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Sample records for survey national nursing

  1. National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  2. National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses (NSSRN) Download makes data from the survey readily available to users in a one-stop download. The Survey has been...

  3. Nursing professionalism: a national survey of professionalism among Japanese nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Michiko; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the professionalism of nurses in Japan. The Japanese version of the Behavioural Inventory for Professionalism in Nursing was conducted as a national survey. Computer-generated random selection of nurses in Japan obtained responses from 1501 nurses. A descriptive design examined the levels of and differences in nursing professionalism. Comparisons of the total level of professionalism in educational preparation, current position, years of experience, and current practice setting were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test. The results revealed that Japanese nurses had low levels of professionalism, and professionalism was related significantly to higher educational preparation, years of experience as a nurse, and current position as a nursing administrator or faculty. The results can be used as a benchmark for continued assessments of the level of nursing professionalism and for further development of nursing professionalism. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Nursing procedures during continuous renal replacement therapies: a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Benelli, Sonia; Barbarigo, Fabio; Cocozza, Giulia; Pettinelli, Noemi; Di Luca, Emanuela; Mettifogo, Mariangela; Toniolo, Andrea; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The current role of nurses in the management of critically ill patients needing continuous renal replacement therapies is clearly fundamental. The care of these complex patients is typically shared by critical care and dialysis nurses: their precise duties may vary from country to country. Methods To clarify this issue we conducted a national-level survey at a recent Italian course on nursing practices during continuous renal replacement therapies. Results A total of 119 question...

  5. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cowman, Seamus

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30) efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. RESULTS: Across all nursing homes (n = 60), 18% (n = 570) of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30), where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257), only 7% (n = 18) residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239) residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care) for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  6. Stroke and Nursing Home care: a national survey of nursing homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although stroke is recognised as a major factor in admission to nursing home care, data is lacking on the extent and nature of the disabilities and dependency in nursing homes arising from stroke. A national study conducted in nursing homes can quantify the number of residents with stroke in nursing homes, their disability and levels of dependency. Methods A cross-sectional survey research design was used. A total of 572 public and private nursing homes were identified nationally and a stratified random selection of 60 nursing homes with 3,239 residents was made. In half of the nursing homes (n = 30 efforts were made to interview all residents with stroke Survey instruments were used to collect data from residents with stroke and nursing home managers on demography, patient disability, and treatment. Results Across all nursing homes (n = 60, 18% (n = 570 of the residents had previously had a stroke. In homes (n = 30, where interviews with residents with stroke (n = 257, only 7% (n = 18 residents were capable of answering for themselves and were interviewed. Data on the remaining 93% (n = 239 residents were provided by the nursing home manager. Nurse Managers reported that 73% of residents with stroke had a high level of dependency. One in two residents with stroke was prescribed antidepressants or sedative medication. Only 21% of stroke residents were prescribed anticoagulants, 42% antiplatelets, and 36% cholesterol lowering medications. Stroke rehabilitation guidelines were lacking and 68% reported that there was no formal review process in place. Conclusions This study provides seminal findings on stroke and nursing home services in Ireland. We now know that one in six nursing home residents in a national survey are residents with a stroke, and have a wide range of disabilities. There is currently little or no structured care (beyond generic care for stroke survivors who reside in nursing homes in Ireland.

  7. Exploring correlates of turnover among nursing assistants in the National Nursing Home Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, April; Dobbs, Debra; Andel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    High turnover of nursing assistants (NAs) has implications for the quality of nursing home care. Greater understanding of correlates of NA turnover is needed to provide insight into possible retention strategies. This study examined nursing home organizational characteristics and specific job characteristics of staff in relation to turnover of NAs. Cross-sectional data on 944 nationally representative nursing homes were derived from the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey. Using a 3-month turnover rate, 25% of the facilities with the lowest turnover rates were classified as low turnover, 25% of the facilities with the highest turnover were classified as high turnover, and the remaining 50% of the facilities were classified as moderate turnover. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine organizational and job characteristics associated with low and high turnover compared with moderate turnover. One organizational characteristic, staffing levels at or greater than 4.0 hours per patient day, was associated with greater odds of low NA turnover and reduced odds of high NA turnover. Job characteristics including higher wages and union membership were associated with greater odds of low NA turnover, whereas wages, fully paid health insurance, employee assistance benefits, and involvement in resident care planning were associated with reduced odds of high NA turnover. The results of this study suggest that job characteristics of NA staff may be particularly important for turnover. Specifically, the provision of competitive wages and benefits (particularly health insurance) and involvement of NAs in resident care planning could potentially reduce NA turnover, as could maintaining high levels of nurse staffing.

  8. Doctoral Education in Community Health Nursing: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Pamela N.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    According to responses from 23 of 52 doctoral nursing program directors and interviews with 16, newer programs tend to offer more general rather than specialized curricula. Only four identified community health nursing as a specialty, all in older, long-standing programs. (SK)

  9. Nursing education and beliefs towards tobacco cessation and control: a cross- sectional national survey (GHPSS among nursing students in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren Charles W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within the healthcare system, nurses have the ability to influence their patients' smoking habits through counselling. Therefore, it is of great importance to appropriately train health professionals on smoking cessation strategies with the aim to help them provide advice to their patients. In light of the above, the objective of this study was to assess the association between Greek nursing students' beliefs towards tobacco control/smoking cessation and the professional training received. Methods During February 2009, we conducted a cross sectional national survey among all 3rd year nursing students of the two university based nursing departments in Greece (University of Athens, University of the Peloponnese. The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS questionnaire was applied and following written informed consent 73% provided a completed questionnaire (n = 192/263 enrolled students. Results Overall, 33% were current active smokers, while 74% reported ever to experiment smoking. In regards to their beliefs towards tobacco control policies, non smokers were more positive in regards to banning smoking in restaurants (94% vs. 61%, p Conclusions Resources should be invested in improving the quality of undergraduate education in nursing departments in Greece with respect to tobacco control and smoking cessation.

  10. The relationship of positive work environments and workplace injury: evidence from the National Nursing Assistant Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Deirdre; McGhan, Gwen; Walsh, Erin M; Rathert, Cheryl; Belue, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    With estimates of a 51% growth in the number of nursing assistants needed by 2016, there is a critical need to examine workplace factors that negatively contribute to the recruitment and retention of nursing assistants. Studies have shown that high demands, physical stress, and chronic workforce shortages contribute to a working environment that fosters one of the highest workforce injury rates in the United States. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between nursing assistant injury rates and key outcomes, such as job satisfaction and turnover intent, while exploring workplace environment factors, such as injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement, that can decrease the rates of workplace injury. Data from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey were used to examine the negative effects of workplace injury on nursing assistants and the workplace environment factors that are related to the rate of worker injury. Nursing assistants who experience job-related injuries have lower levels of job satisfaction, increased turnover intentions, and are less likely to recommend their facility as a place to work or seek care services. It was also found that nursing assistant injury rates are related to employee ratings of injury prevention training, supervisor support, and employee engagement. NAs with multiple injuries (>2) were 1.3-1.6 times more likely to report being injured at work than NAs who had not been injured when supervisor support, employee engagement, and training ratings were low. Evidence that health care organizations can use to better understand how workplace injuries occur and insight into ways to reduce the current staggering rate of on-the-job injuries occurring in health care workplaces were offered in this study. The findings also offer empirical support for an extension of the National Institute for Occupational Health and Safety/National Occupational Research Agenda Work Organization Framework for

  11. Neonatal nurses' perceptions of pain assessment and management in NICUs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; Delaney, Colleen; Vazquez, Victoria

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this survey was to investigate neonatal nurses' perceptions of knowledge and practice in pain assessment and management. A convenience sample consisted of 237 neonatal nurses with a membership in National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) and neonatal nurses in Connecticut who were not NANN members. A researcher-developed questionnaire, including 36 questions with Likert scale and 2 open-ended questions, was used. The nurses were knowledgeable, and about 50% felt that they received adequate training and continuing education on pain. Participants reported the use of pain assessment tools (81%) and felt confident in uses of pharmacologic (83%) and nonpharmacologic interventions (79%). More than half felt that the pain tool used in their unit was appropriate for neonates (65%) and was an accurate measure (60%). Fewer than half reported that pain was well managed (44%) and that their pain protocols were research evidence based (43%). Nurses' perceptions of well-managed pain were significantly correlated with training, use of appropriate and accurate pain tools, and clear and research-based protocols. Barriers to effective pain management emerged as resistance to change, lack of knowledge, perceived fear of side effects of pain medication and incorrect interpretation of pain signals, lack of time, and lack of trust in the pain assessment tools. Gaps exist in knowledge, evidence, and practice in neonatal assessment and management.

  12. Nursing education and beliefs towards tobacco cessation and control: a cross- sectional national survey (GHPSS) among nursing students in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patelarou, Evridiki; Vardavas, Constantine I; Ntzilepi, Penelope; Warren, Charles W; Barbouni, Anastasia; Kremastinou, Jenny; Connolly, Gregory N; Behrakis, Panagiotis

    2011-05-06

    Within the healthcare system, nurses have the ability to influence their patients' smoking habits through counselling. Therefore, it is of great importance to appropriately train health professionals on smoking cessation strategies with the aim to help them provide advice to their patients. In light of the above, the objective of this study was to assess the association between Greek nursing students' beliefs towards tobacco control/smoking cessation and the professional training received. During February 2009, we conducted a cross sectional national survey among all 3rd year nursing students of the two university based nursing departments in Greece (University of Athens, University of the Peloponnese). The Global Health Professional Student Survey (GHPSS) questionnaire was applied and following written informed consent 73% provided a completed questionnaire (n = 192/263 enrolled students). Overall, 33% were current active smokers, while 74% reported ever to experiment smoking. In regards to their beliefs towards tobacco control policies, non smokers were more positive in regards to banning smoking in restaurants (94% vs. 61%, p < 0.001), in bars and cafes (82% vs. 34%, p < 0.001), and all public places (93% vs. 51%, p < 0.001) when compared to current smokers. In comparison with students who had not received training on the importance of asking patients about their smoking habits, those that did were more likely to believe that nurses should have a role in smoking cessation and should act as role models for their patients. Resources should be invested in improving the quality of undergraduate education in nursing departments in Greece with respect to tobacco control and smoking cessation.

  13. Spiritual care as perceived by Lithuanian student nurses and nurse educators: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklikiene, Olga; Vozgirdiene, Inga; Karosas, Laima M; Lazenby, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Political restrictions during 50years of Soviet occupation discouraged expressions of spirituality among Lithuanians. The aim of this paper is to describe Lithuanian nursing educators' and students' perception of spiritual care in a post-Soviet context. This cross-sectional study was carried out among student nurses and nursing educators at three universities and six colleges in Lithuania. The questionnaire developed by Scott (1959) and supplemented by Martin Johnson (1983) was distributed to 316 nursing students in the 3rd and 4th years of studies and 92 nurse educators (N=408). Student nurses and their educators rated general and professional values of religiousness equally; although students tended to dislike atheistic behavior more than educators. Four main categories associated with perceptions of spirituality in nursing care emerged from the student nurses: attributes of spiritual care, advantages of spiritual care, religiousness in spiritual care, and nurse-patient collaboration and communication. Themes from nurse educators paralleled the same first three themes but not the last one. Student nurses and nurse educators acknowledged the importance of spiritual care for patients as well as for care providers - nurses. In many cases spiritual care was defined by nursing students and nurse educators as faith and religiousness. Being a religious person, both for students and educators, or having spiritual aspects in students' personal lives influenced the perception of religious reflection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A national survey of nurse training: Confidence and competence in educating patients commencing methotrexate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sandra; Hassell, Andrew; Ryan, Sarah; Adams, Nicola; Walker, David

    2017-09-01

    Methotrexate is routinely used to treat active disease in inflammatory arthritis. There have previously been patient safety concerns associated with methotrexate usage in practice. Most patients commencing methotrexate treatment are seen by the rheumatology nurse, to receive education (often referred to as drug counselling) on this agent prior to starting treatment. Yet, there are no recommended criteria regarding education or experience to ensure minimum competence of the rheumatology nurse. The objectives of the present survey were, firstly, to identify the relevant training experience of rheumatology nurses who provide methotrexate education and, secondly, to explore their confidence and competence in undertaking this role. A national electronic survey of rheumatology nurses, identified via the Royal College of Nursing Rheumatology Forum, national meetings and personal contacts, in order to access nurses who counsel patients on methotrexate, was carried out. A total of 104 nurses completed the survey. Reported training was highly variable, ranging from very little to having undertaken MSc courses. Knowledge of the drug was rated as the most important requirement. Confidence was largely very good and was reported to develop with experience, with 80% of participants reporting being confident after 1 year in the role. A small number of participants (four) indicated that they were 'not at all confident'. Aspects of competence and knowledge were assessed using questions on clinical situations; knowledge appeared to be good, with the exception of a question on shingles. Confidence correlated with knowledge (r = 0.21; p = 0.05), amount of training (r = 0.24; p = 0.03) and most strongly with time in the role (r = 0.74; p = 0.00001). The amount of training correlated with confidence but not with knowledge. All participants used written information, often using more than one source, with 87% of participants favouring the Arthritis Research UK information leaflet on

  15. Use of Evidence-Based Practice in School Nursing: Survey of School Nurses at a National Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Primary and acute care settings are the focus of a concerted effort to implement evidence-based practice (EBP) in health care; yet, little attention has been given to use of EBP among school nurses. The aims of this study were to (a) describe current use of EBP among school nurses attending a national school nurse conference, (b) describe…

  16. Trends in the nursing doctoral comprehensive examination process: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawn, Barbara E; Goldberg, Shari

    2012-01-01

    The doctoral comprehensive or qualifying examination (CE/QE) is a traditional rite of passage into the community of scholars for the nursing profession. This exploratory, descriptive cross-sectional study examined trends in the process, timing, and methodology of comprehensive and qualifying examinations in nursing doctoral programs in the United States. Administrators from 45 schools responded to an online survey from 27 states across the country (37% response rate). Participants reported wide variations in the process. The most common method of implementation was the written take-home test (47%), two thirds of which had a subsequent oral examination. Eleven survey respondents (24%) reported using a form of the traditional written, timed, on-site examination; however, only 4 of these also followed up with an oral defense. Nine schools (20%) moved to a requirement for a written publishable paper; three schools consider the written proposal and its defense as the CE/QE. Approximately half had changed their policy in the past 5 years. With the increase in nursing doctor of philosophy programs over the past decade, information is needed to facilitate the development of methods to achieve program outcomes. An understanding of national CE/QE trends can provide a starting point for discussion and allow innovative ideas to meet the need of individual programs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nurses' caring and empathy in Jordanian psychiatric hospitals: A national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadidi, Majdi M B; Abdalrahim, Maysoon S; Al-Hussami, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    Nurses working in psychiatric hospitals need to acquire the skills of therapeutic communication and empathy, and have higher levels of caring. The present study aims to investigate the level of caring and empathy among nurses working in psychiatric hospitals. A cross-sectional survey was utilized to collect data from 205 nurses recruited from three psychiatric hospitals in Jordan. The Background Information Questionnaire, Modified Caring Dimensions Inventory, and Toronto Empathy Questionnaire were administered to the recruited participants. The findings revealed that the sampled nurses had a high level of caring and empathy. Significant correlations were found between caring and having a specialized training in mental health nursing, and having organizational and managerial support. However, no significant correlations were found between empathy and participants' characteristics. Specialized training in mental health nursing, having organizational and managerial support, and empathy were found predictors for caring. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  18. Infection Prevention and Control Programs in United States Nursing Homes: Results of a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Carolyn T. A.; Stone, Patricia W.; Castle, Nicholas; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Larson, Elaine L.; Dick, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to (1) obtain a national perspective of the current state of nursing home (NH) infection prevention and control (IPC) programs and (2) examine differences in IPC program characteristics for NHs that had and had not received an infection control deficiency citation. Design A national cross-sectional survey of randomly sampled NHs was conducted and responses were linked with Certification and Survey Provider Enhanced Reporting (CASPER) and NH Compare data. Setting Surveys were completed and returned by 990 NHs (response rate 39%) between December 2013 and December 2014. Participants The person in charge of the IPC program at each NH completed the survey. Measurements The survey consisted of 34 items related to respondent demographics, IPC program staffing, stability of the workforce, resources and challenges, and resident care and employee processes. Facility characteristics and infection control deficiency citations were assessed using CASPER and NH Compare data. Results Most respondents had at least two responsibilities in addition to those related to infection control (54%) and had no specific IPC training (61%). While many practices and processes were consistent with infection prevention guidelines for NHs, there was wide variation in programs across the US. About 36% of responding facilities had received an infection control deficiency citation. NHs that received citations had infection control professionals with less experience (P = .01) and training (P = .02) and were less likely to provide financial resources for continuing education in infection control (P = .01). Conclusion The findings demonstrate that a lack of adequately trained infection prevention personnel is an important area for improvement. Furthermore, there is a need to identify specific evidence-based practices to reduce infection risk in NHs. PMID:26712489

  19. A national survey examining the professional work life of today's nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Gutierrez, Antonio; Keating, Sarah

    2013-08-01

    To examine factors that influence faculty member's work life in order to provide a supportive environment for recruiting and retaining nursing faculty. A cross-sectional non-experimental design incorporating correlation-based analyses gathered from a 45-item online survey. The survey gauged several aspects of the nurse faculty work life, including teaching competence, productivity, and organizational support. US nurse faculty employed at either a CCNE or NLNAC accredited nursing program. A stepwise linear regression analysis was conducted to ascertain which aspects of work life significantly predicted nurse faculty members' intent to stay or leave the faculty role. A one-way ANOVA examined whether faculty members' intent to stay or leave the faculty role varied as a function of generation. Data from 808 useable surveys demonstrated that perceptions of administration's support for faculty improvement, perceptions of productivity, choice of pursuing a professional career in nursing, and the application of perceived teaching expertise significantly predicted faculty members' intent to stay or leave the faculty role. Moreover, generational membership influenced faculty members' intent to stay or leave the faculty role. Academic nurse administrators can positively affect the work life of their faculty and their intent to stay in the organization through support for the development of teaching and research roles with time and resources, recognition of faculty efforts, consideration of faculty needs from individual and generational perspectives, and targeted mentoring for career development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Violence-Related Content in the Nursing Curriculum: A Follow-up National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodtli, M. Anne; Breslin, Eileen T.

    2002-01-01

    A 1999 survey of 408 nursing programs followed up on a 1995 survey (n=298). Most current respondents included content on abuse of women, children, and the elderly; 63% reported no faculty development on violence issues; 67% had not evaluated violence-related curriculum since 1995; only 39% felt that the curriculum adequately addressed violence,…

  1. Association of faculty perceptions of work-life with emotional exhaustion and intent to leave academic nursing: report on a national survey of nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedidia, Michael J; Chou, Jolene; Brownlee, Susan; Flynn, Linda; Tanner, Christine A

    2014-10-01

    The current and projected nurse faculty shortage threatens the capacity to educate sufficient numbers of nurses for meeting demand. As part of an initiative to foster strategies for expanding educational capacity, a survey of a nationally representative sample of 3,120 full-time nurse faculty members in 269 schools and programs that offered at least one prelicensure degree program was conducted. Nearly 4 of 10 participants reported high levels of emotional exhaustion, and one third expressed an intent to leave academic nursing within 5 years. Major contributors to burnout were dissatisfaction with workload and perceived inflexibility to balance work and family life. Intent to leave was explained not only by age but by several potentially modifiable aspects of work, including dissatisfaction with workload, salary, and availability of teaching support. Preparing sufficient numbers of nurses to meet future health needs will require addressing those aspects of work-life that undermine faculty teaching capacity. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Professional and academic destination of masters in nursing graduates: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennan, Jonathan

    2008-08-01

    Master's degrees, especially in the form of coursework master's programmes are becoming the main conduit for continuing professional education to the professions. However, there is a paucity of literature on the academic or professional destination of nurses following the completion of master's degrees in nursing. A cross-sectional postal survey of 322 graduates from masters in nursing programmes in Ireland was undertaken. Former students were surveyed regarding their professional and academic destinations subsequent to graduation. The majority of graduates were employed in clinical nursing followed by a substantial number working in the area of nurse education, mainly at the grade of college lecturer. The vast majority of graduates had achieved promotional grades following the master's degree. A minority of graduates indicated a desire to undertake further study at degree level. Those that did were following or intended to follow PhD level studies. However, the majority of graduates did not view the degree as a pathway to a PhD but as an integral part of their continuing professional education and related to clinical practice. There is a reversal of the trend seen in Ireland and the UK in the mid to late 1990s in which the majority of graduates followed career pathways in nurse education. Although there has been an increase in the number of nurses completing master's level education over the last five years unemployment of underemployment of graduates is not yet an issue.

  3. What predicts nurse faculty members' intent to stay in the academic organization? A structural equation model of a national survey of nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Gutierrez, Antonio P; Keating, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relations among several factors regarding the academic context within a nationally representative sample of U.S. nursing faculty. Correlational design using structural equation modeling to explore the predictive nature of several factors related to the academic organization and the work life of nursing faculty. A survey was used to evaluate several aspects of the work life of U.S. nursing faculty members. Nursing faculty members in academic organizations across the U.S. serving at either CCNE- or NLNAC-accredited institutions of higher education. Standard confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the validity of a proposed measurement model, and structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the validity of a structural/latent variable model. Several direct and indirect effects were observed among the factors under investigation. Of special importance, perceptions of nurse administration's support and perceived teaching expertise positively predicted U.S. nursing faculty members' intent to stay in the academic organization. Understanding the way that nursing faculty members' perceptions of the various factors common to the academic context interact with intent to stay in the academic organization is essential for faculty and nursing administrators. This information can assist administrators in obtaining more resources for faculty development to lobby for additional faculty in order to meet the teaching, research, and service missions of the organization; and to personalize relationships with individual faculty members to understand their needs and acknowledge their efforts. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Consumer participation in nurse education: a national survey of Australian universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Platania-Phung, Chris; Byrne, Louise; Wynaden, Dianne; Martin, Graham; Harris, Scott

    2015-04-01

    Consumers of mental health services have an important role to play in the higher education of nursing students, by facilitating understanding of the experience of mental illness and instilling a culture of consumer participation. Yet the level of consumer participation in mental health nursing programmes in Australia is not known. The aim of the present study was to scope the level and nature of involvement of consumers in mental health nursing higher education in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken involving an internet survey of nurse academics who coordinate mental health nursing programmes in universities across Australia, representing 32 universities. Seventy-eight percent of preregistration and 75% of post-registration programmes report involving consumers. Programmes most commonly had one consumer (25%) and up to five. Face-to-face teaching, curriculum development, and membership-to-programme committees were the most regular types of involvement. The content was generally codeveloped by consumers and nurse academics (67.5%). The frequency of consumer involvement in the education of nursing students in Australia is surprisingly high. However, involvement is noticeably variable across types of activity (e.g. curriculum development, assessment), and tends to be minimal and ad hoc. Future research is required into the drivers of increased consumer involvement.

  5. National Survey of Genetics Content in Basic Nursing Preparatory Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetteberg, Carol G.; Prows, Cynthia A.; Deets, Carol; Monsen, Rita B.; Kenner, Carole A.

    1999-01-01

    A sample of 879 basic nursing programs was used to identify the type and amount of genetics content in curricula. Recommendations were made for increasing genetics content as a result of the synthesis of the survey data with previously collected data. (25 references) (Author/JOW)

  6. The Current State of U.S. Geropsychiatric Graduate Nursing Education: Results of the National Geropsychiatric Graduate Nursing Education Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Caroline E; Harris, Melodee; Buron, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) must be prepared to care for the rapidly increasing numbers of older adults with mental health needs. All 363 graduate nursing programs in the United States were surveyed regarding the nature and extent of geropsychiatric nursing (GPN) content across program curricula and their perceptions of the influence that the APRN Consensus Model has exerted on preparing the next generation of APRNs to meet the growing needs of the older adult population. Of the 202 schools responding, 138 reported GPN content in one or more clinical programs, with the majority of content in non-PMHNP programs. Only 17 schools reported offering a GPN program, track, or minor. The majority of schools (n = 169) perceived that they were adequately well-prepared to meet the APRN Consensus Model's guidelines regarding inclusion of aging-related didactic and clinical educational experiences in all APRN education programs; nearly two thirds (n = 132) perceived a moderate to significant influence of the Consensus Model on institutional infusion of GPN into curricula. Compared with a similar survey 10 years ago, there was little change in the proportion of schools reporting GPN in clinical programs and few schools provide GPN programs, tracks, or minors. Implications for nursing education and practice are discussed.

  7. [National survey on the application of the reform of the state-registered nurse diploma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguillon, Dominique

    2013-05-01

    Following its first national enquiry, the French Directorate General for Health (DGOS) presents here its findings on the reform of the nurse training which focuses on four main areas: partnership with universities, pedagogical content and methods, work placement resources, attribution of European credits.

  8. Nurses' working tasks and MSDs back symptoms: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serranheira, Florentino; Cotrim, Teresa; Rodrigues, Victor; Nunes, Carla; Sousa-Uva, António

    2012-01-01

    Healthcare workers, namely registered nurses (RN), are frequently exposed to work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSDs) risk factors. Identifying the symptoms of these disorders is one of the first epidemiological steps to managing them. This study aims to identify WRMSDs prevalence symptoms in Portuguese RN. During 8 months (2010-2011) the National Public Health School and the Portuguese Registered Nurses Board made a call to all RN to answer an online WRMSDs questionnaire. Respondents (n=2140) are mostly females (77.4%) and work mainly in hospitals (n=1396) and in primary healthcare centers (n=421). Results show high symptoms prevalence (last 12 months) in the lower back (60.6%), the upper back (44.5%), and the neck (48.6%). Nurses' activity, especially patient hygiene in bed, is a strong contributor (p>0.05) to pain in the upper back (OR=1.39 [1.09-1.80]) and lower back (OR=1.4 [1.08-1.84]). Patient holdup without mechanical support has the highest relationship (p>0.05) between work tasks and symptoms in the last 12 months in the upper back (OR=1.50 [1.19-1.90]). Prevalence rates of WRMSDs symptoms in Portuguese nurses are no different from other studies with Swedish, Italian and Greek nurses. Maybe changes in healthcare systems didn't change the way care is delivered and we must rethink how to prevent nurses WRMSDs.

  9. The preparedness of schools to respond to emergencies in children: a national survey of school nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olympia, Robert P; Wan, Eric; Avner, Jeffrey R

    2005-12-01

    Because children spend a significant proportion of their day in school, pediatric emergencies such as the exacerbation of medical conditions, behavioral crises, and accidental/intentional injuries are likely to occur. Recently, both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association have published guidelines stressing the need for school leaders to establish emergency-response plans to deal with life-threatening medical emergencies in children. The goals include developing an efficient and effective campus-wide communication system for each school with local emergency medical services (EMS); establishing and practicing a medical emergency-response plan (MERP) involving school nurses, physicians, athletic trainers, and the EMS system; identifying students at risk for life-threatening emergencies and ensuring the presence of individual emergency care plans; training staff and students in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR); equipping the school for potential life-threatening emergencies; and implementing lay rescuer automated external defibrillator (AED) programs. The objective of this study was to use published guidelines by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association to examine the preparedness of schools to respond to pediatric emergencies, including those involving children with special care needs, and potential mass disasters. A 2-part questionnaire was mailed to 1000 randomly selected members of the National Association of School Nurses. The first part included 20 questions focusing on: (1) the clinical background of the school nurse (highest level of education, years practicing as a school health provider, CPR training); (2) demographic features of the school (student attendance, grades represented, inner-city or rural/suburban setting, private or public funding, presence of children with special needs); (3) self-reported frequency of medical and psychiatric emergencies (most common reported school

  10. CPT coding patterns at nurse-managed health centers: data from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonderheid, Susan C; Pohl, Joanne M; Tanner, Clare; Newland, Jamesetta A; Gans, Dave N

    2009-01-01

    Nurse-managed health centers (NMHCs) play an important role in delivering health care services to a wide range of communities and often serve as our nation's safety net providers. Unfortunately, NMHCs struggle to remain in business for a variety of reasons, including underdeveloped business practices. Until now, NMHCs had only data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Medical Group Management Assocation for comparison with coding patterns in individual centers. This article is the first published report of national data for NMHCs that is available for comparison. Providers need to possess financial acumen to remain open for business. Assessment of CPT coding patterns is a key strategy to support long-term sustainability.

  11. Are nursing students engaged in learning? A secondary analysis of data from the National Survey of Student Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popkess, Ann M; McDaniel, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in higher education supports the practice of active learning as a method of promoting student engagement among college students that has positive effects on problem solving, critical thinking, and persistence. No studies have been reported that evaluate the undergraduate nursing students' level of engagement in college compared with other majors. The purpose of this study was to determine if differences exist between levels of nursing students' engagement and those of education and other health professional students as measured by the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). The NSSE is a self-reporting instrument consisting of 70 items measuring level of academic challenge; student interactions with faculty; supportiveness of the campus environment; participation in active and collaborative learning; and enriching educational experiences. Using a descriptive, correlation design, the study incorporated a secondary analysis of NSSE data collected from freshmen and seniors during 2003. Selected demographic data (freshman or senior status) and NSSE data measuring five benchmarks of engagement were analyzed using ANOVA and t-tests to determine relationships. Freshmen were found to be less engaged than seniors on four of five benchmarks. Nursing and other health profession majors perceived themselves to be significantly less engaged in active and collaborative learning than education majors. Nursing students perceived themselves as significantly more academically challenged than their peers in education and other health professions. Results indicate that although nursing students are engaged in rigorous curricula, they do not perceive themselves to be engaged in student-centered and interactive pedagogies. Implications for further research exploring potential barriers surrounding active and collaborative learning strategies are discussed.

  12. Assessing abortion coverage in nurse practitioner programs in Canada: a national survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinfeld, Lindsay; Arnott, Grady; El-Haddad, Julie; Foster, Angel M

    2016-11-01

    Although nurse practitioners (NPs) play a critical role in the delivery of reproductive health services in Canada, there is a paucity of published information regarding the reproductive health education provided in their training programs. Our study aimed to understand better the didactic and curricular coverage of abortion in Canadian NP programs. In 2014, we conducted a 3-contact, bilingual (English-French) mailed survey to assess the coverage of, time dedicated to and barriers to inclusion of 17 different areas of reproductive health, including abortion. We also asked respondents to speculate on whether or not mifepristone would be incorporated into the curriculum if approved by Health Canada for early abortion. We analyzed our results with descriptive statistics and used inductive techniques to analyze the open-ended questions for content and themes. Sixteen of 23 (70%) program directors or their designees returned our survey. In general, abortion-related topics received less coverage than contraception, ectopic pregnancy management and miscarriage management. Fifty-six percent of respondents reported that their program did not offer information about first-trimester abortion procedures and/or post-abortion care in the didactic curriculum. Respondents expressed interest in incorporating mifepristone/misoprostol into NP education and training. Reproductive health issues receive uneven and often inadequate curricular coverage in Canadian NP programs. Identifying avenues to expand education and training on abortion appears warranted. Embarking on curricular reform efforts is especially important given the upcoming introduction of mifepristone into the Canadian health system for early abortion. Our findings draw attention to the need to integrate abortion-related content into NP education and training programs. The approval of Mifegymiso® may provide a window of opportunity to engage in curriculum reform efforts across the health professions in Canada. Copyright

  13. The presence of resilience is associated with a healthier psychological profile in intensive care unit (ICU) nurses: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealer, Meredith; Jones, Jacqueline; Newman, Julia; McFann, Kim K; Rothbaum, Barbara; Moss, Marc

    2012-03-01

    ICU nurses are repeatedly exposed to work related stresses resulting in the development of psychological disorders including posttraumatic stress disorder and burnout syndrome. Resilience is a learnable multidimensional characteristic enabling one to thrive in the face of adversity. In a national survey, we sought to determine whether resilience was associated with healthier psychological profiles in intensive care unit nurses. Surveys were mailed to 3500 randomly selected ICU nurses across the United States and included: demographic questions, the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Overall, 1239 of the mailed surveys were returned for a response rate of 35%, and complete data was available on a total of 744 nurses. Twenty-two percent of the intensive care unit nurses were categorized as being highly resilient. The presence of high resilience in these nurses was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder, symptoms of anxiety or depression, and burnout syndrome (resilience was independently associated with a lower prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (presilience was independently associated with a lower prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and burnout syndrome in intensive care unit nurses. Future research is needed to better understand coping mechanisms employed by highly resilient nurses and how they maintain a healthier psychological profile. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality indicators in Swedish stroke wards: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persenius, Mona; Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Carlsson, Eva

    2015-09-01

    To describe nursing leaders' perceptions of nutrition quality in Swedish stroke wards. A high risk of undernutrition places great demand on nutritional care in stroke wards. Evidence-based guidelines exist, but healthcare professionals have reported low interest in nutritional care. The Donabedian framework of structure, process and outcome is recommended to monitor and improve nutrition quality. Using a descriptive cross-sectional design, a web-based questionnaire regarding nutritional care quality was delivered to eligible participants. Most clinical nursing leaders reported structure indicators, e.g. access to dieticians. Among process indicators, regular assessment of patients' swallowing was most frequently reported in comprehensive stroke wards compared with other stroke wards. Use of outcomes to monitor nutrition quality was not routine. Wards using standard care plans showed significantly better results. Using the structure, process and outcome framework to examine nutrition quality, quality-improvement needs became visible. To provide high-quality nutrition, all three structure, process and outcome components must be addressed. The use of care pathways, standard care plans, the Senior Alert registry, as well as systematic use of outcome measures could improve nutrition quality. To assist clinical nursing leaders in managing all aspects of quality, structure, process and outcome can be a valuable framework. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Neutral to positive views on the consequences of nurse prescribing: results of a national survey among registered nurses, nurse specialists and physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Rond, M. de; Veer, A.J.E. de; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over the last two decades, the number of countries where nurses are legally permitted to prescribe medication has grown considerably. A lack of peer support and/or objections by physicians can act as factors hampering nurse prescribing. Earlier research suggests that physicians are gener

  16. Neutral to positive views on the consequences of nurse prescribing: results of a national survey among registered nurses, nurse specialists and physicians.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroezen, M.; Dijk, L. van; Groenewegen, P.P.; Rond, M. de; Veer, A.J.E. de; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Over the last two decades, the number of countries where nurses are legally permitted to prescribe medication has grown considerably. A lack of peer support and/or objections by physicians can act as factors hampering nurse prescribing. Earlier research suggests that physicians are gener

  17. Patient survey (HCAHPS) - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The national average for the HCAHPS survey categories. HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients about their experiences during a recent...

  18. French district nurses' opinions towards euthanasia, involvement in end‐of‐life care and nurse–patient relationship: a national phone survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiane, M‐K; Galinier, A; Favre, R; Ribiere, C; Lapiana, J‐M; Obadia, Y; Peretti‐Watel, P

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To assess French district nurses' opinions towards euthanasia and to study factors associated with these opinions, with emphasis on attitudes towards terminal patients. Design and setting An anonymous telephone survey carried out in 2005 among a national random sample of French district nurses. Participants District nurses currently delivering home care who have at least 1 year of professional experience. Of 803 district nurses contacted, 602 agreed to participate (response rate 75%). Main outcome measures Opinion towards the legalisation of euthanasia (on a five‐point Likert scale from “strongly agree” to “strongly disagree”), attitudes towards terminal patients (discussing end‐of‐life issues with them, considering they should be told their prognosis, valuing the role of advance directives and surrogates). Results Overall, 65% of the 602 nurses favoured legalising euthanasia. Regarding associated factors, this proportion was higher among those who discuss end‐of‐life issues with terminal patients (70%), who consider competent patients should always be told their prognosis (81%) and who value the role of advance directives and surrogates in end‐of‐life decision‐making for incompetent patients (68% and 77% respectively). Women and older nurses were less likely to favour legalising euthanasia, as were those who believed in a god who masters their destiny. Conclusions French nurses are more in favour of legalising euthanasia than French physicians; these two populations contrast greatly in the factors associated with this support. Further research is needed to investigate how and to what extent such attitudes may affect nursing practice and emotional well‐being in the specific context of end‐of‐life home care. PMID:18055901

  19. 77 FR 68134 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request (30-day): National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ...): National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics Institute Alumni Survey SUMMARY: Under the... publication. Proposed Collection: National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) Summer Genetics...

