing cultivar, which likely relates to their overall knowledge level, significantly explained yield variation. In particular, those choosing cultivars according to technician advice, personal experiences and high yielding neighbors' advice had on average higher yield than farmers that either followed seed sellers' advice or collectively purchased seeds. Overall, the study presents a generalizable methodology of assessing yield gap as well as its persistent factors using a combination of satellite and survey data.

  19. Euro Heart Survey 2009 Snapshot: regional variations in presentation and management of patients with AMI in 47 countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puymirat, Etienne; Battler, Alex; Birkhead, John; Bueno, Hector; Clemmensen, Peter; Cottin, Yves; Fox, Keith AA; Gorenek, Bulent; Hamm, Christian; Huber, Kurt; Lettino, Maddalena; Lindahl, Bertil; Müller, Christian; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Price, Susanna; Quinn, Tom; Schiele, Francois; Simoons, Maarten; Tatu-Chitoiu, Gabriel; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Zahger, Doron; Zeymer, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Detailed data on patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) on a European-wide basis are lacking. The Euro Heart Survey 2009 Snapshot was designed to assess characteristics, management, and hospital outcomes of AMI patients throughout European Society of Cardiology (ESC) member countries in a contemporary ‘real-world’ setting, using a methodology designed to improve the representativeness of the survey. Methods: Member countries of the ESC were invited to participate in a 1-week survey of all patients admitted for documented AMI in December 2009. Data on baseline characteristics, type of AMI, management, and complications were recorded using a dedicated electronic form. In addition, we used data collected during the same time period in national registries in Sweden, England, and Wales. Data were centralized at the European Heart House. Results: Overall, 4236 patients (mean age 66±13 years; 31% women) were included in the study in 47 countries. Sixty per cent of patients had ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, with 50% having primary percutaneous coronary intervention and 21% fibrinolysis. Aspirin and thienopyridines were used in >90%. Unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparins were the most commonly used anticoagulants. Statins, beta-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors were used in >80% of the patients. In-hospital mortality was 6.2%. Regional differences were observed, both in terms of population characteristics, management, and outcomes. Conclusions: In-hospital mortality of patients admitted for AMI in Europe is low. Although regional variations exist in their presentation and management, differences are limited and have only moderate impact on early outcomes. PMID:24338295

  20. Groundwater capture processes under a seasonal variation in natural recharge and discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, Thomas, III.; Vionnet, Leticia Beatriz

    "Capture" is the increase in recharge and the decrease in discharge that occurs when pumping is imposed on an aquifer system that was in a previous state of approximate dynamic equilibrium. Regional groundwater models are usually used to calculate capture in a two-step procedure. A steady-state solution provides an initial-head configuration, a set of flows through the boundaries for the modeled region, and the initial basis for the capture calculation. The transient solutions provide the total change in flows through the boundaries. A difference between the transient and steady-state solutions renders the capture calculation. When seasonality is a modeling issue, the use of a single initial hydraulic head and a single set of boundary flows leads to miscalculations of capture. Instead, an initial condition for each season should be used. This approach may be accomplished by determining steady oscillatory solutions, which vary through the seasons but repeat from year to year. A regional groundwater model previously developed for a portion of the San Pedro River basin, Arizona, USA, is modified to illustrate the effect that different initial conditions have on transient solutions and on capture calculations. Résumé Les "prélèvements" sont constitués par l'augmentation de la recharge et par la diminution de l'écoulement qui se produit lorsqu'un pompage est imposéà un système aquifère qui était auparavant dans un état proche de l'équilibre dynamique. Les modèles régionaux de nappe sont en général utilisés pour calculer les prélèvements dans une procédure à deux étapes. Une solution en régime permanent donne la configuration piézométrique initiale, un jeu de conditions aux limites pour la région modélisée et les données de base pour le calcul des prélèvements. Les solutions transitoires donnent les modifications globales des conditions aux limites. Lorsque des variations saisonnières sont produites en sortie du modèle, le recours à une

  1. Variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production by natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kichise, Yuki; Izumoto, Eiji; Nakayama, Shunichi; Tashiro, Kosuke; Kuhara, Satoru; Kitagaki, Hiroshi

    2014-08-01

    Research on the relationship between mitochondrial membrane potential and fermentation profile is being intensely pursued because of the potential for developing advanced fermentation technologies. In the present study, we isolated naturally occurring strains of yeast from sake mash that produce high levels of malic acid and demonstrate that variations in mitochondrial membrane potential correlate with malic acid production. To define the underlying biochemical mechanism, we determined the activities of enzymes required for malic acid synthesis and found that pyruvate carboxylase and malate dehydrogenase activities in strains that produce high levels of malic acid were elevated compared with the standard sake strain K901. These results inspired us to hypothesize that decreased mitochondrial membrane potential was responsible for increased malic acid synthesis, and we present data supporting this hypothesis. Thus, the mitochondrial membrane potential of high malic acid producers was lower compared with standard strains. We conclude that mitochondrial membrane potential correlates with malic acid production.

  2. Introduction to natural disturbances and historic range of variation: type, frequency, severity, and post-disturbance structure in central hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katie Greenberg; Beverly S. Collins; Henry McNab; Douglas K. Miller; Gary R. Wein

    2015-01-01

    EXCERPT FROM: Natural Disturbances and Historic Range Variation 2015. Throughout the history of upland hardwood forests of the Central Hardwood Region, natural disturbances have been integral to shaping forest structure and composition, and essential in maintaining diverse biotic...

  3. Understanding nature's particle accelerators using high energy gamma-ray survey instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Anushka Udara

    Nature's particle accelerators, such as Pulsars, Pulsar Wind Nebulae, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernova Remnants accelerate charged particles to very high energies that then produce high energy photons. The particle acceleration mechanisms and the high energy photon emission mechanisms are poorly understood phenomena. These mechanisms can be understood either by studying individual sources in detail or, alternatively, using the collective properties of a sample of sources. Recent development of GeV survey instruments, such as Fermi-LAT, and TeV survey instruments, such as Milagro, provides a large sample of high energy gamma-ray flux measurements from galactic and extra-galactic sources. In this thesis I provide constraints on GeV and TeV radiation mechanisms using the X-ray-TeV correlations and GeV-TeV correlations. My data sample was obtained from three targeted searches for extragalactic sources and two targeted search for galactic sources, using the existing Milagro sky maps. The first extragalactic candidate list consists of Fermi-LAT GeV extragalactic sources, and the second extragalactic candidate list consists of TeVCat extragalactic sources that have been detected by Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes (IACTs). In both extragalactic candidate lists Markarian 421 was the only source detected by Milagro. A comparison between the Markarian 421 time-averaged flux, measured by Milagro, and the flux measurements of transient states, measured by IACTs, is discussed. The third extragalactic candidate list is a list of potential TeV emitting BL Lac candidates that was synthesized using X-ray observations of BL Lac objects and a Synchrotron Self-Compton model. Milagro's sensitivity was not sufficient to detect any of those candidates. However, the 95% confidence flux upper limits of those sources were above the predicted flux. Therefore, these results provide evidence to conclude that the Synchrotron Self-Compton model for BL Lac objects is still a viable

  4. EXPLORING ANTICORRELATIONS AND LIGHT ELEMENT VARIATIONS IN NORTHERN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS OBSERVED BY THE APOGEE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mészáros, Szabolcs [ELTE Gothard Astrophysical Observatory, H-9704 Szombathely, Szent Imre Herceg st. 112 (Hungary); Martell, Sarah L. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Shetrone, Matthew [University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Lucatello, Sara [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Troup, Nicholas W.; Pérez, Ana E. García; Majewski, Steven R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Bovy, Jo [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Cunha, Katia [University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); García-Hernández, Domingo A.; Prieto, Carlos Allende [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Overbeek, Jamie C. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Beers, Timothy C. [Department of Physics and JINA Center for the Evolution of the Elements, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Frinchaboy, Peter M. [Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX 76129 (United States); Hearty, Fred R.; Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Nidever, David L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Schiavon, Ricardo P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, IC2, Liverpool Science Park, Liverpool John Moores University, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-05-15

    We investigate the light-element behavior of red giant stars in northern globular clusters (GCs) observed by the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment. We derive abundances of 9 elements (Fe, C, N, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, and Ti) for 428 red giant stars in 10 GCs. The intrinsic abundance range relative to measurement errors is examined, and the well-known C–N and Mg–Al anticorrelations are explored using an extreme-deconvolution code for the first time in a consistent way. We find that Mg and Al drive the population membership in most clusters, except in M107 and M71, the two most metal-rich clusters in our study, where the grouping is most sensitive to N. We also find a diversity in the abundance distributions, with some clusters exhibiting clear abundance bimodalities (for example M3 and M53) while others show extended distributions. The spread of Al abundances increases significantly as cluster average metallicity decreases as previously found by other works, which we take as evidence that low metallicity, intermediate mass AGB polluters were more common in the more metal-poor clusters. The statistically significant correlation of [Al/Fe] with [Si/Fe] in M15 suggests that {sup 28}Si leakage has occurred in this cluster. We also present C, N, and O abundances for stars cooler than 4500 K and examine the behavior of A(C+N+O) in each cluster as a function of temperature and [Al/Fe]. The scatter of A(C+N+O) is close to its estimated uncertainty in all clusters and independent of stellar temperature. A(C+N+O) exhibits small correlations and anticorrelations with [Al/Fe] in M3 and M13, but we cannot be certain about these relations given the size of our abundance uncertainties. Star-to-star variations of α-element (Si, Ca, Ti) abundances are comparable to our estimated errors in all clusters.

  5. Seasonal variations of natural ventilation and radon-222 exhalation in a slightly rising dead-end tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick; Gautam, Umesh; Tiwari, Dilli Ram; Shrestha, Prithvi; Sapkota, Soma Nath

    2007-01-01

    The concentration activity of radon-222 has been monitored, with some interruptions, from 1997 to 2005 in the end section of a slightly rising, dead-end, 38-m long tunnel located in the Phulchoki hill, near Kathmandu, Nepal. While a high concentration varying from 6 x 10(3) Bq m(-3) to 10 x 10(3) Bq m(-3) is observed from May to September (rainy summer season), the concentration remains at a low level of about 200 Bq m(-3) from October to March (dry winter season). This reduction of radon concentration is associated with natural ventilation of the tunnel, which, contrary to expectations for a rising tunnel, takes place mainly from October to March when the outside air temperature drops below the average tunnel temperature. This interpretation is supported by temperature measurements in the atmosphere of the tunnel, a few meters away from the entrance. The temporal variations of the diurnal amplitude of this temperature indeed follow the ventilation rate deduced from the radon measurements. In the absence of significant ventilation (summer season), the radon exhalation flux at the rock surface into the tunnel atmosphere can be inferred; it exhibits a yearly variation with additional transient reductions associated with heavy rainfall, likely to be due to water infiltration. No effect of atmospheric pressure variations on the radon concentration is observed in this tunnel. This experiment illustrates how small differences in the location and geometry of a tunnel can lead to vastly different behaviours of the radon concentration versus time. This observation has consequences for the estimation of the dose rate and the practicability of radon monitoring for tectonic purposes in underground environments.

  6. Patterns of variation in levels of hsp70 in natural rocky shore populations from microscales to mesoscales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Patricia M; Sorte, Cascade J; Hofmann, Gretchen E; Menge, Bruce A

    2002-08-01

    An important step in connecting the organismal response to thermal stress to patterns of community structure is determining at what scale discernable levels of variation are manifested. The temperature signal to which organisms may potentially respond varies at many spatial scales including microhabitat, tidal height, site and latitude. A number of studies have taken physiological assessment of the heat shock response (HSR) into the intertidal both as a tool for examining the HSR in nature and for examining the utility of HSR molecules as population or community level indicators. Most commonly, immunodetection of the total pool of the Hsp70 family of isoforms is used. Here we present data on levels of Hsp70 in intertidal organisms from microhabitat to the mesoscale. Our data and previously published work show that Hsp70 levels vary at all scales examined, similar to other physical and biological variables of interest. This demonstrates both the potential utility of Hsp70 detection as a molecular tool for field biologists and to the care that must be taken in assessing scale of variation when looking for potential bioindicator molecules.

  7. Daily variation in natural disaster casualties: information flows, safety, and opportunity costs in tornado versus hurricane strikes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Sammy; Tavani, Daniele; Weiler, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    Casualties from natural disasters may depend on the day of the week they strike. With data from the Spatial Hazard Events and Losses Database for the United States (SHELDUS), daily variation in hurricane and tornado casualties from 5,043 tornado and 2,455 hurricane time/place events is analyzed. Hurricane forecasts provide at-risk populations with considerable lead time. Such lead time allows strategic behavior in choosing protective measures under hurricane threat; opportunity costs in terms of lost income are higher during weekdays than during weekends. On the other hand, the lead time provided by tornadoes is near zero; hence tornados generate no opportunity costs. Tornado casualties are related to risk information flows, which are higher during workdays than during leisure periods, and are related to sheltering-in-place opportunities, which are better in permanent buildings like businesses and schools. Consistent with theoretical expectations, random effects negative binomial regression results indicate that tornado events occurring on the workdays of Monday through Thursday are significantly less lethal than tornados that occur on weekends. In direct contrast, and also consistent with theory, the expected count of hurricane casualties increases significantly with weekday occurrences. The policy implications of observed daily variation in tornado and hurricane events are considered. © 2012 Society for Risk Analysis.

  8. Natural genetic variation impacts expression levels of coding, non-coding, and antisense transcripts in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Marsellach, Francesc X.; Codlin, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how natural genetic variation affects gene expression beyond well-annotated coding genes is still limited. The use of deep sequencing technologies for the study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has the potential to close this gap. Here, we generated...... to be affected by eQTLs as protein-coding RNAs. We identified a genetic variation of swc5 that modifies the levels of 871 RNAs, with effects on both sense and antisense transcription, and show that this effect most likely goes through a compromised deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z. The strains, methods...... the first recombinant strain library for fission yeast and conducted an RNA-seq-based QTL study of the coding, non-coding, and antisense transcriptomes. We show that the frequency of distal effects (trans-eQTLs) greatly exceeds the number of local effects (cis-eQTLs) and that non-coding RNAs are as likely...

  9. The natural history of pedal puncture wounds in diabetics: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    East Jeffrey M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgeons usually witness only the limb-threatening stages of infected, closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Given that this catastrophic outcome often represents failure of conservative management of pre-infected wounds, some suggest consideration of invasive intervention (coring or laying-open for pre-infected wounds in hope of preventing contamination from evolving into infection, there being no evidence based guidelines. However, an invasive pre-emptive approach is only justifiable if the probability of progression to catastrophic infection is very high. Literature search revealed no prior studies on the natural history of closed pedal puncture wounds in diabetics. Methods A survey was conducted via an interviewer-administered questionnaire on 198 adult diabetics resident in the parish of St. James, Jamaica. The sample was selected using a purposive technique designed to mirror the social gradient and residential distribution of the target population and is twice the number needed to detect a prevalence of puncture wounds of 14% with a range of 7-21% in a random sample of the estimated adult diabetic population. Results The prevalence of a history of at least one closed pedal puncture wound since diagnosis of diabetes was 25.8% (CI; 19.6-31.9%. The only modifiable variable associated at the 5% level of significance with risk of pedal puncture wound, after adjustment by multivariable logistic regression, was site of interview/paying status, a variable substantially reflective of income more so than quality-of-care. Of 77 reported episodes of closed pedal puncture wound among 51 participants, 45.4% healed without medical intervention, 27.3% healed after non-surgical treatment by a doctor and 27.3% required surgical intervention ranging from debridement to below-knee amputation. Anesthetic foot (failure to feel the puncture and sole of the forefoot as site of puncture were the variables significantly associated with

  10. Cross-section analyses of attitudes towards science and nature from the International Social Survey Programme 1993, 2000, and 2010 surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Joseph Anthony L

    2015-04-01

    This paper explores public attitudes towards science and nature in twelve countries using data from the International Social Survey Programme environment modules of 1993, 2000, and 2010. Analysis of attitude items indicates technocentric and pessimistic dimensions broadly related to the Dominant Social Paradigm and New Environmental Paradigm. A bi-axial dimension scale is utilized to classify respondents among four environmental knowledge orientations. Discernible and significant patterns are found among countries and their populations. Relationships with other substantial variables in the surveys are discussed and findings show that the majority of industrialized countries are clustered in the rational ecologist categorization with respondents possessing stronger ecological consciousness and optimism towards the role of modern institutions, science, and technology in solving environmental problems. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. The natural gas industry - a survey; Erdgaswirtschaft - Eine Branche im Ueberblick

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The situation of natural gas in the Federal Republic of Germany is described, with particular emphasis on the advantages and consequences of natural gas supply. The brochure discusses the role of natural gas on the energy market, the reliability of natural gas supply, the environmental impacts, the energy-saving effect of natural gas, natural gas prices, the competitive strength of the German gas industry, and the long-term reliability of natural gas supply. (orig.) [German] Die Situation des Erdgases in der Bundesrepublik Deutschland wird beschrieben, wobei die wichtigsten Vorteile und Auswirkungen der Erdgasversorgung besonders hervorgehoben werden. Es geht um die Stellung des Erdgases im Energiemarkt, die Sicherheit der Energieversorgung, Umweltschutz, Energieeinsparung durch Erdgaseinsatz, Erdgaspreise, Leistungsfaehigkeit der deutschen Gaswirtschaft und um die langfristig gesicherte Erdgasversorgung. (orig.)

  12. Amazonas project: Application of remote sensing techniques for the integrated survey of natural resources in Amazonas. [Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The use of LANDSAT multispectral scanner and return beam vidicon imagery for surveying the natural resources of the Brazilian Amazonas is described. Purposes of the Amazonas development project are summarized. The application of LANDSAT imagery to identification of vegetation coverage and soil use, identification of soil types, geomorphology, and geology and highway planning is discussed. An evaluation of the worth of LANDSAT imagery in mapping the region is presented. Maps generated by the project are included.

  13. Natural variation in 210Po and 210Pb activity concentrations in the urine of Finnish population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muikku, Maarit; Heikkinen, Tarja; Solatie, Dina; Vesterbacka, Pia

    2011-11-01

    A study to determine activity concentrations of (210)Pb and (210)Po in the urine of certain Finnish population groups was conducted, to investigate the variation in natural background level of urinary excretion. The study participants were divided into three groups mainly based on their diet. The first group comprised recreational fishermen and the second group represented people consuming more reindeer meat than an average Finn, while people using drinking water with very high activity concentrations of (210)Po were selected for the third group. The fourth group was a control group. The mean urinary excretion of (210)Po in groups 1 and 2 was 73 and 100 mBq d(-1), respectively. These values were higher than the value of the control group (20 mBq d(-1)) and the mean values reported in the literature. The mean daily urinary excretion of (210)Pb in groups 1 and 2, 70 and 52 mBq d(-1), was also slightly higher than that in the control group (32 mBq d(-1)). In contrast, the excretion rates of both (210)Po and (210)Pb for the members of group 3 were one to two orders of magnitude higher than those reported in the literature. This was clearly due to the elevated levels of natural radionuclides in their drinking water. The present study demonstrates the importance of possessing good knowledge of the background levels, in order to allow the determination of the additional exposure due, for example, to the malevolent use of radiation.

  14. SPATIAL VARIATION OF Zn GEOCHEMICAL FRACTIONS IN THE SURFACE SEDIMENTS OF THE STRAITS OF MALACCA: NATURAL OR ANTHROPOGENIC?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chee Kong Yap; Ahmad Ismail; Soon Guan Tan

    2005-01-01

    Total concentrations of Zn in the sediments of the offshore and intertidal areas of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia were recently reported in the literaturs. However, total concentrations of metals in the sediment samples do not reflect the portion or carrier phase which is attributable to anthropogenic activities and those of natural origins.In this work, geochemical fraction of Zn in the sediments of the same areas was studied and the potential use of CV as an indicator of Zn pollution was determined. The geochemical study by using sequential extraction technique revealed tions, respectively, in the sediments while most of the total zinc concentrations (offshore: 70%; intertidal: 52%)found in the sediments could be mostly due to natural origins (nonresistant fraction). Thus, the Zn levels in the Straits of Malacca should not pose a risk to the liying organisms. Based on Spearman's correlation coefficients, the source of Zn contamination in the Straits of Malacca was mainly contributed by the intertidal coastal area rather than offshore area. The present study also indicated the coefficient of variation can be used as a potential indicator of total summation of geochemical Zn concentrations in the coastal sediment but of different geochemical of Zn needs further validation.