  20. Educational support for research utilization and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills: a national survey of senior nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florin, Jan; Ehrenberg, Anna; Wallin, Lars; Gustavsson, Petter

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate Swedish university nursing students' experience of educational support for research utilization and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills. Nursing programmes are offered at 26 universities in Sweden and even though there are common regulations for nursing education at the national level, substantial variations are found in local curricula. Little is known about students' capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills, particularly in comparison across universities. A cross-sectional survey design using self-administered postal questionnaires was conducted in 2006. A total of 1440 students (from 26 different universities) participated, constituting 68% of the national population of nursing students in their 6th and final semester. Campus education supported the students to a greater extent than clinical education in following the development of knowledge in an area of interest, using research findings, and acquiring knowledge on how to pursue changes in clinical practice. Perceived support during campus education varied between universities. Students reported high capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills, but large differences were found between universities for: stating a searchable question, seeking out relevant knowledge and critically appraising and compiling best knowledge. The identified differences between universities concerning the students' perceived support for research utilization and their capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills have implications for curricula, pedagogical perspectives in nursing education and the potential to implement evidence-based practice in healthcare settings. Further studies are warranted to investigate students' individual characteristics and organizational characteristics as determinants of research utilization support and capability beliefs regarding evidence-based practice skills. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of

  1. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guest C

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Charlotte Guest,1 Fabian Sobotka,2 Athina Karavasopoulou,3 Stephen Ward,3 Carsten Bantel4,5 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK; 2Division of Epidemiology and Biometry, Department of Health Services Research, Faculty 6, Medicine and Health Sciences, Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Oldenburg, Germany; 3Pain Service, Barts Health, St Bartholomew’s Hospital, London, UK; 4Department of Anaesthesiology, Intensive Care, Emergency Medicine and Pain Therapy, Oldenburg University, Klinikum Oldenburg Campus, Oldenburg, Germany; 5Department of Surgery and Cancer, Anaesthetics Section, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK Objective: Pain remains insufficiently treated in hospitals. Increasing evidence suggests human factors contribute to this, due to nurses failing to administer opioids. This behavior might be the consequence of nurses’ mental models about opioids. As personal experience and conceptions shape these models, the aim of this prospective survey was to identify model-influencing factors. Material and methods: A questionnaire was developed comprising of 14 statements concerning ideations about opioids and seven questions concerning demographics, indicators of adult learning, and strength of religious beliefs. Latent variables that may underlie nurses’ mental models were identified using undirected graphical dependence models. Representative items of latent variables were employed for ordinal regression analysis. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,379 nurses in two London, UK, hospitals (n=580 and one German (n=799 hospital between September 2014 and February 2015. Results: A total of 511 (37.1% questionnaires were returned. Mean (standard deviation age of participants were 37 (11 years; 83.5% participants were female; 45.2% worked in critical care; and 51.5% had more than 10 years experience. Of the nurses, 84% were not scared of opioids, 87

  2. Relationships among moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave of nurse practitioners in emergency departments: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Jennifer; Epstein, Elizabeth; Rovnyak, Virginia; Snyder, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this research study were to investigate moral distress among emergency department (ED) nurse practitioners (NPs) and examine relationships between moral distress and level of practice independence as well as intent to leave a position. Moral distress has been studied regarding registered nurses and physicians (MDs) but less so in NPs. It is important to explore moral distress in NPs because they tread a unique path between nursing and physician roles. Moral distress may play a significant role in staff nurses' intention to leave practice, and level of practice independence is found to have a relationship with NPs' intention to leave. A convenience sample of ED NPs was obtained from a mailing list of a national nursing specialty organization, the Emergency Nurses Association. Using a correlational design, survey methods assessed moral distress with the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R), level of practice independence with the Dempster Practice Behavior Scale, and intent to leave with self-report. Correlational and regression analyses of data were conducted to characterize moral distress among ED NPs and associations between moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave. Results found ED NPs do experience moral distress with poor patient care results from inadequate staff communication and working with incompetent coworkers in their practice. The MDS-R was a significant predictor of intention to leave among respondents. This study is the first of its kind to explore moral distress in ED NPs. Results suggest moral distress influences ED NPs' intent to leave their position. Further studies are needed to explore the findings from this research and to formulate interventions to alleviate moral distress in ED NPs and improve retention in the clinical setting.

  3. Nurses and opioids: results of a bi-national survey on mental models regarding opioid administration in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, Charlotte; Sobotka, Fabian; Karavasopoulou, Athina; Ward, Stephen; Bantel, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    Objective Pain remains insufficiently treated in hospitals. Increasing evidence suggests human factors contribute to this, due to nurses failing to administer opioids. This behavior might be the consequence of nurses’ mental models about opioids. As personal experience and conceptions shape these models, the aim of this prospective survey was to identify model-influencing factors. Material and methods A questionnaire was developed comprising of 14 statements concerning ideations about opioids and seven questions concerning demographics, indicators of adult learning, and strength of religious beliefs. Latent variables that may underlie nurses’ mental models were identified using undirected graphical dependence models. Representative items of latent variables were employed for ordinal regression analysis. Questionnaires were distributed to 1,379 nurses in two London, UK, hospitals (n=580) and one German (n=799) hospital between September 2014 and February 2015. Results A total of 511 (37.1%) questionnaires were returned. Mean (standard deviation) age of participants were 37 (11) years; 83.5% participants were female; 45.2% worked in critical care; and 51.5% had more than 10 years experience. Of the nurses, 84% were not scared of opioids, 87% did not regard opioids as drugs to help patients die, and 72% did not view them as drugs of abuse. More English (41%) than German (28%) nurses were afraid of criminal investigations and were constantly aware of side effects (UK, 94%; Germany, 38%) when using opioids. Four latent variables were identified which likely influence nurses’ mental models: “conscious decision-making”; “medication-related fears”; “practice-based observations”; and “risk assessment”. They were predicted by strength of religious beliefs and indicators of informal learning such as experience but not by indicators of formal learning such as conference attendance. Conclusion Nurses in both countries employ analytical and affective mental

  4. What patient problems nurses encounter, and which of these can they influence? A nation-wide questionnaire survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, R; Francke, A.L.; Delnoij, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to enhance the nursing profession and its scientific foundation, nurses need to demonstrate how they contribute to quality of care and good outcomes in their patients. This requires systematic, standardized data collection about patient problems, nursing interventions and patient outcomes. However, currently little is known about which patient problems nurses encounter in daily practice, how they help their patients in dealing with these problems, and with which result. A...

  5. National Health Interview Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States...

  6. The psychometric testing of the Nursing Teamwork Survey in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragadóttir, Helga; Kalisch, Beatrice J; Smáradóttir, Sigríður Bríet; Jónsdóttir, Heiður Hrund

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic (NTS-Icelandic), which was translated from US English to Icelandic. The Nursing Teamwork Survey, with 33 items, measures overall teamwork and five factors of teamwork: trust, team orientation, backup, shared mental models, and team leadership. The psychometric testing of the NTS-Icelandic was carried out on data from a pilot study and a national study. The sample for a pilot study included 123 nursing staff from five units, and the sample for a national study included 925 nursing staff from 27 inpatient units. The overall test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient in the pilot study was 0.693 (lower bound = 0.498, upper bound = 0.821) (p teamwork. The NTS-Icelandic tested valid and reliable in this study. Study findings support further use of the Nursing Teamwork Survey internationally.

  7. Hospital organizational factors influence work-family conflict in registered nurses: Multilevel modeling of a nation-wide cross-sectional survey in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leineweber, C; Chungkham, H S; Westerlund, H; Tishelman, C; Lindqvist, R

    2014-05-01

    The present shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in many European countries is expected to continue and worsen, which poses a substantial threat to the maintenance of healthcare in this region. Work-family conflict is a known risk factor for turnover and sickness absence. This paper empirically examines whether the nurse practice environment is associated with experienced work-family conflict. A multilevel model was fit with the individual RN at the 1st, and the hospital department at the 2nd level using cross-sectional RN survey data from the Swedish part of RN4CAST, an EU 7th framework project. The data analyzed here is based on a national sample of 8356 female and 592 male RNs from 369 hospital departments. We found that 6% of the variability in work-family conflict experienced by RNs was at the department level. Organizational level factors significantly accounted for most of the variability at this level with two of the work practice environment factors examined, staffing adequacy and nurse involvement in hospital affairs, significantly related to work-family conflict. Due to the design of the study, factors on ward and work group levels could not be analyzed, but are likely to account for additional variance which in the present analysis appears to be on the individual level, with private life factors likely explaining another major part. These results suggest that higher level organizational factors in health care have a significant impact on the risk of work-family conflict among RNs through their impact on the nurse practice environment. Lower level organizational factors should be investigated in future studies using hierarchical multilevel sampling. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. French District Nurses' Opinions towards Euthanasia, Involvement in End-of-Life Care and Nurse: Patient Relationship: A National Phone Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M-K. Bendiane; A. Galinier; R. Favre; C. Ribiere; J-M. Lapiana; Y. Obadia; P. Peretti-Watel

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To assess French district nurses' opinions towards euthanasia and to study factors associated with these opinions, with emphasis on attitudes towards terminal patients. Design and setting...

  9. Surveys and questionnaires in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-06-17

    Surveys and questionnaires are often used in nursing research to elicit the views of large groups of people to develop the nursing knowledge base. This article provides an overview of survey and questionnaire use in nursing research, clarifies the place of the questionnaire as a data collection tool in quantitative research design and provides information and advice about best practice in the development of quantitative surveys and questionnaires.

  10. Organisational climate, biographical factors, and job satisfaction : a national survey of nurses in the Republic of Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Elizabeth Ann

    2005-01-01

    Background and Justification for the Study: This study grew out of a longstanding interest in job satisfaction and its relationship with organisational climate. Several research studies have demonstrated the importance of employee job satisfaction. There is, however, a general consensus in the literature on nursing that job satisfaction among nurses is relatively low. The effects of biographical factors, such as age and gender, on job satisfaction have been examined in previous studies but th...

  11. Nationwide survey on the introduction of nursing diagnosis at nursing schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oya, Nobuko; Kawaharada, Eiko; Kozawa, Yukie; Takeshita, Mieko

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a nationwide survey to grasp the current status of the introduction of nursing diagnosis at nursing schools. This survey showed that there was a gap in awareness between hospitals [1], which require nursing diagnosis skills, and nursing schools, more than half of which do not teach nursing diagnosis. The survey thus demonstrated the importance of collaborations and information sharing in nursing education.

  12. 2016 Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce Survey: Report of Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staebler, Suzanne; Bissinger, Robin

    2017-10-01

    The National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners (NANNP) conducted its second workforce survey of certified neonatal nurse practitioners in the fall of 2016. National Association of Neonatal Nurse Practitioners partnered with the National Certification Corporation and the American Association of Nurse Practitioners to conduct this electronic survey, containing 69 questions and focusing on practice sites and total compensation packages (including benefits) and workforce deficits.Findings indicate a rising neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs) position vacancy rate across the country. Regional salary data indicated that the southeast had lower compensation rates for NNPs, with regions 4 and 11 (South) having the lowest rates. A promising trend indicated that new graduate NNPs with a doctorate are earning more. The study findings indicate that tailoring benefit packages to the age and years of experience for the individual NNP may aid in recruiting and retaining NNPs in practice. For experienced NNPs, altered shift lengths (shorter), higher employer matching rates in retirement plans, and less employee cost sharing for health insurance benefits are more appealing strategies.It is critical for NNPs to continually evaluate the profession's workforce data. There are more than 205,000 nurse practitioners practicing in the United States, with neonatal NPs making up approximately 3% of the larger whole. Increased participation in future surveys will assist in creating sustainable solutions to the workforce crisis facing the profession.

  13. Nursing staff and euthanasia in the Netherlands. A nation-wide survey on attitudes and involvement in decision making and the performance of euthanasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francke, Anneke L; Albers, Gwenda; Bilsen, Johan; de Veer, Anke J E; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D

    2016-05-01

    To give insight into Dutch nursing staff's attitudes and involvement regarding euthanasia. The sample was recruited from a nation-wide existent research panel of registered nurses and certified nursing assistants. Descriptive analyses and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed. 587 respondents (response of 65%) completed the questionnaire. The majority (83%) state that physicians have to discuss the decision about euthanasia with the nurses involved. Besides, 69% state that a physician should discuss a euthanasia request with nurses who have regular contact with a patient. Nursing staff who have religious or other beliefs that they consider important for their attitude towards end-of-life decisions, and staff working in a hospital or home care, are most likely to have this opinion. Being present during the euthanasia is quite unusual: only a small group (7%) report that this has ever been the case in their entire working life. Seven% (incorrectly) think they are allowed to administer the lethal drugs. The majority want to be involved in decision-making processes about euthanasia. Not all are aware that they are not legally allowed to administer the lethal drugs. Nursing staff should be informed of relevant existing legislation and professional guidelines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Informed consent and nurses' roles: a survey of Indonesian practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilo, Astrid P; van Dalen, Jan; Chenault, Michelene N; Scherpbier, Albert

    2014-09-01

    In Southeast Asia, the process of obtaining informed consent is influenced by both culture and policy at the hospital and national level. Both physicians and nurses play vital roles in this process, but physicians influence the roles of nurses. Since the physicians and nurses often have different perspectives, it is important to investigate their views about the informed consent process and nurses' roles therein and whether there is a difference between ideal and experienced practice (reality), and whether this differs across hospitals. A questionnaire was developed and a survey was conducted among physicians and nurses. Using exploratory factor analysis a three factor structure was determined: 'nurses' roles', 'barriers in informed consent', and 'adequacy of information'. Non-parametric tests were applied to compare nurses and physicians, and hospital setting. Responses were obtained from 129 physicians and 616 nurses from two Indonesian hospitals. Those hospitals differ in ownership, location, and size. The study was reviewed by the hospital ethical committee. Participation was voluntary and confidentiality was ensured by keeping the responses anonymous. Physicians and nurses differ significantly on all three factors. The scores reflecting disparity between ideal and reality regarding nurses' roles varied across professions, while barriers in informed consent differed between hospitals. The differences between ideal and reality indicated that improvement in the informed consent process and nurses' roles therein is called for. Varying views between physicians and nurses on nurses' roles may hinder collaboration. The differences between hospital settings showed interventions may have to be customized for different settings. Views on nurses' roles vary across professions. Views on barriers in informed consent vary across hospitals. Therefore interprofessional education is needed to promote interprofessional collaboration and intervention to improve informed consent

  15. Alcohol education and training in pre-registration nursing: a national survey to determine curriculum content in the United Kingdom (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Aisha S; Webster, Brian J

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol-related harm impacts significantly on the health of the population. Nurses are often among the first health professionals that many patients with alcohol-related problems come into contact with and have been identified as playing a key role but may be ill-prepared to respond. Future nurses need to have the skills, knowledge and clinical confidence to respond to patients suffering from alcohol-related harm. A pre-registration curriculum that ensures a nursing workforce fit for practice in responding to alcohol-related harm is necessary. To determine the level of alcohol education and training content in the pre-registration curriculum for nursing in the United Kingdom (UK). To establish whether there are variations in the pre-registration curriculum content across the UK. A descriptive study. All 68 UK Higher Education Institutions offering a total of 111 pre-registration courses for nurses were invited to participate in the study. Twenty nine completed questionnaires were returned, a response rate of 26%. The largest number of identified responders were from England (n=15), with 3 from Scotland and 1 each from Wales and Northern Ireland. Nine Universities chose not to identify themselves. An online semi-structured questionnaire survey was used to collect the study data. Teaching of alcohol and alcohol related harm was mainly delivered during the second year of a pre-registration nursing programme provided mainly to adult and mental health students. Overall, the majority of alcohol related content that is provided within the responding pre-registration nursing courses relates to biophysiology, aetiology, and pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. This study highlights the need for a greater and more relevant focus of alcohol education to pre-registration nursing students of all fields of practice incorporating an integrated approach across all years of study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  17. Turnover, staffing, skill mix, and resident outcomes in a national sample of US nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkoff, Alison M; Han, Kihye; Storr, Carla L; Lerner, Nancy; Johantgen, Meg; Gartrell, Kyungsook

    2013-12-01

    The authors examined the relationship of staff turnover to selected nursing home quality outcomes, in the context of staffing and skill mix. Staff turnover is a serious concern in nursing homes as it has been found to adversely affect care. When employee turnover is minimized, better care quality is more likely in nursing homes. Data from the National Nursing Home Survey, a nationally representative sample of US nursing homes, were linked to Nursing Home Compare quality outcomes and analyzed using logistic regression. Nursing homes with high certified nursing assistant turnover had significantly higher odds of pressure ulcers, pain, and urinary tract infections even after controlling for staffing, skill mix, bed size, and ownership. Nurse turnover was associated with twice the odds of pressure ulcers, although this was attenuated when staffing was controlled. This study suggests turnover may be more important in explaining nursing home (NH) outcomes than staffing and skill mix and should therefore be given greater emphasis.

  18. Innovations in national nutrition surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Alison M; Mak, Tsz Ning; Fitt, Emily; Nicholson, Sonja; Roberts, Caireen; Sommerville, Jill

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe innovations taking place in national nutrition surveys in the UK and the challenges of undertaking innovations in such settings. National nutrition surveys must be representative of the overall population in characteristics such as socio-economic circumstances, age, sex and region. High response rates are critical. Dietary assessment innovations must therefore be suitable for all types of individuals, from the very young to the very old, for variable literacy and/or technical skills, different ethnic backgrounds and life circumstances, such as multiple carers and frequent travel. At the same time, national surveys need details on foods consumed. Current advances in dietary assessment use either technological innovations or simplified methods; neither lend themselves to national surveys. The National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS) rolling programme, and the Diet and Nutrition Survey of Infants and Young Children (DNSIYC), currently use the 4-d estimated diary, a compromise for detail and respondent burden. Collection of food packaging enables identification of specific products. Providing space for location of eating, others eating, the television being on and eating at a table, adds to eating context information. Disaggregation of mixed dishes enables determination of true intakes of meat and fruit and vegetables. Measurement of nutritional status requires blood sampling and processing in DNSIYC clinics throughout the country and mobile units were used to optimise response. Hence, innovations in national surveys can and are being made but must take into account the paramount concerns of detail and response rate.

  19. National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2013-2014. The National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS) was created to assess the prevalence of tobacco use, as well as the factors promoting and impeding tobacco use...

  20. National Survey of Family Growth

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) gathers information on family life, marriage and divorce, pregnancy, infertility, use of contraception, and men's and...

  1. ASHA Completes National Schools Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Johnson, Cassandra

    1996-01-01

    A national survey of speech-language pathologists working in school-based settings examined such topic areas as caseload characteristics, service delivery models, bilingual/bicultural services, support personnel, shortages of speech-language pathologists, and demographic information. (DB)

  2. Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses' views about nursing work: a survey of motivation and maintenance factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, Isabel; Kirk, Ray; Wright, Sarah; Andrew, Cathy

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this article was to report on the analysis of qualitative, open text data, received from a national on-line survey of what factors Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses wish to change about nursing and consideration of the potential policy and practice impacts of these requests on their retention. Prior to the economic recession of 2007-2010, the growing shortage of nurses in New Zealand presented a serious concern for the healthcare workforce. Given the ageing New Zealand nursing workforce, an ageing population and the increasing demands for health care, it is imperative that issues of retention of Generation Y nurses are resolved prior to the imminent retirement of more experienced nurses. A descriptive exploratory approach using a national wide, on-line survey, eliciting both quantitative and qualitative data was used. The survey, conducted from August 2009-January 2010, collected data from Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses (n = 358) about their views about nursing, work and career. Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene theory was used as the framework for the analysis of the open text data. The factors that nurses wanted changed were skewed towards Herzberg's hygiene-maintenance factors rather than motivating factors. This is of concern because hygiene-maintenance factors are considered to be dissatisfiers that are likely to push workers to another employment option.

  3. Using electronic surveys in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Diane G

    2014-11-01

    Computer and Internet use in businesses and homes in the United States has dramatically increased since the early 1980s. In 2011, 76% of households reported having a computer, compared with only 8% in 1984 (File, 2013). A similar increase in Internet use has also been seen, with 72% of households reporting access of the Internet in 2011 compared with 18% in 1997 (File, 2013). This emerging trend in technology has prompted use of electronic surveys in the research community as an alternative to previous telephone and postal surveys. Electronic surveys can offer an efficient, cost-effective method for data collection; however, challenges exist. An awareness of the issues and strategies to optimize data collection using web-based surveys is critical when designing research studies. This column will discuss the different types and advantages and disadvantages of using electronic surveys in nursing research, as well as methods to optimize the quality and quantity of survey responses.

  4. National narcolepsy survey

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, L.

    2010-04-01

    Narcolepsy is characterised by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and has a prevalence of 25 per 100,000. We suspect this is higher than presently seen in the Republic of Ireland. We aimed to calculate the Irish prevalence of Narcolepsy and to examine current management practices. We conducted an online survey of respiratory physicians, neurologists, paediatric neurologists, and psychiatrists with an interest in sleep disorders (73% response rate). Of this group, a total of 16 physicians managed 180 patients prior to January 2009. A clinical diagnosis alone was reached in 67 (41%) patients, the remainder by polysomnography or multiple sleep latency testing. No patients were diagnosed by cerebro-spinal fluid analysis of hypocretin levels. While 70 (42%) patients received modafanil, only 7 (4%) were treated with sodium oxybate. Even allowing for missing data it is apparent that Narcolepsy is hugely under-diagnosed in Ireland, however, current practises adhere with new international guidelines.

  5. College of the Canyons Nursing Alumni Surveys, Spring 2001. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuschke, Daylene M; Dixon, P. Scott; Gribbons, Barry C.

    In the summer of 2001, College of the Canyons (California) conducted of study of registered nursing (RN) and licensed vocational nursing (LVN) alumni, as well as their employers, to assess satisfaction with the preparation and training they received through the College's nursing programs. Out of the 89 invited nursing alumni, 33 surveys were…

  6. Development of a respiratory protection survey instrument for occupational health nurses: an educational project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Deborah; Burgel, Barbara J

    2013-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine (2011) report Occupational Health Nurses and Respiratory Protection: Improving Education and Training outlined seven recommendations to improve the competency of occupational health nurses in respiratory protection. An advisory group was convened in December 2011, with stakeholder representation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health/National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory, American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., American Board for Occupational Health Nurses, Inc., Association of Occupational Health Professionals in Healthcare, American Nurses Association, and Institute of Medicine Standing Committee on Personal Protective Equipment for Workplace Safety and Health. The initial work of the advisory group included developing and administering a survey to assess current occupational health nurse roles and responsibilities relevant to respiratory protection. Development of the survey was led by a master's student and advisor who worked with the advisory group. The process of tool development and preliminary findings are presented in this article.

  7. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekkema Nienke

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of determinants influencing the success of the introduction of new technologies as perceived by nursing staff. Methods The study population is a nationally representative research sample of nursing staff (further referred to as the Nursing Staff Panel, of whom 685 (67% completed a survey questionnaire about their experiences with recently introduced technologies. Participants were working in Dutch hospitals, psychiatric organizations, care organizations for mentally disabled people, home care organizations, nursing homes or homes for the elderly. Results Half of the respondents were confronted with the introduction of a new technology in the last three years. Only half of these rated the introduction of the technology as positive. The factors most frequently mentioned as impeding actual use were related to the (kind of technology itself, such as malfunctioning, ease of use, relevance for patients, and risks to patients. Furthermore nursing staff stress the importance of an adequate innovation strategy. Conclusions A prerequisite for the successful introduction of new technologies is to analyse determinants that may impede or enhance the introduction among potential users. For technological innovations special attention has to be paid to the (perceived characteristics of the technology itself.

  8. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Veer, Anke J E; Fleuren, Margot A H; Bekkema, Nienke; Francke, Anneke L

    2011-10-27

    A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of determinants influencing the success of the introduction of new technologies as perceived by nursing staff. The study population is a nationally representative research sample of nursing staff (further referred to as the Nursing Staff Panel), of whom 685 (67%) completed a survey questionnaire about their experiences with recently introduced technologies. Participants were working in Dutch hospitals, psychiatric organizations, care organizations for mentally disabled people, home care organizations, nursing homes or homes for the elderly. Half of the respondents were confronted with the introduction of a new technology in the last three years. Only half of these rated the introduction of the technology as positive.The factors most frequently mentioned as impeding actual use were related to the (kind of) technology itself, such as malfunctioning, ease of use, relevance for patients, and risks to patients. Furthermore nursing staff stress the importance of an adequate innovation strategy. A prerequisite for the successful introduction of new technologies is to analyse determinants that may impede or enhance the introduction among potential users. For technological innovations special attention has to be paid to the (perceived) characteristics of the technology itself.

  9. National Geodetic Survey's Airport Aerial Photography

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Geodetic Survey (NGS), formerly part of the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, has been performing Aeronautical surveys since the 1920's. NGS, in...

  10. Patient survey (ICH-CAHPS) - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The national average for ICH-CAHPS Survey measures. The ICH-CAHPS Survey is a national, standardized survey of in-center hemodialysis patients about their...

  11. Nursing Home Work Practices and Nursing Assistants' Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E.; Squillace, Marie R.; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L.; Wiener, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Design and Methods: Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey,…

  12. 76 FR 77240 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Pain Assessment for...., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  13. 75 FR 1794 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... privacy. Name of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special; Emphasis Panel Inflammatory... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy...

  14. 76 FR 57068 - National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Summer Research... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  15. 78 FR 63997 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Training and Career... Review, Division of ] Extramural Activities, National Institute of Nursing Research, National...

  16. 77 FR 59941 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: October 18, 2012..., MD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of...

  17. 77 FR 59199 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Clinical Trial Review... of Review, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy...

  18. 78 FR 52938 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Multi-Site Clinical... Review, Division of Extramural Activities, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes...

  19. 76 FR 10912 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Summer Research... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd,...

  20. 75 FR 55808 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; National Research... Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd., Ste. 710, Bethesda,...

  1. Survey design research: a tool for answering nursing research questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Sandra L; Butler, Robert S; Burchill, Christian N

    2015-01-01

    The clinical nurse specialist is in a unique position to identify and study clinical problems in need of answers, but lack of time and resources may discourage nurses from conducting research. However, some research methods can be used by the clinical nurse specialist that are not time-intensive or cost prohibitive. The purpose of this article is to explain the utility of survey methodology for answering a number of nursing research questions. The article covers survey content, reliability and validity issues, sample size considerations, and methods of survey delivery.

  2. Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) is a biennial, cross-sectional survey of a nationally-representative sample of American adults that is used to...

  3. National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a national survey designed to meet the need for objective, reliable information about the provision and use of...

  4. ADN Programs Accredited by the National League for Nursing, 1974

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursing Outlook, 1974

    1974-01-01

    The complete list of programs leading to an associate degree in nursing that are accredited by the National League for Nursing is presented, without annotation. The institutions are listed alphabetically by State. (Author/AJ)

  5. NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues NIH's National Institute of Nursing Research Is Changing Lives Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table ... on. From childbirth to end-of-life care, nursing research is aimed at helping patients across the entire ...

  6. National survey of MRSA: Ireland, 1995.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Johnson, Z

    1997-03-01

    The objective of this survey was to obtain an indication of the size of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) problem in Ireland prior to introducing national MRSA control guidelines. A survey of all microbiology laboratories in Ireland was carried out over two weeks in Spring 1995. For patients from whom MRSA was isolated during the study period standard demographic and clinical data were requested and period prevalence\\/1000 discharges was calculated. All 45 microbiology laboratories surveyed responded. MRSA was isolated from 448 patients during the two-week period. The period prevalence of MRSA was 16.5\\/1000 discharges. Males aged > or = 65 had the highest rate (50\\/1000 discharges). Half of all isolates were from patients in surgical or medical wards, but 4% were from community-based sources such as GPs, nursing homes and hospices. Thirty-two percent of MRSA patients were infected rather than colonized. MRSA is clearly a significant problem in Ireland. While it is largely a hospital problem at present, the increasing trend towards day procedures and shorter hospital stay means that infection will increase in the community.

  7. A survey study of pediatric nurses' use of information sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secco, M Loretta; Woodgate, Roberta L; Hodgson, Andrea; Kowalski, Sandi; Plouffe, Jannelle; Rothney, Patricia R; Sawatzky-Dickson, Doris; Suderman, Eleanor

    2006-01-01

    This survey study explored use of different information sources among a convenience sample of 113 bedside pediatric nurses. The study was guided by three interrelated concepts: types of information sources, levels of evidence, and computer skill. The Nursing Information Use Survey measured use of information sources, impact of information sources on nursing care, barriers to information, and expectations that a computerized clinical desktop or patient information management system would improve patient care. Significant correlations between use of interpersonal and non-computer-based information and non-computer- and computer-based information supported the conceptual model. Use of traditional, non-computer information sources such as textbooks and print-based journals was higher among baccalaureate, compared with diploma, prepared nurses. Nurses with greater computer and online searching skill used more computer-based information. Findings suggested that strategies to improve nurses' computer and information searching skills may promote use of higher-level evidence in planning nursing care.

  8. Training needs of nurses and social workers in the end-of-life care for people with intellectual disabilities: a national survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkema, N.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Albers, G.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Francke, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nurses and social workers caring for people with intellectual disabilities are increasingly confronted with clients in need of end-of-life care. Previous studies, however, suggest that professionals in intellectual disability care services lack knowledge and experience concerning end-of-

  9. National neonatal weight policy survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, B

    2009-06-01

    This survey was conducted to review the current practice regarding frequency of weight measurement in neonatal units in the Republic of Ireland, and whether these practices are in keeping with best practice as described in the literature. There was an 88.5% (23 of 26) response rate to this survey. 6 (26%) units had a written policy, and 16 (70%) had an unwritten agreed practice. In the Vermont Oxford Network\\'s potentially better practices daily weight measurements on newborn infants are recommended until the infant is stable and growing and then alternate day measurements The most common practices in this survey were to weigh infants on alternate days, this occurred in 9 (39%) units, and twice weekly in 6 (26%). Less than 31% of units had a separate policy for those less than 30 weeks, on assisted ventilation, or transitioning to enteral feeds. Most weigh infants on alternate days, and plot weights weekly, which is in keeping with best practice. Few units have separate policies for specific subgroups as is recommended in the limited literature. Consensus guidelines should be developed and promoted nationally.

  10. National neonatal weight policy survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, B

    2012-02-01

    This survey was conducted to review the current practice regarding frequency of weight measurement in neonatal units in the Republic of Ireland, and whether these practices are in keeping with best practice as described in the literature. There was an 88.5% (23 of 26) response rate to this survey. 6 (26%) units had a written policy, and 16 (70%) had an unwritten agreed practice. In the Vermont Oxford Network\\'s potentially better practices daily weight measurements on newborn infants are recommended until the infant is stable and growing and then alternate day measurements The most common practices in this survey were to weigh infants on alternate days, this occurred in 9 (39%) units, and twice weekly in 6 (26%). Less than 31% of units had a separate policy for those less than 30 weeks, on assisted ventilation, or transitioning to enteral feeds. Most weigh infants on alternate days, and plot weights weekly, which is in keeping with best practice. Few units have separate policies for specific subgroups as is recommended in the limited literature. Consensus guidelines should be developed and promoted nationally.

  11. 77 FR 35991 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Early Detection and... Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, (301)...

  12. 77 FR 61418 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Addressing Needs of...: Tamizchelvi Thyagarajan, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research,...

  13. 75 FR 10808 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research, Special Emphasis Panel, NINR Loan Repayment..., Scientific Review Administrator, Office of Review, National Institute of Nursing Research,...

  14. 78 FR 7794 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Palliative Care Research...: Mario Rinaudo, MD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Review, National Institute of Nursing...

  15. Student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Cheng, Cheng; Tian, Yan; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2015-07-01

    The world's population is aging, and the need for nurses is increasing. Working with older adults, however, has always been an unpopular career choice among student nurses. It is important to understand student nurses' motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career. The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career and to identify the associated factors among student nurses. Cross-sectional survey. Participants were last-semester student nurses from 7 universities offering nursing undergraduate programs in Shandong, China. Of the 1290 student nurses, 916 completed the survey (a response rate of 71.0%). The outcome variable was the motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career. This was measured using a motivation questionnaire that included expectancy and value subscales. Other instruments included the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz I, the Geriatrics Attitudes Scale, the Anxiety about Aging Scale, a clinical practice environment questionnaire and a self-administered general information questionnaire. Student nurses' expectancy and value aspects of motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career were both at a moderate level; the highest value they held was of personal interest. Clinical practice environment, anxiety about aging and the attitudes about geriatrics were the main factors influencing student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China. It is imperative for nurse educators to improve the gerontological nursing clinical practice environment for student nurses. Moreover, cultivating student nurses' positive attitudes about geriatrics and relieving anxiety about aging could be beneficial. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Kenyan nurses involvement in national policy development processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juma, Pamela Atieno; Edwards, Nancy; Spitzer, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to critically examine how nurses have been involved in national policy processes in the Kenyan health sector. The paper reports qualitative results from a larger mixed method study. National nonnursing decision-makers and nurse leaders, and provincial managers as well as frontline nurse managers from two Kenyan districts were purposefully selected for interviews. Interviews dealt with nurses' involvement in national policy processes, factors hindering nurses' engagement in policy processes, and ways to enhance nurses' involvement in policy processes. Critical theory and feminist perspectives guided the study process. Content analysis of data was conducted. Findings revealed that nurses' involvement in policy processes in Kenya was limited. Only a few nurse leaders were involved in national policy committees as a result of their positions in the sector. Critical analysis of the findings revealed that hierarchies and structural factors as well as nursing professional issues were the primary barriers constraining nurses' involvement in policy processes. Thus, there is need to address these factors both by nurses themselves and by nonnursing decision makers, in order to enhance nurses engagement in policy making and further the contribution to quality of services to the communities.

  17. Orthopaedic nurses' perception of research utilization - A cross sectional survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-01-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical...... knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire....... The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack...

  18. The National Geochemical Survey - database and documentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in collaboration with other federal and state government agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting the National Geochemical Survey (NGS) to produce...

  19. The National Geochemical Survey - database and documentation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The USGS, in collaboration with other federal and state government agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting the National Geochemical Survey (NGS) to produce a...

  20. National validation of the NACNS clinical nurse specialist core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Kathleen M; Clark, Angela P; Fulton, Janet; Mayo, Ann

    2009-01-01

    To validate the 75 core National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists' (NACNS) clinical nurse specialist (CNS) competencies among practicing CNSs. Specific aims were to (a) determine the extent to which 75 core CNS competencies were used in current CNS practice, (b) determine the importance of those competencies to practicing CNSs, and (c) identify gaps between CNS core competencies and role expectations in current practice. A survey design was used with both paper-and-pencil and online instruments. The survey included 150 items and three open-ended questions. A convenience sampling method was used, which targeted practicing CNSs. Respondents (N=505) were practicing CNSs who entered the field as RNs between 1956 and 2006. The survey had a high degree of internal consistency reliability (0.967%) between the subscales. The 75 NACNS core competencies were found to be useful and important for CNSs. A few gaps were identified between CNS core competencies and CNS role expectations in current practice. No one method for validating competencies will be satisfactory for all situations; however, the processes and methods used in this study were well suited to accomplish the goal of validating CNS core competencies. The process described here may be instructive to leaders of other national and international professional organizations interested in developing and evaluating competencies. Core competencies are useful and important to currently practicing CNSs. The CNS role is growing internationally. Core CNS competencies can be a framework for CNS role development, education, and practice. As described here, a competency validation survey is one way to assure that CNSs are meeting healthcare needs.

  1. Physicians and nurses use and recommend dietary supplements: report of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyon Nicolas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous surveys show that dietary supplements are used by a large proportion of the general public, but there have been relatively few surveys on the prevalence of dietary supplement use among health professionals, including physicians and nurses. Even less information is available regarding the extent to which physicians and nurses recommend dietary supplements to their patients. Methods An online survey was administered in October 2007 to 900 physicians and 277 nurses by Ipsos Public Affairs for the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN, a trade association representing the dietary supplement industry. The health professionals were asked whether they used dietary supplements and their reasons for doing so, and whether they recommend dietary supplements to their patients. Results The "Life...supplemented" Healthcare Professionals Impact Study (HCP Impact Study found that 72% of physicians and 89% of nurses in this sample used dietary supplements regularly, occasionally, or seasonally. Regular use of dietary supplements was reported by 51% of physicians and 59% of nurses. The most common reason given for using dietary supplements was for overall health and wellness (40% of physicians and 48% of nurses, but more than two-thirds cited more than one reason for using the products. When asked whether they "ever recommend dietary supplements" to their patients, 79% of physicians and 82% of nurses said they did. Conclusion Physicians and nurses are as likely as members of the general public to use dietary supplements, as shown by comparing the results of this survey with data from national health and nutrition surveys. Also, most physicians and nurses recommend supplements to their patients, whether or not the clinicians use dietary supplements themselves.

  2. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) - National Cardiovascular Disease Surveillance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 to 2014. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has monitored the health of the nation since 1957. NHIS data on a broad range of health topics are...

  3. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) - National Cardiovascular Disease Surveillance Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 forward. The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) has monitored the health of the nation since 1957. NHIS data on a broad range of health topics are...

  4. Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses’ views about nursing work: a survey of motivation and maintenance factors

    OpenAIRE

    Jamieson, Isabel; Kirk, Ray; Wright, Sarah; Andrew, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aim The aim of this article was to report on the analysis of qualitative, open text data, received from a national on‐line survey of what factors Generation Y New Zealand Registered Nurses wish to change about nursing and consideration of the potential policy and practice impacts of these requests on their retention. Background Prior to the economic recession of 2007–2010, the growing shortage of nurses in New Zealand presented a serious concern for the healthcare workforce. Given th...

  5. Evaluating the late career nurse initiative: a cross-sectional survey of senior nurses in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Jeffs, Lianne; Rizk, Paul; Laporte, Daniel R; Chilcote, Autumn Marie; Bai, Yu Qing

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the impact of the late career nurse initiative on nurse perceptions of their work environment, workplace burnout, job satisfaction, organisational commitment and intention to remain. The Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care introduced the late career nurse initiative with the goal of improving the retention of front-line nurses aged 55 and over by implementing a 0.20 full-time equivalent reduction of physically or psychologically demanding duties, enabling nurses to engage in special projects for the improvement of their organisations and patient care. A sample of 902 nurses aged 55 and over from acute and long-term care facilities were surveyed using valid and reliable questionnaires. Nurses who had participated in the initiative did not differ significantly from those who had not in terms of workplace burnout, job satisfaction, length of service or intention to remain within their current organisation. The late career nurse initiative participants reported significantly higher perceptions of managers' ability, leadership and support and their level of participation in hospital affairs. The late career nurse initiative was associated with perceived differences in nurses' work environment but not outcomes. Leaders need to pay attention to how late career nurses are selected and matched to organisational projects. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Nursing Management Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The 1974 National Acceptors Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laing, J; Phillips, J; Zablan, Z; Llorente, R; Cabigon, J

    1976-01-01

    The 1974 National Acceptors Survey in the Philippines studied 4 methods of contraception: pill, IUD, rhythm, and condom. After 1 year, 72% of IUD acceptors had an IUD in place but only 29% of condom acceptors were still using condoms. Pills and rhythm were equally effective in terms of continuation and pregnancy rates. Continuation rates were higher among acceptors at postpartum clinics than at other clnics, higher among urban respondents than rural, and higher among older respondents. Those with more children had higher continuation rates, whereas those who wanted more children had lower continuation rates. Continuation rates also increased 1) as the duration of marriage lengthened; 2) with a later age at marriage; 3) with higher educational attainment; 4) among income-contributing respondents with higher incomes; 5) among previous contraceptive users; and 6) when physicians provided the services rather than nonmedical personnel, including medical screenings. Clinic attendance, husband's occupation, whether or not there was payment, and husband's support are other factors that seemed to affect continuation rates. Contraceptive effectiveness values were higher among pill and IUD acceptors. The percentage of reduction in fertility following acceptance of a method was 74% for IUDs and 27% for condoms. Fertility reduction was great among acceptors at postpartum clinics, acceptors in central visayas, and the highly educated. Future births averted ranged, for every 100 acceptors, 208 with the IUD, 32 with the condom, and 1 each pill and rhythm. Factors affecting method selection were administrative, beliefs, and preferences. The most common complaint about provision of clinical services was that the staff should spend more time in home visits (86%).

  7. Graduate entry nurses' initial perspectives on nursing: Content analysis of open-ended survey questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Brooks, Ingrid; Vanderheide, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Graduate entry nursing courses offer individuals with prior degrees the opportunity to gain nursing qualifications and facilitate career change. While it is known that accelerated graduate entry courses are increasingly popular, the perceptions of nursing held by such individuals and the influence this has on those seeking to enter the profession are less clearly understood. To explore graduate entry nursing students' perceptions of nursing on entering their pre-registration course. A descriptive design utilising cross-section survey with two open-ended questions: What do you believe the role of the nurse is? What things have influenced that view? were asked. Demographic data were analysed using descriptive frequencies, while the two open-ended questions were analysed using summative content analysis. One university-based postgraduate graduate entry nursing course in Australia PARTICIPANTS: Eight cohorts (n=286) commencing students with prior degrees other than nursing. The course attracts students from diverse backgrounds. Exposure to nursing and nurses, either as a consumer of health care or other health care role, plays a primary role in influencing career change. However, similar to those found with school leavers, there remains much misinformation about nurses' roles for students in these courses. Most identify the role of caring in nursing. For some, media representations are the only information sources. Graduate entry courses offer opportunities to attract new nurses and contribute to addressing workforce shortages. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of nursing roles among students on entry. More work is required by the profession to ensure nursing is accurately and positively represented to the community. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Stress and coping among cardiovascular nurses: a survey in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Estela Regina Ferraz

    2004-01-01

    Cardiovascular nurses are frequently involved in critical patient care, providing support to patients and their families. The goals of this study were to survey a representative sample of cardiovascular nurses, describe ways of coping, and identify sources of stress in the hospital setting. A descriptive and correlational survey design was used. A self-completed questionnaire was distributed to 76 nurses from a cardiovascular hospital in São Paulo City, Brazil. The measures were the Nursing Stress Evaluation Questionnaire (NSEQ) by Bianchi and Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WCOQ) by Folkman and Lazarus. A high response rate of 76.3% was achieved. The results identified work conditions as the major source of stress for nurses and use of positive reappraisal, self-controlling skills, and social support to cope with job stress. Nurses are using coping strategies based on personal resources but the use of organizational strategies is encouraged to improve life quality. Mental health nurses could play an essential role in preventive stress management programs for hospital nurses.

  9. Exploring barriers to pain management in newborn intensive care units: a pilot survey of NICU nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Patricia J; Gonzales, Irene; Parsons, Virgil

    2009-12-01

    To explore barriers that NICU nurses face when attempting to optimally manage newborn pain. Ninety California NICU nurses with current membership in the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) voluntarily participated. A descriptive survey study. A researcher-developed survey consisting of 37 questions was mailed to 300 NICU nurses; 102 were returned and 90 were usable. Probability sampling from a listing of California registered nurses with current membership in the NANN was used to obtain the study's sampling frame. Less than half of the nurses felt that newborn pain is well managed within the NICUs where they are employed. Barriers identified related to physicians' pain management practices, lack of evidence-based pain management protocols, nurses' and physicians' resistance to change practice, infant pain assessment tools, and inadequate staff training regarding pain assessment and management. A knowledge-practice gap still exists within newborn pain management. Increased caregiver education remains a necessity, but strategies that address resistance to change practice within healthcare settings must also be considered.

  10. Survey among critical care nurses and physicians about delirium management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nydahl, Peter; Dewes, Michael; Dubb, Rolf; Hermes, Carsten; Kaltwasser, Arnold; Krotsetis, Susanne; von Haken, Rebecca

    2017-05-18

    Delirium is a serious complication in patients in intensive care units. Previous surveys on delirium management in daily practice showed low adherence to published guidelines. To evaluate delirium management in nurses and physicians working in intensive care units in German-speaking countries and to identify related differences between nurses and physicians. The study used an open online survey with multiple-choice responses. An invitation for participation was spread via journals and electronic resources using a snowball system. Apart from recording socio-demographical characteristics, the survey collected data on delirium assessment, delirium-related processes, non-pharmacological prevention and treatment and barriers for implementation. Differences between nurses and physicians were tested by Fisher's exact test with sequential Bonferroni correction. The survey was conducted in autumn 2016, and 559 clinicians participated. More nurses than physicians reported screening for delirium. The majority of clinicians reported screening for delirium when this was suspected; more than 50% used validated instruments. Half of the clinicians had delirium-related structures implemented, such as two thirds reporting delirium-related processes. Most cited barriers were lack of time and missing knowledge about delirium and its assessment. With significant difference, physicians recommended more than nurses early removal of catheters and daily interprofessional goals for patients. In German-speaking countries, assessment of delirium needs further improvement, leading to accurate assessment. Delirium-related structures and processes appear to be implemented widely, with only a few differences between nurses and physicians. Nurses and physicians in this survey reported similar perceptions and attitudes towards management of delirium. Both professions need more knowledge and inter-professional training on when and how to use validated assessment instruments. © 2017 British

  11. Intersection of Re-Designated National League for Nursing Centers of Excellence(TM) and Quality in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Nursing education is challenged to meet a growing demand for nurses, while substantiating the quality of the educational experience as well as the achievement of desired student outcomes. The National League for Nursing (NLN) Centers of Excellence (COE) in Nursing Education(TM) program represents high performing nursing schools which utilize…

  12. Electronic implementation of national nursing standards--NANDA, NOC and NIC as an effective teaching tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Sharon K; Smith, Kevin F; Flowers, Laura

    2004-01-01

    With the increased interest in evidence-based medicine, Internet access and the growing emphasis on national standards, there is an increased challenge for teaching institutions and nursing services to teach and implement standards. At the same time, electronic clinical documentation tools have started to become a common format for recording nursing notes. The major aim of this paper is to ascertain and assess the availability of clinical nursing tools based on the NANDA, NOC and NIC standards. Faculty at 20 large nursing schools and directors of nursing at 20 hospitals were interviewed regarding the use of nursing standards in clinical documentation packages, not only for teaching purposes but also for use in hospital-based systems to ensure patient safety. A survey tool was utilized that covered questions regarding what nursing standards are being taught in the nursing schools, what standards are encouraged by the hospitals, and teaching initiatives that include clinical documentation tools. Information was collected on how utilizing these standards in a clinical or hospital setting can improve the overall quality of care. Analysis included univariate and bivariate analysis. The consensus between both groups was that the NANDA, NOC and NIC national standards are the most widely taught and utilized. In addition, a training initiative was identified within a large university where a clinical documentation system based on these standards was developed utilizing handheld devices.

  13. Patient satisfaction and non-UK educated nurses: a cross-sectional observational study of English National Health Service Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter; Sloane, Douglas M; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Ball, Jane E; Aiken, Linda H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether patient satisfaction with nursing care in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals in England is associated with the proportion of non-UK educated nurses providing care. Design Cross-sectional analysis using data from the 2010 NHS Adult Inpatient Survey merged with data from nurse and hospital administrator surveys. Logistic regression models with corrections for clustering were used to determine whether the proportions of non-UK educated nurses were significantly related to patient satisfaction before and after taking account of other hospital, nursing and patient characteristics. Setting 31 English NHS trusts. Participants 12 506 patients 16 years of age and older with at least one overnight stay that completed a satisfaction survey; 2962 bedside care nurses who completed a nurse survey; and 31 NHS trusts. Main outcome measure Patient satisfaction. Results The percentage of non-UK educated nurses providing bedside hospital care, which ranged from 1% to 52% of nurses, was significantly associated with patient satisfaction. After controlling for potential confounding factors, each 10-point increase in the percentage of non-UK educated nurses diminished the odds of patients reporting good or excellent care by 12% (OR=0.88), and decreased the odds of patients agreeing that they always had confidence and trust in nurses by 13% (OR=0.87). Other indicators of patient satisfaction also revealed lower satisfaction in hospitals with higher percentages of non-UK educated nurses. Conclusions Use of non-UK educated nurses in English NHS hospitals is associated with lower patient satisfaction. Importing nurses from abroad to substitute for domestically educated nurses may negatively impact quality of care. PMID:26634400

  14. Orthopaedic nurses' attitudes towards clinical nursing research - A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Hølge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2015-05-01

    The call for evidence-based knowledge in clinical nursing practice has increased during recent decades and research in orthopaedic nursing is needed to improve patients' conditions, care and treatment. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies among orthopaedic nurses and their interest and motivation to increase these in everyday practice. A newly developed questionnaire was given to a convenience sample of 87 orthopaedic nurses. Forty three orthopaedic nurses (49.4%) completed the questionnaire. The results indicated that despite the majority of orthopaedic nurses having low self-perceived theoretical knowledge and practical research competencies, their interest and motivation to improve these were high, especially their inner motivation. However, the nurses' inner motivation was inhibited by a lack of acceptance from colleagues and section head nurses and a shortage of time. This study forms a baseline as a part of a larger study and contributes knowledge useful to other orthopaedic departments with an interest in optimizing nursing research to improve orthopaedic nursing care quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. What is good mental health nursing? A survey of Irish nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeman, Richard

    2012-06-01

    The practice, theory, and preparation associated with nursing people with mental health issues has changed in profound ways in recent decades. This has in part been reflected by a shift in nurses identifying as being mental health rather than psychiatric nurses. Context, theory, and values shape what it means to be a mental health nurse. Thirty experienced mental health nurses in Ireland completed a survey on what good mental health nursing is and a definition induced from their responses. Mental health nursing is a professional, client-centered, goal-directed activity based on sound evidence, focused on the growth, development, and recovery of people with complex mental health needs. It involves caring, empathic, insightful, and respectful nurses using interpersonal skills to draw upon and develop the personal resources of individuals and to facilitate change in partnership with the individual and in collaboration with friends, family, and the health care team. This appears to encapsulate the best of what it meant to be a psychiatric nurse, but challenges remain regarding how to reconcile or whether to discard coercive practices incompatible with mental health nursing.

  16. Are nursing home survey deficiencies higher in facilities with greater staff turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Nancy B; Johantgen, Meg; Trinkoff, Alison M; Storr, Carla L; Han, Kihye

    2014-02-01

    To examine CNA and licensed nurse (RN+LPN/LVN) turnover in relation to numbers of deficiencies in nursing homes. A secondary data analysis of information from the National Nursing Home Survey (NNHS) and contemporaneous data from the Online Survey, Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Data were linked by facility as the unit of analysis to determine the relationship of CNA and licensed nurse turnover on nursing home deficiencies. The 2004 NNHS used a multistage sampling strategy to generate a final sample of 1174 nursing homes, which represent 16,100 NHs in the United States. This study focused on the 1151 NNHS facilities with complete deficiency data. Turnover was defined as the total CNAs/licensed nurse full-time equivalents (FTEs) who left during the preceding 3 months (full- and part-time) divided by the total FTE. NHs with high turnover were defined as those with rates above the 75th percentile (25.3% for CNA turnover and 17.9% for licensed nurse turnover) versus all other facilities. This study used selected OSCAR deficiencies from the Quality of Care, Quality of Life, and Resident Behavior categories, which are considered to be more closely related to nursing care. We defined NHs with high deficiencies as those with numbers of deficiencies above the 75th percentile versus all others. Using SUDAAN PROC RLOGIST, we included NNHS sampling design effects and examined associations of CNA/licensed nurse turnover with NH deficiencies, adjusting for staffing, skill mix, bed size, and ownership in binomial logistic regression models. High CNA turnover was associated with high numbers of Quality of Care (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.10-2.13), Resident Behavior (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.03-1.97) and total selected deficiencies (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.12-2.12). Licensed nurse turnover was significantly related to Quality of Care deficiencies (OR 2.06, 95% CI 1.50-2.82) and total selected deficiencies (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.25-2.33). When both CNA turnover and licensed nurse turnover were

  17. Mapping the future of environmental health and nursing: strategies for integrating national competencies into nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Laura S; Butterfield, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    :Nurses are increasingly the primary contact for clients concerned about health problems related to their environment. In response to the need for nursing expertise in the field of environmental health, the Institute of Medicine (IOM), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) have designed core competencies for the nursing profession. The IOM competencies focus on four areas: (1) knowledge and concepts; (2) assessment and referral; advocacy, ethics, and risk communication; and (4) legislation and regulation. The competencies establish a baseline of knowledge and awareness in order for nurses to prevent and minimize health problems associated with exposure to environmental agents. To address the known difficulties of incorporating new priorities into established practice, nurses attending an environmental health short course participated in a nominal group process focusing on the question, "What specific actions can we take to bring environmental health into the mainstream of nursing practice?" This exercise was designed to bring the concepts of the national initiatives (IOM, NINR, ATSDR) to the awareness of individual nurses involved in the direct delivery of care. Results include 38 action items nurses identified as improving awareness and utilization of environmental health principles. The top five ideas were: (1) get environmental health listed as a requirement or competency in undergraduate nursing education; (2) improve working relationships with interdepartmental persons-a team approach; (3) strategically place students in essential organizations such as NIOSH, ATSDR, or CDC; (4) educate nurse educators; and (5) create environmental health awards in nursing. The 38 original ideas were also reorganized into a five-tiered conceptual model. The concepts of this model include: (1) developing partnerships; (2) strengthening publications; (3) enhancing continuing education; (4) updating nursing

  18. Predicting National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    The Baccalaureate Nursing program in San Antonio, Texas experienced a decrease in National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) on the first attempt for students graduating between 2009 and 2014 without a clear explanation for the decline. The purpose of this quantitative non-experimental correlational study was to…

  19. Cultural Competence Among Italian Nurses: A Multicentric Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicolini, Giancarlo; Della Pelle, Carlo; Comparcini, Dania; Tomietto, Marco; Cerratti, Francesca; Schim, Stephanie M; Di Giovanni, Pamela; Simonetti, Valentina

    2015-11-01

    To assess Italian nurses' cultural competence, as they are increasingly called upon to care for people of foreign origins. A cross-sectional, multicentric study. From September 2013 to May 2014, a survey was carried out among Italian nurses. Cultural competence was assessed by the Cultural Competence Assessment tool, translated and adapted to the Italian context. Nurses who completed the survey numbered 1,432; 70.6% were female; 42.6% ranged in age from 41 to 50 years; and 50.0% were bachelor's prepared. More than 50% had participated in some kind of cultural diversity training. Overall, cultural competence was moderate, showing a moderately high level of cultural awareness and sensitivity (mean = 5.41; SD = 0.66) and a moderate level of culturally competent behaviors (mean = 4.33; SD = 1.10). Although Italian nurses' cultural competence was acceptable, given the growing diversity of the patient population, nurses should be better prepared to face the changing health requests. Providing culturally competent care has been associated with improved provider-client communication, higher satisfaction with care, and health status improvement, as full comprehension of health status, adherence to medications and lifestyle recommendations, and appropriate utilization of the health system. Healthcare providers need to be adequately trained to provide culturally competent care. This research provides, for the first time, a report on Italian nurses' levels of cultural competence, and strengthens the current literature underlining the need for continuous education to enhance cultural competence among nurses. © 2015 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  20. Towards a National Discursive Construction of Nurses' Diversity Related Competencies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annie Aarup; Jæger, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    degree programme in nursing containing a national, standardised curriculum is therefore analysed to uncover how cultural difference and intercultural issues are prioritised in terms of learning goals and resources, and to examine whether the discourse contributes significantly to the understanding...

  1. Ouray National Wildlife Refuge : Duck nesting survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary report of the 1991 duck nest survey at Ouray National Wildlife Refuge. Key areas of the refuge were nest searched during the period between May 25th and July...

  2. National Wildlife Refuge System Survey Protocol Template

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This template was developed for drafting National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) Survey Protocols. The template is arranged in the same order as the eight basic...

  3. National Beneficiary Survey (NBS) Round 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — A cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of social security beneficiaries age 18-64 receiving disability benefits in active pay status as of...

  4. National Beneficiary Survey (NBS) Round 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — A cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 6,520 social security beneficiaries age 18-64 receiving disability benefits in active pay status as...

  5. National Beneficiary Survey (NBS) Round 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — A cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of social security beneficiaries age 18-64 receiving disability benefits in active pay status as of...

  6. National Beneficiary Survey (NBS) Round 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — A cross-sectional survey of a nationally representative sample of 4,864 social security beneficiaries age 18-64 receiving disability benefits in active pay status as...

  7. Geodetic Control Points - National Geodetic Survey Benchmarks

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This data contains a set of geodetic control stations maintained by the National Geodetic Survey. Each geodetic control station in this dataset has either a precise...

  8. National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) is designed to collect data on the utilization and provision of ambulatory care services in hospital...

  9. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1999-2000 forward. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of...

  10. National CAHPS Hospice Survey data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This data set contains the national average (mean) “top-box” scores of Medicare-certified hospice agencies on Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and...

  11. Survey explores nurses' of e-health tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Alison

    2012-03-01

    E-health is concerned with promoting the health and wellbeing of individuals, families and communities, and improving professional practice through the use of information management and information and communication technology. In autumn 2010 the RCN, supported by an information technology consultancy, carried out a survey of members' views on e-health to assess their involvement in, and readiness for, e-health developments and their knowledge of its benefits. A total of 1,313 nurses, midwives, healthcare support workers and pre-registration students from across the UK responded. This article describes ways in which nurse managers can influence the successful implementation of the survey recommendations.

  12. Survey of Nursing Service Administration Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Barbara; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A 1972 follow-up study of graduates of the masters program in nursing service administration at the University of Iowa revealed that a large majority found their choice of major to be appropriate and satisfying. Assessment of graduates' employment records and professional activities indicated a successful graduate training program. (EA)

  13. Nurse Corps Training Importance Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    episiotomy Weigh placentas Take fetal scalp blood samples Perform circulation nurse duties during caesarean delivery was the only task which received a mean...56. Apply knowledge of reasons for and types of episiotomies X 57. Perform episiotomy X 58. Perform bulb/mechanical suction on newborns X 59. Clamp

  14. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally-representative telephone survey that collects detailed ...

  15. The Evolution of School Nursing Data Indicators in Massachusetts: Recommendations for a National Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapinski, Mary Ann; Sheetz, Anne H.

    2014-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses' research priorities include the recommendation that data reliability, quality, and availability be addressed to advance research in child and school health. However, identifying a national school nursing data set has remained a challenge for school nurses, school nursing leaders, school nurse professional…

  16. The Evolution of School Nursing Data Indicators in Massachusetts: Recommendations for a National Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapinski, Mary Ann; Sheetz, Anne H.

    2014-01-01

    The National Association of School Nurses' research priorities include the recommendation that data reliability, quality, and availability be addressed to advance research in child and school health. However, identifying a national school nursing data set has remained a challenge for school nurses, school nursing leaders, school nurse professional…

  17. Patient safety and nursing implication: Survey in Catalan hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas Sala, Núria; Monistrol Ruano, Olga; Espuñes Vendrell, Jordi; Sallés Creus, Montserrat; Gallardo González, Mónica; Ramón Cantón, Carme; Bueno Domínguez, María José; Llinas Vidal, Montserrat; Campo Osaba, María Antonia

    This study aims to describe the implementation of the patient safety (PS) programs in catalan hospitals and to analyze the level of nursing involvement. Multicenter cross-sectional study. To obtain the data two questionnaires were developed; one addressed to the hospital direction and another to the nurse executive in PS. The survey was distributed during 2013 to the 65 acute care hospitals in Catalonia. The questionnaire was answered by 43 nursing directors and 40 nurse executive in PS. 93% of the hospitals responded that they had a PS Program and 81.4% used a specific scoreboard with PS indicators. The referent of the hospital in PS was a nurse in 55.8% of the centres. 92.5% had a system of notification of adverse effects with an annual average of 190.3 notifications. In 86% of the centres had a nurse involved in the PS program but only in the 16% of the centres the nurse dedication was at full-time. The nurse respondents evaluate the degree of implementation of the PBS program with a note of approved and they propound as improvement increase the staff dedicated to the PS and specific academic training in PS. The degree of implementation of programs for patient safety is high in Catalan acute hospitals, while the organizational structure is highly diverse. In more than half of the hospitals the PS referent was a nurse, confirming the nurse involvement in the PS programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Surveying the hidden attitudes of hospital nurses' towards poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenauer, James; Ludwick, Ruth; Baughman, Kristin; Fishbein, Rebecca

    2015-08-01

    To explore the attitudes held by registered nurses about persons living in poverty. As a profession, nursing has strong commitment to advocating for the socioeconomically disadvantaged. The links among poverty and health disparities are well established and research demonstrates that attitudes of providers can influence how those in poverty use health services. Although nurses are the largest sector of healthcare providers globally, little research has been published on their attitudes towards patients they care for who live in poverty. Cross-sectional survey. Used a convenience sample of 117 registered nurses who completed the Attitudes Towards Poverty Short Form that contained three subscales. Regression analysis was used to examine the associations between the nurses' age, education, and years of experience, political views and financial security with their total score and subscale scores. Nurses were more likely to agree with stigmatising statements than statements that attributed poverty to personal deficiency or structural factors. In the multivariate analysis, years of experience were associated with more positive attitudes towards those living in poverty. Nurses with the most experience had less stigmatising beliefs about poverty and were more likely to endorse structural explanations. Those with a baccalaureate education were also more likely to endorse structural explanations for poverty. Gaining knowledge about attitudes towards and the factors influencing those attitudes, for example, education, are important in helping combat the disparities associated with poverty. Nurses have a duty to evaluate their individual attitudes and biases towards those living in poverty and how those attitudes and biases may influence daily practice. Assessing nurses' attitudes towards poverty may aid in better means of empowering nurses to seek solutions that will improve health conditions for those living in poverty. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. [Survey in hospitals. Nursing errors, error culture and error management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habermann, Monika; Cramer, Henning

    2010-09-01

    Knowledge on errors is important to design safe nursing practice and its framework. This article presents results of a survey on this topic, including data of a representative sample of 724 nurses from 30 German hospitals. Participants predominantly remembered medication errors. Structural and organizational factors were rated as most important causes of errors. Reporting rates were considered low; this was explained by organizational barriers. Nurses in large part expressed having suffered from mental problems after error events. Nurses' perception focussing on medication errors seems to be influenced by current discussions which are mainly medication-related. This priority should be revised. Hospitals' risk management should concentrate on organizational deficits and positive error cultures. Decision makers are requested to tackle structural problems such as staff shortage.

  20. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    OpenAIRE

    Bekkema Nienke; Fleuren Margot AH; de Veer Anke JE; Francke Anneke L

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of determinants influencing the success of the introduction of new technologies as perceived by nursing staff. Methods The study population is a nationally representative resear...

  1. 77 FR 27075 - National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-08

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; HIV Palliative Care RFA... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  2. 76 FR 31621 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: June 23-24, 2011... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  3. 76 FR 60508 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group; NRRC 52 October 20, 2011..., MD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of...

  4. 76 FR 5596 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: February 17-18, 2011... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  5. 77 FR 32652 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: June 21, 2012. Time...., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,...

  6. 78 FR 29373 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: June 10-11, 2013..., MD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of...

  7. 78 FR 63996 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: November 4-5, 2013..., MD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of...

  8. 75 FR 56118 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: October 21-22, 2010... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd.,...

  9. 78 FR 17420 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Multi-site Clinical... Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892,...

  10. 78 FR 2276 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Initial Review Group. Date: February 14-15, 2013..., MD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of...

  11. U.S. Army Survey of Nurses and Nursing Students: Sampling Frame and Survey Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Actions taken include involving nurses more in the clinical decision process, providing nurses a greater degree of autonomy , and increasing wages...Anesthesia Nursing (RNA) o Maternal-child 0 Psychiatric-mental health o Midwifery 0 Family practice "o Geriatrics/Gerontology 0 Critical care "o Medical...meaningful 0 More autonomy 0 More involving 0 More interesting 0 Other 18. How much influence did each of the following have on your decision to pursue a

  12. National questionnaire survey of TMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Naomi; Wada, Hideo; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Murata, Mitsuru; Izuno, Takashi; Sugita, Minoru; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2009-10-01

    A questionnaire survey of Japanese patients with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was carried out to investigate the frequency, laboratory abnormalities, and outcome in 2004. Out of 185 patients, there were 13 with familial TMA and 172 with acquired TMA. In acquired TMA, there were 66 with Escherichia coli O-157 infection (O-157)-related TMA, 35 with ADAMTS13-related TMA, and 22 with other types of TMA. The frequency of TMA in O-157-related TMA was high in patients from 0- to 15-year-old, and acquired TMA without O-157 was frequently observed in patients ranging from 31 to 65 years of age. In the treatment of acquired TMA, including plasma exchange (PE), steroid, antiplatelet agent, and anticoagulant, PE was carried out in 94.3% of ADAMTS13-related TMA, 77.3% of other TMA, and 7.6% of O-157-related TMA. The efficacy of PE and steroid therapy tended to be higher in ADAMTS13 TMA than in other types of TMA. The complete remission rate is the highest in O-157 TMA. The mortality rate was the lowest for O-157 TMA, and this rate also tended to be lower in ADAMTS13-related TMA than in other types of TMA. However, the determination of ADAMTS13 was not universal in Japan at the time of this questionnaire.

  13. Nursing students perceptions of desirable leadership qualities in nurse preceptors: a descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilembo, Melanie; Monterosso, Leanne

    2008-02-01

    There is a paucity of literature examining the context of leadership within the clinical preceptor/undergraduate nursing student relationship and the relevance of this to the clinical learning environment. This study used a mixed methodological survey approach to explore the leadership qualities in nurse preceptors that are considered desirable and contribute to positive practicum experiences from the perspective of 23 undergraduate nurses. Findings showed students both want and need leadership from their preceptors in order to develop psychomotor skill competency and to experience orientation to the real world of nursing care. Gaining insight into the leadership qualities that students perceive as desirable to enhance the practical experience is vital since that practical experience is viewed as the making or breaking of many students and influences retention in undergraduate education and within the profession post registration.

  14. Education for nurses working in cardiovascular care: a European survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Nurses represent the largest sector of the workforce caring for people with cardiovascular disease in Europe. Little is known about the post-registration education provided to nurses working within this specialty. The aim of this descriptive cross sectional survey was to describe the structure, content, teaching, learning, assessment and evaluation methods used in post-registration cardiovascular nurse education programmes in Europe. A 24-item researcher generated electronic questionnaire was sent to nurse representatives from 23 European countries. Items included questions about cardiovascular registered nurse education programmes. Forty-nine respondents from 17 European countries completed questionnaires. Respondents were typically female (74%) and educated at Masters (50%) or doctoral (39%) level. Fifty-one percent of the cardiovascular nursing education programmes were offered by universities either at bachelor or masters level. The most frequently reported programme content included cardiac arrhythmias (93%), heart failure (85%) and ischaemic heart disease (83%). The most common teaching mode was face-to-face lectures (85%) and/or seminars (77%). A variety of assessment methods were used with an exam or knowledge test being the most frequent. Programme evaluation was typically conducted through student feedback (95%). There is variability in the content, teaching, learning and evaluation methods in post-registration cardiovascular nurse education programmes in Europe. Cardiovascular nurse education would be strengthened with a stronger focus upon content that reflects current health challenges faced in Europe. A broader view of cardiovascular disease to include stroke and peripheral vascular disease is recommended with greater emphasis on prevention, rehabilitation and the impact of health inequalities. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013.

  15. Racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. national nurse workforce 1988-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ying; Brewer, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this article is to examine the racial and ethnic diversity profile of the nurse workforce over time and by geographic region. We conducted survey analysis using the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses from 1988 to 2008, and further supplemented our trend analysis using published findings from the 2013 National Workforce Survey of Registered Nurses. The gap in racial/ethnic minority representation between the RN workforce and the population has been persistent and has widened over time. This diversity gap is primarily due to underrepresentation of Hispanics and Blacks in the RN workforce, which varied across states and regions, with the largest gaps occurring for Hispanics in the South and West and for Blacks in the South. Greater levels of sustained and targeted support to increase nurse workforce diversity are needed and should be geared not only to specific underrepresented groups but also to the regions and states with the greatest needs. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. [Possibilities and problems in the development of forensic nursing in Japan: a questionnaire survey of clinical nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Hiromi; Tsuntematsu, Kayoko; Yanai, Keiko

    2012-09-01

    Forensic nursing scientifically obtains and preserves the criminal damage from victims of domestic violence, child abuse, elder abuse, sexual violence and other related forms of violence. This was developed in North America in the 1980s, and has carried out appropriate nursing care while protecting the human rights of victims. Serious crime in Japan has been increasing, and it would seem that forensic nursing opportunities should expand as well. However, in Japan, there hasn't been much discussion about forensic nursing. Theorizing that support for clinical forensic nursing should be recognized and relevant, we carried out a survey of 581 clinical nurses to investigate the development of forensic nursing in Japan. 93 clinical nurses (16.0%) had a low level of familiarity with forensic nursing; however, 324 nurses (56.3%) had encountered patients who had suffered violence. 264 nurses (45.4%) had a feeling of wanting to be involved in forensic nursing, but were not confident with the knowledge and technology, while 144 nurses (24.8%) were concerned about the larger responsibility they would have. 400 nurses (68.8%) hoped to receive specialized knowledge and technical education. It is necessary to establish an education system for forensic nursing in accordance with the educational status-quo while considering the present state of forensic nursing education.

  17. Baccalaureate nursing students' breastfeeding knowledge: a descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J

    2006-05-01

    This descriptive survey study assessed the breastfeeding knowledge of junior and senior baccalaureate nursing students (N=80) who had successfully completed their obstetric nursing course. With a possible perfect knowledge score of 100, participants' scores ranged from 35 to 85 with a sample mean score of 60. Surprisingly, most (85%) did not know that breastfeeding is recommended for the first year of an infant's life, and only five participants knew the proper management of mastitis. Well over one third (41.3%) of the participants opposed breastfeeding in public. Findings reveal the need to strengthen both the didactic and clinical components of the obstetric course curriculum. The acquisition of breastfeeding knowledge at the student level will better equip novice nurses to provide more effective breastfeeding counsel and support for childbearing women and to promote the achievement of the breastfeeding objectives of both the United States and the World Health Organization.

  18. Cross-sectional online survey of research productivity in young Japanese nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Yumiko; Fukahori, Hiroki; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Narama, Miho; Kono, Ayumi; Atogami, Fumi; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Okaya, Keiko; Takamizawa, Emiko; Yoshizawa, Toyoko

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the factors affecting the research productivity of young nursing faculty in Japan. An online survey targeting young nursing scholars (aged ≤ 39 years) who were members of the Japan Academy of Nursing Science was conducted from October to November 2012. Of 1634 potential respondents, 648 completed the survey (39.7%), and 400 full-time faculty of a baccalaureate degree program were selected for the analysis. The numbers of English-language and Japanese publications in the past 3 years were regressed onto personal characteristics, such as academic degree and type of university. The mean numbers of publications in English and Japanese in the past 3 years were 0.41 and 1.63, respectively. Holding a doctoral degree was significantly related to a higher number of publications in English and Japanese (e(β) = 5.78 and e(β) = 1.89, respectively). Working at a national university (e(β) = 2.15), having a research assistant (e(β) = 2.05), and the ability to read research articles in English (e(β) = 2.27) were significantly related to more English-language publications. Having the confidence to conduct quantitative research (e(β) = 1.67) was related to a larger number of Japanese publications. The lack of mentoring (e(β) = 0.97) and university workload (e(β) = 0.96) were associated with a lesser number of Japanese publications. The research productivity of young nursing faculty appeared to be quite low. Strategies to enhance research productivity in young nursing faculty, such as encouraging the achievement of a doctoral degree or enrichment of research resources, should be undertaken. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  19. National survey of the Portuguese elderly nutritional status: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Teresa; Peixoto-Plácido, Catarina; Goulão, Beatriz; Mendonça, Nuno; Alarcão, Violeta; Santos, Nuno; de Oliveira, Rita Machado; Yngve, Agneta; Bye, Asta; Bergland, Astrid; Lopes, Carla; Nicola, Paulo; Santos, Osvaldo; Clara, João Gorjão

    2016-07-16

    Worldwide we are facing a serious demographic challenge due to the dramatic growth of the population over 60 years. It is expected that the proportion of this population will nearly double from 12 to 22 %, between 2015 and 2050. This demographic shift comes with major health and socio-economic concerns. Nutrition is a fundamental determinant of both health and disease and its role in extending a healthy lifespan is the object of considerable research. Notably, malnutrition is one of the main threats to health and quality of life among the elderly. Therefore, knowledge about nutritional status among the elderly is essential for the promotion and maintenance of healthy ageing and to support the development of health protection policies and equity in elderly health care. This is a nationwide nutrition survey of the Portuguese population over 65 years old, with data collection through face-to-face interviews. A representative and random sample of community dwelling elderly and nursing homes residents will be obtained by multistage sampling stratified per main Portuguese regions, sex and age groups. Minimum sample size was estimated to be 2077 elderly (979 in the community and 1098 in nursing homes). Data will be collected on food habits and eating patterns, nutritional status, food insecurity, lifestyle, self-rated general health status and self-reported diseases, functionality, loneliness, cognitive function, emotional status and demographic and socio-economic characterization. This is the first national survey to evaluate the prevalence of nutritional risk and malnutrition of the Portuguese population above 65 years old, including those living in nursing homes. It will allow the identification of population subgroups of elderly with increased odds of malnutrition and nutritional risk. In addition, this survey will contribute to the identification of psychosocial and clinical predictors of malnutrition among elderly, which is an important risk factor for other

  20. Predictors of Retention and Passing National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The current nursing shortage has challenged colleges to educate nurses at a faster pace than in previous times. Successful completion of the nursing programs and passing the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) exam is important for the students, faculty, and nursing programs. The purpose of this retrospective…

  1. Estimates from two survey designs: national hospital discharge survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, B J; Kozak, L J

    1992-05-01

    The methodology for the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) has been revised in several ways. These revisions, which were implemented for the 1988 NHDS, included adoption of a different hospital sampling frame, changes in the sampling design (in particular the implementation of a three-stage design), increased use of data purchased from abstracting service organizations, and adjustments to the estimation procedures used to derive the national estimates. To investigate the effects of these revisions on the estimates of hospital use from the NHDS, data were collected from January through March of 1988 using both the old and the new survey methods. This study compared estimates based on the old and the new survey methods for a variety of hospital and patient characteristics. Although few estimates were identical across survey methodologies, most of the variations could be attributed to sampling error. Estimates from two different samples of the same population would be expected to vary by chance even if precisely the same methods were used to collect and process the data. Because probability samples were used for the old and new survey methodologies, sampling error could be measured. Approximate relative standard errors were calculated for the estimates using the old and new survey methods. Taking these errors into account, less than 10 percent of the estimates were found to differ across survey methodologies at the 0.05 level of significance. Because a large number of comparisons were made, 5 percent of the estimates could have been found to be significantly different by chance alone. When there were statistically significant differences in nonmedical data, the new methods appeared to produce more accurate estimates than the old methods did. Race was more likely to be reported using the new methods. "New" estimates for hospitals in the West Region and government-owned hospitals were more similar than the corresponding "old" estimates to data from the census of

  2. 78 FR 50067 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open...: National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. Date: September 17-18, 2013. Open: September 17, 2013,...

  3. 77 FR 12599 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment. Date... Inst of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701 Democracy Blvd. (DEM 1), Suite...

  4. 77 FR 6812 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel Genomic Advances to Wound...: Tamizchelvi Thyagarajan, Ph.D., Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research,...

  5. 77 FR 76054 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Multi-Site Clinical... Assistance Program Nos. 93.361, Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: December...

  6. 78 FR 22892 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing...

  7. 76 FR 571 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing...

  8. 75 FR 55808 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, Clinical Trial Review... Program Nos. 93.361, Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: September 8,...

  9. 76 FR 76169 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open...: National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. Date: January 17-18, 2012. Open: January 17, 2012, 1...

  10. 75 FR 49941 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing...

  11. 77 FR 72363 - National Institute Of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute Of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing...

  12. 75 FR 20853 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing...

  13. 76 FR 23828 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing...

  14. 76 FR 49779 - National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open... unwarranted invasion of personal privacy. Name of Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing...

  15. 78 FR 73867 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Multi-Site Clinical... Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, 301-402-5807,...

  16. 77 FR 17079 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open...: National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. Date: May 15-16, 2012. Open: May 15, 2012, 1 p.m. to 5:15...

  17. 78 FR 14098 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel; Loan Repayment. Date.... 93.361, Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 26, 2013....

  18. 78 FR 75358 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting... hereby given of a meeting of the National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open...: National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. Date: January 13-14, 2014. Open: January 13, 2014, 1:00...

  19. Lao National Literacy Survey 2001: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Submission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Background: Adult literacy rates are an important indicator for describing the status of education and development within a country. The Lao national literacy survey was undertaken in 2001 to provide a reliable source of literacy data which in turn will determine if the country will reach Education For All (EFA) goals agreed upon at the World…

  20. Belief in an Afterlife: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenow, Daniel J.; Bolin, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    Examined factors affecting belief in afterlife. Data from 1978 subfile on National Opinion Research Center's General Social Survey showed that, controlling on frequency of church attendance and religious intensity, Protestants had highest incidence of belief in life after death, followed by Catholics, and then by Jews. Race, religion, and church…

  1. A survey into student nurses' attitudes towards mental illness: implications for nurse training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Tim; Wood, Steve; Williams, Rena

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports on a survey of attitudes to mental illness that was completed with a cohort of pre-registration nurses in 2007 in a large university in Essex. The background literature highlights the effects of attitudes on stigma, disadvantage and discrimination and presents a brief review of the literature on cultural variations in attitudes. It also briefly reviews the attitudes of health professionals to mental illness. A survey using the Community Attitudes to Mental Illness questionnaire was completed and ethnicity proved to be an important factor in accounting for variations in attitudes to mental illness. The Black and Black British group displayed less positive attitudes across all nursing branches when compared to the white group. The differences raised questions about how best nurse training can prepare nurses to practice in culturally sensitive ways that acknowledge the beliefs of patients whilst avoiding stereotyping and discrimination. Personal contact with someone with mental illness was also found to be a significant factor and the importance of user involvement in training is discussed. The paper concludes with some recommendations for nurse training that include greater use of teaching strategies that challenge beliefs and assumptions and promote a commitment to multicultural mental health practice.