  15. Geographic Variation and Factors Associated with Female Genital Mutilation among Reproductive Age Women in Ethiopia: A National Population Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setegn, Tesfaye; Lakew, Yihunie; Deribe, Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a common traditional practice in developing nations including Ethiopia. It poses complex and serious long-term health risks for women and girls and can lead to death. In Ethiopia, the geographic distribution and factors associated with FGM practices are poorly understood. Therefore, we assessed the spatial distribution and factors associated with FGM among reproductive age women in the country. We used population based national representative surveys. Data from two (2000 and 2005) Ethiopian demographic and health surveys (EDHS) were used in this analysis. Briefly, EDHS used a stratified, two-stage cluster sampling design. A total of 15,367 (from EDHS 2000) and 14,070 (from EDHS 2005) women of reproductive age (15-49 years) were included in the analysis. Three outcome variables were used (prevalence of FGM among women, prevalence of FGM among daughters and support for the continuation of FGM). The data were weighted and descriptive statistics (percentage change), bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were carried out. Multicollinearity of variables was assessed using variance inflation factors (VIF) with a reference value of 10 before interpreting the final output. The geographic variation and clustering of weighted FGM prevalence were analyzed and visualized on maps using ArcGIS. Z-scores were used to assess the statistical difference of geographic clustering of FGM prevalence spots. The trend of FGM weighted prevalence has been decreasing. Being wealthy, Muslim and in higher age categories are associated with increased odds of FGM among women. Similarly, daughters from Muslim women have increased odds of experiencing FGM. Women in the higher age categories have increased odds of having daughters who experience FGM. The odds of FGM among daughters decrease with increased maternal education. Mass media exposure, being wealthy and higher paternal and maternal education are associated with decreased odds of women

  16. Geographic Variation and Factors Associated with Female Genital Mutilation among Reproductive Age Women in Ethiopia: A National Population Based Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tesfaye Setegn

    Full Text Available Female genital mutilation (FGM is a common traditional practice in developing nations including Ethiopia. It poses complex and serious long-term health risks for women and girls and can lead to death. In Ethiopia, the geographic distribution and factors associated with FGM practices are poorly understood. Therefore, we assessed the spatial distribution and factors associated with FGM among reproductive age women in the country.We used population based national representative surveys. Data from two (2000 and 2005 Ethiopian demographic and health surveys (EDHS were used in this analysis. Briefly, EDHS used a stratified, two-stage cluster sampling design. A total of 15,367 (from EDHS 2000 and 14,070 (from EDHS 2005 women of reproductive age (15-49 years were included in the analysis. Three outcome variables were used (prevalence of FGM among women, prevalence of FGM among daughters and support for the continuation of FGM. The data were weighted and descriptive statistics (percentage change, bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were carried out. Multicollinearity of variables was assessed using variance inflation factors (VIF with a reference value of 10 before interpreting the final output. The geographic variation and clustering of weighted FGM prevalence were analyzed and visualized on maps using ArcGIS. Z-scores were used to assess the statistical difference of geographic clustering of FGM prevalence spots.The trend of FGM weighted prevalence has been decreasing. Being wealthy, Muslim and in higher age categories are associated with increased odds of FGM among women. Similarly, daughters from Muslim women have increased odds of experiencing FGM. Women in the higher age categories have increased odds of having daughters who experience FGM. The odds of FGM among daughters decrease with increased maternal education. Mass media exposure, being wealthy and higher paternal and maternal education are associated with decreased odds

  17. Gravity-dependent signal path variation in a large VLBI telescope modelled with a combination of surveying methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Pierguido; Abbondanza, C.; Vittuari, L.

    2009-11-01

    The very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) antenna in Medicina (Italy) is a 32-m AZ-EL mount that was surveyed several times, adopting an indirect method, for the purpose of estimating the eccentricity vector between the co-located VLBI and Global Positioning System instruments. In order to fulfill this task, targets were located in different parts of the telescope’s structure. Triangulation and trilateration on the targets highlight a consistent amount of deformation that biases the estimate of the instrument’s reference point up to 1 cm, depending on the targets’ locations. Therefore, whenever the estimation of accurate local ties is needed, it is critical to take into consideration the action of gravity on the structure. Furthermore, deformations induced by gravity on VLBI telescopes may modify the length of the path travelled by the incoming radio signal to a non-negligible extent. As a consequence, differently from what it is usually assumed, the relative distance of the feed horn’s phase centre with respect to the elevation axis may vary, depending on the telescope’s pointing elevation. The Medicina telescope’s signal path variation Δ L increases by a magnitude of approximately 2 cm, as the pointing elevation changes from horizon to zenith; it is described by an elevation-dependent second-order polynomial function computed as, according to Clark and Thomsen (Techical report, 100696, NASA, Greenbelt, 1988), a linear combination of three terms: receiver displacement Δ R, primary reflector’s vertex displacement Δ V and focal length variations Δ F. Δ L was investigated with a combination of terrestrial triangulation and trilateration, laser scanning and a finite element model of the antenna. The antenna gain (or auto-focus curve) Δ G is routinely determined through astronomical observations. A surprisingly accurate reproduction of Δ G can be obtained with a combination of Δ V, Δ F and Δ R.

  18. A survey of financing possibilities of projects in energetics with emphasis to the market with natural gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abed Al-Zabidi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available With the present expansion of globalization within economic competition of individual countries are stability and economicdevelopment inevitably bound with the term of energy, therefore also the natural gas. Presently, energy is still the most important factorof economic and social development.The critical tempo of energy consumption, entering of new players on the energetic market, quick industrialization of Asiancountries and accordingly growing difference between supply and demand, worries of depletion of the existing sources and worseningof our living environment are all worldwide global problems.The subject of the presented paper is a survey of market with natural gas in Slovakia, possibilities of diversification of sourcesof natural gas, its transport and distribution with the emphasis to the possibilities of financing of projects in energetics.

  19. Survey of the fatty acid composition of retail milk in the United States including regional and seasonal variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell-Megaro, A M; Barbano, D M; Bauman, D E

    2011-01-01

    Consumers are increasingly aware that food components have the potential to influence human health maintenance and disease prevention, and dietary fatty acids (FA) have been of special interest. It has been 25 years since the last survey of US milk FA composition, and during this interval substantial changes in dairy rations have occurred, including increased use of total mixed rations and byproduct feeds as well as the routine use of lipid and FA supplements. Furthermore, analytical procedures have improved allowing greater detail in the routine analysis of FA, especially trans FA. Our objective was to survey US milk fat and determine its FA composition. We obtained samples of fluid milk from 56 milk processing plants across the US every 3 mo for one year to capture seasonal and geographical variations. Processing plants were selected based on the criteria that they represented 50% or more of the fluid milk produced in that area. An overall summary of the milk fat analysis indicated that saturated fatty acids comprised 63.7% of total milk FA with palmitic and stearic acids representing the majority (44.1 and 18.3% of total saturated fatty acids, respectively). Unsaturated fatty acids were 33.2% of total milk FA with oleic acid predominating (71.0% of total unsaturated fatty acids). These values are comparable to those of the previous survey in 1984, considering differences in analytical techniques. Trans FA represented 3.2% of total FA, with vaccenic acid being the major trans isomer (46.5% of total trans FA). Cis-9, trans-11 18:2 conjugated linoleic acid represented 0.55% total milk FA, and the major n-3 FA (linolenic acid, 18:3) composed 0.38%. Analyses for seasonal and regional effects indicated statistical differences for some FA, but these were minor from an overall human nutrition perspective as the FA profile for all samples were numerically similar. Overall, the present study provides a valuable database for current FA composition of US fluid milk, and

  20. Gene flow and geographic variation in natural populations of Alnus acuminata ssp. arguta (Fagales: Betulaceae in Costa Rica and Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olman Murillo

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Seventeen natural populations in Costa Rica and Panama were used to asses gene flow and geographic patterns of genetic variation in this tree species. Gene flow analysis was based on the methods of rare alleles and FST (Index of genetic similarity M, using the only four polymorphic gene loci among 22 investigated (PGI-B, PGM-A, MNR-A and IDH-A. The geographic variation analysis was based on Pearson`s correlations between four geographic and 14 genetic variables. Some evidence of isolation by distance and a weak gene flow among geographic regions was found. Patterns of clinal variation in relation to altitude (r = -0.62 for genetic diversity and latitude (r= -0.77 for PGI-B3 were also observed, supporting the hypothesis of isolation by distance. No private alleles were found at the single population level.Diecisiete poblaciones naturales de esta especie forestal en Costa Rica y Panamá, fueron investigadas en relación con sus patrones de flujo genético y de variación geográfica. El análisis de flujo genético fue basado en los métodos de los alelos raros y de FST (Indice de similaridad genética M. Los análisis fueron a su vez basados en los únicos cuatro loci genéticos de un total de 22 investigados que mostraron polimorfismo (PGI-B, PGM-A, MNR-A and IDH-A. Los análisis de variación geográfica fueron basados en el desarrollo de correlaciones de Pearson entre 4 variables geográficas y 14 variables genéticas. Alguna evidencia de aislamiento por distancia así como un débil flujo genético entre regiones geográficas fue encontrado. Fueron también observados patrones de variación clinal en relación con la altitud (r = -0.62 para la diversidad genética y latitud (r= -0.77 en PGI-B3, que apoyan la hipotesis de aislamiento por distancia para esta especie. No se encontraron alelos privados en ninguna de las poblaciones investigadas.

  1. Olfaction variation in mouse husbandry and its implications for refinement and standardization: UK survey of animal scents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Salesansky, Noelia; Mazlan, Nur H; Whitfield, Lucy E; Wells, Dominic J; Burn, Charlotte C

    2016-10-01

    Olfaction plays a crucial role in mouse communication, providing information about genetic identity, physiological status of conspecifics and alerting mice to potential predators. Scents of animal origin can trigger physiological and behavioural responses that could affect experimental responses and impact positively or negatively on mouse welfare. Additionally, differing olfactory profiles could help explain variation in results between laboratories. A survey was sent to animal research units in the UK to investigate potential transfer of scents of animal origin during routine husbandry procedures, and responses were obtained from animal care workers and researchers using mice in 51 institutions. The results reveal great diversity between animal units regarding the relevant husbandry routines covered. Most [71%] reported housing non-breeding male and female mice in the same room, with 76% reporting that hands were not washed and gloves not changed between handling male and female mice. The most commonly reported species housed in the same facility as mice was the rat (91%), and 41% of respondents were aware that scents from rats could affect mice. Changing of gloves between handling mice and other species was reported by 79% of respondents. Depending on the aspect considered, between 18 and 33% of respondents believed human and non-human animal odours would strongly affect mouse physiology, behaviour or standardization, while approximately 32-54% believed these effects would be weak. This indicates uncertainty regarding the significance of these factors. Understanding and controlling these practices could reduce unwanted variability in experimental results and maximize welfare. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. The Survey of Sorption Ion-Exchange Properties of Paleozoic Natural Minerals in the Static Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germanova, T. V.; Nefedov, V. A.; Valieva, I. R.

    2017-05-01

    An experimental and exploring process’ results of iron’s ion, manganese and ammonium sodium extraction from aqueous solution by some Ural’s natural minerals in a static regime at certain physicochemical conditions: by the zeolite, montmorillonite and vermiculite in the static conditions. Values of maximum sorption capacity are estimated on a gram of natural sorbents for the present conditions. Comparison of the survey’s results shows that effective sorptions from exploring natural minerals can be used as a clinoptilolite and zeolite-mineral montmorillonite type.

  3. On resource survey of natural mineral drugs in eastern Jilin and their sustaining application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    There are rich natural resources of natural mineral drugs in eastern Jilin Province. Systematic resource investigation can elevate fractional conversion of this area' s mineral drugs resources superiority. Research on natural mineral drugs of this area can upgrade the translation rate of resource superiority and accelerate the development of local medical industry, especially, it can provide scientific data for founding the strategic design of Chinese traditional medicine's trademark of Jilin Changbai Mountain. Since the resource of mineral drugs can not be regenerated, it must be exploited scientifically, utilized reasonably and protected effectively its sustaining application.

  4. In-flight medical emergencies during airline operations: a survey of physicians on the incidence, nature, and available medical equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinkelbein J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jochen Hinkelbein,1,2 Christopher Neuhaus,2,3 Lennert Böhm,1 Steffen Kalina,1 Stefan Braunecker1,2 1Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, 2Working group “Emergency Medicine and Air Rescue”, German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (DGLRM, Munich, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany Background: Data on the incidence of in-flight medical emergencies on-board civil aircraft are uncommon and rarely published. Such data could provide information regarding required medical equipment on-board aircraft and requisite training for cabin crew. The aim of the present study was to gather data on the incidences, nature, and medical equipment for in-flight medical emergencies by way of a survey of physician members of a German aerospace medical society.Materials and methods: Using unipark.de (QuestBack GmbH, Cologne, Germany, an online survey was developed and used to gather specific information. Members of the German Society for Aviation and Space Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Luft- und Raumfahrtmedizin e.V.; DGLRM were invited to participate in the survey during a 4-week period (21 March 2015 to 20 April 2015. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: Altogether, 121 members of the society responded to the survey (n=335 sent out. Of the 121 respondents, n=54 (44.6% of the participants (89.9% male and 10.1% female; mean age, 54.1 years; n=121 were involved in at least one in-flight medical emergency. Demographic parameters in this survey were in concordance with the society members’ demographics. The mean duration of flights was 5.7 hours and the respondents performed 7.1 airline flights per year (median. Cardiovascular (40.0% and neurological disorders (17.8% were the most frequent diagnoses. The medical equipment (78.7% provided was sufficient. An emergency diversion was

  5. Final technical report for Phenomic Analysis of Natural and Induced Variation in Brachypodium Distachyon DE-SC0001526

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, John P. [USDA ARS Western Regional Research Center, Albany, NY (United States)

    2014-12-17

    The goal of this project was to apply high-throughput, non-destructive phenotyping (phenomics) to collections of natural variants and induced mutants of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon and characterize a small subset of that material in detail. B. distachyon is well suited to this phenomic approach because its small size and rapid generation time allow researchers to grow many plants under carefully controlled conditions. In addition, the simple diploid genetics, high quality genome sequence and existence of numerous experimental tools available for B. distachyon allow us to rapidly identify genes affecting specific phenotypes. Our phenomic analysis revealed great diversity in biofuel-relevant traits like growth rate, biomass and photosynthetic rate. This clearly demonstrated the feasibility of applying a phenomic approach to the model grass B. distachyon. We also demonstrated the utility of B. distachyon for studying mature root system, something that is virtually impossible to do with biomass crops. We showed tremendous natural variation in root architecture that can potentially be used to design crops with superior nutrient and water harvesting capability. Finally, we demonstrated the speed with which we can link specific genes to specific phenotypes by studying two mutants in detail. Importantly, in both cases, the specific biological lessons learned were grass-specific and could not have been learned from a dicot model system. Furthermore, one of the genes affects cell wall integrity and thus may be a useful target in the context of biomass crop improvement. Ultimately, all this information can be used to accelerate the creation of improved biomass crops.

  6. Spatial variations of Pb in the vertical zone of the soil-plant system in the Changbai Mountain National Nature Reserve

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The characteristics of vertical and horizontal variations of lead element(Pb) in soil-plant system of vertical zone in Changbai Mountain National Nature Reserve(CNNR) were studied.The results showed that Pb concentrations in soils of vertical zone are all above 25 mg/kg,and the average Pb concentration of each soil zone negatively correlates its degree of variation,i.e.brown coniferous forest soil zone has the lowest average Pb concentration of four soil zones,and the highest horizontal variation; however,mountain soddy forest soil has the highest average Pb concentration,and the lowest horizontal variation; the average concentration of plant Pb of each plant zone is lower than the worldwide average level of Pb in plant( Clarke),respectively,and plant Pb content order is consistent with soil Pb content order,but their horizontal variations are different from those in soil zones,the variation of mountain tundra forest zone is highest,but Betula ermanii forest zone the lowest.Vertical variation of plant Pb is obviously higher than that in soils with variation coefficient of 89.76%; the enrichment capability of plant for Pb is depended on the plant types and the different organs of plant; parent material and parent rock,pH values,soil organic matter and soil particle fraction etc.are the main factors influencing variations of Pb content in soil-plant system of vertical zone in CNNR.

  7. Modulation of Ambient Temperature-Dependent Flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana by Natural Variation of FLOWERING LOCUS M.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Lutz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants integrate seasonal cues such as temperature and day length to optimally adjust their flowering time to the environment. Compared to the control of flowering before and after winter by the vernalization and day length pathways, mechanisms that delay or promote flowering during a transient cool or warm period, especially during spring, are less well understood. Due to global warming, understanding this ambient temperature pathway has gained increasing importance. In Arabidopsis thaliana, FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM is a critical flowering regulator of the ambient temperature pathway. FLM is alternatively spliced in a temperature-dependent manner and the two predominant splice variants, FLM-ß and FLM-δ, can repress and activate flowering in the genetic background of the A. thaliana reference accession Columbia-0. The relevance of this regulatory mechanism for the environmental adaptation across the entire range of the species is, however, unknown. Here, we identify insertion polymorphisms in the first intron of FLM as causative for accelerated flowering in many natural A. thaliana accessions, especially in cool (15°C temperatures. We present evidence for a potential adaptive role of this structural variation and link it specifically to changes in the abundance of FLM-ß. Our results may allow predicting flowering in response to ambient temperatures in the Brassicaceae.

  8. Effects of walls temperature variation on double diffusive natural convection of Al2O3-water nanofluid in an enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhzadeh, G. A.; Dastmalchi, M.; Khorasanizadeh, H.

    2013-12-01

    The effect of wall temperature variations on double diffusive natural convection of Al2O3-water nanofluid in a differentially heated square enclosure with constant temperature hot and cold vertical walls is studied numerically. Transport mechanisms of nanoparticles including Brownian diffusion and thermophoresis that cause heterogeneity are considered in non-homogeneous model. The hot and cold wall temperatures are varied, but the temperature difference between them is always maintained 5 °C. The thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, viscosity and density and thermophoresis diffusion and Brownian motion coefficients are considered variable with temperature and volume fraction of nanoparticles. The governing equations are discretized using the control volume method. The results show that nanoparticle transport mechanisms affect buoyancy force and cause formation of small vortexes near the top and bottom walls of the cavity and reduce the heat transfer. By increasing the temperature of the walls the effect of transport mechanisms decreases and due to enhanced convection the heat transfer rate increases.

  9. Natural variation in Vif: differential impact on APOBEC3G/3F and a potential role in HIV-1 diversification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviana Simon

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts the antiviral activity exhibited by the host cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F. Here, we show that defective vif alleles can readily be found in HIV-1 isolates and infected patients. Single residue changes in the Vif protein sequence are sufficient to cause the loss of Vif-induced APOBEC3 neutralization. Interestingly, not all the detected defects lead to a complete inactivation of Vif function since some mutants retained selective neutralizing activity against APOBEC3F but not APOBEC3G or vice versa. Concordantly, independently hypermutated proviruses with distinguishable patterns of G-to-A substitution attributable to cytidine deamination induced by APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, or both enzymes were present in individuals carrying proviruses with completely or partly defective Vif variants. Natural variation in Vif function may result in selective and partial neutralization of cytidine deaminases and thereby promote viral sequence diversification within HIV-1 infected individuals.

  10. Natural Variation in Vif: Differential Impact on APOBEC3G/3F and a Potential Role in HIV-1 Diversification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts the antiviral activity exhibited by the host cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F. Here, we show that defective vif alleles can readily be found in HIV-1 isolates and infected patients. Single residue changes in the Vif protein sequence are sufficient to cause the loss of Vif-induced APOBEC3 neutralization. Interestingly, not all the detected defects lead to a complete inactivation of Vif function since some mutants retained selective neutralizing activity against APOBEC3F but not APOBEC3G or vice versa. Concordantly, independently hypermutated proviruses with distinguishable patterns of G-to-A substitution attributable to cytidine deamination induced by APOBEC3G, APOBEC3F, or both enzymes were present in individuals carrying proviruses with completely or partly defective Vif variants. Natural variation in Vif function may result in selective and partial neutralization of cytidine deaminases and thereby promote viral sequence diversification within HIV-1 infected individuals.

  11. Linking differential domain functions of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hailiang; Sun, Shengyuan; Yao, Jialing; Wang, Chongrong; Yu, Sibin; Xu, Caiguo; Li, Xianghua; Zhang, Qifa

    2010-11-09

    Grain yield in many cereal crops is largely determined by grain size. Here we report the genetic and molecular characterization of GS3, a major quantitative trait locus for grain size. It functions as a negative regulator of grain size and organ size. The wild-type isoform is composed of four putative domains: a plant-specific organ size regulation (OSR) domain in the N terminus, a transmembrane domain, a tumor necrosis factor receptor/nerve growth factor receptor (TNFR/NGFR) family cysteine-rich domain, and a von Willebrand factor type C (VWFC) in the C terminus. These domains function differentially in grain size regulation. The OSR domain is both necessary and sufficient for functioning as a negative regulator. The wild-type allele corresponds to medium grain. Loss of function of OSR results in long grain. The C-terminal TNFR/NGFR and VWFC domains show an inhibitory effect on the OSR function; loss-of-function mutations of these domains produced very short grain. This study linked the functional domains of the GS3 protein to natural variation of grain size in rice.

  12. Natural Nuclear Reactor Oklo and Variation of Fundamental Constants Part 1: Computation of Neutronic of Fresh Core

    CERN Document Server

    Petrov, Yu V; Onegin, M S; Petrov, V Yu; Sakhnovskii, E G; Petrov, Yu.V.

    2006-01-01

    Using a modern methods of reactor physics we have performed the full-scale calculations of the natural reactor Oklo. For reliability we have used the recent version of two Monte Carlo codes: the Russian code MCU REA and world wide known code MCNP (USA). Both codes produce close results. We constructed computer model of zone RZ2 of reactor Oklo which takes into account all details of design and composition. The calculations were performed for the three fresh cores with different uranium contents. Multiplication factors, reactivities and neutron fluxes were calculated. We estimated also the temperature and void effects for the fresh core. As would be expected, we have found for the fresh core a great difference between reactor spectra and Maxwell's one, which was used before for averaging cross sections in the Oklo reactor. The averaged cross section of Sm and its dependence on the shift of resonance position (due to variation of fundamental constants) are significantly different from previous results. Contrary...

  13. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  14. Coupled effects of natural and anthropogenic controls on seasonal and spatial variations of river water quality during baseflow in a coastal watershed of Southeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinliang Huang

    Full Text Available Surface water samples of baseflow were collected from 20 headwater sub-watersheds which were classified into three types of watersheds (natural, urban and agricultural in the flood, dry and transition seasons during three consecutive years (2010-2012 within a coastal watershed of Southeast China. Integrating spatial statistics with multivariate statistical techniques, river water quality variations and their interactions with natural and anthropogenic controls were examined to identify the causal factors and underlying mechanisms governing spatiotemporal patterns of water quality. Anthropogenic input related to industrial effluents and domestic wastewater, agricultural activities associated with the precipitation-induced surface runoff, and natural weathering process were identified as the potential important factors to drive the seasonal variations in stream water quality for the transition, flood and dry seasons, respectively. All water quality indicators except SRP had the highest mean concentrations in the dry and transition seasons. Anthropogenic activities and watershed characteristics led to the spatial variations in stream water quality in three types of watersheds. Concentrations of NH(4(+-N, SRP, K(+, COD(Mn, and Cl- were generally highest in urban watersheds. NO3(-N Concentration was generally highest in agricultural watersheds. Mg(2+ concentration in natural watersheds was significantly higher than that in agricultural watersheds. Spatial autocorrelations analysis showed similar levels of water pollution between the neighboring sub-watersheds exhibited in the dry and transition seasons while non-point source pollution contributed to the significant variations in water quality between neighboring sub-watersheds. Spatial regression analysis showed anthropogenic controls played critical roles in variations of water quality in the JRW. Management implications were further discussed for water resource management. This research

  15. SYNTAXONOMICAL SURVEY OF GERANIO-CARDAMINETALIA HIRSUTAE: SEMI-NATURAL THEROPHYTIC VEGETATION OF THE MEDITERRANEAN REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. GUARINO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A syntaxonomical scheme, including geographical range and synonymies of all the associations ascribed to Geranio-Cardaminetalia hirsutae, is presented. This order, framed into the class Stellarietea mediae, groups sciaphilo-subnitrophilous annual vegetation of natural and semi-natural habitats, commonly occurring on substrata rich in organic matter, accumulating on stone-walls, shaded rocks and initial soils, often under the canopy of shrubs and trees. Twelve new associations from Sardinia, Sicily, Egean islands and Israel are here described for the first time.

  16. Impacts of decadal variations in natural emissions due to land-cover changes on ozone production in southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Li

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The decadal variations in emissions of high-reactivity biogenic volatile organics (BVOCs, as a result of land-cover changes, could significantly impact ozone (O3 production. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry (WRF/Chem modelling system, coupled with dynamic vegetation data sets derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, 2001–2012 and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR, early 1990s measurements, were used to investigate the impacts of land-cover changes on natural emissions, and consequently O3 production, in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region of southern China over the past two decades. Model results indicate that BVOC emissions were highly dependent on forest area. The total BVOC emissions in the modelling domain increased by a factor of two due to afforestation since the early 1990s, declined slowly (−5.8% yr−1 until 2006 and then increased continuously (+9.1% yr−1 to 2012. The decadal variations in BVOC emissions have complex implications for summer O3 production in PRD, depending on the chemical regimes and prevailing winds. The impacts on O3 production were most sensitive in downwind areas, and it was found that the large increase in BVOC emissions during 2006–2012 tended to reduce surface O3 concentrations by 1.6–2.5 ppb in rural regions, but caused an increment of O3 peaks by up to 2.0–6.0 ppb in VOC-limited urban areas (e.g., Guangzhou, Foshan and Zhongshan. The opposite was true in the period 2001–2006, when the reduced BVOC emissions resulted in 1.3–4.0 ppb increases in daytime O3 concentrations over northern rural regions. Impact of the two-fold increase in BVOC emissions since the early 1990s to 2006 was a 0.9–4.6 ppb increment in surface O3 concentrations over the downwind areas. This study suggests that the potential impacts on ozone chemistry should be considered in long-term land-use planning and air-quality management.

  17. Variation and evolution of male sex combs in Drosophila: nature of selection response and theories of genetic variation for sexual traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Abha; Singh, Rama S

    2008-05-01

    We investigated the genetic architecture of variation in male sex comb bristle number, a rapidly evolving secondary sexual character of Drosophila. Twenty-four generations of divergent artificial selection for sex comb bristle number in a heterogeneous population of Drosophila melanogaster resulted in a significant response that was more pronounced in the direction of low bristle numbers. We observed a strong positive correlated response to selection in the corresponding female transverse bristle row. The correlated response in male abdominal and sternopleural bristle numbers, on the other hand, did not follow the same pattern as sex comb bristle number differences between selection lines. Relaxation-of-selection experiments along with mate choice and fecundity assays using the selection lines developed demonstrated the action of stabilizing selection on sex comb bristle number. Our results show (1) substantial genetic variation underlying sex comb bristle number variation; (2) a weak relationship between the sex comb and developmentally related, non-sex bristle systems; and (3) that sexual selection may be a driving force in sex comb evolution, indicating the potential of sex combs to diversify rapidly during population differentiation and speciation. We discuss the implications of these results for theories of genetic variation in display and nondisplay male sex traits.

  18. Racial/ethnic variation in breastfeeding across the US: a multilevel analysis from the National Survey of Children's Health, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanoff, Candice M; McManus, Beth M; Carle, Adam C; McCormick, Marie C; Subramanian, S V

    2012-04-01

    We examined whether differences across states in race/ethnicity-specific breastfeeding rates are due solely to state differences in individual factors associated with breastfeeding or additionally, certain state "contextual" factors. Using data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health, multilevel models examined whether state variability in race/ethnicity specific breastfeeding initiation and duration to 6 months were explained by (1) individual sociodemographic characteristics of women in states, and (2) an aggregate state measure of the availability of evidence-based maternity care services related to breastfeeding. Observed variability of race/ethnicity-specific breastfeeding rates was only minimally reduced after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics (Median Odds Ratios (MOR), breastfeeding initiation: non-Hispanic White = 1.46, non-Hispanic Black = 2.26; Hispanic = 1.89. MOR, breastfeeding for 6 months: non-Hispanic White = 1.36, non-Hispanic Black = 1.84; Hispanic = 1.56). Overall variability in the degree of state gaps changed little in adjusted models (breastfeeding initiation: non-Hispanic Black σ(2) = 0.74, se 0.28, Hispanic σ(2) = 0.45, se 0.11; breastfeeding to 6-months: non-Hispanic Black σ(2) = 0.41, se 0.10, Hispanic σ(2) = 0.22, se 0.05). The measure of maternity care services was positively associated with breastfeeding overall but generally did not explain a substantial portion of between-state variability nor the overall variability in racial/ethnic gaps. Contextual sources of variation in state breastfeeding practices and disparities remain poorly understood. Differences in the socioeconomic makeup of states do not fully explain variability. The association of state breastfeeding rates and disparities with relevant policy and practice factors should be further investigated.

  19. VKORC1 common variation and bone mineral density in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana C Crawford

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis, defined by low bone mineral density (BMD, is common among postmenopausal women. The distribution of BMD varies across populations and is shaped by both environmental and genetic factors. Because the candidate gene vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (VKORC1 generates vitamin K quinone, a cofactor for the gamma-carboxylation of bone-related proteins such as osteocalcin, we hypothesized that VKORC1 genetic variants may be associated with BMD and osteoporosis in the general population. To test this hypothesis, we genotyped six VKORC1 SNPs in 7,159 individuals from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III. NHANES III is a nationally representative sample linked to health and lifestyle variables including BMD, which was measured using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA on four regions of the proximal femur. In adjusted models stratified by race/ethnicity and sex, SNPs rs9923231 and rs9934438 were associated with increased BMD (p=0.039 and 0.024, respectively while rs8050894 was associated with decreased BMD (p=0.016 among non-Hispanic black males (n=619. VKORC1 rs2884737 was associated with decreased BMD among Mexican-American males (n=795; p=0.004. We then tested for associations between VKORC1 SNPs and osteoporosis, but the results did not mirror the associations observed between VKORC1 and BMD, possibly due to small numbers of cases. This is the first report of VKORC1 common genetic variation associated with BMD, and one of the few reports available that investigate the genetics of BMD and osteoporosis in diverse populations.

  20. Survey of period variations of superhumps in SU UMa-type dwarf novae. V. The fifth year (2012-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taichi; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Masi, Gianluca; Nocentini, Francesca; Dubovsky, Pavol A.; Kudzej, Igor; Imamura, Kazuyoshi; Ogi, Minako; Tanabe, Kenji; Akazawa, Hidehiko; Krajci, Thomas; Miller, Ian; de Miguel, Enrique; Henden, Arne; Noguchi, Ryo; Ishibashi, Takehiro; Ono, Rikako; Kawabata, Miho; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Nishino, Hirochika; Furukawa, Hisami; Masumoto, Kazunari; Matsumoto, Katsura; Littlefield, Colin; Ohshima, Tomohito; Nakata, Chikako; Honda, Satoshi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Hashimoto, Osamu; Stein, William; Pickard, Roger D.; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Pavlenko, Elena P.; Antonyuk, Oksana I.; Baklanov, Aleksei V.; Antonyuk, Kirill; Samsonov, Denis; Pit, Nikolaj; Sosnovskij, Aleksei; Oksanen, Arto; Harlingten, Caisey; Tyyskä, Jenni; Monard, Berto; Shugarov, Sergey Yu.; Chochol, Drahomir; Kasai, Kiyoshi; Maeda, Yutaka; Hirosawa, Kenji; Itoh, Hiroshi; Sabo, Richard; Ulowetz, Joseph; Morelle, Etienne; Michel, Raúl; Suárez, Genaro; James, Nick; Dvorak, Shawn; Voloshina, Irina B.; Richmond, Michael; Staels, Bart; Boyd, David; Andreev, Maksim V.; Parakhin, Nikolai; Katysheva, Natalia; Miyashita, Atsushi; Nakajima, Kazuhiro; Bolt, Greg; Padovan, Stefano; Nelson, Peter; Starkey, Donn R.; Buczynski, Denis; Starr, Peter; Goff, William N.; Denisenko, Denis; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Shappee, Benjamin; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Prieto, José L.; Itagaki, Koh-ichi; Kaneko, Shizuo; Stubbings, Rod; Muyllaert, Eddy; Shears, Jeremy; Schmeer, Patrick; Poyner, Gary; Rodríguez-Marco, Miguel

    2014-04-01

    Continuing the project described in Kato et al. (2009, PASJ, 61, S395), we collected times of superhump maxima for SU UMa-type dwarf novae mainly observed during the 2012-2013 season. We found three objects (V444 Peg, CSS J203937, and MASTER J212624) having strongly positive period derivatives despite the long orbital period (Porb). By using the period of growing stage (stage A) superhumps, we obtained mass ratios for six objects. We characterized nine new WZ Sge-type dwarf novae. We made a pilot survey of the decline rate in the slowly fading parts of SU UMa-type and WZ Sge-type outbursts. The decline time scale was found to generally follow an expected P_orb^{1/4} dependence, and WZ Sge-type outbursts also generally follow this trend. There are some objects which show slower decline rates, and we consider these objects good candidates for period bouncers. We also studied unusual behavior in some objects, including BK Lyn which made a transition from an ER UMa-type state to a novalike (standstill) state in 2013, and unusually frequent occurrences of superoutbursts in NY Ser and CR Boo. We applied the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) power spectral analysis, which has been proven to be very effective in analyzing the Kepler data, to the ground-based photometry of BK Lyn, and detected a dramatic disappearance of the signal of negative superhumps in 2013. We suggested that the mass-transfer rates did not strongly vary between the ER UMa-type state and novalike state in BK Lyn, and this transition was less likely caused by a systematic variation of the mass-transfer rate.

  1. Natural variation in CBF gene sequence, gene expression and freezing tolerance in the Versailles core collection of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunel Dominique

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plants from temperate regions are able to withstand freezing temperatures due to a process known as cold acclimation, which is a prior exposure to low, but non-freezing temperatures. During acclimation, a large number of genes are induced, bringing about biochemical changes in the plant, thought to be responsible for the subsequent increase in freezing tolerance. Key regulatory proteins in this process are the CBF1, 2 and 3 transcription factors which control the expression of a set of target genes referred to as the "CBF regulon". Results To assess the role of the CBF genes in cold acclimation and freezing tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana, the CBF genes and their promoters were sequenced in the Versailles core collection, a set of 48 accessions that maximizes the naturally-occurring genetic diversity, as well as in the commonly used accessions Col-0 and WS. Extensive polymorphism was found in all three genes. Freezing tolerance was measured in all accessions to assess the variability in acclimated freezing tolerance. The effect of sequence polymorphism was investigated by evaluating the kinetics of CBF gene expression, as well as that of a subset of the target COR genes, in a set of eight accessions with contrasting freezing tolerance. Our data indicate that CBF genes as well as the selected COR genes are cold induced in all accessions, irrespective of their freezing tolerance. Although we observed different levels of expression in different accessions, CBF or COR gene expression was not closely correlated with freezing tolerance. Conclusion Our results indicate that the Versailles core collection contains significant natural variation with respect to freezing tolerance, polymorphism in the CBF genes and CBF and COR gene expression. Although there tends to be more CBF and COR gene expression in tolerant accessions, there are exceptions, reinforcing the idea that a complex network of genes is involved in freezing tolerance

  2. Diversity, geographic distribution, and habitat-specific variations of microbiota in natural populations of the chicken mite, Dermanyssus gallinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Claire Valiente; Thioulouse, Jean; Chauve, Claude; Zenner, Lionel

    2011-07-01

    Dermanyssus gallinae is considered to be the most economically significant ectoparasite to affect egg-laying poultry in Europe. This mite can also act as a vector for a number of pathogens. The array of bacteria associated with D. gallinae mites could provide insight into the biology and population dynamics of arthropods, but at the present time little information is available. To understand the intra- and interpopulation diversity of its associated microbiota, we analyzed the whole internal bacterial community of natural populations of D. gallinae originating from two types of poultry farm habitats (standard and free-range) in two regions of France (Brittany and the Rhone-Alpes). Total DNA was extracted from individual or pooled mites, and polymerase chain reaction temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rRNA was then done to separate bacterial DNA fragments associated with the host arthropod. A large diversity of bacteria was detected, but principally firmicutes and gamma-Proteobacteria. Between-group analyses of temporal temperature gradient gel electrophoresis-banding patterns revealed that bacterial populations clustered into categories according to their geographic origin and the habitat specifics of the farms. Some degree of stability of bacterial populations was observed within a specific time scale. These results suggest that environmental factors either recent (e.g., poultry farming practices) or long-standing (e.g., geographic isolation) may affect the bacterial communities present in D. gallinae. Further knowledge of the microbiota associated with D. gallinae and its variation would indeed offer new perspectives for biological control methods to prevent the establishment, proliferation, and transmission of pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Natural nuclear reactor at Oklo and variation of fundamental constants: Computation of neutronics of a fresh core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Nazarov, A. I.; Onegin, M. S.; Petrov, V. Yu.; Sakhnovsky, E. G.

    2006-12-01

    Using modern methods of reactor physics, we performed full-scale calculations of the Oklo natural reactor. For reliability, we used recent versions of two Monte Carlo codes: the Russian code MCU-REA and the well-known international code MCNP. Both codes produced similar results. We constructed a computer model of the Oklo reactor zone RZ2 which takes into account all details of design and composition. The calculations were performed for three fresh cores with different uranium contents. Multiplication factors, reactivities, and neutron fluxes were calculated. We also estimated the temperature and void effects for the fresh core. As would be expected, we found for the fresh core a significant difference between reactor and Maxwell spectra, which had been used before for averaging cross sections in the Oklo reactor. The averaged cross section of 62149Sm and its dependence on the shift of a resonance position Er (due to variation of fundamental constants) are significantly different from previous results. Contrary to the results of previous papers, we found no evidence of a change of the samarium cross section: a possible shift of the resonance energy is given by the limits -73⩽ΔEr⩽62 meV. Following tradition, we have used formulas of Damour and Dyson to estimate the rate of change of the fine structure constant α. We obtain new, more accurate limits of -4×10-17⩽α·/α⩽3×10-17yr-1. Further improvement of the accuracy of the limits can be achieved by taking account of the core burn-up. These calculations are in progress.

  4. Annual Variation in Flowering Phenology, Pollination, Mating System, and Pollen Yield in Two Natural Populations of Schima wallichii (DC. Korth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Prasad Khanduri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Schima wallichii is a highly valuable tree of tropical forest in north-east Himalaya region that grows naturally in a wide range of altitudes between 750 and 2400 m asl with varying environments. Flowering phenology of tropical tree species at population level is generally ignored and therefore a detailed knowledge of flowering and fruiting patterns of important multipurpose tree species is critical to the successful management of forest genetic resources. Materials and Methods. The study was conducted at two different altitudes (i.e., 750 m and 900 m asl in the tropical semideciduous forest of north-east Himalaya. The floral phenology including flowering synchrony in the populations, anthesis, anther dehiscence, stigma receptivity, pollinators visitation frequency, and mating system including index of self-incompatibility were worked out in Schima wallichii according to the ear-marked standard methods given by various scientists for each parameter. Results. The flowering period in Schima wallichii varied from 33 to 42 days with mean synchrony of 0.54 to 0.68 between the populations. The stigma was receptive up to 2.5 days only and showed slightly protandrous type of dichogamy. Average pollen production ranged between 6.90 × 107 pollen per tree in 2007 and 15.49 × 108 pollen per tree in 2011. A three-year masting cycle was noticed in this species. The frequency of visitation of honey bees was fairly high (5.2 ± 1.12 visits/flower/hour as compared to other pollinators. The hand pollination revealed maximum fruit (74.2 ± 5.72% and seed (70.8 ± 7.46% settings. Conclusions. The variation in flowering phenology and pollen yield individually and annually along with temporal separation in anther dehiscence and pollinator’s visitation cause pollen limited reproduction, which ultimately influences the reproductive success in Schima wallichii.

  5. Intelligent Approaches to interact with Machines using Hand Gesture Recognition in Natural way: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Chaudhary

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Hand gestures recognition (HGR is one of the main areas of research for the engineers,scientists and bioinformatics. HGR is the natural way of Human Machine interaction and today manyresearchers in the academia and industry are working on different application to make interactions moreeasy, natural and convenient without wearing any extra device. HGR can be applied from games controlto vision enabled robot control, from virtual reality to smart home systems. In this paper we arediscussing work done in the area of hand gesture recognition where focus is on the intelligentapproaches including soft computing based methods like artificial neural network, fuzzy logic, geneticalgorithms etc. The methods in the preprocessing of image for segmentation and hand imageconstruction also taken into study. Most researchers used fingertips for hand detection in appearancebased modeling. Finally the comparison of results given by different researchers is also presented.

  6. A survey of phytotoxic microbial and plant metabolites as potential natural products for pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Kevin K; Andolfi, Anna; Cantrell, Charles L; Cimmino, Alessio; Duke, Stephen O; Osbrink, Weste; Wedge, David E; Evidente, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    Phytotoxic microbial metabolites produced by certain phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria, and a group of phytotoxic plant metabolites including Amaryllidacea alkaloids and some derivatives of these compounds were evaluated for algicide, bactericide, insecticide, fungicide, and herbicide activities in order to discover natural compounds for potential use in the management and control of several important agricultural and household structural pests. Among the various compounds evaluated: i) ophiobolin A was found to be the most promising for potential use as a selective algicide; ii) ungeremine was discovered to be bactericidal against certain species of fish pathogenic bacteria; iii) cycasin caused significant mortality in termites; iv) cavoxin, ophiobolin A, and sphaeropsidin A were most active towards species of plant pathogenic fungi; and v) lycorine and some of its analogues (1-O-acetyllycorine and lycorine chlorohydrate) were highly phytotoxic in the herbicide bioassay. Our results further demonstrated that plants and microbes can provide a diverse and natural source of compounds with potential use as pesticides.

  7. South African National Survey of Arachnida: A checklist of the spiders (Arachnida, Araneae) of the Lekgalameetse Nature Reserve, Limpopo province, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Foord, Stefan H.; Anna S. Dippenaar-Schoeman; Rudy Jocqué; Charles R. Haddad; Robin Lyle; Peter Webb

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the South African National Survey of Arachnida (SANSA) is to document the Arachnida fauna of South Africa. One of the focus areas of SANSA is to survey protected areas to obtain species-specific information, and species distribution patterns for Red Data assessments. Here, we provide the first checklist of the spider species of Lekgalameetse Nature Reserve (LNR) in the Limpopo province of South Africa collected during five surveys between 2009 and 2016 using methods targeting both ...

  8. Survey of natural and anthropogenic radioactivity in environmental samples from Yugoslavia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, M; Polić, P; Bartolomei, P; Benzi, V; Martellini V; Cvetković, O; Damjanov, V; Simić, M; Zunić, Z; Zivancević, B; Simić, S; Jovanović, V

    2002-01-01

    The radioactivity of 238U, 226Ra, 232Th, 40K and 137Cs in sediments, soil, turf and honey from Serbia and Kosovo (Yugoslavia) was measured using gamma and alpha spectrometry in order to estimate the radiation hazard from natural and man-made sources, as well as to compile a database for radioactivity levels in those regions. One sample, collected in the vicinity of a "depleted uranium" (DU) shell of the recent Balkan war, revealed a high 238U activity and a non-natural 235U/238U activity ratio, confirming therefore its anthropogenic origin. However, some other soil samples coming from characteristic DU craters did not show any characteristic level of radioactivity. The other sediment and turf samples taken all around the country show low radioactivity levels for all the isotopes here considered. With the aim of obtaining some indication about radioactivity migration in the food chain, several honey samples have been examined too. All samples show very low radioactivity content, often indistinguishable from natural background.