  2. Lateral Violence in Nursing Survey: Instrument Development and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynne S. Nemeth

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An examination of the psychometric properties of the Lateral Violence in Nursing Survey (LVNS, an instrument previously developed to measure the perceived incidence and severity of lateral violence (LV in the nursing workplace, was carried out. Conceptual clustering and principal components analysis were used with survey responses from 663 registered nurses and ancillary nursing staff in a southeastern tertiary care medical center. Where appropriate, Cronbach’s alpha (α evaluated internal consistency. The prevalence/severity of lateral violence items constitute two distinct subscales (LV by self and others with Cronbach’s alpha of 0.74 and 0.86, respectively. The items asking about potential causes of LV are unidimensional and internally consistent (alpha = 0.77 but there is no conceptually coherent theme underlying the various causes. Respondents rating a potential LV cause as “major” scored higher on both prevalence/severity subscales than those rating it a “minor” cause or not a cause. Subsets of items on the LVNS are internally reliable, supporting construct validity. Revisions of the original LVNS instrument will improve its use in future work.

  3. Safety and quality of nurse independent prescribing: a national study of experiences of education, continuing professional development clinical governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alesha; Latter, Sue; Blenkinsopp, Alison

    2014-11-01

    To determine the adequacy of initial nurse independent prescribing education and identify continuing professional development and clinical governance strategies in place for non-medical prescribing. In 2006, new legislation in England enabled nurses with an independent prescribing qualification to prescribe, within their competence. In 2006, non-medical prescribing policies released by the Department of Health outlined the recommendations for education, continuing professional development and governance of non-medical prescribing; however, there was no evidence on a national scale about the extent of implementation and effectiveness of these strategies. National surveys of: (i) nurse independent prescribers; and (ii) non-medical prescribing leaders in England. Questionnaire surveys (August 2008-February 2009) covering educational preparation, prescribing practice (nurse independent prescribers) and structures/processes for support and governance (non-medical prescribing leaders). Response rates were 65% (976 prescribers) and 52% (87 leaders). Most nurses felt their prescribing course met their learning needs and stated course outcomes and that they had adequate development and support for prescribing to maintain patient safety. Some types of community nurse prescribers had less access to support and development. The prescribing leaders reported lacking systems to ensure continuity of non-medical prescribing and monitoring patient experience. Educational programmes of preparation for nurse prescribing were reported to be operating satisfactorily and providing fit-for-purpose preparation for the expansion to the scope of nurse independent prescribing. Most clinical governance and risk management strategies for prescribing were in place in primary and secondary care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Professional Nurse Coaching: Advances in National and Global Healthcare transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Darlene

    2013-01-01

    Nurse coaches are responding to the mandate of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910)—the foundational philosopher of modern nursing—to advocate, identify, and focus on factors that promote health, healthy people, and healthy communities that are recognized today as environmental and social determinants of health.1,2 The Institute of Medicine report3 and other health initiatives suggest the need for increased education and leadership from nurses to address the healthcare needs of our nation and world. Nurse coaches are strategically pos-i tioned and equipped to implement health-promoting and evidence-based strategies with clients and support behavioral and lifestyle changes to enhance growth, overall health, and well-being. With possibilities not yet imagined, employment opportunities for nurses who incorporate coaching into professional practice are developing across the entire spectrum of health, well-ness, and healing. PMID:24416681

  5. The 2014 National Nursing Research Roundtable: The science of caregiving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Patricia A.; Gullatte, Mary

    2014-01-01

    The National Nursing Research Roundtable (NNRR) meets annually to provide an opportunity for the leaders of nursing organizations with a research mission to discuss and disseminate research findings to improve health outcomes. In 2014, the NNRR addressed the science of caregiving, a topic of increasing importance given that more people are living with chronic conditions and that managing chronic illness is shifting from providers to individuals, their families, and the communities where they live. The NNRR consisted of scientific presentations in which leading researchers discussed the latest advances in caregiving science across the life span and breakout sessions where specific questions were discussed. The questions focused on the policy and practice implications of caregiving science and provided an opportunity for nursing leaders to discuss ways to advance caregiving science. The nursing community is ideally positioned to design and test caregiver health interventions and to implement these interventions in clinical and community settings. PMID:25015405

  6. Nurses' Use of a Web-Based National Guide for Child Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, Johanna; Olander, Ewy; Anderberg, Peter; Berglund, Johan Sanmartin

    2016-05-01

    Rikshandboken i Barnhälsovård is a Swedish Web-based guide for child healthcare, providing quality-ensured guidelines and support contributing to equality in child healthcare among all children. In 2015, a new child healthcare program was implemented and made available in this Web-based guide. The aim of this study was to investigate how child healthcare nurses use Rikshandboken i Barnhälsovård and factors affecting its use. The study was a comprehensive Web survey of 2376 child healthcare nurses in Sweden answered by 1309. Statistical processing was performed using descriptive and analytical methods. Rikshandboken i Barnhälsovård was widely used by the respondents, but regional differences and number of years in the profession affected the use. Almost all nurses were satisfied with the usability, content, and design and felt that a national guide for child healthcare is important. This indicates that an established Web-based national guide is an appropriate setting when a new national program is implemented. In order to achieve an equal and equitable child healthcare, it is essential that all nurses use the national guide to provide evidence-based practice. The value of main child healthcare units as regional facilitators in the innovation process of Rikshandboken i Barnhälsovård should not be underestimated.

  7. What deters nurses from participating in web-based graduate nursing programs?: A cross-sectional survey research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Suzanne H

    2016-01-01

    A graduate degree is required of nursing faculty in America. Because of the nursing faculty shortage, web-based graduate nursing programs are being offered to encourage nurses to return to school. The identification of deterrents to participating in these programs is an important step in increasing enrollment. To identify deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs. Descriptive survey research. Louisiana Two hundred and eighty-one registered nurse members of the Louisiana Nurses' Association. The 54-item four-point Likert-type interval scale Deterrents to Participation in Web-Based Graduate Nursing Programs Survey Instrument was used. Data were collected over 8weeks using SurveyMonkey.com to administer the web survey tool to all members of the Louisiana State Nurses' Association. A factor analysis revealed a three-factor solution that explained 55.436% of the total variance in deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs. The factors were labeled "concerns about quality, cost, and time," "concerns about access to resources: technological and personal," and "concerns about electronic mediated communication." Multiple regression analysis revealed an overall model of three predictors of deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs: no computer literacy, annual household income between 20,000 and 50,000 dollars, and having the current educational status of graduating from a diploma RN program. This model accounted for 21% of the variance in the deterrents to participation scores. Since these three significant predictors of deterrents to participation in web-based graduate nursing programs were identified, web-based nursing graduate program administrators might consider an outreach to RN diploma graduates in an effort to make them aware of available technology support programs to foster participation. Scholarships for lower income nursing students are recommended, and programs to support computer

  8. Job dissatisfaction and burnout of nurses in Hunan, China: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenjuan; He, Guoping; Wang, Honghong; He, Ying; Yuan, Qun; Liu, Dan

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we focused on measuring levels of nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction in the daily practice of nurses in Hunan province, China, analyzed factors related to nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction, and explored the relationship between them. Previous studies have shown a high level of burnout and job dissatisfaction among nurses worldwide. A cross-sectional survey of 1100 nurses was conducted. The nurses worked at 20 hospitals in 11 cities and counties throughout China's Hunan province. Nurse burnout was measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Nurse-rated job dissatisfaction was described using a four point scale, and work environment was measured using the Nursing Work Index - Practice Environment Scale. The results showed that nurses had high burnout scores and were dissatisfied with their jobs. Staffing, work environment, and work hours were all significantly associated with nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction. Adequate staffing, improved work environment, and reasonable work hours are related to decreasing nurse burnout and job dissatisfaction.

  9. Nurses' perceptions of pain assessment and management practices in neonates: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pölkki, Tarja; Korhonen, Anne; Laukkala, Helena

    2017-08-22

    This study aimed to describe pain assessment and management practices for neonates based on nurses' perceptions in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted in Finland. Of all nurses (N = 422) working in the NICUs in the country's five university hospitals, 294 responded to a questionnaire. The data were analysed by statistical methods. Nurses agreed that pain assessment is important, but over half of them reported being able to assess pain in a reliable way without using pain assessment scales. Physiological parameters and changes in neonate's behaviour were reported as routinely observed, but many specific facial expressions indicative of pain were less often observed. Only a few pain assessment scales were known, and they were not routinely used in clinical practice. Most nurses reported using physical methods and giving oral sucrose along with non-nutritive sucking. Counselling parents to continue breastfeeding or guiding them to use skin-to-skin care or music was rarely reported as used to alleviate infants' pain. Educational interventions for nurses are needed to improve pain assessment and management practices in the NICUs. In addition, there is a need for national guidelines in order to ensure the equal treatment to all neonates. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  10. Pilot survey of NICU nurses' interest in the neonatal nurse practitioner role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn B; Vargo, Lyn E; Reavey, Daphne A; Hunter, Kim S

    2005-02-01

    This descriptive, qualitative pilot study explored the interest and perceptions of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses regarding the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role. Motivating factors to become an NNP, challenges facing NNPs, and rewards of the NNP role from the perspectives of NICU nurses were explored. The convenience sample was obtained using 2 survey techniques. The first sample group included nurses who were employed in Level III NICUs located within 2 major Midwestern cities. In order to confirm the data and to expand the scope, the second sample group was recruited from NICU nurses who were attending a regional educational conference. All participants were currently employed NICU nurses and were therefore potential NNP students. Combining the participants of both enrollment techniques resulted in a potential of 696 subjects. A simple self-administered survey was used to collect data. Narrative data were qualitatively analyzed. Demographic data and categorical items were quantified. This study achieved a total 30% response rate (n = 209). Of the total participants, only 32% of Level III NICU nurses were interested in becoming an NNP. Analysis of the data revealed 6 major categories (themes) of reasons why nurses were not interested in the NNP role. The themes most often mentioned by the participants were (1) obligations to family and/or work (46%) and (2) too much responsibility in the NNP role (30%). The data also revealed several different rewards and challenges for those in the NNP role as well as factors that may motivate nurses to become an NNP. Given the current NNP shortage, an increase in the supply of NNPs for the workforce is imperative. Current enrollment in NNP academic programs does not appear to be meeting the demand. Exploring the factors that influence enrollment in NNP programs from the perspective of potential NNP students is the first step towards increasing the supply of NNPs. The majority of participants were not interested

  11. Post-harmonised European National Travel Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Linda; Sobrino Vázquez, Natalia

    of walking trips rather similar with a higher level of cycling in the Netherlands, more public transport in Switzerland, and more air traffic in Sweden. Normally kilometres per respondent / inhabitant is used for national planning purpose and this is very affected by the share of mobile travellers......Look-up tables are collected and analysed for 12 European National Travel Surveys (NTS) in a harmonized way covering the age group 13-84 year. Travel behaviour measured as kilometres, time use and trips per traveller is compared. Trips per traveller are very similar over the countries whereas...

  12. 77 FR 3481 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory.... Contact Person: Weiqun Li, MD, Scientific Review Officer, National Institute of Nursing Research, National... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.361, Nursing Research, National Institutes...

  13. 77 FR 3479 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory... Review Officer, Office of Review, National Inst of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 6701... of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.361, Nursing Research, National Institutes of...

  14. Employers' and employees' views on responsibilities for career management in nursing: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Julia

    2015-01-01

    To examine nurse employees' and employers' views about responsibilities for managing nurses' careers. Career management policies are associated with cost savings, in terms of workforce recruitment and retention and an increase in job and career satisfaction. In nursing, responsibility for career management remains relatively unexplored. A multicenter, cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Data were collected from 871 nurse employees and employers in the British National Health Service. The study was conducted in 2008, a period when policy reforms aimed at modernizing the healthcare workforce in England. In the current discussions in Europe and the USA about the future of nursing, these data reveal insights not previously reported. Exploratory analyses were undertaken using descriptive and inferential statistics. The analysis indicated a temporal dimension to career management responsibilities. Short-term responsibilities for securing funding and time for development lay more with employers. Medium-term responsibilities for assessing nurses' strengths and weakness, determining job-related knowledge and skills and identifying education and training needs appeared to be shared. Long-term responsibilities for developing individual careers and future development plans lay primarily with employees. New ways of managing nurses' career development that lead to greater independence for employees and greater flexibility for employers, while retaining a high-calibre and competent workforce, are needed. Ultimately, career management responsibilities should not tilt to either side but rather be shared to benefit both parties. Clarifying employers' and employees' responsibilities for career management may help both parties to develop a common understanding of each other's role and to meet their obligations in a constructive dialogue. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Conference 2017 Conference Agenda Conference Registration Travel & Hotel Continuing Education 2016 Speaker Handouts Future NAPNAP Conferences Specialty Symposia Exhibitors & Sponsors 2017 Exhibitor Resources 2017 Industry Sponsored Ancillary Events Industry-Sponsored Posters 2017 For ...

  16. Methods of the National Nutrition Survey 1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resano-Pérez Elsa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the methods and analyses of the 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-99. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The 1999 National Nutrition Survey (NNS-99 is a probabilistic survey with nationwide representativity. The NNS-99 included four regions and urban and rural areas of Mexico. The last sampling units were households, selected through stratified cluster sampling. The study population consisted of children under five years of age, school-age children (6-11 years, and women of childbearing age (12-49 years. Data were collected on anthropometric measurements, hemoglobin levels, morbidity and its determinants, and socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. In addition, data on diet and micronutrients intakes (iron, zinc, vitamin A, folic acid, vitamin C, and iodine were obtained in a sub-sample of subjects. RESULTS: The response rate for the NNS-99 was 82.3%; the non-response rate was 5.9% and the remaining did not participate due to uninhabited houses. CONCLUSIONS: This survey updates the information on nutritional status in Mexico and should serve as the basis for food and nutrition policy-making and priority program design.

  17. Blended learning in ethics education: a survey of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-05-01

    Nurses are experiencing new ethical issues as a result of global developments and changes in health care. With health care becoming increasingly sophisticated, and countries facing challenges of graying population, ethical issues involved in health care are bound to expand in quantity and in depth. Blended learning rather as a combination of multiple delivery media designed to promote meaningful learning. Specifically, this study was focused on two questions: (1) the students' satisfaction and attitudes as members of a scenario-based learning process in a blended learning environment; (2) the relationship between students' satisfaction ratings of nursing ethics course and their attitudes in the blended learning environment. In total, 99 senior undergraduate nursing students currently studying at a public nursing college in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted in this study. The participants were asked to fill out two Likert-scale questionnaire surveys: CAAS (Case Analysis Attitude Scale), and BLSS (Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale). The results showed what students felt about their blended learning experiences - mostly items ranged from 3.27-3.76 (the highest score is 5). Another self-assessment of scenario analysis instrument revealed the mean scores ranged from 2.87-4.19. Nearly 57.8% of the participants rated the course 'extremely helpful' or 'very helpful.' This study showed statistically significant correlations (r=0.43) between students' satisfaction with blended learning and case analysis attitudes. In addition, results testified to a potential of the blended learning model proposed in this study to bridge the gap between students and instructors and the one between students and their peers, which are typical of blended learning, and to create meaningful learning by employing blended pedagogical consideration in the course design. The use of scenario instruction enables students to develop critical

  18. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  19. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  20. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  1. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  2. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  3. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  4. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  5. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  6. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  7. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2008)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  8. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  9. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  10. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2009)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  11. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2013)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  12. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2004)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) measures the prevalence and correlates of drug...

  13. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  14. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) measures the prevalence and correlates of drug...

  15. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  16. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  17. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2007)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  18. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  19. National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally representative survey to assess experiences of intimate partner violence,...

  20. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  1. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) measures the prevalence and correlates of drug...

  2. National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) - III

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions - III (NESARC-III) is a nationally representative survey of 46,500 adult Americans that collected...

  3. National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH-2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH) series (formerly titled National Household Survey on Drug Abuse) primarily measures the prevalence and correlates...

  4. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual Refuge Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on National...

  5. Transferring 2001 National Household Travel Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Patricia S [ORNL; Reuscher, Tim [ORNL; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

    2007-05-01

    Policy makers rely on transportation statistics, including data on personal travel behavior, to formulate strategic transportation policies, and to improve the safety and efficiency of the U.S. transportation system. Data on personal travel trends are needed to examine the reliability, efficiency, capacity, and flexibility of the Nation's transportation system to meet current demands and to accommodate future demand. These data are also needed to assess the feasibility and efficiency of alternative congestion-mitigating technologies (e.g., high-speed rail, magnetically levitated trains, and intelligent vehicle and highway systems); to evaluate the merits of alternative transportation investment programs; and to assess the energy-use and air-quality impacts of various policies. To address these data needs, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) initiated an effort in 1969 to collect detailed data on personal travel. The 1969 survey was the first Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). The survey was conducted again in 1977, 1983, 1990, 1995, and 2001. Data on daily travel were collected in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990 and 1995. In 2001, the survey was renamed the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) and it collected both daily and long-distance trips. The 2001 survey was sponsored by three USDOT agencies: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). The primary objective of the survey was to collect trip-based data on the nature and characteristics of personal travel so that the relationships between the characteristics of personal travel and the demographics of the traveler can be established. Commercial and institutional travel were not part of the survey. Due to the survey's design, data in the NHTS survey series were not recommended for estimating travel statistics for categories smaller than the combination of Census division (e.g., New

  6. A National Study on Nurses' Exposure to Occupational Violence in Lebanon: Prevalence, Consequences and Associated Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Alameddine

    Full Text Available Healthcare institutions have commonly reported exposure of employees, particularly nurses, to high levels of occupational violence. Despite such evidence in the Middle East Region, there is a dearth of national studies that have systematically investigated this phenomenon. This study investigates the prevalence, characteristics, consequences and factors associated with nurses' exposure to occupational violence in Lebanon.A cross-sectional design was utilized to survey a nationally representative sample of 915 nurses registered with the Order of Nurses in Lebanon. Stratified random sampling by governorate was utilized. Individually-mailed questionnaires collected information on exposure to violence, degree of burnout and demographic/professional background. The main outcome variables were exposure to verbal abuse (never, 1-3, 4-9 and 10+ times and physical violence (never, ever over the past 12-months. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate prevalence of violence. Multivariable, binomial and multinomial regression models were carried out to investigate the correlates of exposure to verbal abuse and physical violence, respectively.Response rate was 64.8%. Over the last year, prevalence of nurses' exposure to verbal abuse was 62%, (CI: 58-65% and physical violence was 10%, (CI: 8-13%. Among respondents, 31.7% of nurses indicated likelihood to quit their jobs and 22.3% were undetermined. Furthermore, 54.1% reported high levels of emotional exhaustion and 28.8% reported high levels of depersonalization. Compared to nurses with no exposure to verbal abuse, nurses reporting high exposure had high levels of emotional exhaustion (OR:6.4; CI:1.76-23.32, depersonalization (OR:6.8; CI: 3-15 and intention to quit job (OR:3.9; CI: 1.8-8.3. They further reported absence of anti-violence policies at their institutions (OR: 3; CI: 1.5-6.3. Nurses that were ever exposed to physical violence were more likely to be males (OR: 2.2; CI: 1.1-4.3, working day and

  7. Dropouts from nursing education: path analysis of a national sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, B H

    1980-01-01

    Path analysis was used to test a theoretical model of college nursing student dropouts. Multiple regression was used to assess the relative importance of the predictor variables. Students' self-reported reasons for dropping out were studied by contingency and correlational analyses to determine the relationship between these reasons and individual difference variables. Factor analysis was used to develop scales to measure the variables of locus of control, self-esteem, social integration, and institutional commitment. The sample of students was drawn from the National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972. Included in the sample were students entering two- and four-year nursing programs full-time in the fall of 1972. These two groups of students were found to be significantly different in measures of cognitive ability and in aspirations for further education. Approximately 27 percent of the two-year and 41 percent of the four-year students withdrew from their nursing programs during this study. Reasons for withdrawal most frequently cited by both groups related to losing interest in nursing and becoming interested in other fields of study. Educational aspirations had the strongest direct effect on persistence in nursing for two-year students; for four-year students, academic ability was the most powerful predictor of persistence.

  8. Danish National Framework for collecting information about patients’ nutritional status. Nursing Minimum dataset (N-MDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsen, Sasja Jul; Madsen, Inge; Bjerrum, Merete

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark the national guidelines for nursing documentation outlines twelve areas in which nurses have to systematically document daily care. Nutrition is one of these areas. However, the guidelines are frameworks that do not specify exactly what data nurses have to collect and which areas nurse...

  9. Success-Failure on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses by Nurse Candidates from an Accelerated Baccalaureate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Andrew C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Nine years of data from first-time nurse candidates taking the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were examined to identify predictors of successful performance and determine probabilities of success. Variables placing nurse candidates at risk included first-semester grade point average, sex, and whether they…

  10. Nurse preparedness for the non-communicable disease escalation in Thailand: a cross-sectional survey of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Nicholas D; Rajataramya, Benjaporn; Tanomsingh, Saengchom; Ronis, David L; Potempa, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Chronic diseases are now the largest cause of mortality in Thailand, and form an increasingly large portion of the healthcare landscape. In the Thai health system, many patients with chronic conditions receive care and disease management services from nurses, yet specialized training in chronic diseases is not currently part of standard nursing degree programs. Given the evolving epidemiology of the Thailand population, we questioned whether practicing nurses remain confident in their knowledge and skills in chronic disease management. We conducted a cross-sectional, self-efficacy survey of nurses in eight randomly-selected provinces in Thailand, receiving 468 responses. Nurse self-efficacy was analyzed in prominent chronic disease types, including cancer, hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, and pulmonary diseases. Factors, such as geographic location, education level, continuing education experience, and hospital size, were found to significantly affect nurse self-efficacy levels; nurses highly prioritized additional training in heart diseases and cerebrovascular diseases, followed by hypertension, cancer, and diabetes.

  11. Trauma Care Training for National Police Nurses in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubiano, Andrés M.; Sánchez, Álvaro I.; Guyette, Francis; Puyana, Juan C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In response to a requirement for advanced trauma care nurses to provide combat tactical medical support, the antinarcotics arm of the Colombian National Police (CNP) requested the Colombian National Prehospital Care Association to develop a Combat Tactical Medicine Course (MEDTAC course). Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of this course in imparting knowledge and skills to the students. Methods We trained 374 combat nurses using the novel MEDTAC course. We evaluated students using pre-and postcourse performance with a 45-question examination. Field simulations and live tissue exercises were evaluated by instructors using a Likert scale with possible choices of 1 to 4. Interval estimation of proportions was calculated with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI). Differences in didactic test scores were assessed using a t-test at 0.05 level of statistical significance. Results Between March 2006 and July 2007, 374 combat nursing students of the CNP were trained. The difference between examination scores before and after the didactic part of the course was statistically significant (p combat nurses serving in the CNP. MEDTAC represents a customized approach for military trauma care training in Colombia. This course is an example of specialized training available for groups that operate in austere environments with limited resources. PMID:19947877

  12. The provision of diabetes care in nursing homes in Galway city and county: a survey of nursing homes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, Lorna

    2014-03-01

    In addition to the increasing prevalence of diabetes, our population is growing older and living longer. This survey aimed to determine the care provided to residents with diabetes in Nursing Homes.\\r\

  13. Current Dermatologic Care in Dutch Nursing Homes and Possible Improvements: A Nationwide Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lubeek, S.F.; Geer, E.R. van der; Gelder, M.M. van; Koopmans, R.T.; Kerkhof, P.C. van de; Gerritsen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the provision and need of dermatologic care among Dutch nursing home patients and to obtain recommendations for improvement. DESIGN: Cross-sectional nationwide survey. SETTING: All 173 nursing home organizations in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Physicians working in nursing

  14. The United Kingdom National Healthy School Standard: A Framework for Strengthening the School Nurse Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklander, Molly K.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze the school nursing role within the National Healthy School Standard (NHSS) in the United Kingdom with a view toward clarifying and strengthening the role of school nurses globally. Within the National Healthy School Standard framework, school nurses serve an integral role in linking health and education…

  15. Surveying multiple health professional team members within institutional settings: an example from the nursing home industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Melissa A; Roman, Anthony; Rogers, Michelle L; Tyler, Denise A; Mor, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Quality improvement and cost containment initiatives in health care increasingly involve interdisciplinary teams of providers. To understand organizational functioning, information is often needed from multiple members of a leadership team since no one person may have sufficient knowledge of all aspects of the organization. To minimize survey burden, it is ideal to ask unique questions of each member of the leadership team in areas of their expertise. However, this risks substantial missing data if all eligible members of the organization do not respond to the survey. Nursing home administrators (NHA) and directors of nursing (DoN) play important roles in the leadership of long-term care facilities. Surveys were administered to NHAs and DoNs from a random, nationally representative sample of U.S. nursing homes about the impact of state policies, market forces, and organizational factors that impact provider performance and residents' outcomes. Responses were obtained from a total of 2,686 facilities (response rate [RR] = 66.6%) in which at least one individual completed the questionnaire and 1,693 facilities (RR = 42.0%) in which both providers participated. No evidence of nonresponse bias was detected. A high-quality representative sample of two providers in a long-term care facility can be obtained. It is possible to optimize data collection by obtaining unique information about the organization from each provider while minimizing the number of items asked of each individual. However, sufficient resources must be available for follow-up to nonresponders with particular attention paid to lower resourced, lower quality facilities caring for higher acuity residents in highly competitive nursing home markets.

  16. Implementation of curriculum guidelines for pharmacology and pharmacotherapeutics in FNP graduate programs: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N S; Possidente, C J; Muskus, C

    2001-01-01

    Model Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics Curriculum Guidelines were developed by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties and published in 1998. To date, no publication of evaluation of adoption or adherence to these guidelines is available. The purpose of this survey was to determine how family nurse practitioner programs incorporate the guidelines into their curriculum. A mailed self-report questionnaire to 193 schools yielded a 41% response rate. Eighty-five percent (n = 68) of the programs have not yet fully integrated the guidelines into their curriculum. Difficulties addressing the extensive content within a 3-credit course and the challenges of teaching students with varied clinical backgrounds and knowledge levels were frequently cited. Although further study of achievement of the guidelines is necessary, an increase in credit allocation, consideration of a conceptual approach to the topic, and use of varied teaching strategies may make achievement of the guidelines more realistic.

  17. [The national addictions survey of Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Conyer, R; Medina-Mora, M E; Sepúlveda, J; De la Fuente, R; Kumate, J

    1990-01-01

    A probabilistic household survey was made with the following objectives: to estimate the prevalence of consumption of tobacco, alcohol and legal and illegal drugs; to identify attitudes and values, risk factors and problems associated with the consumption of addictive substances in a population from 12 to 65 years old, which resides in the urban areas of Mexico. This survey forms part of the National Health Surveys System, and its sample design is based on the Master Sample Framework of the National Health Surveys System, which gathered information representative of the national population and for seven regions. In the elaboration of the questionnaire indicators proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO), validated for Mexico, were used as well as previous knowledge about the topic. Thirteen thousand and five interviews were made, of which 96.7 per cent were complete and 2.6 per cent were rejected. In the group from 12 to 17 years old, 32 per cent of the men and 23 per cent of the women already consumed alcoholic drinks. The age group with the largest proportion of men who were frequent drinkers is from 30 to 39 years of age, with 36.3 per cent. For women 34.0 per cent of the frequent drinkers were found in the 40 to 49 year age group. It was found that six per cent of the population from 18 to 65 years of age is alcohol dependent, 12.5 per cent of men and less than one per cent of women. The population which smokes reaches 26 per cent of the total, with 38.3 per cent of men and 14.4 per cent of women. Forty two and four per cent of smokers are from 18 to 29 years of age. Among the daily smokers, 17 per cent were considered dependent on cigarettes. Only 4.8 per cent of the population admits having consumed some type of drug on at least one occasion, with the men from 12 to 34 years old being the age group which is most affected by the use of drugs (8.5%). Active users in the last year made up 2.1 per cent and in the last month the proportion of active users

  18. Development of the Basic Core Test Items of National Nurse's License Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Ja Kim

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a classification framework for the test elements of the National Registered Nurse's License Examination and to divide the test items into standard and basic core on the basis of the RN's job descriptions. And the adequa to proportion of the basic core test items is going to be identified. Method and results: In order to develop the classification framework of the National Registered Nurse's License Examination, RN's job descriptions, nursing standards, and the specific learning objectives of nursing courses were reviewed. And a survey was used to identify which entity would be appropriate for a reference to the basic core test items. 146 of professors from schools of nursing and members of each division of Korean Academic Society of Nursing(KASN were participated in the survey. The study showed the 98% of respondents agreed to use RN's job descriptions in selecting the basic core test items and 30% for the basic core test would be appropriate. And the contents, the selection criteria, and the proportion of the basic core test items were developed by the members of this research, the members of the National RN's License Examination subcommittee, and the presidents of each division of KASN. The total of 1990 standard test items were selected among 3524 items, that 3 out of 7 members in the research team agreed to choose. Duplicated items in the standard items were deleted. 205 items out of the 1990 standard items were selected as the basic core test items. And 14 items were added in Medical Laws and Ethics which leads the total of 219 basic core test items. ln conclusion, the 99 items, 30% of total current examination items were chosen as the final basic core test items using the delphimethod. Further studies are needed to validate the current National License Examination for RN on the basis of the 99 basic core test items.

  19. Teens, Health and Technology: A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Wartella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the age of digital technology, as teens seem to be constantly connected online, via social media, and through mobile applications, it is no surprise that they increasingly turn to digital media to answer their health questions. This study is the first of its kind to survey a large, nationally-representative sample of teens to investigate how they use the newest digital technologies, including mobile apps, social networking sites, electronic gaming and wearable devices, to explore health topics. The survey covered the types of health topics teens most frequently search for, which technologies they are most likely to use and how they use them, and whether they report having changed their behaviors due to digital health information. In addition, this survey explores how the digital divide continues to impact adolescents. Results of this study indicate that teens are concerned about many health issues, ranging from fitness, sexual activity, drugs, hygiene as well as mental health and stress. As teens virtually always have a digital device at their fingertips, it is clear that public health interventions and informational campaigns must be tailored to reflect the ways that teens currently navigate digital health information and the health challenges that concern them most.

  20. Teens, Health and Technology: A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Wartella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the age of digital technology, as teens seem to be constantly connected online, via social media, and through mobile applications, it is no surprise that they increasingly turn to digital media to answer their health questions. This study is the first of its kind to survey a large, nationally-representative sample of teens to investigate how they use the newest digital technologies, including mobile apps, social networking sites, electronic gaming and wearable devices, to explore health topics. The survey covered the types of health topics teens most frequently search for, which technologies they are most likely to use and how they use them, and whether they report having changed their behaviors due to digital health information. In addition, this survey explores how the digital divide continues to impact adolescents. Results of this study indicate that teens are concerned about many health issues, ranging from fitness, sexual activity, drugs, hygiene as well as mental health and stress. As teens virtually always have a digital device at their fingertips, it is clear that public health interventions and informational campaigns must be tailored to reflect the ways that teens currently navigate digital health information and the health challenges that concern them most.

  1. Nursing unit teams matter: Impact of unit-level nurse practice environment, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, and quality of care, and patient adverse events--a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bogaert, Peter; Timmermans, Olaf; Weeks, Susan Mace; van Heusden, Danny; Wouters, Kristien; Franck, Erik

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the impact of nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, and burnout on nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events variables at the nursing unit level. Nurse practice environment studies show growing insights and knowledge about determining factors for nurse workforce stability, quality of care, and patient safety. Until now, international studies have primarily focused on variability at the hospital level; however, insights at the nursing unit level can reveal key factors in the nurse practice environment. A cross-sectional design with a survey. In a cross-sectional survey, a sample of 1108 nurses assigned to 96 nursing units completed a structured questionnaire composed of various validated instruments measuring nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout, nurse reported job outcomes, quality of care, and patient adverse events. Associations between the variables were examined using multilevel modelling techniques. Various unit-level associations (simple models) were identified between nurse practice environment factors, nurse work characteristics, burnout dimensions, and nurse reported outcome variables. Multiple multilevel models showed various independent variables such as nursing management at the unit level, social capital, emotional exhaustion, and depersonalization as important predictors of nurse reported outcome variables such job satisfaction, turnover intentions, quality of care (at the unit, the last shift, and in the hospital within the last year), patient and family complaints, patient and family verbal abuse, patient falls, nosocomial infections, and medications errors. Results suggested a stable nurse work force, with the capability to achieve superior quality and patient safety outcomes, is associated with unit-level favourable perceptions of nurse work environment factors, workload, decision latitude, and social capital, as well low levels of burnout

  2. Specialty satisfaction, positive psychological capital, and nursing professional values in nursing students: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Chung Hee; Park, Ju Young

    2017-10-01

    Ideally, college majors should be chosen to achieve self-realization and correspond to self-concept. However, some students select a major based on extrinsic factors, rather than aptitude or interests, because of a lack of employment opportunities. If they have negative college experiences with an unsatisfactory major, they might not engage fully in their occupation following graduation. This study aimed to identify factors affecting specialty satisfaction in preclinical practice nursing-college students. A cross-sectional descriptive survey. A nonprobability convenience sample of 312 nursing-college students at colleges in Deajeon City, South Korea. The survey questionnaire was distributed to those who agreed to participate. Freshmen and sophomore nursing students (n=312). Participants were 312 students at colleges in Deajeon City. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data, which were analyzed using SPSS/WIN. Positive psychological capital and nursing professional values were positively correlated with specialty satisfaction. Significant predictors for specialty satisfaction included hope and optimism (as components of positive psychological capital), the roles of nursing service and originality of nursing (as nursing professional values), and aptitude/interests and job value (as motives for selecting a major). The findings suggested that nursing students' specialty satisfaction was partially linked to positive psychological capital and professional values. Therefore, the promotion of positive factors should be useful in enhancing specialty satisfaction in preclinical-practice nursing-college students. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A survey on information seeking behaviour of nurses at a private hospital in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyri, Paraskevi; Kostagiolas, Petros; Diomidous, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    The paper deals with the investigation of the information seeking behavior of nursing staff of a private hospital in Greece. It is assumed that the information seeking behaviour has an effect on the nursing care and practices. A survey was conducted through a specially designed questionnaire distributed within 2013 to registered nurses of a major private Hospital in Athens. Nonparametric descriptive statistics have been carried out through SPSS version 20. The information needs of nurses are related to their work role and include information for nursing interventions and hospital infections control. The online scientific content is considered as the main source of information, while lack of time is considered as the main obstacle when seeking information. Regarding the effects of information, nurses believe that information quality and availability influences nursing care as well as nursing practices. Development of appropriate information services and information literacy skills for nurses is required.

  4. Where is family in the family nurse practitioner program? Results of a U.S. family nurse practitioner program survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirati, Christina M; Denham, Sharon A; Raffle, Holly; Ware, Lezlee

    2012-08-01

    Though recent progress in family nursing science can serve the family nurse practitioner (FNP) to intervene in the regulation of family health, whether those advances are taught to FNP students has been unclear. All 266 FNP programs in the United States were invited to participate in a survey to assess the content and clinical application of family nursing theories in the curriculum. The majority of FNP programs frame family as the context of care for the individual. Though FNP students receive a foundation in family nursing theory in core courses, they are not usually expected to use family assessment methods in clinical practicum courses or to plan interventions for the family as the unit of care. The authors challenge educators to consider family nursing science as an essential component of the FNP program as the Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) evolves and becomes requisite for entry into advanced practice.

  5. Precautionary practices for administering anesthetic gases: A survey of physician anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists and anesthesiologist assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L

    2016-10-02

    Scavenging systems and administrative and work practice controls for minimizing occupational exposure to waste anesthetic gases have been recommended for many years. Anesthetic gases and vapors that are released or leak out during medical procedures are considered waste anesthetic gases. To better understand the extent recommended practices are used, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted in 2011 among members of professional practice organizations representing anesthesia care providers including physician anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists, and anesthesiologist assistants. This national survey is the first to examine self-reported use of controls to minimize exposure to waste anesthetic gases among anesthesia care providers. The survey was completed by 1,783 nurse anesthetists, 1,104 physician anesthesiologists, and 100 anesthesiologist assistants who administered inhaled anesthetics in the seven days prior to the survey. Working in hospitals and outpatient surgical centers, respondents most often administered sevoflurane and, to a lesser extent desflurane and isoflurane, in combination with nitrous oxide. Use of scavenging systems was nearly universal, reported by 97% of respondents. However, adherence to other recommended practices was lacking to varying degrees and differed among those administering anesthetics to pediatric (P) or adult (A) patients. Examples of practices which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: using high (fresh gas) flow anesthesia only (17% P, 6% A), starting anesthetic gas flow before delivery mask or airway mask was applied to patient (35% P; 14% A); not routinely checking anesthesia equipment for leaks (4% P, 5% A), and using a funnel-fill system to fill vaporizers (16%). Respondents also reported that facilities lacked safe handling procedures (19%) and hazard awareness training (18%). Adherence to precautionary work practices was generally highest among

  6. Initial Survey Instructions for North American breeding bird survey at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Initial Survey Instructions for the North American Breeding Bird Survey at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. This survey is conducted annually between May 22nd...

  7. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Eufaula National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  8. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  9. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Crystal River National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  10. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was...

  11. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey...

  12. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for National Bison Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for National Bison Range and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was conducted to...

  13. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  14. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Savannah National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  15. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  16. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for National Elk Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for National Elk Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to...