  9. Spatiotemporal variation of radon and carbon dioxide concentrations in an underground quarry: coupled processes of natural ventilation, barometric pumping and internal mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    Radon-222 and carbon dioxide concentrations have been measured during several years at several points in the atmosphere of an underground limestone quarry located at a depth of 18 m in Vincennes, near Paris, France. Both concentrations showed a seasonal cycle. Radon concentration varied from 1200 to 2000 Bq m(-3) in summer to about 800-1400 Bq m(-3) in winter, indicating winter ventilation rates varying from 0.6 to 2.5 x 10(-6) s(-1). Carbon dioxide concentration varied from 0.9 to 1.0% in summer, to about 0.1-0.3% in winter. Radon concentration can be corrected for natural ventilation using temperature measurements. The obtained model also accounts for the measured seasonal variation of carbon dioxide. After correction, radon concentrations still exhibit significant temporal variation, mostly associated with the variation of atmospheric pressure, with coupling coefficients varying from -7 to -26 Bq m(-3) hPa(-1). This variation can be accounted for using a barometric pumping model, coupled with natural ventilation in winter, and including internal mixing as well. After correction, radon concentrations exhibit residual temporal variation, poorly correlated between different points, with standard deviations varying from 3 to 6%. This study shows that temporal variation of radon concentrations in underground cavities can be understood to a satisfactory level of detail using non-linear and time-dependent modelling. It is important to understand the temporal variation of radon concentrations and the limitations in their modelling to monitor the properties of natural or artificial underground settings, and to be able to assess the existence of new processes, for example associated with the preparatory phases of volcanic eruptions or earthquakes.

  10. natural

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Gómez Macías

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partiendo de óxido de magnesio comercial se preparó una suspensión acuosa, la cual se secó y calcinó para conferirle estabilidad térmica. El material, tanto fresco como usado, se caracterizó mediante DRX, área superficial BET y SEM-EPMA. El catalizador mostró una matriz de MgO tipo periclasa con CaO en la superficie. Las pruebas de actividad catalítica se efectuaron en lecho fijo empacado con partículas obtenidas mediante prensado, trituración y clasificación del material. El flujo de reactivos consistió en mezclas gas natural-aire por debajo del límite inferior de inflamabilidad. Para diferentes flujos y temperaturas de entrada de la mezcla reactiva, se midieron las concentraciones de CH4, CO2 y CO en los gases de combustión con un analizador de gases tipo infrarrojo no dispersivo (NDIR. Para alcanzar conversión total de metano se requirió aumentar la temperatura de entrada al lecho a medida que se incrementó el flujo de gases reaccionantes. Los resultados obtenidos permiten desarrollar un sistema de combustión catalítica de bajo costo con un material térmicamente estable, que promueva la alta eficiencia en la combustión de gas natural y elimine los problemas de estabilidad, seguridad y de impacto ambiental negativo inherentes a los procesos de combustión térmica convencional.

  11. Constraints to connecting children with nature--Survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees sponsored by the National Conservation Training Center, Division of Education Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Schuster, Rudy M.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) names "connecting people with nature" as one of its top six priorities in the online Service Employee Pocket Guide. The National Conservation Training Center (NCTC) took the initiative to identify issues that impede greater progress in addressing constraints to connecting children with nature. The Division of Education Outreach at NCTC formed a working relation with the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance branch of the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a study on these issues. To meet the objectives of the study, a survey of a sample of FWS employees was conducted. This report includes the description of how the survey was developed and administered, how the data were analyzed, and a discussion of the survey results. The survey was developed based on published literature and incorporated input from two working groups of professionals focused on the issue of connecting children with nature. Although the objective as stated by the FWS is to connect people with nature, the survey primarily focused on connecting children, rather than all people, with nature. The four primary concepts included on the survey were interpretation of how the FWS defined "connection" as part of its mission, perceived success with outreach, constraints to connecting children with nature, and importance of connecting children with nature. The survey was conducted online using KeySurvey© software. The survey was sent to 604 FWS employees. Responses were received from 320 employees. The respondents represented diversity in regions, tenure, wage/grade level, job series, supervisory status, and involvement with education and outreach activities. The key findings of the survey are as follows: * FWS employees believe they as individuals and the agency are successful now and will be more successful in the future in connecting children with nature. * FWS employees believe that there are many outcomes that are relevant to the FWS objective to connect people

  12. Post-traumatic stress disorder associated with natural and human-made disasters in the World Mental Health Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, E. J.; Atwoli, L.; Kawakami, N.; Navarro-Mateu, F.; Piotrowski, P.; King, A. J.; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S.; Alonso, J.; Bunting, B.; Demyttenaere, K.; Florescu, S.; de Girolamo, G.; Gluzman, S.; Haro, J. M.; de Jonge, P.; Karam, E. G.; Lee, S.; Kovess-Masfety, V.; Medina-Mora, M. E.; Mneimneh, Z.; Pennell, B.-E.; Posada-Villa, J.; Salmerón, D.; Takeshima, T.; Kessler, R. C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Research on post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following natural and human-made disasters has been undertaken for more than three decades. Although PTSD prevalence estimates vary widely, most are in the 20–40% range in disaster-focused studies but considerably lower (3–5%) in the few general population epidemiological surveys that evaluated disaster-related PTSD as part of a broader clinical assessment. The World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys provide an opportunity to examine disaster-related PTSD in representative general population surveys across a much wider range of sites than in previous studies. Method Although disaster-related PTSD was evaluated in 18 WMH surveys, only six in high-income countries had enough respondents for a risk factor analysis. Predictors considered were socio-demographics, disaster characteristics, and pre-disaster vulnerability factors (childhood family adversities, prior traumatic experiences, and prior mental disorders). Results Disaster-related PTSD prevalence was 0.0–3.8% among adult (ages 18+) WMH respondents and was significantly related to high education, serious injury or death of someone close, forced displacement from home, and pre-existing vulnerabilities (prior childhood family adversities, other traumas, and mental disorders). Of PTSD cases 44.5% were among the 5% of respondents classified by the model as having highest PTSD risk. Conclusion Disaster-related PTSD is uncommon in high-income WMH countries. Risk factors are consistent with prior research: severity of exposure, history of prior stress exposure, and pre-existing mental disorders. The high concentration of PTSD among respondents with high predicted risk in our model supports the focus of screening assessments that identify disaster survivors most in need of preventive interventions. PMID:27573281

  13. A Historical Survey of an Everlasting Debate: The Nature of Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ozsoy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of interest has been discussed from various perspectives so far and it will be probably continued to be discussed. Contrary to the economists like Alfred Marshall, who argued for the necessity of interest for savings and capital accumulation; some other economists like J.M.Keynes, who characterized it as a barrier to capital accumulation, have been seen as well. Besides the views asserting that interest is a just and beneficial tool for the economic system to stand, some other opinions contending that it is unjust and leads to some costs more than benefits have been put into words as well. Although interest has been criticized throughout the history, it maintained its existence. At the present time, it is applied almost in every country. In this study, most of the philosophic, economic and religious interest-related thoughts from antiguity to the present will be analyzed within the framework of their arguments on the nature of interest, namely, its justness, costs and benefits. Our target is to find an answer to the question of what the nature of interest is by making use of the arguments of the thoughts in question.

  14. A Historical Survey of an Everlasting Debate: The Nature of Interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Özsoy

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of interest has been discussed from various perspectives so far and it will be probably continued to be discussed. Contrary to the economists like Alfred Marshall, who argued for the necessity of interest for savings and capital accumulation; some other economists like J.M.Keynes, who characterized it as a barrier to capital accumulation, have been seen as well. Besides the views asserting that interest is a just and beneficial tool for the economic system to stand, some other opinions contending that it is unjust and leads to some costs more than benefits have been put into words as well. Although interest has been criticized throughout the history, it maintained its existence. At the present time, it is applied almost in every country. In this study, most of the philosophic, economic and religious interest-related thoughts from antiguity to the present will be analyzed within the framework of their arguments on the nature of interest, namely, its justness, costs and benefits. Our target is to find an answer to the question of what the nature of interest is by making use of the arguments of the thoughts in question.

  15. Aerial ungulate surveys with a combination of infrared and high–resolution natural colour images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franke, U.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Information on animal population sizes is crucial for wildlife management. In aerial surveys, we used a silent light aircraft (microlight and a combination of a computer–linked thermal infrared camera (640 x 480 pixels to detect ungulates and high–resolution visual images (5,616 x 3,744 pixels to identify specific species. From winter 2008/2009 to winter 2010/2011, we flew 48 missions over three German national parks and a German/ French biosphere reserve. Within each study area, we followed non–overlapping linear transects with a flying altitude ~450 m above ground level and scanned 1,500–2,000 ha every two hours of flight time. Animals best detected and identified were red deer and fallow deer. Detection rates with respect to the type and density of vegetation cover ranged from 0% (young spruce to 75% (young defoliated beech to 100% (open land. This non–invasive method is cost–effective and suitable for many landscapes.

  16. Nature and statistical properties of quasar associated absorption systems in the XQ-100 Legacy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Perrotta, Serena; Prochaska, J Xavier; Cristiani, Stefano; Cupani, Guido; Ellison, Sara; Lòpez, Sebastian; Becker, George D; Berg, Trystyn A M; Christensen, Lise; Denney, Kelly D; Hamann, Frederick; Pâris, Isabelle; Vestergaard, Marianne; Worseck, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    We statistically study the physical properties of a sample of narrow absorption line (NAL) systems looking for empirical evidences to distinguish between intrinsic and intervening NALs without taking into account any a priori definition or velocity cut-off. We analyze the spectra of 100 quasars with 3.5 < z$\\rm_{em}$ < 4.5, observed with X-shooter/VLT in the context of the XQ-100 Legacy Survey. We detect a $\\sim$ 8 $\\sigma$ excess in the number density of absorbers within 10,000 km/s of the quasar emission redshift with respect to the random occurrence of NALs. This excess does not show a dependence on the quasar bolometric luminosity and it is not due to the redshift evolution of NALs. It extends far beyond the standard 5000 km/s cut-off traditionally defined for associated absorption lines. We propose to modify this definition, extending the threshold to 10,000 km/s when also weak absorbers (equivalent width < 0.2 \\AA) are considered. We infer NV is the ion that better traces the effects of the qua...

  17. A survey of natural radioactivity in drinking water; Kartlaeggning av naturligt radioaktiva aemnen i dricksvatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, Rolf; Mjoenes, Lars [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, Stockholm (Sweden); Ek, Britt-Marie [SGU, Uppsala (Sweden); Appelblad, Petra [Swedish Defence Research Agency, Stockholm (Sweden); Erlandsson, Bitte; Svensson, Kettil [National Food Administration, Uppsala (Sweden); Hedenberg, Gullvy [Svenskt Vatten AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-11-01

    A survey of uranium and other radioactive material in drinking water from municipal water works has been conducted. Water samples from water works with ground water from 256 communities were analysed. In EUs Drinking Water Directive (98/83/EG) a reference level of 0.1 mSv/year is set for Total Indicative Dose (TID). Levels above 0.1 mSv/year is judged as 'fit for consumption with reservations' in the Swedish drinking water regulations. The radiation dose from uranium and other radionuclides in tap water is low. An estimated dose exceeding 0.1 mSv/year was found in only two samples. Half the amount of all tap water from municipal water work plants use surface water, which has low levels of radioactivity. Nine water works show a uranium concentration above 15 microgram per litre ({mu}g/l). There is no reference level for uranium in drinking water neither in the EU nor in Sweden but the WHO recommend a reference level of 15 ({mu}g/l)

  18. Accounting for regional variation in both natural environment and human disturbance to improve performance of multimetric indices of lotic benthic diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao; Stevenson, R Jan; Infante, Dana M

    2016-10-15

    Regional variation in both natural environment and human disturbance can influence performance of ecological assessments. In this study we calculated 5 types of benthic diatom multimetric indices (MMIs) with 3 different approaches to account for variation in ecological assessments. We used: site groups defined by ecoregions or diatom typologies; the same or different sets of metrics among site groups; and unmodeled or modeled MMIs, where models accounted for natural variation in metrics within site groups by calculating an expected reference condition for each metric and each site. We used data from the USEPA's National Rivers and Streams Assessment to calculate the MMIs and evaluate changes in MMI performance. MMI performance was evaluated with indices of precision, bias, responsiveness, sensitivity and relevancy which were respectively measured as MMI variation among reference sites, effects of natural variables on MMIs, difference between MMIs at reference and highly disturbed sites, percent of highly disturbed sites properly classified, and relation of MMIs to human disturbance and stressors. All 5 types of MMIs showed considerable discrimination ability. Using different metrics among ecoregions sometimes reduced precision, but it consistently increased responsiveness, sensitivity, and relevancy. Site specific metric modeling reduced bias and increased responsiveness. Combined use of different metrics among site groups and site specific modeling significantly improved MMI performance irrespective of site grouping approach. Compared to ecoregion site classification, grouping sites based on diatom typologies improved precision, but did not improve overall performance of MMIs if we accounted for natural variation in metrics with site specific models. We conclude that using different metrics among ecoregions and site specific metric modeling improve MMI performance, particularly when used together. Applications of these MMI approaches in ecological assessments

  19. Fine-Scale Microclimatic Variation Can Shape the Responses of Organisms to Global Change in Both Natural and Urban Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Murdock, Courtney C; Vickers, Mathew; Sears, Michael W

    2016-07-01

    When predicting the response of organisms to global change, models use measures of climate at a coarse resolution from general circulation models or from downscaled regional models. Organisms, however, do not experience climate at such large scales. The climate heterogeneity over a landscape and how much of that landscape an organism can sample will determine ultimately the microclimates experienced by organisms. This past few decades has seen an important increase in the number of studies reporting microclimatic patterns at small scales. This synthesis intends to unify studies reporting microclimatic heterogeneity (mostly temperature) at various spatial scales, to infer any emerging trends, and to discuss the causes and consequences of such heterogeneity for organismal performance and with respect to changing land use patterns and climate. First, we identify the environmental drivers of heterogeneity across the various spatial scales that are pertinent to ectotherms. The thermal heterogeneity at the local and micro-scales is mostly generated by the architecture or the geometrical features of the microhabitat. Then, the thermal heterogeneity experienced by individuals is modulated by behavior. Second, we survey the literature to quantify thermal heterogeneity from the micro-scale up to the scale of a landscape in natural habitats. Despite difficulties in compiling studies that differ much in their design and aims, we found that there is as much thermal heterogeneity across micro-, local and landscape scales, and that the temperature range is large in general (>9 °C on average, and up to 26 °C). Third, we examine the extent to which urban habitats can be used to infer the microclimatic patterns of the future. Urban areas generate globally drier and warmer microclimatic patterns and recent evidence suggest that thermal traits of ectotherms are adapted to them. Fourth, we explore the interplay between microclimate heterogeneity and the behavioral thermoregulatory

  20. Factors affecting early elementary (K--4) teachers' introduction of the nature of science: A national survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Sophia Jean

    A researcher-developed questionnaire regarding the importance and developmental appropriateness of 12 specific elements of the nature of science (Alshamrani, 2008) for early elementary (kindergarten through fourth grade [K-4]) science instruction was mailed to a random sample of U.S. K-4 teachers. At least half (N = 377) of the respondents reported introducing the inferential, empirical, creative, collaborative, tentative, and cultural aspects of the nature of science (NOS) during the current school year, as well as the idea that no single step-by-step scientific method exists. Over 90% of respondents identified the inferential, empirical, and creative aspects of the NOS as developmentally appropriate for the grade level taught. Based on a 5 point scale (0=not at all important and 4 =very important), the mean scores of eight NOS elements were above a value of three, which corresponded with the descriptor somewhat important to include in K-4 science instruction: the inferential, empirical, creative, collaborative, cultural, and tentative NOS, along with the ideas that replication is an important aspect of experimental research and that no single stepwise scientific method exists. A series of binary logistic regression analyses were used to explore the impact of three predictor variables (developmental appropriateness, importance, and presence in state standards) on teachers' self-reported introduction of each of the NOS elements during the 2009-2010 school year. The data for the presence of the NOS elements in state standards were extracted from a previous study (McComas, Lee, & Sweeney, 2009). Developmental appropriateness was a significant predictor of teachers' introduction of the NOS element for all except the collaborative, empirical and inferential aspects of NOS. Importance was a significant predictor for all 12 NOS elements of interest. A NOS element's presence in the state standards significantly predicted teachers' introduction of that NOS element for only

  1. Quantifying Streamflow Variations in Ungauged Lake Basins by Integrating Remote Sensing and Water Balance Modelling: A Case Study of the Erdos Larus relictus National Nature Reserve, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Liang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological predictions in ungauged lakes are one of the most important issues in hydrological sciences. The habitat of the Relict Gull (Larus relictus in the Erdos Larus relictus National Nature Reserve (ELRNNR has been seriously endangered by lake shrinkage, yet the hydrological processes in the catchment are poorly understood due to the lack of in-situ observations. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the variation in lake streamflow and its drivers. In this study, we employed the remote sensing technique and empirical equation to quantify the time series of lake water budgets, and integrated a water balance model and climate elasticity method to further examine ELRNNR basin streamflow variations from1974 to 2013. The results show that lake variations went through three phases with significant differences: The rapidly expanding sub-period (1974–1979, the relatively stable sub-period (1980–1999, and the dramatically shrinking sub-period (2000–2013. Both climate variation (expressed by precipitation and evapotranspiration and human activities were quantified as drivers of streamflow variation, and the driving forces in the three phases had different contributions. As human activities gradually intensified, the contributions of human disturbances on streamflow variation obviously increased, accounting for 22.3% during 1980–1999 and up to 59.2% during 2000–2013. Intensified human interferences and climate warming have jointly led to the lake shrinkage since 1999. This study provides a useful reference to quantify lake streamflow and its drivers in ungauged basins.

  2. VLA survey of the CDFS: the nature of faint radio sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tozzi, P; Fomalont, E; Miller, N; Norman, C; Mainieri, V; Padovani, P; Rosati, P

    2009-01-01

    We present the multiwavelength properties of 266 cataloged radio sources identified with 20 and 6 cm VLA deep observations of the CDFS at a flux density limit of 42 \\mu Jy at the field centre at 1.4 GHz. These new observations probe the faint end of both the star formation and radio galaxy/AGN population. X-ray data, including upper limits, turn out to be a key factor in establishing the nature of faint radio sources. We find that, while the well-known flattening of the radio number counts below 1 mJy is mostly due to star forming galaxies, these sources and AGN make up an approximately equal fraction of the sub--millijansky sky, contrary to some previous results. We have also uncovered a population of distant AGN systematically missing from many previous studies of sub-millijansky radio source identifications. The AGN include radio galaxies, mostly of the low-power, Fanaroff-Riley I type, and a significant radio-quiet component, which amounts to approximately one fifth of the total sample. We also find that ...

  3. Parameterization of aquatic ecosystem functioning and its natural variation: Hierarchical Bayesian modelling of plankton food web dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norros, Veera; Laine, Marko; Lignell, Risto; Thingstad, Frede

    2017-10-01

    Methods for extracting empirically and theoretically sound parameter values are urgently needed in aquatic ecosystem modelling to describe key flows and their variation in the system. Here, we compare three Bayesian formulations for mechanistic model parameterization that differ in their assumptions about the variation in parameter values between various datasets: 1) global analysis - no variation, 2) separate analysis - independent variation and 3) hierarchical analysis - variation arising from a shared distribution defined by hyperparameters. We tested these methods, using computer-generated and empirical data, coupled with simplified and reasonably realistic plankton food web models, respectively. While all methods were adequate, the simulated example demonstrated that a well-designed hierarchical analysis can result in the most accurate and precise parameter estimates and predictions, due to its ability to combine information across datasets. However, our results also highlighted sensitivity to hyperparameter prior distributions as an important caveat of hierarchical analysis. In the more complex empirical example, hierarchical analysis was able to combine precise identification of parameter values with reasonably good predictive performance, although the ranking of the methods was less straightforward. We conclude that hierarchical Bayesian analysis is a promising tool for identifying key ecosystem-functioning parameters and their variation from empirical datasets.

  4. Combining floristic and growth form composition in a gradient- directed vegetation survey of Matjiesrivier Nature Reserve, Western Cape, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Lechmere-Oertel

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The floristically complex vegetation of Matjiesrivier Nature Reserve (MNR. which spans the ecotone between the Fynbos and Succulent Karoo Biomes in the eastern Cederberg Mountains, Western Cape, was surveyed using a gradient-directed transect (gradsect. The gradsect was aligned with a topo-ciimatic aridity gradient across MNR. The vegetation was classified using TWINSPAN. based on a combination of floristic and growth form characteristics, and an understanding of the main ecological gradients controlling vegetation distribution. The final classification described seven robust and eco­logically meaningful communities that represented a trade-off between statistical rigour and practicality for management. The seven communities were mapped using a geographical information system (GIS.