  17. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  18. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  19. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for San Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for San Luis National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  20. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey...

  1. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was...

  2. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for National Key Deer Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for National Key Deer Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was conducted to...

  3. Using Maslow's pyramid and the national database of nursing quality indicators(R) to attain a healthier work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff-Paris, Lisa; Terhaar, Mary

    2010-12-07

    The strongest predictor of nurse job dissatisfaction and intent to leave is that of stress in the practice environment. Good communication, control over practice, decision making at the bedside, teamwork, and nurse empowerment have been found to increase nurse satisfaction and decrease turnover. In this article we share our experience of developing a rapid-design process to change the approach to performance improvement so as to increase engagement, empowerment, effectiveness, and the quality of the professional practice environment. Meal and non-meal breaks were identified as the target area for improvement. Qualitative and quantitative data support the success of this project. We begin this article with a review of literature related to work environment and retention and a presentation of the frameworks used to improve the work environment, specifically Maslow's theory of the Hierarchy of Inborn Needs and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Survey. We then describe our performance improvement project and share our conclusion and recommendations.

  4. Perceptions of nursing students on effective clinical preceptors in Phnom Penh National Hospitals, Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virya Koy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing education has evolved substantially in the last few decades. Preceptorship is important to nursing education for several reasons. The purpose of this study is to describe the effective nursing clinical preceptors in Phnom Penh National Hospitals. Both preceptors and students have reported experiencing constrained relationships, tension and anxiety, which led to failure result or frustrating experiences in clinical teaching and learning. Methods: The stratified sampling of 166 was invited. A cross-sectional design survey was used. The Cronbach's Alpha Coefficient for all items was 0.945. Results: The findings were given as effective clinical preceptorship had a moderate (3.02, 0.85. The interpersonal relationship (3.51, 0.88, evaluation (3.39, 0.93, personal traits (2.80, 0.83, nursing competencies (3.39, 0.93, and teaching ability (2.70, 0.81. Conclusion: Interpersonal relationship, formative evaluation, giving suggestions and correcting mistakes without belittling was perceived to be important characteristic. It is necessary to integrate clinical teaching skills to clinical preceptors. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1605-1610

  5. [Summary of results from the national surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Afonso Dinis Costa; Silveira, Antônio Carlos

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to correlate the main results of three large national surveys on Chagas disease (entomologic, seroprevalence and electrocardiographic) carried out in Brazil from late 1970's to early 1980's, which served as baseline for definition of the control measures adopted in the country. The proportion of infected people was much higher in areas where Triatoma infestans, the most efficient vector of Chagas disease among the five principal species involved in transmission at that time, was predominant. Similar result was observed in places where Triatoma sordida was dispersed, mainly in the country's central region, which corresponds to its native area. This finding is due to the coincidence observed in the geographic distribution of both vectors, since T. sordida is not considered to play an important role in transmission. In the Northeastern semi-arid, endemic area for Triatoma brasiliensis and Triatoma pseudomaculata, rates of human infection were much lower, although both vectors may have some relevance in the maintenance of the disease. As for areas with Panstrongylus megistus, human infection varied according to the levels of domiciliation. Whenever domiciled, like in the humid northeastern coastal area, its involvement in transmission can be clearly demonstrated. In some parts of Bahia State it represented the exclusive vector of the disease. Based upon the results of the seroprevalence survey an electrocardiographic study was carried out in 11 Brazilian states, which showed marked differences in the presence of cardiac alterations when comparing different areas of the country.

  6. Inflammatory bowel disease nurse specialists for patients on biological therapies: a nationwide Italian survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, Alessandra; Marinis, Francesca De; Kohn, Anna; Orzes, Nicoletta; D’Incà, Renata; Iannone, Teresa; Giaquinto, Antonella; Rivara, Cinzia; Ridola, Lorenzo; Lorenzetti, Roberto; Zullo, Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Background Management of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients requires a multidisciplinary approach. Among the working team, the role of IBD nurse is expected to be particularly relevant when managing patients receiving biological therapies. We performed a survey to assess the presence of IBD nurse in centers where patients were receiving biologics. Methods For this Italian nationwide survey a specific questionnaire was prepared. IBD nurse was defined as a nurse directly involved in all phases of biological therapy, from pre-therapy screening, administration and monitoring during therapy, to follow up performed by a dedicated helpline, completed a specific training on biological therapy therapy, and observed international guidelines. Results A total of 53 Italian IBD centers participated in the survey, and 91 valid questionnaires were collected. Overall, 34 (37.4%) nurses could be classified as IBD specialists. IBD nurses had a significantly higher educational level than other nurses, they were more frequently operating in Central or Southern than in Northern Italy, they were working in an Academic center rather than in a General hospital, and in IBD centers with >25 patients on biological therapy. On the contrary, mean age, gender distribution, years of nursing, and years working in the IBD unit did not significantly differ between IBD and other nurses. Conclusions Our nationwide survey showed that the presence of an IBD nurse is still lacking in the majority of Italian IBD centers where patients receive biological therapies, suggesting a prompt implementation. PMID:27708516

  7. [Emotional Leadership: a survey on the emotional skills expressed by nursing management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, Antonella; De Santis, Marco; Torretta, Claudia; Filippi, Mauro; Talucci, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The emotional leadership applied to nursing management is a new topic in the Italian nursing literature, but of great interest internationally. There is a close correlation between nursing leaders with a well-developed emotional intelligence and nurses working well-being. This study investigates knowledge about the emotional leadership and emotional competence in nursing management. The survey was conducted using a questionnaire devised for the purpose, validated and administered to 130 managers, head nurses and nurses in a hospital in Rome. Analysis of data shows a great interest in the subject. 90% of the sample showed that it is essential for managerial roles, be aware and able to manage their own and others' emotions to generate wellbeing at work. Emotional competencies are considered important just as theoretical, technical and social skills to a effective leadership on nursing. This study is one of the first Italian survey on the importance of the development of emotional intelligence in nursing leadership to improve wellbeing at work. Results of the survey should be confirmed by further studies. The emotional skills could be improved in nursing education programs and used as a yardstick for the nursing managers selection.

  8. Competency Recommendations for Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: International Survey Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo, Charlene; Topaz, Maxim; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Nibber, Raji

    2017-01-01

    The IMIA-NIstudents' and emerging professionals' working group conducted a large international survey in 2015 regarding research trends in nursing informatics. The survey was translated into half-a-dozen languages and distributed through 18 international research collaborators' professional connections. The survey focused on the perspectives of nurse informaticians. A total of 272 participants responded to an open ended question concerning recommendations to advance nursing informatics. Five key areas for action were identified through our thematic content analysis: education, research, practice, visibility and collaboration. This chapter discusses these results with implications for nursing competency development. We propose how components of various competency lists might support the key areas for action. We also identify room to further develop existing competency guidelines to support in-service education for practicing nurses, promote nursing informatics visibility, or improve and facilitate collaboration and integration with other professions.

  9. Current Trends in Nursing Informatics: Results of an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Alhuwail, Dari; Ali, Samira; Badger, Martha K; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Georgsson, Mattias; Islam, Tasneem; Jeon, Eunjoo; Jung, Hyunggu; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Lewis, Adrienne; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Ronquillo, Charlene; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Sommer, Janine; Tayaben, Jude L; Topaz, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Nursing informatics (NI) can help provide effective and safe healthcare. This study aimed to describe current research trends in NI. In the summer 2015, the IMIA-NI Students Working Group created and distributed an online international survey of the current NI trends. A total of 402 responses were submitted from 44 countries. We identified a top five NI research areas: standardized terminologies, mobile health, clinical decision support, patient safety and big data research. NI research funding was considered to be difficult to acquire by the respondents. Overall, current NI research on education, clinical practice, administration and theory is still scarce, with theory being the least common. Further research is needed to explain the impact of these trends and the needs from clinical practice.

  10. Adherence to Precautionary Guidelines for Compounding Antineoplastic Drugs: A Survey of Nurses and Pharmacy Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2015-01-01

    Precautionary guidelines detailing standards of practice and equipment to eliminate or minimize exposure to antineoplastic drugs during handling activities have been available for nearly three decades. To evaluate practices for compounding antineoplastic drugs, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted among members of professional practice organizations representing primarily oncology nurses, pharmacists, and pharmacy technicians. This national survey is the first in over 20 years to examine self-reported use of engineering, administrative, and work practice controls and PPE by pharmacy practitioners for minimizing exposure to antineoplastic drugs. The survey was completed by 241 nurses and 183 pharmacy practitioners who compounded antineoplastic drugs in the seven days prior to the survey. They reported: not always wearing two pairs of chemotherapy gloves (85%, 47%, respectively) or even a single pair (8%, 10%); not always using closed system drug-transfer devices (75%, 53%); not always wearing recommended gown (38%, 20%); I.V. lines sometimes/always primed with antineoplastic drug (19%, 30%); and not always using either a biological safety cabinet or isolator (9%, 15%). They also reported lack of: hazard awareness training (9%, 13%); safe handling procedures (20%, 11%); and medical surveillance programs (61%, 45%). Both employers and healthcare workers share responsibility for adhering to precautionary guidelines and other best practices. Employers can ensure that: workers are trained regularly; facility safe-handling procedures reflecting national guidelines are in place and support for their implementation is understood; engineering controls and PPE are available and workers know how to use them; and medical surveillance, exposure monitoring, and other administrative controls are in place. Workers can seek out training, understand and follow facility procedures, be role models for junior staff, ask questions, and report

  11. Selection of nursing teaching strategies in mainland China: A questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, HouXiu; Liu, MengJie; Zeng, Jing; Zhu, JingCi

    2016-04-01

    In nursing education, the traditional lecture and direct demonstration teaching method cannot cultivate the various skills that nursing students need. How to choose a more scientific and rational teaching method is a common concern for nursing educators worldwide. To investigate the basis for selecting teaching methods among nursing teachers in mainland China, the factors affecting the selection of different teaching methods, and the application of different teaching methods in theoretical and skill-based nursing courses. Questionnaire survey. Seventy one nursing colleges from 28 provincial-level administrative regions in mainland China. Following the principle of voluntary informed consent, 262 nursing teachers were randomly selected through a nursing education network platform and a conference platform. The questionnaire contents included the basis for and the factors influencing the selection of nursing teaching methods, the participants' common teaching methods, and the teaching experience of the surveyed nursing teachers. The questionnaires were distributed through the network or conference platform, and the data were analyzed by SPSS 17.0 software. The surveyed nursing teachers selected teaching methods mainly based on the characteristics of the teaching content, the characteristics of the students, and their previous teaching experiences. The factors affecting the selection of teaching methods mainly included large class sizes, limited class time, and limited examination formats. The surveyed nursing teachers primarily used lectures to teach theory courses and the direct demonstration method to teach skills courses, and the application frequencies of these two teaching methods were significantly higher than those of other teaching methods (P=0.000). More attention should be paid to the selection of nursing teaching methods. Every teacher should strategically choose teaching methods before each lesson, and nursing education training focused on selecting

  12. Nursing students' clinical competencies: a survey on clinical education objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, C; Grugnetti, A M; Caruso, R; Gallotti, M L; Borrelli, P; Puci, M

    2017-01-01

    Developing clearly defined competencies and identifying strategies for their measurement remain unfortunately a critical aspect of nursing training. In the current international context, which continues to be characterised by deep economic crisis, universities have a fundamental role to play in redefining the educational goals to respond to the expectations of certain geographical areas of interest, as underscored in the Bologna Process (Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education Convened in Bologna 19 June 1999). The aim of this observational study was to examine the clinical learning context of nursing students using a tool developed by a team of teachers for the analysis of clinical learning. Redefinition of the clinical learning objectives with reference to the competencies set out in the questionnaire validated by Venturini et al. (2012) and the subsequent use of the tool created by the team of teachers for students in the first, second and third-year courses of the 2013/14 academic year, covering all the internships called for in those years. All nursing students enrolled in the first, second and third year of the nursing undergraduate degree program at the University of Pavia (no. 471) participated in this survey. A total of 1,758 clinical internships were carried out: 461 for the first year, 471 for the second year and 826 for the third year. Setting objectives, beginning with the educational offerings in the several clinical contexts, represents a strong point for this process. The results highlight a level of heterogeneity and complexity intrinsic to the University of Pavia educational system, characterized by clinical settings with different clinical levels (Research hospital and other traditional hospitals) that offering different levels of training. The use of the self-evaluation form for clinical learning made it possible to perform real-time observations of the training activities of the entire student body. An educational model

  13. Trajetória das Anotações de Enfermagem: um levantamento em periódicos nacionais (1957-2005 Trajectoria de las Anotaciones de Enfermería: un survey en periódicos nacionales (1957-2005 Nursing Records trajectory: a survey of national journals (1957-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Rosa Carrijo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo é resultado de um levantamento sobre anotação de enfermagem, em uma base de dados informatizada denominada PeriEnf da Escola de Enfermagem da Universidade de São Paulo, realizado em 2005. Objetivou-se descrever os achados por categorias e analisar os temas mais citados no conteúdo das anotações de enfermagem. Pautou-se na técnica de análise de conteúdo, proposta por Bardin, para analisar os 51 textos selecionados no período de 1957 a 2005. Houve um acentuado crescimento do número de estudos que envolvem o tema, sendo a anotação do tipo descritiva, a mais pesquisada e discutida, entretanto esta prática de enfermagem permanece sendo realizada como um ato mecânico, escasso em conteúdo e sem refletir a assistência de enfermagem efetivamente prestada ao paciente.Este estudio es resultado de un survey sobre anotaciones de enfermería hecho en 2005, en una basis de datos informatizada llamada PeriEnf, de la Escuela de Enfermería de la Universidad de São Paulo. Se buscó describir los datos por categorias y analisar los temas más citados en el contenido de la anotación de enfermería. Se utilizó la técnica de analisis de contenido, propuesta por Bardin, para hacer las análises de 51 textos seleccionados de 1957 al 2005. Hubo un crescimiento notable del número de estudios sobre el tema, siendo la anotación descriptiva la más estudiada y discutida. Sin embargo, esta práctica de enfermería sigue siendo realizada como un acto mecánico, com escaso contenido y sin reflexionar la atención de enfermería efectivamente prestada al paciente.This paper is an outcome of a survey on nursing records, made in 2005, through the University of São Paulo, School of Nursing, data basis called Perienf. It aimed at describing data according to categories and analyse themes most cited in the content of the nursing records. Content analysis by Bardin was utilized for this technical analysis of 51 selected texts from 1957 to 2005

  14. A survey of nursing documentation, terminologies and standards in European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoroddsen, Asta; Ehrenberg, Anna; Sermeus, Walter; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    A survey was carried out to describe the current state of art in the use of nursing documentation, terminologies, standards and education. Key informants in European countries were targeted by the Association for Common European Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes (ACENDIO). Replies were received from key informants in 20 European countries. Results show that the nursing process was most often used to structure nursing documentation. Many standardized nursing terminologies were used in Europe with NANDA, NIC, NOC and ICF most frequently used. In 70% of the countries minimum requirements were available for electronic health records (EHR), but nursing not addressed specifically. Standards in use for nursing terminologies and information systems were lacking. The results should be a major concern to the nursing community in Europe. As a European platform, ACENDIO can play a role in enhancing standardization activities, and should develop its role accordingly.

  15. A survey of nursing documentation, terminologies and standards in European countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoroddsen, Asta; Ehrenberg, Anna; Sermeus, Walter; Saranto, Kaija

    2012-01-01

    A survey was carried out to describe the current state of art in the use of nursing documentation, terminologies, standards and education. Key informants in European countries were targeted by the Association for Common European Nursing Diagnoses, Interventions and Outcomes (ACENDIO). Replies were received from key informants in 20 European countries. Results show that the nursing process was most often used to structure nursing documentation. Many standardized nursing terminologies were used in Europe with NANDA, NIC, NOC and ICF most frequently used. In 70% of the countries minimum requirements were available for electronic health records (EHR), but nursing not addressed specifically. Standards in use for nursing terminologies and information systems were lacking. The results should be a major concern to the nursing community in Europe. As a European platform, ACENDIO can play a role in enhancing standardization activities, and should develop its role accordingly. PMID:24199130

  16. Wading bird nesting survey Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report discusses results of a wading bird survey conducted at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge. The objectives of the survey include; 1) quantify nest site...

  17. National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA-1998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA) series measures the prevalence and correlates of drug use in the United States. The surveys are designed to...

  18. Key Statistics from the National Survey of Family Growth: Vasectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Collection Systems Vital Statistics: Birth Data NCHS Key Statistics from the National Survey of Family Growth - V ... NCHS Listservs Surveys and Data Collection Systems Vital Statistics: Birth Data File Formats Help: How do I ...

  19. National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA-2000)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA) series measures the prevalence and correlates of drug use in the United States. The surveys are designed to...

  20. National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA-1999)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA) series measures the prevalence and correlates of drug use in the United States. The surveys are designed to...

  1. National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA-2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA) series measures the prevalence and correlates of drug use in the United States. The surveys are designed to...

  2. National Youth Survey US: Wave IV (NYS-1979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the fourth wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this data collection. The first wave of this survey was conducted in 1976, the second...

  3. National Youth Survey US: Wave V (NYS-1980)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the fifth wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this collection. The first wave of this survey was conducted in 1976, the second wave in...

  4. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on...

  5. National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS-2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS) is an annual survey designed to collect statistical information on the numbers and characteristics of all known...

  6. Anuran Call Survey Summary 2000 Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Anuran call surveys were conducted at the Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge for the first time in 2000. Surveys for anurans are conducted in conjunction with...

  7. Fed manufacturing surveys provide insight into national economy

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, Emily; Pia M. Orrenius; Wang, Jack; Canas, Jesus

    2014-01-01

    Regional Federal Reserve Banks’ manufacturing surveys provide important insight into national economic conditions. The Dallas Fed’s Texas Manufacturing Outlook Survey performs well forecasting the ISM manufacturing index and U.S. industrial production.

  8. Caring labour, intersectionality and worker satisfaction: an analysis of the National Nursing Assistant Study (NNAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovski, Carter C; Price-Glynn, Kim

    2010-03-01

    Caring labour in long-term care settings is increasingly important as the US population ages. Ethnographic research on nursing assistants (NAs) portrays nursing home care as routine and fast paced in facilities that emphasise life maintenance more than care. Recent interview-based and small quantitative studies describe a mix of positive and negative aspects of NA work, including the rewards of caring, despite shortcomings in working conditions and pay. The current study continues this research but, for the first time, using national data. The 2004 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Nursing Assistant Study (NNAS) provides survey data from 3,017 NAs working in long-term care facilities across the US. The NNAS results confirm the importance and centrality of caring to NAs' work. NAs motivated by caring for others were significantly more satisfied with their jobs than those motivated by other reasons, such as convenience or salary. Overall, NAs report surprisingly high job satisfaction, particularly with learning new skills, doing challenging work, and organisational support for caring labour. Areas of dissatisfaction were salary, time for reproductive labour, and turnover. Intersectional analysis revealed race and citizenship played a stronger role than gender in worker satisfaction.

  9. Workplace bullying among nurses and their related factors in Japan: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Mami; Suzuki, Miho; Takai, Yukari; Igarashi, Ayumi; Noguchi-Watanabe, Maiko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko

    2016-09-01

    To explore the association between workplace bullying and workplace environment factors among nurses in Japan. Workplace bullying among nurses is increasing globally and occurs more frequently than among other professions. However, there is little information on the impact of workplace environment factors on nurse bullying in Japan. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered questionnaire. Participants were 1152 nurses recruited at seminars or training courses outside of their workplaces in Tokyo. Workplace bullying was measured using the Negative Acts Questionnaire-Revised. Participants were considered to have been 'bullied' if they reported experiencing at least one negative act on a daily or weekly basis. Workplace environment factors were measured using the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, which comprises five domains: nurse participation in hospital affairs; nursing foundations for quality of care; nurse manager ability, leadership and support of nurses; staffing and resource adequacy; and collegial nurse-physician relationships. A total of 898 (78·0%) questionnaires were returned, of which 825 (71·6%) were analysed. Altogether, 153 (18·5%) nurses were considered 'bullied.' The three most frequent negative acts reported as occurring on a weekly or daily basis were 'someone withholding information which affects your performance' (6·7%), 'being exposed to an unmanageable workload' (4·4%) and 'being shouted at or being the target of spontaneous anger (or rage)' (3·6%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that 'bullied' were associated with low scores on two work environment domains: nurse manager ability, leadership and support of nurses and staffing and resource adequacy. Effective nurse manager leadership and support as well as appropriate staffing management may positively influence workplace bullying among nurses in Japan. Authentic leadership styles and allowing nurses to easily request days off might also be important

  10. 77 FR 45645 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Meeting Pursuant to section 10(d) of the Federal Advisory Committee... for Nursing Research. The meeting will be open to the public as indicated below, with attendance... Committee: National Advisory Council for Nursing Research. Date: September 18-19, 2012. Open: September...

  11. Report on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David F.; Gober, Susan L.

    Factors associated with an unusually high rate of failure on the July 1991 National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) were analyzed for nursing students at Angelo State University in San Angelo (Texas). Of the 111 nursing degree recipients who took the examination for the first time in July 1991, 18 (16.2%) failed.…

  12. 78 FR 39738 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice for Request for Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... programs administered by the Division of Nursing, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and... statement of interest from the nominee to support experience working with Title VIII nursing programs... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse...

  13. Environmental contaminant surveys in three National Wildlife Refuges in Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Environmental contaminants surveys were conducted at National Elk, Seedskadee, and Hutton Lake National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) to provide information on existing...

  14. NABat 2014 survey results : Baca National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the 2014 NABat survey results from Baca National Wildlife Refuge. The North American Bat Monitoring Program (NABat) is a national program to...

  15. Journal Articles Applying National Aquatic Resource Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) data are being used and applied above and beyond the regional and national assessments. This page includes a list of recent journal articles that reference NARS data.

  16. [A Delphi Method Survey of the Core Competences of Post-Acute-Care Nurses in Caring for Acute Stroke Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shu-Ching; Yeh, Lily; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Lin, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) service is becoming increasingly important in Taiwan as a core focus of government policies that are designed to ensure continuity of care. In order to improve PAC nursing education and quality of care, the present study applies a modified Delphi method to identify the core competences of nurses who provide PAC services to acute stroke patients. We surveyed 18 experts in post-acute care and long-term care anonymously using a 29-question questionnaire in order to identify the essential professional skills that are required to perform PAC effectively. The results of this survey indicate that the core competences of PAC may be divided into two categories: Case Management and Care Management. Case Management includes Direct Care, Communication, Health Care Education, Nursing Consulting, and Family Assessment & Health Care. Care Management includes Interdisciplinary Teamwork, Patient Care Management, and Resource Integration. The importance and practicality of each item was evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. The experts required 2 rounds to reach a consensus about the importance and 3 rounds to determine the practicality of PAC core competences. This process highlighted the differing points of view that are held by professionals in the realms of nursing, medicine, and national health policy. The PAC in-job training program in its current form inadequately cul-tivates core competence in Care Management. The results of the present study may be used to inform the development of PAC nurse orientation training programs and continuing education courses.

  17. Sudden hearing loss: National survey in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarillo, Elizabeth; Hernández-García, Estefanía; Herrera, Mayte; García Berrocal, José Ramón; García Arumí, Ana; Durio, Enrique; Plaza, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    The objective of our study was to identify the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in the different ENT Departments of Spain with respect to sudden deafness. We wanted to establish a basis to help to create a new nation-wide consensus, unifying treatment, diagnostic and follow-up criteria for this disease. We carried out an anonymous Internet survey, addressing Spanish ENT doctors nation-wide (n=2,029), gathering in 33 questions different aspects about diagnostic criteria, additional tests, treatment procedures and prognostic factors in sudden deafness, according to the different protocols and experience of the participants in the survey. A total of 293 Spanish ENT doctors (14%) took part anonymously. In relation to diagnostic criteria, is the most noteworthy was the requisite of a confirmed neurosensorial loss (91.1%) followed by "initiated in less than three days" (75%) and 3 consecutive frequencies affected (76.4%). More than half of the participants requested an MRI of the IAC/CPA (68.7%) and 88.2% used gadolinium in this test. The prognostic factor most frequently considered was delay in commencement of treatment onset (84.8%). As far as treatment of primary cases, most of the responders agreed on the use of corticosteroids (99.7%). Oral administration was the most widely used (66%), followed by intravenous (29.6%) and intratympanic (1.4%) administration. Ninety-two percent had not had any major complications with systemic steroids. Intratympanic treatments were used by 70% of responders for rescue in failure. In Spain there is currently a significant disparity of concepts regarding the diagnosis of sudden deafness, and more agreement as to using steroids as their treatment. This highlights the need to implement measures to promote a better approach, which would be homogeneous and consensual, to this condition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  18. Shared meanings for military nurse veterans: follow up survey of nurse veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, and Operation Desert Storm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Bandiero, M P

    1998-01-01

    This study is an extension of a qualitative study involving military nurses in World War II, Korea, Vietnam and Operation Desert Storm. Common themes and shared meanings identified in the previous qualitative study were investigated using a broad sample of military nurses who had served at various times and different branches of the service. The present investigation used a survey to gather data, and results tended to validate results of the earlier study that the experiences of military nurses in times of war tend to transcend many factors including time and branch of service.

  19. Knowledge and fulfillment of biosecurity standards in nurse personal. Almanzor Aguinaga National Hospital. Chiclayo 2002

    OpenAIRE

    SOTO, VÍCTOR; Oficina Epidemiología y Programas Hospital Nacional Almanzor Aguinaga; OLANO, ENRIQUE; Centro de Prevención de Riesgos del Trabajo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To determine knowledge and fulfilment of biosecurity standards in nurses and nurse technicians who work in high risk areas. Material and Methods: Transversal, prospective and descriptive study. Population included nurses and nurse technicians who work at Emergency, Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Intermediate Care Unit (UCEMIN), General Surgery, Surgical Center, Neonatology and Hemodialysis services at Chiclayo Almanzor Aguinaga National Hospital, EsSalud. The sample included 117 worke...

  20. Danish National Framework for collecting information about patients’ nutritional status. Nursing Minimum dataset (N-MDS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkonsen, Sasja Jul; Madsen, Inge; Bjerrum, Merete

    2012-01-01

    In Denmark the national guidelines for nursing documentation outlines twelve areas in which nurses have to systematically document daily care. Nutrition is one of these areas. However, the guidelines are frameworks that do not specify exactly what data nurses have to collect and which areas nurses...... need to document about nutrition in order to make a nursing specific documentation. This present study set out to identify a Nursing Minimum Data set for nutrition in a clinical setting. As data was used validated and available tools to screen or assess patients’ nutritional risk. A systematic...... which indirectly affect intake and needs and 5 Stress factors. The five main categories are intended to help clinical staff make a complete nursing assessment of patients’ nutritional status in order to guide nurses to make a relevant and complete nursing documentation....

  1. Hypertension in Korea: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J S; Jones, D W; Kim, S J; Hong, Y P

    1994-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of hypertension (HTN) and its risk factors, we performed a population-based national cross-sectional blood pressure (BP) survey in Korea in 1990. Through cluster sampling, we selected for study individuals older than 30 years of age in 190 of 154,082 districts. Among 25,567 eligible individuals, 21,242 subjects had measurements of BP and body mass index (BMI) and underwent a standard interview. BP was recorded as the mean of two measurements on a standard mercury manometer. The prevalence of HTN varied widely by area of residence. Overall prevalence was 19.8% for HTN defined as BP > or = 140/90 mm Hg or subject on medication, and 12.4% for BP > or = 160/95 mm Hg or subject on medication. Correlates for HTN identified by logistic regression analysis included positive family history of HTN (odds ratio [OR] = 2.2,), age (10 years); OR = 1.9), alcohol intake (500 cc; OR = 1.4), urban location (versus rural; OR = 1.3), and BMI (1 BMI unit; OR = 1.2). [Am J Prev Med 1994;10:200-4

  2. COPD in Taiwan: a National Epidemiology Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng SL

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Shih-Lung Cheng,1,2 Ming-Cheng Chan,3 Chin-Chou Wang,4 Ching-Hsiung Lin,5 Hao-Chien Wang,6 Jeng-Yuan Hsu,3 Liang-Wen Hang,7,8 Chee-Jen Chang,9 Diahn-Warng Perng,10,* Chong-Jen Yu6,* On behalf of the Taiwan COPD Consortium 1Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, 2Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li City, Taoyuan County, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, 4Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Kaohsiung, 5Division of Chest Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua City, Changhua County, 6Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, 7Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Sleep Medicine Center, China Medical University Hospital, 8Department of Respiratory Therapy, College of Health Care, China Medical University, Taichung, 9Biostatistical Center for Clinical Research, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou Branch, Guishan Township, Taoyuan County, 10Department of Chest Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: To determine the prevalence of COPD in Taiwan and to document the disease characteristics and associated risk factors.Methods: We conducted a random cross-sectional national survey of adults older than 40 years in Taiwan. Respiratory health screening questions identified subjects with diagnosed COPD or whose reported symptoms also fulfilled an epidemiological case definition; these were eligible to complete the survey, which also included indices of symptom severity and disability and questions on comorbidities, medical treatments, smoking habits, and occupations potentially harmful to respiratory health. Subjects with diagnosed COPD were subdivided by smoking status. Subjects who fulfilled the case definition

  3. Description of practice as an ambulatory care nurse: psychometric properties of a practice-analysis survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghi, Heibatollah; Panniers, Teresa L; Smolenski, Mary C

    2007-01-01

    Changes within nursing demand that a specialty conduct periodic, appropriate practice analyses to continually validate itself against preset standards. This study explicates practice analysis methods using ambulatory care nursing as an exemplar. Data derived from a focus group technique were used to develop a survey that was completed by 499 ambulatory care nurses. The validity of the instrument was assessed using principal components analysis; reliability was estimated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The focus group with ambulatory care experts produced 34 knowledge and activity statements delineating ambulatory care nursing practice. The survey data produced five factors accounting for 71% of variance in the data. The factors were identified as initial patient assessment, professional nursing issues and standards, client care management skills, technical/clinical skills, and system administrative operations. It was concluded that practice analyses delineate a specialty and provide input for certification examinations aimed at measuring excellence in a field of nursing.

  4. Community nursing needs more silver surfers: a questionnaire survey of primary care nurses' use of information technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Lusignan Simon

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK the health service is investing more than ever before in information technology (IT and primary care nurses will have to work with computers. Information about patients will be almost exclusively held in electronic patient records; and much of the information about best practice is most readily accessible via computer terminals. Objective To examine the influence of age and nursing profession on the level of computer use. Methods A questionnaire was developed to examine: access, training received, confidence and use of IT. The survey was carried out in a Sussex Primary Care Trust, in the UK. Results The questionnaire was sent to 109 nurses with a 64% response rate. Most primary care nurses (89% use their computer regularly at work: 100% of practice nurses daily, compared with 60% of district nurses and 59% of health visitors (p Conclusions Using computers in the surgery has become the norm for primary care nurses. However, nurses over 50, working out in the community, lack the confidence and skill of their younger and practice based colleagues.

  5. Nurse moral distress: A survey identifying predictors and potential interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathert, Cheryl; May, Douglas R; Chung, Hye Sook

    2016-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas and conflicts are inherent in today's health care organizations and may lead to moral distress, which is often associated with physical and psychological symptoms. Although the existence of moral distress has been observed by scholars for decades, most of the research has been descriptive and has examined what types of health care conflicts lead to distress. This study tested a comprehensive model, underpinned by Social Cognitive Theory, that examined work environment and intrapersonal variables that may influence moral distress. We surveyed nursing staff employed in a U.S. acute care hospital (response rate=45%; n=290). More than half of the respondents reported they experience ethical dilemmas and conflicts from several times a month to daily, and nearly half reported they experience moral distress at least several times a month. Structural equation modeling analysis simultaneously examined the effects of five independent variables on moral distress and moral voice: (a) frequency of ethical dilemmas and conflicts; (b) moral efficacy; (c) ethics communication; (d) ethical environment; and (e) organizational ethics support. Results revealed significant independent effects of the frequency of ethics issues and organizational ethics support on moral distress. Bootstrapping analysis indicated that voice fully mediated the relationship between moral efficacy and moral distress, and partially mediated the relationship between organizational ethics support and distress. Supplemental analysis revealed that organizational ethics support moderated the moral efficacy-voice-moral distress relationship such that when organizational support was low, moral efficacy was negatively related to moral distress via voice. Although it may be impossible to eliminate all ethical dilemmas and conflicts, leaders and organizations may wish to help improve nurses' moral efficacy, which appears to give rise to voice, and reduced moral distress. Increasing organizational

  6. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade.

  7. The role of a clinical nurse consultant in an Australian Health District: a quantitative survey

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkes, Lesley; Luck, Lauretta; O’Baugh, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background This study replicates previous research undertaken in 2013 that explored the role of the Clinical Nurse Consultant in a metropolitan health district in Sydney, Australia. Methods A descriptive survey, using Likert scales, was used to collect data from Clinical Nurse Consultants. Results Clinical Nurse Consultants are well informed about the domains and functions of their role, as stipulated in the relevant award. They identified clinical service and consultancy as the area in which...

  8. Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge visitor survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The US Fish and Wildlife Service and the US Geological Survey are conducting this survey to learn more about refuge visitors in order to improve the management of...

  9. The Characteristics and Utility of National Faculty Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    It is proposed that numerous national surveys of faculty since the late 1960s provide institutional researchers and others with rich sources of descriptive data to help address the shifting national issues and institutional concerns related to faculty resources. An annotated list of 12 major faculty surveys is appended. (MSE)

  10. The Characteristics and Utility of National Faculty Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    It is proposed that numerous national surveys of faculty since the late 1960s provide institutional researchers and others with rich sources of descriptive data to help address the shifting national issues and institutional concerns related to faculty resources. An annotated list of 12 major faculty surveys is appended. (MSE)

  11. Views on nurse prescribing: a survey of community mental health nurses in the Republic of Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, J; Bergin, M; Gooney, M; Jones, A

    2009-02-01

    A nurse prescribing scheme has recently been implemented within the Republic of Ireland. This paper reports on the views of community mental health nurses on nurse prescribing just prior to the implementation of the scheme. Data were gathered through a 13-item questionnaire administered to 103 members of the Association of Community Mental Health Nurses in Ireland. Results indicated a distinct difference of view between male and female community mental health nurses, with female nurses having greater reservations towards the desirability of nurse prescribing in relation to educational preparation and impact on professional relationships. Overall, only 17% of respondents favoured being supervised in their prescribing practice by their consultant psychiatrist. The paper concludes that there is ambivalence towards prescribing in this important group of nurses which may need to be taken into account if nurse prescribing is to be successfully implemented within the Irish mental health service context.

  12. National Wetland Condition Assessment 2011: A Collaborative Survey of the Nation's Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Wetland Condition Assessment 2011: A Collaborative Survey presents the results of an unprecedented assessment of the nation’s wetlands. This report is part of the National Aquatic Resource Surveys, a series of statistically based surveys designed to provide the publi...

  13. How Public Health Nurses Identify and Intervene in Child Maltreatment Based on the National Clinical Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paavilainen Eija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To describe how Finnish public health nurses identify and intervene in child maltreatment and how they implement the National Clinical Guideline in their work. Design and Sample. Cross-sectional survey of 367 public health nurses in Finland. Measures. A web-based questionnaire developed based on the content areas of the guideline: identifying, intervening, and implementing. Results. The respondents reported they identify child maltreatment moderately (mean 3.38, intervene in it better (4.15, and implement the guideline moderately (3.43, scale between 1 and 6. Those with experience of working with maltreated children reported they identify them better P<0.001, intervene better P<0.001, and implement the guideline better P<0.001 than those with no experience. This difference was also found for those who were aware of the guideline, had read it, and participated in training on child maltreatment, as compared to those who were not aware of the guideline, had not read it, or had not participated in such training. Conclusions. The public health nurses worked quite well with children who had experienced maltreatment and families. However, the results point out several developmental targets for increasing training on child maltreatment, for devising recommendations for child maltreatment, and for applying these recommendations systematically in practice.

  14. Instructional Methods for Neuroscience in Nurse Anesthesia Graduate Programs: A Survey of Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    i INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR NEUROSCIENCE IN NURSE ANESTHESIA GRADUATE PROGRAMS : A SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS Michael R. Sanchez APPROVED... GRADUATE PROGRAMS : A SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael R...certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis entitled: Instructional methods for neuroscience in nurse anesthesia graduate programs : A

  15. National Marine Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine recreational fishing is a popular pastime across the United States that generates significant economic impacts to both local economies and to the nation. In...

  16. National Marine Recreational Fishing Expenditure Survey 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Marine recreational fishing is a popular pastime across the United States that generates significant economic impacts to both local economies and to the nation. In...

  17. Advanced practice psychiatric nurses as a treatment resource: survey and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Saul; Bachman, John; Cuffel, Brian; Friesen, Bernice; McCabe, John

    2003-07-01

    Access to behavioral health services, particularly pharmacotherapy, continues to be a significant problem. This is particularly the case for public sector beneficiaries and managed care members. The greater use of advanced practice psychiatric nurses (APPNs) with prescribing privileges could help. To better understand the availability and competence of APPNs to prescribe, the authors conducted 1) a national survey of APPNs' availability and prescribing practices, 2) a comparative analysis of pharmacy claims data generated by APPNs and psychiatrists, and 3) a comprehensive clinical record review comparing APPNs to psychiatrists. About 25% of the sample of APPNs reported having prescription authority and a private practice. The analysis of prescribing practices between APPNs and psychiatrists showed that with a few exceptions, there were no differences between the groups, as did a retrospective clinical record review. These results lead the authors to recommend greater efforts to increase the supply of APPNs.

  18. California's minimum-nurse-staffing legislation and nurses' wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Barbara; Harless, David W; Spetz, Joanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2004, California became the first state to implement minimum-nurse-staffing ratios in acute care hospitals. We examined the wages of registered nurses (RNs) before and after the legislation was enacted. Using four data sets-the National Sample Survey of Registered Nurses, the Current Population Survey, the National Compensation Survey, and the Occupational Employment Statistics Survey-we found that from 2000 through 2006, RNs in California metropolitan areas experienced real wage growth as much as twelve percentage points higher than the growth in the wages of nurses employed in metropolitan areas outside of California.

  19. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Horicon National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Horicon NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  20. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Tamarac NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  1. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Wheeler NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  2. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Noxubee NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  3. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Necedah NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  4. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Quivira NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  5. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Montezuma NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  6. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Assabet River National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Assabet River NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The survey was conducted to better...

  7. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Malheur NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  8. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Monomoy NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  9. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Moosehorn NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  10. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2010/2011 : Individual refuge results for Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Muscatatuck NWR and is part of the USGS Data Series 643. The survey was conducted to better...

  11. Documentation of the Danish National Travel Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Hjalmar

    The basic aim of TU is to survey the transport behaviour of Danes residing in Denmark. The survey is managed by DTU Transport on behalf of a group of Danish authorities and organisa-tions. Thus, we focus on the needs arising from this group: • A stable, continuous, operational, reliable, easy-to-...

  12. Oncology Nurses' Use of the Internet for Continuing Education: A Survey of Oncology Nursing Society Congress Attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Susan C.; Baird, Susan B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey to determine whether oncology nurses (n=670) use the Internet and for what purpose revealed that they use it for drug information, literature searches, academic information, patient education, and continuing education. Results suggest that continuing-education providers should pursue the Internet as a means of meeting the need for quick,…

  13. Developing and testing a new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership: the clinical leadership survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Allison; Laschinger, Heather K Spence; Wong, Carol; Finegan, Joan

    2011-05-01

    To test the psychometric properties of a newly developed measure of staff nurse clinical leadership derived from Kouzes and Posner's model of transformational leadership. While nurses have been recognized for their essential role in keeping patients safe, there has been little empirical research that has examined clinical leadership at the staff nurse level.   A non-experimental survey design was used to test the psychometric properties of the clinical leadership survey (CLS). Four hundred and eighty registered nurses (RNs) providing direct patient care in Ontario acute care hospitals returned useable questionnaires.   Confirmatory factor analysis provided preliminary evidence for the construct validity for the new measure of staff nurse clinical leadership. Structural empowerment fully mediated the relationship between nursing leadership and staff nurse clinical leadership. The results provide encouraging evidence for the construct validity of the CLS. Nursing administrators must create empowering work environments to ensure staff nurses have access to work structures which enable them to enact clinical leadership behaviours while providing direct patient care. © 2011 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. A review of national health surveys in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Rakhi; Pandey, Anamika; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-04-01

    Several rounds of national health surveys have generated a vast amount of data in India since 1992. We describe and compare the key health information gathered, assess the availability of health data in the public domain, and review publications resulting from the National Family Health Survey (NFHS), the District Level Household Survey (DLHS) and the Annual Health Survey (AHS). We highlight issues that need attention to improve the usefulness of the surveys in monitoring changing trends in India's disease burden: (i) inadequate coverage of noncommunicable diseases, injuries and some major communicable diseases; (ii) modest comparability between surveys on the key themes of child and maternal mortality and immunization to understand trends over time; (iii) short time intervals between the most recent survey rounds; and (iv) delays in making individual-level data available for analysis in the public domain. We identified 337 publications using NFHS data, in contrast only 48 and three publications were using data from the DLHS and AHS respectively. As national surveys are resource-intensive, it would be prudent to maximize their benefits. We suggest that India plan for a single major national health survey at five-year intervals in consultation with key stakeholders. This could cover additional major causes of the disease burden and their risk factors, as well as causes of death and adult mortality rate estimation. If done in a standardized manner, such a survey would provide useable and timely data to inform health interventions and facilitate assessment of their impact on population health.

  15. Nurses' perceptions of medication adherence in schizophrenia: results of the ADHES cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsley, Robin; Alptekin, Koksal; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Cañas, Fernando; Dubois, Vincent; Gorwood, Philip; Haddad, Peter M; Naber, Dieter; Olivares, José Manuel; Papageorgiou, Georgios; Roca, Miguel; Thomas, Pierre; Hargarter, Ludger; Schreiner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Poor adherence to antipsychotic treatment is a widespread problem within schizophrenia therapy with serious consequences including increased risks of relapse and rehospitalization. Mounting evidence supports the key roles that nurses play in monitoring patient progress and facilitating long-term treatment adherence. The Adherencia Terapéutica en la Esquizofrenia (ADHES) nurses' survey was designed to assess the opinions of nurses on the causes and management of partial/nonadherence to antipsychotic medication. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey of 4120 nurses from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Interpretation of results was based on a descriptive comparison of responses. Nurses perceived 54% of patients seen in the preceding month to be partially/nonadherent to treatment. Most nurses (90%) reported some level of experience with administration of long-acting injectable (LAI) antipsychotics, with 24% of nurses administering >10 injections per month. The majority (85%) of nurses surveyed believed that improving adherence would improve patient outcomes. Nearly half (49%) reported that most of their patients depend on a family member or other nonprofessional carer to remind them to take their medication as prescribed. A similar proportion of nurses (43%) reported that most of their patients relied on a professional to remind them to take medication. Most nurses (92%) felt that ensuring continuous medication with LAI antipsychotics would yield long-term benefits for patients, but their opinion was that over a third of patients were unaware of LAI antipsychotic treatments. In a series of forced options, the strategy used most often by respondents (89%) to promote medication adherence was to build trusting relationships with patients while listening to and interpreting their needs and concerns. Respondents also rated this as the most effective strategy that they used (48%). Nurses are highly aware of adherence issues faced by their patients; further patient

  16. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey 2012: Individual refuge results for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey for Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge and is part of the USGS Data Series 754. The...

  17. Towards a national report card in nursing: a knowledge synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Mildon, Barbara; Clarke, Sean

    2011-06-01

    This paper is an abridged version of a knowledge synthesis undertaken to inform the proceedings of a collaborative forum of nurse leaders convened under the auspices of Health Canada, the Academy of Canadian Executive Nurses, the Canadian Nurses Association and Canada Health Infoway for the purpose of discussing the development of a nursing report card for Canada. The synthesis summarized the state of the science in the measurement of nursing-sensitive outcomes and the utilization of nursing report cards - information that informed forum participants' dialogue and planning. This condensed version of the synthesis focuses on initiatives related to outcomes and performance monitoring in nursing, including specific indicators and reporting systems and the development, implementation and utilization of nursing report cards.

  18. Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders: From Funding Initiative to National Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleave, Janet H; Szanton, Sarah L; Shillam, Casey; Rose, Karen; Rao, Aditi D; Perez, Adriana; O'Connor, Melissa; Walker, Rachel; Buron, Bill; Boltz, Marie; Bellot, Jennifer; Batchelor-Murphy, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    In 2000, the John A. Hartford Foundation established the Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program initiative, acknowledging nursing's key role in the care of the growing population of older adults. This program has supported 249 nurse scientists with pre- and postdoctoral awards. As a result of the program's success, several Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program awardees formed an alumni organization to continue to advance the quality care of older adults. This group of Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Program awardees joined others receiving support from the John A. Hartford Foundation nursing initiatives to grow a formal organization, the Hartford Gerontological Nursing Leaders (HGNL). The purpose of this article is to present the development, accomplishments, and challenges of the HGNL, informing other professional nursing organizations that are experiencing similar accomplishments and challenges. This article also demonstrates the power of a funding initiative to grow an organization dedicated to impact gerontological health and health care through research, practice, education, and policy.

  19. A European survey of oncology nurse breakthrough cancer pain practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rustoen, Tone; Geerling, Jenske I.; Pappa, Theodora; Rundstrom, Carina; Weisse, Isolde; Williams, Sian C.; Zavratnik, Bostjan; Kongsgaard, Ulf E.; Wengstrom, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the research: Breakthrough cancer pain (BTCP) is a prevalent type of pain in which the nurse can play an important role in improving patients' pain symptoms and overall well-being. Nurses' experience with BTCP (number of patients, and estimates of severity and frequency), the treatment of

  20. Basic Competence of Intensive Care Unit Nurses: Cross-Sectional Survey Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riitta-Liisa Lakanmaa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical care patients benefit from the attention of nursing personnel with a high competence level. The aim of the study was to describe and evaluate the self-assessed basic competence of intensive care unit nurses and related factors. A cross-sectional survey design was used. A basic competence scale (Intensive and Critical Care Nursing Competence Scale version 1, Likert scale 1–5, 1 = poor and 5 = excellent was employed among Finnish intensive care unit nurses (n=431. Intensive care unit nurses’ self-assessed basic competence was good (mean 4.19, SD 0.40. The attitude and value base of basic competence was excellent whereas experience base was the poorest compared to the knowledge base and skill base of intensive and critical care nursing. The strongest factor explaining nurses’ basic competence was their experience of autonomy in nursing care (F value 60.85, β 0.11, SE 0.01, and P≤0.0001. Clinical competence was self-rated as good. Nurses gave their highest competence self-ratings for ICU patient care according to the principles of nursing care. The ICU nurses also self-rated their professional competence as good. Collaboration was self-rated as the best competence. In basic and continuing education and professional self-development discussions it is meaningful to consider and find solutions for how to improve nurses’ experienced autonomy in nursing.

  1. Togiak National Wildlife Refuge lake surveys, 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Preliminary review of the data reveals that all lakes surveyed can be classified as having low conductibility, ranging from the low 20's for the Goodnews Lakes to...

  2. Measuring and exposures from National Media Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Stendahl

    2000-01-01

    Natinal media surveys inform about the number and kind of people being exposed to the media in question. This paper discusses to what extent these numbers may be used as measures for the exposure to ads in the media in question. In this context attention is also focussed on elements in the media...... surveys themselves that might invalidate or give unreliable measures, both when measuring a single exposure and accumulated exposures. Four media types will be discussed: TV, radio, print and the internet....

  3. A national survey of medical student suicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jacklyn; Kumar, Shelley; Nelson, Elizabeth; Harris, Toi; Coverdale, John

    2014-10-01

    Because there is no current information on medical student suicides, the authors surveyed US medical schools about deaths by suicide of medical students from June 2006 to July 2011. In spring through summer of 2012, the authors sent electronic surveys to the 133 accredited US allopathic medical schools at the time, excluding Puerto Rican schools. The 15-item survey included questions about deaths by suicide and deaths by means other than suicide. In the case of a reported suicide, the survey obtained information regarding demographic characteristics and method of suicide. The 90 responding schools (response rate 69 %) reported a total of six suicides (four males, two females; five Caucasians, one Asian) from July 2006 to June 2011. Two deaths by suicide occurred in first year, two in second year, and two in third year. Two of the suicides occurred by gunshot, two by hanging, one by overdose, and for one, the cause of death was unknown. Three of the six students left a suicide note. Although the number and rate of suicides among medical students may be lower than a prior survey that was conducted more than 15 years ago, these data affirm the importance of suicide prevention programs for medical students.

  4. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a hand-written report outlining the results of a vegetation transect survey done in the North Marsh of Presquile National Wildlife Refuge in August of 1978.

  5. Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge coastal survey, final report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial surveys were conducted along the coastline of the Yukon Delta National Wildlife Refuge to determine the distribution and abundance of waterfowl and...

  6. Anuran Call Survey Summary 2002 Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Anuran call surveys were conducted at the Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge for the first time in 2000 so this report summarizes the results of the refuge’s...

  7. Initial Contaminants Survey of Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An initial contaminants survey was conducted at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge (HNWR) in north central Texas. Contaminants from a variety of sources have the...

  8. Contaminant survey of the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment and biotic samples were collected from four locations on the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge for a contaminant survey. Contaminants examined in the...

  9. Sediment contamination survey on St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey was conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assess habitat quality on the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Sediment samples were...

  10. National Youth Survey US: Wave III (NYS-1978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the third wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this data collection, which includes data for youth interviewed in 1979 about events and...

  11. National Youth Survey US: Wave I (NYS-1976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset contains parent and youth data for the National Youth Survey. Youths and one of their parents or legal guardians were interviewed in early 1977 about...

  12. National Youth Survey US: Wave II (NYS-1977)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the second wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this data collection. The first wave was conducted in 1976. Youths were interviewed in...

  13. National Youth Survey US: Wave VI (NYS-1983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the sixth wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this collection. This research project, which was designed to gain a better understanding...

  14. National Youth Survey US: Wave VII (NYS-1987)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Youth data for the seventh wave of the National Youth Survey are contained in this collection. This research project, designed to gain a better understanding of both...

  15. National Geochemical Survey Locations and Results for Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The United States Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with other state and federal agencies, industry, and academia, is conducting a National Geochemical...

  16. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Creel Survey Application

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — This survey is intended to gain an understanding of fish population dynamics and angler use patterns throughout the park. If you have fished only one particular...

  17. Anuran Call Survey Summary 2006 Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Anuran call surveys were conducted at Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge in April-June 2006 using the protocol developed by the North American Amphibian...

  18. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report shows the results of vegetation transect survey done by refuge staff of the North Marsh at Presquile National Wildlife Refuge in September of 1982. There...

  19. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1971

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report discusses the results of a vegetation transect line survey done in 1971 at the North Marsh of Prequile National Wildlife Refuge. No management had been...

  20. Detailed soil survey of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A first order soil survey was produced for a portion of the Pixley National Wildlife Refuge, Tulare County, California. A soil legend composed of eleven soil map...

  1. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report outlines the results of vegetation transect survey done at Presquile National Wildlife Refuge during the summer of 1969. There are historical comparisons...

  2. Vegetation Survey for Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge 1969

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report outlines the findings of vegetation survey work done in September of 1969 at Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge. This work was done on the same five...

  3. Wetland Vegetation Survey Report Presquile National Wildlife Refuge 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report outlines the findings of the first wetland vegetation transect survey that was done at Presquile National Wildlife Refuge since 1973 when the refuge was...

  4. Trumpeter swan surveys on the Chugach National Forest 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Trumpeter swan (Cygnus buccinator) aerial surveys were conducted during May and August 1997 on the Copper River Delta and surrounding areas of the Chugach National...

  5. National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS), 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Mental Health Services Survey (N-MHSS) is designed to collect information from all specialty mental health facilities in the United States, both public...

  6. [September 2000 range survey : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is data from a September 2000 range survey that was conducted on Quivira National Wildlife Refuge. Six vegetation transects were evaluated and compared...

  7. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 2009-2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in...

  8. Survey of breeding birds Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of the results of the second annual survey of breeding birds of Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge conducted in 1995. This series of...

  9. Survey of breeding birds, Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge, 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of the results of the third annual survey of breeding birds of Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge conducted in 1996. Information on...

  10. Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity - National Immunization Survey (Breastfeeding)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset includes breastfeeding data from the National Immunization Survey. This data is used for DNPAO's Data, Trends, and Maps database, which provides...

  11. Anuran Survey Report 2003 Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of a few different studies conducted at Wertheim National Wildlife Refuge between 1999-2002. It includes the Anuran Breeding Call Surveys...

  12. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Surveys that were conducted on 53 refuges across the Refuge System. The report is part of USGS Data...

  13. Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge contaminant survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — As part of a baseline contaminant survey of all National Wildlife Refuges (NWR) in Missouri, fish were collected at the Squaw Creek NWR from Davis and Squaw creeks...

  14. Descriptive survey of the contextual support for nursing research in 15 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uys, Leana R; Newhouse, Robin P; Oweis, Arwa; Liang, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    Global research productivity depends on the presence of contextual factors, such as a doctorally prepared faculty, graduate programmes, publication options, that enable the conduct and publication of studies to generate knowledge to inform nursing practice. The current study aimed to develop and test an instrument that measures the level of contextual support for nursing research within a specific country, allowing comparisons between countries. After development of a 20-item survey with seven factors and 11 criteria based on a literature review, a quantitative descriptive e-mail survey design was used. Nurse researchers (N=100) from 22 countries were invited to participate. The response rate was 39% from 15 countries. Ethics approval was obtained by investigators in their country of origin. Results showed wide variation in the level of contextual support. The average total level of support across all countries was 26.8% (standard deviation [SD]=14.97). The greatest variability was in the area of availability of publishing opportunities (ranging between no suitable journals in a country to over 100). The least variability was in the area of availability of local enabling support (SD=7.22). This research showed wide differences in the level of contextual support for nursing research. The survey instrument can be utilised as a country assessment that can be used to strategically plan the building of infrastructure needed to support nursing research. Contextual support for nursing research is an antecedent of strong science. Building infrastructure for nursing science is a priority for global health.

  15. A survey of role diversity among advanced practice nurses in pediatric gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuffie, Adelina F; Huffman, Shari

    2005-01-01

    A survey of advanced practice nurses in the Association of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Nurses (APGNN) was conducted to assess role diversity in anticipation of sharing these results with our international colleagues at the World Congress in 2004. A single-page, 14-item survey was sent via e-mail or fax to 79 APGNN advanced practice nurses identified by their credentials (MS, PNP, FNP) in the membership database. Forty surveys were returned via e-mail or fax for an overall response rate of 51%. Most reported working full time as nurse practitioners in an outpatient gastrointestinal clinic, yet almost one third were hospital based. Additional job titles included clinical nurse specialist, researcher, and case manager or clinical coordinator. Slightly more than one half reported seeing any patients in their outpatient practice, whereas 43% saw specific populations, with constipation, gastroesophageal reflux, and abdominal pain being the most common diagnoses. Seventy percent had prescriptive privileges. Billing practices were the most diverse, with 30% always billing under their own number, 23% sometimes billing under their own number, and 40% never billing under their own number (5% not applicable). Overall, most advanced practice nurses in APGNN are pediatric nurse practitioners with a primary focus on outpatient care but also are involved in patient and family teaching, nutrition support, home care, and research. Only a few were involved with procedures, which may be surprising to our adult counterparts.

  16. Stress and burnout among hemodialysis nurses: A single-center, prospective survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Karkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress is a well known and identified problem within the nursing profession. Dialysis nurses are exposed to high level of stress. Increasing workload can aggravate stress and cause burnout and exhaustion. Stress and burnout are capable of having a detrimental impact on organizational productivity and pose serious health and safety hazards on the job. We aimed in this study to determine the type and level of stress and the amount of burnout among our dialysis nurses, and to evaluate the managing skills and the impact of stress on their work performance. There were 93 nurses (19 national and 74 expatriate nurses who answered modified questionnaires to the aims of our prospective and descriptive correlational study. Our results show that most nurses involved in the study (national and expatriate experienced a mild level of stress (79% and 68%, respectively and moderate level of burnout (42% and 38%, respectively. The most common stressor among the national nurses was technical breakdowns of machines (15.9% and that among expatriates was job insecurity (16.9%. The majority of the national nurses (21% coped with this by increased sick leaves, whereas the majority (25% of the expatriates responded by becoming easily frustrated. The most utilized coping skill among both groups was the relaxation methods (20.8% versus 24.9% and the least utilized was denial (3.9% versus 0.5%. In conclusion, our results suggest the exposure of dialysis nurses to different types of stress and demonstrate the different experienced coping skills. These results may have implications for nursing management and hospital administration.

  17. Stress and burnout among hemodialysis nurses: a single-center, prospective survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkar, Ayman; Dammang, Mienalyn Lim; Bouhaha, Betty Mandin

    2015-01-01

    Stress is a well known and identified problem within the nursing profession. Dialysis nurses are exposed to high level of stress. Increasing workload can aggravate stress and cause burnout and exhaustion. Stress and burnout are capable of having a detrimental impact on organizational productivity and pose serious health and safety hazards on the job. We aimed in this study to determine the type and level of stress and the amount of burnout among our dialysis nurses, and to evaluate the managing skills and the impact of stress on their work performance. There were 93 nurses (19 national and 74 expatriate nurses) who answered modified questionnaires to the aims of our prospective and descriptive correlational study. Our results show that most nurses involved in the study (national and expatriate) experienced a mild level of stress (79% and 68%, respectively) and moderate level of burnout (42% and 38%, respectively). The most common stressor among the national nurses was technical breakdowns of machines (15.9%) and that among expatriates was job insecurity (16.9%). The majority of the national nurses (21%) coped with this by increased sick leaves, whereas the majority (25%) of the expatriates responded by becoming easily frustrated. The most utilized coping skill among both groups was the relaxation methods (20.8% versus 24.9%) and the least utilized was denial (3.9% versus 0.5%). In conclusion, our results suggest the exposure of dialysis nurses to different types of stress and demonstrate the different experienced coping skills. These results may have implications for nursing management and hospital administration.

  18. Neosho National Fish Hatchery contaminants survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish were collected from Neosho National Fish Hatchery (NNFH) to determine if metal or organic contaminants were elevated in the biota located on the hatchery. Whole...

  19. Boundary survey, Arctic National Wildlife Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is on the geology of the Arctic National Wildlife Range western boundary. The Canning River region and Southern Brooks range are both analyzed, including...

  20. Mingo National Wildlife Refuge contaminants survey results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fishes and turtles were collected from Stanley and Linn Creeks, Ditches 1 and 2, and Mingo Ditch of Mingo National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR) near Puxico, Stoddard and...

  1. Bioethics education of nursing curriculum in Korea: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Kwisoon; Kang, Youngmi; Lee, Woon-Yong

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the current profile of bioethics education in the nursing curriculum as perceived by nursing students and faculty in Korea. A convenience sampling method was used for recruiting 1223 undergraduate nursing students and 140 nursing faculty in Korea. Experience of Bioethics Education, Quality of Bioethics Education, and Demand for Bioethics Education Scales were developed. The Experience of Bioethics Education Scale showed that the nursing curriculum in Korea does not provide adequate bioethics education. The Quality of Bioethics Education Scale revealed that the topics of human nature and human rights were relatively well taught compared to other topics. The Demand for Bioethics Education Scale determined that the majority of the participants believed that bioethics education should be a major requirement in the nursing curriculum. The findings of this study suggest that bioethics should be systemically incorporated into nursing courses, clinical practice during the program, and during continuing education.

  2. Asthma Prevalence, Management, and Education in New York State Elementary Schools: A Survey of School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielb, Christine; Lin, Shao; Hwang, Syni-an

    2007-01-01

    A survey of school nurses was conducted in New York State elementary schools to assess asthma and asthma management in students. The survey contained questions about asthma morbidity, management and education, obstacles to management, and school indoor air quality. The reported prevalence of asthma among students was 8.5%. Of the students with…

  3. Nurses and Physicians Attitudes toward Nurse-Physician Collaboration: A Survey from Gaza Strip, Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Elsous

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional collaboration and teamwork between nurses and physicians is essential for improving patient outcomes and quality of health services. This study examined the attitudes of nurses and physicians toward nurse-physician collaboration. A cross-sectional study was conducted among nurses and physicians (n=414 in two main referral public hospitals in the Gaza Strip using the Arabic Jefferson Scale of Attitude toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration. Descriptive statistics and difference of means, proportions, and correlations were examined using Student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation and p<0.05 was considered as statistical significant. Response rate was 42.8% (75.6% for nurses and 24.4% for physicians. Nurses expressed more positives attitudes toward collaboration than physicians (M ± SD on four-point scale: 3.40±0.30 and 3.01±0.35, resp. and experience duration was not proved to have an interesting influence. Teamwork approach in the professional practice should be recognized taking into consideration that the relationship between physicians and nurses is complementary and nurses are partners in patient care.

  4. Nurses and Physicians Attitudes toward Nurse-Physician Collaboration: A Survey from Gaza Strip, Palestine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsous, Aymen

    2017-01-01

    Interprofessional collaboration and teamwork between nurses and physicians is essential for improving patient outcomes and quality of health services. This study examined the attitudes of nurses and physicians toward nurse-physician collaboration. A cross-sectional study was conducted among nurses and physicians (n = 414) in two main referral public hospitals in the Gaza Strip using the Arabic Jefferson Scale of Attitude toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration. Descriptive statistics and difference of means, proportions, and correlations were examined using Student's t-test, one-way ANOVA, and Pearson correlation and p < 0.05 was considered as statistical significant. Response rate was 42.8% (75.6% for nurses and 24.4% for physicians). Nurses expressed more positives attitudes toward collaboration than physicians (M ± SD on four-point scale: 3.40 ± 0.30 and 3.01 ± 0.35, resp.) and experience duration was not proved to have an interesting influence. Teamwork approach in the professional practice should be recognized taking into consideration that the relationship between physicians and nurses is complementary and nurses are partners in patient care. PMID:28326194

  5. National Survey of Evaluation Practices in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ronald D.; Craig, James R.

    A survey of teacher education evaluation practices was conducted to cover areas not addressed in previous studies. The initial survey form was reviewed by college administrators at Western Kentucky University, revised, and later reviewed by selected members of a group of professional educators across the nation. A questionnaire, developed to…

  6. Teaching Psychiatry Residents to Teach: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp-Han, Holly; Chambliss, R. Bryan; Coverdale, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Because there have been no previously published national surveys on teaching psychiatry residents about how to teach, the authors surveyed United States psychiatry program directors on what and how residents are taught about teaching. Methods: All psychiatry training programs across the United States were mailed a semistructured…

  7. Results From the 2014 National Wilderness Manager Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh Ghimire; Ken Cordell; Alan Watson; Chad Dawson; Gary T. Green

    2015-01-01

    A national survey of managers was developed to support interagency wilderness strategic planning. The focus was on major challenges, perceived needs for science and training, and accomplishments of 1995 Strategic Plan objectives. The survey was administered to managers at the four federal agencies with wilderness management responsibilities: the Bureau of Land...

  8. Highlights of the 2007 National Youth Gang Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egley, Jr., Arlen; O'Donnell, Christina E.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents findings from the 2007 National Youth Gang Survey. Data on the number of gangs, gang members, and gang-related homicides in larger cities, suburban counties, smaller cities, and rural counties are provided to accurately reflect youth gang activity in the United States. Based on survey results, it is estimated that nearly 3,550…

  9. Nurses' expert opinions of workplace interventions for a healthy working environment: a Delphi survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Diane; Clarke, Sean; Hayes, Laureen; Nincic, Vera

    2014-09-01

    Much has been written about interventions to improve the nursing work environment, yet little is known about their effectiveness. A Delphi survey of nurse experts was conducted to explore perceptions about workplace interventions in terms of feasibility and likelihood of positive impact on nurse outcomes such as job satisfaction and nurse retention. The interventions that received the highest ratings for likelihood of positive impact included: bedside handover to improve communication at shift report and promote patient-centred care; training program for nurses in dealing with violent or aggressive behaviour; development of charge nurse leadership team; training program focused on creating peer-supportive atmospheres and group cohesion; and schedule that recognizes work balance and family demands. The overall findings are consistent with the literature that highlights the importance of communication and teamwork, nurse health and safety, staffing and scheduling practices, professional development and leadership and mentorship. Nursing researchers and decision-makers should work in collaboration to implement and evaluate interventions for promoting practice environments characterized by effective communication and teamwork, professional growth and adequate support for the health and well-being of nurses.

  10. National wildlife refuge visitor survey results: 2010/2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carolos, Andrew W.; Miller, Holly M.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. The survey was conducted on 53 refuges across the National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System) to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. A total of 14,832 visitors agreed to participate in the survey between July 2010 and November 2011. In all, 10,233 visitors completed the survey for a 71% response rate. This report provides a summary of visitor and trip characteristics; visitor opinions about refuges and their offerings; and visitor opinions about alternative transportation and climate change, two Refuge System topics of interest. The Refuge System, established in 1903 and managed by the Service, is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 National Wildlife Refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. These combined results are based on surveying at 53 participating

  11. 75 FR 32191 - National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) DNA Samples: Guidelines for Proposals...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Health and Nutrition Examination...: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) is a program of periodic surveys... Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease...

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-11-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings of the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), conducted June 15 through 26, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. The team includes outside experts supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with ANL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at ANL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the S A results will be incorporated into the Argonne National Laboratory Environmental Survey findings for inclusion in the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 75 refs., 24 figs., 60 tabs.

  13. 76 FR 14033 - National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Council on Nurse Education and Practice; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee... results. There will be a discussion to help identify best practices to implement diversity in the nursing...

  14. Diabetes and youth resources for school nurses: an update from the National Diabetes Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivan, Joanne; Greenberg, R D Rachel H

    2014-07-01

    In response to the challenge of diabetes in youth, the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) has developed free, evidence-based education materials and online resources for school nurses, parents, and children living with or at risk for diabetes. This article highlights some of NDEP's resources and identifies ways for school nurses to use them with students and their families.

  15. A Model for Intervention and Predicting Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heupel, Carol

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of selected academic variables to National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) performance was studied and a "best set" of indicators predictive of NCLEX-RN success was identified. Results indicated that selected nursing theory courses and the junior year grade point average could be used to…

  16. Impact of Professional Nursing Tutors on National Council Licensure Examination Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondeik, Shelly L.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the impact of professional nursing tutors on National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) success. Thirty-eight nursing student success rates from Northcentral Technical College, a two year technical college in Wisconsin, were analyzed by using NCLEX pass rate information, professional tutoring logs, and a…

  17. Cross-national comparison of prescribing patterns in Australian and dutch nursing homes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taxis, Katja; Kochen, Sjoerd; Geerens, Sanne; Wouters, Hans; Boersma, Froukje; Maring, Jan G.; Mulder, Hans; Pavlovic, Jugoslav; Stevens, Gerard; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Pont, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prescribing quality is a major issue in nursing home patients. Few cross-national comparisons of prescribing patterns have been carried out in this population. Objectives: To compare prevalence of medication use in nursing home patients between Australia and The Netherlands. Methods: An

  18. Windows to the Future: Can the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals Provide Opportunities for Nursing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, David C; Ferguson, Stephanie L

    2016-01-01

    Windows of opportunity are wide open for the nursing profession to actively participate and engage in the policy implementation, evaluation, and achievement of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. Nurses bring valuable perspectives as members of diverse governance structures and offer a range of solutions that can help governments pursue and achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and targets by 2030.

  19. National databases and rheumatology research II: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Krishnan, Eswar

    2004-11-01

    Three National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were conducted in the United States between 1971 and 1994 to provide data on the nutritional and health status of the population and on specific target conditions. This article describes features of the surveys and provides examples of research on musculoskeletal disorders that used the survey data.

  20. A study of continuing nurse education in Malta: the importance of national context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adami, Maria Fenech; Kiger, Alice

    2005-01-01

    rather than simply extrapolating research evidence and subsequent recommendations on nurse education from one national context to another.

  1. 2010 National Beneficiary Survey: Methodology and Descriptive Statistics.

    OpenAIRE

    Debra Wright; Gina Livermore; Denise Hoffman; Eric Grau; Maura Bardos

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the sampling design and data collection activities for round 4 (2010) of the Social Security Administration’s National Beneficiary Survey (NBS). It also provides descriptive statistics on working-age individuals receiving Supplemental Security Income and Social Security Disability Insurance benefits, based on the nationally representative sample from the 2010 NBS.

  2. Buffalo: Public Attitudes About Crime; A National Crime Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Criminal Justice Information and Statistics Service (Dept. of Justice/LEAA), Washington, DC.

    The National Crime Survey found that about three-fourths of the Buffalo residents perceived national crime as on the upswing, and one-third sensed an increase locally. Fewer than 10% believed crime in either place declined. Most felt their own victimization rate had increased. Fear of criminal attack appeared largely dependent upon the time of day…

  3. National facilities survey. Water treatment technology report No. 12 (Final)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, D.H.

    1994-09-01

    This report is a survey of publicly and privately owned laboratories, facilities, and pilot plant equipment in the United States capable of undertaking water research and technology development. The survey was initiated by the National Water Research Institute and the Bureau of Reclamation as its first step in the development of the National Centers for Separation and Thermal Systems Research (Centers). The Centers concepts will facilitate water purification research through optimization of use of research resources, including facilities, making existing resources, facilities, and equipment available for investigators to conduct research. The survey contains information on 66 facilities in the United States.

  4. Teaching the Spiritual Dimension of Nursing Care: A Survey of U.S. Baccalaureate Nursing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Corinne

    2002-01-01

    Responses from 132 baccalaureate nursing programs indicated that the majority include spiritual dimensions in program philosophy and curriculum, but few had definitions of spirituality and nursing care. Content typically addressed patients' spiritual needs, dying, and holism. Respondents were uncertain about faculty preparation to teach about…

  5. Evolving National Strategy Driving Nursing Informatics in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honey, Michelle; Westbrooke, Lucy

    2016-01-01

    An update to the New Zealand Health Strategy identifying direction and priorities for health services is underway. Three specific areas have implications for nursing informatics and link to education and practice: best use of technology and information, fostering and spreading innovation and quality improvements, and building leaders and capability for the future. An emphasis on prevention and wellness means nursing needs to focus on health promotion and the role of consumers is changing with access to their on-line information a major focus. As the modes of delivery for services such as telehealth and telenursing changes, nurses are increasingly working independently and utilizing information and communication technologies to collaborate with the health team. New Zealand, and other countries, need strong nursing leadership to sustain the nursing voice in policy and planning and ensure nurses develop the required informatics skills.

  6. Job analysis. National Certification Board: Perioperative Nursing, Inc, document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, V; Blue, M R

    1988-05-01

    The document is the critical element in developing an exam that reflects current perioperative nursing practice. The test specifications ensure that each phase of perioperative nursing practice is adequately measured at a proficient level of care. In addition to developing test specifications, the NCB:PNI has recommended that A Job Analysis could be used in the following situations. 1. Nurse managers could use the document in refining job descriptions, evaluating employee performance, creating clinical ladder criteria, and establishing standards of patient care. 2. Perioperative nurse educators could use it in developing self-directed learning contracts, designing curriculum for students or staff development. 3. Researchers could use the document in justifying the existence of registered nurses in the OR. 4. Perioperative nurses could use it for peer review and self-evaluation.

  7. A second national questionnaire survey of TMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito-Habe, Naomi; Wada, Hideo; Matsumoto, Masanori; Fujimura, Yoshihiro; Murata, Mitsuru; Izuno, Takashi; Sugita, Minoru; Ikeda, Yasuo

    2010-07-01

    A second questionnaire survey of Japanese patients with thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was carried out to investigate the frequency, laboratory abnormalities and outcome in 2004 and 2005. The first and second surveys evaluated 397 patients including 19 with familial TMA and 378 with acquired TMA. The patients with acquired TMA included 165 with Escherichia coli O-157 infection-related TMA (O-157 TMA), 70 with ADAMTS13-related TMA (ADAMTS13 TMA) and 38 with other types of TMA (other TMA). The rate of ADAMTS13 TMA was significantly higher in patients with collagen diseases than in patients with all other underlying diseases (p TMA included plasma exchange (PE), steroids, antiplatelet agents, and anticoagulants, PE was carried out in 91.4% of patients with ADAMTS13 TMA, 68.4% of patients with other TMA and 12.7% of patients with O-157 TMA. The efficacy of PE and steroid therapy tended to be higher in patients with ADAMTS13 TMA than in those with other TMA. The complete remission rate was the highest and the mortality rate was the lowest in the patients with O-157 TMA. The mortality rate tended to be lower in patients with ADAMTS13 TMA than in those with other TMA. However, not all of the patients in our study were examined for ADAMTS13 at the time that this questionnaire survey was conducted.

  8. Relationship of Academic Variables to National Council for Licensure Examination for Registered Nurse Performance of Graduates in a Selected Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naron, Rosarica G.; Widlak, Frederic

    This report addresses the unstable and unsatisfactory performance of Chicago, Illinois' Olive-Harvey College's (OHC) associate degree nursing (ADN) graduates on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN). An ex post facto correlation study was designed to determine the worthiness of pre-nursing admission course…

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-10-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), conducted September 14 through 25, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual participants for the Survey team are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Fermilab. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at Fermilab, and interviews with site personnel. 110 refs., 26 figs., 41 tabs.

  10. Emergency nurse practitioner services in major accident and emergency departments: a United Kingdom postal survey.

    OpenAIRE

    Tye, C C; Ross, F.; Kerry, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To establish the current and predicted distribution of formal emergency nurse practitioner services in major accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom; to determine organisational variations in service provision, with specific reference to funding, role configuration, training, and scope of clinical activity. METHODS: Postal survey of senior nurses of all major accident and emergency departments in the United Kingdom (n = 293) in May/June 1996. RESULTS: There were 27...

  11. Examining missed care in community nursing: A cross section survey design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Amanda; Mccarthy, Sandra; Adams, Elizabeth

    2017-09-27

    To examine the prevalence of missed care in the community nursing. Previous studies have used a missed care framework to identify challenges routine nursing care in acute care environments. Several issues related to quality of care, safe staffing, job satisfaction and poor teamwork. However, this concept has not been examined in the community nursing context. A cross-sectional survey design was used to explore the concept of missed care in community nursing using demographical information, community nursing roles and reasons for missed care. Online questionnaires were completed by 458 community nurses in the Republic of Ireland to determine the prevalence of and reasons for missed care (31 July -25 September 2015). With a response rate of 29%, findings were above 70 percent in several routine care responsibilities. Other findings point to a higher level of missed care in nurses who had less than five years' experience and other variables such as age, those who worked additional unpaid hours and there were some regional variations. The results of the study indicate a high prevalence of missed care in the community nurses surveyed and that preventative care was the type of care most likely to be missed. This has serious implications for a nursing service that is preventative in nature and suggests that the missed care framework could benefit workforce planning for community nursing services both in Ireland and elsewhere. Accordingly, policy, practice and educational reforms are fundamental to meet current and future population needs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Neonatal nurses' perceptions of pain management: survey of the United States and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Xiaomei; McGrath, Jacqueline M; Delaney, Colleen; Chen, Hua; Liang, Shuang; Vazquez, Victoria; Keating, Laura; Chang, Kimberly; Dejong, Angela

    2014-12-01

    Despite growing knowledge, neonatal pain remains unrecognized, undertreated, and generally challenging. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted to investigate neonatal nurses' perceptions, knowledge, and practice of infant pain in the United States and China, including 343 neonatal nurses (American nurses [n = 237]; Chinese nurses [n = 106]). Nurses' responses regarding neonatal pain reflected adequate knowledge in general pain concepts, but knowledge deficits related to several topics were found (e.g., preterm infants are more sensitive to pain and long-term consequences of pain). Most reported regular use of pain assessment tools, but fewer agreed that the tool used was appropriate and accurate. More American nurses (83%) than Chinese nurses (58%) felt confident in the use of pain medications, while more Chinese nurses (78%) than American nurses (61%) acknowledged the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic interventions. About half reported that pain in their units was well managed (American: 44.3%; Chinese: 55.7%), and less than half felt that pain guidelines/protocols were research-based (American: 42.6%; Chinese: 34.9%). Nurses' perceptions of well-managed pain in their units were significantly correlated with adequate education/training, use of accurate tools, and use of research-based protocols. Barriers to effective pain management included resistance to change, lack of knowledge, lack of time, fear of side effects of pain medication, and lack of trust in the tools. The survey reflects concerns that pain has not been well managed in many neonatal intensive care units in the United States and China. Further actions are needed to solve the issues of inadequate training, lack of clinically feasible pain tools, and absence of evidence-based guidelines/protocols.