  5. A parasitological survey of natural water springs and inhabitants of a tourist city in southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Nilson; Leal, Diego Averaldo Guiguet; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno

    2012-05-01

    The goals of this study were to investigate the occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in main springs of Campos do Jordão, an important tourist city, in Brazil and to gather the largest amount of parasitological data from autochthonous population that live in rural areas of this city. The membrane filtration technique followed by direct immunofluorescence assay was employed for concentration and visualization of waterborne protozoa. In the period between June 2003 and May 2004, the presence of at least one pathogenic protozoa was detected in 25.0% (3/12) of the springs studied, with mean concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 0.3 Cryptosporidium sp. oocysts and 0.07 to 0.1 Giardia sp. cysts/L. The coproparasitological investigation conducted in dwellers from two rural communities from this city revealed that 49.2% (91/185) of people had intestinal parasites. Among pathogenic protozoa, Cryptosporidium was the most prevalent species (8.1%) followed by Giardia duodenalis (5.9%), Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (2.7%), and Blastocystis hominis (2.2%). The most prevalent geohelminths were Ascaris lumbricoides (14.9%) and Trichuris trichiura (9.7%). This study demonstrated the contamination and the distribution of intestinal parasites, especially Cryptosporidium and Giardia species, in different springs of an important tourist city in Brazil, highlighting the need of monitoring natural water sources. The high prevalence of intestinal parasitosis detected in some specific populations of this city may function as a link of transmission of different intestinal parasitosis due to soil and water contamination, contributing to the maintenance of parasite life cycles. Therefore, the inclusion of consistent public health interventions with measures that include the protection of springs, the installation of minimum health infrastructure, and primary education of the population are widely necessary, aiming the control and prevention of parasite infections.

  6. An ethnopharmacological survey of natural remedies used by the Chinese community in Mauritius

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamad Fawzi Mahomoodally; Luviksha Drushilla Muthoorah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To collect, preserve and document primary ethnopharmacological information on common natural remedies (NRs) used by the Chinese community to treat and/or manage common diseases in Mauritius, a tropical multicultural island in the Indian Ocean. Methods: Face-to-face interviews were carried out with 52 key Chinese informants using a semi-structured questionnaire. Quantitative ethnobotanical indices, namely, the informant consensus factor (FIC), the use value, the fidelity level, the index of agreement on remedies and the relative importance were calculated.Results:constituted the exploited flora and fauna by the Chinese community. Based on the FIC the main categories of plants used were employed against injury and poisons due to external causes (FIC=0.97), diseases of the respiratory system (FIC=0.96), diseases of the eye and adnexa (FIC=0.95), undefined pains or illness (FIC=0.95), diseases during the postpartum period, diseases of the digestive system and diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue (FIC=0.94 each). For zootherapy, diseases of the circulatory system, diseases of the eye and adnexa, diseases of the skin and subcutaneous tissue and endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases had total consensus Plants (61) and animal species (17), belonging to 43 and 9 families respectively, (FIC=1.00). Conclusions: It was found that the Chinese community of Mauritius still relies, to a great extent, on NRs which need to be preserved and used sustainably. Nonetheless, further research is needed to probe the possible active constituents that could be the basis of an evidence-based investigation to discover new drugs.

  7. Observational Constraints on the Nature of the Dark Energy: First Cosmological Results From the ESSENCE Supernova Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood-Vasey, W.Michael; Miknaitis, G.; Stubbs, C.W.; Jha, S.; Riess, A.G.; Garnavich, P.M.; Kirshner, R.P.; Aguilera, C.; Becker, A.C.; Blackman, J.W.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Clocchiatti, A.; Conley, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Foley, R.J.; Garg, A.; Hicken, M.; Krisciunas, K.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2007-01-05

    We present constraints on the dark energy equation-of-state parameter, w = P/({rho}c{sup 2}), using 60 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the ESSENCE supernova survey. We derive a set of constraints on the nature of the dark energy assuming a flat Universe. By including constraints on ({Omega}{sub M}, w) from baryon acoustic oscillations, we obtain a value for a static equation-of-state parameter w = -1.05{sub -0.12}{sup +0.13} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys) and {Omega}{sub M} = 0.274{sub -0.020}{sup +0.033} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.96. These results are consistent with those reported by the Super-Nova Legacy Survey in a similar program measuring supernova distances and redshifts. We evaluate sources of systematic error that afflict supernova observations and present Monte Carlo simulations that explore these effects. Currently, the largest systematic currently with the potential to affect our measurements is the treatment of extinction due to dust in the supernova host galaxies. Combining our set of ESSENCE SNe Ia with the SuperNova Legacy Survey SNe Ia, we obtain a joint constraint of w = -1.07{sub -0.09}{sup +0.09} (stat 1{sigma}) {+-} 0.13 (sys), {Omega}{sub M} = 0.267{sub -0.018}{sup +0.028} (stat 1{sigma}) with a best-fit {chi}{sup 2}/DoF of 0.91. The current SNe Ia data are fully consistent with a cosmological constant.

  8. Temporal Trends in Geographical Variation in Breast Cancer Mortality in China, 1973–2005: An Analysis of Nationwide Surveys on Cause of Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changfa Xia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To describe geographical variation in breast cancer mortality over time, we analysed breast cancer mortality data from three retrospective national surveys on causes of death in recent decades in China. We first calculated the age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR for each of the 31 provinces in mainland China stratified by survey period (1973–1975, 1990–1992 and 2004–2005. To test whether the geographical variation in breast cancer mortality changed over time, we then estimated the rate ratio (RR for the aggregated data for seven regions and three economic zones using generalized linear models. Finally, we examined the correlation between mortality rate and several macro-economic measures at the provincial level. We found that the overall ASMR increased from 2.98 per 100,000 in 1973–1975 to 3.08 per 100,000 in 1990–1992, and to 3.85 per 100,000 in 2004–2005. Geographical variation in breast cancer mortality also increased significantly over time at the regional level (p = 0.002 but not at the economic zone (p = 0.089 level, with RR being generally lower for Western China (Northwest and Southwest and higher in Northeast China over the three survey periods. These temporal and spatial trends in breast cancer mortality were found to be correlated with per capita gross domestic product, number of hospitals and health centres’ beds per 10,000 population and number of practicing doctors per 10,000 population, and average number of live births for women aged 15–64. It may be necessary to target public health policies in China to address the widening geographic variation in breast cancer mortality, and to take steps to ensure that the ease of access and the quality of cancer care across the country is improved for all residents.

  9. Temporal Trends in Geographical Variation in Breast Cancer Mortality in China, 1973–2005: An Analysis of Nationwide Surveys on Cause of Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Changfa; Kahn, Clare; Wang, Jinfeng; Liao, Yilan; Chen, Wanqing; Yu, Xue Qin

    2016-01-01

    To describe geographical variation in breast cancer mortality over time, we analysed breast cancer mortality data from three retrospective national surveys on causes of death in recent decades in China. We first calculated the age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) for each of the 31 provinces in mainland China stratified by survey period (1973–1975, 1990–1992 and 2004–2005). To test whether the geographical variation in breast cancer mortality changed over time, we then estimated the rate ratio (RR) for the aggregated data for seven regions and three economic zones using generalized linear models. Finally, we examined the correlation between mortality rate and several macro-economic measures at the provincial level. We found that the overall ASMR increased from 2.98 per 100,000 in 1973–1975 to 3.08 per 100,000 in 1990–1992, and to 3.85 per 100,000 in 2004–2005. Geographical variation in breast cancer mortality also increased significantly over time at the regional level (p = 0.002) but not at the economic zone (p = 0.089) level, with RR being generally lower for Western China (Northwest and Southwest) and higher in Northeast China over the three survey periods. These temporal and spatial trends in breast cancer mortality were found to be correlated with per capita gross domestic product, number of hospitals and health centres’ beds per 10,000 population and number of practicing doctors per 10,000 population, and average number of live births for women aged 15–64. It may be necessary to target public health policies in China to address the widening geographic variation in breast cancer mortality, and to take steps to ensure that the ease of access and the quality of cancer care across the country is improved for all residents. PMID:27690073

  10. A survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees regarding constraints to connecting children with nature-Summary report to respondents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Schuster, Rudy M.

    2011-01-01

    This report provides a summary of responses to the questions included on a survey of U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service employees regarding constraints to connecting children with nature. The survey was sponsored by the Division of Education Outreach at the National Conservation Training Center and conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The data collection process started on February 25, 2010 and ended on March 9, 2010. The dataset includes the responses from 320 individuals from all regions in the Service. The adjusted response rate for the survey was 55 percent. In this report, we provide the summary results for the survey questions in the order in which the questions were asked. The questions addressed the following topics: relevance of certain outcomes to the aspect of the Service's mission that relates to connecting people with nature, perceived success at connecting children with nature, the extent to which ten constraints present problems in connecting children with nature, and attitudes about the importance of connecting children with nature. The text of comments provided by respondents to open-ended questions is provided. In-depth analyses will be reported in the completion report for this project.

  11. Study of temporal variations of seismoacoustic emission and electromagnetic radiation in boreholes exposed to natural deformation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanov, Alexandr; Astrakhantsev, Yurie; Nachapkin, Nilolay; Beloglasova, Nadegda; Bagenova, Evgenija; Vdovin, Alexey

    2013-04-01

    The investigation of the correlation between the deformation processes, seismoacoustic emission and electromagnetic radiation of the geo-environment is a timely problem due to many reasons. It is related to the discovery of the modulation effect of the high-frequency noise by the long-period deformation processes [1]. The possibility appeared to distinguish similar periods in the variations of the amplitude level of the seismic acoustic emission (SAE) and electromagnetic radiation (EMR) based on the known periodicities of the deformation processes. The investigation of the deformation processes is a complicated problem because the majority of currently applied methods give us information about deformations in the surface layer. In the conditions of the hierarchical block structure of the Earth's crust; such observations do not sufficiently reveal the distribution of deformations related to the accumulation and relaxation of stresses in the internal points of the medium. Therefore, the spatiotemporal distribution of the SAE and EMR in the boreholes carries significant information about the deformation processes in the Earth's crust directly reflecting the actual stresses and the structure of the investigated rock massive [2]. Geodynamical active zones along boreholes are characterized by anomalous (maximum) SAE and EMR values, moreover they change in time [3]. Simultaneous operational measurements of seismic acoustic emission and electromagnetic radiation were carried out in wells Kamchatskiy geodynamic testing ground and the Urals region. An analysis of amplitude-frequency spectra obtained by synchronous uninterrupted SAE and EMR measurements in boreholes allowed identifying latent periodicity of SAE and EMR signals and evaluating its connection with well-known deformation processes. As a result of realized investigations it was shown that simultaneous measurements of SAE and EMR in boreholes contain information on manifestation of deformation processes in fields

  12. Estimating gas escape through taliks in relict submarine permafrost and methane hydrate deposits under natural climate variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    predictions of gas flux to the water column as a result of relict permafrost-associated gas hydrate dissociation due to natural climate variations. Several hydrate saturation values (20%, 50%, 80% pore volume within hydrate layers) and talik widths (0.5 km, 1.0 km, 1.5 km, 2.0 km) are explored for model parameters representative of the 20 m isobath at the North American Beaufort and East Siberian Arctic Seas (ESAS). Preliminary results estimate the maximum present-day gas flux at the North American Beaufort is 0.229 kg/yr/m2 (average 0.005 kg/yr/m2), which produces a methane concentration of 75 nM in the overlying water column for a representative ocean current of 4 cm/s. For the ESAS, preliminary results estimate the maximum present-day gas flux is 0.277 kg/yr/m2 (average 0.030 kg/yr/m2), which produces a methane concentration of 452 nM in the overlying water column. A desired outcome of this study is to provide a framework for discussion on the potential magnitude of methane release that might be attributed to relict permafrost-associated hydrate deposits in regions where the submarine permafrost has been compromised.

  13. Biodiversity inventories in high gear: DNA barcoding facilitates a rapid biotic survey of a temperate nature reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Monica R; Quinn, Jenna; Perez, Kate; Sobel, Crystal N; Sones, Jayme E; Levesque-Beaudin, Valerie; Derbyshire, Rachael; Fernandez-Triana, Jose; Rougerie, Rodolphe; Thevanayagam, Abinah; Boskovic, Adrian; Borisenko, Alex V; Cadel, Alex; Brown, Allison; Pages, Anais; Castillo, Anibal H; Nicolai, Annegret; Glenn Mockford, Barb Mockford; Bukowski, Belén; Wilson, Bill; Trojahn, Brock; Lacroix, Carole Ann; Brimblecombe, Chris; Hay, Christoper; Ho, Christmas; Steinke, Claudia; Warne, Connor P; Garrido Cortes, Cristina; Engelking, Daniel; Wright, Danielle; Lijtmaer, Dario A; Gascoigne, David; Hernandez Martich, David; Morningstar, Derek; Neumann, Dirk; Steinke, Dirk; Marco DeBruin, Donna DeBruin; Dobias, Dylan; Sears, Elizabeth; Richard, Ellen; Damstra, Emily; Zakharov, Evgeny V; Laberge, Frederic; Collins, Gemma E; Blagoev, Gergin A; Grainge, Gerrie; Ansell, Graham; Meredith, Greg; Hogg, Ian; McKeown, Jaclyn; Topan, Janet; Bracey, Jason; Guenther, Jerry; Sills-Gilligan, Jesse; Addesi, Joseph; Persi, Joshua; Layton, Kara K S; D'Souza, Kareina; Dorji, Kencho; Grundy, Kevin; Nghidinwa, Kirsti; Ronnenberg, Kylee; Lee, Kyung Min; Xie, Linxi; Lu, Liuqiong; Penev, Lyubomir; Gonzalez, Mailyn; Rosati, Margaret E; Kekkonen, Mari; Kuzmina, Maria; Iskandar, Marianne; Mutanen, Marko; Fatahi, Maryam; Pentinsaari, Mikko; Bauman, Miriam; Nikolova, Nadya; Ivanova, Natalia V; Jones, Nathaniel; Weerasuriya, Nimalka; Monkhouse, Norman; Lavinia, Pablo D; Jannetta, Paul; Hanisch, Priscila E; McMullin, R. Troy; Ojeda Flores, Rafael; Mouttet, Raphaëlle; Vender, Reid; Labbee, Renee N; Forsyth, Robert; Lauder, Rob; Dickson, Ross; Kroft, Ruth; Miller, Scott E; MacDonald, Shannon; Panthi, Sishir; Pedersen, Stephanie; Sobek-Swant, Stephanie; Naik, Suresh; Lipinskaya, Tatsiana; Eagalle, Thanushi; Decaëns, Thibaud; Kosuth, Thibault; Braukmann, Thomas; Woodcock, Tom; Roslin, Tomas; Zammit, Tony; Campbell, Victoria; Dinca, Vlad; Peneva, Vlada; Hebert, Paul D N

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Comprehensive biotic surveys, or ‘all taxon biodiversity inventories’ (ATBI), have traditionally been limited in scale or scope due to the complications surrounding specimen sorting and species identification. To circumvent these issues, several ATBI projects have successfully integrated DNA barcoding into their identification procedures and witnessed acceleration in their surveys and subsequent increase in project scope and scale. The Biodiversity Institute of Ontario partnered with the rare Charitable Research Reserve and delegates of the 6th International Barcode of Life Conference to complete its own rapid, barcode-assisted ATBI of an established land trust in Cambridge, Ontario, Canada. New information The existing species inventory for the rare Charitable Research Reserve was rapidly expanded by integrating a DNA barcoding workflow with two surveying strategies – a comprehensive sampling scheme over four months, followed by a one-day bioblitz involving international taxonomic experts. The two surveys resulted in 25,287 and 3,502 specimens barcoded, respectively, as well as 127 human observations. This barcoded material, all vouchered at the Biodiversity Institute of Ontario collection, covers 14 phyla, 29 classes, 117 orders, and 531 families of animals, plants, fungi, and lichens. Overall, the ATBI documented 1,102 new species records for the nature reserve, expanding the existing long-term inventory by 49%. In addition, 2,793 distinct Barcode Index Numbers (BINs) were assigned to genus or higher level taxonomy, and represent additional species that will be added once their taxonomy is resolved. For the 3,502 specimens, the collection, sequence analysis, taxonomic assignment, data release and manuscript submission by 100+ co-authors all occurred in less than one week. This demonstrates the speed at which barcode-assisted inventories can be completed and the utility that barcoding provides in minimizing and guiding valuable taxonomic

  14. Evidencing a prominent Moho topography beneath the Iberian-Western Mediterranean Region, compiled from controlled-source and natural seismic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Jordi; Gallart, Josep; Carbonell, Ramon

    2016-04-01

    The complex tectonic interaction processes between the European and African plates at the Western Mediterranean since Mesozoic times have left marked imprints in the present-day crustal architecture of this area, particularly as regarding the lateral variations in crustal and lithospheric thicknesses. The detailed mapping of such variations is essential to understand the regional geodynamics, as it provides major constraints for different seismological, geophysical and geodynamic modeling methods both at lithospheric and asthenospheric scales. Since the 1970s, the lithospheric structure beneath the Iberian Peninsula and its continental margins has been extensively investigated using deep multichannel seismic reflection and refraction/wide-angle reflection profiling experiments. Diaz and Gallart (2009) presented a compilation of the results then available beneath the Iberian Peninsula. In order to improve the picture of the whole region, we have now extended the geographical area to include northern Morocco and surrounding waters. We have also included in the compilation the results arising from all the seismic surveys performed in the area and documented in the last few years. The availability of broad-band sensors and data-loggers equipped with large storage capabilities has allowed in the last decade to boost the investigations on crustal and lithospheric structure using natural seismicity, providing a spatial resolution never achieved before. The TopoIberia-Iberarray network, deployed over Iberia and northern Morocco, has provided a good example of those new generation seismic experiments. The data base holds ~300 sites, including the permanent networks in the area and hence forming a unique seismic database in Europe. In this contribution, we retrieve the results on crustal thickness presented by Mancilla and Diaz (2015) using data from the TopoIberia and associated experiments and we complement them with additional estimations beneath the Rif Cordillera

  15. Characterization of natural variation for zinc, iron and manganese accumulation and zinc exposure response in Brassica rapa L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.; Schat, H.; Koornneef, M.; Wang, X.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Brassica rapa L. is an important vegetable crop in eastern Asia. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variation in leaf Zn, Fe and Mn accumulation, Zn toxicity tolerance and Zn efficiency in B. rapa. In total 188 accessions were screened for their Zn-related characteristics in

  16. Characterization of natural variation for zinc, iron and manganese accumulation and zinc exposure response in Brassica rapa L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.; Schat, H.; Koornneef, M.; Wang, X.; Aarts, M.G.M.

    2007-01-01

    Brassica rapa L. is an important vegetable crop in eastern Asia. The objective of this study was to investigate the genetic variation in leaf Zn, Fe and Mn accumulation, Zn toxicity tolerance and Zn efficiency in B. rapa. In total 188 accessions were screened for their Zn-related characteristics in

  17. Variation in DNA methylation transmissibility, genetic heterogeneity and fecundity-related traits in natural populations of the perennial herb Helleborus foetidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Carlos M; Medrano, Mónica; Bazaga, Pilar

    2014-03-01

    Inferences about the role of epigenetics in plant ecology and evolution are mostly based on studies of cultivated or model plants conducted in artificial environments. Insights from natural populations, however, are essential to evaluate the possible consequences of epigenetic processes in biologically realistic scenarios with genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous populations. Here, we explore associations across individuals between DNA methylation transmissibility (proportion of methylation-sensitive loci whose methylation status persists unchanged after male gametogenesis), genetic characteristics (assessed with AFLP markers), seed size variability (within-plant seed mass variance), and realized maternal fecundity (number of recently recruited seedlings), in three populations of the perennial herb Helleborus foetidus along a natural ecological gradient in southeastern Spain. Plants (sporophytes) differed in the fidelity with which DNA methylation was transmitted to descendant pollen (gametophytes). This variation in methylation transmissibility was associated with genetic differences. Four AFLP loci were significantly associated with transmissibility and accounted collectively for ~40% of its sample-wide variance. Within-plant variance in seed mass was inversely related to individual transmissibility. The number of seedlings recruited by individual plants was significantly associated with transmissibility. The sign of the relationship varied between populations, which points to environment-specific, divergent phenotypic selection on epigenetic transmissibility. Results support the view that epigenetic transmissibility is itself a phenotypic trait whose evolution may be driven by natural selection, and suggest that in natural populations epigenetic and genetic variation are two intertwined, rather than independent, evolutionary factors. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Immunological variation in Taenia solium porcine cysticercosis: measurement on the variation of the antibody immune response of naturally infected pigs against antigens extracted from their own cysticerci and from those of different pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Esquivel-Velázquez, Marcela; Larralde, Carlos

    2013-10-18

    Although it is widely assumed that both antigen and host immunological variability are involved in the variable intensity of natural porcine infections by Taenia solium (T. solium) cysticercis and success of immunodiagnostic tests vaccines, the magnitude of such combined variability has not been studied or measured at all. In this paper we report statistical data on the variability of the antibody response of naturally infected pigs against the antigens extracted from the vesicular fluids of their own infecting cysts (variance within pigs) and against antigen samples extracted from cysts of other cysticercotic pigs (variance among pigs). The variation between pigs was greater than the inter-pigs variations, which suggests that a concomitant immunity process prevents the establishment of cysts coming from a subsequent challenge. In so doing, we found that there is not a single antigenic band that was recognized by all hosts and that antigens varied among the cysts within the same pigs as well as among pigs. Our results may be valuable for the improvement of immunodiagnostic tests and of effective vaccines against naturally acquired porcine T. solium cysticercosis.