  13. "Help Us, Serve England": First World War Military Nursing and National Identities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Historians generally argue that the First World War was a defining experience from which Canadians emerged with a strong sense of national identity distinct from their British roots. There is little historical research on women's wartime experiences and even less on military nurses. This article explores the working relationships of Nursing Sister Emeline Robinson with British nurses, VAD volunteers, orderlies, and medical officers during her one and a half years with the Queen Alexandra Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve through her diary, which spans her enlistment, resignation, and re-enlistment with the Canadian Army Medical Corps.

  14. The impact of ongoing national terror on the community of hospital nurses in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ron, Pnina; Shamai, Michal

    2014-04-01

    The main goal of this study was to explore the connections between the exposure of nurses in Israel to national terror and the levels of distress experienced due to ongoing terror attacks. The data were collected from 214 nurses from various parts of Israel who work in three types of heath services (mainly hospital departments) and provide help to victims of terror. The nurses reported very high levels of burnout, high levels of stress and medium-to high levels of intrusive memories. Levels of exposure were associated with burnout, intrusive memories and level of stress. More professional attention should be given to hospital nurses who provide care for trauma patients.

  15. Job stress and coping strategies among nurses: results of a self report survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAbee, R

    1994-10-01

    1. Many employers do not have the resources for sophisticated investigation, development, and implementation of stress reduction programs for employee health. This does not eliminate the need for such programs. 2. Occupational health nurses can develop stress reduction programs building on individual coping strategies used by workers. A simple survey of workers could provide baseline information for the development of these programs. 3. Exercise, open atmosphere for discussion, relaxation, and taking a break were the top four coping strategies reported by nurses and non-nurse female employees. Employers could easily support stress reduction programs built on these strategies.

  16. Exercise in cancer care in Ireland: a survey of oncology nurses and physiotherapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hanlon, E; Kennedy, N

    2014-09-01

    Little is known about the extent of exercise prescription within cancer care. This cross-sectional survey aims to identify Irish oncology nurses and physiotherapists' current knowledge and practice in prescribing exercise for cancer care and barriers to such prescription. An online survey was distributed to the Chartered Physiotherapists in Oncology and Palliative Care (n = 35) and the Irish Association for Nurses in Oncology (n = 170). The response rate was 74% (26/35) for physiotherapists and 34% (58/170) for oncology nurses. Three quarters of physiotherapists recommended/prescribed exercise with 81% or more of cancer patients in the past 6 months, with the exercises prescribed largely in line with current guidelines. Patients' family/friends advising rest was the most commonly reported exercise barrier by physiotherapists [89% (17/19)], with a lack of exercise guidelines for cancer patients being most problematic for oncology nurses [93% (50/54)]. Only 33% (18/54) of oncology nurses felt they had sufficient knowledge regarding exercise in cancer care. In conclusion, exercise prescription by physiotherapists largely corresponds with current guidelines. A minority of nurses felt they had sufficient knowledge of exercise for this population. Further formal postgraduate educational opportunities are needed for oncology nurses and physiotherapists in this area.

  17. National Association of School Nurses ISSUE BRIEF: School Health Nurse's Role in Education: Privacy Standards for Student Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlman, Katherine; Schwab, Nadine

    2003-01-01

    This article is a reprint of the National Association of School Nurses' "Issue Brief" on Privacy Standards for Student Health Records. It distinguishes between the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HI-PAA), clarifies which of these laws governs the privacy of student health…

  18. Quality of Work Life, Nurses' Intention to Leave the Profession, and Nurses Leaving the Profession: A One-Year Prospective Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Wen; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Chang, Mei Yeh; Chang, Yue-Cune; Yao, Kaiping Grace; Liu, Mei-Chun

    2017-07-01

    To examine the associations among quality of work life, nurses' intention to leave the profession, and nurses leaving the profession. A prospective study design was used. Participants were 1,283 hospital nurses with a purposive sampling in Taiwan. The self-reported questionnaire consisted of three questionnaires: the Chinese version of the Quality of Nursing Work Life scale, an intention-to-leave profession questionnaire, and a demographic questionnaire. Records of nurses leaving the profession were surveyed 1 year later. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistics and inferential statistics. As many as 720 nurses (56.1%) had tendencies to leave their profession. However, only 31 nurses (2.5%) left their profession 1 year later. Nurses' intention to leave the profession mediated the relationship between the milieu of respect and autonomy, quality of work life, and nurses leaving the profession. The milieu of respect and autonomy describing the quality of work life predicts the nurses' intention to leave the profession, and together these predict nurses leaving the profession. This study illustrates that nurse managers could provide effective interventions to ameliorate the milieu of respect and autonomy aspect of quality of work life to prevent nurses from leaving their profession. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Problem neurology residents: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabby, David S; Majeed, Muhammed H; Schwartzman, Robert J

    2011-06-14

    Problem residents are found across most medical specialties at a prevalence of about 10%. This study was designed to explore the prevalence and causes of problem neurology residents and to compare neurology programs' responses and outcomes. Directors of 126 US neurology residency programs were sent an electronic survey. We collected data on demographics, first and all "identifiers" of problem residents, and year of training in which the problem was found. We asked about observable signs, etiology, and who performed remediation. We asked what resources were used and what outcomes occurred. Ninety-five program directors completed surveys (75% response rate). Almost all neurology programs have problem residents (81%). Age, sex, marital status, being a US native, or attending a US medical school had no effect on problem status. Being a parent carried a lower likelihood of problems (32%). Most commonly the problem is acted on during the first year of training. Faculty members without defined educational roles were the most frequent first identifiers. Program directors were the most common remediators. The most common remediation techniques were increasing supervision and assigning a faculty mentor. Graduate medical education office and psychiatric or psychological counseling services were most often used. Eleven percent of problem residents required a program for impaired physicians and 14% required a leave of absence. Sixteen percent were dismissed from their programs. The prevalence of problem residents in neurology is similar to other disciplines, and various resources are available to remediate them.

  20. Professional autonomy and job satisfaction: survey of critical care nurses in mainland Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliopoulou, Katerina K; While, Alison E

    2010-11-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to describe Greek critical care nurses' views on professional autonomy and its relationship with job satisfaction and other work-related variables. Professional autonomy is generally considered a highly desirable nursing attribute and a major factor in nurse job satisfaction. In the critical care environment, a high level of accountability, responsibility and autonomy are required to optimize outcomes of critically unstable patients. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of Greek critical care nurses (n = 431; response rate 70%) in 2007. Data were collected on professional autonomy, job satisfaction, role conflict and role ambiguity. Overall, nurses reported acting moderately autonomously. Younger nurses reported statistically significant lower levels of autonomy. Higher levels of autonomy were reported by female nurses. Multiple logistic regression revealed that appointment level, type of critical care unit and registration with a professional organization were independently associated with autonomy. A positive moderate association was found between reported autonomy, job satisfaction, role conflict and role ambiguity, but there was no relationship between job satisfaction and reported role conflict and role ambiguity. Further education, role enhancement and support are required for nurses working in critical care in Greece if they are to achieve the maximum potential of their professional role. Failure to address the perceptions of professional autonomy may have an impact on staff retention, because of job dissatisfaction. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Towards a National Discursive Construction of Nurses' Diversity Related Competencies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Annie Aarup; Jæger, Kirsten

    2009-01-01

    's journal, "The Nurse", covering an eight-year period it is concluded that the nursing profession understood as a community of practice continues to encounter the same type of problems related to diversity and that increased knowledge, skills and competencies are needed. The discourse of a new Bachelor...

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  3. Cost-effective wound management: a survey of 1717 nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Heather

    2017-06-22

    Delivering high-quality wound care requires a mix of knowledge and skills, which nurses aim to update by attending educational events such as conferences and study days. This article describes the data obtained from 30 educational study days, which took place across England, Scotland and Wales. It will explore nurses' knowledge in relation to the cost-effectiveness and clinical efficacy of current wound care practices, based on the answers of 1717 delegates that attended the events. It will also outline the results in relation to reducing expenditure on wound dressings and the importance of performing an accurate wound assessment.

  4. A national study on nurses' retention in healthcare facilities in underserved areas in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jardali, Fadi; Alameddine, Mohamad; Jamal, Diana; Dimassi, Hani; Dumit, Nuhad Y; McEwen, Mary K; Jaafar, Maha; Murray, Susan F

    2013-09-30

    Nursing shortages and maldistribution are priority issues for healthcare systems around the globe. Such imbalances are often aggravated in underserved areas, especially in developing countries. Despite the centrality of this issue, there is a dearth of studies that examine the retention of nurses in underserved areas in the Middle East Region. This study investigates the characteristic and the factors associated with the retention of nurses working in rural areas in Lebanon. This study uses a non-experimental cross-sectional design to survey nurses working in underserved areas of Lebanon. Underserved areas in Lebanon were identified using WHO definition. A total of 103 health facilities (hospitals and primary healthcare centers) located in these areas were identified and all nurses working at these facilities received a copy of the survey questionnaire. The questionnaire included five sections: demographic, work-life, career plan, job satisfaction, and assessment of work environment. Analysis included univariate and bivariate (chi-square, Student's t-test and ANOVA) tests to describe the respondents and examine the significance between nurses' characteristics and their intent to stay. A logistic regression model was constructed to identify factors associated with nurses' intent to stay in underserved areas. A total of 857 nurses from 63 Primary Healthcare (PHC) centers and hospitals responded to the questionnaire (75.5% response rate). Only 35.1% of nurses indicated their intent to stay in their current job over the coming one to three years. Surveyed nurses were most satisfied with relationship with co-workers and least satisfied with extrinsic rewards. Rural nurses working in PHC centers were more satisfied than their hospital counterparts on all aspects of work and had significantly higher intention to stay (62.5% compared to 31.5% in hospitals, P Lebanon, especially in the hospital sector. The status quo is disquieting as it reflects an unstable and

  5. Teaching styles used in Malawian BSN programmes: a survey of nurse educator preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilemba, Evelyn B; Bruce, Judith C

    2015-02-01

    This paper describes the teaching styles employed by Malawian nurse educators in the four year Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programme, according to Grasha's (1996) five teaching styles. An analysis of the educational processes of undergraduate nurses in Malawi followed anecdotal reports from stakeholders on the low levels of nurses' performance in the workplace. It was postulated that, in most instances, nursing students are exposed to traditional teaching approaches that do not equip them with skills for a demanding and ever-changing healthcare system. A survey was conducted as part of a two-phased, sequential, explanatory mixed methods study. The target population comprised fifty nurse educators (N=50) who were invited to participate in the survey. Data were collected using Grasha's Teaching Styles Inventory (Version 3.0). A total of 44 inventories (n=44) were returned amounting to a response rate of 88%. Survey results were analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS), version 16.0. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. The Expert and Delegator teaching styles were moderately preferred (x̅ 4.02; SD 1.06) by the majority of nurse educators (70.45%; n=31 and 86.36%; n=38 respectively). The Facilitator teaching style was the least preferred (x̅ 3.7; SD 1.43) by 66.90% of educators (n=29), who also reported weak facilitative skills in the sub-scales. Similarly, educators reported a low preference for the Personal Model teaching style (x̅ 3.6; SD 1.17). Teacher-centred styles tend to dominate the teaching activities of Malawian nurse educators in the BSN programme. Facilitative pedagogical approaches must be encouraged coupled with appropriate staff development that enables educators to facilitate learning with confidence, competence and self-efficacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Violence at the workplace--a questionnaire survey of nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merecz, Dorota; Rymaszewska, Joanna; Mościcka, Agnieszka; Kiejna, Andrzej; Jarosz-Nowak, Joanna

    2006-10-01

    In the health sector, anywhere in the world nurses are one of the most exposed groups to violence. However, it is not obvious that psychiatric nurses (PNs) are more exposed to aggression and burnout. To determine the nature and effects of aggressive acts towards nursing staff in psychiatric and other medical services in Poland. Various questionnaires (Stress at Work Scale, General Health Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Work Satisfaction Scale), were distributed among psychiatric (N=78) and non-psychiatric nurses (N-PNs) (N=335). A 92.6% response rate was achieved. Significant differences were found between PNs and non-psychiatric counterparts with respect to their experiences of violence. The most frequently reported incident was verbal abuse, followed by threats and physical assault. Patients were significantly more frequent perpetrators in psychiatric wards than in others. The level of intra-staff aggression did not significantly vary between groups, neither did the level of work satisfaction and absenteeism. The frequency of violent acts and stress related to them point out the strong need for the development of preventive programs to address the issue of violence at work.

  7. Predictors of adherence to safe handling practices for antineoplastic drugs: A survey of hospital nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Sharon R; Steege, Andrea L; Boiano, James M

    2016-01-01

    Despite growing awareness of the hazards of exposure to antineoplastic drugs (ADs), surveys continue to find incomplete adherence to recommended safe handling guidelines. A 2011 survey of healthcare workers presents an opportunity to examine factors associated with adherence among 1094 hospital nurses who administered ADs. Data for these hypothesis-generating analyses were taken from an anonymous, web-based survey of healthcare workers. Regression modeling was used to examine associations between a number of predictors (engineering controls, work practices, nurse perceptions, and nurse and hospital characteristics) and three outcomes reported by nurses: use of personal protective equipment (PPE); activities performed with gloves previously worn to administer ADs; and spills of ADs. Adherence to safe handling guidelines was not universal, and AD spills were reported by 9.5% of nurses during the week prior to the survey. Familiarity with safe handling guidelines and training in safe handling were associated with more reported PPE use. Nurse-perceived availability of PPE was associated with more reported PPE use and lower odds of reported spills. Use of closed system drug-transfer devices and luer-lock fittings also decreased the odds of self-reported AD spills, while more frequent AD administration increased the risk. AD administration frequency was also associated with performing more activities with gloves previously worn to administer ADs, and nurse perception of having adequate time for taking safety precautions with fewer such activities. The results suggest that training and familiarity with guidelines for safe handling of ADs, adequate time to adhere to guidelines, and availability of PPE and certain engineering controls are key to ensuring adherence to safe handling practices. Further assessment of training components and engineering controls would be useful for tailoring interventions targeting these areas.

  8. Personality and professional commitment of students in nursing, social work, and teaching: A comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are often portrayed as possessing specific traits and dispositions associated with care and empathy. The assumption has been that possessing these traits makes nurses competent, engaged, and well suited to their job. This proposition has been mostly normative, and few studies have investigated how this plays out empirically. The aims of this study were to investigate (a) whether possessing a personality trait related to empathy and care was more common among nursing students than students in teaching and social work programs and (b) whether nursing students possessing an affirming personality trait judged themselves to be more suited to their future work - understood as commitment to the profession - than students in teaching and social work. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All first-year students attending seven Norwegian universities and university colleges were invited to participate in the study. Of the 1675 students who participated in the survey, 527 were nursing students, 668 were students in teaching, and 480 were social work students. A response rate of 65 percent was achieved. The survey was conducted by Oslo and Akershus University College in the autumn of 2012. Data collection methods included both a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an online survey. Instruments used included Blau's Career Commitment Scale and Orlinsky and Rønnestad's Interpersonal Adjective Scale. Analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data. Nursing students did not differ from students in teaching and social work programs in terms of the degree of affirming personality trait. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed an equally strong association between having an affirming personality trait and being committed to the profession among all these student groups. The results of this study indicate that the narrative of nursing students as individuals who possess a special personality characteristic does not entirely reflect reality

  9. Robotic surgery in Italy national survey (2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Eugenio; Pansadoro, Vito

    2013-03-01

    Robotic surgery in Italy has become a clinical reality that is gaining increasing acceptance. As of 2011 after the United States, Italy together with Germany is the country with the largest number of active Robotic centers, 46, and da Vinci Robots installed, with at least 116 operators already trained. The number of interventions performed in Italy in 2011 exceeded 6,000 and in 2010 were 4,784, with prevalence for urology, general surgery and gynecology, however these interventions have also begun to be applied in other fields such as cervicofacial, cardiothoracic and pediatric surgery. In Italy Robotic centers are mostly located in Northern Italy, while in the South there are only a few centers, and four regions are lacking altogether. Of the 46 centers which were started in 1999, the vast majority is still operational and almost half handle over 200 cases a year. The quality of the work is also especially high with large diffusion of radical prostatectomy in urology and liver resection and colic in general surgery. The method is very well accepted among operators, over 80 %, and among patients, over 95 %. From the analysis of world literature and a survey carried out in Italy, Robotic surgery, which at the moment could be better defined as telesurgery, represents a significant advantage for operators and a consistent gain for the patient. However, it still has important limits such as high cost and non-structured training of operators.

  10. A hospital survey on the utilization of the master file of the standardized nursing practice terminology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuru, Satoko; Wako, Fumiko; Watanabe, Chitose; Uchiyama, Makiko; Okamine, Eiko; Inoue, Manami; Omori, Miho

    2013-01-01

    A common language in nursing facilitates better communication among nurses and other healthcare providers, assuring better nursing care, hence better patient outcomes. As we developed and disseminated the standardized terminology of nursing which provided nurses with a set of terms to describe nursing observations and nursing actions, we run a survey to see how much it was recognized and utilized in actual clinical settings. The result showed that approximately 60% of the respondents were cognizant of our terminology, and again 60% of them were either actually using the terminology or interested in using it in the future. For them, the main purposes of utilizing the terminology were nursing documentation and care planning. Sometimes it was used as an educational tool. This suggests that we should further develop a tool to assist nurses with their documentation and care planning alongside the revision of the terminology itself.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  12. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiken, L.H.; Sermeus, W.; Heede, K. Van den; Sloane, D.M.; Busse, R.; McKee, M.; Bruyneel, L.; Rafferty, A.M.; Griffiths, P.; Moreno-Casbas, M.T.; Tishelman, C.; Scott, A.; Brzostek, T.; Kinnunen, J.; Schwendimann, R.; Heinen, M.M.; Zikos, D.; Sjetne, I.S.; Smith, H.L.; Kutney-Lee, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. DESIGN: Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. SETTING: Nurses were surveyed in

  13. Patient safety, satisfaction, and quality of hospital care: cross sectional surveys of nurses and patients in 12 countries in Europe and the United States.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiken, L.H.; Sermeus, W.; Heede, K. Van den; Sloane, D.M.; Busse, R.; McKee, M.; Bruyneel, L.; Rafferty, A.M.; Griffiths, P.; Moreno-Casbas, M.T.; Tishelman, C.; Scott, A.; Brzostek, T.; Kinnunen, J.; Schwendimann, R.; Heinen, M.M.; Zikos, D.; Sjetne, I.S.; Smith, H.L.; Kutney-Lee, A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether hospitals with a good organisation of care (such as improved nurse staffing and work environments) can affect patient care and nurse workforce stability in European countries. DESIGN: Cross sectional surveys of patients and nurses. SETTING: Nurses were surveyed in gen

  14. National Survey of the Education of Teachers. Bulletin, 1933, No. 10. Volume V: Special Survey Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Benjamin W.; Betts, Gilbert L.; Greenleaf, Walter J.; Waples, Douglas; Dearborn, Ned H.; Carney, Mabel; Alexander, Thomas

    1935-01-01

    The Seventy-first Congress authorized a survey of the education of teachers on a Nation-wide scope, conducted during the last 3 years. After the work of the survey was organized it was apparent that only a limited number of studies could be undertaken with the time and funds available. It was decided, therefore, to cooperate whenever possible with…

  15. Nursing home work practices and nursing assistants' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Christine E; Squillace, Marie R; Meagher, Jennifer; Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M

    2009-10-01

    To estimate the impact of nursing home work practices, specifically compensation and working conditions, on job satisfaction of nursing assistants employed in nursing homes. Data are from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, responses by the nursing assistants' employers to the 2004 National Nursing Home Survey, and county-level data from the Area Resource File. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate effects of compensation and working conditions on nursing assistants' overall job satisfaction, controlling for personal characteristics and local labor market characteristics. Wages, benefits, and job demands, measured by the ratio of nursing assistant hours per resident day, were associated with job satisfaction. Consistent with previous studies, job satisfaction was greater when nursing assistants felt respected and valued by their employers and had good relationships with supervisors. Nursing assistants were more satisfied when they had enough time to complete their work, when their work was challenging, when they were not subject to mandatory overtime, and where food was not delivered to residents on trays. This is the first investigation of nursing assistant job satisfaction using a nationally representative sample of nursing assistants matched to information about their employing nursing homes. The findings corroborate results of previous studies in showing that compensation and working conditions that provide respect, good relationships with supervisors, and better staffing levels are important to nursing assistant job satisfaction.

  16. Practice nurses' workload, career intentions and the impact of professional isolation: A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watt Graham CM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practice nurses have a key role within UK general practice, especially since the 2004 GMS contract. This study aimed to describe that role, identify how professionally supported they felt and their career intentions. An additional aim was to explore whether they felt isolated and identify contributory factors. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire survey in one large urban Scottish Health Board, targeted all practice nurses (n = 329. Domains included demographics, workload, training and professional support. Following univariate descriptive statistics, associations between categorical variables were tested using the chi-square test or chi-square test for trend; associations between dichotomous variables were tested using Fisher's Exact test. Variables significantly associated with isolation were entered into a binary logistic regression model using backwards elimination. Results There were 200 responses (61.0% response rate. Most respondents were aged 40 or over and were practice nurses for a median of 10 years. Commonest clinical activities were coronary heart disease management, cervical cytology, diabetes and the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although most had a Personal Development Plan and a recent appraisal, 103 (52.3% felt isolated at least sometimes; 30 (15.5% intended leaving practice nursing within 5 years. Isolated nurses worked in practices with smaller list sizes (p = 0.024 and nursing teams (p = 0.003; were less likely to have someone they could discuss a clinical/professional (p = 0.002 or personal (p Conclusions A significant proportion of practice nurses reported feeling isolated, at least some of the time. They were more likely to be in small practices and more likely to be considering leaving practice nursing. Factors contributing to their isolation were generally located within the practice environment. Providing support to these nurses within their practice setting may help

  17. Bullying in the American Graduate Medical Education System: A National Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar R Chadaga

    Full Text Available To deliver an estimate of bullying among residents and fellows in the United States graduate medical education system and to explore its prevalence within unique subgroups.A national cross-sectional survey from a sample of residents and fellows who completed an online bullying survey conducted in June 2015. The survey was distributed using a chain sampling method that relied on electronic referrals from 4,055 training programs, with 1,791 residents and fellows completing the survey in its entirety. Survey respondents completed basic demographic and programmatic information plus four general bullying and 20 specific bullying behavior questions. Between-group differences were compared for demographic and programmatic stratifications.Self-reported subjected to workplace bullying from peers, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff, or patients in the past 12 months.Almost half of the respondents (48% reported being subjected to bullying although both those subjected and not subjected reported experiencing ≥ 1 bullying behaviors (95% and 39% respectively. Attendings (29% and nurses (27% were the most frequently identified source of bullying, followed by patients, peers, consultants and staff. Attempts to belittle and undermine work and unjustified criticism and monitoring of work were the most frequently reported bullying behaviors (44% each, followed by destructive innuendo and sarcasm (37% and attempts to humiliate (32%. Specific bullying behaviors were more frequently reported by female, non-white, shorter than < 5'8 and BMI ≥ 25 individuals.Many trainees report experiencing bullying in the United States graduate medical education programs. Including specific questions on bullying in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education annual resident/fellow survey, implementation of anti-bullying policies, and a multidisciplinary approach engaging all stakeholders may be of great value to eliminate these pervasive behaviors in the field of

  18. Bullying in the American Graduate Medical Education System: A National Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadaga, Amar R; Villines, Dana; Krikorian, Armand

    2016-01-01

    To deliver an estimate of bullying among residents and fellows in the United States graduate medical education system and to explore its prevalence within unique subgroups. A national cross-sectional survey from a sample of residents and fellows who completed an online bullying survey conducted in June 2015. The survey was distributed using a chain sampling method that relied on electronic referrals from 4,055 training programs, with 1,791 residents and fellows completing the survey in its entirety. Survey respondents completed basic demographic and programmatic information plus four general bullying and 20 specific bullying behavior questions. Between-group differences were compared for demographic and programmatic stratifications. Self-reported subjected to workplace bullying from peers, attendings, nurses, ancillary staff, or patients in the past 12 months. Almost half of the respondents (48%) reported being subjected to bullying although both those subjected and not subjected reported experiencing ≥ 1 bullying behaviors (95% and 39% respectively). Attendings (29%) and nurses (27%) were the most frequently identified source of bullying, followed by patients, peers, consultants and staff. Attempts to belittle and undermine work and unjustified criticism and monitoring of work were the most frequently reported bullying behaviors (44% each), followed by destructive innuendo and sarcasm (37%) and attempts to humiliate (32%). Specific bullying behaviors were more frequently reported by female, non-white, shorter than bullying in the United States graduate medical education programs. Including specific questions on bullying in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education annual resident/fellow survey, implementation of anti-bullying policies, and a multidisciplinary approach engaging all stakeholders may be of great value to eliminate these pervasive behaviors in the field of healthcare.

  19. NATIONAL SURVEY ON PREVALENCE OF CANCER PAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志民; 连智; 周伟华; 穆悦; 吕宪祥; 赵苳; 蔡志基; 曹家琪; 任正洪

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To collect nationwide basic data about cancer related pain.``Methods. Sixty cancer patients in each province were randomly selected to participate in this survey. The subjects represented all stages of cancer, tumor sites, and different demographic characteristics. Two self-designed structured questionnaires including reasons, types of pain and pain management were used by patients and physicians respectively. Subjects were asked to report whether he/she had experienced any type of cancer related pain and filled out the equivalent questionnaire. The severity of pain was assessed by using "visual analogue scale".Original data input and analysis were using EPI-INFO software package.``Results. The result showed that 61.6% (958/1555) of patients had different types of cancer related pain.Majority of pain (85.1%) were caused by advanced cancer. The major reasons (64.4%) for poor management or impedimental factors of pain care are due to patient including over-concern on opioid analgesic addiction, reluctance to report pain or refused to use opioid analgesic until at times when pain is intolerable; 26. 8% belonged to physician' s reasons including fear to cause addiction on opioid and lack of knowledge about cancer pain management; 16. 2% are due to lack of different kinds of opioid analgesic for use and 16. 1% belonged to drug regulation.``Conclusions. The results showed that majority of patients (61.6%) had different types of cancer related pain. In most of patients, cancer pain was relieved when they were treated. The major reason for under-treatment or impeded factors for effective relief of cancer pain was fear of opioid addiction by both medical professionals and patients.

  20. NATIONAL SURVEY ON PREVALENCE OF CANCER PAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志民; 连智; 周伟华; 穆悦; 吕宪祥; 赵苳; 蔡志基; 曹家琪; 任正洪

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To collect nationwide basic data about cancer related pain. Methods. Sixty cancer patients in each province were randomly selected to participate in this survey. The subjects represented all stages of cancer, tumor sites, and different demographic characteristics. Two selfdesignedstructured questionnaires including reasons, types of pain and pain management were used by patients and physicians respectively. Subjects were asked to report whether he/she had experienced any type of cancer related pain and fdled out the equivalent questionnaire. The severity of pain was assessed by using "visual analogue scale".Original data input and analysis were using EPI-INFO software package. Results. The result showed that 61.6% (958/1555) of patients had different types of cancer related pain.Majority of pain (85.1%) were caused by advanced cancer. The major reasons (64.4%) for poor management or impedimental factors of pain care are due to patient including over-concern on opioid analgesic addiction, reluc-tance to report pain or refused to use opioid analgesic until at times when pain is intolerable; 26. 8% belonged to physician' s reasons includiag fear to cause addiction on opioid and lack of knowledge about cancer pain management; 16. 2% are due to lack of different kinds of opioid analgesic for use and 16. 1% belonged to drug regulation. Conclusions. The results showed that majority of patients (61.6%) had different types of cancer related pain. In most of patients, cancer pain was relieved when they were treated. The major reason for under-treatmentor impeded factors for effective relief of cancer pain was fear of opioid addiction by both medical professionals andpatients.

  1. BEHAVIOR RISK FACTORS IN INDONESIA: NATIONAL HOUSEHOLD HEALTH SURVEY 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Ch. M. Kristanti; Dwi Hapsari; Julianty Pradono; Soeharsono Soemantri

    2012-01-01

    A series of National Household Health Surveys (NHHS) reported the occurrence of epidemiological transition caused by demographic transition and prolonged economical diversity, Communicable diseases are still prevalent, followed by the emergence of Non Communicable Diseases (NCDs), which are due to an increasing level of behavior risk factors in the population. In the NHHS 2001, a morbidity survey collected information about behavioral risk indicators, whereas the WHO'S STEPwise approach was o...

  2. National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) N/P Values for Lakes – National Lake Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Aquatic Resource Survey (NARS) findings for nutrients in streams and lakes highlight that nutrient pollution is widespread across the United States and...

  3. National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) N/P Values for Lakes – National Lake Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Aquatic Resource Survey (NARS) findings for nutrients in streams and lakes highlight that nutrient pollution is widespread across the United States and...

  4. Standards for nurse staffing in critical care units determined by: The British Association of Critical Care Nurses, The Critical Care Networks National Nurse Leads, Royal College of Nursing Critical Care and In-flight Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Kate; Wren, Ian; Baldwin, Andrea; St Ledger, Una; Gibson, Vanessa; Goodman, Sheila; Walsh, Dominic

    2010-01-01

    Since 1967 the gold standard for nurse staffing levels in intensive care and subsequently critical care units has been one nurse for each patient. However, critical care has changed substantially since that time and in recent years this standard has been challenged. Previously individual nursing organisations such as the British Association of Critical Care Nurses (BACCN) and the Royal College of Nursing have produced guidance on staffing levels for critical care units. This paper represents the first time all three UK Professional Critical Care Associations have collaborated to produce standards for nurse staffing in critical care units. These standards have evolved from previous works and are endorsed by BACCN, Critical Care Networks National Nurse Leads Group (CC3N) and the Royal College of Nursing Critical Care and In-flight Forum. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the much more detailed document 'Standards for Nurse Staffing in Critical Care', which can be found on the BACCN web site at www.baccn.org.uk. The full paper has extensively reviewed the evidence, whereas this short paper provides essential detail and the 12 standard statements. Representation was sort from each of the critical care associations. The authors extensively reviewed the literature using the terms: (1) critical care nursing, (2) nursing, (3) nurse staffing, (4) skill mix, (5) adverse events, (6) health care assistants and critical care, (7) length of stay, (8) critical care, (9) intensive care, (10) technology, (11) infection control. Comprehensive review of the evidence has culminated in 12 standard statements endorsed by BACCN, CC3N and the Royal College of Nursing Critical Care and In-flight Forum. The standards act as a reference for nursing staff, managers and commissioners associated with critical care to provide and support safe patient care. The review of the evidence has shown that the contribution of nursing can be difficult to measure and consequently support

  5. Genetic counseling: a survey to explore knowledge and attitudes of Italian nurses and midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godino, Lea; Turchetti, Daniela; Skirton, Heather

    2013-03-01

    In the past, genetic services were delivered to a limited number of families with rare conditions. However, genomics is now being applied to both inherited and common diseases in a range of healthcare settings, and there is a greater need for nurses to understand the basic concepts of genetic health care. The aim of this cross-sectional survey was to explore the understanding and attitudes of Italian nurses toward genetic health care. A questionnaire was completed by 102 nurses and midwives (85% response rate). Of these, 61% believed that genetic counseling was only an informative and advisory process, and 53.9% could not specify to whom the counseling was aimed. When asked to identify nurses' role in genetic health care, 62% of the respondents believed they had no role, although 28% believed that nurses could provide information, support, and counseling. These findings indicate that nurses have only partial knowledge of the issues surrounding genetic health care. To prepare nurses for the post-genomic era, improved genetic education at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels is required.

  6. Questionnaire survey of working relationships between nurses and doctors in University Teaching Hospitals in Southern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebamowo Clement A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Smooth working relationships between nurses and doctors are necessary for efficient health care delivery. However, previous studies have shown that this is often absent with negative impact on the quality of health care delivery. In 2002, we studied factors that affect nurse-doctor working relationships in University Teaching Hospitals (UTH in Southern Nigeria in order to characterize it and identify managerial and training needs that might be used to improve it. Method Questionnaire survey of doctors and nurses working in four UTH in Southern Nigeria was done in 2002. The setting and subjects were selected by random sampling procedures. Information on factors in domains of work, union activities, personnel and hospital management were studied using closed and open-ended questionnaires. Results Nurse-doctor working relationships were statistically significantly affected by poor after-work social interaction, staff shortages, activist unionism, disregard for one's profession, and hospital management and government policies. In general, nurses had better opinion of doctors' work than doctors had about nurses' work. Conclusion Working relationships between doctors and nurses need to be improved through improved training and better working conditions, creation of better working environment, use of alternative methods of conflict resolution and balanced hospital management and government policies. This will improve the retention of staff, job satisfaction and efficiency of health care delivery in Nigeria.

  7. Current Dermatologic Care in Dutch Nursing Homes and Possible Improvements: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubeek, Satish F K; van der Geer, Eric R; van Gelder, Marleen M H J; Koopmans, Raymond T C M; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M; Gerritsen, Marie-Jeanne P

    2015-08-01

    To assess the provision and need of dermatologic care among Dutch nursing home patients and to obtain recommendations for improvement. Cross-sectional nationwide survey. All 173 nursing home organizations in the Netherlands. Physicians working in nursing homes. Web-based questionnaire concerning the burden of skin diseases in nursing home patients, diagnostic procedures and therapy, collaboration with dermatologists, physicians' level of education, and suggestions for improvement. A total of 126 (72.8%) nursing home organizations, with 1133 associated physicians participated in our study and received the questionnaire. A total of 347 physicians (30.6%) completed the questionnaire. Almost all respondents (99.4%) were recently confronted with skin diseases, mostly (pressure) ulcers, eczema, and fungal infections. Diagnostic and treatment options were limited because of a lack of availability and experience of the physicians. More live consultation of dermatologists was suggested as being important to improve dermatologic care. Other suggestions were better education, more usage of telemedicine applications, and better availability of diagnostic and/or treatment procedures like cryotherapy. Physicians in nursing homes are frequently confronted with skin diseases. Several changes in organization of care and education are expected to improve dermatologic care in nursing home patients. Copyright © 2015 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A questionnaire-based survey on nurse perceptions of patient handoffs in japanese hospitals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2012-01-01

    transfer, responsibility transfer, management goals, environment and handoff system. As an overall trend, Japanese nurses indicated that both information and responsibility for the patient were transferred moderately well within the hospital. They put a higher priority on the goal of patient safety...... and strategies contributing to effective handoffs. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 2011, collecting 1462 valid responses (74% response rate) from nurses in six Japanese hospitals. There were 17 questions, each with reply options on a five-point Likert scale, covering five main aspects: information...... and a relatively smaller on efficiency. Most respondents viewed their hospital's handoff system as immature. Significant differences were observed in nurses' perceptions not only across hospitals but also across wards/departments. In particular, during patient handoffs between different units, nurses working...

  9. National scientific literature on nursing ethics: a systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Nicéia D’Aquino Oliveira Teixeira

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the most prevalent nursing ethical issues published in scientific Brazilian journals. Methods: A systematic literature review with the following inclusion criteria: (1 articles on Nursing Ethics written in Portuguese, English, French, and Spanish; (2 published in Brazilian journals; (3 in the period from January 1997 to February 2009. The search was carried out in four databases BDENF, LILACS, MEDLINE, and SCIELO. The key-words were ethics AND nursing. The selected studies were classified into categories. The content of the articles were analyzed using the Collective Subject Discourse. The categories generated discourses by organizing the main excerpts from the abstracts of the selected studies, which are the “key expressions”. Results: A hundred and thirty three articles that met the inclusion criteria were classified into eight categories: 1. Nursing Care; 2. Dilemmas and Controversies; 3. Education; 4. Legal Aspects; 5. Research; 6. Management; 7. Values and Beliefs; 8. Perspectives and Health Policies. The category “Nursing Care” prevailed in 36% of the selected articles, and it was classified into six subcategories. “Dilemmas and Controversies” was the second most prevalent category (15%. Conclusion: The number of theoretical papers on ethical issues is high, but there is little research on the ethical experiences in nursing practice.

  10. The quality of sample surveys in a developing nation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A Bourne

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Paul A Bourne1, Christopher AD Charles2,3, Neva South-Bourne4, Chloe Morris1, Denise Eldemire-Shearer1, Maureen D Kerr-Campbell51Department of Community Health and Psychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, Jamaica; 2King Graduate School, Monroe College, Bronx, New York, USA; 3Center for Victim Support, Harlem Hospital Center, New York, USA; 4Research assistant for Paul A Bourne; 5Systems Development Unit, Main Library, Faculty of Humanities and Education, University of the West Indies, Mona, Kingston, JamaicaBackground: In Jamaica, population census began in 1844, and many intercensal ratios obtained from the census data showed that there is a general high degree of accuracy of the data. However, statistics from the Jamaican Ministry of Health showed that there are inaccuracies in health data collected from males using sample surveys.Objectives: The objectives of the present research are to 1 investigate the accuracy of a national sample survey, 2 explore the feasibility and quality of using a subnational sample survey to represent a national survey, 3 aid other scholars in understanding the probability of using national sample surveys and subnational sample surveys, 4 assess older men’s ­evaluation of their health status, and 5 determine whether dichotomization changes self-evaluated health status.Methods: For the current study, the data used in the analysis were originally collected from 2 different sources: 1 the Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (JSLC and 2 Survey of Older Men (SOM. Cross validation of self-evaluated data of men in Jamaica was done with comparable samples of the complete JSLC data and the SOM data, where men older than 55 years were selected from each sample.Results: In study 1, 50.2% of respondents indicated at least good self-evaluated health status compared with 74.0% in study 2. Statistical associations were found between health status and survey sample (Χ2 [df = 5

  11. Specialized Prisons and Services: Results From a National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Findings from the National Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJ-DATS) National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices survey are examined to describe types of services provided by three types of prisons: those that serve a cross-section of offenders, those that specialize in serving offenders with special psychosocial and medical needs, and those that specialize in serving legal status or gender specific populations. Information is presented on the prevalence and type of specialize...

  12. 78 FR 14549 - National Contact Center; Information Collection; National Contact Center Customer Evaluation Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ...Under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, the General Services Administration will be submitting to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve an extension of a previously approved information collection requirement regarding the National Contact Center customer evaluation surveys. In this request, the previously approved surveys have been supplemented......

  13. Surveying nursing practice on wards for older people with mental health needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinshaw, Carole

    2006-11-01

    This article discusses a survey of the nursing care of older people with mental health problems in inpatient units. The survey considered assessment and care planning, record keeping, the environment, staff, user and carer feedback, staffing systems, compliments, complaints, incidents, dementia care mapping, and a clinical supervision and training needs audit. Practice development work, undertaken to ensure that the project's recommendations were implemented, is also described.

  14. Cross-Continental Comparison of National Food Consumption Survey Methods—A Narrative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyzer, de W.; Bracke, T.; McNaughton, S.A.; Parnell, W.; Moshfegh, A.J.; Pereira, R.A.; Lee, H.S.; Veer, van 't P.; Henauw, de S.; Huybrechts, I.

    2015-01-01

    Food consumption surveys are performed in many countries. Comparison of results from those surveys across nations is difficult because of differences in methodological approaches. While consensus about the preferred methodology associated with national food consumption surveys is increasing, no inve

  15. Cross-continental comparison of national food consumption survey methods--a narrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food consumption surveys are performed in many countries. Comparison of results from those surveys across nations is difficult because of differences in methodological approaches. While consensus about the preferred methodology associated with national food consumption surveys is increasing, no in...

  16. Gynaecological cancer follow-up: national survey of current practice in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeson, Simon; Stuart, Nick; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Hall, Liz; Whitaker, Rhiannon

    2013-01-01

    To establish a baseline of national practice for follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. Questionnaire survey. Gynaecological cancer centres and units. Members of the British Gynaecological Cancer Society and the National Forum of Gynaecological Oncology Nurses. A questionnaire survey. To determine schedules of follow-up, who provides it and what routine testing is used for patients who have had previous gynaecological cancer. A total of 117 responses were obtained; 115 (98%) reported hospital scheduled regular follow-up appointments. Two involved general practitioners. Follow-up was augmented or replaced by telephone follow-up in 29 responses (25%) and patient-initiated appointments in 38 responses (32%). A total of 80 (68%) cancer specialists also offered combined follow-up clinics with other specialties. Clinical examinations for hospital-based follow-up were mainly performed by doctors (67% for scheduled regular appointments and 63% for patient-initiated appointments) while telephone follow-up was provided in the majority by nurses (76%). Most respondents (76/117 (65%)) provided routine tests, of which 66/76 (87%) reported carrying out surveillance tests for ovarian cancer, 35/76 (46%) for cervical cancer, 8/76 (11%) for vulval cancer and 7/76 (9%) for endometrial cancer. Patients were usually discharged after 5 years (82/117 (70%)), whereas three (3%) were discharged after 4 years, nine (8%) after three years and one (1%) after 2 years. Practice varied but most used a standard hospital-based protocol of appointments for 5 years and routine tests were performed usually for women with ovarian cancer. A minority utilised nurse-led or telephone follow-up. General practitioners were rarely involved in routine care. A randomised study comparing various models of follow-up could be considered.

  17. The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices survey: multilevel survey methods and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxman, Faye S; Young, Douglas W; Wiersema, Brian; Rhodes, Anne; Mitchell, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices (NCJTP) survey provides a comprehensive inquiry into the nature of programs and services provided to adult and juvenile offenders involved in the justice system in the United States. The multilevel survey design covers topics such as the mission and goals of correctional and treatment programs; organizational climate and culture for providing services; organizational capacity and needs; opinions of administrators and staff regarding rehabilitation, punishment, and services provided to offenders; treatment policies and procedures; and working relationships between correctional and other agencies. The methodology generates national estimates of the availability of programs and services for offenders. This article details the methodology and sampling frame for the NCJTP survey, response rates, and survey procedures. Prevalence estimates of juvenile and adult offenders under correctional control are provided with externally validated comparisons to illustrate the veracity of the methodology. Limitations of the survey methods are also discussed.

  18. A patient satisfaction survey of a nurse-led colorectal clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Anna; Humphrey, Scott

    A new service was set up to achieve government targets to see patients with signs or symptoms of a possible colorectal cancer within two weeks of referral from their GP. The new clinics were nurse-led. A patient satisfaction survey was used to assess patients' opinions about the clinic. The results showed patients had a positive view of the clinic.

  19. Integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer care: Survey of oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Salins

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Oncologists, oncology nurses, and patients felt that integration of early specialist palliative care in cancer improves symptom control, end-of-life care, health-related communication, and continuity of care. The perceptions of benefit of the palliative care intervention in the components surveyed, differed among the three groups.

  20. The relationship between work engagement and psychological distress of hospital nurses and the perceived communication behaviors of their nurse managers: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunie, Keiko; Kawakami, Norito; Shimazu, Akihito; Yonekura, Yuki; Miyamoto, Yuki

    2017-06-01

    Communication between nurse managers and nurses is important for mental health of hospital nurses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between managers' communication behaviors toward nurses, and work engagement and psychological distress among hospital nurses using a multilevel model. The present study was a cross-sectional questionnaire survey. The participants were nurses working at three hospitals in Japan. A total of 906 nurses from 38 units participated in the present study. The units with small staff sizes and participants with missing entries in the questionnaire were excluded. The data for 789 nurses from 36 questionnaire survey units were analyzed. A survey using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted. The questionnaire asked staff nurses about communication behaviors of their immediate manager and their own levels of work engagement, psychological distress, and other covariates. Three types of manager communication behaviors (i.e., direction-giving, empathetic, and meaning-making language) were assessed using the Motivating Language scale; and the scores of the respondents were averaged for each unit to calculate unit-level scores. Work engagement and psychological distress were measured using the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the K6 scale, respectively. The association of communication behaviors by unit-level managers with work engagement and psychological distress among nurses was analyzed using two-level hierarchical linear modeling. The unit-level scores for all three of the manager communication behaviors were significantly and positively associated with work engagement among nurses (ppsychological distress (p>0.05). Motivating language by unit-level managers might be positively associated with work engagement among hospital nurses, which is mediated through the better psychosocial work environment of the unit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2012--Individual refuge results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietsch, Alia M.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Conk, Shannon J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 560 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts nearly 45 million visitors annually, including 34.8 million people who observe and photograph wildlife, 9.6 million who hunt and fish, and nearly 675,000 teachers and students who use refuges as outdoor classrooms. Understanding visitor perceptions of refuges and characterizing their experiences on refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The purpose of the survey was to better understand visitor experiences and trip characteristics, to gauge visitors’ levels of satisfaction with existing recreational opportunities, and to garner feedback to inform the design of programs and facilities. The survey results will inform performance, planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCPs), visitor services, and transportation planning processes. This Data Series consists of 25 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: • Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. • Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results.• Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational

  2. Attitudes and beliefs about chronic pain among nurses- biomedical or behavioral? A cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Prem

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Studies have documented that nurses and other health care professionals are inadequately prepared to care for patients in chronic pain. Several reasons have been identified including inadequacies in nursing education, absence of curriculum content related to pain management, and attitudes and beliefs related to chronic pain. Aims: The objective of this paper was to assess the chronic pain-related attitudes and beliefs among nursing professionals in order to evaluate the biomedical and behavioral dimensions of their perceptions on pain. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional survey of 363 nurses in a multispecialty hospital. Materials and Methods: The study utilized a self-report questionnaire - pain attitudes and beliefs scale (PABS - which had 31 items (statements about pain for each of which the person had to indicate the level at which he or she agreed or disagreed with each statement. Factor 1 score indicated a biomedical dimension while factor 2 score indicated a behavioral dimension to pain. Statistical Analysis Used: Comparisons across individual and professional variables for both dimensions were done using one-way ANOVA and correlations were done using the Karl-Pearson co-efficient using SPSS version 11.5 for Windows. Results: The overall factor 1 score was 52.95 ± 10.23 and factor 2 score was 20.93 ± 4.72 (P = 0.00. The female nurses had a higher behavioral dimension score (21.1 ± 4.81 than their male counterparts (19.55 ± 3.67 which was significant at P< 0.05 level. Conclusions: Nurses had a greater orientation toward the biomedical dimension of chronic pain than the behavioral dimension. This difference was more pronounced in female nurses and those nurses who reported "very good" general health had higher behavioral dimension scores than those who had "good" general health. The study findings have important curricular implications for nurses and practical implications in palliative care.

  3. 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education: Highlights Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horizon Research, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    The 2012 National Survey of Science and Mathematics Education was designed to provide up-to-date information and to identify trends in the areas of teacher background and experience, curriculum and instruction, and the availability and use of instructional resources. A total of 7,752 science and mathematics teachers in schools across the United…

  4. Preliminary amphibian surveys : Baca National Wildlife Refuge : July & August, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes an initial amphibian survey effort on the Baca National Wildlife Refuge, conducted on 7/17/15, 7/24/15, and 8/28/15. The main emphasis of this...

  5. National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey Results: 2010/2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — ViSIT is an interactive web tool created by USGS to visualize the data collected as part of the National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Survey. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  6. Multicultural Training in School Psychology: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Margaret R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    National sample of 121 directors of school psychology training programs responded to survey measuring extent to which programs integrated multicultural themes into core courses, offered minority-related courses, exposed students to culturally diverse clients during practica and internships, provided minority issues research opportunities, and…

  7. Multicultural Career Counseling: A National Survey of Competencies and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespia, Kristin M.; Fitzpatrick, Mary E.; Fouad, Nadya A.; Kantamneni, Neeta; Chen, Yung-Lung

    2010-01-01

    Career counselors' multicultural competence has not been widely investigated. In this study, a national sample of 230 career counselors completed an online survey that included measures of career counseling self-efficacy and multicultural counseling competence. Beyond these self-report instruments, counselors responded to open-ended items that…

  8. The Teaching of Undergraduate Health Psychology: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Aliza A.; Gurung, Regan A. R.; Revenson, Tracey A.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted an online national survey to examine how undergraduate health psychology is taught, offer information about course design and content, and provide a needs analysis. Health psychology instructors (N = 126) answered questions about course format, teaching tools, importance of covering specific topics, and needed resources. A principal…

  9. Life and Work Values of Counselor Trainees: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Louis A.; Beebe, Ronald S.; Toman, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    This national web-based study used the Schwartz Value Survey (Schwartz, 1994) and Super's Work Values Inventory-Revised (Zytowski, n.d.) to identify general life and work value orientations of 674 female and male entry-level counselor trainees residing in 27 states. In general, trainees emphasized benevolence, self-direction, and achievement and…

  10. Rural and remote Australian general practice nurses' sources of evidence for knowledge translation: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jane; Field, John; Cant, Robyn

    2011-09-01

    This paper explores nurses' sources of knowledge for evidence-based practice, comparing rural/remote, urban and regional participants. A cross-sectional survey of practice nurses in the state of Victoria was conducted in 2008. The instrument used was the Developing Evidence-based Practice Questionnaire - Au, distributed to a convenience sample of nurses with response of 590 (33%). Survey data were stratified by geographical location for this exploratory report. The sample was representative of practice nurses, with half employed in either regional or rural and remote areas. Rural and remote nurses were less qualified in nursing than urban nurses. However, rural, remote and regional nurses were significantly less likely to apply experiential knowledge as evidence and were more likely to source knowledge from clinical nurse specialists or nurse practitioners, local audit reports or articles in research and medical journals. Nurses in each work category reported in-service training, conferences and information shared by colleagues as important in developing their knowledge for practice. According to participants, evidence-based practice would be promoted by allocation of work time, education and training in research skills, and improved access to resources. Rural and remote practice nurses prioritised the development of their skills in sourcing and appraising evidence for practice as a strategy to facilitate knowledge translation at the point of care. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2011 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  11. The effects of nationality differences and work stressors on work adjustment for foreign nurse aides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hsieh

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main purpose of this study was to discuss the nationality differences of foreign nurse aides and the effect of work stressors influencing work adjustment. And of helping them adapt to Taiwanese society, we summarized the difficulties that foreign nurse aides face in Taiwan. Methods The subjects included 80 foreign nurse aides from the Philippines, Indonesia, and Vietnam who worked in long-term care facilities in Tao Yuan County. We recruited volunteers at the participating facilities to complete the anonymous questionnaires. The return rate of the questionnaire was 88.75%. The validated instruments of Hershenson's (1981 and Schaefer and Moos (1993 were adopted to measure work stressors and work adjustment, respectively. A forward-backward translation process was used in this study. Results Indonesian foreign nurse aides respect their work, and are better workers than Vietnamese and Filipino nurse aids in many respects, which shows how the nationality of the foreign nurse aides might affect work adjustment. The stress created from patient care tasks influenced the foreign nurse aides' personal relationships at work and also affected their attitude when they performed their tasks. In addition, pressure from their supervisors might have affected their work skills, work habits, personal relationships, self-concepts or work attitudes. Moreover, a heavy workload and improper scheduling might have affected the personal relationships and work attitudes of the foreign nurse aides. It was found that work stressors had a significant correlation with work adjustment. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that training programs are important factors for work adjustment among foreign nurse aides. Furthermore, celebration and leisure activities could be provided to release them from work stressors. More effort should be put into improving the working environment, namely providing a more supportive and enriching

  12. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: A questionnaire survey of nurse-users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Bekkema, N.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better un

  13. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Bekkema, N.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better un

  14. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: A questionnaire survey of nurse-users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Bekkema, N.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better

  15. Successful implementation of new technologies in nursing care: a questionnaire survey of nurse-users.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Fleuren, M.A.H.; Bekkema, N.; Francke, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing number of new technologies are becoming available within nursing care that can improve the quality of care, reduce costs, or enhance working conditions. However, such effects can only be achieved if technologies are used as intended. The aim of this study is to gain a better

  16. Sandia National Laboratories, California proposed CREATE facility environmental baseline survey.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catechis, Christopher Spyros

    2013-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, Environmental Programs completed an environmental baseline survey (EBS) of 12.6 acres located at Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) in support of the proposed Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) Facility. The survey area is comprised of several parcels of land within SNL/CA, County of Alameda, California. The survey area is located within T 3S, R 2E, Section 13. The purpose of this EBS is to document the nature, magnitude, and extent of any environmental contamination of the property; identify potential environmental contamination liabilities associated with the property; develop sufficient information to assess the health and safety risks; and ensure adequate protection for human health and the environment related to a specific property.

  17. The relationship between repeated unintended pregnancies and current contraceptive use: National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) 2006-2008 data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yui; Masho, Saba; McGrath, Jacqueline M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the number of unintended pregnancies and current contraceptive use. This is a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey, the 2006-2008 National Survey of Family Growth, which included 4,052 women between the ages of 15 and 44 years. A statistically significant association was found between the nonuse of contraceptives and repeated unintended pregnancies, as well as among those who used an effective contraceptive method and repeated unintended pregnancies. Nurses are encouraged to ask questions about intendedness of pregnancies during women's visits and help women choose appropriate contraceptive methods.

  18. Adherence of Pain Assessment to the German National Standard for Pain Management in 12 Nursing Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Osterbrink

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain is very common among nursing home residents. The assessment of pain is a prerequisite for effective multiprofessional pain management. Within the framework of the German health services research project, ‘Action Alliance Pain-Free City Muenster’, the authors investigated pain assessment adherence according to the German national Expert Standard for Pain Management in Nursing, which is a general standard applicable to all chronic/acute pain-affected persons and highly recommended for practice.

  19. [Key content and formulation of national Chinese materia medica resources survey at county level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Li, Hai-Tao; Guo, Lan-Ping; Zhao, Run-Huai; Zhang, Ben-Gang; Sun, Li-Ying; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2013-08-01

    According to National Census for Water, National Population Census, National Land and Resources Survey, and work experience of experimental measures for national Chinese materia medica resources(CMMR) survey,the national CMMR survey at the county level is the key point of whole survey, that includes organization and management, field survey, sorting data three key links. Organization and management works of national CMMR survey needs to finish four key contents, there are definite goals and tasks, practicable crew, preparation directory, and security assurance. Field survey works of the national CMMR survey needs to finish five key contents, there are preparation works for field survey, the choice of the key survey area (samples), fill in the questionnaire, video data collection, specimen and other physical collection. Sorting data works of the national CMMR survey needs to finish tree key contents, there are data, specimen and census results.

  20. A survey of commitment and compassion among nurses in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jane L; Davidson, Patricia M; Ollerton, Richard; Jackson, Debra; Kristjanson, Linda

    2007-06-01

    To assess the views and attitudes of aged care staff providing direct care towards palliative care and to identify their learning needs. Survey design using purposive sampling methods. Nurses and care assistants (n=222) employed within nine residential aged care facilities in regional Australia completed the survey. The majority had received 'on the job training' and were committed to providing end-of-life care. Differences in the level of confidence to deal with patient/family interactions and manage complex palliative care scenarios were evident between nurses and care assistants (p<0.05). Both nurses and care assistants perceived a need for further education in symptom management and communication, yet their content need differed significantly between groups. Nurses and care assistants in residential aged care facilities demonstrate commitment to the delivery of palliative care and express a need for increased palliative care competencies. The heterogeneity of roles and educational preparation within the aged care workforce indicate that tailored palliative care education initiatives are required to meet the learning needs of aged care nurses and care assistants, particularly in relation to end-of-life care. These data have implications for skill-mix and model of care development.

  1. A survey of the teaching and learning of biological sciences on undergraduate nursing courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharrad, H J; Allcock, N; Chapple, M

    1994-12-01

    Curriculum planners developing degree courses in nursing have to decide how much time to allocate to each of the academic disciplines including biological sciences. There is no research-based evidence to suggest what depth and detail of knowledge of biological sciences is required to support nursing practice. There is also some debate about the teaching methods used and who should teach the biological sciences. This paper reports the results of a small survey investigating the teaching of biological sciences on 16 nursing degree courses in the UK. The survey uncovered great variation in the number of hours spent on biological sciences in the different universities and in the science entry requirements of the different universities. Most teachers of biological sciences had a first degree in the subject but few were nurses. The possible implications of these findings are discussed. Problems associated with shared learning and didactic teaching methods are also highlighted. Although the biological sciences input will largely be a matter of institutional preferences, nursing needs to develop a research-based framework to aid curriculum planning.

  2. Job control, work-family balance and nurses' intention to leave their profession and organization: A comparative cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Inoue, Takahiro; Harada, Hiroko; Oike, Miyako

    2016-12-01

    The shortage of nurses is a problem in many countries. In Japan, the distribution of nurses across different care settings is uneven: the shortage of nurses in home healthcare and nursing homes is more serious than in hospitals. Earlier research has identified numerous factors affecting nurses' intention to leave work (e.g., job control, family-related variables, work-family conflict); however, these factors' levels and effect size may vary between nurses in hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes. This study measured job control, family-related variables, and work-family conflict among nurses in hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes, and compared these variables' levels and effect size on nurses' intention to leave their organization or profession between these care settings. The research design was cross-sectional. Participating nurses from hospitals, home healthcare facilities, and nursing homes self-administered an anonymous questionnaire survey; nurses were recruited from the Kyushu district of Japan. Nurses from nine hospitals, 86 home healthcare offices, and 107 nursing homes participated. We measured nurses' intention to leave nursing or their organization, perceived job control, family variables and work-family conflict. We analyzed 1461 participants (response rate: 81.7%). The level of job control, family variables, and work-family conflict affecting nurses varied between hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes; additionally, these variables' effect on nurses' intention to leave their organization or profession varied between these care settings. Work-family conflict, family variables, and job control most strongly predicted nurses' intention to leave their organization or profession in hospitals, home healthcare, and nursing homes, respectively. Interventions aiming to increase nurse retention should distinguish between care settings. Regarding hospitals, reducing nurses' work-family conflict will increase nurse retention. Regarding

  3. National Natality Survey/National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The survey provides data on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics of mothers, prenatal care, pregnancy history, occupational background, health status of mother and infant, and types and sources of medical care received.

  4. Insulin knowledge and practice: a survey of district nurses in Northern Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Alison; Reid, Bernie; Laird, Elizabeth A

    2017-03-02

    Insulin is one of the top ten high-alert medications worldwide. Approximately 30% of people with diabetes in the UK use injectable therapies, most commonly insulin, to manage their condition. With an increasing number of people with diabetes being managed within the community, district nurses play an important role in the safe and effective use of insulin. This study surveyed a convenience sample of 164 district nurses working within one Health and Social Care Trust in Northern Ireland to ascertain their knowledge and practice regarding insulin. Study response rate was 38% (n=63). It was found that district nurses' knowledge and practice relating to insulin therapy was lacking as indicated by a total mean score of 53.1%. Total knowledge scores were slightly higher (58%) than total practice scores (46%). Nevertheless, 79.4% of district nurses felt secure and 6.3% felt very secure in managing diabetes. Deficits in district nurses' knowledge and practice were identified in areas relating to insulin action, dosage, storage, injection site technique and rotation, hypoglycaemic/hyperglycaemic management, pharmacological action and prescription format. These deficits highlight the need for workplacebased learning and development programmes, incorporating real time, point of care interventions, to enhance and maintain district nurses' insulin knowledge and practice.

  5. Preparedness for End of Life-a Survey of Jerusalem District Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaulov, Adir; Frankel, Meir; Rubinow, Alan; Maaravi, Yoram; Brezis, Mayer

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the quality of end-of-life (EOL) care in nursing homes. Survey and semistructured interviews. Jerusalem district nursing homes. Staff members of 28 long-term care and skilled nursing facilities in the Jerusalem area in Israel of various ethnic, religious, and administrative affiliations (N = 207). Qualitative analysis of semistructured interviews and statistical analysis of questionnaires. Most staff members reported that EOL preferences were unknown for more than 90% of residents and that fewer than 10% had a healthcare proxy. Most staff members recalled conducting fewer than five EOL conversations over the past year with residents or family members and could recall fewer than five cases in which a resident was allowed to die in the nursing home. According to staff opinions the prevalence of tube feeding was estimated at greater than 10%, initiated because of aspiration, malnutrition, and understaffing, often against family's preferences. More than 25% of staff members believed that pain management was inadequate. Knowledge about management of chronic pain was poor in half of nurses and nearly one-third of physicians. Most staff would rather not receive the treatments they administered to residents. Nursing homes in Jerusalem lack competency for quality EOL care, and there are multiple psychological, training, and policy challenges to improvement. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Alcohol Use Disorders in National Samples of Mexicans and Mexican-Americans: The Mexican National Addiction Survey and the U.S. National Alcohol Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Guilherme; Medina-Mora, Maria Elena; Lown, Anne; Ye, Yu; Robertson, Marjorie J.; Cherpitel, Cheryl; Greenfield, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The authors show associations between immigration and alcohol disorders using data from the 1995 and 2000 U.S. National Alcohol Surveys and the 1998 Mexico National Household Survey on Addictions. The prevalence of alcohol dependence was 4.8% for the Mexicans, 4.2% for the Mexico-born immigrants, and 6.6% for the U.S.-born Mexican Americans. They…

  7. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories Livermore (SNLL), located at Livermore, California. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The SNLL Survey is a portion of the larger, comprehensive DOE Environmental Survey encompassing all major operating facilities of DOE. The DOE Environmental Survey is one of a series of initiatives announced on September 18, 1985, by Secretary of Energy, John S. Herrington, to strengthen the environmental, safety, and health programs and activities within DOE. The purpose of the Environmental Survey is to identify, via a no fault'' baseline Survey of all the Department's major operating facilities, environmental problems and areas of environmental risk. The identified problem areas will be prioritized on a Department-wide basis in order of importance in 1989. The findings in this report are subject to modification based on the results from the Sampling and Analysis Phase of the Survey. The findings are also subject to modification based on comments from the Albuquerque Operations Office concerning the technical accuracy of the findings. The modified preliminary findings and any other appropriate changes will be incorporated into an Interim Report. The Interim Report will serve as the site-specific source for environmental information generated by the Survey, and ultimately as the primary source of information for the DOE-wide prioritization of environmental problems in the Survey Summary Report. 43 refs., 21 figs., 24 tabs.

  8. Nurses and challenges faced as clinical educators: a survey of a group of nurses in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian E A Eta

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical teaching is an important component of clinical education. In nursing, clinical teaching is ensured by clinical nurse educators (CNEs. This study aimed at describing the major challenges faced by CNEs in Cameroon. METHODS: In a qualitative study, supplemented with quantitative methods, CNEs were enrolled from three health districts to represent their frequency in Cameroon’s health delivery system. RESULTS: A total of 56 CNEs participated in the study, of whom, as many as 58.9% acknowledged always facing challenges in clinical teaching and supervision. The major challenges identified were the lack of opportunities to update knowledge and skills, students’ lack of preparedness and the CNEs not being prepared for clinical teaching. CNEs attributed these challenges in major part to the lack of incentives and poor health policies. CONCLUSION: CNEs in Cameroon do indeed face major challenges which are of diverse origins and could adversely affect teaching in clinical settings

  9. Information exchange between registered nurses and district nurses during the discharge planning process: cross-sectional analysis of survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordmark, Sofi; Söderberg, Siv; Skär, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Discharge planning is an important care process for managing transitions from the hospital to the community. It has been studied for >20 years, but few studies clarify the information exchanged between healthcare providers. This study aimed to describe nurses' experiences and perceptions of information exchange during the discharge planning process, focused on what, when and how information is exchanged between the hospital and primary healthcare. Method: A web-based census survey was used to collect data; the data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and chi-squared test. A questionnaire was distributed to 194 registered nurses (129 respondents) from a central county hospital and 67 district nurses (42 respondents) working in 13 primary healthcare centres. Results: The results show a significant difference between given and received information between the two groups. Both groups thought the information exchange worked best when all participants met at the discharge planning conference and that the electronic information system was difficult to use. Conclusion: This study shows difficulties knowing what patient-related information needs to give and not receiving the expected information. These results can be used to develop knowledge about roles, work tasks and needs to enhance the outcome of the process and the information exchanged.

  10. Attitude and Intention Regarding Pain Management among Chinese Nursing Students: A Cross-Sectional Questionnaire Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Liang-Yu; Xu, Yin-Chuan; Lin, Dan-Ni; Jin, Jing-Feng; Yan, Min

    2017-08-01

    Optimal pain management is a priority in effective nursing care. Lack of sufficient pain knowledge associated with inadequate pain management has been proved. However, the intention, defined as the predictor of behavior, regarding pain management remains unknown. Therefore, the study was to determine the attitude and intention regarding pain management among Chinese nursing students and investigate the underlying determinants and their interactions in terms of intention toward pain management. The Pain Management Survey Questionnaire, comprising the key determinants of the theory of planned behavior-that is, direct attitude, belief-based intention, subjective norm, direct control, and indirect control-was used to collect data from 512 nursing students who undertook clinical rotation in an affiliated hospital of a medical college in China. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, independent sample t test, Pearson correlation analysis, or structural equation modeling analysis. Chinese nursing students reported negative attitudes and behavioral intentions toward pain management. Direct control, subjective norm, belief-based attitude, and indirect control independently predicted nursing students' intention to treat patients with pain. Direct control was the strongest predictor. Structural equation modeling analysis further revealed 39.84% of the variance associated with intention that could be explained by determinants of the theory of planned behavior. Additionally, educational school level and previous pain management training had great effects on pain management intention. Overall, this study identified intention as an important factor in effective pain treatment. Chinese nursing students have negative attitudes and insufficient intention to pain management. Therefore, hospitals and universities in China should manage these factors to improve nursing students' practice regarding pain management. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing

  11. Ethics policies on euthanasia in nursing homes: a survey in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiengre, Joke; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette; Verbeke, Geert; Van Craen, Katleen; Schotsmans, Paul; Gastmans, Chris

    2008-01-01

    In many European countries there is a public debate about the acceptability and regulation of euthanasia. In 2002, Belgium became the second country after the Netherlands to enact a law on euthanasia. Although euthanasia rarely occurs, the complexity of the clinical-ethical decision making surrounding euthanasia requests and the need for adequate support reported by caregivers, means that healthcare institutions increasingly need to consider how to responsibly handle euthanasia requests. The development of written ethics policies on euthanasia may be important to guarantee and maintain the quality of care for patients requesting euthanasia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, development, position, and communication of written ethics policies on euthanasia in Flemish nursing homes. Data were obtained through a cross-sectional mail survey of general directors of all Catholic nursing homes in Flanders, Belgium. Of the 737 nursing homes invited to participate, 612 (83%) completed the questionnaire. Of these, only 15% had a written ethics policy on euthanasia. Presence of an ethics committee and membership of an umbrella organization were independent predictors of whether a nursing home had such a written ethics policy. The Act on Euthanasia and euthanasia guidelines advanced by professional organizations were the most frequent reasons (76% and 56%, respectively) and reference sources (92% and 64%, respectively) for developing ethics policies on euthanasia. Development of ethics policies occurred within a multidisciplinary context. In general, Flemish nursing homes applied the Act on Euthanasia restrictively by introducing palliative procedures in addition to legal due care criteria. The policy was communicated to the consulting general practitioner and nurses in 74% and 89% of nursing homes, respectively. Although the overall prevalence of ethics policies on euthanasia was low in Flemish nursing homes, institution administrators displayed growing

  12. A European survey relating to cancer therapy and neutropenic infections: Nurse and patient viewpoints.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, Kay

    2011-09-25

    PURPOSE: Severe neutropenia and febrile neutropenia (FN) are the major causes of morbidity, treatment interruptions and dose reductions in patients undergoing chemotherapy. The European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS) conducted an European survey to evaluate nurse perspectives on prevention of infection and FN in this setting, and how much they educate their patients about this. A separate survey explored these issues in patients receiving chemotherapy. METHODS: 217 nurse participants were identified by EONS from the membership database and 473 cancer patients who were receiving\\/had received chemotherapy were identified through patient advocacy groups. Questionnaires were completed anonymously online for both surveys. RESULTS: More than 90% of the nurses agreed that preventing infections including FN is extremely\\/very important for a successful chemotherapy outcome and said that they, or other health professionals in their practice, advised patients about these issues. Most (90%) indicated that they favoured giving treatment to protect against FN and infections in chemotherapy patients at risk, rather than treating infection after it develops, but 82% expressed concern over patient concordance with measures employed. A substantial proportion of patients reported emergency room visits, hospitalization and\\/or chemotherapy delays or changes as a result of neutropenia, infection or FN. However, only 44% said that their infection risk was discussed with them before starting chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that nurses recognise the importance of reducing the risk of infection and FN in patients undergoing chemotherapy, as well as the need to educate patients. However, results of the patient survey suggest a need for better patient education.

  13. The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices survey: Multilevel survey methods and procedures⋆

    OpenAIRE

    Taxman, Faye S.; Young, Douglas W.; Wiersema, Brian; Rhodes, Anne; Mitchell, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices (NCJTP) survey provides a comprehensive inquiry into the nature of programs and services provided to adult and juvenile offenders involved in the justice system in the United States. The multilevel survey design covers topics such as the mission and goals of correctional and treatment programs; organizational climate and culture for providing services; organizational capacity and needs; opinions of administrators and staff regarding rehabilita...

  14. [Colombia 2015 National Mental Health Survey. Study Protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Restrepo, Carlos; de Santacruz, Cecilia; Rodriguez, María Nelcy; Rodriguez, Viviana; Tamayo Martínez, Nathalie; Matallana, Diana; Gonzalez, Lina M

    2016-12-01

    The 2015 National Mental Health Survey (NMHS) is the fourth mental survey conducted in Colombia, and is part of the National System of Surveys and Population Studies for health. A narrative description is used to explain the background, references, the preparation, and characteristics of the 2015 NMHS. The 2015 NMHS and its protocol emerge from the requirements that support the national and international policies related to mental health. Together with the Ministry of Health and Social Protection, the objectives, the collection tools, the sample, and the operational plan are defined. The main objective was to obtain updated information about the mental health, mental problems and disorders, accessibility to health services, and an evaluation of health conditions. Participants were inhabitants from both urban and rural areas, over 7 years old, and in whom the comprehension of social determinants and equity were privileged. An observational cross-sectional design with national, regional and age group representativity, was used. The age groups selected were 7-11, 12-17, and over 18 years old. The regions considered were Central, Orient, Atlantic, Pacific, and Bogota. The calculated sample had a minimum of 12,080 and a maximum of 14,496 participants. A brief summary of the protocol of the 2015 NMHS is presented. The full document with all the collection tools can be consulted on the Health Ministry webpage. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  15. The National Map Customer Requirements: Findings from Interviews and Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarbaker, Larry; Coray, Kevin E.; Poore, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to receive customer feedback and to understand data and information requirements for The National Map. This report provides results and findings from interviews and surveys and will guide policy and operations decisions about data and information requirements leading to the development of a 5-year strategic plan for the National Geospatial Program. These findings are based on feedback from approximately 2,200 customers between February and August 2008. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted more than 160 interviews with 200 individuals. The American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS) and the International Map Trade Association (IMTA) surveyed their memberships and received feedback from over 400 members. The Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) received feedback from over 1,600 of its U.S.-based software users through an online survey sent to customers attending the ESRI International User Conference in the summer of 2008. The results of these surveys were shared with the USGS and have been included in this report.

  16. Attitudes to absenteeism among diploma nursing students in Ireland - an exploratory descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona; Kaliszer, Michael

    2002-10-01

    Nurse education within Ireland is currently in a transition period. October 2002 heralds the national implementation of a third-level four-year degree based programme for the preparation of nurses, to replace the current three-year diploma system. Anecdotally, one concern expressed by nurse educators regarding this move, is the regulation and monitoring of student non-attendance. This study explores the views of those involved in nurse education in Ireland to absenteeism among diploma nursing students to ascertain whether or not concern exists. The findings reveal absenteeism as a potential problem among nursing students. Most respondents agree that student attendance at both the practical and theoretical aspect of current education programmes is a problem. There is overwhelming agreement that student attendances while on the clinical area should be monitored, while the majority of respondents agree that attendance monitoring during lectures should take place. Some divergent views emerge among the lecturers and tutors with the lecturers seeming more 'liberal' on average than the tutors, reflecting perhaps the different traditions of their environments. Mostly however, the differences between the two groups are small and statistically insignificant. Overall responses indicate a continued commitment to monitoring and control of absenteeism in this population. Systematic policies need to be developed and enforced and key personnel need to be employed to support attendance monitoring in the third level setting.

  17. National survey of women in physics in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkmann, C.; Rodriguez, A.; Brodacz, I.; Dilaver, N.; Suárez, A.; Ayala, P.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports very generally on changes in the situation of women in physics in Austria since 2008 and more specifically on a national web-based survey that was distributed among physicists in Austria. It was aimed at understanding why few women are motivated to study physics and to follow an academic path. Family responsibilities— among others—seem to have a deep impact on women's careers. In Austria, initiatives to support women in scientific careers are quite well known throughout the physics community, and a high percentage of women responding to the survey said they had participated in at least one of them.

  18. Survey of mental health nurses' attitudes towards risk assessment, risk assessment tools and positive risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downes, C; Gill, A; Doyle, L; Morrissey, J; Higgins, A

    2016-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Risk assessment and safety planning are a core aspect of the role of the mental health nurse. Conflicting views exist on the value of risk assessment tools. Few studies have examined mental health nurses' attitudes towards risk, including use of tools and the role of positive risk in recovery. WHAT THE PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Mental health nurses view risk assessment as a core dimension of their role and not merely an exercise to fulfil organizational clinical safety and governance obligations. The majority of nurses hold positive attitudes towards therapeutic or positive risk, and consider creative risk taking as vital to people's recovery. The majority of nurses believe that risk assessment tools facilitate professional decision making, however, some are concerned that tools may negatively impact upon therapeutic relationships. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Ongoing education on the use of risk assessment tools is required to minimize views that their use is incompatible with therapeutic engagement, and to enable nurses to develop confidence to engage with positive risk and to allow service users make decisions and take responsibility. Introduction Risk assessment and safety planning are considered core components of the role of the mental health nurse; however, little is known about nurses' attitudes towards risk assessment, use of tools to assess risk or therapeutic risk taking. Aim This study aimed to explore mental health nurses' attitudes towards completing risk assessments, use of tools as an aid, and therapeutic or positive risk. Method An anonymous survey which included 13 attitudinal statements, rated on a five-point Likert scale, was completed by 381 mental health nurses working in adult services in Ireland. Findings Findings indicate strong support for the practice of risk assessment in mental health practice. The vast majority of nurses believe that risk assessment tools facilitate professional

  19. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  20. Survey shows consumers open to a greater role for physician assistants and nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Michael J; Pankow, Stacie; Erikson, Clese; Shipman, Scott

    2013-06-01

    Impending physician shortages in the United States will necessitate greater reliance on physician assistants and nurse practitioners, particularly in primary care. But how willing are Americans to accept that change? This study examines provider preferences from patients' perspective, using data from the Association of American Medical Colleges' Consumer Survey. We found that about half of the respondents preferred to have a physician as their primary care provider. However, when presented with scenarios wherein they could see a physician assistant or a nurse practitioner sooner than a physician, most elected to see one of the other health care professionals instead of waiting. Although our findings provide evidence that US consumers are open to the idea of receiving care from physician assistants and nurse practitioners, it is important to consider barriers to more widespread use, such as scope-of-practice regulations. Policy makers should incorporate such evidence into solutions for the physician shortage.