  19. Population dynamics of a natural red deer population over 200 years detected via substantial changes of genetic variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffmann, Gunther Sebastian; Johannesen, Jes; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2016-01-01

    ... of the structure of extant populations. Here, we investigate for the first time the change in the genetic constitution of a natural red deer population over two centuries, using up to 200‐year‐old antlers (30 generations...

  20. Cycle-by-cycle Variations in a Direct Injection Hydrogen Enriched Compressed Natural Gas Engine Employing EGR at Relative Air-Fuel Ratios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan Wasiu Saheed

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the pressure development in a combustion chamber is uniquely related to the combustion process, substantial variations in the combustion process on a cycle-by-cycle basis are occurring. To this end, an experimental study of cycle-by-cycle variation in a direct injection spark ignition engine fueled with natural gas-hydrogen blends combined with exhaust gas recirculation at relative air-fuel ratios was conducted. The impacts of relative air-fuel ratios (i.e. λ = 1.0, 1.2, 1.3 and 1.4 which represent stoichiometric, moderately lean, lean and very lean mixtures respectively, hydrogen fractions and EGR rates were studied. The results showed that increasing the relative air-fuel ratio increases the COVIMEP. The behavior is more pronounced at the larger relative air-fuel ratios. More so, for a specified EGR rate; increasing the hydrogen fractions decreases the maximum COVIMEP value just as increasing in EGR rates increases the maximum COVIMEP value. (i.e. When percentage EGR rates is increased from 0% to 17% and 20% respectively. The maximum COVIMEP value increases from 6.25% to 6.56% and 8.30% respectively. Since the introduction of hydrogen gas reduces the cycle-by-cycle combustion variation in engine cylinder; thus it can be concluded that addition of hydrogen into direct injection compressed natural gas engine employing EGR at various relative air-fuel ratios is a viable approach to obtain an improved combustion quality which correspond to lower coefficient of variation in imep, (COVIMEP in a direct injection compressed natural gas engine employing EGR at relative air-fuel ratios.

  1. Pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2) affects bone size and shape and contributes to natural variation in postnatal growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christians, Julian Kenneth; de Zwaan, Devin Rhys; Fung, Sunny Ho Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy associated plasma protein A2 (PAPP-A2) is a protease of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 and is receiving increasing attention for its roles in pregnancy and postnatal growth. The goals of the present study were to characterize the effects of PAPP-A2 deletion on bone size and shape in mice at 10 weeks of age, and to determine whether Pappa2 is the gene responsible for a previously-identified quantitative trait locus (QTL) contributing to natural variation in postnatal growth in mice. Mice homozygous for constitutive PAPP-A2 deletion were lighter than wild-type littermates, and had smaller mandible dimensions and shorter skull, humerus, femur, tibia, pelvic girdle, and tail bone. Furthermore, PAPP-A2 deletion reduced mandible dimensions and the lengths of the skull, femur, pelvic girdle, and tail bone more than would be expected due to the effect on body mass. In addition to its effects on bone size, PAPP-A2 deficiency also altered the shape of the mandible and pelvic girdle, as assessed by geometric morphometrics. Mice homozygous for the PAPP-A2 deletion had less deep mandibles, and pelvic girdles with a more feminine shape. Using a quantitative complementation test, we confirmed that Pappa2 is responsible for the effects of the previously-identified QTL, demonstrating that natural variation in the Pappa2 gene contributes to variation in postnatal growth in mice. If similar functional variation in the Pappa2 gene exists in other species, effects of this variation on the shape of the pelvic girdle might explain the previously-reported associations between Pappa2 SNPs and developmental dysplasia of the hip in humans, and birthing in cattle.

  2. Natural genetic variation in social niche construction: social effects of aggression drive disruptive sexual selection in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltz, Julia B; Foley, Brad R

    2011-05-01

    Social niche construction (SNC) occurs when animals actively shape their social environments. Currently the fitness consequences of SNC are poorly understood, and no study has examined whether variation in SNC has a genetic basis. Here we report the first instance of genetic variation in SNC by showing that Drosophila male aggression shapes the social environment. We allowed flies of different genotypes to interact in complex arenas; we measured the number and sex of individuals in the groups that formed and counted instances of mating. Arenas containing more aggressive male genotypes formed groups with fewer males, demonstrating that aggressive male genotypes experienced different social environments than nonaggressive genotypes. Further, genotypes with highest mating success were those whose SNC behavior generated the social environment in which they were most adept at mating: genotypes who mate most often after winning aggressive encounters benefit from aggressive SNC, while genotypes who mate most often after losing achieve high mating rates by forgoing aggression. The presence of these alternative strategies-which were robust across eight population densities-revealed that selection on aggression and context-dependent mating was disruptive, consistent with the hypothesis that SNC can maintain genetic variation in multiple behaviors.

  3. Tests for the replication of an association between Egfr and natural variation in Drosophila melanogaster wing morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodgson James

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative differences between individuals stem from a combination of genetic and environmental factors, with the heritable variation being shaped by evolutionary forces. Drosophila wing shape has emerged as an attractive system for genetic dissection of multi-dimensional traits. We utilize several experimental genetic methods to validation of the contribution of several polymorphisms in the Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr gene to wing shape and size, that were previously mapped in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from North Carolina (NC and California (CA. This re-evaluation utilized different genetic testcrosses to generate heterozygous individuals with a variety of genetic backgrounds as well as sampling of new alleles from Kenyan stocks. Results Only one variant, in the Egfr promoter, had replicable effects in all new experiments. However, expanded genotyping of the initial sample of inbred lines rendered the association non-significant in the CA population, while it persisted in the NC sample, suggesting population specific modification of the quantitative trait nucleotide QTN effect. Conclusion Dissection of quantitative trait variation to the nucleotide level can identify sites with replicable effects as small as one percent of the segregating genetic variation. However, the testcross approach to validate QTNs is both labor intensive and time-consuming, and is probably less useful than resampling of large independent sets of outbred individuals.

  4. Surveying the Landscape of Teacher Education in New York City: Constrained Variation and the Challenge of Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pam L.; Hammerness, Karen; Lankford, R. Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; McDonald, Morva; Reininger, Michelle; Ronfeldt, Matthew; Wyckoff, James

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe the state of teacher education in and around the large and diverse school district of New York City. Using multiple data sources, including program documents, interviews, and surveys of teachers, this study attempts to explore the characteristics of programs that prepare elementary teachers of New York City…

  5. Plant Distribution and Habitat, Non-Agriculture - NATURAL_FEATURES_USGS_IN: Natural Features in Indiana (U.S. Geological Survey, 1:24000, Point Shapefile)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Natural_features_usgs_in is a point shapefile showing the locations and attribute values of natural features extracted from the Geographic Names Information System...

  6. Genome-wide association studies identify heavy metal ATPase3 as the primary determinant of natural variation in leaf cadmium in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai-Yin Chao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanism of cadmium (Cd accumulation in plants is important to help reduce its potential toxicity to both plants and humans through dietary and environmental exposure. Here, we report on a study to uncover the genetic basis underlying natural variation in Cd accumulation in a world-wide collection of 349 wild collected Arabidopsis thaliana accessions. We identified a 4-fold variation (0.5-2 µg Cd g(-1 dry weight in leaf Cd accumulation when these accessions were grown in a controlled common garden. By combining genome-wide association mapping, linkage mapping in an experimental F2 population, and transgenic complementation, we reveal that HMA3 is the sole major locus responsible for the variation in leaf Cd accumulation we observe in this diverse population of A. thaliana accessions. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of HMA3 from 149 A. thaliana accessions reveals the existence of 10 major natural protein haplotypes. Association of these haplotypes with leaf Cd accumulation and genetics complementation experiments indicate that 5 of these haplotypes are active and 5 are inactive, and that elevated leaf Cd accumulation is associated with the reduced function of HMA3 caused by a nonsense mutation and polymorphisms that change two specific amino acids.

  7. Natural History of Malignant Bone Disease in Renal Cancer: Final Results of an Italian Bone Metastasis Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Daniele; Procopio, Giuseppe; Porta, Camillo; Ibrahim, Toni; Barni, Sandro; Mazzara, Calogero; Fontana, Andrea; Berruti, Alfredo; Berardi, Rossana; Vincenzi, Bruno; Ortega, Cinzia; Ottaviani, Davide; Carteni, Giacomo; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Virzì, Vladimir; Santoni, Matteo; Silvestris, Nicola; Satolli, Maria Antonietta; Collovà, Elena; Russo, Antonio; Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Fedeli, Stefano Luzi; Tanca, Francesca Maria; Adamo, Vincenzo; Maiello, Evaristo; Sabbatini, Roberto; Felici, Alessandra; Cinieri, Saverio; Tonini, Giuseppe; Bracarda, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone metastasis represents an increasing clinical problem in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as disease-related survival improves. There are few data on the natural history of bone disease in RCC. Patients and methods Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs), and bone-directed therapies for 398 deceased RCC patients (286 male, 112 female) with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. Results Median time to bone metastasis was 25 months for patients without bone metastasis at diagnosis. Median time to diagnosis of bone metastasis by MSKCC risk was 24 months for good, 5 months for intermediate, and 0 months for poor risk. Median number of SREs/patient was one, and 71% of patients experienced at least one SRE. Median times to first, second, and third SRE were 2, 5, and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 12 months after bone metastasis diagnosis and 10 months after first SRE. Among 181 patients who received zoledronic acid (ZOL), median time to first SRE was significantly prolonged versus control (n = 186) (3 months vs 1 month for control; P<0.05). Conclusions RCC patients with bone metastasis are at continuous risk of SREs, and in this survey ZOL effectively reduced this risk. PMID:24386138

  8. Natural history of malignant bone disease in renal cancer: final results of an Italian bone metastasis survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Santini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bone metastasis represents an increasing clinical problem in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC as disease-related survival improves. There are few data on the natural history of bone disease in RCC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on clinicopathology, survival, skeletal-related events (SREs, and bone-directed therapies for 398 deceased RCC patients (286 male, 112 female with evidence of bone metastasis were statistically analyzed. RESULTS: Median time to bone metastasis was 25 months for patients without bone metastasis at diagnosis. Median time to diagnosis of bone metastasis by MSKCC risk was 24 months for good, 5 months for intermediate, and 0 months for poor risk. Median number of SREs/patient was one, and 71% of patients experienced at least one SRE. Median times to first, second, and third SRE were 2, 5, and 12 months, respectively. Median survival was 12 months after bone metastasis diagnosis and 10 months after first SRE. Among 181 patients who received zoledronic acid (ZOL, median time to first SRE was significantly prolonged versus control (n = 186 (3 months vs 1 month for control; P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: RCC patients with bone metastasis are at continuous risk of SREs, and in this survey ZOL effectively reduced this risk.

  9. Variation in type A trichothecene production and trichothecene biosynthetic genes in Fusarium goolgardi from natural ecosystems of Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal species Fusarium goolgardi occurs on the plant Xanthorrhoea glauca in natural ecosystems of Australia and is closely related to fusaria that produce a subgroup (type A) of trichothecene mycotoxins that lack a carbonyl group at carbon atom 8 (C-8). Here, mass spectrometric analysis reveale...

  10. Natural Variation in "Drosophila" Larval Reward Learning and Memory Due to a cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Karla R.; Hendel, Thomas; Gerber, Bertram; Sokolowski, Marla B.

    2007-01-01

    Animals must be able to find and evaluate food to ensure survival. The ability to associate a cue with the presence of food is advantageous because it allows an animal to quickly identify a situation associated with a good, bad, or even harmful food. Identifying genes underlying these natural learned responses is essential to understanding this…

  11. Geographic and phenotypic variation in heartwood and essential-oil characters in natural populations of Santalum austrocaledonicum in Vanuatu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Tony; Southwell, Ian; Russell, Mike; Tate, Hanington; Tungon, Joseph; Sam, Chanel; Dickinson, Geoff; Robson, Ken; Leakey, Roger R B

    2010-08-01

    Phenotypic variation in heartwood and essential-oil characters of Santalum austrocaledonicum was assessed across eleven populations on seven islands of Vanuatu. Trees differed significantly in their percentage heartwood cross-sectional area and this varied independently of stem diameter. The concentrations of the four major essential-oil constituents (alpha-santalol, beta-santalol, (Z)-beta-curcumen-12-ol, and cis-nuciferol) of alcohol-extracted heartwood exhibited at least tenfold and continuous tree-to-tree variation. Commercially important components alpha- and beta-santalol found in individual trees ranged from 0.8-47% and 0-24.1%, respectively, across all populations, and significant (P<0.05) differences for each were found between individual populations. The Erromango population was unique in that the mean concentrations of its monocyclic ((Z)-beta-curcumen-12-ol and cis-nuciferol) sesquiterpenes exceeded those of its bi- and tricyclic (alpha- and beta-santalol) sesquiterpenes. Heartwood colour varied between trees and spanned 65 colour categories, but no identifiable relationships were found between heartwood colour and alpha- and beta-santalol, although a weak relationship was evident between colour saturation and total oil concentration. These results indicate that the heartwood colour is not a reliable predictive trait for oil quality. The results of this study highlight the knowledge gaps in fundamental understanding of heartwood biology in Santalum genus. The intraspecific variation in heartwood cross-sectional area, oil concentration, and oil quality traits is of considerable importance to the domestication of sandalwood and present opportunities for the development of highly superior S. austrocaledonicum cultivars that conform to the industry's International Standards used for S. album.

  12. Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca variations in environmental and biological sources: A survey of marine and terrestrial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Stephanie; Clementz, Mark T.

    2012-10-01

    The relative concentrations of strontium to calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium to calcium (Ba/Ca) in mammalian bioapatite are common biogeochemical indicators for trophic level and/or dietary preferences in terrestrial foodwebs; however, similar research in marine foodwebs is lacking. This study combined environmental and biological Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca data from both terrestrial and marine settings from 62 published books, reports, and studies along with original data collected from 149 marine mammals (30 species) and 83 prey items (18 species) and found that variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of biological and environmental samples are appreciably different in terrestrial and marine systems. In terrestrial systems, environmental sources account for most of the variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios. In contrast, environmental sources in marine systems (i.e., seawater) are comparatively invariant, meaning most of the variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios originate from biological processes. Marine consumers, particularly non-mammalian and mammalian vertebrates, show evidence of biopurification of Ca relative to Sr and Ba, similar to what is observed in terrestrial systems; however, unlike terrestrial systems, variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of environmental sources are overprinted by bioaccumulation of Sr and Ba at the base of marine foodwebs. This demonstrates that in marine systems, spatial or temporal differences may have little to no effect on Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of marine vertebrates, making Sr/Ca, and to a lesser extent Ba/Ca, potentially useful global proxies for trophic level and dietary preferences of marine vertebrates.

  13. Education techniques for lifelong learning: international variations in initial certification and maintenance of certification in radiology: a multinational survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresolin, Linda; McLoud, Theresa C; Becker, Gary J; Kwakwa, Francis

    2008-01-01

    A survey was sent to representatives of national and regional radiology societies around the world regarding the status of certification, maintenance of certification (MOC), and continuing medical education (CME) requirements. Data were forthcoming from 24 countries (response rate, 71%), including the United States. The survey results indicated that most responding countries now have a standardized process and requirements for initial certification of diagnostic and therapeutic radiologists. Similarly, most reporting countries now have some form of mandatory CME, although the degree to which compliance is tracked varies. There is considerable heterogeneity in what these countries require for recertification or MOC, and the development of such requirements is cited as a goal for many of the countries. The standardization and institutionalization of certification and recertification requirements is in rapid evolution globally.

  14. Porous gravity currents: A survey to determine the joint influence of fluid rheology and variations of medium properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Valentina; Longo, Sandro; Chiapponi, Luca; Di Federico, Vittorio

    2016-06-01

    We develop a model to grasp the combined effect of rheology and spatial stratifications on two-dimensional non-Newtonian gravity-driven flow in porous media. We consider a power-law constitutive equation for the fluid, and a monomial variation of permeability and porosity along the vertical direction (transverse to the flow) or horizontal direction (parallel to the flow). Under these assumptions, similarity solutions are derived in semi-analytical form for thin gravity currents injected into a two-dimensional porous medium and having constant or time-varying volume. The extent and shape of the porous domain affected by the injection is significantly influenced by the interplay of model parameters. These describe the fluid (flow behaviour index n), the spatial heterogeneity (coefficients β, γ, δ, ω for variations of permeability and porosity in the horizontal or vertical direction), and the type of release (volume exponent α). Theoretical results are validated against two sets of experiments with α = 1 (constant inflow) conducted with a stratified porous medium (simulated by superimposing layers of glass beads of different diameter) and a Hele-Shaw analogue for power-law fluid flow, respectively. In the latter case, a recently established Hele-Shaw analogy is extended to the variation of properties parallel to the flow direction. Comparison with experimental results shows that the proposed model is able to capture the propagation of the current front and the current profile.

  15. Genome-wide analysis of ZmDREB genes and their association with natural variation in drought tolerance at seedling stage of Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxue Liu

    Full Text Available The worldwide production of maize (Zea mays L. is frequently impacted by water scarcity and as a result, increased drought tolerance is a priority target in maize breeding programs. While DREB transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a central role in desiccation tolerance, whether or not natural sequence variations in these genes are associated with the phenotypic variability of this trait is largely unknown. In the present study, eighteen ZmDREB genes present in the maize B73 genome were cloned and systematically analyzed to determine their phylogenetic relationship, synteny with rice, maize and sorghum genomes; pattern of drought-responsive gene expression, and protein transactivation activity. Importantly, the association between the nucleic acid variation of each ZmDREB gene with drought tolerance was evaluated using a diverse population of maize consisting of 368 varieties from tropical and temperate regions. A significant association between the genetic variation of ZmDREB2.7 and drought tolerance at seedling stage was identified. Further analysis found that the DNA polymorphisms in the promoter region of ZmDREB2.7, but not the protein coding region itself, was associated with different levels of drought tolerance among maize varieties, likely due to distinct patterns of gene expression in response to drought stress. In vitro, protein-DNA binding assay demonstrated that ZmDREB2.7 protein could specifically interact with the target DNA sequences. The transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing ZmDREB2.7 displayed enhanced tolerance to drought stress. Moreover, a favorable allele of ZmDREB2.7, identified in the drought-tolerant maize varieties, was effective in imparting plant tolerance to drought stress. Based upon these findings, we conclude that natural variation in the promoter of ZmDREB2.7 contributes to maize drought tolerance, and that the gene and its favorable allele may be an important genetic resource for the genetic

  16. Genome-wide association implicates numerous genes underlying ecological trait variation in natural populations of Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKown, Athena D; Klápště, Jaroslav; Guy, Robert D; Geraldes, Armando; Porth, Ilga; Hannemann, Jan; Friedmann, Michael; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; Ehlting, Jürgen; Cronk, Quentin C B; El-Kassaby, Yousry A; Mansfield, Shawn D; Douglas, Carl J

    2014-07-01

    In order to uncover the genetic basis of phenotypic trait variation, we used 448 unrelated wild accessions of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa) from much of its range in western North America. Extensive data from large-scale trait phenotyping (with spatial and temporal replications within a common garden) and genotyping (with a 34 K Populus single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array) of all accessions were used for gene discovery in a genome-wide association study (GWAS). We performed GWAS with 40 biomass, ecophysiology and phenology traits and 29,355 filtered SNPs representing 3518 genes. The association analyses were carried out using a Unified Mixed Model accounting for population structure effects among accessions. We uncovered 410 significant SNPs using a Bonferroni-corrected threshold (P<1.7×10(-6)). Markers were found across 19 chromosomes, explained 1-13% of trait variation, and implicated 275 unique genes in trait associations. Phenology had the largest number of associated genes (240 genes), followed by biomass (53 genes) and ecophysiology traits (25 genes). The GWAS results propose numerous loci for further investigation. Many traits had significant associations with multiple genes, underscoring their genetic complexity. Genes were also identified with multiple trait associations within and/or across trait categories. In some cases, traits were genetically correlated while in others they were not.

  17. Using Survey Responses to Determine the Value-Added Features of a Webinar Portal System for Adoption by Natural Resource Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharis, Laurie; Bardon, Robert E.; Hubbard, William; Taylor, Eric; Gonzalez-Jeuck, Grizel

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of a recent survey of natural resource webinar providers. Respondents were asked a range of questions regarding their webinar services. Findings showed that respondents most commonly marketed their webinars through email or websites and targeted an audience of professionals. Respondents noted that the greatest…

  18. Air temperature and CO{sub 2} variations in a naturally ventilated classroom under a Nordic climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celis Mercier, S.; Potvin, A. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). School of Architecture; Tardif, M. [Sustainable Buildings and Communities, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presented preliminary results of the first stage of an ongoing passive cooling pre-design evaluation for the refurbishment of a primary school in Ste-Marie-de-Beauce, Quebec. The 1950's building did not have any mechanical systems apart from the central hot-water heating system. The viability of passive cooling and natural ventilation was evaluated by considering whether the surrounding outside conditions were favourable to passive cooling and natural ventilation and whether the the building envelope was optimized to minimize solar gain into the space. The study also evaluated the effectiveness of window operation in controlling a classroom thermal environment and indoor air quality. Field measurements and questionnaires were collected in the fall of 2008. A systemic approach integrating acoustic, thermal, visual and olfactory ambiences was proposed. 17 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Variation in the response of the invasive species Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Smith) to natural (cyanobacterial toxin) and anthropogenic (herbicide atrazine) stressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerard, Claudia [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, Equipe Physiologie et Ecophysiologie, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)]. E-mail: claudia.gerard@univ-rennes1.fr; Poullain, Virginie [UMR CNRS Ecobio 6553, Equipe Physiologie et Ecophysiologie, Universite de Rennes 1, Avenue du General Leclerc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2005-11-15

    In the context of increasing freshwater pollution, the impact on life-traits (survival, growth and fecundity) and locomotion of Potamopyrgus antipodarum of a 5-week field-concentration exposure to the cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR and the triazine herbicide, atrazine was studied. Whatever the age of exposed snails (juveniles, subadults, adults), microcystin-LR induced a decrease in survival, growth and fecundity but had no effect on locomotion. Atrazine induced a decrease in locomotory activity but had no significant effect on the life-traits. These results are discussed in terms of consequences to field populations. - At concentrations relevant to the field, cyanobacterial toxins (natural) and atrazine (anthropogenic) are detrimental to the gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum, with a greater toxicity for the natural (vs anthropogenic) stressor.

  20. NOAA's Shoreline Survey Maps - Raster NOAA-NOS Shoreline Survey Manuscripts that define the shoreline and alongshore natural and man-made features

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOS coastal survey maps (often called t-sheet or tp-sheet maps) are special use planimetric or topographic maps that precisely define the shoreline and alongshore...

  1. Insect responses to host plant provision beyond natural boundaries: latitudinal and altitudinal variation in a Chinese fig wasp community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Compton, Stephen G; Quinnell, Rupert J; Peng, Yan-Qiong; Barwell, Louise; Chen, Yan

    2015-09-01

    Many plants are grown outside their natural ranges. Plantings adjacent to native ranges provide an opportunity to monitor community assembly among associated insects and their parasitoids in novel environments, to determine whether gradients in species richness emerge and to examine their consequences for host plant reproductive success. We recorded the fig wasps (Chalcidoidea) associated with a single plant resource (ovules of Ficus microcarpa) along a 1200 km transect in southwest China that extended for 1000 km beyond the tree's natural northern range margin. The fig wasps included the tree's agaonid pollinator and other species that feed on the ovules or are their parasitoids. Phytophagous fig wasps (12 species) were more numerous than parasitoids (nine species). The proportion of figs occupied by fig wasps declined with increasing latitude, as did the proportion of utilized ovules in occupied figs. Species richness, diversity, and abundance of fig wasps also significantly changed along both latitudinal and altitudinal gradients. Parasitoids declined more steeply with latitude than phytophages. Seed production declined beyond the natural northern range margin, and at high elevation, because pollinator fig wasps became rare or absent. This suggests that pollinator climatic tolerances helped limit the tree's natural distribution, although competition with another species may have excluded pollinators at the highest altitude site. Isolation by distance may prevent colonization of northern sites by some fig wasps and act in combination with direct and host-mediated climatic effects to generate gradients in community composition, with parasitoids inherently more sensitive because of declines in the abundance of potential hosts.

  2. Variation of mechanical and thermal properties of the thermoplastics reinforced with natural fibers by electron beam processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sok Won; Oh, Seungmin; Lee, Kyuse

    2007-11-01

    With restrictions for environmental protection being strengthened, the thermoplastics reinforced with natural fibers (NFs) such as jute, kenaf, flax, etc., appeared as an automobile interior material instead of the chemical plastics. Regardless of many advantages, one shortcoming is the deformation after being formed in high temperature of about 200 °C, caused by the poor adhesion between the natural fibers and thermoplastics. Also, the energy saving in connection with car air-conditioning becomes very important. In this study, the thermal conductivity, tensile strength, and deformation of several kinds of thermoplastic composites composing of 50% polypropylene (PP) and 50% natural fiber irradiated by the electron beam (energy: 0.5 MeV, dose: 0-20 kGy) were measured. The length and thickness of PP and NF are 80±10 mm and 40-120 μm, respectively. The results show that the thermal conductivity and the tensile strength changed and became minimum when the dose of electron beam is 10 kGy, and the deformation after the thermal cycle were reduced by the electron beam.

  3. Using areas of known occupancy to identify sources of variation in detection probability of raptors: taking time lowers replication effort for surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murn, Campbell; Holloway, Graham J

    2016-10-01

    Species occurring at low density can be difficult to detect and if not properly accounted for, imperfect detection will lead to inaccurate estimates of occupancy. Understanding sources of variation in detection probability and how they can be managed is a key part of monitoring. We used sightings data of a low-density and elusive raptor (white-headed vulture Trigonoceps occipitalis) in areas of known occupancy (breeding territories) in a likelihood-based modelling approach to calculate detection probability and the factors affecting it. Because occupancy was known a priori to be 100%, we fixed the model occupancy parameter to 1.0 and focused on identifying sources of variation in detection probability. Using detection histories from 359 territory visits, we assessed nine covariates in 29 candidate models. The model with the highest support indicated that observer speed during a survey, combined with temporal covariates such as time of year and length of time within a territory, had the highest influence on the detection probability. Averaged detection probability was 0.207 (s.e. 0.033) and based on this the mean number of visits required to determine within 95% confidence that white-headed vultures are absent from a breeding area is 13 (95% CI: 9-20). Topographical and habitat covariates contributed little to the best models and had little effect on detection probability. We highlight that low detection probabilities of some species means that emphasizing habitat covariates could lead to spurious results in occupancy models that do not also incorporate temporal components. While variation in detection probability is complex and influenced by effects at both temporal and spatial scales, temporal covariates can and should be controlled as part of robust survey methods. Our results emphasize the importance of accounting for detection probability in occupancy studies, particularly during presence/absence studies for species such as raptors that are widespread and

  4. [Survey on fungi contamination and natural occurrence of mycotoxins in 94 corn feed ingredients collected from China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X M; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Xu, W J; Liu, D; Jiang, T; Xu, J; Li, F Q

    2016-10-06

    Objective: To investigate fungi contamination and the natural occurrence of mycotoxins in corn feed ingredients collected from China. Methods: A total of 94 corn feed ingredient samples were collected from 8 Chinese provinces(i.e., Anhui, Hebei, Heilongjiang, Jilin, Jiangsu, Liaoning, Inner Mongolia, and Shandong)in February 2014. A tandem ultra-performance liquid chromatographymass spectrometry method was used for simultaneous detection of twelve kinds of mycotoxins, including aflatoxin(AF), type A and type B tricothecenes, and zearalenone(ZEN). Contaminated fungi were also identified and counted. Results: AF was detected in 36.2%(34/94)of samples; the concentration of AFB1 was the highest in the four AFs with the range: 0.3~181.3 μg/kg; and then followed by AFB2(range: 1.0-74.3 μg/kg). There were 7 samples(7.5%)with AFB1 concentrations higher than the tolerance limit of 50 μg/kg. The concentration of type A tricothecenes in all samples was lower(0.1-10.5 μg/kg). DON had the most serious contamination than other kind of type B tricothecenes(range: 0.7-606.6 μg/kg; median: 66.3 μg/kg). The DON concentration in all samples was below the tolerance limit of 1 000 μg/kg. ZEN was detected in 76.6%(72/ 94)of samples(median: 36.9 μg/kg), with 3 samples having ZEN concentrations higher than the tolerance limit of 500 μg/kg. The survey on fungi contamination showed that all samples were contaminated by fungi(range: 5.0-1.4×10(5) CFU/g). There were 18 and 3 samples with quantities of fungi higher than the tolerance and forbidden limits, respectively. The Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Trichoderma and Mucor genuses were the predominant fungi in corn feed ingredients, with detection rates of 71.3%(67), 60.6%(57), 71.3%(67), 27.7%(26), and 24.5%(23), respectively. The detection rate of Fusarium moniliforme, 73.4%(69/94)was higher than that of Aspergillus flavus, 41.5%(39/94). Conclusion: In this survey, the corn feed ingredients were not seriously contaminated by

  5. Determination of natural frequencies by coupled method of homotopy perturbation and variational method for strongly nonlinear oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbarzade, M.; Langari, J.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper a new approach combining the features of the homotopy concept with variational approach is proposed to find accurate analytical solutions for nonlinear oscillators with and without a fractional power restoring force. Since the first-order approximation leads to very accurate results, comparisons with other results are presented to show the effectiveness of this method. The validity of the method is independent of whether or not there exist small or large parameters in the considered nonlinear equations; the obtained results prove the validity and efficiency of the method, which can be easily extended to other strongly nonlinear problems. At the end we compare our procedure with the optimal homotopy perturbation method.

  6. On the nature of extraversion: variation in conditioned contextual activation of dopamine-facilitated affective, cognitive, and motor processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depue, Richard A; Fu, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Research supports an association between extraversion and dopamine (DA) functioning. DA facilitates incentive motivation and the conditioning and incentive encoding of contexts that predict reward. Therefore, we assessed whether extraversion is related to the efficacy of acquiring conditioned contextual facilitation of three processes that are dependent on DA: motor velocity, positive affect, and visuospatial working memory. We exposed high and low extraverts to three days of association of drug reward (methylphenidate, MP) with a particular laboratory context (Paired group), a test day of conditioning, and three days of extinction in the same laboratory. A Placebo group and an Unpaired group (that had MP in a different laboratory context) served as controls. Conditioned contextual facilitation was assessed by (i) presenting video clips that varied in their pairing with drug and laboratory context and in inherent incentive value, and (ii) measuring increases from day 1 to Test day on the three processes above. Results showed acquisition of conditioned contextual facilitation across all measures to video clips that had been paired with drug and laboratory context in the Paired high extraverts, but no conditioning in the Paired low extraverts (nor in either of the control groups). Increases in the Paired high extraverts were correlated across the three measures. Also, conditioned facilitation was evident on the first day of extinction in Paired high extraverts, despite the absence of the unconditioned effects of MP. By the last day of extinction, responding returned to day 1 levels. The findings suggest that extraversion is associated with variation in the acquisition of contexts that predict reward. Over time, this variation may lead to differences in the breadth of networks of conditioned contexts. Thus, individual differences in extraversion may be maintained by activation of differentially encoded central representations of incentive contexts that predict reward.

  7. On the Nature of Extraversion: Variation in Conditioned Contextual Activation of Dopamine-Facilitated Affective, Cognitive, and Motor Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard allen Depue

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Research supports an association between extraversion and dopamine (DA functioning. DA facilitates incentive motivation and the conditioning and incentive encoding of contexts that predict reward. Therefore, we assessed whether extraversion is related to the efficacy of acquiring conditioned contextual facilitation of three processes that are dependent on DA: motor velocity, positive affect, and visuospatial working memory. We exposed high and low extraverts to three days of association of drug reward (methylphenidate, MP with a particular laboratory context (Paired group, a test day of conditioning, and three days of extinction in the same laboratory. A Placebo group and an Unpaired group (that had MP in a different laboratory context served as controls. Conditioned contextual facilitation was assessed by (i presenting video clips that varied in their pairing with drug and laboratory context and in inherent incentive value, and (ii measuring increases from day 1 to Test day on the three processes above. Results showed acquisition of conditioned contextual facilitation across all measures to video clips that had been paired with drug and laboratory context in the Paired high extraverts, but no conditioning in the Paired low extraverts (nor in either of the control groups. Increases in the Paired high extraverts were correlated across the three measures. Also, conditioned facilitation was evident on the first day of extinction in Paired high extraverts, despite the absence of the unconditioned effects of MP. By the last day of extinction, responding returned to day 1 levels. The findings suggest that extraversion is associated with variation in the acquisition of contexts that predict reward. Over time, this variation may lead to differences in the breadth of networks of conditioned contexts. Thus, individual differences in extraversion may be maintained by activation of differentially encoded central representations of incentive contexts that

  8. Genetic structure and natural variation associated with host of origin in Penicillium expansum strains causing blue mould.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzani, S M; Montemurro, C; Di Rienzo, V; Solfrizzo, M; Ippolito, A

    2013-07-15

    Blue mould, caused by Penicillium expansum, is one of the most economically damaging postharvest diseases of pome fruits, although it may affect a wider host range, including sweet cherries and table grapes. Several reports on the role of mycotoxins in plant pathogenesis have been published, but few focussed on the influence of mycotoxins on the variation in host preference amongst producing fungi. In the present study the influence of the host on P. expansum pathogenicity/virulence was investigated, focussing mainly on the relationship with patulin production. Three P. expansum strain groups, originating from apples, sweet cherries, and table grapes (7 strains per host) were grown on their hosts of isolation and on artificial media derived from them. Strains within each P. expansum group proved to be more aggressive and produced more patulin than the other two groups under evaluation when grown on the host from which they originated. Table grape strains were the most aggressive (81% disease incidence) and strongest patulin producers (up to 554μg/g). The difference in aggressiveness amongst strains was appreciable only in the presence of a living host, suggesting that the complex pathogen-host interaction significantly influenced the ability of P. expansum to cause the disease. Incidence/severity of the disease and patulin production proved to be positively correlated, supporting the role of patulin as virulence/pathogenicity factor. The existence of genetic variation amongst isolates was confirmed by the High Resolution Melting method that was set up herein, which permitted discrimination of P. expansum from other species (P. chrysogenum and P. crustosum) and, within the same species, amongst the host of origin. Host effect on toxin production appeared to be exerted at a transcriptional level.

  9. Seasonal variation in Eurasian Wigeon Anas penelope sex and age ratios from hunter-based surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Kevin Kuhlmann; Dalby, Lars; Sunde, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    Demographic monitoring is vital for tracking and modelling the population dynamics of highly mobile bird populations. However, different types of monitoring can sometimes lead to different outcomes, and understanding the causes of equivocal results is an important step to advance future monitoring...... dominated by adult males, and juvenile proportions were highest in November and significantly lower before and after this peak. Nationwide field assessments undertaken in January 2012 showed no significant differences from sex and age ratios in the wing survey data from that particular hunting season (2011...

  10. Genetic Basis for Spontaneous Hybrid Genome Doubling during Allopolyploid Speciation of Common Wheat Shown by Natural Variation Analyses of the Paternal Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Nasuda, Shuhei; Ashida, Yasuyo; Nitta, Miyuki; Tsujimoto, Hisashi; Takumi, Shigeo; Kawahara, Taihachi

    2013-01-01

    The complex process of allopolyploid speciation includes various mechanisms ranging from species crosses and hybrid genome doubling to genome alterations and the establishment of new allopolyploids as persisting natural entities. Currently, little is known about the genetic mechanisms that underlie hybrid genome doubling, despite the fact that natural allopolyploid formation is highly dependent on this phenomenon. We examined the genetic basis for the spontaneous genome doubling of triploid F1 hybrids between the direct ancestors of allohexaploid common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD genome), namely Triticumturgidum L. (AABB genome) and Aegilopstauschii Coss. (DD genome). An Ae. tauschii intraspecific lineage that is closely related to the D genome of common wheat was identified by population-based analysis. Two representative accessions, one that produces a high-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid when crossed with a T. turgidum cultivar and the other that produces a low-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid with the same cultivar, were chosen from that lineage for further analyses. A series of investigations including fertility analysis, immunostaining, and quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis showed that (1) production of functional unreduced gametes through nonreductional meiosis is an early step key to successful hybrid genome doubling, (2) first division restitution is one of the cytological mechanisms that cause meiotic nonreduction during the production of functional male unreduced gametes, and (3) six QTLs in the Ae. tauschii genome, most of which likely regulate nonreductional meiosis and its subsequent gamete production processes, are involved in hybrid genome doubling. Interlineage comparisons of Ae. tauschii’s ability to cause hybrid genome doubling suggested an evolutionary model for the natural variation pattern of the trait in which non-deleterious mutations in six QTLs may have important roles. The findings of this study demonstrated that the

  11. Genetic basis for spontaneous hybrid genome doubling during allopolyploid speciation of common wheat shown by natural variation analyses of the paternal species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Matsuoka

    Full Text Available The complex process of allopolyploid speciation includes various mechanisms ranging from species crosses and hybrid genome doubling to genome alterations and the establishment of new allopolyploids as persisting natural entities. Currently, little is known about the genetic mechanisms that underlie hybrid genome doubling, despite the fact that natural allopolyploid formation is highly dependent on this phenomenon. We examined the genetic basis for the spontaneous genome doubling of triploid F1 hybrids between the direct ancestors of allohexaploid common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., AABBDD genome, namely Triticumturgidum L. (AABB genome and Aegilopstauschii Coss. (DD genome. An Ae. tauschii intraspecific lineage that is closely related to the D genome of common wheat was identified by population-based analysis. Two representative accessions, one that produces a high-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid when crossed with a T. turgidum cultivar and the other that produces a low-genome-doubling-frequency hybrid with the same cultivar, were chosen from that lineage for further analyses. A series of investigations including fertility analysis, immunostaining, and quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis showed that (1 production of functional unreduced gametes through nonreductional meiosis is an early step key to successful hybrid genome doubling, (2 first division restitution is one of the cytological mechanisms that cause meiotic nonreduction during the production of functional male unreduced gametes, and (3 six QTLs in the Ae. tauschii genome, most of which likely regulate nonreductional meiosis and its subsequent gamete production processes, are involved in hybrid genome doubling. Interlineage comparisons of Ae. tauschii's ability to cause hybrid genome doubling suggested an evolutionary model for the natural variation pattern of the trait in which non-deleterious mutations in six QTLs may have important roles. The findings of this study demonstrated

  12. Tectonic evolution of the Resolution Ridge System, New Zealand: insights gained through UNCLOS surveying for natural prolongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, R.; Barker, D.

    2005-12-01

    For coastal States, demonstration of submerged natural prolongation of the land mass is a key element in delimiting the extent of the continental margin under the terms of UNCLOS article 76. Straddling an active plate boundary and with continental margins encompassing most major tectonic settings, the New Zealand (NZ) continent presents numerous, varied examples of natural prolongation of the land mass. The mostly submerged NZ continent covers over 5,000,000 km2. The continent grew by the accretion of basement terranes and the Hikurangi Plateau, a large igneous province, along the eastern margin of Gondwana during the Paleozoic and Mesozoic. Fragmentation of Gondwana initially involved thinning and extension of the continental rocks of New Zealand, and ultimately resulted in the separation of the New Zealand continent from Australia and Antarctica. Renewed tectonic activity in the Cenozoic resulted in the formation of the Resolution Ridge System (RRS) southwest of NZ and several volcanic arcs north of NZ. These volcanic arcs extend onto NZ and are a submerged natural prolongation of the land mass. Geological and geophysical surveys undertaken for the NZ Continental Shelf Project established that most of the RRS was not a prolongation of the NZ land mass, and advanced understanding of NZ's tectonic evolution. The RRS is a series of bathymetric highs extending southwest of Fiordland, NZ, from Resolution Ridge itself, adjacent to the northern limit of the Puysegur Trench, to the southeast termination of the fossil spreading centre in the Tasman Sea (TS; 158°40'E, 48°10'S). A 40° bend at 162°E, 46°30'S divides the ridge system into a northeastern segment, comprising large, en echelon, northeast-southwest-trending basement ridges and basins, and a southwest segment composed of longer, more continuous ridges trending northeast-southwest. The ridge system was formed by rapid reorientation of seafloor spreading directions (through c. 90°) in the TS at ~50 Ma. The

  13. Survey of Period Variations of Superhumps in SU UMa-Type Dwarf Novae. VIII: The Eighth Year (2015-2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Taichi; Monard, Berto; Vanmunster, Tonny; Maeda, Yutaka; Miller, Ian; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Isogai, Keisuke; Kimura, Mariko; Imada, Akira; Tordai, Tamas; Akazawa, Hidehiko; Tanabe, Kenji; Otani, Noritoshi; Ogi, Minako; Ando, Kazuko; Takigawa, Naoki; Dubovsky, Pavol A; Kudzej, Igor; Shugarov, Sergey Yu; Katysheva, Natalia; Golysheva, Polina; Gladilina, Natalia; Chochol, Drahomir; Starr, Peter; Kasai, Kiyoshi; Pickard, Roger D; de Miguel, Enrique; Kojiguchi, Naoto; Sugiura, Yuki; Fukushima, Daiki; Yamada, Eiji; Uto, Yusuke; Kamibetsunawa, Taku; Tatsumi, Taiki; Takeda, Nao; Matsumoto, Katsura; Cook, Lewis M; Pavlenko, Elena P; Babina, Julia V; Pit, Nikolaj V; Antonyuk, Oksana I; Antonyuk, Kirill A; Sosnovskij, Aleksei A; Baklanov, Aleksei V; Kafka, Stella; Stein, William; Voloshina, Irina B; Ruiz, Javier; Sabo, Richard; Dvorak, Shawn; Stone, Geoff; Andreev, Maksim V; Antipin, Sergey V; Zubareva, Alexandra M; Zaostrojnykh, Anna M; Richmond, Michael; Shears, Jeremy; Dubois, Franky; Logie, Ludwig; Rau, Steve; Vanaverbeke, Siegfried; Simon, Andrei; Oksanen, Arto; Goff, William N; Bolt, Greg; Debski, Bartomiej; Kochanek, Christopher S; Shappee, Benjamin; Stanek, Krzysztof Z; Prieto, Jose L; Stubbings, Rod; Muyllaert, Eddy; Hiraga, Mitsutaka; Horie, Tsuneo; Schmeer, Patrick; Hirosawa, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009, arXiv:0905.1757), we collected times of superhump maxima for 128 SU UMa-type dwarf novae observed mainly during the 2015-2016 season and characterized these objects. The data have improved the distribution of orbital periods, the relation between the orbital period and the variation of superhumps, the relation between period variations and the rebrightening type in WZ Sge-type objects. Coupled with new measurements of mass ratios using growing stages of superhumps, we now have a clearer and statistically greatly improved evolutionary path near the terminal stage of evolution of cataclysmic variables. Three objects (V452 Cas, KK Tel, ASASSN-15cl) appear to have slowly growing superhumps, which is proposed to reflect the slow growth of the 3:1 resonance near the stability border. ASASSN-15sl, ASASSN-15ux, SDSS J074859.55+312512.6 and CRTS J200331.3-284941 are newly identified eclipsing SU UMa-type (or WZ Sge-type) dwarf novae. ASASSN-15cy has a short (~0.05...

  14. U.S. Geological Survey research in Handcart Gulch, Colorado—An alpine watershed with natural acid-rock drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Andrew H.; Caine, Jonathan Saul; Verplanck, Philip L.; Bove, Dana J.; Kahn, Katherine G.

    2009-01-01

    Handcart Gulch is an alpine watershed along the Continental Divide in the Colorado Rocky Mountain Front Range. It contains an unmined mineral deposit typical of many hydrothermal mineral deposits in the intermountain west, composed primarily of pyrite with trace metals including copper and molybdenum. Springs and the trunk stream have a natural pH value of 3 to 4. The U.S. Geological Survey began integrated research activities at the site in 2003 with the objective of better understanding geologic, geochemical, and hydrologic controls on naturally occurring acid-rock drainage in alpine watersheds. Characterizing the role of groundwater was of particular interest because mountain watersheds containing metallic mineral deposits are often underlain by complexly deformed crystalline rocks in which groundwater flow is poorly understood. Site infrastructure currently includes 4 deep monitoring wells high in the watershed (300– 1,200 ft deep), 4 bedrock (100–170 ft deep) and 5 shallow (10–30 ft deep) monitoring wells along the trunk stream, a stream gage, and a meteorological station. Work to date at the site includes: geologic mapping and structural analysis; surface sample and drill core mineralogic characterization; geophysical borehole logging; aquifer testing; monitoring of groundwater hydraulic heads and streamflows; a stream tracer dilution study; repeated sampling of surface and groundwater for geochemical analyses, including major and trace elements, several isotopes, and groundwater age dating; and construction of groundwater flow models. The unique dataset collected at Handcart Gulch has yielded several important findings about bedrock groundwater flow at the site. Most importantly, we find that bedrock bulk permeability is nontrivial and that bedrock groundwater apparently constitutes a substantial fraction of the hydrologic budget. This means that bedrock groundwater commonly may be an underappreciated component of the hydrologic system in studies of

  15. Functions of bounded variation

    OpenAIRE

    Lind, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The paper begins with a short survey of monotone functions. The functions of bounded variation are introduced and some basic properties of these functions are given. Finally the jump function of a function of bounded variation is defined.

  16. Posttranslational modification and sequence variation of redox-active proteins correlate with biofilm life cycle in natural microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Steven [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Erickson, Brian K [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Hwang, Mona [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Banfield, Jillian F. [University of California, Berkeley; Thelen, Michael P. [University of California, Berkeley

    2010-01-01

    Characterizing proteins recovered from natural microbial communities affords the opportunity to correlate protein expression and modification with environmental factors, including species composition and successional stage. Proteogenomic and biochemical studies of pellicle biofilms from subsurface acid mine drainage streams have shown abundant cytochromes from the dominant organism, Leptospirillum Group II. These cytochromes are proposed to be key proteins in aerobic Fe(II) oxidation, the dominant mode of cellular energy generation by the biofilms. In this study, we determined that posttranslational modification and expression of amino-acid sequence variants change as a function of biofilm maturation. For Cytochrome579 (Cyt579), the most abundant cytochrome in the biofilms, late developmental-stage biofilms differed from early-stage biofilms in N-terminal truncations and decreased redox potentials. Expression of sequence variants of two monoheme c-type cytochromes also depended on biofilm development. For Cyt572, an abundant membrane-bound cytochrome, the expression of multiple sequence variants was observed in both early and late developmental-stage biofilms; however, redox potentials of Cyt572 from these different sources did not vary significantly. These cytochrome analyses show a complex response of the Leptospirillum Group II electron transport chain to growth within a microbial community and illustrate the power of multiple proteomics techniques to define biochemistry in natural systems.

  17. Seasonal variation and natural infection of Lutzomyia antunesi (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae, an endemic species in the Orinoquia region of Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Vasquez Trujillo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lutzomyia antunesi has been commonly reported in outbreaks of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL in the Orinoquia region of Colombia. The bionomics of this species were studied in the municipality of Villavicencio (Meta, Colombia. Sandflies were captured over the course of one week per month for one year in intradomiciliary, peridomiciliary and extradomiciliary housing areas. The captures were performed from 06:00 pm-06:00 am using CDC light traps and the females were processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect Leishmania spp. A total of 22,097 specimens and 19 species were captured of which Lu. antunesi (89% and Lutzomyia walkeri (5% were the most abundant. Other species recognised as anthropophilic (Lutzomyia panamensis, Lutzomyia gomezi, Lutzomyia flaviscutellata and Lutzomyia fairtigi were present in very low abundance (< 2%. Natural infection with Leishmania spp was detected using PCR in Lu. antunesi, Lu. panamensis and Lu. flavicutellata, showing infection rates of 1%, 4.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The present paper provides information on various ecological aspects of Lu. antunesi. An analysis of seasonality shows that this species increases in abundance in the hottest months (December, January and February, directly correlating with the maximum temperature and inversely correlating with precipitation. The natural infection rate is associated with the peaks of highest abundance.

  18. Seasonal variation and natural infection of Lutzomyia antunesi (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae), an endemic species in the Orinoquia region of Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Adolfo Vásquez; Reina, Angélica E González; Orjuela, Agustín Góngora; Suárez, Edgar Prieto; Palomares, Jairo Enrique; Alvarez, Luz Stella Buitrago

    2013-01-01

    Lutzomyia antunesi has been commonly reported in outbreaks of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in the Orinoquia region of Colombia. The bionomics of this species were studied in the municipality of Villavicencio (Meta, Colombia). Sandflies were captured over the course of one week per month for one year in intradomiciliary, peridomiciliary and extradomiciliary housing areas. The captures were performed from 06:00 pm-06:00 am using CDC light traps and the females were processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Leishmania spp. A total of 22,097 specimens and 19 species were captured of which Lu. antunesi (89%) and Lutzomyia walkeri (5%) were the most abundant. Other species recognised as anthropophilic (Lutzomyia panamensis, Lutzomyia gomezi, Lutzomyia flaviscutellata and Lutzomyia fairtigi) were present in very low abundance (< 2%). Natural infection with Leishmania spp was detected using PCR in Lu. antunesi, Lu. panamensis and Lu. flavicutellata, showing infection rates of 1%, 4.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The present paper provides information on various ecological aspects of Lu. antunesi. An analysis of seasonality shows that this species increases in abundance in the hottest months (December, January and February), directly correlating with the maximum temperature and inversely correlating with precipitation. The natural infection rate is associated with the peaks of highest abundance. PMID:23828011

  19. Variation in Heat-shock Proteins and Photosynthetic Thermotolerance among Natural Populations of Chenopodium album L. from Contrasting Thermal Environments: Implications for Plant Responses to Global Warming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepak Barua; Scott A. Heckathorn; James S. Coleman

    2008-01-01

    Production of heat-shock proteins (Hsps) is a key adaptation to acute heat stress and will be Important in determining plant responses to climate change. Further, intraspecifc variation in Hsps, which will influence species-level response to global warming, has rarely been examined in naturally occurring plants. To understand intraspeciflc variation in plant Hsps and its relevance to global warming, we examined Hsp content and thermotolerance in five naturally occurring populations of Chenopodium album L. from contrasting thermal environments grown at low and high temperatures. As expected,Hsp accumulation varied between populations, but this was related more to habitat variability than to mean temperature.Unexpectedly, Hsp accumulation decreased with increasing variability of habitat temperatures. Hsp accumulation also decreased with increased experimental growth temperatures. Physiological thermotolerance was partitioned into basal and induced components. As with Hsps, induced thermotolerance decreased with increasing temperature variability. Thus,populations native to the more stressful habitats, or grown at higher temperatures, had lower Hsp levels and induced thermotolerance, suggesting a greater reliance on basal mechanisms for thermotolerance. These results suggest that future global climate change will differentially impact ecotypes within species, possibly by selecting for increased basal versus inducible thermotolerance.

  20. Patterns of nucleotide sequence variation in ICAM1 and TNF genes in twelve ethnic groups of India: roles of demographic history and natural selection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanghamitra Sengupta; Shabana Farheen; Neelanjana Mukherjee; Partha P. Majumder

    2007-12-01

    We have studied DNA sequence variation in and around the genes ICAM1 and TNF, which play functional and correlated roles in inflammatory processes and immune cell responses, in 12 diverse ethnic groups of India, with a view to investigating the relative roles of demographic history and natural selection in shaping the observed patterns of variation. The total numbers of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detected at the ICAM1 and TNF loci were 29 and 12, respectively. Haplotype and allele frequencies differed significantly across populations. The site frequency spectra at these loci were significantly different from those expected under neutrality, and showed an excess of intermediate-frequency variants consistent with balancing selection. However, as expected under balancing selection, there was no significant reduction of $F_{ST}$ values compared to neutral autosomal loci. Mismatch distributions were consistent with population expansion for both loci. On the other hand, the phylogenetic network among haplotypes for the TNF locus was similar to expectations under population expansion, while that for the ICAM1 was as expected under balancing selection. Nucleotide diversity at the ICAM1 locus was an order of magnitude lower in the promoter region, compared to the introns or exons, but no such difference was noted for the TNF gene. Thus, we conclude that the pattern of nucleotide variation in these genes has been modulated by both demographic history and selection. This is not surprising in view of the known allelic associations of several polymorphisms in these genes with various diseases, both infectious and noninfectious.

  1. Survey of period variations of superhumps in SU UMa-type dwarf novae. VIII. The eighth year (2015-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taichi; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Monard, Berto; Vanmunster, Tonny; Maeda, Yutaka; Miller, Ian; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Isogai, Keisuke; Kimura, Mariko; Imada, Akira; Tordai, Tamás; Akazawa, Hidehiko; Tanabe, Kenji; Otani, Noritoshi; Ogi, Minako; Ando, Kazuko; Takigawa, Naoki; Dubovsky, Pavol A.; Kudzej, Igor; Shugarov, Sergey Yu.; Katysheva, Natalia; Golysheva, Polina; Gladilina, Natalia; Chochol, Drahomir; Starr, Peter; Kasai, Kiyoshi; Pickard, Roger D.; Miguel, Enrique de; Kojiguchi, Naoto; Sugiura, Yuki; Fukushima, Daiki; Yamada, Eiji; Uto, Yusuke; Kamibetsunawa, Taku; Tatsumi, Taiki; Takeda, Nao; Matsumoto, Katsura; Cook, Lewis M.; Pavlenko, Elena P.; Babina, Julia V.; Pit, Nikolaj V.; Antonyuk, Oksana I.; Antonyuk, Kirill A.; Sosnovskij, Aleksei A.; Baklanov, Aleksei V.; Kafka, Stella; Stein, William; Voloshina, Irina B.; Ruiz, Javier; Sabo, Richard; Dvorak, Shawn; Stone, Geoff; Andreev, Maksim V.; Antipin, Sergey V.; Zubareva, Alexandra M.; Zaostrojnykh, Anna M.; Richmond, Michael; Shears, Jeremy; Dubois, Franky; Logie, Ludwig; Rau, Steve; Vanaverbeke, Siegfried; Simon, Andrei; Oksanen, Arto; Goff, William N.; Bolt, Greg; Dębski, Bartłomiej; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Shappee, Benjamin; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.; Prieto, José L.; Stubbings, Rod; Muyllaert, Eddy; Hiraga, Mitsutaka; Horie, Tsuneo; Schmeer, Patrick; Hirosawa, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Continuing the project described by Kato et al. (2009, PASJ, 61, S395), we collected times of superhump maxima for 128 SU UMa-type dwarf novae observed mainly during the 2015-2016 season and characterized these objects. The data have improved the distribution of orbital periods, the relation between the orbital period and the variation of superhumps, and the relation between period variations and the rebrightening type in WZ Sge-type objects. Coupled with new measurements of mass ratios using growing stages of superhumps, we now have a clearer and statistically greatly improved evolutionary path near the terminal stage of evolution of cataclysmic variables. Three objects (V452 Cas, KK Tel, and ASASSN-15cl) appear to have slowly growing superhumps, which is proposed to reflect the slow growth of the 3 : 1 resonance near the stability border. ASASSN-15sl, ASASSN-15ux, SDSS J074859.55+312512.6, and CRTS J200331.3-284941 are newly identified eclipsing SU UMa-type (or WZ Sge-type) dwarf novae. ASASSN-15cy has a short (˜0.050 d) superhump period and appears to belong to EI Psc-type objects with compact secondaries having an evolved core. ASASSN-15gn, ASASSN-15hn, ASASSN-15kh, and ASASSN-16bu are candidate period bouncers with superhump periods longer than 0.06 d. We have newly obtained superhump periods for 79 objects and 13 orbital periods, including periods from early superhumps. In order that future observations will be more astrophysically beneficial and rewarding to observers, we propose guidelines on how to organize observations of various superoutbursts.

  2. A long panel survey to elicit variation in preferences and attitudes in the choice of electric vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Fjendbo; Cherchi, Elisabetta; Ortúzar, Juan de Dios

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology we set up to gather appropriate data to study the impact of real life experience with electric vehicles (EVs) over a relatively long period of time on individual preferences and attitudes. We used stated choices (SC) to elicit individual preferences because EVs...... and their associated charging infrastructure are not yet fully integrated onto the market. Furthermore, to measure the extent to which the experience of using an EV may affect individual preferences and attitudes, we set up a “long panel” survey, where data was gathered before and after individuals experienced an EV...... in real life during a three-month period. We also measured attitudinal effects (AE) that might affect the choice of an EV by individuals. To our knowledge, this represents the first example of a “long panel” SC/AE and the first attempt to measure the formation of preferences and attitudes...

  3. A natural neighbour method based on Fraeijs de Veubeke variational principle for materially non-linear problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Li; Serge Cescotto; Barbara Rossi

    2009-01-01

    The natural neighbour method can be considered as one of many variants of the meshless methods. In the present paper, a new approach based on the Fraeijs de Veubeke (FdV) functional, which is initially developed for linear elasticity, is extended to the case of geometrically linear but materially non-linear solids. The new approach provides an original treatment to two classical problems: the numerical evaluation of the integrals over the domain A and the enforcement of boundary conditions of the type ui = uion Su. In the absence of body forces (Fi = 0), it will be shown that the calculation of integrals of the type fA .dA can be avoided and that boundary conditions of the type ui = ui on Su can be imposed in the average sense in general and exactly if ui is linear between two contour nodes, which is obviously the case for ui = 0.

  4. Natural variation in the glucose content of dilute sulfuric acid-pretreated rice straw liquid hydrolysates: implications for bioethanol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Takashi; Teramura, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Miki; Kanamaru, Kengo; Kawaguchi, Hideo; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko; Yamasaki, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Rice straw is a promising resource for bioethanol production. Because the glucose content of pretreatment liquid hydrolysates is highly correlated with ethanol yield, the selection of appropriate rice cultivars is essential. The glucose content in liquid hydrolysates of pretreated rice straws of 208 diverse cultivars was evaluated in natural field in 2013 and 2014 using a novel high-throughput system. The glucose content of the rice straw samples varied across cultivars and was affected by environmental factors such as temperature and solar radiation. Several high-quality cultivars exhibiting high glucose content in both years were identified. The results of this study can aid in development of novel rice cultivars suitable as both feedstocks for bioethanol production and cooking.

  5. Salinity variations in the water resources fed by the Etnean volcanic aquifers (Sicily, Italy): natural vs. anthropogenic causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Walter; Bellomo, Sergio; Bonfanti, Pietro; Brusca, Lorenzo; Longo, Manfredi

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, in an attempt to reveal possible changes connected to natural or anthropogenic causes, the main results of hydrogeochemical monitoring carried out at Mount Etna are evaluated. We report on the salinity contents of the groundwaters that flow in fractured volcanics, which make up the flanks of the volcano. These waters, analyzed for major ion chemistry, were sampled regularly from 1994 to 2004. Basing on nonparametric Sen's slope estimator, time series of groundwater composition reveal that the salinity of most of the Etnean aquifers increased by 0.5% to 3.5% each year during this period. This change in the water chemistry is clearly referable to the overexploitation of the aquifers. This increasing trend needs to be inverted urgently; otherwise, it will cause a shortage of water in the near future, because the maximum admissible concentration of salinity for drinking water will be exceeded.

  6. Intra-cycle variation of the uterine cavity indentation assessed with three-dimensional ultrasound in natural and stimulated cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravelos, Sotirios H; Li, Tin-Chiu

    2016-05-01

    The recent ESHRE-ESGE classification for female genital anomalies attempts to promote objectivity in diagnosis of normal and septate uteri. The aim of this study was to ascertain whether the uterine cavity indentation - the characteristic feature of septate uteri - varies significantly throughout the cycle. Seventy consecutive women underwent three-dimensional ultrasound twice: 35 during the proliferative and luteal phase of a natural cycle, and 35 during the first and final day of a stimulated cycle. Endometrial thickness, interostial distance, cavity indentation and percentage of cavity indentation were all assessed in accordance with the ESHRE-ESGE consensus on diagnosis of female genital anomalies. Overall, throughout both cycles, there was a significant increase in endometrial thickness (from 4.6 mm to 10.2 mm; P cavity indentation (from 30.3% to 15.0%; P uterine cavity indentation has important implications for both clinical practice and research.

  7. Seasonal variation and natural infection of Lutzomyia antunesi (Diptera: Psychodidae: Phlebotominae), an endemic species in the Orinoquia region of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez Trujillo, Adolfo; González Reina, Angélica E; Góngora Orjuela, Agustín; Prieto Suárez, Edgar; Palomares, Jairo Enrique; Buitrago Alvarez, Luz Stella

    2013-06-01

    Lutzomyia antunesi has been commonly reported in outbreaks of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in the Orinoquia region of Colombia. The bionomics of this species were studied in the municipality of Villavicencio (Meta, Colombia). Sandflies were captured over the course of one week per month for one year in intradomiciliary, peridomiciliary and extradomiciliary housing areas. The captures were performed from 06:00 pm-06:00 am using CDC light traps and the females were processed for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect Leishmania spp. A total of 22,097 specimens and 19 species were captured of which Lu. antunesi (89%) and Lutzomyia walkeri (5%) were the most abundant. Other species recognised as anthropophilic (Lutzomyia panamensis, Lutzomyia gomezi, Lutzomyia flaviscutellata and Lutzomyia fairtigi) were present in very low abundance (temperature and inversely correlating with precipitation. The natural infection rate is associated with the peaks of highest abundance.

  8. Hypo- and hyperglycemia in relation to the mean, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, and nature of the glucose distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodbard, David

    2012-10-01

    We describe a new approach to estimate the risks of hypo- and hyperglycemia based on the mean and SD of the glucose distribution using optional transformations of the glucose scale to achieve a more nearly symmetrical and Gaussian distribution, if necessary. We examine the correlation of risks of hypo- and hyperglycemia calculated using different glucose thresholds and the relationships of these risks to the mean glucose, SD, and percentage coefficient of variation (%CV). Using representative continuous glucose monitoring datasets, one can predict the risk of glucose values above or below any arbitrary threshold if the glucose distribution is Gaussian or can be transformed to be Gaussian. Symmetry and gaussianness can be tested objectively and used to optimize the transformation. The method performs well with excellent correlation of predicted and observed risks of hypo- or hyperglycemia for individual subjects by time of day or for a specified range of dates. One can compare observed and calculated risks of hypo- and hyperglycemia for a series of thresholds considering their uncertainties. Thresholds such as 80 mg/dL can be used as surrogates for thresholds such as 50 mg/dL. We observe a high correlation of risk of hypoglycemia with %CV and illustrate the theoretical basis for that relationship. One can estimate the historical risks of hypo- and hyperglycemia by time of day, date, day of the week, or range of dates, using any specified thresholds. Risks of hypoglycemia with one threshold (e.g., 80 mg/dL) can be used as an effective surrogate marker for hypoglycemia at other thresholds (e.g., 50 mg/dL). These estimates of risk can be useful in research studies and in the clinical care of patients with diabetes.

  9. Spatio-temporal variation in territory quality and oxidative status: a natural experiment in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Crommenacker, Janske; Komdeur, Jan; Burke, Terry; Richardson, David S

    2011-05-01

    1. Fluctuations in the quality of the habitat in which an animal lives can have major consequences for its behaviour and physiological state. In poor-quality habitat with low food availability, metabolically intensive foraging activity is likely to result in increased generation of reactive oxygen species, while scarcity of food can lead to a weakening of exogenously derived antioxidant defences. The consequent oxidant/antioxidant imbalance may lead to elevated oxidative stress. 2. Although the link between food availability and oxidative stress has been studied in the laboratory, very little is known about this relationship in the wild. Here, we investigate the association between territory quality (measured through food availability) and oxidative stress in the Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis). 3. Seychelles warblers are insectivorous birds that inhabit a fixed feeding territory year round. Individuals experience profound and rapid local fluctuations in territory quality within these territories, owing to changing patterns of vegetation defoliation resulting from seasonal